MSC Annual Report 2020-21

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#MakeItHomeNZ

Annual Report 2020-2021


COUNCIL MEMBER ORGANISATIONS Accident Compensation Corporation Boys’ Brigade NZ Christian Camping Department of Conservation Education Outdoors NZ Girl Guiding NZ Girls’ Brigade NZ Heliski Operators MetService New Zealand Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment NZ Alpine Club NZ Deerstalkers Association NZ Defence Force NZ Land Search and Rescue Inc. NZ Mountain Guides Association NZ Mountain Radio Service NZ Outdoor Instructors Association NZ Police NZ Snowsports Council/SAANZ NZ Sporting Goods Association NZ Walking Access Commission Recreation Aotearoa Scouts NZ The Duke of Edinburgh’s Hillary Award Tourism Industry Aotearoa William Pike Challenge Award

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Contents Welcome Evidence-based prevention Research projects Initiatives that make a difference

4-5 6-17 8-17 18-33

Insight-led projects

20-33

We had tonnes of fun

34-35

Effective communication that makes a difference Showcasing communication projects Financial summary

36-51 38-51 52-53

New Zealand Mountain Safety Council Level 1 Harbour City Centre, 29 Brandon Street | Wellington 6011 info@mountainsafety.org.nz | mountainsafety.org.nz All images copyright Mountain Safety Council 2021 Cover and inside front photos: Nathan Watson, filming the Copland Valley Track Video

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A year to remember

Welcome to our report This last year has been ‘interesting’ for many reasons. We’ve navigated through the continued impacts of COVID-19, dealt with dramatic weather events that have caused huge disruption and damage to many of our outdoor places, and throughout this a record number of Kiwis have been getting outdoors. Reassuringly, one thing has remained consistent, and that’s the high level of collaboration we see across the sector through all the work we do. The sector works together to ensure people enjoy their outdoor adventures and make it home safely. As always, this collaboration is about the people. You have been right there with us as we have established new insights and as we created new engaging content, always in partnership. This year we have been producing seven more track specific tramping safety videos to compliment the existing 12 hugely successful videos from series one. The development of these is a great example of collaboration, with people from many of our Council Members and Partner organisations directly involved with pre-production, filming and post-production development. The original 12 videos have been viewed hundreds of thousands of times, and this next series is expected to build on that success. Our new ‘Plan My Walk’ app is a standout highlight and is already gaining momentum well ahead of summer 2021. Early indications suggest that significant numbers of Kiwis (and internationals when they return) will use this tool as they plan for, and embark on, their walking and tramping adventures. Make sure you have checked it out on the iOS or Android app store, or online, and please continue to share it with your local communities. Plan My Walk has also benefitted significantly from collaboration and is another example of the sector working together to benefit people exploring the outdoors. As you all reflect on the content through these pages, you will be encouraged to see the impact that this prevention work continues to have. We are grateful to our staff, our board, and all of you; from our Council Members, Partners and funders who have embraced and shared our mission. Together, we will continue to achieve so much more. But now, we are pleased to present to you a reflection on 2020-21 and all that we accomplished together.

PHOTO: Bevan Smith, filming Alpine Route tramping video in Richmond Ranges

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NIC BROWN

MIKE DAISLEY

NZ MOUNTAIN SAFETY COUNCIL BOARD CHAIR

NZ MOUNTAIN SAFETY COUNCIL CHIEF EXECUTIVE

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Evidence-based prevention

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The RAE Awards 2021 showcasing Emanuel Kalafateli from Research NZ (left) and Nathan Watson from MSC (right)

Award winning research This year we have been recognised for our outstanding evidence-based prevention work, winning the Insights Communication Award at the 2021 Research Association NZ Awards. This significant industry award is external recognition that our insights work is of the highest calibre in Aotearoa. The award judges said, “This entry clearly demonstrated how well executed insights can have a significant positive impact on the behaviours of often hard to reach audiences when coupled with carefully planned, multi-channel, engaging communications. The insights led to effective communication and deeper stakeholder engagement, providing real utility for their industry, peers, partners and the public.” Insights are the foundation of all our work. Being evidence based means our prevention initiatives; our safety messaging, our collaborative partnerships, our resources, tools and information, are developed to target a known safety issue. This approach ensures minimal waste of our valuable time, and limited resources, and most importantly it means the best outcomes for the people exploring Aotearoa’s wonderful outdoors. Prevention is challenging work. It requires you to be ahead of the problem, to be agile, issue focused and user centric. It requires a detailed understanding of past incidents and the unique ability to apply that into many contexts.

PHOTO: Adam Smith, Kime Hut while filming the Tararua Southern Crossing Video

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Issue Specific Advisory Groups

Angelus Hut Tracks ISAG group at Robert Lodge in Nelson Lakes National Park

Three areas of focus Over the past year, we have continued to progress the work of three Issue Specific Advisory Groups (ISAG). While each of the advisory groups have now been disestablished, work on the agreed solutions has been progressing. This year we have seen the recruitment, facilitation and final report of a new group (Angelus Hut Tracks and Routes), the public release of the Tararua Ranges group report, and implementation of several initiatives connected with all three reports. Further agreed work will carry on throughout the 21-22 financial year. Relevant Council Members and Partners are working together to ensure the evidence-based process is delivering the best outcomes and ultimately addressing outdoor safety issues.

ABOVE: Angelus Hut Tracks ISAG group at Robert Lodge in Nelson Lakes National Park LEFT: Caleb Smith, Signage in Tararua Forest Park

Media | Wairarapa Times-Age A safer Tararua is on track

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ISSUE SPECIFIC ADVISORY GROUP

Robert Ridge and Angelus Hut The routes and tracks leading to Angelus Hut, notably via Robert Ridge, in the Nelson Lakes National Park have been a hotspot for tramping incidents in Aotearoa. Insights show an incident rate of approximately 1 in 700 trampers requiring search and rescue (SAR) assistance. This is considerably higher than the incident rate of 1 in 3,639 trampers across the country, for the same nine-year period (01/07/2010 30/06/2019).

Scan the QR Code with your phone to read more about this project

Last year, in collaboration with the Department of Conservation (DOC) and NZ Police, an ISAG proposed a number of prevention solutions which would improve the safety of trampers heading to Angelus Hut. After two meetings in October and November in 2020, a draft report was completed. In June 2021, following a review of the draft report, we met with DOC to discuss each of the six proposed solutions in detail and moved forward on implementation. Two solutions have already been completed, and the other four will lead to shared projects between ourselves and DOC.

ISSUE SPECIFIC ADVISORY GROUP

Tongariro Alpine Crossing Since the completion of the ISAG report in 2019, the majority of the eight agreed projects are complete. In the past year, we have signed a Partnership Agreement with National Park Village Business Association, which owns the TongariroCrossing.org.nz website, the most popular website for information about the Tongariro Alpine Crossing. This has enabled the website to be upgraded with helpful safety and planning advice for people intending to walk the track, including displaying our Tongariro Alpine Crossing safety video, links to Plan My Walk and an updated topographic map. It also now includes suggestions of alternative tracks. We engaged with transport concessionaires, which resulted in the design and printing of in-transit safety cards for passengers. Indirectly, Plan My Walk is related to three of the solutions proposed by the ISAG in that it promotes other walks in the area, is a single source of trusted information in a mobile app format, and functions as an automated advisory warning tool. Planning has also begun to make improvements to the inaugural Tongariro Alpine Crossing safety video as proposed by the ISAG. This will involve foreign language subtitles and is being translated into several languages in addition to English, specifically to target Asian audiences. Filming and production will take place in the 2021-22 financial year. DOC continues to issue a Bad Weather Advisory for the track during the main summer walking season, using NIWA to model the forecast. They also deploy Kaitiaki Rangers during these times who assist with communicating safety messages.

Top to bottom: Scan the QR Code with your phone to read more about this project. Our Tongariro Transport Agency Flyer, 13,000 have been printed.

ISSUE SPECIFIC ADVISORY GROUP

Tararua Ranges Since the completion of the report in 2020, we have worked alongside DOC to implement the recommendations. The proposed eight solutions would provide clarity on expected journey times, a public interface for reporting track issues, encourage trampers to factor in longer journey times during their planning, and to provide accurate information on conditions for trampers to set realistic expectations. We are continuing to work through the recommendations in partnership with DOC.

Scan the QR Code with your phone to read more about this project

Functions within Plan My Walk are a directly linked to three of the proposed interventions. Alongside updating track information on DOC’s website, Plan My Walk serves as the proposed app to help trampers in the Tararuas to plan their tramp (Solution 2). It also easily shows alternative track options (Solution 3) and includes a public observation tool (Solution 8).

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ACC Injury Research

PHOTO: Caleb Smith

Developing a deeper understanding of injury claims In our 2019/2020 Annual Report we reported on this research having only just been completed. Here’s a recap on the key details, and on the following page we have included a couple of the key findings. This research aimed to expand our knowledge of the details surrounding tramping injury claims. We have conducted extensive analysis of ACC injury data, but we still had many questions relating to these injuries that the data was not able tell us. For example, ACC injury claims do not typically include the track or the exact location at the time of their injury, detailed causation factors are not captured, and it is not clear if they were tramping solo or in a group. Seeking answers to these and other questions, we conducted a research project that surveyed just under 1250 trampers who had ACC injury claims approved. The research was very unique as external agencies rarely survey past claimants, and all contact details are highly confidential making it a very strict process. To enable the project, we partnered with Research NZ, and together we completed the ACC Ethics Approval process. Research NZ conducted the survey, most of which was done by postal method.

PHOTO: Caleb Smith

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Top tracks

Top conservation areas

This infographic shows the top 11 tracks where an injury was sustained among the survey respondents.

This infographic also shows the top 10 conservation areas where an injury was sustained among the survey respondents.

There is not just one single track that accounts for a substantial portion of all tramping injuries. Instead, we see injuries spread across many tramping tracks, and outside this top 11 list there are a huge number of tracks that recorded just a handful of injuries.

Like tracks, all conservation areas are reasonably similar with no single area standing out. Combined, these 10 areas account for over 40% of all injuries.

This result is interesting because it shows that injuries are occurring on tracks throughout Aotearoa, unlike search and rescues and fatalities where we typically see clear location hotspots with higher rates. BELOW: Infographic showing a ma of New Zealand showing our ACC Research: % of ACC claimed injuries that were on a named track % of ACC claimed injuries that were in a named conservation area

COROMANDEL FOREST PARK 2.6%

3.2% KAIMAI MAMAKU CONSERVATION PARK

1.8% Pinnacles/Kauaeranga

Valley Track

5.4%

TONGARIRO NATIONAL PARK

1.9% Lake Waikaremoana Track

3.9%

2.3%

EGMONT NATIONAL PARK

ABEL TASMAN NATIONAL PARK

Tongariro Alpine Crossing 2.3%

Abel Tasman Coastal Track

5.3%

KAHURANGI NATIONAL PARK

2.2%

Queen Charlotte Track

TARARUA FOREST PARK

1.4%

5.7%

Heaphy Track 2.1%

Old Ghost Road 1.4%

NELSON LAKES NATIONAL PARK

3.2%

MT ASPIRING NATIONAL PARK

4.0% Milford Track 1.7%

2.1% Routeburn Track Kepler Track

1.7%

FIORDLAND NATIONAL PARK

7.8%

1.8%

Tuatapere Hump Ridge Track

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Stuff.co.nz | June 2021

Expert reports for coronial investigations We have continued to work closely with coroners across Aotearoa by producing expert reports to assist them in their role when investigating a land-based outdoor recreation fatality. These reports detail the events leading up to the tragedy, the circumstances of the incident, causation factors, a summary of key findings and recommendations for prevention. Coroners have heavy caseloads and due to the large volume and diversity of scenarios, it’s not possible for them to be an expert in everything. Our reports ensure the coroners have all the facts presented impartially and enable them to make recommendations that can have real-world positive impact. In almost all cases, coroners adopt our recommendations in their findings. It’s typical for coroners and the Ministry of Justice media teams to work with us when releasing findings to the media and public, and we are typically included in relevant media articles where our recommendations are adopted. In the past year we have completed eight full reports and one supplementary report.

Media | NZ Herald

Media | Stuff

Coromandel rock climber’s death ‘preventable’, Coroner says

Tourist who died in Tongaririo National Park made multiple mistakes, coroner says

Media | Stuff

Media | NZ Herald

Climbers did not recognise avalanche risk in Aoraki/Mt Cook National Park - coroner

Swedish hunter Hans Christian Tornmarck died pursuing tahr, coroner finds

PHOTO: Filming Mt Somers Track Video

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85,330

Understanding online user conversations

RECORDS (COMMENTS) CAPTURED

88%

Our marketing listening tool – TextFerret – has continued to collect and analyse digital conversations. In the last year we have monitored these conversations and using TextFerret’s artificial intelligence we have identified and monitored a range of themes.

FROM SOCIAL MEDIA

34,900

BREAKDOWN OF CONVERSATION THEMES

RECORDS CAPTURED FROM FACEBOOK

2.1% Family trips

BREAKDOWN OF THE TRAMPING THEME Popular tracks e.g. Great Walks

19%

Gear, clothing and equipment

16%

Rivers

People’s experiences

16%

Incidents

Huts

Planning

11%

10%

9%

COVID-19 (in relation to tramping)

8%

1.2%

Weather

PLBs

3% 3%

TIME SERIES

2% Transport for tramp

Analysing the tramping theme, you can see how the topics change in volume over time. In the 16-month period from 1 March 2020 to 17 June 2021, you can see how the topics change as different conversations take place. The first spike in March 2020 represents the COVID-19 lockdown and shows how that event generated considerable digital conversation relating to the theme of tramping. The volume of this conversation decreased in April, rising slightly again in May, and then fell away considerably in June as other topics took centre stage. The big spike in May for ‘Incidents’ is due to the large multiday search for the pair of lost trampers outside the Kahurangi National Park. High profile tramping areas are a consistently high-volume theme, occupying the most months (10) as the largest volume of conversation.

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bit.ly/AvalancheIncidentsNZReport

Digital storytelling of avalanche incidents Every year avalanches are one of the main hazards backcountry users face. As part of our in-depth data analysis and insights development we collect and analyse avalanche incidents to create a comprehensive picture of what is going on in the backcountry. To effectively communicate this data, we use ArcGIS StoryMaps to develop a new resource that weaves images, infographics and maps together into an interactive story. The digital format easily allows us to update the data each year, ensuring the story remains current and of continued benefit to the alpine and avalanche community.

Scan the QR code to read it online or visit bit.ly/AvalancheIncidentsNZReport

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PHOTO: Rob Frost

Avalanche culture within the NZ mountaineering community Annually, thousands of people who participate in backcountry snow sports activities, either consciously or subconsciously expose themselves to the danger of avalanches. While Aotearoa, thankfully, does not experience the same number of avalanche fatalities as other developed northern hemisphere nations, this potential for tragedy is always present. Since 1999 there have been 27 avalanche fatalities in Aotearoa. Despite the comparatively low number of fatalities, Aotearoa does have one standout statistic:19 of the 27 fatalities have involved mountaineers or alpine climbers - this is equivalent to 70% of all avalanche-related fatalities. Before implementing any targeted prevention initiatives, we felt we needed to develop a more comprehensive understanding of ‘why’. Developing a better understanding of the unique factors relevant to mountaineering and avalanches is essential in developing any evidence-based prevention. To enable this, we embarked on a world-first research project that sought to develop a clear understanding relating to the attitudes and behaviours of the New Zealand mountaineering community towards avalanche dangers and avalanche safety. The results of this research, alongside statistical evidence, would be used to form the basis of improved avalanche prevention, specifically targeting mountaineers and alpine climbers. A reference panel was established to provide expert guidance on the subject of avalanches and social science research. Working collaboratively with our research partners, Research NZ, we set about developing a unique methodology and commenced the research. The research has consisted of informative interviews with 14 people (including the reference panel, avalanche survivors and mountaineers) to identify a range of themes and topics to cover in the survey. The survey instrument was built on the basis of these interview themes, and through the reference panel’s guidance. Currently, the research is still underway, and we look forward to presenting the findings very soon.

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Impact and Influencer Survey Every second year we conduct a bespoke body of research that surveys trampers and hunters. This research covers a broad range of topics relating to their attitudes towards planning and preparation, safety, information sources and advice, awareness of organisations and safety information, retail habits and much more. The findings from this research are very helpful in maintaining a strong understanding of these activity communities. This insight is essential in keeping pace with our target audiences and delivering effective prevention. We use these insights to inform our tactical decisions at a Business Plan level and to influence decisions we make when delivering specific projects. This year we changed the methodology we use to obtain a sample of people. Previously, for 2017 and 2019 surveys, we used a research panel to obtain samples, but this time we sourced a sample via Sport New Zealand’s Active New Zealand Survey, working with Sport NZ and NielsenIQ to achieve this. Between June 11 and 28, a total of N=11,884 trampers and hunters were invited to participate in the online survey. By the end of the survey a total of n=1,807 people had responded, a response rate of 15%. Here is a sample of some of the findings.

“ BEFORE I GO (DAY WALKING/TRAMPING/HUNTING) I USUALLY....”

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PHOTO: Jack Austin

“ I OFTEN DON’T HAVE ENOUGH EQUIPMENT OR CLOTHING, AND FIND MYSELF WISHING I HAD PACKED MORE”

“ SOMETIMES WHEN I’M IN THE OUTDOORS, I FIND MYSELF IN SITUATIONS THAT I’M NOT WELL-PREPARED FOR”

“ COVID-19 HAS CHANGED HOW I THINK ABOUT MY PERSONAL SAFETY IN THE OUTDOORS”

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Initiatives that make a difference

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Gaining positive behaviour change This year we have continued to focus on developing resources, providing information, and delivering campaigns that make a real difference to improving personal safety in the outdoors. These initiatives draw heavily on our insights and partnerships. After the huge success of the first Tramping Video Series, there was no stopping a second series, and over the summer we filmed seven more tracks. These videos, like the initial twelve, will enable effective planning, preparation, and decision-making, leading to improved safety behaviours and reduced safety incidents. The highlight of 2020 – 2021, and one of the biggest projects the organisation has ever undertaken, was the development and release of Plan My Walk. We are becoming accustomed to delivering world-first safety initiatives, but this took things to a whole new level. To cap off a brilliant year, the NZ Avalanche Advisory website was recognised with a Bronze award at the 2020 NZ Best Design awards for its excellent user design experience. Given the complex and highly- technical nature of avalanche advisories, it is essential the site effectively communicates the key messages. This external validation confirms our approach is the right one.

PHOTO: Filming the Pinnacles/ Kauaeranga Track Video

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Plan My Walk Development

Planmywalk.nz

Plan My Walk Our goal was simple, develop a digital tool that enabled effective and efficient trip planning. It’s planning made easy. The history of Plan My Walk dates back to its predecessor, Plan My Trip. Over a twoyear period, we had been building up to a significant overhaul of Plan My Trip, having learnt a lot about how users engage with, and benefit from, a digital planning tool. Prior to starting the development of Plan My Walk, we completed two research projects that helped to establish a clear understanding of how people plan their trips into the outdoors. From these findings, it was evident that a simple, effective, and user-friendly digital trip planning tool would be of significant value. The creation of Plan My Walk is based on clear evidence. A concerning number of trampers who sustain an injury, require search and rescue (SAR) assistance, or those who never make it home, are in most cases, entirely avoidable. In many situations more comprehensive trip planning and preparation would have made a big difference. The insights showed us that, being ‘unprepared for the weather conditions’ caused 12% of tramping-related SAR, and an ‘overambitious choice of route, lack of sufficient fitness and taking longer than expected to reach the destination’ caused 30% of tramping related SAR.

Wireframing with Somar Digital

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PHOTO: Caleb Smith


18,913 UNIQUE USERS

10,424 REGISTERED USERS

8,623 APP DOWNLOADS Caleb Smith, using the gear list feature to pack

732 TRIPS PLANNED (7 MAY 2020 - 30 JUNE 2021

Plan My Walk makes planning easy by combining a range of essential information into one app. It includes a range of information we know trampers need when planning their trip, including specific track information, gear lists, track and weather alerts, and weather forecasts. Additionally, users can create a trip plan, assign an emergency contact and share their plans with others. Since the initial release on May 7 2021, we have been enhancing many of the features to deliver a premium product outdoor enthusiasts will love. Since the release, new developments include the addition of the new MetService Mountain Weather Hazards to specific weather forecasts, the addition of Road Snowfall Warnings to alerts and a range of other user experience improvements based on user feedback. Support from Council Members and Partners has been huge, and throughout winter 2021 their enthusiasm has helped to build a core base of early adopters. This is essential in achieving good reach and uptake in the walking and tramping community.

Some of the posts shared by partners and influencers so far

Media | Newshub New Zealand outdoor adventure app Plan My Walk designed to save lives

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Tramping Video Series

Seven new videos to add to our series Adding to the success of the first 12 tramping safety videos released in 2018, we have another seven tracks coming soon. Over seven weeks our teams headed into the hills filming. Armed with two drones, one camera, multiple battery packs, GoPro’s, a laptop and spare memory cards, plus all the normal gear you need for a multi-day tramping trip, each film shoot was an example of precision planning and quality project management. In keeping with the successful format, each video focuses on content relevant to the specific track and covers topics that are essential to planning, preparation, and fieldbased decision-making. The walk-through style means viewers get a real taste of the adventure, birds-eye views of the track via the use of 3-D maps, combined with drone footage and dynamic graphics overlaid highlight important aspects of the trip. Key decision points, windaffected ridges, river crossings, mountain passes, potential avalanche paths and slowrelease slips are just some of the hazards these videos cover. The videos will be publicly released prior to summer 2021. The new videos are the Kauaeranga Kauri Trail Pinnacles Walk (Coromandel), Tararua Southern Crossing (Wellington/Wairarapa), Alpine Route (Tasman/Marlborough), Mt Somers Tracks (Canterbury), Copland Valley (Westland), Gillespie Pass and the Rees-Dart Circuit (Otago).

KEY RESEARCH FINDINGS FROM THE FIRST 12 VIDEOS The insights from the first series are very promising: 76% of people who watched the video prior to their trip said they would make changes to their plans because of the information in the video, and 90% of those people did. Furthermore, 95% said they learned something new, with 82% saying their knowledge of hazards along the track had improved, and 85% said their overall understanding of the track had increased.

Media | Stuff Video series aims to better prepare trampers for alpine adventures

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PHOTO: Nathan Watson


22 DAYS ON-LOCATION FILMING

250+

Kauaeranga Kauri Trail (Pinnacles Walk)

KM WALKED

18 HUTS VISITED

Tongariro Alpine Crossing

Taranaki Summit Route

6.8

Tararua Southern Crossing

ALPINE ROUTE

TB OF FOOTAGE

Alpine Route

Waiau Pass

Robert Ridge Route Poukirikiri/Travers Saddle

Copland Valley Mueller Hut Route

Mt Somers Tracks

Gillespie Pass Gertrude Saddle Route Milford Track

Cascade Saddle Rees-Dart Circuit Ben Lomond Track Routeburn Track

Kepler Track

Map of the tracks featured in our Tramping Video Series Series One tracks NEW: Series Two tracks

REES-DART TRACK

POST PRODUCTION

TARARUA SOUTHERN CROSSING

PINNACLES/ KAUAERANGA VALLEY

MT SOMERS

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Avalanche Advisory

Our avalanche.net.nz website was a Bronze winner in the 2020 Best Awards for User Experience Design

Avalanche.net.nz

Forecasting across 12 alpine regions Throughout the 2020-2021 forecasting season, we produced 1,479 unique avalanche advisories across the 12 forecasting regions. A key highlight of the year was further development to the www.avalanche.net. nz website. This included improvements for mobile users, streamlining the public observation process and map functionality, enhancements to the forecasting tool used to publish the advisories, InfoEx data submission and management improvements, and updating some of the terminology used throughout the forecasts to align with the latest international best practice. At the beginning of each winter forecasting season, we continue to bring the whole team together for annual training. This is an essential part of our overall quality management as it provides a unique opportunity for professional development, consistency of forecasting, training in the latest developments and outlines areas of key focus for the season ahead. We ran a third consecutive winter/spring public observation competition to encourage the submissions of public observations. This data is critical in helping our forecasters understand what is going on in their regions. We believe that this incentive scheme continues to help increase the number of public observations we receive each year.

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12 FORECASTING REGIONS (AORAKI/MT COOK OPERATING YEAR-ROUND)

1,479 AVALANCHE ADVISORIES

213 PUBLIC OBSERVATIONS

Throughout winter/spring we ran a hugely successful New Zealand Avalanche Advisory (NZAA) promotional campaign. This focused on promoting general awareness of avalanche dangers, use of the avalanche advisory, and to share observations. Last August was one of the worst months on record for snowfall and this had a huge impact on backcountry recreation. Quite simply in many areas there just wasn’t enough snow to head out. Seasonal weather, in particular snowfall, has a direct impact on the NZAA website metrics, when there’s no snow no one is looking at the avalanche advisory. To cap off what was overall a successful year, despite low snowfall, the NZAA website www.avalanche.net.nz won a Bronze award at the 2021 Best Design Awards. Recognition that the advancements we have made over the last few years in developing an effective tool to convey complex content is working and that the website user design and experience is right up there with the best in Aotearoa. We would also like to take this opportunity to acknowledge Trevor Streat who sadly passed away in September 2020. Trev was one of our longest serving avalanche forecasters, had served in a leadership role for many years mentoring new forecasters, and stands as one of the most respected mountain and avalanches professionals. Further details on the promotional campaign and the NZAA website metrics are outlined later in this report.

Media | Newshub Aoraki/Mt Cook avalanche a reminder to plan ahead - expert

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Outdoor Safety Retail Partnerships

OUr Torpedo7 live session on Facebook

Outdoor Safety Retail Partnerships Retail partnerships continue to be one of the most effective communication channels available to us. They ensure we are connecting directly with outdoor participants who are often in the active phase of planning or preparing. Each of our retail partners continue to demonstrate a commitment to outdoor safety through their willingness to share our resources, including Plan My Walk. This enables greater reach and impact of our safety messages and prevention measures.

IN-STORE KIOSKS Four Bivouac and four Macpac stores around the country each host an interactive kiosk. The kiosks provide customers with interactive packing list suggestions for classic New Zealand walks and tramps, and are customised to the store’s location by playing safety videos for local tracks as well as up-to-date MetService weather forecasts for the area. Staff use utilise the kiosks to help customers who have specific queries, or who are looking for general advice on safely exploring the outdoors. The eight MSC kiosks are in the following stores: Macpac: Tower Junction Christchurch, Taupo, Nelson and Queenstown.

Macpac staff trying out the new kiosks

Bivouac Outdoor: Wellington, Sylvia Park Auckland, Palmerston North, and Tower Junction Christchurch. Total pageviews | 24,683 (end of Oct 2020 - 30 June 2021)

TRAINING MODULE One of our retail partnership tactics centres on staff training and education. Staff who know about what tools and resources we offer can act as ambassadors and influencers, sharing this knowledge with customers. To enhance staff knowledge, we built a series of training modules, that are delivered to retail staff through their existing internal learning management systems. The training modules were deployed to staff towards the end of June 2021 so engagement metrics will be provided in the next Annual Report.

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Learning how to layer clothing in one of the new training modules we developed


MACPAC VIDEOS In collaboration with Macpac, we embarked on a project to build a series of ‘How to’ videos. Each video covers a key skill or topic with expert advice from both us and Macpac. Combining some of the filming with the production of our Tramping Video Series, the team filmed most of the content in the Mt Somers area in Canterbury. This was followed by an after hours filming session in-store at the Macpac Willis Street (Wellington) store with the presenters Holly from Macpac and Tom. Currently in post-production, the videos will be live in time for summer 2021.

15K BIVOUAC BROCHURES

60K MACPAC REFUND CARDS

5K HUNTING AND FISHING NZ BROCHURES

Filming at the Wellington Macpac store

PHYSICAL COLLATERAL Through both online sales and in-store purchases, retailers provide us with an opportunity to distribute physical collateral, such as A5 double-sided flyers. The launch of Plan My Walk provided an obvious focus for these resources and through Hunting & Fishing NZ, Bivouac and Macpac we will be distributing thousands of physical resources. We have been adding unique tracking QR codes to collateral to measure their usage.

Macpac refund card

Hunting & Fishing New Zealand store flyer

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Southern Hemisphere Alpine Conference

MSC Ceo, Mike daisley at SHAC 2021

Alpine sector comes together The bi-annual Southern Hemisphere Alpine Conference (SHAC) returned in 2021 and was held for the first time in Wanaka. We had a great turnout to the threeday event, which also included a full day Avalanche Search and Rescue seminar, sponsored by NZSAR. This SHAC was different to the previous years as many international guests and speakers could not make it due to the COVID-19 restrictions. Despite this, the domestic turnout of alpine and avalanche experts was strong and the event registered its largest ever attendance. With borders shut, many locals who would normally be overseas were able to attend and this helped ensure a great line up of quality presenters. With exhibitors quickly snapping up the spaces available to showcase their products and services, a crowded house of professionals eager to connect with their colleagues from across Aoteraoa against the backdrop of beautiful Wanaka, it was an event to be remembered. The feedback we received following the event was really positive, and a return to Wanaka in 2023 is certainly on the cards. This year we filmed some of the presentations and made them available on our Youtube channel.

Media | The Wanaka App Search and rescue seminar a Wanak first

PHOTO: Marli Wingens

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PHOTOS FROM THIS YEAR’S CONFERENCE AND SAR DAY

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Firearms training

Firearmsafety.org.nz website

Firearms safety training The past year has been a productive recovery period for firearms safety courses since the initial COVID-19 interruptions. The smooth delivery of 575 courses across the country saw a return to normal attendee levels. We continue to work closely with NZ Police in the delivery of the firearms safety courses. This includes the recent revival of the Whakatūpato programme which is aimed at increasing licensing numbers and firearm safety in rural and Māori communities. We have supported the return of this programme through providing instructors to deliver the courses. We have continued to invest in the training and moderation of our professional instructors and this year we delivered two workshops, in Auckland and Christchurch. At the conclusion of each course attendees are provided with our resources to take home, this includes a chamber safety flag and a hunter safety resource.

6,579

6,239

PARTICIPANTS ATTENDED COURSES

SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED

575

54

COURSES DELIVERED

LOCATIONS NATIONWIDE

PHOTO: NZ Hunter’s Journal

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Collaboration in the sector

New Outdoor Safety Code icons

Land Safety Code We collaborated with many industry organisations to revise and relaunch the new Land Safety Code in time for one of the busiest summers anticipated - the 2020/21 post-COVID-19 lockdown summer. The Code provides an easy five-step guide of the most important things you should do before, and during, any land-based recreation, such as tramping, day walking, hunting and the numerous activities Kiwis enjoy in our outdoor spaces. We worked alongside the Department of Conservation (DOC), Land Search and Rescue (LandSAR), Maritime NZ Rescue Co-Ordination Centre, NZ Police, Auckland Council and NZ Search and Rescue on this project. We supported the rollout of the Land Safety Code by leading the joint media release and including the Code in written content and additional media releases.

A story on our new website from a participant who activated a Personal Locator Beacon

Beacons Campaign In collaboration with NZ Search and Rescue (NZSAR), DOC, Maritime NZ, Rescue Co-ordination Centre NZ and LandSAR we jointly delivered a campaign that promoted the use of distress beacons for land-based outdoor recreation. Funded by NZSAR, managed by GSL Promotus, and involving a range of sector partners, the campaign utilised the expertise and reach of each partner to effectively raise awareness of the importance of a beacon.

Media | Stuff Trampers thank locator beacon for their rescue in Fiordland

Top left to bottom right: MSC safety collateral at Wellington Emergency expo, Learnz Virtual Field Trip, Ben Lomond Track flyer for local VC, backcountry signage for NZ Sleds, Tramping Video Series poster at local accomodation provider

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Website refresh

mountainsafety.org.nz

Enabling engagement with essential outdoor skills We worked to make key topics of outdoor safety more available to the public by refreshing our mountainsafety.org.nz website. We pulled key information from the NZ Bushcraft Manual into sections of the website as well as reformatting older manuals to make them freely available online for users. Adding a search function to our website has further enabled users to research the information they are looking for.

5,460+ READS ON ISSUU READER SINCE LAUNCHING NOV 2020

First Aid Manual | April 2021 - June 2021 | 120 reads NZ Firearm Handbook | Dec 2020 - June 2021 | 129 reads Outdoor Safety Risk Management | Nov 2020 - June 2021 | 1,395 reads Abseiling for Instructors | Nov 2020 - June 2021 | 194 reads Hypothermia Handbook | July 2020 - June 2021 | 173 reads Avalanche Accidents in Aotearoa | August 2020 - June 2021 | 663 reads Alpine Skills Manual | June 2020 - June 2021 | 195 reads

To further engage users in learning key topics, we developed a set of online learning platforms. These are hosted on our website as well as developed for external Learning Management Systems (LMS) with our Outdoor Safety Retail Partners. The engagement so far is encouraging, and we are looking forward to seeing how these perform as the retailers encourage their staff to use them. We then exported these courses for our Outdoor Safety Retail Partners.

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PHOTO: Caleb Smith

1,140 Bitly clicks to this

123 Bitly clicks to this

October 2020 - July 2021

March 2020 - July 2021

438 Bitly clicks to this

211 Bitly clicks to this

March 2020 - July 2021

March 2020 - July 2021


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STORIES PUBLISHED

197,663 TOTAL READ SECTION PAGE VIEWS

89,274

Blog section on mountainsafety.org.nz

UNIQUE READERS

Engagement through storytelling

(SEPTEMBER 2020 - 30 JUNE 2021)

In order to connect further with our target audiences, we have been applying the power of storytelling to communicate our messages and reinforce our brand. We added a ‘read’ section to our website which has allowed us to produce stories and share them when required. We have utilised this storytelling method in some of our marketing campaigns, encouraging the sharing of information from both our network and participants themselves known as #ShareYourStoryNZ, and have been impressed with the results. Two of our top performing stories in the read section were ‘real stories’ from the public sharing their learnings with us.

TOP THREE STORIES (THAT WERE NOT PART OF A PAID CAMPAIGN)

This isn’t an easy story to tell...

Let’s talk communications

Packing for the worst pays off

1,045 unique page views

1,036 unique page views

999 unique page views

10 March 2021 - 30 June 2021

12 May - 30 June 2021

19 Jan 2020 - 30 June 2021

SHARING OUR CONTENT WITH A GROWING SUBSCRIBER NETWORK We have created a system that produces Electronic Direct Mail (EDMs) to further sustain engagement with our audiences. We have built an audience subscriber list via our Mailchimp subscription platform and data initiatives, and are able to send out relevant timely updates to people according to their interests in the outdoors. This has been especially useful for seasonal safety information, our campaigns as well as updates to our Plan My Walk app. We will continue to work on this method of communication in order to strengthen our relationship with outdoor users.

Plan My Walk updates

Duck season awareness

Roar campaign kickoff

23,000+

35%

subscribed to our public mail list

average open rate of our EDMs

(as at July 2021)

(as at July 2021, industry standard for a Non Profit org is 25.17% for Mailchimp 2019 data)

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We had tonnes of fun

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Our work took us everywhere We love to get out of the office and explore Aotearoa, especially around our local Wellington base. We are lucky that our work takes us to every corner of the country, and there are some pretty amazing places out there. Whether we are filming new video content, delivering an event or conference, meeting partners, checking out the manufacturing of our pack liners, or investing in our culture through dedicated staff days, we are always having fun!

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Effective communication that makes a difference

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We are finalists in the marketing awards, for a second year in a row Our purpose is clear; we are here to improve personal safety in the outdoors. We are not motivated by awards, but it sure is awesome when that external validation of our hard work is recognised. This year we have been recognised as finalists in two categories at the 2021 TVNZ-NZ Marketing Awards. Our hunting campaign ‘Same Hunt, Different Story. Your Call.’ is up for an award in the Notfor-Profit category. If that wasn’t exciting enough, our overall proactive safety messaging, campaigns, brand and prevention strategy is a finalist in the ‘Best Purpose-driven Marketing Strategy’ category. Keep reading to learn more about the specific campaigns and safety messaging that these nominations encompass.

PHOTO: Scene from our Roar Campaign Video: ‘Same hunt, different story’

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Avalanche Winter Campaign Advisory 2020

Our winter season video on YouTube

Aotearoa’s winter provides new activities and places to explore. Therefore, we need targeted safety messaging, such as avalanche risks and skills required in the harsh backcountry environment. Every year we apply new strategies to communicate this to the people who need it. During the winter of 2020, we developed a campaign aimed at backcountry users, encouraging them to check the avalanche forecast as part of their planning as well as sharing of user data in the public observation tool on avalanche.net.nz. One of the ways we generate awareness of our services, is through the power of a strategic multi-channel marketing campaign. We utilised the expertise of our agency partner GSL Promotus to help implement our campaign objectives. A layered strategy was adopted to impact our targeted audience along the different stages of the consumer journey. A customised messaging and digital media mix was implemented at each stage. They were divided into two categories: » Active planners – The messaging encouraged people to check the forecasts and plan well before they go outdoors. » Active participants – The messaging encouraged people to share their observations on social media and on the website.

PHOTO: Loic Lassueur

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1,402,667 IMPRESSIONS

10,768 CLICKS

0.77% CLICK THROUGH RATE

12,109 WEBSITE SESSIONS

Web banner on MetService.com

132,092 COMPLETED VIDEO VIEWS

As well as targeted advertising, we also worked with relevant partners and various media channels to broaden our reach during the winter season.

$0.03

We also worked to engage the backcountry user network further through placing content in specific groups’ channels, including the NZ Avalanche Dispatch, NZ Alpine Club Climber magazine and NZ Mountain Guides Association Quickclips newsletter. These updates through the season, as well sharing of our other winter safety messaging material (such as our recent Alpine Snow Skills Series) on our own channels, is an example of how we can deliver our many resources to different groups, a strategy we implement across our campaigns.

1:35m

COST PER VIEW

AVERAGE TIME ON SITE (1 JULY 2020 - 17 OCT 2020)

We achieved 15 proactive media features across Stuff, Otago Daily Times, Newshub, RadioNZ and TVNZ.

Media | Stuff Avalanche risk reaches dangerous levels as cold front hits south

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Avalanche Summer Campaign Advisory 2020/21 40

We shared our stories via the new blog section of our website

Preparing trampers for the traditionally popular summer period is a big task on our calendar. The objective of the Summer Campaign 2020/21 was to create awareness about the importance of quality planning and preparation with an aim of preventing incidents that are caused by a lack of that. We used a unique approach focused on storytelling, using three real Kiwi stories about common safety issues faced in the outdoors. Paired with these stories, we asked our audience ‘what would you do?’. Posing the question triggered engagement with our audience, which proved very popular. Like all of our campaigns, the messaging we use is emotive and highlights known attitudinal or behavioural issues. We draw attention to the problems, and then follow this up with a clear call to action, and layer in resources or tools that provide the education needed. Audiences were encouraged to reflect on their own behaviour and attitude, and this helps facilitate discussions within their community. A pair of young trampers are almost at the hut, they encounter a river and decide as a group that it was unsafe to cross.

A trail runner gets caught out in rough weather. Good thing she packed spare warm clothes, ready for the unexpected.

A new tramper is going out on their first overnight trip. What do they pack, how do they prepare, and is there anything they’d do differently next time?

34,731

17,337

10,448

STORY READS

STORY READS

STORY READS

0.72%

0.46%

0.42%

CLICK THROUGH RATE

CLICK THROUGH RATE

CLICK THROUGH RATE


11,232,834 IMPRESSIONS

66,103 CLICKS

0.59% CLICK THROUGH RATE

2.4 PAGES PER SESSION Google display advertising

46,576 NEW USERS ATTRIBUTED TO CAMPAIGN

We used our website’s new ‘Read’ section to host the stories, and through a combination of paid advertising and earned media, our partner’s support and our own channels, the stories were promoted over the summer months.

(15 NOV 2020 - 13 MARCH 2021)

We were really impressed with the results of engagement from this new approach, and will look at applying these learnings for future campaigns. Since 2007, on average there have been 2.2 tramping deaths per year over the summer months (December, January and February). Summer 2020/21 was only the third time since 2007 there were zero tramping fatalities. The other summer periods were 2017/18 and 2018/19. We achieved 17 proactive media features including Stuff, Newshub, RadioNZ, and TVNZ

Media | TVNZ One News Heading into the outdoors this summer? Mountain Safety Council gives five key rules for your trip

PHOTO: Caleb Smith

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Avalanche Roar Hunting Advisory Campaign 2021

The Video Campaign is a finalist in the 2021 TVNZ Marketing Awards

Our campaign video playing on YouTube

The Roar hunting season is the biggest event on Aotearoa’s hunting calendar. We anticipated this year was going to be huge as the COVID-19 Level 4 Lockdown last year cancelled hunters’ chances. Our campaign targeted mainly rural males aged 35 to 64, which are well known for being notoriously hard to influence - they have been hunting for years and believe they know everything there is to know about hunting. This year’s Roar hunting campaign was about planning and preparation rather than the typical messages around firearms. This focus was driven by our insights that showed 21% of hunting search and rescues are caused by poor navigational skills, and 20% are caused by lack of warm, waterproof clothing, and not carrying a torch. By pivoting the messaging from the sensitive firearms narrative used previously and talking about skills that can be worked on before a hunting trip, we were able to keep our hunting audience engaged.

Behind the scenes of filming the campaign video took us to various locations in the Wellington region

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11,547,634 IMPRESSIONS

301,924 COMPLETED VIDEO VIEWS

43% VIDEO VIEW COMLETION RATE

1.21% Our video showed the difference between a prepared and unprepared hunter

The Roar hunting campaign was centred around a video, “Same Hunt, Different Story. Your Call”, produced in partnership with Flying Saucer Productions, which focused on two hunters and their conflicting planning and preparation pre-trip, with the aim of highlighting how the different outcomes can come down to some simple decisions before you go out. This approach encouraged solid preparation before heading off.

CLICK THROUGH RATE ON SOCIAL

2.19 AVERAGE PAGES PER SESSION

$0.10 COST PER VIDEO VIEW

There were zero hunting fatalities this Roar, maintaining the zero trend since 2018, but against a backdrop of the busiest roar season in history (2021) – this shows our hunting specific strategy has been working, and continues to work.

(17 MARCH - 24 APRIL 2021)

The different lengths of our video were easily shared amongst the NZ hunting community

We achieved 11 proactive media features across Stuff, Newshub, RadioNZ, NZ Herald and others

Media | Stuff Be the hunter your mates want to hunt with, not a search and rescue statistic

PHOTO: Stills from our video from Flying Saucer

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Duck shooting campaign 2021

Our campaign video playing on YouTube

For duck shooters, the annual opening weekend in May is a huge deal. Historically, 64% of all Game Bird hunting injuries occur during May and 41% are on opening weekend alone. Worryingly, 34% of all injuries involve a firearm. In most cases pure luck has prevented more firearms fatalities, but in the close confines of a maimai one mistake can be catastrophic. For the last few years we have focused heavily on reducing duck shooting-related firearms injuries. While our insights show evidence of other injuries relating to slips, trips and falls around the maimai or pond, these are of low consequence compared to the incidents involving firearms. Using content we had created from the previous year we chose to repurpose our highlyeffective ducking shooting awareness video from 2019 ‘Let habits die, not your mates’. We achieved two proactive media features across Newshub and NZ Herald.

Media | NZ Herald | Stratford Press Be the hunter your mates want to hunt with, not a search Game bird hunting: Keeping safe this duck shooting season

1,065,197

44%

IMPRESSIONS

CLICK THROUGH RATE

52,692 COMPLETED VIDEO VIEWS

29% VIDEO VIEW COMPLETION RATE

2.1% AVERAGE PAGES PER SESSION

$0.15 COST PER VIDEO VIEW (23 APRIL - 31 MAY 2021)

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Media

Partnerships

Our channels

Paid Promotion

We are so proud to have been announced as finalists in the 2021 TVNZ-NZ Marketing Awards in the ‘Best Purposedriven Marketing Strategy’ category. This showcases not only our entire prevention strategy, but our overall proactive safety messaging, safety campaigns and brand. Named as a finalist is really important to our team as it tells us our hard work is paying off. To provide structure and a clear purpose-driven strategy, annually we approach our work based on the seasons and participation trends. Through 2020/21, we focused on four priority areas: avalanches and backcountry alpine snowsports, summer tramping, hunting during the Roar season and duck shooting opening weekend. Our purpose-driven marketing strategy encompasses many aspects of our work. To achieve our vision, we strategically focus on three platforms: insights, messaging and partnerships. Our insights ensure evidence-based actions, our mutually beneficial partnerships provide even greater reach and influence into distinct communities, and our messaging provides the user-centric content that enables our audiences to improve their skills, knowledge, and behaviours. While each of our campaigns target different users and different behaviours, the principles are the same. We use four key tactics to reach and influence: our own channels, earned media, our partners and paid advertising. Each tactic works to support the others, and combined, allow us to deliver highly engaged and influential purposedriven campaigns.

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Media Impact PHOTO: caleb Smith

Increasing our presence in the media has been a strategic priority, especially over the last year. At the start of this financial year, we set a goal of featuring in 52 proactive articles, that’s a proactive pickup each week for a year. Increasing our presence in the media has multiple benefits: » helps to grow our brand recognition across a wider range of people » positions us as the ‘go to’ organisation for outdoor safety » provides journalists and media outlets with a clear point of contact for relevant stories and instills confidence that they are working with a respected, trusted and professional body that can provide evidence-based and well-balanced responses » allows for the strategic targeting of specific issues; for example we can focus on key safety messages that we know are based on insights. Achieving one media pickup per week requires a huge amount of effort and focus, especially given these articles cannot be based on an incident, and outdoor safety is not usually a topic journalists are looking for content on. Over the year we successfully achieved our goal with 61 proactive features. In total, including reactive features, we achieved 111 media article mentions. The top three sources for all media pickup:

The top three campaigns we ran that generated media interest:

Stuff.co.nz articles | 39 Newshub articles | 12 NZ Herald articles | 11

Winter/NZ Avalanche Advisory | 16 Spring/Summer tramping | 17 Roar hunting season | 12 Duck shooting season | 2

MSC CEO Mike Daisley on set with media

In collaboration with Stuff.co.nz we wrote seven proactive stories for their travel news. Combined these articles gained 98,127 page views. The top three stories were: 1. Never tramped before? It’s time to take a hike with these five tracks for first-timers 2. Get away from the crowds: Five off-the-beaten-track hikes to discover 3. Love to tramp? Have you knocked these five tracks off?

NOTE: ‘Proactive’ means that without our work the article would not have been generated. In most cases these proactive articles are due to a media release or pitching an article idea to a journalist. Proactive articles do not include any form of incident, so this means media articles generated off coronial findings or search and rescue events are not included. We are also very careful in what we count as a media article, we do not include sources such as Voxy, Scoop, Yahoo or MSN. Only well-established New Zealand-based media that have a genuine news presence, and are used by New Zealanders count, for example Stuff.co.nz, NZ Herald, Newshub and Radio NZ among others. We use Meltwater as our media monitoring tool, which only monitors digital articles. Radio interviews and print articles, of which we do each year, are not monitored by this service.

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2020 July 3 proactive | 0 reactive

August 1 proactive | 2 reactive

September 5 proactive | 1 reactive

October 8 proactive | 5 reactive

November 3 proactive | 1 reactive

December 1 proactive | 0 reactive

February 6 proactive | 4 reactive

March 13 proactive | 4 reactive

(6 of the 8 proactive relate to avalanche/NZAA promotion while all 5 reactive related to the death of a rock climber in the Coromandel)

2021 January 8 proactive | 0 reactive

(all 4 reactive relate to climbers caught in an avalanche on Mt Earnslaw)

April 4 proactive | 4 reactive

May 6 proactive | 5 reactive

(4 of the 5 reactive relate to the two climbers killed on Taranaki Maunga)

(11 of the 13 proactive relate to roar hunting and 3 of the 4 reactive relate to a climbers death in Aoraki/Mt Cook NP)

June 3 proactive | 3 reactive

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Metrics

MOUNTAINSAFETY.ORG.NZ

623,570 TOTAL PAGE VIEWS 188,181 SESSIONS 140,064 UNIQUE USERS

69.7% 75.1%

NB: We overhauled our website design on 2 September 2020. We have not presented percentage increase of total page views as a result of this, as well as a carry over from last year’s data extraction issue as the result of a 2019 MetService website update.

PLANMYWALK.NZ

18,913 UNIQUE USERS 10,424 APP DOWNLOADS 8,623 REGISTERED USERS 732

TRIPS PLANNED

METRICS ARE FOR LAUNCH DATE OF SITE: 7 MAY 2020 - 30 JUNE 2021

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FACEBOOK (MSC + ALPINE + HUNTING)

5,409,929 TOTAL IMPRESSIONS

AVALANCHE.NET.NZ

332,800 VIDEO VIEWS

228,252 TOTAL PAGE VIEWS

9%

133,470 SESSIONS

4.3%

47,316 UNIQUE USERS

2.4%

38,576 TOTAL LIKES

64%

148% 4.9%

NB: August 2020 was a terrible month for snowfall and this has a direct impact on website traffic.

YOUTUBE

630,020 TOTAL VIEWS

44%

2,855,781 IMPRESSIONS

6.8%

22,581 TOTAL HOURS WATCHED

0.5%

2.09min AVERAGE WATCH TIME

NB: The decrease in watch time is a result of no new longduration video content being published in this year.

FIREARMSAFETY.ORG.NZ

129,810 TOTAL PAGE VIEWS 52,231 SESSIONS 25,065 UNIQUE USERS

57.6%

35.3%

8.6% 12.2% INSTAGRAM (MSC)

1,179,291 TOTAL REACH 9,734 11,714

41.2%

TOTAL PHOTO ENGAGEMENTS

TOTAL FOLLOWERS

64.3%

3.54%

COVID19OUTDOORS.NZ

54,555 TOTAL PAGE VIEWS

INSTAGRAM (NZAA)

47,351 SESSIONS

242,191 TOTAL REACH

39,670 UNIQUE USERS

11,620 TOTAL PHOTO ENGAGEMENTS

METRICS ARE FOR LAUNCH DATE OF SITE: 22 APRIL 2020 - 30 JUNE 2021

2,447 TOTAL FOLLOWERS

70.9% 552.8%

54%

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Videos 8,200+

SUBSCRIBERS AS OF JULY 2021

Content that works Our videos have had a positive impact on safety. We know this because our research has confirmed they have positively changed behaviours, and we can see the impact on incident numbers. Multiple award nominations are further external validation of the successful strategic and campaign approaches we use to reach the target audiences. As a result of this on-going success, we have continued to use video content as a prevention tactic. Our YouTube channel hosts the various videos we have developed and captures just one of the many lenses of video performance data.

TOP VIEWS: SAME HUNT. DIFFERENT STORY (60S)

119,283 TOTAL VIEWS 56s AVERAGE VIEW DURATION TOP AUDIENCE RETENTION DISTRESS BEACONS 101

80% OF VIEWERS WATCHED THE ENTIRE VIDEO 4.20s AVERAGE VIEW DURATION

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TOP PLAYLISTS

TRAMPING VIDEO SERIES

GET OUTDOORS SERIES

SEVEN BASIC FIREARM RULES

ALPINE SNOW SKILLS SERIES

199,272

103,924

11,368

7,977

TOTAL VIEWS (1 JULY 2020 - 30 JUNE 2021)

TOTAL VIEWS (1 JULY 2020 - 30 JUNE 2021)

TOTAL VIEWS (1 JULY 2020 - 30 JUNE 2021)

TOTAL VIEWS (9 SEP 2020 - 30 JUNE 2021)

71,324

7,977

628,104

522,660

LIFETIME VIEWS (OCT 2018 - 30 JUNE 2021)

LIFETIME VIEWS (MAY 2017 - 30 JUNE 2021)

LIFETIME VIEWS (MAR 2016 - 30 JUNE 2021) LIFETIME VIEWS (9 SEP 2020 - 30 JUNE 2021)

WE HAVE ADDED OUR VIDEOS TO MORE SITES Sharing tactics: Many of our videos, especially the Get Outdoors Series and Tramping Video Series, have been strategically embedded in other places where we know those target audiences go for information. This includes the Department of Conservation track pages, MetService Mountains and Parks forecast pages, Tourism NZ track pages and, of course, our new Plan My Walk app and website.

11.2% OF OUR TOTAL YOUTUBE VIDEO VIEWS ARE FROM DOC.GOVT.NZ

Media also commonly use them, especially our River Safety video which Stuff.co.nz often includes in any article related to walking or tramping.

MetService New Zealand Mountains and Parks sections

Stuff news article showcasing our River Crossing video

Tongariro Alpine Crossing page doc.govt.nz

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Summarised Financial Statements 52

Note MSC has applied Public Benefit Entity Simple Format Reporting - Accrual (Not for Profit). These summarised financial statements have been extracted from the Performance Report (PR) which was authorised for issue by the Executive Committee on 8 October 2021. The PR has been audited and an unqualified opinion was issued. These summary financial statements have not been audited. The summary financial statements cannot be expected to provide as complete an understanding as provided by the PR. A copy of the PR can be obtained by contacting MSC.

Thank you A huge thank you to our funders for their continued support.


STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION - AT 30 JUNE 2021

2021

2020

222,250

116,094

222,250

116,094

Assets Property, plant and equipment Non-current Assets Inventory, debtors & prepayments Term deposits Bank accounts Current Assets Total Assets Current Liabilities Retained Earnings Total Liabilities and Retained Earnings

76,651

90,082

300,000

860,000

626,778

102,490

1,003,429

1,052,572

$1,225,679

$1,168,666

357,376

430,237

868,303

738,429

$1,225,679

$1,168,666

1,440,913

1,115,910

310,140

263,600

293,500

172,000

90,000

85,000

4,000

-

109,887

61,037

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE - YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2021 Revenue Providing goods or services New Zealand Lottery Grants Board New Zealand Police New Zealand Search and Rescue Council Sport New Zealand Department of Conservation Other Other revenue Interest and sundry Total Revenue

20,693

18,967

2,269,133

1,716,514

755,455

745,238

Expenditure Employee related costs Providing goods or services Total Expenditure Surplus

1,383,804

997,216

2,139,259

1,742,454

$129,874

$(25,940)

CASH FLOW STATEMENT - YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2021 Net Cash Flows from Operating Activities

147,520

259,212

Net Cash Flows from Investing Activities

376,768

(615,695)

Opening cash balance Closing Cash Balance

102,490

458,973

$626,778

$102,490

This is represented by: Bank accounts Closing Cash Balance

626,778

102,490

$626,778

$102,490

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PHOTO: Tararua Ranges, Caleb Smith

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#MakeItHomeNZ

mountainsafety.org.nz avalanche.net.nz firearmsafety.org.nz planmywalk.nz

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