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catalog 2012/2013

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instructor asked me, “How could you connect these people on a three-dimensional level? And how can you respond to the fact that our culture is becoming more and more visually focused?’ So I started sketching, and all of a sudden I had this idea of incorporating virtual reality into my project to connect all these people on different levels. So, for example, somebody could be in this hotel franchise in Sydney, Australia, but could interact with someone in the same hotel in NYC. I created the idea of slabs cutting vertically through the building (through the public and private spaces—the tea room, the hotel rooms, the restaurant) to enforce the sense of simultaneity. The slabs are made up of large screens, which function as outlets to the world. It’s almost like Facebook— but on a larger scale. A network you could belong to that would open up your private realm to all these other members. You could interact… you could leave a message. I also set it into the future, because I don’t think the technology is available yet, and how can you respond to the fact that our culture is becoming


4 QUEENS

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18 NYSID Main Campus 1A

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Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum

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Guggenheim Museum

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Whitney Museum of American Art

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MoMA

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Grand Central Terminal

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NY Public Library - Main

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The New Museum

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Chelsea galleries

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United Nations

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Christie’s auction house

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Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts

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Sotheby’s auction house

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23rd Street

14th Street

W. 4th Street West Village

MANHATTAN 10

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42nd Street

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Times Square Decoration & Design Building

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NY Design Center

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70th Street

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SoHo design showrooms and galleries

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Lexington Ave.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

59th Street 20

5th Ave.

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American Museum of Natural History

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Central Park

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NYSID Graduate Center

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SoHo

Chinatown

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Museum of Arts & Design 20

Financial District

NEW JERSEY

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Table of Contents 4 5 6 7 8 12 14 20 26 28 32 36 44 56 64 65 68 69 81 94 96 96 97 97 98 99 101 101 102 106 109 Back inside cover

Message from the President Who is NYSID? History: NYSID & the Profession Timeline: Key Events in Interior Design History NYSID Campus Pathways to Study Undergraduate Study Graduate Study The People at NYSID Faculty Profiles Facilities & Resources Student Profiles Evolution of Student Work Alumni Profiles Student Statistics Student Life NYSID Board Members & Accreditation Undergraduate Programs of Study Graduate Programs of Study Admissions Health Insurance Housing Summer Pre-College Program Registration Academic Calendar Payment of Tuition & Fees Refund Policies & Procedures Financial Aid General Regulations & Policies Faculty Applications & Forms for Admission Getting to NYSID


Message from the President

Greetings! Take a look around: we are barely over 10 years into the 21st century, and yet the landscape of how we live, work, and communicate has altered drastically from the way we pictured it in the twilight of the 20th century. Nowhere is this more evident than in the design of the interior environment. In fact, the concept of the built environment itself has changed in these last ten years. As NYSID approaches its one hundredth birthday, a look back over the last 96 years reveals a discipline and a profession that has evolved beyond all expectation. Design today is a sophisticated and complex profession that combines elements of both aesthetics and function. We strive to design an interior environment that is beautiful and appealing to the senses, but we must also contend with the very real and imminent challenges brought about by climate change, overpopulation in many parts of the world, the globalization of business and culture, and the scarcity of natural resources. At its core, design practice must seek always to protect the health, safety, and welfare of the public. Today, our institution takes as its mandate the need to prepare the next generation of interior design professionals and leaders. Our current undergraduate and graduate programs in interior design are regarded by our peers and by the industry to be among the best in America. Building on our longtime success in interior design education, NYSID has broadened its mission and expanded its academic offerings to include a new, first-professional MFA (Master of Fine Arts) in Interior Design for students without a design undergraduate degree; a Bachelor of Arts (BA) in the History of the Interior and the Decorative Arts; and two Master of Professional Studies (MPS) programs, one in Sustainable Interior Environments and the other in Interior Lighting Design. In this catalog, you will find a host of programs to give voice to your passion for design, whether it’s the history and theory of design, or design practice, and provide you with a credential that will open up a world of career possibilities. So explore, dream, and imagine yourself at NYSID. You’ll be taking the first step towards realizing a future in this dynamic, exciting, and vital profession of interior design. Yours sincerely,

Christopher J. Cyphers, Ph.D. President

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message from the president


Who is NYSID?

NYSID is the only institution of higher learning in New York devoted exclusively to the design of the interior environment. We are a nationally ranked, independent, fully accredited college of design—in continuous operation since 1916. For nearly 100 years, our School has laid the foundations for the future of this industry. NYSID graduates not only go on to work in prestigious commercial and private firms—they also establish them. David Scott, Mica Ertegun, Anne Eisenhower, Rick Shaver, and Mariette Himes Gomez are just a few of our former students. Alumni (and even our current students), see their work regularly featured in publications like Interior Design, Elle Décor, Architectural Digest, and Metropolis. The people who work and study here love what they do. They win awards. They change the way we live. Perhaps, one day soon, you’ll be among them. In this catalog, you’ll read about what the students have to say in their own words (p. 36); and about our alumni in theirs (p. 56). You’ll see how actual student assignments here take shape; and learn about the teaching philosophy behind them (p. 36). We hope you’ll get a feel for what an incredibly singular place NYSID is. We pride ourselves on friendliness and communication, as much as on our rigorous coursework. More than anything, we want you to grow here. Your future success is how we gauge our own.

Mission The New York School of Interior Design is dedicated to the advancement of the discipline of interior design through education, research, professional development, public programs, and community outreach. Critical to its mission is the engagement with New York City’s cultural institutions, access to design resources, and its immersion in the city’s creative economy. NYSID’s guiding principle is that the successful design of an interior space improves human welfare, and that the interior design profession assumes an important role in ensuring that these spaces are beautiful, functional, healthy, safe, and built in a socially and environmentally conscientious way.

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History: NYSID & the Profession

NYSID’s history is synonymous with the history of the design profession itself. The School was founded by architect Sherrill Whiton in 1916, back when interior design was beginning to take shape as a true, respected profession—one that required training in everything from art history to the play of light on walls and surfaces. (In fact, Whiton’s textbook, Interior Design and Decoration, now in its 6th printing, is still a design school standard.) NYSID was chartered in 1924 by the New York State Board of Regents and has operated continuously for nearly one hundred years. In its early days NYSID was located in various buildings on Madison Avenue and in Midtown (the last, an impressive site on East 56th Street, designed by architect and faculty member William Breger), eventually settling down to its current location among the city’s top fine art and antique dealers on East 70th Street in 1994. A major expansion to NYSID’s tandem building on East 69th Street followed. The School connected and renovated the buildings, updated fixtures, installed state-of-the-art electrical and computer services—all resulting in a fascinating mixture of old and new in its Renaissance- and Colonial-Revival campus. During its long tenure, NYSID has steadily graduated influential professional interior designers, from the Great Depression to the World War II Years, not to mention the subsequent architectural boom of the ‘50s and ‘60s. By the time Jacqueline Kennedy was First Lady—and first brought to national prominence the role of the interior designer with her renovation of the White House—we’d already been on the scene for four decades. In many ways, it’s our firm foundation in the evolution of interior design’s history that has allowed us to be its forerunner. Today, we are firm believers in the importance of sustainability in materials and the construction of green buildings; in fostering the dialog between the fields of interior design and architecture; and in the future of professional accreditation standards in the interior design industry. Thanks to the efforts of our esteemed faculty—and equally esteemed graduates—good interior design is a paradigm for good, healthy, sustainable life on the planet. And the skills of its professionals, are, more than ever, in demand.

Top to Bottom: 1959 Graduating class Student exhibit, 1940s Alum and faculty member, Bill Engel, at 1986 student exhibition, Lever House, NYC

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history: nysid and the profession


Timeline: Key Events in Interior Design History

Augustus Sherrill Whiton

1916

Sherrill Whiton publishes Home Study Course in the Decorative Arts, laying the foundation for what became the New York School of Interior Design

1924

Eleanor McMillen opens McMillen Inc, the first full-service interior design firm NYSID chartered by the New York State Board of Regents

1926

The Metropolitan Museum of Art showcases Art Deco in new designs from the previous year’s Paris exhibition

1931

American Institute of Interior Decorators formed, with 342 members, after a conference in Grand Rapids, Michigan

1932

Decorators Digest published, will be renamed Interior Design in 1950 The Museum of Modern Art presents Modern Architecture: International Exhibition, featuring what became known as the International Style

1937

Sherrill Whiton publishes Interior Design and Decoration, the classic text for design students

1948

Designs for Business formed as the first design firm specializing in commercial interiors

1951

Scandinavian design gains world’s attention at Triennale exhibition in Milan

1961

Albert Hadley leaves McMillen to work for Mrs. Henry Parish II. Firm soon renamed Parish-Hadley NYSID moves to East 56th Street into facilities designed by Bill Breger

1962

Interior Design Educator’s Council established

1964

Decoration & Design Building opens in New York, consolidating trade showrooms in one location

1970

Foundation for Interior Design Education and Research established to accredit interior design programs (Later became Council for Interior Design Accreditation)

1974

National Council for Interior Design Qualification (NCIDQ) incorporated to oversee academic standards leading to a professional qualification examination

1975

American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) formed by merger of American Institute of Interior Designers (AID) and National Society of Interior Designers (NSID)

1977

NYSID granted the right to offer baccalaureate degrees

1981

Memphis collaborative debuts in Milan, spearheading Postmodernist movement

1990

Legislation for certification of interior designers passed in New York, California, and Virginia

1994

International Interior Design Association formed, merging three design organizations NYSID moves to East 70th Street

1997

100th anniversary of Edith Wharton and Ogden Codman’s seminal work, The Decoration of Houses

1999

NYSID graduates its first Master of Fine Arts class

2001

Stanley Abercrombie revises Sherrill Whiton’s landmark Interior Design & Decoration, in its 5th edition

2009

NYSID admits its first professional-level Master of Fine Arts class

2010

NYSID admits its first MPS in Sustainable Interior Environments class and its first BA in the History of the Interior and Decorative Arts class; NYSID opens Graduate Center timeline: ke y events in interior design history

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NYSID Campus

New York City: The Best Place to Study Design We count as our neighbors great design showrooms and professional practices—not to mention amazing restaurants and galleries, the retail scene of Madison Avenue, and Central Park. The best of New York City is at our door. In fact, you might say New York City is our Campus.

Industry Statistics Creative economy is a term used to describe a range of professions related to the visual arts, design, architecture, museums, art dealers, art education, and related occupations. According to an important study by the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, one out of every four creative economy jobs is located in New York and Los Angeles. “Besides being important employers, the creative arts industries are associated with high paying wages.” “Vital as the creative arts industries are economically, their overall importance to society transcends economic analysis.” New York is one of the top paying states for interior designers, with an annual mean salary of $64,400; the mean annual salary for interior designers nationwide is $52,100. The top paying metropolitan region for interior designers is the NY-NJ metro region, with an annual mean salary of $67,840. The mean annual salary in this region for all occupations is $57,170. Interior designers earn more, on average, than most other professional occupations, excluding those in financial services.

Source: “The Economic Impact of the Creative Arts Industries: New York and Los Angeles,” Monthly Labor Review, October 2007 Source: US Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment estimates for May 2010 (most recent data publicly available)

The NY-NJ metro region employs the largest number of interior designers: 2570. The next largest metro region is Los Angeles, CA: 1680.

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ne w york cit y: the be st pl ace to study de sign

The NY-NJ metro region employs the largest number of interior designers


Where is NYSID? We’re incredibly proud of our campus, comprised of two, one-hundred-year-old Renaissance- and ColonialRevival buildings on Manhattan’s Upper East Side, blocks away from world-class cultural and design resources—from The Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Guggenheim to the D & D Building (home to over 120 showrooms and the wares of 3,000 manufacturers). Our atelier is a serene work site for students between classes, and our roof garden, with its panoramic views, is a tranquil rest spot. Sunlit upper-floor classrooms are equipped with state-of-the-art plotters and computers, while downstairs, students meet and socialize over organic salads and sandwiches in our café. Our new Graduate Center doubles NYSID’s physical size and contains the latest in sustainable design and lighting technology. The center sits at the heart of New York City’s design community. Other schools may offer instruction in design; but when you visit our campus, you’ll see how we not only teach it, we inspire it.

We’re situated at the epicenter of the design world, Manhattan, with its artistic and cultural resources, and unmistakable energy

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Graduate Center NYSID’s Graduate Center features 40,000 SF of design studio space, computer labs, seminar rooms, a lecture hall, lighting laboratory, materials library, student lounge, output center, extensive exhibition space, and a model shop. The Graduate Center, which is situated at Manhattan’s design epicenter, features state-of-theart technology, including LED interior lighting, lightharvesting systems, a laser cutter, 3-D printer, and a completely Wi-Fi environment.

The Graduate Center is a living laboratory of sustainable design practices

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Pathways to Study NONDEGREE

Twelve credits may be taken on a nondegree basis through the Institute for Continuing and Professional Studies (they can be applied to future programs)

BID

UNDERGRADUATE

One-year certificate program perfect for students without a portfolio (courses feed directly into the AAS)

AAS

Apply directly or transfer from the BID to the two-year pre-professional degree (course feeds directly into the BFA)

BFA

Four-year, liberal arts degree in the History of the Interior and the Decorative Arts.

GRADUATE

MFA - 1

Three-year, full-time, professional-level program for those who have a baccalaureate degree in a discipline unrelated to design (only two years for NYSID’s BA graduates)

MFA - 2

A two-year, post-professional, full-time degree for those with a baccalaureate degree in interior design, architecture, or closely related discipline

MPS

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pat h way s to s t u dy

One-year, full-time, post-professional, programs in sustainable interior environments and interior lighting design

Comprehensive four-year, CIDAaccredited, professional-level degree (apply directly or transfer from the AAS)

BA Recieve one year of advanced standing in the MFA-1 program.


Where Do You Fit In? All of NYSID’s academic programs build seamlessly, one upon the other, like interconnected blocks. So basically, you can choose how much or how little you want to study with us, and never “waste” time or credits. We’re confident you’ll find our academic calendar and course-requirement structure streamlined, student-friendly—and professionally minded. Classes on all levels are available at NYSID days, nights, on weekends, and during the summer.

For Credit/Matriculated Study Do you have a portfolio? A portfolio is a standard requirement for pursuing any professional degree in interior design practice.* Students without a portfolio begin in our one-year BID certificate program on the undergraduate level (see p. 17), or take a qualifying workshop on the graduate level (see p. 21). Do you want to become a certified interior designer? The portfolio and credits you amassed in the BID plug directly into the requirements for the AAS upon acceptance to the program. The AAS is a two-year pre-professional degree program. (Note: If you want to be certified in the profession, two years of study is the minimum required by most states) (see p. 16). Do you want to earn a first-professional, CIDA-accredited college degree? NYSID’s first-professional degree on the undergraduate level is the BFA. It is a four-year program and is CIDA accredited. Note: The first two years of coursework of the BFA are identical to those of the AAS. And courses are available days, nights, and on weekends (see p. 15). NYSID’s graduate programs take the BA and BFA programs to their next logical levels and come in three very practical options. Are you new to design and want to earn a professional-level graduate degree? If you already have a baccalaureate degree in a discipline that is unrelated to design, you can enroll in the MFA-1 program, which provides all the skills you will need to become an interior design professional. It is a three-year, full-time program. NYSID’s BA program graduates get advanced standing (see p. 21). Do you already have a bachelor’s degree in interior design or architecture and wish to gain more skills on the post-professional level? We have two options: The MFA-2 program is a post-professional degree for those who already hold a degree in interior design or architecture. It is a two-year, full-time program (see p. 22).

Our MPS (Master of Professional Studies) programs are post-professional degrees for those who already hold baccalaureate degrees in interior design or architecture but who wish to concentrate on either environmentally informed design preparing themselves for LEED AP certification, or on the latest in the design and technology of lighting with its myriad applications. They are both one-year programs (see pp. 23-24).

Nondegree/Nonmatriculation Do you simply want to “test the waters” of interior design—while still earning credits? NYSID allows you to take courses on a nondegree basis through the Institute for Continuing and Professional Studies (ICPS). ICPS courses will introduce you to the profession—and what’s more, most will also give you undergraduate credits that will apply toward your future academic goals. Classes are available throughout the year, during the day and at night, and on the weekends. Are you a professional looking for CEUs or LUs? The Institute for Continuing and Professional Studies is here for you— to expand your knowledge base, gain skills, and broaden your professional horizons. Read on for more details, and even look to our Profile pages (pp 36-41) for examples. So many of our successful students, as well as famous alumni, came to NYSID without even a portfolio to their name. Within a single semester, the whole landscape of their design future changed.

*For those interested in the history of interiors and the decorative arts, there is our BA program, which does not require a portfolio for admission (see p. 18). pat h way s to s t u dy

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Undergraduate Study

For those seeking an undergraduate degree in interior design, NYSID offers four unique programs: a 24-credit Basic Interior Design certificate (BID), a 66-credit Associate in Applied Science (AAS), a 132-credit CIDA-accredited Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA), and a 120-credit Bachelor of Arts (BA) in the History of the Interior and the Decorative Arts. Combining professional courses, design history, and the liberal arts, the undergraduate programs give NYSID graduates the skills and education needed to meet the demands of this global profession. See pp. 69-80 for more information.

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Bachelor of Fine Arts in Interior Design The Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) in Interior Design degree program provides students with the professional-level preparation to become practicing interior designers. In combination with the required professional experience, the curriculum satisfies the educational requirements for membership in national and local interior design associations and allows graduates to sit for the qualifying exams for interior design certification in many states. The focus of this professional-level program is on the development of the designer’s ability to formulate, propose, and carry out creative design solutions in a safe and pleasing fashion. The program is accredited by the Council for Interior Design Accreditation (CIDA). The BFA may be completed full time or part time. See p. 69 for more information.

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Associate in Applied Science in Interior Design

In order to become a Certified Interior Designer in the State of New York and many other states, individuals must have a minimum of two years of college-level interior design education. The Associate in Applied Science (AAS) in Interior Design degree satisfies this requirement. Required credits earned in AAS courses may be applied to the BFA upon acceptance into the BFA program. The AAS may be completed full time or part time. See p. 69 for more information.

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Basic Interior Design Basic Interior Design is a 24-credit nondegree certificate program that provides an introduction to the field of interior design with emphasis on fundamental skills and knowledge in interior design, architecture, and the visual and decorative arts. Credits earned in Basic Interior Design (BID) courses may be applied to the AAS and BFA upon acceptance to these programs. The BID program may be completed full time or part time. See p. 69 for more information.

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Bachelor of Arts in the History of Interior Design & the Decorative Arts For those with an interest in the social and cultural history of design and the objects that inhabit the interior, we offer a Bachelor of Arts (BA) in the History of the Interior and the Decorative Arts. This 120-credit program combines the study of design and material culture from a historical perspective with an introduction to basic studio practice. There are few institutions that offer the opportunity for students of design history to actually partake of the practice of design. NYSID’s location amidst some of the world’s most celebrated museums, auction houses, and galleries creates a living laboratory of the past into which students can immerse themselves in the objects and spaces most others read about in textbooks. The BA degree program requires full-time study. Graduates of the BA in the History of the Interior and the Decorative Arts have the unique opportunity to apply to the college’s professional-level Master of Fine Arts in Interior Design degree program (MFA-1) with one year of advanced standing. Admission to the MFA-1 program allows the candidate to complete the full-time, three-year MFA-1 degree in two years (four semesters and two summers). Admission to the MFA-1 program requires the submission of a portfolio and formal acceptance. To be admitted with advanced standing, applicants must have completed the BA with a 3.0 GPA or higher and have taken both Materials & Methods of Construction and Codes. Study in the MFA-1 program with advanced standing would begin in the summer and consist of Interior Design Studio II and Construction Documents using AutoCAD I. See p. 70 for more information.

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What Happens After Graduation? The measure of any institution’s success is the success of its graduates. And for nearly 100 years, NYSID graduates have been leaders and contributors to the design profession. Choose a career designing: health care facilities and hospitals night clubs theaters corporate offices exhibitions community centers educational facilities model homes historic restorations restaurants hotels museums and galleries residential interiors Rewarding opportunities at interior design and architecture firms as well as related professions await NYSID’s graduates. Some even choose to continue their education and pursue higher degrees. Our Career Development service, available to those who complete 12 credits at the college and graduates for five years after leaving the college, offers contacts, support and information on finding internships and openings within the profession.

furniture cruise ships vacation resorts spas department stores and retail outlets

Top firms post positions with confidence at NYSID—knowing they will get the most qualified candidates for the job.

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Graduate Study

At the graduate level, NYSID offers three distinct opportunities to pursue a graduate degree in interior design. For those without a design background, our 90-credit Professional-Level Master of Fine Arts in Interior Design program (MFA-1) prepares students to enter the interior design profession with an advanced degree. A 60-credit Post-Professional-Level Master of Fine Arts in Interior Design program (MFA-2) provides students who already have a design or architecture background the opportunity to further develop and refine their voice as designers and to engage in projects that are more conceptual in nature. The postprofessional Master of Professional Studies (MPS) programs focus on Sustainable Design and its implementation, and on Interior Lighting Design and technology. See pp. 81-91 for more information.

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Master of Fine Arts in Interior Design Professional Level The professional-level Master of Fine Arts in Interior Design (MFA-1) is a 90-credit program designed to provide students who possess a baccalaureate degree in a field unrelated to design with an advanced degree containing the education to become licensed interior design practitioners. The focus of this program is on the development of the ability to formulate, propose, and carry out design solutions in a safe, sustainable, and aesthetically pleasing way. In combination with the required professional experience, the curriculum satisfies the educational requirements for membership in national and local interior design associations and allows graduates to sit for qualifying exams for interior design certification in many jurisdictions. The MFA-1 degree program requires full-time study. See p. 81 for more information.

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Master of Fine Arts in Interior Design Post-Professional Level

The post-professional Master of Fine Arts in Interior Design (MFA-2) is a 60-credit, full-time, advanced study program with a focus on studio and academic research in history, theory, and methods as they relate to an interdisciplinary approach to interior design. The MFA-2 is a postprofessional terminal degree of particular interest to students who have already earned an undergraduate professional degree in interior design, architecture, environmental design, or other closely related fields. See p. 85 for more information.

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Master of Professional Studies in Sustainable Interior Environments Sustainability in design and architecture is more than a passing fad; it is a fact of life that will become all the more important as the world’s population grows and natural resources continue to diminish. An outgrowth of NYSID’s commitment to the principles and practices of sustainable design, we offer a oneyear, 30-credit Master of Professional Studies (MPS) in Sustainable Interior Environments. Intended for those working in the design or architecture professions with an emphasis on the interior, this program provides students with a thorough grounding in the best practices in environmentally informed designs for the interior. Upon completion of the MPS program, students are in a position to sit for the LEED AP certification exam and possess a highly sought-after credential. See p. 90 for more information.

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Master of Professional Studies in Interior Lighting Design

As any interior designer or architect can tell you, imaginative and cost effective interior illumination is critical to the success of every interior space. Changing technologies, new laws that mandate energy efficiency and the demand for inspired, innovative solutions have created a strong need for specialists in interior lighting design. Intended for the professional working in design or architecture with an emphasis on the interior environment, the one-year, 30-credit Master of Professional Studies (MPS) in Interior Lighting Design program provides students with a comprehensive education in the best practices in natural and artificial illumination. Graduates of the lighting program are well prepared to sit for the certification exam given by the NCQLP (National Council on Qualifications for Lighting Professions). See p. 88 for more information

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MPS in Healthcare Interior Design

Perspective drawing, assisted living facility for young adults with muscular dystrophy. The healthcare industry is rapidly expanding in order to accommodate the growing needs of the baby boom generation and the global population explosion. As the industry and the government grapple with the complexities and debates that shape society, designers must be increasingly responsive to the growing healthcare field. Modern healthcare encompasses large hospitals, critical care units, specialty health centers, dementia care, and aging-in-place, among many other typologies. Intended for the professional working in design or architecture, the one-year, 30-credit Master of Professional Studies (MPS) in Healthcare Interior Design is a post-professional program focused on the specialized knowledge, research, and skills required by design professionals as they create varied healthcare settings. Graduates will be prepared to practice as healthcare specialist designers, researchers for architectural and design firms, facility planners in healthcare institutions, and other administrative and design management positions within the broad healthcare industry. See page 87a for more information.

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The People at NYSID

Throughout our long history, world-class designers, art historians, architects, and authorities on the decorative arts have been proud to be affiliated with NYSID. The best design professionals and experts in the field come through our doors. Because New York is a world-class design center, the college has access to the best design professionals and experts in their areas of specialization.

“As for the faculty, I found my instructors without exception to be of outstanding caliber. I had attended some very strong academic institutions in the past, and I’d have to say that my teachers at NYSID were as talented, challenging, and committed as any of the other schools I’d attended before.” - Bob Kaner AAS ’02

Danish furniture designer Jens Risom (right)— affiliated with NYSID for many years as faculty and International Advisory Board member— with former NYSID president Arthur Satz (left) at commencement, 1967.

Sherri Donghia, former executive vice president and creative director at Donghia, Inc; recipient of a NYSID honorary Doctor of Fine Arts and commencement speaker, 2007.

Albert Hadley, known as the “Dean of American Interior Designers” and member of NYSID’s International Advisory Board. (Appears here on the cover of the NYSID publication Drawings and the Design Process.) NYSID alum Jill Alsman (’67) with recent AAS graduate Dallis Stamps pictured at the NYSID alumni reception hosted by Italian mosaic stone and glass manufacturer SICIS.

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NYSID President Christopher J. Cyphers (left) and noted residential designer Mario Buatta (right)—member of NYSID’s International Advisory Board and the 2011 NYSID Gala honoree.

NYSID instructor Barry Lewis (left) and David Hartman (right), cohosts of the popular PBS series “Walking Tours”; pictured here at the Steinway Piano Factory in Astoria, Queens.

Ethan Lu, principal with Metropolitan United Studio (MUS), and NYSID MPS Sustainability Area Coordinator.

Clodagh, designer and author; recipient of a NYSID honorary Doctor of Fine Arts and commencement speaker in 2004, and a member of NYSID's International Advisory Board.

Vicente Wolf, designer, artist, author; member of the NYSID International Advisory Board, and instructor of a design process workshop.

Kiki Dennis, principal of Kiki Dennis Interiors (right) advises a student enrolled in NYSID’s Precollege Program for high school students.

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Faculty Profiles NYSID faculty work as practicing designers in addition to being educators, authors, and active members of professional design organizations and, as such, give NYSID students special insights into the practice of their chosen field.

Ethel Rompilla Ethel Rompilla has taught Color for Interiors for twenty years, first coming to NYSID as a student, and later, after graduation, going on to work for the prestigious architectural firm HOK (which today has 24 offices on three continents).

Rompilla is devoted to every aspect of color: from its centuries’ old history, to its powerful psychological impact, as well as its practical application within a space. What’s more, she is a master teacher who is able to convey her passion and expertise to her students. “People think of color as little color swatches, but it’s really more complex than that,” says Rompilla. “There are so many things involved beyond the color itself: there’s the tonal value of the color (its lightness and darkness); its neutrality and chromatic intensity; the visual mix of color (in which one color, when seen next to 28

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another, affects its overall perception to the eye)—aspects that people don’t realize go into its selection. I’ve had students tell me all the time that they pick a little color swatch, and it looks great; but then they buy the paint and paint the room—and they just fall over, it’s so intensely chromatic.” In Color for Interiors, students mix hundreds and hundreds of colors; then, they learn how to use color in an interior in a way that makes a cohesive whole. “We balance tonal and chromatic values; we try to understand the role that horizontals and verticals play in an interior, and the ways that the eye makes connections, via color, between them; and ultimately, how to create balance and harmony in a space.” In 2005, Rompilla wrote one of the essential textbooks in the field, Color for Interior Design (Abrams)—which is used in NYSID’s course— yet another facet of her commitment to her students’ total immersion in the subject. “Students love studying color because it just opens up a whole new world for them; they feel their eyes have been opened up for the first time,” opines Rompilla. “One day, for instance, I had a student bring in a newspaper article with a photograph of three ballet dancers. ‘Look,’ she said, ‘I can’t believe that the first thing I noticed about the dancers’ costumes is that they form a triad scheme: three colors that

are equidistant on a 12-color wheel.’ It’s like when students first study drafting,” explains Rompilla, “they start seeing the world in terms of scale and proportion. This student became analytical as well as observational. She noticed the details as well as the big picture. That’s something,” Rompilla adds, “that a good designer needs.”


Edwin Zawadzki Edwin Zawadzki (MArch, Yale) worked at architecture firms Perkins & Will (where, among other things, he worked on an urban plan for Beirut) and Oliver Cope Architect (learning classical, high-end residential design) before starting his own design firm,

In Situ Design, with his wife, Mason Wickham, in 1999. He has taught at the School since 2002. Though Zawadzki has a great deal of experience teaching throughout NYSID’s curriculum (Basic Drafting, Contract I, and the MFA’s Design Studio II), his focus over the last five years has been on the commercial and residential design studios. Throughout, Zawadzki has largely trained his sights on helping students to understand and manipulate abstract concepts—and, most importantly, how to translate them into viable, rational designs. “My teaching philosophy is basically that there is a process to design. It’s not just about coming in and making things conform to your personal opinions,” says Zawadzki. “The possibilities for using materials and defining spaces are effectively infinite, but the reasons for laying out a floor plan, or choosing one

material over another—for making a design conclusion—stem from a thought process that should be rigorous and communicable. Objective ideas drive all the decisions, right down to what kind of a baseboard goes into a room.” In one of the studios that Zawadzki co-teaches with another professor, William Engel, Residential Design III, students learn to become fluent with, and work within, a conceptual framework. First they pick two pieces of art from a local museum; then they analyze them in depth; ultimately, they implement the underlying aesthetic sensibilities, intentions, and/or formal concepts they have teased out of the artworks into a design idea of their own: a private single-family residence (for one student’s example, see p. 39). Throughout, Zawadzki and Engel are there for students at every step of the way, from initial sketches to

design development presentation. “Too often, students tend to think of a design problem as a puzzle, like a Rubik’s Cube,” says Zawadzki, “and that if they solve it they’ll find the right answer. But what they must learn is that there isn’t some teacher’s edition of the ‘right’ answer; 10 students can—and will—have 10 answers to a design problem. The only way to solve a design problem is to produce a design, take a position, and draw: plans, elevations, sections; then draw it all over again! Build models in real materials, not just on a computer. Tear the model up, if need be. Put it back together. It’s a huge amount of work, with no shortcuts. But you’ll arrive at a solution in a different way.”

Pictured: Lobby, St. Paul Hotel, Montreal, Canada (with Carlos Aparicio Associates, NY; Acanto Interiors, Montreal; Lemoyne Lapointe Magne, Architectes, Montreal) fa c u lt y p r o f i l e s

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René Estacio René Estacio is not only a professor, he’s also a NYSID alumn, having received his AAS in interior design from the school in 1981 after getting a BS in Architecture from the University of St. Thomas in the Philippines. A specialist in all aspects of furniture design (who today runs a successful interior and furniture design practice) Estacio has taught at NYSID for 11 years. He single-handedly developed the syllabi for the furniture design courses in both the BFA and MFA programs.

setting up his own business. Throughout his career, Estacio estimates that he’s created more than 500 designs for various settings, including the nationally known concern Flicks Reed, for whom he is a consultant. “My philosophy, both when I design and when I teach,” says Estacio, “is that before you can design for the future, you have to know what was designed in the past. Particularly in furniture, you have to know history.” While at some schools, furniture design only ranks as an elective, at NYSID it is a required course of study in the BFA program, because, as Estacio points out, it is a necessary skill in designing the total environment for a client. What’s more, Estacio believes that NYSID’s educational environment is exceptional for a student’s total immersion in design. “I encourage my students to think outside the box; and I absolutely without a doubt find this quality in students at NYSID. They’re eager to learn, and inquisitive.”

Estacio’s storied career began immediately after his student days when he started working for eminent New York City interior designer John Saladino in 1981. In 1988, Estacio went on to work for French architect Thierry Despont’s firm, and then, in 1990 for the Kohler Company. Estacio served as director of design for Kohler’s furniture concern, McGuire Furniture in San Francisco, where he relocated before coming back to New York in 1994 and 30

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Occasionally, students who have created a design for a chest of drawers, or chair, or a table, or a piece of upholstery in one of Estacio’s classes will approach the instructor and want to take their work further. “Some of my students will come and say ‘I really would like to build a prototype of this design I did in class—not just create it on paper or in a model’ and I say ‘OK, I’ll help you do it,’ because I see that they are so committed and they really care. I tell them I’d be happy to see something they design come to fruition.”

Chairs designed for Ficks Reed


Barbara Lowenthal Barbara Lowenthal is principal of her own private architecture and design firm, director of NYSID's MFA programs. She has taught extensively at NYSID since 1994 in an array of courses, among them Design Process, Contract Design II, BFA Thesis Studio, and the master’s program Thesis Studio. She received her bachelor of arts degree in art history

from the University of Michigan, and her masters of architecture from Princeton University.

Lowenthal’s pedagogical approach is both highly conceptual and inherently practical, imbuing in her students a respect for their own initial creative vision for a space, be it a retail lingerie store (see p. 37 for one student’s example), an office, a restaurant, or a museum. Key is the fact that Lowenthal, who has taught across the curriculum at NYSID, has an encyclopedic knowledge of how to combine and focus a student’s skills to best serve their vision. “Students need to consider many different things when they’re designing a space,” Lowenthal says, “not just the constraints, but some overarching idea to direct their design. It’s very important that they learn to make decisions in a nonarbitrary way, and that they convey that to a client. At NYSID,

Cantilevered stair in NYC office of Carl Marks & Co., courtesy of Alan Gaynor + Company

this objective, defining principle is called the ‘Design Concept.’ Once you have it fully developed, you use it as your touchstone, and all your decisions—about planning the space, the finishes, furnishings, and the like—fall into place, and create something unified and whole. You use your concept as your touchstone,” explains Lowenthal, “like the thesis of a paper.”

An objective approach, yes, but through it Lowenthal has won both the respect (and gratitude) of students over the years; her keen eye and perceptive in-class critiques help

students to navigate the shoals of even the most complicated set of a project’s requirements. What is more, she is able to convey how each individual student can bring their most unique and personal vision to bear, deploying it throughout the many drawings and models a project may require.

“I see my job as a teacher to help students achieve the design goals they set themselves,” opines Lowenthal. “That’s my approach—to help them refine, develop, and think more deeply about they’re doing.”

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Facilities & Resources

Library Our library, which is the heart of our institution, has over 12,000 books, periodicals, and indexes that cover every aspect of international art, design, decorative arts, architecture, and professional practice—as well as other very pertinent resources like current trade catalogs and manufacturers’ samples representing a wide variety of fabric swatches, wallpaper and floor coverings, paint samples, carpets, and textile trimmings. In addition, NYSID students have access to the 2.6 million volumes of NYU’s Bobst Library, the 54,000-volume Gimbel Library at Parsons School of Design, as well as all the resources available through the NYSID library’s membership in METRO (The Metropolitan New York Library Council)—a consortium of over 300 regional libraries.

Mario Buatta Materials Atelier Students work independently on their projects in NYSID’s Mario Buatta Materials Atelier—a tranquil room on the second floor equipped with computers, printers, plotters, and drafting tables, as well as materials resources. Named for a design world icon, this sunny, airy spot served as a library early in the last century, and indeed, it maintains a classic feeling of grace and grandeur. Double-height windows look out onto the tree-lined block of East 70th Street, while an iron balcony housing library archives overlooks the back of the room. Student-tutors are available, free of charge, in the atelier throughout the week to help with drafting skills, design history questions, computer graphics, and the like.

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Lighting Lab Our lighting lab is dedicated to the study of interior architectural lighting; in it, NYSID students learn how state-of-the-art light sources interact with a myriad of surfaces— from wood grain finishes to brushed stainless steel. Located on the fourth floor of our 70th Street building, it is outfitted with sophisticated lighting sources and controls that have been supplied by some 46 manufacturers.

Technology & Design Technology is a key component of a NYSID student’s education. As an institution we are committed to the integration of hand drawing and drafting with the latest computer-aided design programs. It’s a skill we are proud that our students develop. You see the latest computers and plotters in our classrooms, and our students learn the programs from some of the best in the field. The result is student work that is superior in its nuance and sensitivity, yet technically complex. Our students expect the best tools and guidance. We provide them.

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Satz Auditorium The Arthur King Satz Auditorium is where you’ll find most large gatherings on campus—including NYSID’s popular Public Lecture Series, design symposia, and lecture classes. Experts in sustainable building practice; shelter magazine editors, award-winning architects, and numerous industry professionals have passed through the hall. In centuries past, the site (at 170 East 70th Street—a former carriage house) served as a stable for horses. Today, it has been converted to include state-of-the-art audio visual technology, and seats 200.

Galleries Our campus has two on-site galleries, allowing NYSID to showcase numerous exhibitions to the public: the Sherrill Whiton Gallery in the Student Center of the East 70th Street building and the NYSID Gallery on East 69th Street. Recent thematic shows include “Fashioning the Modern French Interior: Pochoir Portfolios in the 1920s” organized by The Wolfsonian Museum; “The HOME House Project” presenting 100 designs for affordable housing that utilize environmentally conscious materials and methods; and “MidCentury Modern: The Interior and Furniture Design of Florence Knoll.” Both galleries frequently display the work of alumni, faculty, and students.

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Student Profiles

Yiannos Vrousgos Third-year BFA student

Where are you from, and what did you do before coming to NYSID? I’m from Thessaloniki, Greece. I studied marketing and business administration at the ACT (American College of Thessaloniki). My family owns a retail company that imports and distributes clothes all over the world, so I was introduced to the world of design—mostly fashion—at a very young age. Some of my father’s friends who happened to be professors at the University advised me to leave marketing behind and follow my passion for design. Why did you pick NYSID? In Europe every country has its own design history, its own design school. There is no diversity, no multicultural environment. I liked that NYSID is located in the heart of Manhattan. New York has so much energy, and is such a diverse environment that you get inspiration from every corner, every person you meet in the street. Studio classes were 10-15 people maximum, and I knew that would give me the opportunity to have personal time with the instructor. Everyone was very helpful, friendly, and applying was a very personal experience. I first applied for the Basic Interior Design Program [BID]—which was very necessary for people like myself who needed to build a design portfolio and get introduced to the tools needed for communicating your design, like drafting, perspective, sketching. Once at NYSID, what did you discover? The first day of school, they said to us, ‘Design is going to be a part of your life, a 24/7 experience; It will change your life and how you see things.’ They were telling the truth. It was a big change for me. Not just a course or a passing interest. Design becomes part of your life. You go in the street; you look at the buildings, parks, art, from a different point of view, you see, experience and appreciate design everywhere you go, everywhere you look. 36

student profiles

“The first day of school, they said to us, ‘Design is going to be a part of your life, a 24/7 experience; It will change your life and how you see things.’ They were telling the truth.”


In Process: Yiannos Vrousgos Tell us about your retail design project for a lingerie store, which you completed as part of your studio class, Contract Design II.* I called my retail lingerie store “Boudoir,” inspired by the boudoir space in Pre-Revolutionary France that served a woman as both dressing room and bedroom combined. It was a place of mystery and enigma, where she dressed and undressed, and could meet clandestine suitors. I wanted to create a retail space that at once was impressive, but that also evoked the comfort and privacy a woman would feel in her own home, so I made small, closet-like spaces inside the larger interior of the store. Double-height display closets in shiny black lacquer connect the floors vertically and add unexpected shifts of architectural scale. I used wallpaper of tarnished silver on the ceiling, velvet textures on the seating, dim ambient lighting, colors like violet and grey. There are also dramatic punctuations of white where products are displayed on shelves—this is, after all, a retail space. A sophisticated woman is the client I envision for such a space. She’s someone who goes into the drawers in her home to get ready for the perfect date, but who ultimately dresses for herself. I want to convey to her a sense of mystery and sexuality, and that the shopping experience should be intimate, personal— like opening up your closet and seeing what’s inside.

*Contract Design II is a fifth-semester BFA course. Over the span of its semester, students are guided through the design of commercial spaces. student profiles

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Tiffany Gomez Third-year BFA student

What did you do before you came to NYSID? I took a year off after high school, before coming to NYSID. I’m from the Bronx. My family is skilled in creative things like art and drawing. My dad does work as a decorative finisher, and my uncle and cousin as well. I’ve always had an interest in design What made you choose NYSID? I liked the small class size, and the fact that the school only offered one major. I looked on the web and at the catalog and saw images of student work. I hadn’t seen much of that before and I thought it would be interesting to see how to get to that point. What did you discover about yourself once you got here? The first year it was a lot of the basics, and I was just trying to understand everything. Now I’m at the point where I’m discovering different talents about myself, different things I like doing. I’m glad I chose this career. I like Bill Engel as a teacher; he’s an artist. Teachers like Engel and Edwin Zawadski get you to think abstractly. They definitely push you to break away and go into another way of thinking. What do you want to do after you leave NYSID? I want to start working for a firm—I’m not sure yet—big or small. Possibly in the future start my own business.

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“Teachers like Engel and Edwin Zawadski get you to think abstractly. They definitely push you to break away and go into another way of thinking.”


In Process: Tiffany Gomez Tell us about the art-based residential project you did for an assignment in your Residential Design III studio class—designing a loft residence in Soho. Before we actually got the floor plan, our professors had us go to a museum (I went to MoMA) and choose two works of art—one 2-D and one 3-D—on which to base our design. We’d start off by understanding what the artist did; then from there, inspired by their initial ideas, take it in our own direction. I chose a painting by Yves Klein and a sculpture by Jean Tinguely. Tinguely’s sculpture, called “Fragment from Homage to New York” (1960) was literally set in motion in MoMA’s Sculpture Garden in 1960 and exploded: black smoke came out, paintings were created...and ultimately everything was destroyed. Being a fragment, the sculpture was really just what was left. My design was about what you don’t see; creation in the form of destruction. It was also about breaking down design, step by step, for my client to see.

The person living here is not your everyday person, and it’s definitely not your everyday design—but there are people who are willing to attempt living in something nontraditional. I like that it makes you think a little. By making somebody else think, I did my job.

I started with the notion of a solid white cube as representing the initial “solid idea” of the artist in the creation process. Then, as you walk through the space of the loft, the solid white cube breaks down into different configurations: you either have a corner missing, or a side missing, or even half the cube missing. For example, there’s a solid white cube at the beginning of the space that serves as storage and closets. There’s an L-shaped cube attached to the ceiling and wall that floats about a foot off the floor and serves as a sleeping area. And a larger cube on the top floor with its top open in a skylight serves as the master bedroom. The cubes define the entirety of space by making their mark wherever they land, much as Klein did with the women he used in his paintings.

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Dita Domonkos Fourth-year BFA student

What did you do before you came to NYSID? I didn’t have a visual arts background. I was in graduate school in Hawaii and got my master’s degree in educational psychology. I worked as the director of a social rehab clinic in New York that specialized in schizophrenia and manic depression. Later, I got a job doing documentary films for PBS; I also made medically oriented films for pharmaceutical companies so that physicians could understand new drugs and how they work. What made you choose interior design? One day, my brother bought land in the Bahamas. He said, I’ll build a house, if you decorate it. I found that challenging. I loved it, and here I am. I started out in the Basic, one-year program and I really liked it, so I applied for the two-year program and then the BFA program (which is what I’m in now). Why NYSID? I asked friends, and this was the school that was recommended the most. I liked it from the time I came here. Small classes of 12 or less. There’s a range of people of different ages and from different cultures and countries. The school is very concept oriented, as well as architecturally oriented. Here, you’re really becoming an architect of interior spaces. What are some things you discovered once you were at NYSID? At first I thought this would be a breeze. Then I found that every part was challenging—and I love challenge. I love the historical courses, learning the history of furnishings and decoration, the history of architecture and design, and of art. Ann-Seargent Wooster is teaching a course about art and society that brings the time and culture alive—what people wore, what the customs were.

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Since I didn’t have a visual arts background, learning how to draw freehand and on the computer was a challenge. To develop space and visualize it; that’s something I just have to keep working on. A lot of people fly though the 3-D Max and AutoCAD courses—they’ve grown up on the computer, even had them in high school. But this was a challenge for someone like myself. That said, the school has a tutor, every day, in the atelier to help people having trouble with their homework. It’s free. So, if you need someone to hold your hand, it’s there. What would you like to do after graduation? Right now, I’m interested in health care facilities and spas, largely because I’m interested in environments that foster and support transformation.

“The school is very concept oriented, as well as architecturally oriented. Here, you’re really becoming an architect of interior spaces.”


In Process: Dita Domonkos Tell us about the project you just completed for Contract Design III* with Instructor Robert Dadras—the design of a Rehabilitation Center for Wounded Soldiers Returning from Iraq and Afghanistan. We have to do case studies, and a great deal of research into the particular field of health care we’ve chosen—treatments, previously designed facilities. In my case, there was nothing—no case studies, no alreadyexisting facilities that focused on traumatic brain injury, post-traumatic stress disorder, and loss of limbs—three main injuries suffered by soldiers exposed to roadside and other bombs. These bombs tear limbs from the body; they rupture the connections of the brain; they rupture all sense of security and sense of self, so that the injuries are damaging both physically and psychologically, and often people suffer from more than one type of injury. This led me to make case-study trips to the Walter Reade Army Medical Center in Washington, D.C., which has the most advanced treatment for loss of limbs, as well as to various facilities in New York that treated brain injury. My design was really a synthesis of many sources. But eventually, I decided to make a very orderly plan. My thought was: these people are in the Army, and they’re used to order. I also chose to place tree forms throughout the space. The branching trees on the covered roof garden, as well as the sculptural trees in the reception area suggest connection and reconnection. And, in a central atrium that terminates in a dome on the roof, the columns resemble the top of a tree reaching to the sky. Trees find ways to grow and branch out when they are injured in harmony with nature. It’s a message to the patients in the hospital that ‘You can come out of this better than you were before.’ It’s about hope.

*Contract Design III is an advanced BFA course that focuses, in depth, over a single semester, on the design of a health care facility. Students may choose the modality of health care treatment they wish. student profiles

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Stefan Steil First-year MFA student

Where are you from, and what did you do before coming to NYSID? I’m from a small town outside Frankfurt, Germany. I was a textile designer, tailor, and pattern maker there and also worked in the retail and wholesale business. I had already received my “Schneidermeister”— Master Craftsman diploma in tailoring which, in Germany, means I had completed three years of study, and then learned the trade while on the job for three years. It’s quite similar to the centuries-old Guild system. Why did you first come to NYSID? I decided to shift my skills. I first got the idea to go into interior design while styling textiles for photo shoots for U.S. interior design magazines like Martha Stewart Living. I thought I should pursue a career that was more about how a whole space will feel, function, influence the user’s behavior. I looked at every single school that offered interior design in the City. My first impression of NYSID was that it was the most welcoming and supportive. Everyone was very helpful to me when I was learning about the school. And I liked the size of the campus. What are some of the things you’ve done and discovered here? While I was still a BFA student, I got a paid internship with Selldorf Architects. Annabelle Selldorf, the principal, trusted me and gave me a lot of responsibility to pull things off on my own—not only assist other designers , which I also did. After my internship was over, Selldorf hired me full time. I worked on three large projects, including the restoration and redesign of the Oak Room at the Plaza Hotel. I worked a great deal on the textiles and furniture, designing them using freehand sketching, AutoCAD, and Photoshop. Strike-offs and prototypes were produced; then the final designs chosen and ordered.

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Can you tell us more about what it’s like to work with an architectural firm while at NYSID? In a big firm like Selldorf, we’re involved in design on a very large scale. We’re designing things like custom light fixtures, furniture, textiles, rugs. I had to liaise with showrooms, for instance, and learn how to manage time on a project. I was learning things like whom I could call when I needed something—who my good trustworthy and reliable contacts were (electricians, contractors, woodworkers, fabric showrooms, furniture vendors), how fast they could get me things. Meanwhile, while at school, I also had three professors who mentored me and were very nurturing (Veronica Whitlock, Barbara Lowenthal, Scott Ageloff). If I needed to re-work an idea, Barbara [Lowenthal, MFA Area Coordinator] would keep saying to me, “Use the trace. Keep working freehand. Find a solution to your problem by sketching.” They saw me evolve.


In Process: Stefan Steil Tell us about the major hotel project you completed as part of your MFA Design Studio II course. Design Studio II focuses on one large project: a hotel with nine stories. We were given the floor plan and the program—all the requirements we must meet for our design, space-wise: the lobby, the restaurant, the tea room, spa, hotel rooms, and also private residences. The professor, Edwin Zawadski, is very conceptually driven. Usually, in classes, there’s a balance of concept, space planning, and finishes and materials, but his approach—so far out there, intellectual—was really a challenge for me, and I was excited about that. My idea was designing a hotel for a ‘global nomad’—which I think of as a person, or a group of people, who travel the world; they are fairly wealthy, they attend the same events (art openings, movie events, trade shows); the hotel would be a destination for them. They need to meet each other in places all over the world. I also refused to design a typical hotel room and tried to reinvent it by stripping it of any unnecessary clutter. My instructor asked me, “How could you connect these people on a three-dimensional level? And how can you respond to the fact that our culture is becoming more and more visually focused?” So I started sketching, and all of a sudden I had this idea of incorporating virtual reality into my project to connect all these people on different levels. So, for example, somebody could be in this hotel franchise in Sydney, Australia, but could interact with someone in the same hotel in NYC. I created the idea of slabs cutting vertically through the building (through the public and private spaces—the tea room, the hotel rooms, the restaurant) to enforce the sense of simultaneity. The slabs are actually made up of large screens, which function as outlets to the world. It’s almost like Facebook—but on a larger scale. A network you could belong to that would open up your private realm to all these other members. You could interact…you could leave a message. I also set it into the future, because I don’t think the technology is available yet.

“It was also clearly about thinking outside the box.”

As far as materials go, I chose an almost blank approach: plain stainless steel; mirrored surfaces; concrete—all to reinforce the futuristic aspect. The empty, serene interiors are supposed to provide a backdrop in this climate of excess. In a way, I think that the professor actually tried to prepare students for the real world with this project. So that you are able to back up your ideas and concepts, whatever your design, for a client. student profiles

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Evolution of Student Work First Year, First Semester

4.

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3.

1. Visual Concepts James Heffron

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2. Basic Drafting Laura Brown

evolution of student work

3. Color for Interiors Shar Wilson

5.

4. Historical Styles 1 Laurence Jansen

5. Color for Interiors From bottom up: Naomi Shiff Shar Wilson


First Year, Second Semester

4. 1.

5.

2. 3.

1. Perspective Sofia Juperius

2. Design Process Olga Bukur

3. Historical Styles II Anne Young

4. Materials & Methods of Construction Makiko Matsushima

5. Residential Design I Alejandra Munizaga

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Second Year, Third Semester

1.

2.

3.

1. Elements of Rendering Maria Fernandez Santamaria

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2. Construction Documents I Dallis Stamps

3. Residential Design II Jun Oh Kim


Second Year, Fourth Semester

2.

1.

3.

1. Lighting I Yumi Kagamihara

2. Construction Documents II Krissy Stecyk

3. Contract Design I Left to Right: Judith Looyestein Presley Becker

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Third Year, Fifth Semester

3.

2.

1.

1. Kitchen & Bath Design Mari Kuzumaki

2. Advanced Graphic Communications I Olivia Vien

3. Residential Design III Top Left, Right, Center: Daniel Park Sarah Muchow Tiffany Gomez*

*to read more about this project in-depth, visit p. 39 48

evolution of student work


Third Year, Sixth Semester

2.

3.

1.

1. Architectural Wooodwork Detailing Matvey Panov

2. Lighting II Matvey Panov & Daniela Palumbo

3. Contract Design II Top to Bottom: Valerie Wagner Yiannos Vrousgos* *to read about this project in-depth, visit p. 37

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Fourth Year, Seventh Semester

2.

1.

1. Furniture Design Top to Bottom: Brad Wheeler Elvina Kaplun

2. Contract Design III Top to Bottom: Daniel Park Dita Domonkos* *to read about this project in-depth, visit p. 41

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Fourth Year, Eighth Semester

BFA Thesis Yasuko Nishi, Museum of Japanese Contemporary Art

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MFA Design Studio I & II

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2.

1. Design Studio I Top to Bottom: Julia Asaputri Evgenia Nesterova

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2. Design Studio II Top to Bottom: Bimo Wibowo Julia Asaputri


MFA Furniture Design

Julia Tobin

Evgenia Nesterova

Evgenia Nesterova

Stefan Steil

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MFA Green Design

Sana Karray, Schematic Floor Plan

Stefan Steil, Solar Analysis

Bimo Wibowo, Solar Analysis

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evolution of student work

Monal Raje Examples of green features: Office chair is 99% recyclable Plants remove toxins from air Light fixtures use 33% less energy Ceiling tiles have 78% recycled content Bamboo flooring FSC certified Floor-to-ceiling glass for daylight Automated blinds Biomimicry carpet Biomorphic furniture Multipurpose furniture


MFA Thesis

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2. 1. Thesis Khun Hae Kim

2. Thesis Elaine Martos

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Alumni Profiles

Alberto Villalobos and Mercedes Desio AAS ’06, BFA ’08 Alberto Villalobos, who hails from Colombia, and Mercedes Desio, from Italy, met in the summer of 2003 while they were both students at NYSID—he, in the AAS program, and she in the BFA. By the time Alberto graduated in 2006 with an AAS (and Mercedes was still in her third year of the BFA) they had already begun to work together professionally, designing residential interiors. “We both love to travel, and we wanted to open up a store, to showcase what we like, what we know from around the world,” says Alberto, “and to also use as an office to do interior design out of.” The duo got commissions to do interiors for a beach house in Miami, as well as a 59th Street NYC apartment while still at NYSID. They’ve since continued to work on other residential commissions (the renovation of a lake house in New Jersey; a London apartment) both locally and abroad. “We always work together in a partnership—even on school projects, it wasn’t about competition, it was about improving each other’s work. One of our best clients right now was someone we went to school with who is doing a three-floor apartment in Paris. Our connections in school helped us a lot on the business side.” Alberto goes on to say about the NYSID, “The school gave me extremely strong notions about color, the way to undertand it and use it. Residential Design II with René Estacio—it changed the way I see design. And the professors, they go straight to the point—you don’t waste time. At NYSID, they always put a lot of emphasis on functionality, space planning; at the same time, they never forget about the finishes and fabrics and what makes the design attractive. They made sure you know how to make a design work.”

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Now open on E. 11th Street in Manhattan, Alberto and Mercedes’ store Etós reflects their eclectic taste with its mix of antique and contemporary furniture and furnishings: Pre-Columbian pottery; a chest of drawers from the Philippines in shagreen and bronze; custom-made cabinets from Brussels, and numerous other objects culled on forays made from North Carolina to Paris to Argentina. “Design is something that always evolves,” says Alberto, “and as designers we believe in the practicality of the space, the way you live in it, the way it’s laid out. We also have great relationships with our clients. Once you try to understand the way they live, what their needs are, a trust is developed, and you make the right decisions. The design just flows organically into the finished space, and nothing feels forced.”


“The School gave me extremely strong notions about color, the way to understand it and use it.�

alumni profiles

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Robert Kaner AAS ’02 Before he became a designer, Robert Kaner (NYSID AAS 2002) practiced corporate and securities law at New York law firm Simpson Thacher & Bartlett. He got his undergraduate degree in public policy from Princeton University and his law degree from Harvard. Kaner had always been interested in architecture, furniture, and design since he was young, and while at both Princeton and Harvard, he had pursued courses in art and architecture in addition to his fields of primary study. By 1999, Kaner decided to put aside law, and pursue his longstanding creative interests at NYSID. Says Kaner, “The school seemed to be very supportive of the needs of career changers like myself who had some maturity and life experience. I also found a nice mix of students with diverse backgrounds and experience levels to engage with. As for the faculty, I found my instructors without exception to be of outstanding caliber. I had attended some very strong academic institutions in the past, and I’d have to say that my teachers at NYSID were as talented, challenging, and committed as any of the schools I’d attended before.” Following graduation, Kaner began his professional design career in the interior design group at Steven Harris Architects (a Tribeca-based architecture firm). He later went on to establish his own firm, Robert Kaner Interior Design, specializing in high-end contemporary residential design. Kaner favors clean, modern lines in spaces that are inherently warm and livable.

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“I found it interesting, as I pursued my studio courses at NYSID, that a number of faculty members noticed my legal background in my work. I think that has to do with the way I break apart a design problem and put the pieces back to together. There’s a very rational, analytic approach to looking at design challenges and coming up with creative solutions.” Illustrated here is Kaner’s design for 100 United Nations Plaza Residence New York—the substantial renovation of a 1980s-style high-rise apartment. Originally the space favored small, separate rooms for cooking, dining, and living. These spaces were broken apart and reconfigured into an open plan with mid-century, modern elements. Kaner collaborated closely with an architect on this project—and together, the two took into consideration everything from surface finishes to lighting selections to the size of furniture groupings in determining how to configure the spaces. “It’s a complete design, with architecture and interior intertwined,” says Kaner. We also felt it was very important to bring the UN into the plan because of the apartment building’s identity and the prominent views of the UN from the apartment. A number of style choices within the apartment reference the sensibility of the UN’s design, and the slab-like proportions of the new divider cabinet we created to anchor the apartment even echoes the proportions of the main UN tower.”


United Nations Plaza Residence (Architect: Rafael Berkowitz, rb|architect)

“I found it interesting that a number of faculty members noticed my legal background in my work. I think that has to do with the way I break apart a design problem and put the pieces back to together. There’s a very rational, analytic approach to looking at design challenges and coming up with creative solutions.�

alumni profiles

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Susan Nagle BFA ’97 Susan B. Nagle received her BFA from NYSID in 1997. She is a partner in the architecture and design firm of Bentel & Bentel. She and her partners at Bentel & Bentel were inducted into the prestigious Hospitality Design Platinum Circle in 2007—the hospitality design world’s hall of fame. A variety of Bentel & Bentel’s institutional, hospitality, and residential works have been featured in magazines like Metropolis, Interior Design, Architectural Record, and Wallpaper magazine. Says Nagle, “I enjoy hospitality design tremendously. Because of the wide array of design and cultural issues surrounding every project, we always engage each one with heightened intensity and awareness, whether it is a restaurant or a hotel. For many of our hotel projects in particular, we investigate new ways to adapt a high-end residential ambiance to a communal setting while satisfying all of the baseline code and maintenance criteria. It’s extremely challenging, and frequently fast paced.” While at NYSID, Nagle connected with courses like Historical Styles, as well as her residential and contract design studios. “It was in Residential Design II* that the light bulb turned on. I realized that everything that I had done up until that point, everything I had been taught, melded together, and I got it—it all clicked. That gave me a freedom which I never had before. Now it was truly possible for me to tap into my core creativity.”

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Illustrated here is Bentel & Bentel’s design for award-winning Chef Tom Colicchio’s restaurant Craft in Los Angeles, which Nagle and her partners created with Colicchio’s cooking philosophy in mind. Colicchio respects the simplicity and integrity of individual ingredients and flavors, uniting them in what he feels is the “highest form of uncomplicated culinary craftsmanship,” and serving them in the same copper pans in which they were cooked. Bentel & Bentel approached this idea “by using a limited set of architectural materials and the simplest craftsmanship required to join them,” states Nagle. The overall result gives us a clean-lined yet lush space, one in which we are free to admire individual elements—a standing-seam bronze wall, existing columns in sandblasted bronze plate, the cool crisp transparency of a blackened steel and glass wine case balanced by the warm old-growth white oak flooring and custom-designed teak and walnut millwork. These elements anchor the patrons’ sensual experience of the main dining room. “My mentor at NYSID was my Residential Design II professor Anne Korman,” says Nagle. “In class, Professor Korman would critique the students’ work individually, and I would trail alongside listening and observing intently. By doing this, I absorbed so much. This positively made me a better designer.” *Residential Design II is a second-year AAS and BFA class.


The overall result gives us a clean-lined yet lush space, one in which we are free to admire individual elements.

Craft, Los Angeles, California (Architect: Peter A. Bentel, AIA, Bentel & Bentel) alumni profiles

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David Scott BFA ’91 Before he came to NYSID in 1987, David Scott had already received a BS in economics, and even worked in hotel and real estate sales. “I remember a drawing class at NYSID vividly,” relates Scott of those early days in his change of careers. “It was a day that we visited the Metropolitan Museum and were drawing the Egyptian Temple of Dendur. I put my pencil to the page, and it’s hard to describe, but it was a moment in which everything fell into place. After all, this was a second career for me. But somehow, at that moment, I knew I really was an artist.” Scott’s design career began while he was still in school. “I was hired to do three jobs in my senior year, and opened my own business while still a student,” says Scott. “There were a lot of sleepless nights. Every thought that came to me, I would write it down—there were so many details. But I figured, ‘sink or swim.’ So I jumped in.” Now Scott (principal of David Scott Interiors, LTD) is a renowned designer of high-end residential interiors. His work has been featured in publications ranging from the New York Times Magazine to New York Spaces to Interior Design, and his firm has contributed to such prestigious showhouses as the Hamptons Designer Showhouse and the ASID showhouse at the Ansonia. Scott’s residential work is client centered and architecturally savvy, with an eye toward the unique requirements of a site.

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Illustrated here is his design for a residence in Southampton, situated between the Atlantic and Shinnecock Bay. At once livable and monumental, the residence (with its flexible living spaces, home theater, staff quarters, and dramatic roof terrace) was the product of a three-year collaboration among Scott, his client, and the residence’s architect. As a result, there’s an amazing overall harmony to the space. Vertical and horizontal lines work in concert; areas of color punctuate the assertive clarity of pristine white; and the “built” and the “designed” environments seamlessly merge. “It was a very team-oriented project, in which I was involved from the ground up,” says Scott. “My philosophy was, and is, that really good design is site specific. So the cues I took were from the place and the family that lives there. As an artist, you’re inspired by nature and the life of the people who are going to inhabit the space. Everything comes out of that.”


“As an artist, you’re inspired by nature and the life of the people who are going to inhabit the space. Everything comes out of that.”

Residence, Southampton, NY (Architect: Alexander Gorlin Architects) alumni profiles

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Student Statistics Who Are Our Students?*

AG E S

G ender Undergrad

ethnic identity

Graduate

Undergrad

Undergrad

Graduate

Graduate

Male

10%

20%

18-25

35%

30%

White

59%

49%

Female

90%

80%

26-45

52%

65%

Asian

11%

20%

46+

13%

5%

Hispanic of any race

10%

4%

28

Black or African American

4%

4%

American Indian or Alaskan Native

0%

0%

Native Hawaiin or Pacific Islander

0%

0%

Two or more races

0%

0%

Average Age 32

G e o graphic o rigin Undergrad

Graduate

New York

70%

68%

Nonresident Alien

6%

13%

Mid-Atlantic (incl. NY)

82%

74%

Race and Ethnicity Unknown

10%

10%

New England

5%

5%

South

2%

3%

Midwest

1%

0%

West

2%

2%

Southwest

1%

2%

International

7%

14%

FALL 2011 Admissi ons Profile Undergrad

Applications

502

412

Admitted

267

187

Enrolled

140

78

Total Enrollment

727

*Profile of the 2010 incoming class

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student life

Graduate


Student Life

New York City—We Use it! What you do outside of the New York School of Interior Design’s classrooms is almost as important to your education as what you do in them. Our Student Activities Office is intent on making sure that your experience here is a good one.  From our “Fall Kickoff” party to movie nights on the roof, there are great things happening right on campus.  And then there are the things that can only happen in NYC:  trips to Broadway shows, ice skating in Central Park, boat cruises around the Statue of Liberty, and much more!  Student Activities will give you numerous chances to see the sights, be part of the NYSID community, and establish lifelong friendships.  It’s about getting involved, having fun, and making friends!

student life

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International Advisory Board Stanley Abercrombie Christian P. Ă rkay-Leliever Robin Klehr Avia Jeannie Bochette William N. Breger Michael Bruno Mario Buatta Clodagh Birch Coffey Murray B. Douglas David Anthony Easton Anne Eisenhower Mica Ertegun Mariette Himes Gomez Michael Graves Albert Hadley Gerald A. Holbrook Douglas Tong Hsu Thomas Jayne Wolfram Koeppe Jack Lenor Larsen Michael Manes Charlotte Moss Barbara Ostrom Sylvia Owen Charles Pavarini, III James Stewart Polshek John Saladino Lady Henrietta Spencer-Churchill Alexandra Stoddard Adam D. Tihany Bunny Williams Vicente Wolf

Board of Trustees Patricia M. Sovern, Chairwoman Christopher J. Cyphers, NYSID President Elaine Wingate Conway Alexander C. Cortesi Matthew DeMarco, Esq., General Counsel and Assistant Secretary Jill H. Dienst James P. Druckman Ross J. Francis Elliot H. Greene Jodie W. King Anne Korman Susan B. Nagle David L. Scott Terry Kleinberg, Faculty Trustee Arthur King Satz, President Emeritus

Accreditation Chartered by the Board of Regents of the University of the State of New York in 1924, NYSID is authorized by the Board of Regents to confer the degrees of Associate in Applied Science in Interior Design (AAS), Bachelor of Fine Arts in Interior Design (BFA), Bachelor of Arts in the History of the Interior and the Decorative Arts (BA), Master of Fine Arts in Interior Design (MFA-1 and MFA-2), Master of Professional Studies in Sustainable Interior Environments (MPS-S), and Master of Professional Studies in Interior Lighting Design (MPS-L). NYSID is an accredited institutional member of the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD). In addition, the BFA program is accredited by the Council for Interior Design Accreditation (CIDA), which is recognized by the Council on Post-Secondary Accreditation and the United States Department of Education as the sole accrediting agency for post-secondary interior design programs. As of June 24, 2011, the New York School of Interior Design is a Candidate for Accreditation by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education, 3624 Market Street, Philadelphia PA 19104 (267) 284-5000. Candidate for Accreditation is a status of affiliation with a regional accrediting commission which indicates that an institution has achieved recognition and is progressing toward, but is not assured of, accreditation. It has provided evidence of sound planning, seems to have the resources to implement the plans, and appears to have the potential for obtaining its goals within a reasonable time. Note Program requirements and policies specified in this publication are effective as of the date of publication and supersede those published previously. The college reserves the exclusive right to change any policies or provisions contained in this publication without prior notice and to comply with any applicable law, rule, or regulation. Students are responsible for knowledge of information contained in the NYSID Catalog and Student Handbook. Failure to read either publication does not excuse students from the requirements of the policies and procedures of the New York School of Interior Design.

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Undergraduate Programs BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IN INTERIOR DESIGN

The Bachelor of Fine Arts in Interior Design degree program provides students with the professional-level preparation to become practicing interior designers. In combination with the required professional experience, the curriculum satisfies the educational requirements for membership in national and local interior design associations and allows graduates to sit for the qualifying exams for interior design certification in many states. The mission of this CIDA-accredited professional-level program is to prepare students for full participation in the profession of interior design today and in the future. It combines a comprehensive interior design curriculum and a broad-based education in the liberal arts. With a focus on the development of practical and critical thinking skills, it is structured to produce graduates who are culturally, socially, and historically aware, and who are able to continue on a path of lifelong learning. The program’s emphasis on creativity, effective verbal and graphic communication skills, technical proficiency, and sustainability ensures graduates have the knowledge and skills to create safe and pleasing interior environments and to grow with the profession. Admission to the BFA program requires submission of a portfolio and formal acceptance. Students are subject to the requirements stated in the current catalog at the time of their acceptance. Students may study full time or on a part-time basis. The 132-credit BFA degree is composed of 87 professional credits and 34 liberal arts general education credits plus 11 elective credits. All courses must be taken in the proper sequence. Course credits earned in NYSID’s Basic Interior Design or AAS program are transferable to the BFA upon formal acceptance. Of the 132 credits required for a BFA degree, a minimum of 66 credits must be taken at NYSID, of which 60 credits must be in professional and design history courses. The residency requirement includes Professional Practice II (328), Residential Design III (334), Contract Design II (386), Thesis Preparation (417), Contract Design III (486), and Thesis (487). The last 26 credits prior to receiving a BFA degree must be taken at NYSID. The complete BFA curriculum is listed following the undergraduate program descriptions.

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE IN INTERIOR DESIGN

The pre-professional program in interior design prepares students to be design assistants in residential and commercial interior design offices, or in the interior design department of an architectural firm. Students master fundamental skills in drawing, hand and digital drafting, color, history of design, materials and methods of construction, building systems, and professional practice, along with a broad range of liberal arts courses.

Students apply their skills and knowledge in several design studio classes covering a range of design project types. The curriculum satisfies a portion of the educational requirements of the national qualifying examination for interior design certification in many jurisdictions. Admission to the AAS program requires submission of a portfolio and formal acceptance. The student is subject to the requirements stated in the current catalog at the time of acceptance. The pre-professional AAS degree is composed of 66 credits which can be completed in four semesters of full-time study; however, students may develop an individualized program of study on a part-time basis. Of the total credits, 46 are required in the professional sequence and 18 in the liberal arts plus 2 elective credits. Of the 66 credits required for an AAS degree, a minimum of 33 credits must be taken at NYSID of which 30 credits must be in professional and design history courses. The residency requirement includes Residential Design II (234) and Contract Design I (286). Courses are to be taken in the proper sequence. The last 16 credits prior to receiving an AAS degree must also be taken at NYSID. All 66 credits required for the AAS degree may be applied to the BFA program upon acceptance as a transfer student into that program. The complete AAS curriculum is listed following the undergraduate program descriptions.

BASIC INTERIOR DESIGN

The Basic Interior Design program provides an introduction to the field of interior design with emphasis on fundamental skills and knowledge in interior design, architecture, and the visual and decorative arts. Introductory courses focus on drawing, design concepts, and design history, building a foundation-level understanding of the technical and aesthetic principles essential to understanding space planning, color, drafting, materials, and finishes. All courses are taught by a select faculty of interior designers, architects, artists, and art historians. The Basic Interior Design program is composed of 24 credits and is the foundation of the college’s undergraduate degree programs. It prepares students to continue in one of NYSID’s degree programs or to pursue a career in sales or other areas related to the interior design industry. Admission to the Basic Interior Design program requires formal acceptance. No portfolio is required to be considered for this program. The student is subject to the requirements stated in the current catalog at the time of acceptance. Of the 24 credits required for Basic Interior Design, a minimum of 18 credits of professional and design history course work must be taken at NYSID. The last 12 credits prior to completion must be taken at NYSID. All 24 credits required for the BID certificate may be applied to the AAS or BFA programs upon acceptance into either of these programs. AAS and BFA portfolio requirements can be met by submitting studio work from BID courses. The complete Basic Interior Design curriculum is listed following the undergraduate program descriptions. u n d e r g r a d u at e p ro g r a m s o f s t u dy

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Undergraduate Curriculum BACHELOR OF ARTS IN THE HISTORY OF THE INTERIOR & THE DECORATIVE ARTS

Bachelor of Fine Arts in Interior Design (132 credits)

The NYSID Bachelor of Arts in the History of the Interior and the Decorative Arts program provides students with an undergraduate liberal arts degree in art history with a special focus on the interior environment and the objects it contains. The curriculum consists of a strong general education foundation, which includes courses in English composition, math, science, the humanities, and advanced seminars on the history of art, design, architecture, and the interior environment, including the decorative arts. Students also enjoy a significant hands-on studio component intended to give design historians the language and feel of the creative process. Other important features of the program include a required internship, a course in business practices, and study abroad opportunities. Graduates are prepared to work in museums and galleries, showrooms, design media and journalism, and other design industry establishments, or to seek advanced degrees in historic preservation, art and design history, interior design, architecture, and other disciplines related to the built environment.

First Semester — 16 Credits 101 Historical Styles I (2)* 119 Textiles for Interiors (2) 128 Basic Drafting (3) 141 Color for Interiors (2) 150 English Composition I (3)* 171 Basic Mathematics (2)* 180 Visual Concepts (2)

The 120-credit BA degree is composed of 37 liberal arts general education credits and 16 design studio credits, 56 major area lecture and seminar credits, 8 elective credits, and a 3-credit required internship. Admission to the BA in the History of the Interior and the Decorative Arts program requires formal acceptance. In order to graduate, the student is subject to the requirements stated in the catalog at the time of acceptance. Of the 120 credits required for the BA degree, a minimum of 60 credits must be taken at NYSID, all of which must be in required major area courses. The residency requirement includes Introduction to the History and Theory of Design (211), History of American Building Materials and Technology (287), Systems of Ornamental Design (260), Introduction to Arts Management (348), Design Theory (355), Senior Project Preparation (415), Senior Project (485), Design History Seminar (318), and Internship (490). The last 24 credits prior to receiving the degree must be taken at NYSID. Advanced Standing Option Graduates of the BA in the History of the Interior and the Decorative Arts may apply to the college’s first-professional Master of Fine Arts in Interior Design degree program (MFA-1) with one year of advanced standing. Admission to the MFA-1 program allows the candidate to complete the full-time, three-year MFA-1 degree in two years (four semesters and two summers). Admission to the MFA-1 program requires the submission of a portfolio and formal acceptance. To be admitted with advanced standing applicants must have completed the BA with a 3.0 GPA or higher and have taken both Materials & Methods of Construction (187) and Codes (230). Study in the MFA-1 program with advanced standing begins during the summer session and consists of Interior Design Studio II (538) and Construction Documents I (532). 70

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Second Semester — 17 Credits 102 Historical Styles II (2)* 134 Residential Design I (3) 135 Perspective (2) 160 English Composition II (3)* 175 Cultural Anthropology (2)* 182 Design Process (3) 187 Materials & Methods of Construction (2) Third Semester — 16 Credits 111 Modern Architecture and Design I (2) 132 Construction Documents I (3) 165 Environmental Psychology (2)* 212 Elements of Rendering (2) 230 Codes (2) 234 Residential Design II (3) 288 Building Systems (2) Fourth Semester — 17 Credits 112 Modern Architecture and Design II (2) 228 Professional Practice I (2) 236 Construction Documents II (3) 271 Environmental Science (2)* 283 Lighting I (3) 286 Contract Design I (3) — Professional or liberal arts elective (2) Fifth Semester — 16 Credits 201 Art and Society I: Pre-19th Century (3)* 203 Humanities I (3)* 231 Kitchen and Bath Design (3) 332 Advanced Graphic Communications I (3) 334 Residential Design III (4) Sixth Semester — 17 Credits 202 Art and Society II: 19th and 20th Centuries (3)* 204 Humanities II (3)* 340 Architectural Woodwork Detailing (3) 383 Lighting II (3)


386 —

Contract Design II (3) Professional elective (2)

Seventh Semester — 16 Credits 305 Intensive French (4)* or 307 Intensive Italian (4)* 328 Professional Practice II (2) 417 Thesis Preparation (1) 442 Furniture Design (3) 486 Contract Design III (4) — Design history elective (2) Eighth Semester — 17 Credits 355 Design Theory (2) 487 Thesis (4) — Design history elective (2) — Professional or liberal arts elective (9)

Associate in Applied Science in Interior Design (66 credits) First Semester — 16 Credits 101 Historical Styles I (2)* 119 Textiles for Interiors (2) 128 Basic Drafting (3) 141 Color for Interiors (2) 150 English Composition I (3)* 171 Basic Mathematics (2)* 180 Visual Concepts (2) Second Semester — 17 Credits 102 Historical Styles II (2)* 134 Residential Design I (3) 135 Perspective (2) 160 English Composition II (3)* 175 Cultural Anthropology (2)* 182 Design Process (3) 187 Materials & Methods of Construction (2) Third Semester — 16 Credits 111 Modern Architecture and Design I (2) 132 Construction Documents I (3) 165 Environmental Psychology (2)* 212 Elements of Rendering (2) 230 Codes (2) 234 Residential Design II (3) 288 Building Systems (2) Fourth Semester — 17 Credits 112 Modern Architecture and Design II (2) 228 Professional Practice I (2) 236 Construction Documents II (3)

271 283 286 —

Environmental Science (2)* Lighting I (3) Contract Design I (3) Professional or liberal arts elective (2)

Basic Interior Design (24 credits) First Semester — 12 Credits 101 Historical Styles I (2)* 128 Basic Drafting (3) 141 Color for Interiors (2) 150 English Composition I (3)* 180 Visual Concepts (2) Second Semester — 12 Credits 102 Historical Styles II (2)* 119 Textiles for Interiors (2) 134 Residential Design I (3) 135 Perspective (2) 182 Design Process (3) *Liberal Arts courses

BA in the History of the Interior and the Decorative Arts (120 credits) First Semester — 16 Credits 101 Historical Styles I (2) 119 Textiles for Interiors (2) 128 Basic Drafting (3) 141 Color for Interiors (2) 150 English Composition I (3) 171 Basic Mathematics (2) 180 Visual Concepts (2) Second Semester — 15 Credits 102 Historical Styles II (2) 134 Residential Design I (3) 160 English Composition II (3) 175 Cultural Anthropology (2) 182 Design Process (3) 211 Introduction to the History and Theory of Design (2) Third Semester — 15 Credits 111 Modern Architecture and Design I (2) 165 Environmental Psychology (2) 168 Economics of Taste and Style (2) 197 The Golden Mean as a Design Tool (1) 201 Art and Society I (3) 270 Topics in World Literature (3) 245 Photography for Interior Designers (2) u n d e r g r a d u at e p ro g r a m s o f s t u dy

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Fourth Semester — 13 + 2 Credits 112 Modern Architecture and Design II (2) 202 Art and Society II (3) 271 Environmental Science (2) — Design History A1 (2) — Design History B1 (2) 287 History of American Building Materials and Technology (2) 199 Study Abroad (2) (taken in Summer) Fifth Semester — 15 Credits 166 Art and Antique Appraising I (2) 203 Humanities I (3) — Design History A2 (2) — Design History B2 (2) 260 Systems of Ornamental Design (2) 305 Foreign Language I–Intensive French (4) Sixth Semester — 13 + 2 Credits 167 Art and Antique Appraising II (2) 204 Humanities II (3) — Design History A3 (2) — Design History B3 (2) 307 Foreign Language II – Intensive Italian (4) _ Elective(s) (2) Seventh Semester — 16 Credits — Design History A4 (2) — Design History B4 (2) 348 Introduction to Arts Management (2) 355 Design Theory (2) 370 Historic Preservation (2) (taken in summer) 415 Senior Project Preparation (2) — Elective(s) (4) Eighth Semester — 13 Credits 318 Design History Seminar (2) — Design History A5 (2) 485 Senior Project (4) 490 Internship (3) — Elective(s) (2)

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NOTE: Students must take a total of 18 credits in courses designated as Design History. Group A and Group B courses are offered on a rotating basis. Group A 205 208 215 225 226 315

Antique Furniture and Accessories (2) Furnishings and Interiors in America 1700-1810 (2) The Beaux Arts Tradition in America (2) 17th and 18th Century Interiors (2) 18th and 19th Century Ceramics (2) History of Building Types (2)

Group B 216 275 276 316 317 325 326

20th Century Design (2) The Dwelling from a Global Perspective (2) The Dwelling in the West (2) Great Women Designers (2) Topics in Non-Western Art and Design (2) Landscape Design in History (2) History of Urban Form (2)


Undergraduate Course Descriptions General Education Liberal Arts 101 HISTORICAL STYLES I Lecture Credits 2; No Prerequisites This course is an introductory overview of the history of design in furniture, interiors, and architecture from the ancient world through 1820. Lecture, readings, and field trips focus on the development of major forms, period styles, and ornament from ancient Egypt, Greece, and Rome through the Renaissance, Baroque, Rococo, and Neoclassical eras. 102 HISTORICAL STYLES II Lecture Credits 2; Prerequisite: 101 The second half of the introductory survey, this course focuses on the history of Western furniture, interiors, and architecture in the 19th and 20th centuries. Styles examined include 19th-century revival styles, Arts and Crafts, Art Deco, European and American Modernism, and the International Style. 150 ENGLISH COMPOSITION I Lecture credits 3; Prerequisite: Placement test This course focuses on the development of college-level writing skills. Discussions and coursework include reading assignments, idea development, and sentence structure. By using short essays on current design and other relevant topics as models, students learn to write grammatically correct prose. 151 ENGLISH COMPOSITION I/ESL Lecture credits 3; Prerequisite: Placement test This English writing course has the same focus as course 150 while being specifically designed to meet the special needs and concerns of students whose native language is not English. 160 ENGLISH COMPOSITION II Lecture credits 3; Prerequisite: 150 or 151 or placement test Students continue to develop their writing skills and learn how to write convincing, well-planned research papers. Students become familiar with the library resources needed to conduct research and learn how to focus on a topic, organize material, write a compelling description, and compare and contrast two objects or ideas. 165 ENVIRONMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY Lecture credits 2; Prerequisite: 150 or 151 This introduction to environmental psychology explores human interaction with the social and physical environment. It examines perception and cognition, cultural differences in space use, proxemics, and the role of values in the design of the environment. 171 BASIC MATHEMATICS Lecture credits 2; Prerequisite: Placement test Fundamental concepts of mathematics are introduced through a review

of basic arithmetic, algebra, geometry, and trigonometry. Emphasis is on topics with particular application to design, such as patterns, perspective, ratio, and proportion, imperial and metric measurement, and the Golden Mean. 175 CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY Lecture credits 2; Prerequisite: 150 or 151 The global diversity of social organization is explored through ethnology, the anthropological study of socioeconomic systems, and cultural heritage. Students will explore cultural aspects such as gender, labor, exchange, and religion though readings and discussions, and examine detailed views of various cultural aspects within a whole culture that ultimately bind a society together. 201 ART AND SOCIETY I: Pre-19th Century Lecture credits 3; Prerequisite: 160 This course examines the development of painting and sculpture beginning from the fall of the Roman Empire through the masters Bernini, Rembrandt, Vermeer, and Velasquez, to the rise of Neo-classicism and Romanticism. Characteristics of artistic styles and the changing role of the artist are viewed in a social and historical context. 202 ART AND SOCIETY II: 19th and 20th Centuries Lecture credits 3; Prerequisite: 160 This course ranges from Realism, Impressionism, and Post-Impressionism to the frontiers of abstraction. The effect of political movements on early 19th century art is examined, as well as the profound impact of the technological revolution at the turn of the century on early 20th-century art movements such as Cubism. 203 HUMANITIES I Lecture credits 3; Prerequisite: 160 This course explores the development of Western culture from the Ice Age through the Late Middle Ages by examining philosophy, religion, aesthetic theory, economics, and politics and their ideological, chronological, and technical implications. Students will read texts from leading literary and philosophical works to gain insight into the ancient world. 204 HUMANITIES II Lecture credits 3; Prerequisite: 160 The continuation of Humanities I, this course explores the development of Western culture from the Early Renaissance through the present day by examining philosophy, religion, aesthetic theory, economics, and politics and their ideological, chronological, and technical implications. Students will read texts from leading literary and philosophical works to gain insight into the modern world. 270 TOPICS IN WORLD LITERATURE Lecture credits 3; Elective; Prerequisite: 160 This course satisfies the advanced writing requirement for students who have met the English Composition I requirement through placement u n d e r g r a d u at e p ro g r a m s o f s t u dy

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testing. Changing topics may include contemporary American literature, Shakespeare, literature of the Enlightenment, Romanticism, or significant non-Western works. 271 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE Lecture credits 2; Prerequisite: 160, 171 This course deals with issues such as the disruption of basic ecosystems by human intervention; demography, overpopulation, and hunger; atmospheric and climatic change due to global warming and depletion of the ozone layer; the impact of urbanization on agriculture; the destruction of rainforests and its implication for future systems; resource depletion, energy use, and sustainability; and how public and governmental decisions shape environmental policies. 305 INTENSIVE FRENCH Lecture credits 4; No prerequisites Intensive French begins with basic vocabulary and grammar and continues through more advanced communication skills. Conversations use professional design terminology and references, enabling students to become familiar with significant developments in French art, architecture, and design. No prior knowledge of French is required. 307 INTENSIVE ITALIAN Lecture credits 4; No prerequisites Intensive Italian begins with basic vocabulary and grammar and continues through more advanced communication skills. Conversations use professional design terminology and references, enabling students to become familiar with significant developments in Italian art, architecture, and design. No prior knowledge of Italian is required.

Design History and Theory 111 MODERN ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN I Lecture credits 2; Prerequisites: 102, 150, 160 The sources of modern architecture and design are explored from the 18th-century designers Adam, Soane, and Ledoux through the 19th century and the work of the eclectic architects. The course examines how architects used stylistic elements of the past and adapted them to solve modern design problems. Each revival style is traced to the original era to explore the meaning of the adaptations. 112 MODERN ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN II Lecture credits 2; Prerequisites: 102, 150, 160 The second part of the overview of modern architecture, this course focuses on the period 1890 to the present in Europe and America. Styles and movements covered include the American Beaux Arts, the Chicago School, Art Nouveau, Vienna Secession, Futurism, Expressionism, Art Moderne, the Modern Movement, and Post-Modernism.

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199 STUDY ABROAD PROGRAM Lecture credits 2; Elective; Prerequisite: 102 This two-week study tour will visit significant sites looking at both historical and contemporary installations. Emphasis is on historical and stylistic analysis. Students will do preparatory readings, keep a journal/ sketchbook, and produce a final paper. Locations have included Spain, Scandinavia, London, Rome, Paris, and Istanbul and their environs. Students may elect at the time of registration to take this course pass/fail only if it is not required by their program. 205 ANTIQUE FURNITURE AND ACCESSORIES Lecture credits 2; Elective; Prerequisite: 102 or equivalent Illustrated lectures and first-hand observation will provide students with an understanding of how period styles have been interpreted in the decorative arts and have evolved from the Renaissance through the beginning of the 19th century. Course material focuses on objects in ceramic, metal, and glass; lamps and lighting fixtures; and furniture and will demonstrate the importance of these objects in reflecting the forms and ornaments of each particular style. All students meet with the instructor for the first session at NYSID; the remaining classes are held at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. 208 FURNISHINGS AND INTERIORS IN AMERICA 1700–1810 Lecture credits 2; Elective; Prerequisite: 102 or equivalent This course examines the origins of design in America in the 18th century, tracing its development from a dominant English aesthetic to the beginnings, after 1776, of an individual national style. It will address the social and cultural context of objects and interiors as well as their visual characteristics. Objects will be examined in terms of craftsmanship and quality of manufacture. The course will address issues of materials and form as well as concepts of revival, reproduction, and restoration. All students meet with instructor for the first session at NYSID; the remaining classes are held at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. 211 INTRODUCTION TO THE THEORY AND HISTORY OF DESIGN Lecture Credits 2; Prerequisites: 101, 150, or 151 This course introduces students to ideas and approaches to the study of design history and theories with particular emphasis on the interior environment. Through a combination of in-class lectures, discussions, guest speakers, and numerous site visits and tours, students learn about the wide-ranging nature of the field. Students explore different ways of reading the built environment through firsthand observation and the use of historical documents. Emphasis is placed on methodology, terminology, and understanding of broad historical frameworks. 215 THE BEAUX ARTS TRADITION IN AMERICA Lecture credits 2; Elective; Prerequisites: 111 or 112 Through a series of lectures and walking tours, this course examines how Beaux Arts architects created both public and private environments in America. Lectures focus on the golden era of American domestic design pioneered by Richard Morris Hunt in the 1870s and ’80s, developed in the interiors of Stanford White and Elsie de Wolfe, and showcased in


American mansions like Vizcaya and Beauport. Students will visit both private and public interiors and explore a variety of Beaux Arts building types, including the row house and the department store. 216 20th CENTURY DESIGN Lecture credits 2; Elective; Prerequisites: 111 or 112 This course will examine the major design movements of the 20th century and the designers and architects who shaped the development of the contemporary modern aesthetic. Beginning with Art Nouveau and the Arts and Crafts movement, it will examine such critical influences as the Wiener Werkstatte, the Bauhaus, Midcentury Modernism, Postmodernism, Minimalism, and the global design of the recent avant-garde. 225 17th AND 18th CENTURY INTERIORS Lecture credits 2; Elective; Prerequisite: 102 or equivalent This course focuses on French and English design. Furniture styles from shops founded in the reign of Louis XIV and 18th-century products of rare quality and detail still influence design style today. A focus on two centers—London and Paris—helps students gain insight into fashionable design of the period and its enduring influence in the 19th and 20th centuries. All students meet with the instructor for the first session at NYSID; remaining classes are held at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. 226 18th AND 19th CENTURY CERAMICS Lecture credits 2; Elective; Prerequisite: 102 Exploring the broad range of ceramics produced during this period, from hand-formed pots to exquisite tableware and serving pieces, this course will introduce students to the history of porcelain from its origins in China to its discovery in Europe in the early 18th century. It will provide an introduction to the nature of different types of ceramics, how they were formed and decorated, and how they varied according to the material, the country of origin, and the particular style of the time. All students meet with instructor for the first session at NYSID; the remaining classes are held at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. 275 THE DWELLING FROM A GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE Lecture credits 2; Elective; Prerequisites: 111 or 112 This course concentrates on the history of shelter outside the Western mainstream. Students will have the opportunity to study typical examples from prehistoric times through the present, including residences found in Asia, Africa, and the Americas, establishing the evolution of shelter to permanent dwellings. Lectures will focus on specific geographic areas, their houses, and interiors, as well as the cultural forces that determine their form. 276 THE DWELLING IN THE WEST: A Survey of Vernacular Traditions Lecture credits 2; Elective; Prerequisites: 111 or 112 Students will consider the evolution of the vernacular dwellings in North America and Europe beginning with the Renaissance. Lectures will cover a broad range of urban and suburban forms, from the town house to the apartment building, as well as farm dwellings, rural cottages, and tract houses. Class discussions will explore the importance of industrialization, mass production, and the role played by commercial developers and the media.

287 HISTORY OF AMERICAN BUILDING MATERIALS AND TECHNOLOGY Lecture Credits 2; Prerequisite: 111; Corequisite: 112 This course surveys the evolution of materials and techniques used in the production of American interiors, including architectural detailing and decorative elements, from colonial times to the present. Each major building technology is explored using a historical perspective, from its pre-American roots to its further development in America. Through this course students acquire a comprehensive knowledge of interior construction terminologies, historical methods of interior construction, and a detailed understanding of interior construction and finish materials that have been used. 315 HISTORY OF BUILDING TYPES Lecture credits 2; Elective; Prerequisites: 111, 112 This seminar will investigate the development of one or more building types and their interiors. Semester topics may focus on libraries, clubs, museums, hotels, or government buildings. Each building type is examined in depth through lectures and site visits. 316 GREAT WOMEN DESIGNERS Lecture credits 2; Elective; Prerequisites: 111, 112 This course explores the significant contributions of women to the fields of architecture and design. Important contemporary and historical figures such as Edith Wharton, Elsie de Wolfe, Eileen Gray, Julia Morgan, Andrée Putman, Gae Aulenti, and Denise Scott Brown will be discussed. 317 TOPICS IN NON-WESTERN ART AND DESIGN Lecture credits 2; Elective; Prerequisites: 111, 112 This course introduces some of the significant traditions of art, architecture, and design in the non-Western world and their influence on Western architecture and design. It will provide students with an understanding of the historical background of each culture, major building forms, types of furnishings and interiors, and distinctive forms of ornament. Changing topics may include Islamic, Indian, Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Mayan, and Native American design. 318 DESIGN HISTORY SEMINAR Lecture credits 2; Elective; Prerequisites: 111, 112 This seminar is an in-depth study of a special topic related to the history of design and decorative arts. The course is structured around a set of lectures, class discussions, core readings, and field trips. Students are required to develop a creative project or write a research paper related to the seminar topic. 325 LANDSCAPE DESIGN IN HISTORY Lecture credits 2; Elective; Prerequisites: 111, 112 This course explores the concepts, principles, and methods of landscape design in a historical perspective with special focus on the relationships between landscape and interior and exterior architecture. The shape and meaning of gardens in each society will be examined as well as analyzing what they say about each era’s philosophical and spiritual concepts of nature. u n d e r g r a d u at e p ro g r a m s o f s t u dy

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326 History of Urban Form Lecture credits 2; Prerequisites: 111, 112, 211 This course surveys urban form from its origins in the ancient world to present day urbanism as well as analyzes ideal cities. Architecture, public space, city planning, and public works are considered in relation to the social, political, economic, and religious context of the city. 355 DESIGN THEORY Lecture credits 2; Prerequisites: 111, 112, 286 This seminar is an in-depth analysis of the relationship among theory, practice, and socio-historical considerations in architecture and interior design. Beginning with a discussion of the various approaches to and functions of “theory,” both traditional and critical, the course focuses on a close reading of major primary texts by design theorists from Claude Perrault to Le Corbusier. These theories and the built works they inform will be analyzed in their appropriate historical and critical contexts. Through lecture and discussion of assigned readings, the course will stress the importance of theory for the achievement of a socially appropriate and responsible design.

Lectures 114 INTRODUCTION TO SUSTAINABILITY AND THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT Lecture Credits 2; No prerequisites This survey course introduces students to the principles and concepts of sustainability and provides the context for design decisions for the 21st century. Students will develop an understanding of why current and future makers of the built environment must think differently than in the past and the reasons for both historical and current concerns about resource limitations. Class lectures will explore differing interpretations of the concept of sustainability and the broad range of factors contributing to a sustainable society, including health, productivity, biomimicry, passive design strategy, material re-use and resource conservation. Guest lecturers will include experts in the field of sustainable softgoods, hardwoods, lighting, daylighting, environmental systems, LEED and BIM. 119 Textiles for Interiors Lecture credits 2; No prerequisites This course is a survey of the history and science of fabrics through lectures on major decorative arts periods as well as textile design, fibers, methods of weaving, dyeing, flammability, finishes, and trims. Properties, code requirements, and maintenance of contract and residential fabrics and their application are covered as well as estimating yardage. Also included in the course are lectures on the history of wallpaper and carpeting and their application to today’s interiors. 166 ART AND ANTIQUE APPRAISING I Lecture credits 2; Elective; Prerequisite: 102 This course provides an invaluable approach to determining quality and value of fine and decorative art in the marketplace. Students learn to recognize and research porcelain, glass, silver, prints, and other collect76

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ibles found in estates, private collections, and auction rooms. Technique and authentication problems are stressed by slide presentations, items brought in by students, and field trips to museums. 167 ART AND ANTIQUE APPRAISING II Lecture credits 2; Elective; Prerequisite: 166 Participants are given an opportunity to appraise typical contents of a residence, including special consideration of insurance and estate valuation. Problems of equitable distribution of personal property when the appraiser is called upon to analyze furnishings for liquidation is also discussed. Other topics include the valuation of donated fine and decorative art to a tax-exempt institution in accordance with IRS guidelines and the valuation of architectural or attached art found in landmark buildings, such as stained-glass windows and stonework. 168 ECONOMICS OF TASTE AND STYLE Lecture Credits 2; Elective; No prerequisites International political and environmental factors influence trends in interior design, architecture, and the world of fine and decorative arts. This course is an introduction to the market in the fine and decorative arts. Students will learn the differences between cost, value and quality in period furniture, ceramics, glass and textiles, and will gain insight into the range of factors that influence purchasing or collecting these objects; such as, changing fashions, scarcity, mass-market adaptations, provenance and condition. 187 MATERIALS AND METHODS OF CONSTRUCTION Lecture credits 2; Prerequisite: 128 Properties and appropriate uses for interior construction and finish materials are explored. Through lectures, presentations, and the preparation of construction details, students become familiar with the application of a wide variety of building materials. 228 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE I Lecture credits 2; Prerequisites: 160, 171, 234 The course introduces students to the business practices important to entry level designers. Students are introduced to the role and responsibilities of a design assistant, with special emphasis on ethical considerations. Topics include developing and maintaining a design resource library, interacting with vendors and contractors, researching the design market, preparing purchase orders and specifications, and developing a decorative budget. Discussions will also address assisting in developing design schemes, preparing for client presentations, and tracking orders through installation. 230 CODES Lecture credits 2; Prerequisite: 128 An introduction to building codes and legal regulations as they relate to interior design work is presented. Discussions cover building codes, the process of code development and revision, and the responsibilities of interior designers in incorporating code requirements in their work.


Essential sections of the building code, such as egress, occupancy levels, regulations for the handicapped, general accessibility requirements, finish, and material specifications and fire ratings, are included. 245 PHOTOGRAPHY FOR INTERIOR DESIGNERS Lecture Credits 2; Elective; Prerequisite: 180 This course is an introduction to the history, language, and techniques of architectural and interior photography. Students will acquire a basic knowledge of photographic vocabulary, learn how to evaluate photographic images, and become familiar with traditional and digital photographic equipment and techniques. Discussions and assignments will also explore composition, styling, and lighting. 288 BUILDING SYSTEMS Lecture credits 2; Prerequisite: 187 A study of the materials and methods of plumbing, HVAC, fire protection, lighting, and electrical systems in relation to interior architecture and design. 328 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE II Lecture credits 2; Prerequisite: 228; Corequisite: 417 This advanced professional practice course focuses on the business, legal, financial, and managerial considerations of interior design practice. A case study is used to explain the formation of a design business, and its structure and operations; designer/client and designer/vendor relationships; contract formats for residential and commercial projects; various forms of compensation; project management including programming, budgeting, scheduling, bidding, contract administration, and postoccupancy evaluations; government and statutory rules and regulations; insurance and dispute resolution. Students are also introduced to the issue of legal recognition of the profession and licensing. 348 Introduction to Arts Management Lecture credits 2; Prerequisites: 112, 160, 171 This course explores the world of arts organizations, including galleries, museums, research institutions, and curated collections. Students study issues relevant to the management of arts organizations, including organizational structures, operations, budgeting, community relations, grants, fundraising, marketing, and ethics.

course presents an overview of the special issues related to the design and construction of long- and short-term health care facilities. 370 HISTORIC PRESERVATION Lecture credits 2; Elective; Prerequisite: 111 and 112 or 601 and 602 The goal of this course is to familiarize designers with the individual character, workmanship, style, and integrity of the historic or older building interior, and to the standards and regulations which may bear upon work within these buildings. Course lectures, field trips, assignments, and projects will explore historic preservation as it relates to a variety of project types including period rooms, museum installations, historic sites, and adaptive re-use. This course satisfies Design History elective requirements. 415 Senior Project Preparation Lecture credits 2; Corequisites: 348 This research-based course lays the foundation for the Senior Project course to be taken in the following semester. In consultation with the faculty, and through guided research, students will select an appropriate topic for their Senior Project. Students will write a research proposal, summarizing their preliminary research, articulating a research question, and describing the scope of their senior project. 485 Senior Project Lecture credits 4; Prerequisite: 415 The Senior Project is the culmination of the BA degree program. Students implement the project identified and researched in the Senior Project Preparation course. Students must present their work to a committee of professionals and all projects are exhibited in a poster display in the annual student exhibition in May.

Studios 128 BASIC DRAFTING Studio credits 3; No prerequisites The course is an introduction to the tools, techniques, and principles of architectural drafting, graphic conventions, and lettering. Students will measure actual sites and study the use of dimensional orthographic and three-dimensional paraline drawing types.

357 RETAIL DESIGN Lecture credits 2; Elective; Prerequisite: 286 This course introduces students to the factors important in the successful design of stores and boutiques in urban, suburban, and shopping mall settings. Students learn about space utilization, fixtures, and display as well as the role the interior designer plays in branding and the selling of a product.

132 CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS I Studio credits 3; Prerequisite: 187, 171 This course introduces students to the preparation of construction documents using AutoCAD. Students obtain an overview of construction drawing formats and principles while learning to develop the plans, elevations, sections, and details that will form part of a set of working drawings for a small commercial or residential interior project.

358 HEALTH CARE FACILITIES Lecture credits 2; Elective; Prerequisite: 286 Through lectures, field trips, and short-term graphic exercises, this

134 RESIDENTIAL DESIGN I Studio credits 3; Prerequisites: 101, 128, 141, 180 Through studio projects, lectures, and discussions, this course provides u n d e r g r a d u at e p ro g r a m s o f s t u dy

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an introduction to the design of the residential environment. By focusing on the design of a traditional, transitional, and contemporary room, students learn how to arrange furniture successfully and select fabrics, finishes, and accessories. Exercises in room design and character are supplemented by sessions assessing client needs, developing a written program, and preparing a professional design presentation. 135 PERSPECTIVE Studio credit 2; Prerequisite: 128 Drawing in perspective is a primary form of communication for all designers. It enables one to illustrate creative ideas in three-dimensional terms and is the foundation for design and architectural presentation drawings. Students learn to construct one-point and two-point perspective drawings through grid, measured, and plan projection methods. 138 PRESENTATION TECHNIQUES USING POWERPOINT Studio credit 1; Elective; No Prerequisites PowerPoint business presentation graphics software integrates text, graphics, audio, and animation. Students will learn to insert images, attach sound, and animate a multipage presentation. 139 PRESENTATION TECHNIQUES USING PHOTOSHOP Studio credit 1; Elective; Prerequisite: 132 Photoshop is software that facilitates the incorporation of graphic images into many kinds of documents and presentations. Using this program, students will learn to scan, manipulate, and insert images and text, and create a complete digital presentation. 140 INTRODUCTION TO WEB PAGE DESIGN Studio credit 1; Elective; Prerequisite: 132 Interior designers increasingly use the internet to market their firms and services. This course will introduce students to the basics of creating a web page. Lectures and demonstrations will cover issues of layout and media, and launching a site. Each student will create their own page for the web. 141 COLOR FOR INTERIORS Studio credits 2; No prerequisites This studio course concentrates on the study of color theory and color schemes for interiors. Compilation of the Munsell Color Charts is the basis for a series of projects which lead to the development of complete color schemes. Psychological and practical influences affecting the choice of color are studied. Using gouache paints, colors for walls, floor coverings, window treatments, upholstery, accessories, and accent areas are selected and applied to a variety of room settings. 142 GOOGLE SKETCHUP Studio Credit 1; No prerequisite This course provides students with the ability to explore and express design ideas in three dimensions using Google SketchUp, a quick, easyto-learn 3D image modeling program that is compatible with AutoCAD. 78

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Students will learn how to enhance their drawings with shadow, light, textures, and other advanced digital rendering techniques. 180 VISUAL CONCEPTS Studio credits 2; No prerequisites Students are introduced to the language and principles common to all visual activity. Through freehand drawing exercises and study models, the abstract elements of design—point, line, plane, shape/form, value, color, and texture—are examined, along with the principles which unify these elements in a clear visual conceptual organization. Discussion and critique of assigned projects enable students to develop an understanding of the elements and principles of design composition. 182 DESIGN PROCESS Studio credits 3; Prerequisites: 101, 128, 180 This course is an exploration of formal design principles and their application to the built environment. Students gain an understanding of geometric order and the articulation of enclosures as defined by base, vertical, and overhead planes, and become familiar with the process of designing interior space, including concept development, programming, diagramming, and schematic planning. The principles of sustainability and universal design and their impact on design thinking are introduced. 189 DEcorative painting I: FAUX FINISHES and Gilding Studio credit 1; Elective; No prerequisites An introduction to the techniques and history of decorative painting with an emphasis on faux finishes, glazes and gilding. Students will produce sample presentation boards, while exploring the creative possibilities of decorative painting as it relates to classical and contemporary interiors. 190 DECORATIVE PAINTING II: STENCILS AND PATTERNS Studio Credit 1; Elective; No Prerequisites A further exploration of the techniques and history of decorative painting with an emphasis on painted pattern and stenciling for interior embellishment. Students will develop hand-painted project boards based on historical or contemporary designs. 195 DECORATIVE PAINTING III: MURALS AND GRAPHICS Studio Credit 1; Elective; No Prerequisites An exploration of the history and techniques of decorative painting with an emphasis on large-scale murals and graphics for contemporary interior embellishment. Students will develop their ideas on canvas, scaling and transferring their designs while learning the basic methods of mural painting. 197 THE GOLDEN MEAN AS A DESIGN TOOL Studio credit 1; Elective; No prerequisites The Golden Mean stands alone among mathematical expressions of proportion. Its appearance in nature, design, and architecture is universally recognized, from Egyptian pyramids and the Greek Parthenon to Le Corbusier, and from sunflowers to spiral shells from the sea. The Golden


Mean principle is explored in lectures, and practical studio workshops teach students how to draw the Golden Mean proportion and use it as a design tool. 212 ELEMENTS OF RENDERING Studio credits 2; Prerequisites: 128, 135 This course builds upon basic perceptual and drawing skills through intensive exercises. Students gain an understanding of various rendering techniques through learning to apply texture, pattern, and color to their drawings. 231 KITCHEN AND BATH DESIGN Studio credits 3; Prerequisites: 132, 234, 288 This course provides an in-depth introduction to the planning and design of kitchens and baths with a focus on residential applications. Design projects emphasize issues of safety, accessibility, modularity, and manufactured products including metric based items, appliances, materials, and industry standards. 234 RESIDENTIAL DESIGN II Studio credits 3; Prerequisites: 119, 134, 182 Building on the skills and knowledge acquired in Residential Design I, this studio focuses on how to design a complete residence. Emphasis is placed on design process, programming, space planning, building codes, and presentation techniques. 236 CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS II Studio credits 3; Prerequisite: 132 Building upon the skills and concepts learned in Construction Documents I, students will use Autodesk’s Revit program to create a set of integrated construction documents. Simulating a team context, each student will use Revit to create a set of construction documents for a commercial renovation project. Key concepts of 3D Studio Max will also be introduced. 238 PORTFOLIO DEVELOPMENT Studio credit 1; Elective; Prerequisite: 234 This course provides an introduction to various formats and processes used in creating a portfolio. Methods and examples of organization and layout are covered. 247 RENDERING WITH MARKERS Studio credits 2; Elective; Prerequisites: 141, 212 This course explores dry and wet marker techniques to delineate forms, textures, and finishes employed in the presentation of design projects. 260 SYSTEMS OF ORNAMENTAL DESIGN Studio credits 2; Elective; Prerequisites: 102, 182 This studio course explores the major Western and non-Western styles of ornament that have been employed in architectural interiors. Through a series of lectures, demonstrations, and exercises, students will learn how to apply ornament to a variety of interior spaces using the rules of

composition. Styles such as Classical, Gothic, Romanesque, and Modern as well as Asian and Native American are covered. 283 LIGHTING I Studio credits 3; Prerequisites: 132, 171 Students are introduced to basic technical and creative concepts in lighting interior spaces, with emphasis on the architectural aspects of lighting design. Human factors, color, materials, and the behavior of light are discussed. Also reviewed are lamps, fixtures, layout, and circuiting. Students work on studio projects and develop interior lighting plans and specifications. 286 CONTRACT DESIGN I Studio credits 3; Prerequisites: 132, 212, 230, 234; Corequisite: 283 While providing an overview of contract design, this course emphasizes the elements used by the designer in the development of nonresidential interior spaces such as restaurants and offices. Both conceptual and practical issues are explored relative to site selection, programming, space planning, circulation, volume, furnishings, color, and texture in the design of interior space. 332 ADVANCED GRAPHIC COMMUNICATIONS I Studio credits 3; Prerequisites: 132, 212, 236 This course instructs students in the advanced use of computers and the integration of hand drawing techniques to illustrate interior space through the construction of 3D models. Students will explore qualities of light, materials, and perspective views in order to create compelling and realistic images incorporating both digital and traditional drawing methods. 334 RESIDENTIAL DESIGN III Studio credits 4; Prerequisites: 111 or 112, 286, 288 This studio focuses on residential interior projects of increasing complexity and diversity. Emphasis is placed on the development of a comprehensive solution using innovative and appropriate conceptual approaches. The goals of this course include refining the ability of students to express themselves both graphically and verbally, and developing proficiency in handling three-dimensional space using suitable materials and technology. 340 ARCHITECTURAL WOODWORK DETAILING Studio credits 3; Prerequisites: 231, 286 Wood detailing is explored as applied to architectural interiors. The focus of projects is the development of design and drawing skills related to built-in cabinets, moldings, and other specialties. 364 MIXED MEDIA RENDERING Studio credits 2; Elective; Prerequisites: 141, 212 Students produce renderings and drawings with various media to further develop their individual style in this studio course. Light, material, and surface representations are analyzed on objects, furniture, and spaces. u n d e r g r a d u at e p ro g r a m s o f s t u dy

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365 CONCEPTUAL SKETCHING I Studio credits 1; Elective; Prerequisite: 212 This advanced freehand drawing course focuses on developing the use of sketching as a design development and communication tool. Using drawings made through observation, students will learn how to refine and develop an idea primarily by means of quick three-dimensional sketching. 366 CONCEPTUAL SKETCHING II Studio Credit 1; Prerequisite: 365 Students will advance their individual drawing skills and styles developed during Conceptual Sketching I by focusing on integrating object and spatial sketching, both on the NYSID campus and at selected sites. Elaboration using advanced student projects and integration with digital techniques will be explored. 383 LIGHTING II Studio credits 3; Prerequisite: 283 The goal of this course is to expand upon the skills and vocabulary of lighting knowledge gained in Lighting I by applying them to solve design problems in architectural lighting projects. Course lectures familiarize the student with lighting design strategies, graphics, and circuiting techniques, creation of specification booklets and basic dimming systems as well as specialty topics such as decorative luminaires and energy efficiency. The influence of lighting on color and related psychological effects is explored. 386 CONTRACT DESIGN II Studio credits 3; Prerequisites: 111, 112, 334 Building on the skills and information gained in Contract Design I, students design projects such as showrooms, corporate offices, or retail environments. Practical issues such as compliance with building codes, sustainability, and use of modular furniture systems are addressed in relation to both high-rise building design and historic contexts. 417 THESIS PREPARATION Studio credits 1; Prerequisite or corequisite: 486; Corequisite 328 This research-based course lays the foundation for the thesis project to be executed in the following semester. In consultation with the faculty, students will select an appropriate project type, determine the site to be used, prepare existing condition drawings, and write a project statement and program. 432 ADVANCED GRAPHIC COMMUNICATIONS II Studio credits 2; Elective; Prerequisite: 332 This course focuses on 3D Studio and its application in illustrating interior space. Students complete a series of projects exploring qualities of light, materials, and perspective views in an effort to create compelling and realistic images. Adobe Photoshop is also explored as a support tool in the development of these images. In addition, students learn how to translate AutoCAD 3D models to 3D Studio and to create complex three-dimensional models which otherwise would be impossible to create in AutoCAD. 80

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442 FURNITURE DESIGN Studio credits 3; Prerequisites: 340, 386 This design studio focuses on the aesthetic and functional issues related to the creation of custom, freestanding furniture. The design and production of both hard and soft goods are covered. Special attention is given to anthropometric and ergonomic considerations, as well as the use of the metric system in the design of a furniture piece. 486 CONTRACT DESIGN III Studio credits 4; Prerequisites: 332, 383, 386 Students research, develop, and analyze data and design criteria for a substantial project involving diverse populations. This advanced studio requires students to incorporate the skills and knowledge gained throughout their studies to create a comprehensive project, including presentation drawings, models, material and furniture boards, detail drawings and specifications. 487 THESIS Studio credits 4; Prerequisites: 417, 442, 486 (Must be taken during the last semester of the BFA program) The thesis is the culminating interior design studio project of the BFA professional-level degree program. Students implement the project identified and researched in the Thesis Preparation course. Students must present their work to a jury of professionals, and all projects are exhibited in a thesis exhibition. 490 INTERNSHIP Variable credit; Elective; Prerequisite: Completion of 90 credits in the BFA or BA degree program. The NYSID internship program offers elective academic credit for college-monitored work experience. Internships for credit are available to students matriculated in the BFA or BA degree program who have accumulated 90 credits or more and have a cumulative GPA of 3.00. It is designed to help students build on skills already learned in the classroom and to acquire new ones. Students have the opportunity to integrate theory and practice and to gain professional experience. An internship for 3 credits consists of 240 hours of contact time at the job placement site. An internship for 2 credits consists of 160 hours of contact time at the job placement site. Students may take no more that one internship for credit towards their degree. Grading is pass/fail only. 500 ADVANCED INDEPENDENT STUDY Variable credit; Elective; Prerequisite: Approval of the Dean This course option allows the advanced student with a 3.50 GPA or better to create an individual program of study with a faculty member. Students are required to present an outline of their intended study to the dean for approval prior to registration and must present their final project to a faculty jury. This study course may be taken for elective credit only.


Graduate Programs MASTER OF FINE ARTS IN INTERIOR DESIGN, MFA-1 The Master of Fine Arts in Interior Design – Professional Level (MFA-1) program is formulated to provide students who possess a baccalaureate degree in an unrelated field (of which 30 credits must have been in the liberal arts) with an advanced degree containing the professional-level education to be leaders in interior design practice and education. The program’s comprehensive curriculum emphasizes research and analysis applied to a wide range of user groups, taking into account global practice, sustainable design, and social justice. This focus enables graduates of the program to participate in leading the discipline into the future, to broaden the understanding of how interior design can serve the greater world community, and to provide creative design solutions at the highest level. In combination with the required professional experience, the curriculum satisfies the educational requirements for membership in national and local interior design associations and allows graduates to sit for qualifying exams for interior design certification in many jurisdictions. Admission to the MFA-1 program requires formal acceptance and submission of a portfolio demonstrating the applicant’s creative abilities in the fine or applied arts or the successful completion of a NYSID qualifying workshop prior to matriculation. This 90-credit MFA degree requires full-time study and is composed of 86 professional credits and 4 elective credits offering both seminar and studio courses in art and design history, graphic communication, technical skills and knowledge, professional practice, and interior design studios. Students may take up to 6 additional free-elective credits over the course of their program, during the fall and spring semesters as part of the flat tuition. Of the 90 credits required for the MFA-1 degree, a minimum of 60 credits must be taken at NYSID, all of which must be in required professional courses. Only 500-level courses may be satisfied by transfer credit. The residency requirement includes Interior Design Studio III, IV, V, and VI, MFA-1 Thesis Preparation and MFA Thesis. Every student who matriculates into the NYSID MFA-1 program will be required to develop and maintain a portfolio of their entire educational experience in the program. The NYSID MFA-1 portfolio will include artifacts, such as, papers, tests, journal entries, and visual materials produced in each of the courses. In addition to the materials generated to satisfy the individual course requirements, all students will be required to provide a reflective analysis of each learning experience, relating it to their understanding of its place and value within in the overall program of study, and to the larger context of the discipline.

MFA-1 Curriculum (90 + 6 optional elective credits) First Semester - 15 credits 501 Historical Styles I (2) 514 Intro to Sustainability & the Built Environment (2) 517 Design & Drawing I (3) 519 Textiles for Interiors (2) 526 Hand Drawing and Rendering Techniques (2) 541 Color for Interiors (2) 587 Materials & Methods of Construction (2) Second Semester - 15 credits 502 Historical Styles II (2) 527 Design & Drawing II (3) 528 Interior Design Studio I (3) 530 Codes (2) 532 Construction Documents I (3) 617 Building Systems (2) Summer Session One - 3 credits 538 Interior Design Studio II (3) Third Semester - 15 credits 503 Survey of Art I (2) 601 Modern Architecture & Design I (2) 608 Interior Design Studio III (3) 629 Presentation Techniques (2) 633 Lighting I (3) 636 Construction Documents II (3) Fourth Semester - 15 credits 504 Survey of Art II (2) 602 Modern Architecture & Design II (2) 618 Interior Design Studio IV (3) 631 Kitchen & Bath Design (3) 639 Advanced Graphic Communications I (3) — Electives (2) Summer Session Two - 3 credits 628 Interior Design Studio V (3) Fifth Semester - 16 credits 634 Advanced Detailing (2) 638 Interior Design Studio VI (3) 642 MFA-1 Thesis Prep (2) 643 Lighting II (3) 646 Advanced Graphic Communications II (2) — Electives (4) Sixth Semester - 14 credits 635 Theory of the Built Environment (2) 641 Interior Design Practice (3) 644 Furniture Design (3) 648 MFA-1 Thesis (4) — Electives (2)

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MFA-1 Course Descriptions Lectures 501 Historical Styles I Lecture credits 2 This course is an introductory overview of the history of design in furniture, interiors, and architecture from the ancient world through the end of the 18th century. Lectures, readings, field-trips, and assignments focus on the development of major forms, period styles, and ornament from ancient Egypt, Greece, and Rome through the Renaissance, Baroque, Rococo, and Neoclassical eras. Through research and analysis students develop awareness of historical precedents as the historical basis of modern designs and analyze the key formal and decorative attributes of the built environment. 502 Historical Styles II Lecture credits 2; Prerequisite: 501 The second half of the introductory survey, this course focuses on the history of Western furniture, interiors, and architecture in the 19th and 20th centuries. Styles examined include 19th-century revival styles, Arts & Crafts, Art Deco, European and American Modernism, and the International Style. 503 Survey of Art I Lecture credits 2 History of art from prehistoric through medieval times. Different characteristics of artistic styles and the changing role of the artist are viewed in a cultural and historical context. 504 Survey of Art II Lecture credits 2; Prerequisite: 503 History of art from prehistoric through medieval times. Different characteristics of artistic styles and the changing role of the artist are viewed in a cultural and historical context. 514 INTRODUCTION TO SUSTAINABILITY AND THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT Lecture Credits 2; No prerequisites This survey course introduces students to the principles and concepts of sustainability and provides the context for design decisions for the 21st century. Students will develop an understanding of why current and future makers of the built environment must think differently than in the past and the reasons for both historical and current concerns about resource limitations. Class lectures will explore differing interpretations of the concept of sustainability and the broad range of factors contributing to a sustainable society, including health, productivity, biomimicry, passive design strategy, material re-use and resource conservation. Guest lecturers will include experts in the field of sustainable softgoods, hardwoods, lighting, daylighting, environmental systems, LEED and BIM.

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519 Textiles for Interiors Lecture credits 2 This course is a survey of the history and science of fabrics through lectures on major decorative arts periods as well as textile design, fibers, methods of weaving, dyeing, flammability, finishes, and trims. Properties of residential and contract fabrics and their applications are covered as well as estimating yardage and maintenance. Also included in the course are lectures on the history of wallpaper and carpeting and their application to today’s interiors. Through research and analysis students will develop an understanding of the importance of the selection and specification of materials and their impact on the functional and aesthetic quality of the built environment. 530 Codes Lecture credits 2; Prerequisite: 517 An introduction to building codes and legal regulations as they relate to interior design work is presented. Discussions cover building codes, the process of code development and revision, and the responsibilities of interior designers in incorporating code requirements in their work. Essential sections of the building code, such as egress, occupancy levels, regulations for the handicapped, general accessibility requirements, finish and material specifications, and fire ratings, are included. 587 Materials and Methods of Construction Lecture credits 2 Properties and appropriate uses for interior construction and finish materials are explored. Through lectures, presentations, and the preparation of construction details, students become familiar with the application of a wide variety of building materials. Students are introduced to the basic principles and concepts of sustainability and green design. Through research and analysis students will develop an understanding of the importance of the selection and specification of materials and their impact on the functional and aesthetic quality of the built environment. 601 Modern Architecture and Design I Lecture credits 2; Prerequisite: 502 This course examines the sources of modern architecture and design from the 18th-century designers Adam, Soane, and Ledoux through the 19th century and the work of the eclectic architects. The course examines how architects used stylistic elements of the past and adapted them to solve modern design problems. Each revival style is traced to the original era to explore the meaning of the adaptations. Through research and analysis students develop awareness of historical precedents as the historical basis of modern designs and analyze the key formal and decorative attributes of the built environment. 602 Modern Architecture and Design II Lecture credits 2; Prerequisite: 601 The second part of the overview of modern architecture, this course focuses on the period 1890 to the present in Europe and America. Styles and movements covered include the American Beaux Arts, the Chicago School, Art Nouveau, Vienna Secession, Futurism, Expressionism, Art Moderne, the Modern Movement, and Post-Modernism.


617 Building Systems Lecture credits 2; Prerequisites: 530, 587 A study of the materials and methods of plumbing, HVAC, fire protection, lighting, and electrical systems in relation to interior architecture and design. Through research and analysis students become aware of the impact of materials, construction methods, and building systems on the built environment and develop an understanding of the relationships among codes, sustainability, culture, and human-environment interaction. 635 Theory of the Built Environment Lecture credits 2; Prerequisite: 642 This seminar is an in-depth analysis of the relationship among theory, practice, and socio-historical considerations in architecture and interior design. Beginning with a discussion of the various approaches to and functions of “theory,” both traditional and critical, the course focuses on a close reading of major primary texts of architecture and design theory. The relationship between these theories and the built works they inform will be analyzed in their appropriate historical and critical contexts. Through lecture and discussion of assigned readings, the course will stress the importance of theory for the achievement of a socially appropriate and responsible design.

Studios 517 Design and Drawing I Studio credits 3 Students are introduced to the language common to all visual activity, and the tools, techniques, and principles of architectural drafting. Through freehand drawing and mechanical-drawing exercises and study models, the abstract elements of design–point, line, plane, shape/form, value, color, and texture–are examined, along with the principles that unify these elements in a clear visual organization. Discussion, analysis, and critique of assigned projects enable students to develop an understanding of the elements and principles of 2D- and 3D-design composition. 526 HAND DRAWING AND RENDERING TECHNIQUES Studio credits 2; No prerequisites In this course, sketching and rendering skills will be developed as tools for design and graphic communication. Students will draw freehand from observation, in situ, and master quick perspective sketching techniques, using pencil, ink, watercolor, and other media. (Open to MFA-1 students only) 527 Design and Drawing II Studio credits 3; Prerequisite: 517 Through a series of assignments, students will advance their analytical compositional and graphic communications skills; this includes the exploration and application of formal design principles to architectural interior space and learning perspective and various rendering techniques.

528 Interior Design Studio I Studio credits 3; Prerequisites: 501, 517, 519 Through studio projects, lectures, and discussions, this course provides an introduction to the interior environment through the complete design of an individual room. By designing a traditional, transitional, and contemporary space, students learn how to successfully select and arrange furniture, select and apply fabrics, finishes, and accessories. Exercises in room design and character are supplemented by sessions on how to assess client needs and the development of a professional visual and oral design presentation. 532 Construction Documents I Studio credits 3; Prerequisites: 517, 587 This course introduces students to the preparation of construction documents using AutoCAD. Students obtain an overview of construction drawing formats and principles while learning to develop the plans, elevations, sections, and details that will form part of a set of working drawings for a small commercial or residential interior project. 538 Interior Design Studio II Studio credits 3; Prerequisites: 527, 528 Building on the skills and knowledge acquired in Interior Design Studio I, this studio focuses on the design of a multi-space facility. Students will integrate current research in environment and behavior as they engage in the design process, programming, space planning, and selection of finishes and the arrangement and selection of furnishings. Emphasis is placed on building codes and learning and applying a range of professional presentation techniques. 541 Color for Interiors Studio credits 2 This studio course concentrates on the study of color and color schemes This studio course concentrates on the study of color and color schemes for interiors. Compilation of the Munsell Color Charts is the basis for a series of projects which lead to the development of complete color schemes. Psychological and practical influences affecting the choice of color are studied. Using gouache paints, colors for walls, floor coverings, window treatments, upholstery, accessories, and accent areas are selected and applied to a variety of room settings. Through research and analysis students will develop an understanding of the relationship of color to the various elements of the built environment and its role in protecting the health, safety, and welfare of the end-user. 608 Interior Design Studio III Studio credits 3; Prerequisite: 587; Corequisite: 633 This course emphasizes the broad range of elements used by the designer in the development of interior spaces. Conceptual and practical issues are explored collaboratively and individually, relative to the synthesis of interior space: site selection and analysis, programming, space planning, circulation, volume, furnishings, color, and texture. Students learn and apply sustainable design practices to the selection of finish materials. g r a d u at e p ro g r a m s

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618 Interior Design Studio IV Studio credits 3; Prerequisites: 608, 617 This studio focuses on interior projects of increasing complexity and diversity. Emphasis is placed on the development of a comprehensive solution using innovative and appropriate conceptual approaches. The goals of this course include refining the ability of students to express their ideas graphically and verbally, and on the development of proficiency in handling three-dimensional space using suitable materials and technology. 628 Interior Design Studio V Studio credits 3; Prerequisites: 602, 618, 634 Synthesizing the skills and information gained in previous Interior Design Core Studios, students design large scale commercial projects such as showrooms, corporate offices, or retail environments. Practical concerns such as professional service contracts, budgeting, scheduling, acoustics, lighting, and compliance with building codes are addressed in relation to high-rise building design and historic preservation. Students work collaboratively during the research phase of the design process. 629 Presentation Techniques Studio credits 2; Prerequisite: 527 Students will produce drawings and renderings with various media, emphasizing the production of professional representations integrating digital and hand drawing. Forms, textures, and finishes employed in interior design presentations will be emphasized. 631 Kitchen and Bath Design Studio credits 3; Prerequisites: 608, 636 This course is an in-depth introduction to the planning and design of kitchens and baths in residential and commercial applications. Design projects emphasize issues of accessibility and universal design, modularity, safety, manufactured products and appliances, materials, and industry standards. Space planning and construction details are emphasized. Students will understand sustainability and environmental impact as it applies to the design and construction of custom kitchens and baths, including appliances, cabinetry, surfacing, and applied finishes. 633 Lighting I Studio credits 3; Prerequisites: 532, 538 Students are introduced to basic technical and creative concepts in lighting interior spaces, with emphasis on the architectural aspects of lighting design. Human factors, space planning, color, materials, and the behavior of light are discussed. Also reviewed are lamps, fixtures, layout, and circuiting. Students work on studio projects and develop interior lighting plans and specifications. Through research and analysis students will develop an understanding of the relationship of light to the various elements of the built environment and its role in protecting the health, safety, and welfare of the end-user. 634 Advanced Detailing Studio credits 2; Prerequisite: 636 Millwork detailing is explored as applied to architectural interiors. The focus of projects is the development of design and drawing skills related to paneling, built-in cabinetry, stairways, and other specialties. 84

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636 Construction Documents II Studio credits 3; Prerequisites: 530, 532 Building upon the skills and concepts learned in Construction Documents I , students will use Autodesk’s Revit program to create a set of integrated construction documents. Simulating a team context, each student will use Revit to create a set of construction documents for a commercial renovation project. Key concepts of 3D Studio Max will also be introduced. 638 Interior Design Studio VI Studio credits 3; Prerequisite: 628 Students research, develop, and analyze data and design criteria for a substantial institutional project involving diverse populations. Students research case studies, project types, and relevant environment and behavior theory. This advanced studio requires students to integrate and synthesize the skills and knowledge gained throughout their studies to create a comprehensive project, including presentation drawings, models, material and furniture boards, detail drawings, and specifications. 639 Advanced Graphic Communications I Studio credits 3; Prerequisites: 629, 636 Through a series of assignments, students will advance their compositional and graphic communication skills, including the exploration and application of formal design principals to architectural interior space and learning perspective and various rendering techniques. 641 Interior Design Practice Studio credits 3; Prerequisites: 638 This course will introduce students to the business practices important to professional designers. Topics include project management, working with vendors, contractors, consultants, and clients, and marketing. The course will focus on the business, legal, financial, managerial, and ethical considerations of interior design practice. Students are introduced to the issue of legal recognition of the profession and licensing. 642 MFA-1 Thesis Preparation Studio credit 2; Corequisite: 638 This research-based course lays the foundation for the thesis to be taken in the following semester. In consultation with the faculty, students will select an appropriate project type, determine the site to be used, prepare existing condition drawings, and write a project statement and program outline. 643 Lighting II Studio credits 3; Prerequisite: 633 The goal of this course is to expand upon the skills and vocabulary of lighting knowledge gained in Lighting I through application in design problems. Course lectures familiarize students with lighting design strategies, graphics, and circuiting techniques, creation of specification booklets, and basic dimming systems as well as specialty topics such as decorative luminaires and energy efficiency. The influence of lighting on color and related psychological effects is explored. 644 FURNITURE DESIGN Studio credits: 3; Prerequisites: 628, 634 This design studio focuses on the aesthetic and functional issues related to the creation of custom freestanding furniture. The process


of designing furniture prototypes from the initial articulation of design objectives to the technical exploration of their manufacture, including analysis of the environmental impact of the object, will be explored. Discussions and assignments lead to the design of three original furniture prototypes, one of which is required to be developed using the metric system. 646 ADVANCED GRAPHIC COMMUNICATIONS II Studio Credits 2; Prerequisite: 639 This course focuses on 3D Studio and its application in illustrating interior space. Students complete a series of projects exploring qualities of light, materials and perspective views in an effort to create compelling and realistic images. Adobe Photoshop is also explored as a support tool in the development of these images. In addition, students learn how to translate AutoCAD 3D models to 3D Studio and to create complex three-dimensional models which otherwise would be impossible to create in AutoCAD. 648 MFA-1 Thesis Studio credits 4; Prerequisite: 642 The thesis is the culminating interior design studio project of the MFA-1 professional-level degree program. Students implement the project identified and researched in the Thesis Preparation course. Students must present their work to a jury of professionals and all projects are exhibited in the annual thesis exhibition. All phases of a professional project are explored: research, programming, analysis of existing conditions, design criteria, concept development, presentation drawings, models, material boards, and selected details with presentation and critique.

Electives 680 INDEPENDENT STUDY Variable credit This course option allows the experienced student with a 3.50 GPA or better to create an individual program of study with a faculty member. Students are required to present an outline of their intended study to their faculty advisor and coordinator of the graduate program for approval prior to registration. 690 ADVANCED INTERNSHIP Variable credit The NYSID internship program offers elective academic credit for college-monitored work experience to qualified students matriculated in the third year of the MFA-1 and the second year of the MFA-2 degree programs and who have a cumulative GPA of at least a 3.0. It is designed to help students build on skills already learned in the classroom and to acquire new ones. Students have the opportunity to integrate theory and practice and to gain professional experience. An internship for 3 credits consists of 240 hours of contact time at the job placement site. An internship for 2 credits consists of 160 hours of contact time at the job placement site. Students may take no more that one internship for credit towards their degree. Grading is pass/fail only. ADDITIONAL ELECTIVES MFA candidates may satisfy elective degree requirements by taking appropriate undergraduate or graduate courses with the approval of their academic advisor.

MASTER OF FINE ARTS IN INTERIOR DESIGN, MFA-2 The Master of Fine Arts in Interior Design – Post-Professional (MFA-2) is a two-year, full-time 60-credit post-professional terminal degree program that provides practicing professionals in interior design, architecture, environmental design and closely-related fields with the opportunity for advanced creative and academic scholarship in interior design. Through the core design studio sequence, specialty studios, lectures, seminars, and electives, students experience a diverse array of design approaches and project types, and projects of increasing complexity culminating in a thesis studio. The MFA-2 curriculum is formulated to increase understanding of related design disciplines, with special emphasis on their interdependence. An interdisciplinary approach to design is increasingly valuable for professional advancement as designers are asked to satisfy the complex requirements of contemporary architectural and interior environments. There are four components to the program: a core design studio sequence, specialty studios, lectures/seminars, and electives. The thesis, (11 credits), required as a culminating project, consists of 3 credits of directed research followed by an 8-credit studio project. Each student must demonstrate originality, research and design skills, and creative capacity to resolve advanced problems in design. The thesis is presented to a graduate faculty jury for evaluation. Completion of the program with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale is required for the degree. Forty-nine (49) credits are in required courses and 11 credits in elective courses. Students graduate with a deep understanding of the interdisciplinary nature of the design of the built environment, the ability to articulate and resolve advanced problems in design, and are prepared to become leaders of the profession.

MFA-2 Curriculum (60 credits) Students must complete 60 credits in the MFA-2 program, of which a minimum of 39 credits must be in studio courses. Studio courses are shown in bold. CORE STUDIOS - 23 credits 640 Design Studio I (6) 650 Design Studio II (6) 660 Directed Thesis Research (3) 670 Thesis Studio (8) SPECIALTY STUDIOS - 15 credits As offered: 612 Product Design (3) 613 Lighting Design (3) 614 Set Design (3) 622 Green Design (3) 623 Furniture Design (3) 624 Hospitality Design(3) 625 Exhibition Design (3) 651 Landscape Design (3) g r a d u at e p ro g r a m s

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LECTURES/SEMINARS - 11 credits 645 History and Theory of Interior Design I: The Classical Tradition (4) 655 History and Theory of Interior Design II: The Modern Tradition (4) As offered: 621 Office Design (3) 647 Sociology of the Domestic Interior (3) 656 Sociology of the Contemporary Environment (3) 665 History and Theory of Aesthetics (3) ELECTIVES - 11 credits Students in the MFA-2 program may choose electives from both undergraduate or graduate course offerings with approval of their advisor.

MFA-2 Course Descriptions Core Studios 640 DESIGN STUDIO I Studio credits 6 The objective of this studio is to focus conceptually and analytically on the manipulation of interior space using a contemporary program in a historical context. Students analyze a landmarked building and develop a design that accommodates a program of new uses. 650 DESIGN STUDIO II Studio credits 6 The subject of this studio is a comprehensive and detailed design of interior spaces within a modern building shell, such as a residential condominium, office building, airport, or shopping mall. Students analyze the complex relationships among tenants, developers, architects, engineers, interior designers, and others in the planning and implementation of tenant projects within such structures. 660 DIRECTED THESIS RESEARCH Studio credits 3 In consultation with faculty, students select challenging subjects that relate to issues in the world of design today. Each student conducts systematic research and analyzes ideas that become the foundation for the thesis (670). 670 THESIS STUDIO Studio credits 8 The thesis is a culminating interior design project requiring a comprehensive solution to a stated design problem of the student’s choice. This capstone experience involves advanced exploration of pertinent theoretical issues and is based on systematic research and analysis.

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Specialty Studios 612 PRODUCT DESIGN Studio credits 3 This studio explores the marketing, psychology, conceptualization, and design of products commonly found in interiors, from tableware to telephones. 613 Lighting Design Studio Credits 3 This studio course focuses on the design of the decorative luminaire, its history, and functionality. Studies include period styles, thematic content, and religious context as well as form, materials, and luminous characteristics. Students will research, design, and fabricate a working prototype of a custom decorative luminaire and visit museums, glassworks, shade restoration specialists, and manufacturing plants. 614 SET DESIGN Studio credits 3 This course introduces the related discipline of set design. Students will utilize their previously acquired knowledge, technical skills, and creativity to investigate the issues and techniques involved in designing for the theater, television, and film. 622 GREEN DESIGN Studio credits 3 Interior designers and architects have become increasingly responsible for formulating environmentally responsible design solutions. In this course, students learn to incorporate parameters for energy reduction, health, and sustainable construction and finish materials, HVAC, lighting, recycling, and cost payback into the research and completion of one or more “green” design projects. 623 FURNITURE DESIGN Studio credits 3 This course focuses on the process of designing furniture prototypes from the initial articulation of design objectives to the technical exploration of their manufacture. Discussions and assignments lead to the design of three original furniture prototypes. 624 HOSPITALITY DESIGN Studio credits 3 In this course, students undertake a design project that develops a restaurant or hotel interior. Discussion topics covered include: the continuing development of tourist industries; the impact of changing economic conditions and public tastes; and the planning and furnishing of hotels and restaurants. 625 EXHIBITION DESIGN Studio credits 3 A successful exhibit generates interest and excitement about its subject matter. This course focuses on the special challenge of designing an appropriate exhibition for a gallery, museum, trade show, convention, or showroom.


651 LANDSCAPE DESIGN Studio credits 3 This studio explores the concepts, principles, and methods of landscape design with special focus on the relationships between landscape and interior design. Students will develop a studio project that relates interior and exterior space through the discourse of landscaping and plant design.

Lectures & Seminars 645 HISTORY AND THEORY OF INTERIOR DESIGN I: THE CLASSICAL TRADITION Lecture credits 4 This research seminar is an in-depth analysis of the classical tradition in architecture and interior design from Versailles to Post-Modern classicism. Students will read primary theoretical texts, give an oral presentation, and develop a research paper on an aspect or work of classical design. Students will be instructed in how to conduct advanced scholarly research and write formal analyses of buildings and interiors. 655 HISTORY AND THEORY OF INTERIOR DESIGN II: MODERN TRADITION Lecture credits 4 This seminar analyzes the modernist and avant-garde traditions in architecture and interior design. Emphasis is on the critical reading and in-class discussion of the major writings on modern design theory and criticism from the Gothic Revival and the Arts and Crafts to Free-Form Modernism. Students will develop research topics into a final paper dealing with the relationship between modern theory and practice. 621 OFFICE DESIGN Lecture credits 3 This course traces the development of the design of the office workplace, the single biggest speciality in contract interior design. Beginning with the rise of commerce and banking, progressing through the revolution in technology, downsizing, and globalization, students examine in depth the interdisciplinary contributions by interior designers, architects, industrial designers, real estate and development firms, bankers, and business users.

to the resulting innate human response as it weighs the influences of technology, communication, workplace, and mega-structures against the collective psyche. 665 HISTORY AND THEORY OF AESTHETICS Lecture credits 3 This seminar focuses on the history and theory of Aesthetics from the late 17th century writings of Claude Perrault to the Surrealist Manifestos of the 20th century. Writers covered include the Germans Baumgarten, Kant and Hegel; the French theorists Laugier, BoullĂŠe, and Breton; the English authors Hogarth, Wordsworth, Burke, Price, and Ruskin. Emphasis is on an analysis of major aesthetic categories (the Beautiful, the Sublime, the Picturesque, the Exotic, the Surreal) and their relationship to actual works of art and design, past and present.

Electives 680 INDEPENDENT STUDY Variable credit This course option allows the experienced student with a 3.50 GPA or better to create an individual program of study with a faculty member. Students are required to present an outline of their intended study to their faculty advisor and coordinator of the graduate program for approval prior to registration. 690 ADVANCED INTERNSHIP Variable credit The NYSID internship program offers elective academic credit for college-monitored work experience to qualified students matriculated in the third year of the MFA-1 and the second year of the MFA-2 degree programs and who have a cumulative GPA of at least a 3.0. It is designed to help students build on skills already learned in the classroom and to acquire new ones. Students have the opportunity to integrate theory and practice and to gain professional experience. An internship for 3 credits consists of 240 hours of contact time at the job placement site. An internship for 2 credits consists of 160 hours of contact time at the job placement site. Students may take no more that one internship for credit towards their degree. Grading is pass/fail only.

647 SOCIOLOGY OF THE DOMESTIC INTERIOR Lecture credits 3 This seminar analyzes the factors that shape domestic interiors from Ancient Greece to Post-Modernism. A variety of sources of meaning for each period will be examined including language of furniture, social factors, power, prestige, gender issues, the role of childhood, and technological advances. In addition to lectures and discussions, emphasis will be placed on conducting scholarly research using databases and libraries. 656 SOCIOLOGY OF THE CONTEMPORARY ENVIRONMENT Lecture credits 3 This seminar explores the relationship of contemporary interior and architectural design and their subtle sociological and psychological effects on the general public. The changing environment is examined in relation g r a d u at e p ro g r a m s

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MASTER OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES IN HEALTHCARE INTERIOR DESIGN The healthcare industry is rapidly expanding in order to accommodate the growing needs of the baby boom generation and the global population explosion. As the healthcare industry and the government grapple with the complexities and debates that shape society, designers must be increasingly responsive to the growing healthcare field. Modern healthcare encompasses large hospitals, critical care units, specialty health centers, dementia care, and aging-in-place, among many other typologies, including hybrid hospitality-healthcare projects, such as spas. The 30-credit MPS in Healthcare Interior Design is a post-professional program focused on the specialized knowledge, research, and skills required by design professionals as they create varied healthcare settings. The program curriculum has two complementary threads: understanding healing and restorative environments, and the business of healthcare. Courses include knowledge in research methods, history and theory of healthcare, environment and behavior studies, and applied design. Green design and lighting research related to health, productivity, and precision will be integrated throughout the course of study. The program is designed for students of varied backgrounds who understand that in the healthcare industry, business, and design are inextricably intertwined. Students will graduate the program with a unique set of skills that will make them highly desirable as members of design and planning teams. They will be prepared to practice as healthcare specialist designers, researchers for architectural and design firms, facility planners in healthcare institutions, and other administrative and design management positions within the broad healthcare industry. Completion of this program will not lead to licensure in architecture or interior design.

MPS in Healthcare Interior Design Curriculum (30 credits) First Semester - 12 credits 710 Survey of Healthcare Environments (3) 711 Introduction to Research Methods (3) 712 The Business of Healthcare (3) 715 History & Theory of Healthcare (3) Second Semester - 12 credits 719 Materials, Textiles, and Furnishings for Healthcare Settings (3) 720 Healthcare Studio I (3) 721 Applied Research Methods (3) 722 Building Systems for Healthcare (3) Summer Session - 6 credits 730 Healthcare Studio II (3) 731 Programming for Healthcare Environments (3)

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MPS in Healthcare Course Descriptions 710 Survey of Healthcare Environments 3 credits Students will be introduced to current planning and design considerations for healthcare facilities. Conducted as a series of professional seminars examining overall planning and design considerations, and a detailed study of specific care areas, such as oncology, surgery, pediatrics, and others. 711 Introduction to Research Methods 3 credits Designers of healthcare environments must understand the research methods used in evidence-based design, which complement evidencebased medicine. In this course, students will explore alternate research methodologies and their philosophical and epistemological foundations. 712 The Business of Healthcare 3 credits Past and current models of healthcare organizations and project types will be reviewed, along with an analysis of the different corporate structures, hierarchies, and roles common to various healthcare organizations.

722 Building Systems for Healthcare 3 credits Healthcare settings require by code, custom, and practice specific building systems. This course is an in-depth examination of the special mechanical systems used in hospitals and other care environments. 730 Healthcare Studio II 3 credits Studio course focused on the planning and design of key areas within an academic medical center or hospital within an urban context preceded by an analysis of hospital structures. 731 Programming for Healthcare Environments 3 credits Programming is a predesign process that is used to determine the needs of end-users at every organizational level. Then, through post-occupancy evaluations (POEs), designers are able to evaluate the designed environment to determine its success in meeting the needs of the end-users and how well the initial program was met. This course will introduce the practice of programming and post-occupancy evaluation for interior environments, specifically for healthcare.

715 History & Theory of Healthcare 3 credits This course examines the history and range of theories on the relationships between human beings, their health and well-being, and the design of the physical setting for care. Students will be introduced to the connections between medical thought, health-care delivery and health facility design at different historical periods, and across different cultures and societies. 719 Materials, Textiles, and Furnishings for Healthcare Settings 3 credits Materials, finishes, and furnishings play a big role in the perception of specialized healthcare interiors by patients, practitioners, and families. Through this course, students will learn how to specify these elements on the basis of performance, environment-behavior findings, life-cycle, and maintenance. 720 Healthcare Studio I 3 credits Through one group and one individual design project, students will understand the technical and aesthetic development of small-scale healthcare projects and spaces. Knowledge from previous classes will be applied to the design solution for a specialized healthcare type. 721 Applied Research Methods 3 credits Students will design and implement one small research project. They will present their findings in the form of a paper, and poster or PowerPoint presentation typically presented at academic conferences. g r a d u at e p ro g r a m s

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MASTER OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES IN INTERIOR LIGHTING DESIGN The NYSID MPS in Interior Lighting Design is a one-year post-professional program providing rigorous professional education in the area of natural and artificial illumination focused on the interior environment, exposing students to a range of knowledge and skills that provide graduates with a balance of conceptual and practical techniques for successful design execution. Coursework addresses the history and theory of lighting design, principles of sustainability as they relate to the discipline, natural and artificial lighting and control systems, integrated systems design, as well as financial analysis, code compliance, and project maintenance. The program includes lighting design studios that integrate acquired knowledge and research, while exploring residential, commercial, and institutional environments, and prepares graduates to achieve NCQLP (National Council on Qualifications for Lighting Professions) Certification. The 30-credit MPS requires completion in one year and is structured to accommodate working professionals by offering all classes in the evening and on weekends. The program consists of two 15-week semesters composed of lecture, seminar, and studio formats followed by an 8-week summer session. All of the 30 credits required for the MPS degree must be taken in residence at NYSID. Admission to the MPS in Interior Lighting Design program requires formal acceptance and a first-professional degree in interior design, architecture, engineering, or a closely related field, and submission of a portfolio demonstrating the applicant’s professional–level education and experience.

MPS in Interior Lighting Design Curriculum (30 credits) First Semester - 13 credits 724 History and Theory of Interior Illumination (2) 727 The Science of Light (2) 729 Programming for Light (2) 730 Daylighting Studio (3) 732 Presentation Techniques for Lighting Designers (2) 737 Light Source Selection and Evaluation (2) Second Semester - 12 credits 735 Lighting Historic Interiors (2) 740 Lighting Workshop I (4) 741 Luminaire Design (2) 744 Green Lighting, Energy, and Controls (2) 745 Illuminating Art (2) Summer Session - 5 credits 750 Lighting Workshop II (3) 759 The Business of Light (2) 88

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MPS in Interior Lighting Design Course Descriptions Lectures 724 HISTORY AND THEORY OF INTERIOR ILLUMINATION Lecture credits 2 Students are introduced to the history and theory of the illumination of interior spaces, and the influence of culture, changing aesthetic preferences, attitudes, and technologies. Both Western and Eastern examples are explored. 727 THE SCIENCE OF LIGHT Lecture credits 2 This course introduces students to the principles and concepts of lighting. Students will develop an understanding of optics, the effects of light on people’s physical health and psychological well-being, and the influence of lighting conditions on people’s visual capabilities. Class lectures and assignments will cover light source physics and lighting measurement, as well as the principles of spatial vision, visual comfort, and color. 729 PROGRAMMING FOR LIGHT Lecture credits 2 This course examines the task of developing a lighting project, and the various strategies for structuring the project work flow. Students will learn about the assessment of existing conditions, how maintenance, electrical conditions, and regulations influence design constraints and criteria. 737 LIGHT SOURCE SELECTION AND EVALUATION Lecture credits 2 In this course, students will learn how to determine the best light source for any application. Lectures will cover the full range of sources including new and developing technologies. Students will do mock-ups of various installation conditions and calculate light levels for each. 744 GREEN LIGHTING, ENERGY, AND CONTROLS Lecture credits 2 The success of a sustainable interior is directly linked to the quality and efficiency of its artificial illumination. Students will be introduced to the newest technologies and ones in development as they consider methods for integrating artificial and natural illumination leading to a well lit and efficient result. 759 THE BUSINESS OF LIGHT Lecture credits 2 This course is intended to give students an understanding of providing professional lighting design services independently or in the context of interior design or architecture firms. Topics such as contracts, specifications, and other business procedures are covered, as well as, project management, shop drawings review, mock-ups, commissioning, and maintenance.


Studios 730 DAYLIGHTING STUDIO Studio credits 3 This course instructs designers in the analysis, evaluation, and manipulation of daylight, and its effect on the design and success of an interior space. Through studio projects students will learn the methods of calculating the contributions of daylight, and its impact on space planning choices, interior finishes, as well as window options and interior daylight control.

750 LIGHTING WORKSHOP II Studio credits 3 This lighting design studio course focuses on the design of retail, restaurant and corporate facilities. Each student will develop a comprehensive lighting solution for a series of spaces and present their solutions including plans, specifications, lighting calculations and rendered perspectives to a jury of industry professionals.

732 PRESENTATION TECHNIQUES FOR LIGHTING DESIGNERS Studio credits 2 This course introduces students to the various techniques for illustrating lighting design concepts. Both traditional and digital methods will be explored as a means of accurately conveying the effects of lighting within interior spaces, enhancing modeling of objects and textured surfaces, and rendering color. 735 LIGHTING HISTORIC INTERIORS Studio credits 2 This course instructs designers in the analysis, evaluation, and design of lighting solutions within historic interior spaces. Students will learn methods of documenting existing conditions, researching period equipment, and determining appropriate choices that respect history and meet contemporary needs. Lectures and assignments will cover both adaptive reuse and period restorations. 740 LIGHTING WORKSHOP I Studio credits 4 Lighting Workshop I is a studio based course designed to build on knowledge gained so far in the program while relating to other courses taken concurrently. Each student will develop a comprehensive lighting solution for a series of spaces including residential, healthcare, and educational environments. 741 LUMINAIRE DESIGN Studio credits 2 This studio course focuses on the design of the decorative luminaire, its history, and its functionality. Studies include period styles, thematic content, and religious context as well as form, materials, and luminous characteristics. Students will research, design, and fabricate a working prototype of a custom decorative luminaire and visit museums, glass works, shade restoration specialists, and manufacturing plants. 745 ILLUMINATING ART Studio credits 2 The successful lighting of two dimensional and three dimensional art in residential, commercial, and exhibition settings deals with a wide range of issues including, preservation of the art, flexibility, color rendering, and modeling. Students will address these concerns as they develop appropriate solutions for a variety of media in a broad range of contexts. g r a d u at e p ro g r a m s

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MASTER OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES IN SUSTAINABLE INTERIOR ENVIRONMENTS The NYSID Master of Professional Studies (MPS) in Sustainable Interior Environments is a one-year post-professional program focused on specialized knowledge, thinking, and skills, structured to prepare design professionals to assume leadership roles in developing and maintaining sustainable interior spaces that will positively impact the world. The curriculum provides rigorous professional education in the area of sustainable design focused on the interior environment, exposing students to a range of topics, research methods, integrated design development methodologies, and sustainable project management practices. Course work addresses the history and theory of sustainability, principles of sustainable materials, natural and artificial lighting and control systems, and integrated environmental systems design and indoor air quality as well as green textiles, furnishings, and decorative elements. The program includes two major studios designed to integrate acquired knowledge and research while exploring both residential and nonresidential environments, and prepares graduates to achieve LEED AP Accreditation. The 30-credit MPS requires completion in one year and is structured to accommodate working professionals by offering all classes in the evening and on weekends. The program consists of two 15-week semesters composed of lecture, seminar, and studio formats followed by an 8-week summer session. All of the 30 credits required for the MPS degree must be taken at NYSID. Admission to the MPS in Sustainable Design of the Interior program requires formal acceptance and a first-professional degree in interior design, architecture, engineering, or a closely related field, and submission of a portfolio demonstrating the applicant’s professional–level education and experience.

MPS in Sustainable Interior Environments Curriculum (30 credits) First Semester - 12 credits 725 History and Theory of Sustainability in the Interior Environment (2) 726 Principles of Sustainable Design in the Natural Environment (2) 728 Designing the Green Interior (2) 733 Sustainable Soft Goods (2) 742 Sustainable Studio I - Residential Environments (4)

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Second Semester - 12 credits 736 Materials and Finishes for the Sustainable Interior (2) 738 Constructing the Green Interior (2) 743 Sustainable Hard Goods (2) 749 Environmental Systems for the Sustainable Interior (2) 752 Sustainable Studio II - Contract Environments (4) Summer Session - 6 credits 734 Daylighting (2) 744 Green Lighting, Energy, and Controls (2) 748 Maintaining the Green Interior (2)

MPS in Sustainable Interior Environments Course Descriptions Lectures 725 HISTORY AND THEORY OF SUSTAINABILITY IN THE INTERIOR ENVIRONMENT Lecture credits 2 Students are introduced to the history and theory of sustainability and, through research and analysis, explore precedents in the vernacular and designed environment, as well as their relationship to the finite nature of our planet. 726 Principles of Sustainable Design in the Natural Environment Lecture credits 2 This course introduces students to the principles and concepts of sustainability and provides the context for design decisions for the 21st century. Students will develop an understanding of why current and future makers of the built environment must think differently than in the past and the reasons for both historical and current concerns about resource limitations. Class discussions will explore differing interpretations of the concept of sustainability and the broad range of factors contributing to a sustainable society, including health, productivity, and culture. 728 Designing the Green Interior Lecture credits 2 This course examines the task of developing a sustainable project and the various strategies for structuring the project team and workflow. The questions of who participates, what roles people play, and how the design process works in this new paradigm are covered, while introducing the purpose and practices leading to LEED certification. 733 Sustainable Soft Goods Lecture credits (2) This course examines both mass market and custom soft goods and introduces students to the analytical methods for determining appropriate


choices for designing and selecting soft goods for a sustainable interior. Upholstery frames, fillings, and finish textiles for furnishings, as well as window treatments and floor coverings, are covered. Both new and remanufactured goods are explored, along with issues related to sourcing and transportation. 734 Daylighting Lecture credits 2 This course instructs designers in the analysis, evaluation, and manipulation of daylight, and its effect on the design and success of an interior space. Students will learn the methods of calculating the contributions of daylight and its impact on space planning choices and interior finishes, as well as window options and interior daylight control. 736 Materials and Finishes for the Sustainable Interior Lecture credits 2 This course instructs designers in the analysis, evaluation, and selection of construction and finish materials for the sustainable interior. Students will learn methods of determining material appropriateness and considerations when designing a green interior along with understanding the LEED rating system as applied to interior materials. 738 Constructing the Green Interior Lecture credits 2 This course introduces students to strategies and procedures for implementing the green project and successful project management and builds on knowledge gained in 628 Designing the Green Interior. The collaborative roles of designer, architect, engineer, contractor, and owner are explored, along with requirements leading to LEED certification. 743 Sustainable Hard Goods Lecture credits 2 This course examines both mass market and custom hard goods and the methods for determining appropriate choices when designing or selecting hard goods for a sustainable interior. Both natural and manmade materials will be covered, as well as finishing processes. Through research and analysis, students will become familiar with new and remanufactured goods, including issues related to sourcing, transportation, and LEED certification.

a successful maintenance program for a variety of facility types, ensuring the endurance of the facility and its future as a sustainable environment. This course concludes with presentations devoted to the preparation for the LEED AP exam. 749 Environmental Systems for the Sustainable Interior Lecture credits 2 This course covers the methodologies for determining and maintaining comfortable conditions within buildings and focuses on efficient performance and systems integration. Students will gain knowledge of various building systems, methods for determining energy use, and the factors that contribute to a comfortable and sustainable interior. Case studies where students assess the success of various theoretical concepts and applications are included.

Studios 742 Sustainable Studio I—Residential Environments Studio credits 4 Building on knowledge gained so far in the program and relating to other courses taken concurrently, this design studio focuses on the task of creating a sustainable residential interior. Working in teams, each group will design a residential project assigned from among varying types, including a free-standing single family residence, a residence within a multiple dwelling, a residence created through adaptive reuse, or a residence for special populations, such as a dormitory, group home, or assisted living facility. 752 Sustainable Studio II—Contract Environments Studio credits 4 This capstone design studio focuses on the challenge of designing a sustainable contract interior. Working in teams, each group will be assigned a different contract project type including corporate, institutional, health care, hospitality, and retail. This project is presented to a graduate faculty jury and industry specialists for evaluation.

744 Green Lighting, Energy, and Controls Lecture credits 2 The success of a sustainable interior is directly linked to the quality and efficiency of its artificial illumination. Students will be introduced to the newest technologies and ones in development as they consider methods for integrating artificial and natural illumination leading to a well-lit and efficient result. 748 Maintaining the Green Interior Lecture credits 2 Making an interior sustainable does not end on move-in day. This course introduces students to the materials, methods, and strategies for creating g r a d u at e p ro g r a m s

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Course and Credit Listing The following is a complete list of courses (at the time of publication). Number of credits is listed in parentheses after the course title. Electives are shown in italics. See course schedules available before the beginning of each semester for current offerings. Courses are subject to a minimum enrollment per class. NYSID reserves the right to cancel any course or section, alter time schedules, or substitute faculty.

UNDERGRADUATE 101 Historical Styles I (2) 102 Historical Styles II (2) 111 Modern Architecture and Design I (2) 112 Modern Architecture and Design II (2) 114 Introduction to Sustainability and the Built Environment (2) 119 Textiles for Interiors (2) 128 Basic Drafting (3) 132 Construction Documents I (3) 134 Residential Design I (3) 135 Perspective (2) 136 Introduction to Revit Architecture (1) 138 Presentation Techniques Using PowerPoint (1) 139 Presentation Techniques Using Photoshop (1) 140 Introduction to Web Page Design (1) 141 Color for Interiors (2) 142 Google SketchUp (1) 150 English Composition I (3) 151 English Composition I/ESL (3) 160 English Composition II (3) 165 Environmental Psychology (2) 166 Art and Antique Appraising I (2) 167 Art and Antique Appraising II (2) 168 Economics of Taste and Style (2) 171 Basic Mathematics (2) 175 Cultural Anthropology (2) 180 Visual Concepts (2) 182 Design Process (3) 187 Materials and Methods of Construction (2) 189 Decorative Painting I: Faux Finishes and Gilding (1) 190 Decorative Painting II: Stencils and Patterns (1) 195 Decorative Painting III: Murals and Graphics (1) 197 The Golden Mean as a Design Tool (1) 92

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199 201 202 203 204 205 208 211 212 215 216 225 226 228 230 231 234 236 238 245 247 260 270 271 275 276 283 286 287 288 305 307 315 316 317

Study Abroad (2) Art and Society I: Pre-19th Century (3) Art and Society II: 19th and 20th Centuries (3) Humanities I (3) Humanities II (3) Antique Furniture and Accessories (2) Furnishings and Interiors in America 1700-1810 (2) Introduction to the Theory and History of Design (2) Elements of Rendering (2) The Beaux Arts Tradition in America (2) 20th Century Design (2) 17th and 18th Century Interiors (2) 18th and 19th Century Ceramics (2) Professional Practice I (2) Codes (2) Kitchen and Bath Design (3) Residential Design II (3) Construction Documents II (3) Portfolio Development (1) Photography for Interior Designers (2) Rendering with Markers (2) Systems of Ornamental Design (2) Topics in World Literature (3) Environmental Science (2) The Dwelling from a Global Perspective (2) The Dwelling in the West (2) Lighting I (3) Contract Design I (3) History of American Building Materials and Technology (2) Building Systems (2) Intensive French (4) Intensive Italian (4) History of Building Types (2) Great Women Designers(2) Topics in Non-Western Art and Design (2)

318 325 326 328 332 334 340 348 355 357 358 364 365 366 370 383 386 415 417 432 442 485 486 487 490 500

Design History Seminar (2) Landscape Design in History (2) History of Urban Form (2) Professional Practice II (2) Advanced Graphic Communications I (3) Residential Design III (4) Architectural Woodwork Detailing (3) Introduction to Arts Management (2) Design Theory (2) Retail Design (2) Health Care Facilities (2) Mixed Media Rendering (2) Conceptual Sketching I (1) Conceptual Sketching II (1) Historic Preservation (2) Lighting II (3) Contract Design II (3) Senior Project Preparation Thesis Preparation (1) Advanced Graphic Communications II (2) Furniture Design (3) Senior Project Contract Design III (4) Thesis (4) Internship (variable) Advanced Independent Study (variable)

GRADUATE MFA-1 501 Historical Styles I (2) 502 Historical Styles II (2) 503 Survey of Art I (2) 504 Survey of Art II (2) 514 Introduction to Sustainability and the Built Environment (2) 517 Design and Drawing I (3) 519 Textiles for Interiors (2) 526 Hand Drawing and Rendering Techniques (2) 527 Design and Drawing II (3) 528 Interior Design Studio I (3) 530 Codes (2)


532 538 541 587 601 602 608 617 618 628 629 631 633 634 635 636 638 639 641 642 643 644 646 648 680 690

Construction Documents I (3) Interior Design Studio II (3) Color for Interiors (2) Materials and Methods of Construction (2) Modern Architecture and Design I (2) Modern Architecture and Design II (2) Interior Design Studio III (3) Building Systems (2) Interior Design Studio IV (3) Interior Design Studio V (3) Presentation Techniques (2) Kitchen and Bath Design (3) Lighting I (3) Advanced Detailing (2) Theory of the Built Environment (2) Construction Documents II(3) Interior Design Studio VI (3) Advanced Graphic Communications I (3) Interior Design Practice (3) MFA-1 Thesis Preparation (2) Lighting II (3) Furniture Design (3) Advanced Graphic Communications II (2) MFA-1 Thesis (4) Independent Study (variable) Advanced Internship (variable)

GRADUATE MFA-2 612 Product Design (3) 613 Lighting Design (3) 614 Set Design (3) 621 Office Design (3) 622 Green Design (3) 623 Furniture Design (3) 624 Hospitality Design (3) 625 Exhibition Design (3) 640 Design Studio I (6) 645 History and Theory of

647 650 651 655 656 660 665 670 680 690

Interior Design I: The Classical Tradition (4) Sociology of the Domestic Interior (3) Design Studio II (6) Landscape Design (3) History and Theory of Interior Design II: The Modern Tradition (4) Sociology of the Contemporary Environment (3) Directed Thesis Research (3) History and Theory of Aesthetics (3) Thesis Studio (8) Independent Study (variable) Advanced Internship (variable)

733 734 736 738 742 743 744 748 749 752

Sustainable Soft Goods (2) Daylighting (2) Materials and Finishes for the Sustainable Interior (2) Constructing the Green Interior (2) Sustainable Studio I—Residential Environments (4) Sustainable Hard Goods (2) Green Lighting, Energy, and Controls (2) Maintaining the Green Interior (2) Environmental Systems for the Sustainable Interior (2) Sustainable Studio II—Contract Environments (4)

GRADUATE MPS IN INTERIOR LIGHTING DESIGN 724 History and Theory of Interior Illumination (2) 727 The Science of Light (2) 729 Programming for Light (2) 730 Daylighting Studio (3) 732 Presentation Techniques for Lighting Designers (2) 735 Lighting Historic Interiors (2) 737 Light Source Selection and Evaluation (2) 740 Lighting Workshop I (4) 741 Luminaire Design (2) 744 Green Lighting, Energy, and Controls (2) 745 Illuminating Art (2) 750 Lighting Workshop (3) 759 The Business of Light (2) GRADUATE MPS IN SUSTAINABLE INTERIOR ENVIRONMENTS 725 History and Theory of Sustainability in the Interior Environment (2) 726 Principles of Sustainable Design in the Natural Environment (2) 728 Designing the Green Interior (2) course and credit listing

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Admissions UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS 1 Application 2 $60 Application Fee ($100 for international students) 3 Essay 4 Official high school transcript, if applicable; official college transcript(s), if applicable 5 Two letters of recommendation 6 ACT/SAT scores, if applicable 7 Portfolio (required for AAS and BFA applicants) 1. APPLICATION All applicants to NYSID must submit a completed Application for Admission form available in the back of this catalog or on the web portal (http://portal.nysid.edu/ics/admissions). 2. APPLICATION FEE A nonrefundable application fee of $60 (or $100 for International Students) must be mailed along with your application, or can be paid online (http://portal.nysid.edu/ics/admissions). No cash payments. 3. ESSAY Applicants must submit a typed personal statement, roughly one page in length, describing their reasons for applying to NYSID. This can be mailed or emailed to admissions@nysid.edu. 4. TRANSCRIPTS a) A transcript that indicates graduation from an accredited secondary high school— including a graduation date—is required for admission. b) Applicants who did not complete secondary school but who have passed the High School Equivalency Examination (GED) must have an official score report sent to the Office of Admissions. c) Applicants who have previously attended other colleges or universities must have official college transcripts sent directly to the Office of Admissions from all colleges or universities attended. Transfer credit will be assessed by an Academic Advisor as part of the admissions process. d) Applicants who have obtained a college degree are not required to submit their high school transcript. 5. LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION a) All applicants must submit at least two letters of recommendation. Letters typically come from, but are not limited to, teachers, employers, design professionals, or counselors. b) Letters from friends or relatives are generally not accepted. Applicants may choose to use the Letter of Recommendation forms at the back of this catalog. 6. SAT/ACT SCORES a) Applicants who have graduated from a US high school within the past five years are expected to submit results from either the Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT) of the College Board (CEEB code 0333) or the 94

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American College Testing Program (ACT code 2829). These results should be sent to the Office of Admissions. b) Applicants who have successfully completed 45 or more credit hours at another accredited college or university are not required to submit standardized test results. 7. PORTFOLIO—Required for BFA and AAS programs. Applicants without a portfolio, see note below. a) The portfolio should demonstrate the applicant’s technical and creative abilities in the fine and/or applied arts. b) Applicants must submit a portfolio of 10 to 15 pieces to the Office of Admissions. The work should be of varied media and may consist of still life compositions, individual objects, landscapes, portraits, self-portraits, and/or figure drawings. At least two pieces should reflect an interior space. Drafting/technical drawings should be submitted if possible. c) We can accept portfolios in a number of formats, including slides or CDs. Portfolios are not returned unless specifically requested (a selfaddressed, postage-paid envelope must be provided). Note: Applicants who are interested in pursuing either the AAS or BFA degree but do not have the required portfolio materials must apply for admission to the Basic Interior Design (BID) nondegree program. Upon successful completion of the first semester of the BID program, students may apply for a change of program to either the AAS or BFA degree program. A portfolio of class work is required as part of the change of program application. Required credits earned in the Basic Interior Design program may be applied to the AAS and BFA upon acceptance into these programs. UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSIONS POLICIES FILING DATES AND NOTIFICATION Applications are accepted and decisions are made on a rolling basis, although it is recommended that applications are received by February 1 for the Fall semester and October 1 for the Spring semester. Students applying for admission after those dates cannot be guaranteed full-time status and may not be eligible for financial aid. When an application is submitted, the applicant will receive an email with log-in information for our web portal, so that they can track their admissions status online. Applicants are notified of admissions decisions by mail. TUITION DEPOSIT Students accepted into an undergraduate program at NYSID must submit a Declaration of Intent card and pay a nonrefundable tuition deposit of $350 within 30 days of the date of acceptance into the program. Those accepted prior to April 1 for the fall semester may request in writing an extension to May 1. CHANGE OF ACADEMIC PROGRAM Students accepted into an undergraduate program (e.g., Basic Interior Design) wishing to transfer to another program (e.g., Associate in


Applied Science) must complete a Change of Academic Program Request form, available in the Office of Admissions. Students must fulfill current admissions requirements for that level of study and be in good academic standing to be accepted into the new program. Students must also submit a portfolio for review to the Office of Admissions. READMISSION Matriculated students (those previously accepted into a degree program or Basic Interior Design) who leave the school for a year or more are required to apply for readmission. Applications for readmission are available in the Office of Admissions. Readmitted students are required to satisfy all degree requirements current at the time of readmission. Students who have attended other schools during their absence from NYSID must have official transcripts sent directly to NYSID. Course descriptions and samples of work produced in any course may also be required. Readmission requests from students who left while on academic probation are reviewed by the Admissions Committee. The student is notified of the readmission decision by mail. GRADUATE ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS 1 Application 2 $60 application fee ($100 for international students) 3 Essay and Resume 4 Official college transcript(s) 5 Two letters of recommendation 6 Portfolio (Required for MFA-2 and MPS applicants) 1. APPLICATION All applicants to a graduate program must submit a completed Graduate Application for Admission form, available in the back of this catalog, or on our website (www.nysid.edu). 2. APPLICATION FEE The application must be accompanied by payment of a nonrefundable $60 processing fee ($100 for international students). 3. ESSAY AND RESUME Applicants must submit a typed personal statement, roughly one page in length, describing their educational and professional goals. This can be mailed or emailed to admissions@nysid.edu. 4. OFFICIAL COLLEGE/UNIVERSITY TRANSCRIPTS a) Official transcripts from the undergraduate degree-granting institution as well as any other institutions attended after secondary school, are required. b) For the post-professional MFA (MFA-2) and MPS programs, a bachelor’s degree or equivalent is required in either interior design, architecture, or a closely related field. Note: Students entering the professional-level MFA-1 program with a previous undergraduate degree must submit transcripts indicating that they met the Council for Interior Design Accreditation's (CIDA) liberal

arts requirement of thirty semester credit hours of diverse college-level liberal arts and science courses. If not, they will be required to take additional courses that comply with CIDA's definition while at NYSID. 5. LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION Two letters of recommendation are required from employers, professors, or others able to judge the applicant’s aptitude for graduate study. 6. PORTFOLIO a) For the MFA-2 and MPS programs, applicants must submit a portfolio of a minimum of 15 pieces of design work. Applicants must demonstrate a professional level of design skills that, in the estimation of the Graduate Admissions Committee, enables the applicant to successfully pursue advanced study. b) For the MFA-1 program, applicants must submit a portfolio of 10 to 15 pieces of work which demonstrates their technical and creative abilities in the fine and/or applied arts. The work should be of varied media and may consist of still life compositions, individual objects, landscapes, portraits, self-portraits, and/or figure drawings. At least two pieces should reflect an interior space. Drafting/technical drawings should be submitted if possible. MFA-1 applicants who do not have a portfolio may instead meet this requirement by completing a two-week intensive training course offered in the summer session. This is not an option for MFA-2 or MPS applicants. c) All portfolios may be submitted in a number of formats, including books, slides, or CDs. Portfolios are not returned unless specifically requested (a self-addressed, postage-paid envelope must be provided). GRADUATE ADMISSIONS POLICIES The Post-Professional MFA (MFA-2) and MPS programs are designed primarily for students who have earned professional-level degrees in interior design, architecture, environmental design, or a closely related field. Inasmuch as the program builds on the design, technical, and professional base of these degrees, students with undergraduate degrees which do not encompass these areas of study will be required to demonstrate equivalent knowledge gained through nonacademic experience. The professional-level MFA (MFA-1) program offers training for students who have completed a bachelor’s degree in a field other than interior design or architecture. GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATION (GRE) The Graduate Record Examination is not required; however, students who have taken the examination should have the results forwarded to the college. TRANSFER OF CREDITS No transfer credit is accepted for the MFA-2 and MPS programs.

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FILING DATES AND NOTIFICATION The priority date for applications for admission to a graduate program is February 1. After that date, applications will be accepted on a spaceavailable basis. Applicants are notified of admissions decisions by mail after March 1. TUITION DEPOSIT Students accepted into a graduate program at NYSID must pay a nonrefundable tuition deposit of $500 within 30 days of the date of acceptance into the program. Those accepted prior to April 1 may request in writing an extension to May 1.

3. FINANCIAL DOCUMENTATION * All international students who need an F-1 visa to study in the United States must provide documentation demonstrating that the student will have sufficient funds to meet the full financial expenses for the duration of the individuals program of study. Such documents must be current and dated not more than six months in advance of the date that the Form I-20 is issued by the international student advisor. * This information is not used to determine admissibility, and a decision on an application can be made without the financial documentation being received by NYSID.

INTERNATIONAL STUDENT ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS In addition to the regular admissions credentials for undergraduate or graduate programs, international students must also submit:

An international student advisor is available to help with the special needs of international students, including visa matters, internships, employment authorization, and housing. The advisor can be contacted at 212.472.1500 x203 or admissions@nysid.edu.

1 Proof of English Proficiency 2 Evaluation of Foreign Transcripts by World Education Service (WES) 3 Financial Documentation *

Health Insurance

1. PROOF OF ENGLISH PROFICIENCY All applicants whose primary language is not English and/or have received their education in a country where English is not the official language of instruction are required to submit a Test of English as Foreign Language (TOEFL) score. The minimum score is a 79 on the internetbased test or a 213 on the computer-based test. NYSID’s TOEFL code is 9185. The English proficiency requirement can also be met by successfully completing Level 112 at an ELS Language Center and submitting an official certificate-of-completion. This requirement may be waived if the student has completed freshmanlevel English Composition at a United States college or university with a grade of “C” or higher. 2. EVALUATION OF FOREIGN TRANSCCRIPTS BY WORLD EDUCATION SERVICE (WES) It is the student’s responsibility to provide a WES Course-by-Course foreign credential evaluation of all secondary (high school) and postsecondary (college and university) academic records. This is necessary to determine admissibility and to assess any possible transfer credit. Instructions are found at www.wes.org. The WES evaluation is required of all applicants educated in countries outside the United States, with the exception of those students educated in Taiwan (under certain circumstances, a WES evaluation or Certified English translation may be requested by the Admissions Office for transcripts from Taiwan). Applications will not be reviewed or considered for admission without the required English proficiency score or WES evaluation. Please contact NYSID’s Office of Admissions at 212-472-1500 x204 or admissions@nysid.edu if you have questions about these requirements.

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The New York School of Interior Design requires all undergraduate and graduate students taking 9 or more credits to be covered by a health insurance plan. Any student who does not already have a health insurance plan will be automatically enrolled in the United Healthcare Student Insurance Plan, a program arranged by the college and administered through University Health Plans, Inc. A brochure outlining benefits may be found online at the University Health Plans’ website: www.universityhealthplans.com under the New York School of Interior Design link. Students who are enrolled in this plan will be billed for single coverage. Dependent coverage may be purchased, by the student, online through the University Health Plans’ website: www.universityhealthplans.com This is an annual plan; students will be enrolled for both the Fall and Spring Semester with coverage extending through vacation periods. Any student who already has a health insurance plan that is comparable to the health insurance program offered by the school may choose to waive this coverage.

Housing NYSID offers housing to students at a state-of-the-art student residential facility at the corner of East 97th Street and Third Avenue. This lively, safe, and easily accessible east-side location makes the NYSID student experience complete. The neighborhood is full of shops and restaurants, and the residence itself offers plenty of opportunities to make friends, as it houses students from a variety of New York City colleges. The Residence at 1760 Third Avenue features doubles and triples, all with their own bathroom, and provides 24-hour security and concierge service. Each student room is equipped with a refrigerator, microwave oven, and 26-inch DVD-equipped, flat-screen TV. There is free cable, free local and national phone service, and free high-speed internet. Rooms come fully furnished (except for bedding), and the facility has on site a


full-service gym, game room, common rooms, laundry room, quiet rooms, and computer kiosks. Housing applications are mailed with a student’s acceptance packet. For more information on student housing, please contact 212-472-1500, x 203.

Summer Pre-College Program This interactive course is designed to immerse students in the creative and rewarding world of interior design. Open to high school sophomores, juniors, and seniors, the course introduces students to interior design and helps them explore career possibilities. Taught by a team of NYSID faculty students attend lectures by design professionals, demonstrations of architectural drawing and digital media, and talks about color and materials. Taking full advantage of NYSID's prime location in the nation's design capital, field trips to contract and residential firms, design museums, and notable sites are included. The mentored design studio component will enable students to develop skills in a relaxed atmosphere and produce a project that can be added to their portfolio.  Upon successful completion of the course, students earn one college credit.

Registration In order to attend courses at NYSID, one must be formally accepted by the Office of Admissions into the Master of Fine Arts (MFA), Master of Professional Studies (MPS), Bachelor of Arts (BA), Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA), Associate in Applied Science (AAS), or Basic Interior Design (BID) program or enroll on a nonmatriculated basis. Students may accumulate a maximum of 12 credits on a nonmatriculated basis before being required to apply and be admitted to a program in order to continue to study at NYSID. 1. It is the responsibility of students to ensure that they are registered for courses in the proper sequence to meet degree requirements. Students should review course requests with an academic advisor or the registrar to verify that these criteria are being met. 2. Students with prior education or professional experience desiring to enroll in a course(s) without having completed course prerequisites must have the approval of an academic advisor. Students are responsible for providing necessary documentation, such as portfolio and transcripts, along with course descriptions to demonstrate qualifications prior to approval and registration. 3. Following formal acceptance, the Office of the Registrar maintains all official academic records, which are the property of the School. 4. Nonmatriculated students may register for courses following the course prerequisites. 5. Students are responsible for knowing regulations regarding course withdrawals, refund deadlines, program changes, and academic policies as described in the current catalog and Student Handbook.

IMMUNIZATION Prior to registration, all students born on or after January 1, 1957 and registering for 6 or more credits must submit the acceptable forms of proof of immunization to the School. See the Immunization Form in the back of this catalog or contact the Office of the Registrar 212-472-1500 ext 209 for immunization requirements. PLACEMENT IN MATHEMATICS AND ENGLISH Prior to registering for mathematics or English, all students must take the NYSID placement test. The placement test schedule is posted on the college’s websites, or call 212-472-1500 ext 210. Students may not take a mathematics or English placement test more than once. MATHEMATICS All students in the AAS, BFA, and BA degree programs are required to demonstrate proficiency in fundamental mathematical skills including basic arithmetic, algebra, geometry, and trigonometry. Proficiency may be demonstrated by transferring 2 credits of college-level mathematics with a grade of “C” or better, as approved by an academic advisor. All other students must take the NYSID math placement test. Placement testing will result in one of the following: 1. The student demonstrates sufficient proficiency to meet the NYSID mathematics requirement, and the 2-credit mathematics requirement converts to free electives. 2. The student demonstrates sufficient basic mathematical skills to register for 171 Basic Mathematics. 3. The student does not demonstrate sufficient basic mathematical skills to register for 171 Basic Mathematics and is required to complete a 2 semester-hour noncredit remedial course in mathematics. ENGLISH All students in the AAS, BFA, and BA degree programs and the Basic Interior Design program are required to demonstrate proficiency in writing grammatically correct prose. Students in the degree programs are also required to demonstrate proficiency in writing a well-planned research paper. All or part of the NYSID English requirements may be met by transferring appropriate college level credits with a grade of “C” or better, as approved by an academic advisor. Students who still need to satisfy 150 English Composition I must take the NYSID English placement test. Placement testing does not reduce the number of credits required by a particular program’s curriculum. Placement testing will result in one of the following: 1. The student demonstrates sufficient proficiency to place out of 150 English Composition I and into 160 English Composition II. AAS, BFA, and BA students are required to complete 3 credits in an advanced composition course that is designated as satisfying the college’s writing requirement. 2. The student demonstrates sufficient basic writing skills to register for 150 English Composition I or 151 English Composition I/ESL. 3. The student does not demonstrate sufficient basic writing skills to register for 150 English Composition I or 151 English Composition I/ESL r eg i s t r at i o n

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and is required to complete a 3 semester-hour noncredit remedial course in grammar and writing. TRANSFER CREDITS Transcripts are evaluated by academic advisors for possible transfer credit during and after the admissions process in order to determine if a student may be granted advanced standing. The coursework must be found relevant to the courses required by the degree at NYSID into which the student is matriculating. NYSID uses recognized guidelines that aid in the evaluation of credit, such as those published by the American Council on Education and the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers in assessing and documenting comparable learning through course content and level of instruction. Transfer credit may be accepted from institutions that are approved by the U.S. Department of Education, institutions that are recognized by accrediting agencies approved by the U.S. Department of Education, or those institutions which are recognized by the ministry of education or equivalent agency in the foreign country in which the studies occurred. Coursework from institutions which are not accredited or which do not meet the criteria above will be evaluated on the basis of evaluation of student work as it meets or exceeds the standards and expectations of equivalent NYSID courses, including but not limited to such student work as papers or art and design projects; and educational material such as course syllabi; handouts, assignments, and other documents; and the level of instruction as evidenced by the qualifications of the instructor, in comparison with instructor qualifications at NYSID. The School may accept liberal arts credits earned through the CLEP proficiency examinations. NYSID’s CLEP number is 7664. NEW STUDENT ORIENTATION New Student Orientation is held in order to familiarize students with the policies and procedures of NYSID. This program provides an opportunity for new arrivals to get to know each other as well as members of the faculty and staff. An additional orientation is required for new International Students. FULL-TIME/PART-TIME STATUS In order to be classified as having full-time status at NYSID, students must be registered for a minimum of 12 credits during the fall or spring semesters. Students who register in a given semester for 11 credits or less, or drop below 12 credits during the refund period, are classified as parttime students. Part-time status is further classified as three-quarter time (9–11 credits), half time (6–8 credits), and less than half time (1–5 credits). A change in status may affect a student’s eligibility for financial aid. ADVISEMENT/REGISTRATION SCHEDULES Students who have questions regarding courses for registration may make an appointment with an academic advisor during office hours prior to the registration period. Evening appointments for advisement must be requested. Registrations will not be processed unless immunization records are on file in the Office of the Registrar. Students should log in to the web portal and reserve courses online. Academic advisors review all course reservations; students should check the web portal for course approval. Once courses are approved, the account balance is available on the web portal, and students can pay tuition and any applicable fees online. 98 r eg i s t r at i o n

NYSID also accepts the paper registration form and payment in person or by mail. The registration form is in the course bulletin and online. REGISTRATION DATES NYSID offers a fall semester, a spring semester, and a summer session. Students should register during the regular registration period noted on the academic calendar and in the course registration bulletin issued for each semester or summer session. Continuing students who register after the regular registration period must pay a late fee in addition to the registration/technology/student activity fees. New students may register without penalty of a late fee. DROP/ADD Students who wish to change classes (drop or add) must drop or add online on the web portal or complete a Drop/Add form in the Office of the Registrar within the dates specified in the course bulletin. All drop/adds are reviewed by an academic advisor and, if applicable, by the International Student Advisor or Financial Aid Officer. A drop fee applies to drops that result in a refund. GRADE REPORTS Grade reports are available through the NYSID web portal (http://portal. nysid.edu) immediately after they are received from the faculty. Students may also obtain an updated unofficial transcript through the portal. Students are advised to review this information promptly and address perceived discrepancies with their instructor. Grade reports are not released to students who have outstanding financial obligations such as library fines or tuition balances. (See also Grading System in this catalog and the Student Handbook for policies.)

Academic Calendar SUMMER 2012 Monday, June 4 Thursday, June 28 Wednesday, July 4 Wednesday July 25

Summer session classes begin All course additions and registrations must be made prior to the second meeting of the class Last day for voluntary withdrawal from registered courses Independence Day - School closed Summer session ends

FALL 2012 Thursday, August 30 Tuesday, September 4 Monday, September 10 Monday, October 29 Wednesday, Nov 21, 6 pm through Sunday, Nov 25 Monday, December 17

New student orientation Fall semester classes begin Last day for course additions and registrations Last day for voluntary withdrawal from registered courses Thanksgiving recess begins at 6 pm - no evening classes Fall semester ends


SPRING 2013 Thursday, January 17 Tuesday, January 22 Monday, January 28 Monday, February 18 Monday, March 18 Monday, March 25 through Sunday, March 31 Monday, May 13

New student orientation Spring semester classes begin Last day for course additions and registrations President’s Day - School closed Last day for withdrawal from registered courses Spring recess Spring semester ends

TUITION AND FEE SCHEDULE The following costs are in effect for the 2012-2013 academic year (begins summer 2012). NYSID reserves the right to change regulations at any time without prior notice and the right to change tuition and fees as necessary. Registration fees and tuition deposits are nonrefundable. Tuition is estimated to increase approximately 4% a year. Undergraduate Tuition and Fees for Basic Interior Design, AAS and BFA in Interior Design programs, and Nonmatriculated Undergraduates

Students pay registration, technology and student activity fees online and reserve courses. In general, tuition and all applicable fees must be paid no later than 15 calendar days after course reservations are approved by an academic advisor. At some point prior to the beginning of the semester, tuition and all applicable fees are due at the time of course reservation and approval. For registration for the fall semester only, students may pay 50% of the semester’s tuition at the time of registration and the balance by the deadline approximately one month before the semester starts. Students must check the academic calendar on the web portal and in the course bulletin for all important registration and payment deadlines. Tuition deposits paid at the time of acceptance into a program can be applied to tuition at the time of registration. See Tuition Payment Plan below for other payment options.

Tuition per credit $828 Admission application fee $60 Admission application fee for international students $100 Registration fee (Fall & Spring Semesters) $115 per semester Registration fee (Summer Session) $75 Technology fee $150 per semester Student activity fee (none in Summer) $70 per semester Replacement ID $25 Late registration fee $100 Tuition deposit (nonrefundable, $350 applied to tuition) Drop fee $50 Returned check fee $35 Transcript fee $10 Completion of program/Diploma fee $40

Registration fees and tuition deposits are nonrefundable. No fees are transferable to another semester.

Undergraduate Tuition and Fees for BA in the History of the Interior and the Decorative Arts

Payment of Tuition & Fees

Before a student is eligible to register for a given semester, tuition and fees for all previous semesters must be paid in full. In the event that payment of tuition and fees is delinquent, the student will also be charged all fees the School incurs for the collection of the student’s delinquent account. Grades, transcripts, or any other official records will not be released unless all outstanding balances are paid in full. Note: A $1,000 nonrefundable fee will be charged to the account of any student who drops or withdraws from 199 Study Abroad and 370 Historic Preservation after approval by an academic advisor. All other refund schedules apply. The School accepts credit cards (American Express, MasterCard, and VISA) for payment online and accepts checks payable to NYSID, money orders, or credit cards for payment in person in the Office of the Registrar or by mail. Early registration is advisable for all courses. TUITION PAYMENT PLAN Tuition Management Systems (TMS) offers a plan under which students may arrange to finance tuition with monthly payments on a per semester basis for a nominal fee. If a student enrolls in a TMS Payment Plan, the registration, technology and student activity fees and the first payment of one-fifth of the total tuition is due directly to NYSID at the time of registration. The remaining payments are made to TMS. Payment options are not available to a student whose payment plan was canceled in the previous semester due to nonpayment or delinquent payments. There is no TMS for the summer session. For more information on TMS Payment Plans, call 800-722-4867, or online at www.afford.com/options.

BA candidates pay tuition on a semester basis. Students entering the BA in the History of the Interior and the Decorative Arts program in fall 2012 pay $12,438 per semester. For BA students who exceed 18 credits per semester, the per credit charge for this program is $828. Admission application fee $60 Admission application fee for international students $100 Registration fee (Fall & Spring Semesters) $115 per semester Registration fee (Summer Session) $75 Technology fee $150 per semester Student activity fee (none in Summer) $70 per semester Replacement ID $25 Late registration fee $100 Tuition deposit (nonrefundable, $350 applied to tuition) Drop fee $50 Returned check fee $35 Transcript fee $10 Completion of program/Diploma fee $40 Most courses require additional expenses for lab fees, textbooks, supplies, or museum admissions.

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GRADUATE TUITION AND FEES MFA candidates pay annual tuition billed on a semester basis (fall and spring) and separately for summer. Students entering the MFA-1 professional-level program and MFA-2 post-professional program pay $13,790 per semester and $919 per credit for any required or elective courses taken during the summer sessions. MPS candidates pay $11,032 per semester for fall and spring, and $5,516 for summer. For MFA-1 students admitted without a portfolio, the qualifying MFA-1 workshop is $919. For all graduate students, the per-credit charge for credits attempted in excess of 30 during the fall and spring semesters combined will be $919.

EXPENSES Typical expenses in addition to tuition and fees for the academic year (9 months) are estimated as follows:

Admission application fee $60 Admission application fee for international students $100 Registration fee (Fall & Spring Semesters) $115 per semester Registration Fee (Summer Session) $75 Technology fee $150 per semester Student activity fee (none in Summer) $70 per semester Replacement ID $25 Late Registration Fee $100 Tuition deposit (nonrefundable, $500 applied to tuition) Drop Fee $50 Returned check fee $35 Transcript fee $10 Completion of program/ Diploma fee $40

Dependent Student – Off Campus Housing $16,000 Living Expenses $5,000 Transportation $1,500 Books and supplies $1,500 Personal expenses $2,000

All graduate students must own or purchase a computer that meets specific requirements, which can be found by going to the Resources tab on www.nysid.edu. HEALTH INSURANCE FEE The fees for the 2011- 2012 year are as follows: Semester Rates Fall (8/27/11- 1/16/12) $492.00 Spring (1/17/12- 8/26/12) $763.00 This is an annual plan; students will be enrolled for both the fall and spring semester. Any student who already has a health insurance plan that is comparable to the health insurance program offered by the school may choose to waive this coverage. HOUSING COSTS NYSID’s housing options and costs for the 2011-2012 academic year (9 months) are: Double $14,400 Triple $13,530 $800 total housing deposit: $500 nonrefundable deposit applied towards housing cost (paid with housing application), $300 security deposit (due at contract signing and refunded at the end of the spring semester subject to room inspection).

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Dependent Student – On Campus Housing $16,000 Living expenses $5,000 Transportation $1,500 Books and supplies $1,500 Personal expenses $2,000

Dependent Student – With Parent Housing $8,000 Living Expenses $5,000 Transportation $1,500 Books and supplies $1,500 Personal expenses $2,000 Independent Student – On Campus Housing $16,000 Living Expenses $5,000 Transportation $1,500 Books and supplies $1,500 Personal expenses $3,000 Independent Student – Off Campus Housing $16,000 Living Expenses $5,000 Transportation $1,500 Books and supplies $1,500 Personal expenses $3,000 Independent Student – With Parent Housing $8,000 Living Expenses $5,000 Transportation $1,500 Books and supplies $1,500 Personal expenses $3,000 The above are estimates only. Visit the Net Price Calculator at www.nysid.edu for a more individualized cost of attendance.


Refund Policies & Procedures REFUND SCHEDULE Tuition refunds are calculated according to NYSID’s refund schedule based on the date courses are dropped on the web portal. A drop form may also be completed and signed in the Office of the Registrar; the drop date and refund (if applicable) are based on receipt of the signed form in the Office of the Registrar. Telephone notification is not accepted. Registration fees and tuition deposits are nonrefundable. All fees are nontransferable to another semester. Once the drop is approved, a refund will be made by check regardless of the student’s method of payment. Refunds resulting from dropping a course during the late registration period will not be processed until after the drop/add period is over. Students who receive federal aid may have to return a portion of the funds to the federal government if they withdraw from the School. This may result in monies owed to NYSID. The refund schedules are: SUMMER 2012 Last day to receive refund of: 100% May 25 75% June 4 50% June 14 25% June 21 No refund after June 21, 2012 FALL 2012 Last day to receive refund of: 100% August 27 75% September 10 50% September 17 25% September 24 No refund after September 24, 2012

STUDENT CLASSIFICATION BY YEAR The student’s level (e.g., freshman, sophomore, etc.) is determined by the following range of total credits earned. Both resident and transfer credits are included: Freshman 1 to 33 credits Sophomore 34 to 66 credits Junior 67 to 99 credits Senior 100 to 132 credits

Financial Aid Financial assistance is available to students who are matriculated and in good academic standing. Both need-based and merit-based scholarships are offered, and there are financial aid programs for both full-time and part-time study. An applicant is considered for financial assistance upon completion of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). UNDERGRADUATE FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE All applicants must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) online at www.fafsa.ed.gov. This single application will be reviewed for a student’s eligibility for the federal Pell grant, FSEOG grant, Work-Study Program, NYSID scholarships or assistantships, and New York State aid, if applicable. Students can apply for financial aid after January 1 of the academic year they are planning to enroll. New students for the fall semester should submit the FAFSA by August 1 while continuing students should submit the FAFSA by July 15. Continuing students attending the summer sessions should file the FAFSA by May 15. Everyone who applies for financial aid is notified via email and regular mail with regards to their eligibility. Students may log-on to their NYSID web portal account (http://portal. nysid.edu/ ics) to view any updates to their financial aid status.

SPRING 2013 Last day to receive refund of: 100% January 7 75% January 21 50% January 28 25% February 4 No refund after February 4, 2013

FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS

Note: For one-credit mini courses and all Continuing Education courses, refunds must be requested no later than one week prior to the first session or no refund is permissible.

FEDERAL SUPPLEMENTAL EDUCATION OPPORTUNITY GRANT (FSEOG) Priority is given to students who are eligible to receive the Federal Pell Grant. Award amounts depend on the level of need, the number of credits for which a student is registered, and the availability of funds.

See note under Payment of Tuition & Fees regarding 199 Study Abroad and 370 Historic Preservation. Students should check the academic calendar online for any updates to deadlines and schedules.

FEDERAL PELL GRANT Federal Pell Grants are awarded to undergraduate students who complete a FAFSA and demonstrate financial need. The maximum amount is set annually, and the grant is available for both full-time and part-time study. Students with a prior bachelor’s degree are not eligible.

FEDERAL WORK-STUDY PROGRAM This program offers an excellent opportunity for undergraduate and graduate students to defray their educational expenses. There are several jobs available at the college that allow the student to study and work on a convenient schedule. Students must demonstrate financial need to be eligible. 101 financial aid


FEDERAL DIRECT STAFFORD LOAN Undergraduate and graduate students who attend at least half time (6 credits or more) may borrow a Federal Stafford Loan. Consult the Financial Aid Office to determine the extent of loan eligibility.

U.S. citizens and permanent residents may also qualify for financial assistance in the form of federal, state, and private loan and grant programs. Graduate students should apply for financial aid through the Office of Financial Aid.

FEDERAL DIRECT PARENT LOAN (FPLUS) Dependent students may supplement their funding with a federal PLUS loan. Loan eligibility is not based on need; however, the parent who is the borrower must maintain a good credit rating. Consult the Financial Aid Office to determine the extent of loan eligibility and to complete the loan application.

The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) should be completed online at www.fafsa.ed.gov. Other documents, such as federal tax forms and citizenship documentation, may be requested. If financial need has been established and adequate funding is available, graduate students are considered for NYSID aid, Federal Work-Study, and Federal Stafford Loans.

TUITION ASSISTANCE PROGRAM (TAP) Residents of New York State who attend full time (12 credits or more) and demonstrate financial need may be eligible for this state-funded grant.

Additional information on financial aid is found on www.nysid.edu.

General Regulations & Policies

AID FOR PART-TIME STUDY (APTS) Residents of New York State who attend less than full time (3–11 credits) and demonstrate need may be eligible for this state-funded grant. The financial aid office will provide the APTS application to eligible students.

Students are responsible for the accuracy of their academic records and for knowing regulations regarding withdrawals, refund deadlines, program changes, schedule changes, and school policy as described in the NYSID catalog, course bulletins, and the Student Handbook.

VETERANS AID NYSID has always been proud to welcome our country’s veterans as students and continues to work with them on getting the most out of the GI Bill which may include up to $17,500 in base tuition and fees benefits. GI Bill information can be found on the website of the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs (www.gibill.va.gov), or contact NYSID’s Veteran’s Affairs liaison at 212-472-1500, ext 207.

STUDENT HANDBOOK NYSID publishes a Student Handbook to act as a general guide to student life at NYSID and to communicate administrative and academic policies. Students are responsible for knowing the information contained in the Student Handbook. Failure to read the handbook does not excuse students from the requirements and regulations contained therein. These administrative and academic policies may be changed by NYSID from time to time. Students should check the web portal and www.nysid. edu for updates to schedules, deadlines, policies, and other important information.

UNDERGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS Full-time (12 or more credits) matriculated students who maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.0 may be eligible for NYSID financial assistance. First-semester students are eligible but must meet the GPA standard upon conclusion of their first semester to continue receiving a scholarship in subsequent semesters. All undergraduate scholarships are merit based. To be considered, undergraduate applicants must have all admissions materials fulfilled by February 1 for the fall term and November 1 for the spring term. Additional information on financial aid is found on www.nysid.edu. GRADUATE FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE NYSID offers a limited number of graduate assistantships. These assistantship stipends range from $5,000 to $10,000 per academic year and are renewable in the second year provided the student maintains good academic standing. The graduate assistant earns a stipend up to the amount of the award by agreeing to carry out work assignments in an academic or administrative department of the college for up to 20 hours per week. All graduate assistantships are merit based. Qualifying MFA applicants will be contacted in the spring with information reguarding what further materials are needed to be considered for an assistantship.

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ACADEMIC POLICIES COURSE ATTENDANCE Regular and punctual attendance at all classes is mandatory. Students are responsible for making up all work missed due to illness or personal emergency. If a student misses a class due to illness or personal emergency, he/she should notify the instructor of the circumstances. A student is not excused from any class because it conflicts with employment. A student will be involuntarily withdrawn from a class and a grade of “F” will be assigned in the case of excessive absences. This is defined as absence from more than 20% of the classes of a course in a given semester. Students are required to arrive at their classes on time. Three instances of lateness are recorded as one absence. No refunds will be made to students who are involuntarily withdrawn from a class due to excessive absences. Students are required to attend classes for the entire time period, do studio work in class as directed by the instructor, and present their work at final review sessions. Students are excused from review sessions only in the case of a documented illness or personal emergency. In the case of a student’s unexcused absence from his/her scheduled presentation, the work is graded as failure.


RELIGIOUS OBLIGATIONS NYSID recognizes and respects the diversity of its students and their respective religious obligations and practices. The School therefore makes every effort to afford all individuals appropriate opportunity to fulfill those religious obligations and practices. Instructors provide students with the opportunity to make up class work or examinations that are missed because of religious obligations and practices. It is the student’s responsibility to notify instructors in advance, preferably in writing, and to follow through in making up work. COURSE CANCELLATIONS All courses are offered subject to a minimum enrollment per class. The School reserves the right to alter time schedules, substitute faculty, or cancel any course or section in which enrollment is deemed insufficient. GRADING SYSTEM A Outstanding A- B+ Very Good B B- C+ Satisfactory C C- D+ Poor D D- F Inadequate AUD INC P LP R W

4.00 3.67 3.33 3.00 2.67 2.33 2.00 1.67 1.33 1.00 0.67 0.00

“Audit,” must attend 80% of all classes. No credit. “Incomplete;” issued as a result of an extenuating circum- stance beyond the student’s control (such as serious illness, death in the family, or an accident). Coursework must be completed within four (4) weeks of the last day of classes of the semester or it automatically becomes an “F” on the permanent transcript. “Pass” "Low Pass" meets minimal course standards “Repeated” for a better grade Voluntary withdrawal before midsemester or midsession

The definition of each grade and the standard it represents are detailed in the Student Handbook. It is the responsibility and prerogative of faculty to assign a final grade for student achievement in a course. The evaluation on which a grade is based includes, but is not limited to, quality of total course work, interim and final examinations, meeting course criteria, class participation, prompt attendance, and demonstration of individual progress. If a student fails to complete a course for any reason, the next level course can be taken only after the prerequisite is successfully completed. If, for a serious and valid reason such as error in calculation, a student requests reconsideration of an assigned final grade, the student may ask the faculty member to review the initial evaluation. However, final grades

are not subject to further reviews or changes of grade by anyone other than the grading faculty member. All courses within the Master of Professional Studies programs are graded Pass (P), Low Pass (LP), or Fail (F). Credit will be given for passing grades, P or LP. No credit will be given for a grade of F. Each student in the MPS program receives a written evaluation based on the student’s academic portfolio that remains part of the student’s permanent record but is not included in the transcripts. INCOMPLETE An incomplete is given only if the student: 1. attended more than 80 percent of the course; 2. completed all but one project/assignment; 3. made a specific request for an incomplete to the instructor before the last class session; and 4. provides documentation of personal illness or injury, or illness or death in her/his immediate family. All reasons must be submitted in writing and reviewed by the instructor and an academic advisor before the Incomplete can be recorded. It is the student’s responsibility to follow up directly with the instructor to resolve an Incomplete. An Incomplete must be made up within four weeks of the last day of classes of the semester or it automatically becomes a grade of “F” on the permanent transcript. COURSES REPEATED FOR A BETTER GRADE In order to satisfy program requirements, matriculated students must retake all required professional studio courses in which the grade received is not a “C-” or better. A repeated course must be the same course as the one for which the unsatisfactory grade was awarded. After completion of the repeated course, the first grade is recorded as “R” (Repeat), and the later grade earned is averaged into the GPA. Institutional financial aid (i.e., New York School of Interior Design scholarships) may not be used to cover the expenses of repeating a course. GOOD STANDING To be in good standing, a student in the BFA, BA, AAS, or Basic Interior Design program must maintain a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.0. Students in the graduate programs must maintain a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0. Students who are recipients under the New York State Assistance Program must also meet academic standards for satisfactory progress as registered with the State of New York. ACADEMIC PROBATION AND DISMISSAL Failure to maintain the minimum cumulative GPA noted above means that the student’s tenure at NYSID is in jeopardy. In the undergraduate programs, a student whose GPA falls below 2.0 in any single semester is placed on academic probation for the following semester. The student’s performance and attendance are reviewed at the end of the probationary semester. If the term GPA falls below 2.0 again in the following semester, the student may be dismissed from the college. Students on academic probation are not permitted to register for an internship for credit or petition for a grade of Incomplete. NYSID reserves g e n e r a l r eg u l at i o n s & p o l i c i e s

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the right to impose other restrictions and conditions in individual cases, as it sees fit. In a graduate program, a student whose cumulative or semester GPA falls below 3.0 may be subject to dismissal. Ordinarily a student with a grade point average below published minimums who has voluntarily withdrawn from the college or who has been academically dismissed from the college will not be eligible to apply for readmission. ACADEMIC DISTINCTION Any undergraduate student who has completed 12 or more credits during any term, does not carry an INC (Incomplete) for that semester and has a GPA of 3.5 or higher is named to the Dean’s List. The BFA, BA, and AAS degrees may be conferred with Honors (cumulative GPA of 3.5–3.79) or High Honors (3.80–4.0). STUDENT WORK Student work completed for courses taken at NYSID remains the property of the School until such time as the School releases it to the student. Students should include their name, address, course title, and semester on all work. RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS For complete residence requirements, see the descriptions under the specific program headings. GRADUATION PROCEDURES To be eligible to graduate with an MFA, MPS, BFA, BA, or AAS degree or to complete the Basic Interior Design program, the student must satisfy all NYSID program academic requirements and be in good standing. Students should monitor their academic progress (degree audit) online throughout their program and meet with an academic advisor in the semester prior to the anticipated graduation for a transcript review to determine eligibility for graduation. All applicable transfer credits, incomplete work, and financial obligations must be resolved in order to participate in graduation or receive a diploma. Financial obligations include tuition, fees, library fines, and collection fees. The diploma is held pending clearance of the candidate’s financial account. At the start of the semester in which a program completion is anticipated, the student must file a Graduation Information and Candidacy Form in the Office of the Registrar. Students who have completed graduation requirements for degree programs during the preceding academic year are invited to participate in the commencement ceremony held after the spring semester. Degree candidates who are eligible for graduation must indicate their intention to attend the commencement ceremony as well as provide measurements for a cap and gown on the Graduation Candidacy form, which must be returned to the Registrar’s Office no later than March 1.

CAREEER PLACEMENT SERVICE The college maintains an active career placement service for graduates and current matriculated students who have completed a minimum of 12 credits at NYSID. Because of its reputation in the design field, many NYSID graduates find work in the best design, architectural, and industry-related firms in New York City, across the United States, and around the world. Further information may be obtained by calling 212- 472-1500, ext. 210, or visit our website at www.nysid.edu.

GENERAL POLICIES NOTICE OF NONDISCRIMINATION POLICY NYSID admits students of any sex, age, marital status, race, color, creed, national, and ethnic origin, actual or perceived sexual orientation or veteran status to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the School. It does not discriminate on the basis of sex, age, marital status, race, creed, disability, national or ethnic origin, actual or perceived sexual orientation or veteran status in the administration of its educational policies, admission policies, scholarship and loan programs, and other school-related programs ACADEMIC FREEDOM NYSID has adopted the 1940 statement of principles on academic freedom as put forward by the American Association of University Professors and the Association of American Colleges. The policy statement appears in the Faculty Handbook. DISCIPLINE As an academic community, NYSID actively promotes policies and procedures associated with mutual respect for the civil, personal, and property rights of its members. The rules and regulations exist to affirm the special values and functions designed to preserve freedom of expression. The School expects students to be familiar with all regulations regarding behavior intended to promote a proper professional school environment. Violations are subject to disciplinary actions which include dismissal. Regulations and policies are stated in the Student Handbook. FAMILY EDUCATION RIGHTS AND PRIVACY ACT The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) entitles a student to certain rights with respect to their education records and Directory information. Education records contain information such as academic transcript, financial aid and student account records. A student's rights regarding these records according to FERPA are: * The right to inspect and review their education records. Students should submit to the Registrar a written request that identifies the record(s) they wish to inspect. The New York School of Interior Design will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected within a reasonable time. * The right to request the amendment of their education records to ensure that they are accurate and not in violation of their privacy rights.

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Students should write to the NYSID official responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading. If the New York School of Interior Design decides not to amend the record as requested by the student, NYSID will notify the student of the decision and advise the student of his or her right to a hearing. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student at that time. * The right to file with the U.S. Department of Education a complaint concerning alleged failures by NYSID to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the office that administers FERPA is: Family Policy Compliance Office/U.S. Department of Education/400 Maryland Avenue SW/Washington, DC 20202-4605 * The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in their education records (information that would make their identity easily traceable; e.g., Social Security number, etc.) except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. One exception which permits disclosure without consent is disclosure to College officials with legitimate educational interests. A College official is a person employed by the New York School of Interior Design in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and health staff); a person or company with whom NYSID has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor or collection agent); a person serving on the Board of Directors; or a student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting antoher College official in performing his or her tasks. A College official has legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility. Although Directory information can be shared with third parties without the consent of students; NYSID does offer students the opportunity to request that this information is not provided to outside interests. The request should be put in writing and submitted to the Registrar. COMPLAINT PROCEDURES In accordance with section 494C(J) of the Higher Education Act of 1965, any person who believes he or she has been aggrieved by an institution of higher education has the right to file a written complaint. For more details regarding complaint procedures refer to the Student Handbook. ANNUAL SECURITY REPORT In compliance with the Student Right-to-Know and the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, NYSID's Annual Security Report provides statistics for the previous three years concerning reported crimes. Crimes are reported that occurred on campus; in property owned or controlled by the College; and on public property within, or immediately adjacent to and accessible from, the campus. In addition to the above, institutional policies concerning campus conduct, policies concerning alcohol and drug use, crime prevention, the reporting of crimes, sexual assault, fire and safety information and statistics, and other matters are distributed to all current students and employees.

Individuals may gain access to this information in a number of ways. The Registrar will provide, upon request, all campus crime statistics as reported to the United States Department of Education. These statistics are available at www.ope.ed.gov/security/ and on the NYSID website. Requests for a hardcopy of the Annual Security Report can be directed to: Office of the Registrar 170 East 70th Street New York, NY 10021 212-472-1500 x207

Annual Security Report: Crime Statistics 2008-2010 Offense Murder/Non-Negligent Manslaughter Negligent Manslaughter Sex Offenses, Forcible Sex Offenses, Non-Forcible Robbery Aggravated Assault Burglary Motor Vehicle Theft Arson Liquor Law Arrests Liquor Law Violations Drug Law Arrests Drug Law Violations Illegal Weapons Possession Arrests Illegal Weapons Violations

On-Campus; Non-Campus Property; & Public Property   2008 2009 2010 0 0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0

DRUG-FREE SCHOOLS AMENDMENT NYSID has adopted regulations in accordance with the provisions of the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendment to the Higher Education Act of 1965. This information is updated annually and kept on file in the library, and the regulations are published in the Student Handbook. SMOKING Smoking is prohibited in front of and inside all campus buildings.

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Faculty Raja Abillama, Ph.D., City University of New York, Graduate Center; MS, London School of Economics and Political Science; BArch, American University of Beirut Maryann Sorenson Allacci, PhD, MPhil, Graduate School and University Center CUNY; MA, Hunter College Emily Altman, MA, Columbia University, BA, Smith College Goil Amornvivat MArch, Yale University; BArch, Carnegie Mellon University; Partner, Tug Studio Dean Barger, BFA, University of Toledo Matthew R. Barlow, BS, University of Cincinnati; Architectural Technician, HOK, Inc. Ann Barton, BArch, Cooper Union Vanessa Betancourt, RA, LEED AP; BPS, Pratt Institute; Senior Associate, Swanke Hayden Connell Architects Reid Betz, RA; LEED AP; MArch, The Georgia Institute of Technology; Bachelor of Engineering in Civil Engineering, The Cooper Union; Principal, Ageloff & Associates Melinda Bickers, NCIDQ Certified; New York State Certified Interior Designer; ASID; DC; MA, Parsons School of Design/Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum, BFA, New York School of Interior Design; BS, Northwestern University; Principal, MJB Design Associates, Inc. Benjamin Birillo, School of Visual Arts; Graphic Design Raymond Blackburn, MFA, City College of New York; BA, Hunter College Daniel Bontrop, BFA in Interior Design, Parsons School of Design; Principal and Lead Designer, Daniel Bontrop Interiors Anthea Bosch-Moschini, BFA, New York School of Interior Design; Founder & Principal/Partner, Studio A Design LLC Peter P. Brandt, Ph.D (Hon), RA; NYSID Director of Undergraduate Studies; NCIDQ Certified; BArch, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Principle, Brandt Design Associates Tania Branquinho, NCIDQ Certified; BFA, New York School of Interior Design

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Debra L. Bryant, MFA, Syracuse University; BFA, State University of New York at Buffalo Michael Buchanan, BA, Fashion Institute of Technology; Interior Designer, Michael Buchanan Style David Burdett, MA, De Montfort University, Leicester, UK, BA, Leicester Polytechnic School of Architecture, Leicester, UK Ruth Virginia Burt, ASID Allied; DC; MA, New York University; BA, Marymount Manhattan College; AAS, New York School of Interior Design; Principal, Ruth Burt International, Ltd. Becky Button, IIDA; NCIDQ Cerfified; LEED AP; BFA, New York School of Interior Design; BS, State University of New York at New Paltz; Design Director and Associate Principal, Swanke Hayden Connell Architects Charles Cameron, IES; MFA, New York University, BA, Drew University; Partner & Principal Designer, Meeker Cameron Light Design Group Lissette Carrera, MFA-Post Professional, New York School of Interior Design; BFA, Ringling College of Art & Design Maria Chamberlin-Hellman, PhD, MPhil, MA, AB, Columbia University Mary L. Chan, MA, Edinburgh University; BA, Vassar College; AAS, Parsons School of Design; Principal, Studio Bartleby Richard Todd Class, IDEC; NYSID Director of Academic Computing; BS, Architectural Design, New York Institute of Technology Eric Cohen, NCIDQ Certified; AIA; MArch, University of Minnesota; BA, Kent State University; Sr. Associate Principal, Ethelind Coblin Architect, PC Adrienne Concra, BFA, University of Georgia William Costa, Bachelor of Industrial Design, Pratt Institute; Independent Marketing and Product Development Consultant, Sourceeuro LLC Kati Curtis, CID; ASID; LEED AP; BFA Interior Design, Savannah College of Art & Design Robert Dadras, RA; BArch, New York Institute of Technology; Principal, Dadras Interior Design Victor Dadras, RA; MArch, Harvard University; BArch, New York Institute of Technology; Principal, TKV Architects Timothy deFiebre, BFA, Denison University; Founder, Timothy deFiebre Designs

Jennifer Kiki Dennis, BA, Ithaca College; AAS, New York School of Interior Design; Principal, Kiki Dennis Interiors, Inc. Carol Derby, BA, William's College; Director of Environmental Strategy, Designtex Alphonse D. Diaz, Licensed Architect, New York and Illinois; MArch, BS in Architecture, University of Illinois; Project Architect, Beth Cooper Lawrence Architect, P.C. Patricia DiMaggio, BA, Brooklyn College; Commercial Engineer, Osram Sylvania, Inc. William Engel, IES Affiliate; BFA, New York School of Interior Design; Artist, Designer Rene B. Estacio, BS, Architecture, University of St. Thomas; AAS, New York School of Interior Design; Principal, Rene Estacio, Product Designer Michelle Everett, BFA, New York School of Interior Design;Principal, Michelle Everett Interior Design Ellen Fisher, Dean of Academic Affairs, NYSID; NCIDQ Certified; New York State Certified Interior Designer; ASID; IDEC; MA, Columbia University; BA, Ithaca College; AAS, Fashion Institute of Technology; Principal, Design & Planning Interiors Rachel Fletcher, MFA, Humboldt State University; MA, State University of New York at Albany; BA, Hofstra University; Geometer, Theater Designer Andrew D. Fredman, NCARB, Green Building Council; MArch, Columbia University; BA, The Johns Hopkins University; Principal, Andrew Fredman Architect LLC Daniel C. Friedman, LEED AP; MArch, New Jersey Institute of Technology; BA, Hobart College; Associate/Project Manager, Metropolitan United Studio Steve Gerber, BFA, Pratt Institute; Illustrator, Graphic Designer Eric J. Gering, AIA; MArch, Yale University; BS Arch, Penn State University; Principal, Eric Joseph Gering, Architect Joseph Goldstein, AIA; BArch, Cooper Union; BA, Yale University Donna J. Goodman, RA; MArch, Columbia University; BA, Smith College Judith B. Gura, ASID; NYSID Design History Area Coordinator; MA, Design History, Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative


Arts; AB, Cornell University; Museum and Exhibition Consultant, The Brooklyn Museum Randi Halpern, NCIDQ Certified; BFA In Interior Design, New York Institute of Technology Kate Hanenberg, MArch, University of Virginia; BA, Sarah Lawrence College; Senior Associate, Perkins Eastman Architects Robert J. Harding, MFA, Southern Illinois University; BA, Rutgers University; Artist, Designer Eric Hilton, BArch, Syracuse University; President, Eric Hilton LTD Morris Hylton III, MS, Columbia University, BArch, University of Kentucky Courtney P. Hewitt, Master of Industrial Design, Pratt Institute; BA, University of Vermont; Founder, Powers Unlimited Eileen Imber, ASLA; Master’s in Urban Planning, Graduate Center, City University of New York; MS, Education, Brooklyn College; BS, City College, City University of New York; BS, Education, New York University Darris W. James, BArch, University of Tennessee College of Architecture & Design; Senior Assocate, Gensler Evie T. Joselow, PhD, Graduate Center CUNY; BA, Vassar College May Julsuwan, LEED AP; MS, Pratt Institute; BBA, Baruch College; Job Captain/Technical Coordinator/LEED Coordinator Steven R. Kaplan, MArch, Columbia University Graduate School of Architecture; BA, Bowdoin College; Prinicpal, Fisher & Kaplan Properties John Katimaris, RA; NCIDQ Certified; AIA, IALD, IES, IIDA; MFA, Parsons School of Design; BS Arch, New York Institute of Technology; Principal, Katimaris+Associates Design Consultants, Inc. Addison Kelly, IALD: Parsons School of Design Augustus Kim-Wendell, MFA, School of Visual Arts; BS, Architecture, Northeastern University; Principal, Kim-Wendell Design Robert Arthur King, RA, AIA, ASID; AAA; New York State Certified Interior Designer; AADipl, Architectural Association (London); BArch, Columbia University; AAA, Academy of Aeronautics; President, Robert Arthur King, Architect, PC Terry Kleinberg, RA; MArch, Princeton University; BA, Wesleyan University; Principal, Terry Kleinberg, Architect

Anne Korman, ASID; Design Diploma, New York School of Interior Design; Principal, Anne Korman Inc. Don Kossar, ASID Allied; BFA, New York School of Interior Design; BS, Brooklyn College; Principal, Don Kossar Interiors Chad Laird, MA, Stony Brook University; BA, Florida State University Eric Lam, RA, AIA, IIDA, NCIDQ Certified, LEED AP; BA, The City College of New York; Principal, Lam McGowan Architecture + Design Mark La Rosa, BA, Central Michigan University Kunho Lee, IIDA, NCIDQ Certified, LEED AP; BFA, New York School of Interior Design Rocco Leonardis, RIBA; MFA (Sculpture), MFA (Painting) New York Academy of Art; BArch, Pratt Institute; Principal, Rocco Leonardis, Architect Barry Lewis, BS, New School for Social Research; Certificate, University of Paris (Sorbonne); Architectural Historian Kai X. Liang, MS, Columbia University; BArch, University of Oregon; Design Architect, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP Cathleen Lindsay, BD, University of Florida; Partner, Lindsay Newman Architecture and Design Stephen Thomas Lofthouse, MA, BA, Hunter College Barbara Lowenthal, RA; NYSID MFA Area Coordinator; MArch, Princeton University; BA, University of Michigan; Principal, Barbara Lowenthal, RA Ethan Lu, RA; AIA; LEED AP; NYSID Sustainability Area Coordinator; MS, Columbia University; MArch, Harvard University; BS, University of Michigan; Principal and Co-Founder, Metropolitan United Studio, PLLC Francine Martini, NCIDQ Certified, IIDA, Master in Design Management, Pratt Institute; BA in Interior Design, The College of New Jersey; Principal, Martini Design Interiors Patricia McGillicuddy, IES; MFA, Lighting Design for Theatre, New York University; BA,State University of New York at Oswego; Manager of Technology, IESNA Valerie Mead, ASID Allied, DC; BFA, New York School of Interior Design; Owner, Valerie Elizabeth Mead Interiors Larry Mersel, AIA; BArch, Carnegie Mellon University

Margaret Mintz, MA, Carleton University, Canada; BA, University of Windsor, Canada; BEd, University of Toronto, Canada; BFA, New York School of Interior Design; President, Mintz and Partners, Inc. Interior Design Thomas Morbitzer, AIA; MArch, Yale University; BS, The Ohio State University; Owner, Tug Studio Leah Nanpei, MS, Columbia University; BArch, University of Oregon; Intermediate Designer, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill Ali Nematollahy, MA, Graduate Center, City University of New York; BA, University of Maryland Ozgem Ornektekin, LEED AP; BS, University of Denver; Project Manager/Sustainability Task Leader, AECOM Technology Corp. Jon Otis, MS, University of Massachusetts; BA, Moravian College; Creative Director, Object Inc. Mehmet Ozpay, AIA Associate; MArch, University of Stuttgart Mitul Parekh, IES, LEED AP; Master of Engineering in Architectural Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University; Bachelor of Technology in Architectural Engineering, University of Calicut, India; Lighting Designer, Cline Bettridge Bernstein Lighting Design, Inc. Pamela Perkins, NYSID Liberal Arts Area Coordinator; PhD, AM, Brown University; AB, Vassar College Matthew A. Postal, PhD, Graduate Center of City University of New York; MA, New York University, Institute of Fine Arts; BA, Vassar College; Architectural Historian Ethel Rompilla, ASID Allied; DC; BFA, New York School of Interior Design William Rosebro, MArch, Rice University; BA, University of Virginia Kate Russell, MS Pratt Institute; BA, State University of New York College at Brockport Roxanne Ryce-Paul, LEED AP BD+C; Master of Science Urban Planning, Columbia University; Master of Science Historic Preservation, Columbia University; BArch, The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Art and Science; Founder & Director, EcoEco Building Addie Sels, BFA, New York School of Interior Design; BS, Cornell University; Diplome d’Etudes de la Civilisation Francaise, Sorbonne; Interior Designer fa c u lt y

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Faculty continued Eric A. Silinsh, BArch, Carnegie Mellon University; Project Manager/Project Architect, Zivkovic Associates Mark T. Simpson, MFA, Lighting Design, New York University; MA, The American University; BA, Psychology, Case Western Reserve University Mark Squeo, AIA; MArch, University of Texas at Arlington; BArch, Syracuse University; Principal, Squeo Architecture, P.C. Gregory Stanford, BArch, Syracuse University John Steigerwald, AIA, ASID, RIBA, NCARB; MArch, Harvard University; BArch, Virginia Polytech Institute State University

Christopher Welsh , RA; BArch, Pratt Institute Doug West , NCIDQ Certified; LEED AP; BS, Cor-

nell University; Associate/Senior Interior Designer, HOK Inc.

Veronica Whitlock, NCIDQ Certified; NY State Certified Interior Designer; ASID, IDEC, IDLNY, DC; NYSID Lower Area Coordinator; MA, Parsons School of Design/Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum; BFA, New York School of Interior Design; BA, Duke University Cecilia Whittaker-Doe, BFA, State University of New York College at Buffalo; President, Doe Print Designs Ltd.

Mason Wickham , MArch, Rice University; BS,

University of Virginia

Lecturers Mary Kay Baldwin , ASID Industry Partners; DC; IFDA; BS, Syracuse University Rosalind Benedict , BA, Duke University; Textile and Rug Specialist

Ivy Berman , MBA, New York University; BA, Tufts University; Owner, IV Sales and Consulting Adrienne Concra , BFA, University of Georgia Christopher J. Desler, BS, BA, University of

Massachusetts; Marketing Consultant, The Wool Bureau

Ann-Sargent Wooster, AICA; MA (Art History),

Dennis Lee, BS, Suny Empire College; AAS, The Fashion Institite of Technology; President and Design Director, Tyler Hall

Michael Kenneth Stokes, MFA, New York School of Interior Design; BFA, St. Mary's College of Maryland

Jennifer R. Worth , Masters of Art, Hunter Col-

Edward Goodman , BA, Long Island University; Director of Marketing and Design, Trimmings Division, ScalamandrĂŠ

Lee Stout, NCIDQ Certified, IDEC; BFA, Pratt Institute; President, Lee Stout NYC

Catholic University of America; BArch, Catholic University of America

Stefan Steil, MFA, New York School of Interior Design; BFA, New York School of Interior Design; Interior Designer, Selldorf Architects

MA (Fine Arts), Hunter College; AB, Bard College; Artist and Art Historian lege; BA, Hunter College

Robert E. Yori Jr, Associate AIA Member; BS,

Ramon Tejada, MFA, Bennington College; BA, Wheaton College; Production Coordinator/Graphic Designer, The Shakespeare Society

Robert Yuricic, BS, Architecture, New York Institute of Technology; Architect, Greenberg Farrow Architecture, Engineering Development

Heidi Theunissen, MArch, The Ohio State University; B.Ed., University of Stellenbosch, South Africa; BA, University of Stellenbosch, South Africa; Designer, Cook + Fox Architects, LLP

Edwin J. Zawadzki, MArch, Yale University; BA,

Jeffrey Tome, MA, Computer Art, New York Institute of Technology; BFA, School of Visual Arts Ernesto E. Trindade, AIA, LEED AP; Master of Urban Design, The City University of New York; BArch, The City College of New York; Vice President, Cannon Design Peter Tymus, MA, BS, New York University

Jason Van Nest , MArch, Yale University; BS, College of Architecture Georgia Tech; Adjunct Professor, New York Institute of Technology

Freya Van Saun , MA, The Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts; BFA, Fashion Institute of Technology; AS, Empire State College Erin Wells, ASID; BFA, New York School of Inte-

rior Design; BA, Oberlin College;Director of Interior Design, Ageloff & Associates

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Jody Xuereb, College of Aeronautics; Owner & Operator, J & P Custom Upholstry

MaryPaul Yates, AAS, Fashion Institute of

Technology; BFA, Syracuse University; Principal, Yates Design Inc.

Harvard University; Design Principal, In Situ Design

Key to Professional Affiliations AAA American Arbitration Association AIA American Institute of Architects AICA International Association of Art Critics - American Section ASA American Society of Appraisers ASID American Society of Interior Designers ASLA American Society of Landscape Architects DC The Decorators Club FAIA Fellow American Institute of Architects IALD International Association of Lighting Designers IDEC Interior Design Educators Council IDLNY Interior Designers for Legislation in New York IES Illuminating Engineering Society IIDA International Interior Design Association LEED Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design NCIDQ National Council for Interior Design Qualification RA Registered Architect RIBA Royal Institute of British Architects


Application for Undergraduate Admission Office of Admissions • NYSID • 170 East 70th Street, New York, NY 10021-5110 • 212-472-1500 • Fax 212-472-1867 • admissions@nysid.edu A nonrefundable, nontransferable fee of $60 must accompany this application ($100 for International Students). Checks or money orders should be made payable, in U.S. currency, to the New York School of Interior Design (NYSID). No cash. Social Security Number: ___ ___ ___ - ___ ___ - ___ ___ ___ ___ Do you plan Full-Time Part-Time Study ? Program of Study: Beginning: Year: Bachelor of Fine Arts Associate in Applied Science Basic Interior Design BA in History of the Interior/Dec Arts

Fall _________ Spring _________

Have you ever attended classes at NYSID ? Personal Data

Mr.

Ms.

Yes

Have you previously applied for admission to NYSID? Yes No If yes, when? ____________________ Have you submitted any documents prior to applying? Yes No If yes, specify what _______________ When? _________________________

No

Mrs.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Name (last, first, middle initial) Maiden/Previous Name (if any) ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Permanent Address Telephone - Landline ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ City State Zip Country Telephone - Cellullar ________________________________________________________________________ E-Mail Address (*Important as this is a primary means of communication through the admissions process!) ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Present Mailing Address (if different from above) Good Until ... ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ City State/County Zip Telephone - Landline ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Date of Birth (month, day, year) Place of Birth Male Single

Female Married

*Do you intend to apply for financial aid? *I plan to take or took the SAT/ACT on International Students only:

U.S. Citizen Permanent Resident Non-U.S.Citizen/Country of Citizenship _________________ Visa Type __________ Yes

No

____________

I plan to take or took the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) on: __________ Score: _________ I will require a F-1 Student Visa to study at NYSID. Yes No

*U.S. Citizen & Permanent Residents only

COMPLETE BOTH SIDES


RECORD OF PREPARATION

Supply full information regarding all college preparation to date. List every institution in chronological order. Note: All undergraduate and graduate work must be listed. Include previous study at NYSID. Use additional sheets if needed and be sure that your name is on any additional sheet. Please have your school(s) send the appropriate official transcripts directly to the NYSID Office of Admissions.

College/Univ.— City, State, Country

Dates (from-to)

Major

Credits/GPA

High School — City, State, Country Dates (from-to) Major (if applic.) GPA Employment & Activities History Employer

Location

Dates (from-to)

Degree & Date

Grad. Date

Type of Work

List any additional information you think supports your application (i.e., honors, scholarships, special training, awards, hobbies, interests). ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ESSAY: On an attached page(s), describe your reasons for applying to NYSID. This essay must be included with your application. Ethnicity:* Are you Hispanic/Latino/Spanish? Yes No In addition, select one or more of the following racial categories to describe yourself: American Indian of Alaskan Native Asian Black or African American Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander White Two or more races Nonresident Alien Race and Ethnicity unknown * This information is optional; providing it is strictly voluntary. It is for information reporting purposes as required of educational institutions by federal or state law. What influences led to your decision to apply to NYSID? (please specify by name) Publication: _________________________________ Open House (Date): ______________________________ Teacher/Professor: ____________________________ College Fair (Date): _______________________________ Counselor: __________________________________ Name and address of person who referred you to NYSID: Admissions Representative: _____________________ _________________________________________________ NYSID Student/Faculty Member: ________________ _________________________________________________ NYSID Alumnus/Alumna: _______________________ _________________________________________________ Other: _______________________________________ The above information is correct and complete to the best of my knowledge. I understand that all materials and credentials submitted by me and on my behalf become the property of the school and will not be released to anyone except school personnel. If admitted, I agree to comply with and be governed by all the rules and regulations of the school, subject to any changes and additions made by the proper authorities.

________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________ Signature Date


Application for Graduate Admission Office of Admissions • NYSID • 170 East 70th Street, New York, NY 10021-5110 • 212-472-1500 • Fax 212-472-1867 • admissions@nysid.edu A nonrefundable, nontransferable fee of $60 must accompany this application ($100 for International Students). Checks or money orders should be made payable, in U.S. currency, to the New York School of Interior Design (NYSID). No cash. With the exception of the portfolio, all items submitted as part of your application for admission become the property of NYSID. These items will not be returned.

Social Security Number: ___ ___ ___ - ___ ___ - ___ ___ ___ ___ Program of Study: Master of Fine Arts—Professional Level Master of Professional Studies in Sustainable Interior Environments Master of Fine Arts—Post-Professional Level Master of Professional Studies in Interior Lighting Design Have you previously applied for admission to NYSID? Yes No If yes, when? ____________________ Have you submitted any documents prior to applying for admission?

Yes

What document(s)? _________________________________________ PERSONAL DATA

Mr.

Ms.

No

If yes, specify ___________________

Date submitted __________________________________

Mrs.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Name (last, first, middle initial) Maiden/Previous Name (if any) ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Permanent Address Telephone - Landline ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ City State Zip Country Telephone - Celllular __________________________________________________________________ E-Mail Address (*Important as this is a primary means of communication through the admissions process!) ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Present Mailing Address (if different from above) Good Until ... ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ City State/County Zip Telephone - Landline ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Date of Birth (month, day, year) Place of Birth Male

Female

U.S. Citizen

Single

Married

Non-U.S.Citizen/Country of Citizenship _________________ Visa Type __________

*Do you intend to apply for financial aid?

Yes

No

Permanent Resident

I am interested in a NYSID Assistantship

International Students only: I plan to take or took the TOEFL (Test of English as a foreign Language) on: __________ Score: _________ I will require a F-1 Student Visa to study at NYSID. Yes No *U.S. Citizen & Permanent Residents only COMPLETE BOTH SIDES


RECORD OF PREPARATION

Supply full information regarding all college preparation to date. List every institution in chronological order.

Note: All undergraduate and graduate work must be listed. Include previous study at NYSID. Use additional sheets if needed and be sure that your name is on any additional sheet. Please have your school(s) send the appropriate official transcripts directly to the NYSID Office of Admissions.

College/Univ.— City, State, Country

Dates (from-to)

Major

Credits/GPA

Degree & Date

Employment & Activities History Employer

Location

Dates (from-to)

Type of Work

Describe any related activities and experience in support of your application (i.e., research, awards, honors, special training, lectures, exhibitions, publications.) _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ PERSONAL STATEMENT: Attach your detailed statement of intent describing your academic and professional goals. Ethnicity:* Are you Hispanic/Latino/Spanish? Yes No In addition, select one or more of the following racial categories to describe yourself: American Indian of Alaskan Native Asian Black or African American Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander White Two or more races Nonresident Alien Race and Ethnicity unknown * This information is optional; providing it is strictly voluntary. It is for information reporting purposes as required of educational institutions by The above information is correct and complete to the best of my knowledge. I understand that all materials and credentials submitted by me and on my behalf become the property of the school and will not be released to anyone except school personnel. If admitted, I agree to comply with and be governed by all the rules and regulations of the school, subject to any changes and additions made by the proper authorities.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Signature Date The New York School of Interior Design does not discriminate on the basis of sex, age, marital status, race, color, creed, disability, national or ethnic origin, actual or perceived sexual orientation or veteran status in the administration of its educational policies, admission policies, scholarship and loan programs and other school-related programs.


Letter of Recommendation Office of Admissions • NYSID • 170 East 70th Street, New York, NY 10021-5110 • 212-472-1500 • Fax 212-472-1867 • admissions@nysid.edu TO THE APPLICANT: Please complete the following section. You must choose one of the Right of Access options, sign and date. Request recommendations from persons other than family or friends (for example, teachers, counselors, or employers). Social Security Number:

___ ___ ___ - ___ ___ - ___ ___ ___ ___

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Applicant’s name Applicant for the following program:

BFA

AAS

Basic Interior Design

BA

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Evaluator’s name Right of Access I understand that Federal legislation provides me with the right of access to this recommendation which may be waived, but that no school or person can require me to waive this right. I hereby waive my right of access to this recommendation and authorize the evaluator to provide a candid evaluation and all relevant information to the New York School of Interior Design. _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Date Signature I do not waive my right of access to this recommendation but I authorize the evaluator to provide a candid evaluation and all relevant information to the New York School of Interior Design. _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Date Signature TO THE EVALUATOR: The person whose name appears above has applied for admission to undergraduate level study at the New York School of Interior Design. Your candid evaluation of this individual’s ability to succeed in this course of study would be greatly appreciated. Please return the completed form to the Office of Admissions as soon as possible. How long have you known the applicant? _______________________________________________________________________________ In what capacity? __________________________________________________________________________________________________

COMPLETE BOTH SIDES


Best I know

Top 5%

Top 20%

Top 50%

Below average

Ability to express self orally

Ability to express self in writing

Ability to express visually or graphically

Ability to work with others

Leadership and organizational ability

Maturity

Imagination and creative potential

Unable to judge

What do you consider the applicant’s talents or strengths? _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ What do you consider the applicant’s weaknesses? ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Do you recommend this person as a candidate for their selected program? Yes, without reservation

No

Yes, with the following reservation: _______________________________________________

Signature of the evaluator _________________________________________________________ Date __________________________ Name (please print) _____________________________________________________________________________________________ School, agency or firm ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Address _______________________________________________________________________________________________________ Please indicate if you are an alumna/us of the New York School of Interior Design: Yes

No

If yes, degree and date ____________________________________________________________________________

Please indicate if you are a faculty of the New York School of Interior Design: Yes

No

If yes, course(s) you teach _________________________________________________________________________


Letter of Recommendation Office of Admissions • NYSID • 170 East 70th Street, New York, NY 10021-5110 • 212-472-1500 • Fax 212-472-1867 • admissions@nysid.edu TO THE APPLICANT: Please complete the following section. You must choose one of the Right of Access options, sign and date. Request recommendations from persons other than family or friends (for example, teachers, counselors, or employers). Social Security Number:

___ ___ ___ - ___ ___ - ___ ___ ___ ___

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Applicant’s name Applicant for the following program:

BFA

AAS

Basic Interior Design

BA

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Evaluator’s name Right of Access I understand that Federal legislation provides me with the right of access to this recommendation which may be waived, but that no school or person can require me to waive this right. I hereby waive my right of access to this recommendation and authorize the evaluator to provide a candid evaluation and all relevant information to the New York School of Interior Design. _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Date Signature I do not waive my right of access to this recommendation but I authorize the evaluator to provide a candid evaluation and all relevant information to the New York School of Interior Design. _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Date Signature TO THE EVALUATOR: The person whose name appears above has applied for admission to undergraduate level study at the New York School of Interior Design. Your candid evaluation of this individual’s ability to succeed in this course of study would be greatly appreciated. Please return the completed form to the Office of Admissions as soon as possible. How long have you known the applicant? _______________________________________________________________________________ In what capacity? __________________________________________________________________________________________________

COMPLETE BOTH SIDES


Best I know

Top 5%

Top 20%

Top 50%

Below average

Ability to express self orally

Ability to express self in writing

Ability to express visually or graphically

Ability to work with others

Leadership and organizational ability

Maturity

Imagination and creative potential

Unable to judge

What do you consider the applicant’s talents or strengths? _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ What do you consider the applicant’s weaknesses? ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Do you recommend this person as a candidate for their selected program? Yes, without reservation

No

Yes, with the following reservation: _______________________________________________

Signature of the evaluator _________________________________________________________ Date __________________________ Name (please print) _____________________________________________________________________________________________ School, agency or firm ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Address _______________________________________________________________________________________________________ Please indicate if you are an alumna/us of the New York School of Interior Design: Yes

No

If yes, degree and date ____________________________________________________________________________

Please indicate if you are a faculty of the New York School of Interior Design: Yes

No

If yes, course(s) you teach _________________________________________________________________________


Immunization Form - Part 1

Office of Admissions • NYSID • 170 East 70th Street, New York, NY 10021-5110 • 212-472-1500 • Fax 212-472-1867 • admissions@nysid.edu Immunity is required prior to registration. Please complete and return this form (Part 1 front and back) to NYSID.

Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR) PART ONE: To be completed by the student NYSID Identification Number: ____________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Name (last, first, middle initial) Date of Birth (month, day, year) ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Address PART TWO: To be completed and signed by a healthcare provider I. MMR (Measles, Mumps, Rubella) If given instead of individual immunizations If administered during childhood: 1. Dose 1 — Immunized at 12 months or after and before five years

2.

Dates must include month and year

_____________________

Dose 2 — Immunized at five years or later

_____________________

If administered in later years, two doses need to be administered at least 30 days apart:

Dose 1 ____________________

Dose 2 _____________________

or if section I (above) does not apply, complete A, B, and C below. II. A. Measles (Rubeola): Check appropriate box 1. Had disease; confirmed by record office 2. Has report of immune titer. Specify date of titer:

_____________________

_____________________

3. Immunized twice with live measles vaccine at 12 months after birth or later: # 1 ____________________

_____________________ # 2 _____________________

B. Mumps: Check appropriate box

1. 2. 3.

Had disease; confirmed by record office Has report of immune titer. Specify date of titer: Immunized with vaccine at 12 months after birth or later

_____________________ _____________________ _____________________

C. Rubella (German Measles): Check appropriate box (Physician’s diagnosis of rubella is not acceptable) 1. Had report of immune titer. Specify date of titer: 2. Immunized with vaccine at 12 months after birth or later

_____________________ _____________________

Healthcare Provider: _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Name _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Address Telephone _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Signature Date Reverse of this form must be completed


Immunization Form - Part 1 Office of Admissions • NYSID • 170 East 70th Street, New York, NY 10021-5110 • 212-472-1500 • Fax 212-472-1867 • admissions@nysid.edu

Meningococcal Meningitis Please check ONE statement and sign below. I have (or parent/guardian of student under the age of 18: My child has) had meningococcal meningitis immunization within the past 10 years. Date received: ___________________________ I have read, or have had explained to me, the information regarding meningococcal meningitis disease included with this form. I will (or parent/guardian of student under the age of 18: my child will) obtain immunization against meningococcal meningitis within 30 days from my private health care provider. I have read, or have had explained to me, the information regarding meningococcal meningitis disease included with this form. I understand the risks of not receiving the vaccine. I have decided that I will not (or parent/guardian of student under the age of 18: my child will not) obtain immunization against meningococcal meningitis disease.

NYSID Identification Number: ____________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Name (last, first, middle initial) Date of Birth (month, day, year) ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Address ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Email Address Daytime Telephone ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Student Signature (Parent/Guardian if student is a minor) Date


Immunization Form - Part 2 New York State PHL 2167 New York State Public Health Law 2167 requires postsecondary institutions to distribute information about meningococcal disease and vaccination to the students, or parents or guardians of students under the age of 18. The institution is required to maintain a record of the following for each student: • Certificate of Immunization for meningococcal meningitis disease; OR • A response to receipt of meningococcal meningitis disease and vaccine information signed by the student or the student's parent or guardian; AND, EITHER • Self-reported or parent recall of meningococcal meningitis immunization within the past 10 years; OR • An acknowledgement of meningococcal disease risks and refusal of meningococcal meningitis immunization signed by the student or student's parent or guardian. Information About Meningococcal Meningitis Meningococcal meningitis is rare. However, when it strikes, its flu like symptoms make diagnosis difficult. If not treated early, meningococcal meningitis can lead to swelling of the fluid surrounding the brain and spinal column as well as severe and permanent disabilities, such as hearing loss, brain damage, seizures, limb amputation and even death. The vaccine Menactra™ is 85% to 100% effective in preventing the four types of meningococcal disease (types A, C, Y, W-135). These four types cause about 70% of the disease in the United States. Because the vaccine does not include type B, which accounts for about one-third of cases in adolescents, it does not prevent all cases of meningococcal disease. [Note: If you (your child) received the meningococcal vaccine available before February 2005, called Menomune™, please note this vaccine's protection lasts for approximately 3 to 5 years. Revaccination with the new conjugate vaccine, called Menactra™, should be considered within 3 to5 years after receiving Menomune™.] Please complete the Meningococcal Meningitis Response Form and return it to NYSID. Please note that according to NYS Public Health Law, no institutions shall permit any student to attend the institution in excess of 30 days without complying with this law. Please note that according to NYS Public Health Law, no institutions shall permit any student to attend the institution in excess of 30 days without complying with this law. The 30-day period may be extended to 60 days if a student can show a good faith effort to comply. To learn more about meningitis and the vaccine please consult with your (or your child’s) physician. You can also find information about the disease at the New York State Department of Health website: www.nyhealth.gov; website of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) www.cdc.gov/meningitis/bacterial/faqs.htm; and the American College Health Association (ACHA) website: www.acha.org.


Immunization Form - Part 2

New York State PHL 2165 New York State Public Health Law 2165 requires college students planning to enroll in a college in NY State to show proof of immunization against measles, mumps, and rubella. Students born prior to January 1, 1957 are exempt from this requirement. Persons for whom the immunizations might be detrimental or contrary to their religious beliefs must show documentation to that effect. Measles • The student must submit proof of two doses of live measles vaccine: the first dose given no more than 4 days prior to the student's first birthday and the second at least 28 days after the first dose; or • The student must submit serological proof of immunity to measles. This means the demonstration of measles antibodies through a blood test performed by an approved medical laboratory; or • The student must submit a statement from the diagnosing physician, physician assistant or nurse practitioner that the student has had measles disease; or • The student must submit proof of honorable discharge from the armed services within 10 years from the date of application to the institu tion. The proof of honorable discharge shall qualify as a certificate enabling a student to attend the institution pending actual receipt of immunization records from the armed services; or • If a student is unable to access his/her immunization record from a health care provider or previous school, documentation that proves the student attended primary or secondary school in the United States after 1980 will be sufficient proof that the student received one dose of live measles vaccine. If this option is used, the second dose of measles vaccine must have been administered within one year of attendance at a post-secondary institution. Mumps • The student must submit proof of one dose of live mumps vaccine given no more than 4 days prior to the student's first birthday; or • The student must submit serological proof of immunity to mumps. This means the demonstration of mumps antibodies through a blood test performed by an approved medical laboratory; or • The student must submit a statement from the diagnosing physician, physician assistant, or nurse practitioner that the student has had mumps disease; or • The student must submit proof of honorable discharge from the armed services within 10 years from the date of application to the institu tion. The proof of honorable discharge shall qualify as a certificate enabling a student to attend the institution pending actual receipt of immunization records from the armed services. Rubella • The student must submit proof of one dose of live rubella vaccine given no more than 4 days prior to the student's first birthday; or • The student must submit serological proof of immunity to rubella. This means the demonstration of rubella antibodies through a blood test performed by an approved medical laboratory (Since rubella rashes resemble rashes of other diseases, it is impossible to diagnose reliably on clinical grounds alone. Serological evidence is the only permissible alternative to immunization.); or • The student must submit proof of honorable discharge from the armed services within 10 years from the date of application to the institu tion. The proof of honorable discharge shall qualify as a certificate enabling a student to attend the institution pending actual receipt of immunization records from the armed services. OR MMR (Combined Live Measles, Mumps, and Rubella Immunization) • The student must submit proof of one dose no more than 4 days prior to the student's first birthday. The second dose a minimum of 28 days after the first dose. Students are encouraged to complete the immunization procedures and requirements prior to registration. Please complete the Immunization Form, providing proof of immunization, and return it to NYSID. Please note that according to NYS Public Health Law, no institutions shall permit any student to attend the institution in excess of 30 days without complying with this law. Immunizations can be obtained from private physicians or from the NY City Department of Health. For locations, please visit http://www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/imm/immclin.shtml


NYSID Administration Christopher J. Cyphers, President Ellen S. Fisher, Dean of Academic Affairs Jane Chen, Vice President, Finance & Administration David Sprouls, Vice President, Enrollment Management CREDITS Design: Lara McCormick Major Photography: Mark La Rosa Other Photography: Joyce George, Alonso Homs, Katie Lyman, Demetra Moralis, Durston Saylor, Kim Schlechta, Chris Spinelli, Kal Weyner Photos on cover: Gunnhildur Gudnyjardottir Photos on p. 1: Robert Arthur King Photo on p. 26 (Albert Hadley): Fernando Bengoechea Photo on p. 27 (Barry Lewis): Joseph Sinnott/Thirteen Photo on p. 29: Dan Bibb Photo on p. 31: Paul Warchol Photos on pp. 56-57: Evan Joseph Photo on p. 59: Š Albert Vecerka/Esto Photos on p. 60: Nathan Sayers Photos on p. 61: Mark Darley Photo on pp. 62-63: Michael Moran Drawing by Steven Gerber

Š Copyright 2011 New York School of Interior Design

Getting to NYSID NYSID is located between Lexington and Third Avenues on the south side of East 70th Street in Manhattan. Our administrative offices are at 161 East 69th Street, also between Lexington and Third Avenues. The NYSID Graduate Center is located at 401 Park Avenue South at East 28th Street. By Subway Reaching NYSID by subway is fast and convenient. Trains are within walking distance of the School: No. 6 train, exit at 68th Street Station. Via Pennsylvania Station/LIRR & Path Trains: At Pennsylvania Station, take the E train (Queens bound) to the Lexington Avenue Station. Transfer to the No. 6 train (uptown) and exit at the 68th Street Station. Via Grand Central Station: At Grand Central Station, take the No. 6 train (uptown) to the 68th Street Station. By Bus For the north-south route following Third and Lexington Avenues, take the M101, M102 or M103. (Note: The M101 makes limited stops; the closest stops are East 67th Street and East 72nd Street.) For the east-west route along 72nd Street, take the M72. For the east-west route to East 68th Street, take the M66 to Lexington Avenue.

NYSID Catalog 2012/2013  

The 2012/2013 course catalog for the New York School of Interior Design.

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