Page 1

March 2018

THE FORCE BEHIND THE FLEET

MANAGE YOUR CAREER AT NSWC PCD NSWC Panama City Division

Technical Center of Excellence for Littoral Warfare and Coastal Defense


Coastal Compass | March 2018 | Vol. 6 Issue 3

Captain Aaron S. Peters

Commanding Officer, NSWC PCD

Mr. Edwin A. Stewart

Technical Director, NSWC PCD

INSIDE THIS ISSUE View from the Bridge Workforce Connection Tech Bytes Career Development and You

Tech Bytes

4 7 8 8

12

SeaPerch Competition

12

Awards14 Length of Service Highlight Achievements Military Awards National Society of Professional Engineers

14 14 14 15

Workforce Development Mandatory Training Calendar of Events

Future Physicists Military Affairs Committee Chair Visit People of Panama City Future Workforce

17 17 18 20

Lifestyle22

Safety22 Fleet and Family Support Center 22 Invention Convention 23

INFUSION

FACEBOOK.COM/NSWCPCD

YOUTUBE.COM/NSWCPCDPAO issuu.com/nswcpcd

NAVAL SURFACE WARFARE CENTER PANAMA CITY DIVISION 110 Vernon Avenue | Panama City, FL 32407 NSWCPCD_PAO.FCT@NAVY.MIL 2 | COASTAL COMPASS | NSWC PANAMA CITY DIVISION

16 16

Community17

NSWC PCD WIKI HOMEPAGE

NSWCPCD_PAO.FCT@NAVY.MIL

16


THE FORCE BEHIND THE FLEET

Editorial Staff PRODUCTION MANAGER Don McCall

Head, Public and Congressional Affairs Division (Code 103) Head, Visual Information Branch (Code 1032)

MANAGING EDITOR Jacqui Barker

Public Affairs Officer Head, Communications and Community Relations Branch (Code 1031)

STAFF

Dan Broadstreet, Public Affairs Specialist Katherine Mapp, Public Affairs Specialist Susan H. Lawson, Public Affairs Specialist

DESIGN

Haley Walker, Graphic Designer Janice Grant, Print Specialist

PHOTOGRAPHY

Ron Newsome, Photographer Anthony Powers, Photographer Eddie Green, Photographer

I.T. NEWSFLASH I.T. HELPDESK MAILBOX

The new Information Technology (I.T.) Help Desk mailbox was created to better serve you, our customers: NSWCPCD_IT HELPDESK

IMPACT TO OUR CUSTOMERS

A centralized mailbox was created to better service our customers. The NMCI MACS email box is being removed. Please submit all requests to the NSWCPCD_IT Helpdesk email account. Points of Contact for Code 1042: 636-6026 636-6110

BACKGROUND

In the past, all helpdesk requests were delivered to one individual’s main email account. This occasionally caused some delays in work orders being assigned if the primary help desk person was out and no backup immediately available. Our goal is that the new email distribution list will help cut down on any emails falling through the cracks and each issue being addressed in a timely manner.

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY DIVISION, CODE 104 Bringing IT & IA Solutions to PCD

About the Publication The Coastal Compass is published monthly by the Naval Surface Warfare Center Panama City Division (NSWC PCD) and is an authorized medium for news of general interest about employees of NSWC PCD and their work. Contents of Coastal Compass are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the Department of Defense or Department of the Navy. The Coastal Compass’ content is provided and prepared by the NSWC PCD Office of Congressional and Public Affairs (Code 1031). For details about submissions, call 636-6168 or email nswcpcd_pao.fct@navy.mil.

PCD IT/IA LEADERSHIP TEAM

• CIO –234-4042 • ISSM –230-7564 • Code 1041 Lead – 636-6292 • Code 1042 – 235-5154 • Code 1043 – 234-4992

Helpdesk Contact Options:

Phone: 234-4341 option 1 Email: NSWCPCD_IT HELPDESK

To contact NSWC PCD’s Fraud, Waste, and Abuse Hotline call: 234-4462.

MARCH 2018 | 3


BRIDGE VIEW FROM THE

By Dave Tubridy

FORMER DEPUTY TECHNICAL DIRECTOR NSWC PCD

THREE LESSONS I HAVE LEARNED At the invitation of our Technical Director and Commanding Officer, I am honored to deliver this month's View from the Bridge column as it will be one of my last chances to pontificate before I retire on March 31, 2018. This month's column, however, is not about me; rather, it's all about you. Thirty-six years ago, I came to this command fresh out of college. Much like many of you who read this today, I had so many new ideas and I learned very quickly that I had to continue my development to fit the needs of the Navy. Life at the “lab” back then was different in some ways, yet in many ways the same as today. We worked very hard, like we do today. Sometimes, the challenges seemed overwhelming but we quickly learned that collaboration and communication were keys to our success. We also learned that understanding our stakeholders’ expectations up front was the difference between success and failure. Just because a product worked didn't mean we succeeded if it wasn't what the sponsor wanted or the warfighter needed. Another thing that remains the same is this Division’s talented, multi-generational,

U.S. Navy photo

multi-cultural workforce and its commitment to getting the job done. We have made real positive gains in organizational diversity since that time, but I believe there is still plenty of room for continued improvement. This is an unprecedented time in our command history as so many people like me are preparing to retire over the next five years. What this means is there will be many new opportunities for hard charging, high-performing, employees to step up and take on more responsibility. If you’re relatively new to the Division, just know, there are many potential mentors, coaches, supervisors, and managers willing to help you grow in your federal career. If you haven’t found one yet, keep looking. Keep in mind that you have the greatest vested interest in your career and consequently the preponderance of responsibility. As I close, I offer a message of hope and prosperity to each of you in your federal civil service career. This command is a very special organization.

4 | COASTAL COMPASS | NSWC PANAMA CITY DIVISION

Life at the “lab” back then was different in some ways, yet in many ways, the same as today. We worked very hard, like we do today.

- Dave Tubridy

Former Deputy Technical Director NSWC PCD


U.S. Navy photo

Sometimes, the challenges seemed overwhelming, but we quickly learned that collaboration and communication were keys to our success.

- Dave Tubridy

Former Deputy Technical Director NSWC PCD

Our mission is critically important and our ability to effectively deliver warfighting capabilities has been proven. Your career will be prosperous if you take time to look around, learn from others, collaborate often, and most importantly, never take yourself so seriously that you lose sight of why we are all here. You are here to serve those who serve our nation on the pointy end of the spear. If you remember that, you'll retain your humility, and grow to be a superb leader in the Navy. In summary, I would like to leave you with these three lessons I have repeatedly learned during my career: U.S. Navy photo by Ron Newsome

1. Humility is the key element of

effective leadership so never take yourself too seriously.

2. We are all here to deliver capabilities to the warfighter. Your professional reputation and creditability is only as good as the last thing you delivered.

3. Opportunities will come to those

U.S. Navy photo by Eddie Green

who work hard, deliver on their commitments, and take responsibility for their own professional development.

Thank you all for all you do. It’s been a true honor to serve our Navy and a pleasure to do so with all of you. I look forward to reading about your future accomplishments. Sincerely, Dave Tubridy

U.S. Navy photo by Ron Newsome MARCH 2018 | 5


FEATURED

Third annual SeaPerch Competition held at Gulf Coast State College. Read more on page 12. U.S. Navy photo by Dan Broadstreet

WE'RE ONLINE NSWC PCD WIKI HOMEPAGE INFUSION FACEBOOK.COM/NSWCPCD YOUTUBE.COM/NSWCPCDPAO

ON THE COVER

NSWCPCD_PAO.FCT@NAVY.MIL

This month's Coastal Compass is all about Managing Your Career here at NSWC PCD.

ISSUU.COM/NSWCPCD

6 | COASTAL COMPASS | NSWC PANAMA CITY DIVISION


Workforce Connection

SUCCESS THROUGH PEOPLE

Welcome

ABOARD Andre Charles (A32) Chase Branham (E53) Devin Ramsey (A14) Dorothy Pitre (022) Jamaal Stanley (A11) Kevin Powell (X22) Rojae Wright (X12) Sally Mellen (1013)

U.S. Navy photo by Eddie Green

High-Grade and Supervisory

PROMOTIONS

Scott F. Lowery

John P. Kelly

Underwater Systems Development and Acquisition Branch Head, Code E15

Diving Fleet Systems Branch Head, Code E13

The Branch Head for the Underwater Systems Development and Acquisition Branch supports and oversees the development of Diving and Life Support equipment, including rebreather systems, diver mobility systems, diver information displays, rescue rebreathers, and hyperbaric testing.

The Diving Fleet Systems Branch Head serves as the lead for the sustainment of all Fleet Diving assets managed at NSWC PCD, and provides oversight of all projects in the Branch to ensure that the quality of the products and sound technical rigor across all Fleet Diving Systems is maintained. MARCH 2018 | 7


T R N E E E M R P A C VELO DE U

yees o l p m lps E areers e H CD deral C P C SW heir Fe N w Ho Guide t

O Y

&

1

e can b ama s r e e r Pan ral ca Center ects of e d e f e ting ll asp arfar aviga urface W mprove a N – to i rida val S Y, Flo , but Na ontinues T I C MA D) c mes PANA ting at ti SWC PC port. p N daun ivision ( ment su e D g The Division has a dedicated team of recruiters City r mana e who routinely scout new talent at designated care colleges and universities. We utilize Direct Hire Authorities and Merit Hiring Authorities to recruit the best and the brightest talent. Our Merit positions are posted on USAJobs, where new or existing employees may apply for vacant positions. Under our Direct Hire Authorities we are able to The New Hires Orientation continues to improve do a name request, provided the candidate meets how each new employee is introduced to the all of the qualifications of the position. Once a command. Whether new to the Naval Sea Systems candidate receives an offer for a position, we begin Command Warfare Centers or new to federal the pre-employment process, which includes civil service, the seven-day orientation ensures completion of all required pre-employment forms employees complete all mandatory training, receive and the initiation of the security process. their Common Access Cards, and learn about the command, training, and benefits.

RECRUITING

NEW HIRES

facebook.com/nswcpcd #nswcpcdnpdp New Professionals are a growing percentage of the workforce. They will be taking on greater roles and responsibilities much earlier than their predecessors. - Mr. Ed Stewart (SES) Technical Director People are the Navy’s NSWC PCD foundation. We need to develop our people. - Capt. Aaron Peters Commanding Officer NSWC PCD

Where do you see yourself in 5 - 10 years?

We’re here to help you get there.

NSWC PCD New Professional Development Program Offers: - Rotational Work Assignments - Mentoring - Continuing Education (earn an advanced degree!) - Quality Hands-On Work - Proficiency Training - Career Progression - Experience a variety of projects and areas - Opportunity to pursue career competency qualification and certification

Choosing NSWC PCD was the best decision I ever made. I was immediately plugged into projects and was also mentored by individuals who had been at the base for 10-30 years. - Haley Walker

New Professional (5 yrs)

My job at NSWC PCD has allowed me to work on many cutting edge platforms that I never would have seen if I had gone into industry. - Nicholas Bowman New Professional Network Co-chair (2 yrs)

8 | COASTAL COMPASS | NSWC PANAMA CITY DIVISION

New Professionals make up 25% of the growing technical workforce. You could be one of them!

Naval Surface Warfare Center Panama City Division

New Professional Development Program

ARE YOU IN?

The New Professional Development Program was created to help new employees effectively transition into the workforce and help manage the technical growth of new scientists and engineers. The program offers career guidance, development Contact Us! Lanshava F. Booker assignments, mentoring, and training New Professional Technical Advisor (850) 234-4971 | lanshava.booker@navy.mi opportunities all within the first three years of Recruitment Office (850) 235-5196 employment at NSWC PCD. NSWCPCD_Recruiting.fct@navy.mil

discovering your path.

Choose the right fit. Choose NSWC PCD New Professional Program.


3

CAREER MANAGEMENT & COMPETENCIES

Career Lifecycle

10% 20%

Leadership Development Programs

Mentorship

Assignments

70%

To help personnel grow their federal careers at NSWC Panama City Division, a considerable amount of time has been dedicated to identifying or creating tools, such as the Knowledge Management Site called NSERC. Mentoring continues to be a rich and invaluable way to learn about the command, career requirements, and federal civil service and is encouraged at all levels. Mentoring relationships have mutual benefits, to include teaching both mentors and mentees something new.

NSWC Panama City Division is comprised of more than 1,400 federal civil servants, 300 contractors, and 40 military. Each career series has specific requirements that allow each employee the opportunity to manage their individual careers and grow with the federal government. The goal with career management is to continue to grow each person’s skill set commensurate with their time in grade or length of service. There are many facets to career management that do not exclusively or always focus solely on competencies. Additional requirements include financial health, work-home balance, mentoring, Individual Development Plans (IDPs), training, and the administravia that ensures each person’s personnel files are accurate and current. All of these career focus areas are important to manage, no different than managing ones’ technical competencies - and technical is a term that applies to all Team PCD employees.

NSWC Panama City Division

CAREER

Technical Center of Excellence for Littoral Warfare and Coastal Defense

New

Professional

New Hire

Journey

ENTRY

KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER EXIT

Executive

Expert Senior Leader

MARCH 2018 | 9


Naval Surface Warfare Center Panama City Division

TECHNICAL CAREER PLANNING GUIDE

YOU ARE HERE

Aligned to the Division’s strategy, NSWC Panama City Division has focused on technical rigor, career competencies, and creating positions that allow upward growth into senior executive positions. To help each person manage their careers, NSWC PCD Technical Director, deputy division technical directors, chief engineers, and competency leads have all worked tirelessly to deliver the NSWC PCD Technical Career Planning Guide in 2017. This document addresses career maps, roles, position profiles and qualifications for engineering, science and technology, software engineering, test and evaluation, logistics, quality, and line management. To champion specific career fields, competency leads were selected. These individuals are available to help all personnel in the respective domains manage their careers (see bottom of page 11). More information about the career competencies and leads are available on NSERC. Don’t have an NSERC account? Email the IT Help Desk and request an account today!

Discover ways to grow and what opportunities await you

5

PROPEL For new, first-line supervisors, NAVSEA Warfare Centers seek to create a One Team culture and have implemented a new supervisor training course called Propel. This training course offers a Warfare Center leadership and supervisor perspective on topics that range from how to continue to manage your individual career as you grow as a supervisor to leading your people with excellence.

10 | COASTAL COMPASS | NSWC PANAMA CITY DIVISION


6

LEAN-IN CIRCLES NSWC PCD’s Leaders in a Diverse Environment "change agents" kicked off Lean-In Circles for Division personnel March 27, 2018. This is part of the NAVSEA Warfare Center LDE effort to offer employees a unique, modern mentoring tool as well as to understand the needs of employees in order to further recruit and retain personnel to support Panama City’s unique mission areas.

7

INDIVIDUAL DEVELOPMENT PLANS Never underestimate how an Individual Development Plan (IDP) can help you manage your career. NSWC PCD Commanding Officer presented his strategic Commander’s Guidance and Top 4 Priorities, aligned to higher Navy echelon strategies, to help Panama City Division employees understand their mission support requirements at NSWC PCD.

8

COMPETENCY LEADS

Logistics: Peter Halvorson Quality: Rick Sekerchak Project Management: John Pipkin Science & Technology: Kerry Commander Software Engineering: Lisa Nowalk Test & Evaluation: Clint Iles (Acting) Systems Engineering: Lori Zipes (Acting)

Find this information and more at: https://nserc.navy.mil/nswcpcd/NSWC_PCD_Competencies/SitePages/Home.aspx

MARCH 2018 | 11


"Providing students hands-on STEM opportunities like this opens up new career paths for them in academia, industry and the military."

- Ginger Littleton FSU PC STEM Institute Director

Navy, Academia, Challenge Students

at SeaPerch Competition

By Dan Broadstreet, NSWC PCD Public Affairs

PANAMA CITY, Florida — Gulf Coast State College (GCSC) in collaboration with Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Florida State University Panama City (FSU PC), and the Naval Surface Warfare Center Panama City Division (NSWC PCD) hosted Bay County’s third annual SeaPerch Regional Competition March 9, 2018 at the GCSC Health and Wellness Center’s swimming pool.

and industrial partners use to build actual militarized Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs).”

Dan Flisek, Technical Director for the SeaPerch Regional Competition and Physicist for NSWC PCD, said the Department of Defense’s (DoD) Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) partnerships with academia represents the DoD’s mission to inspire and develop exceptional STEM talent among American students.

“By participating in this SeaPerch event, students are learning new skills like soldering and working in a team while constructing these vehicles,” said Littleton. “Providing students hands-on STEM opportunities like this opens up new career paths for them in academia, industry, and the military.”

“STEM challenges like these are really important because they can serve as a long-range recruiting tool,” said Flisek. For this event, many of the skills taught and practiced are skill sets the Navy

Flisek explained the challenges that students faced were basically being structured as a two-phased underwater obstacle course. “We organized two separate divisions for middle and high school

12 | COASTAL COMPASS | NSWC PANAMA CITY DIVISION

Ginger Littleton, Director for FSU PC STEM Institute, said the competition teaches STEM skills that until recently weren’t traditionally taught inside the average classroom.


U.S. Navy Photos by Dan Broadstreet Students hold remote controls ready to participate in the third annual SeaPerch Regional Competition March 9, 2018. The event, held at Gulf Coast State College Aquatics Center’s swimming pool, is the result of a collaborative partnership between the Bay District Schools, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, and the Naval Surface Warfare Center Panama City Division.

competitors,” said Flisek. “We have two event challenges. The obstacle course, where students have to remotely steer their SeaPerch ROVs to pick up five different hoops at various stations and return in reverse order. And secondly, we also have a tower challenge where students have to lift objects from one tower and then place them onto another.” First-time participants in this regional completion, Vernon High School Students, River Bassinger and Austin Blaess, said they were pleasantly surprised at how easy it was to assemble their SeaPerch kit and with their own unique design. “It only took us a few minutes to design and build this SeaPerch robot,” said Bassinger. “And, we seem to be doing fairly well with the obstacle course even though we just began to prepare for this competition a couple months ago,” said Blaess. “It’s actually pretty cool learning to build our own robots,” said Bassinger.

"When our country’s academic institutions, industry and military collaborate to host STEM opportunities like these, we’re actually grooming tomorrow’s next generation of scientists and engineers. It keeps America technologically competitive with our adversaries." - Bill Porter Electrical Engineer NSWC PCD

NSWC PCD Engineer Bill Porter attended to act as master of ceremonies and to assist as official timekeeper. “Win or lose, you can tell these students are enjoying mastering skills and remotely operating robots that they have designed and built,” said Porter. “When we’ve finished this competition, we will be sending the winning team on to the national competition." Porter emphasized how these STEM competitions were beneficial to local communities, as well as the nation, too. “It’s a win-win on a national level, too,” said Porter. “When our country’s academic institutions, industry and military collaborate to host STEM opportunities like these, we’re actually grooming tomorrow’s next generation of scientists and engineers. It keeps America technologically competitive with our adversaries.”

Technical Director for the third annual SeaPerch Regional Competition, Dan Flisek, oversees and manages the coordination of the southeast-regional SeaPerch competitions.

MARCH 2018 | 13


Awards

RECOGNIZING ACHIEVEMENT

AWARDS AND RECOGNITION PROGRAM Highlight Achievements • ND2(DSW) Tyler J. Woodard, Code CXB, was awarded the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal for Professional Achievement during his tour at NSWC PCD.

CIVILIAN LENGTH OF SERVICE

35 10

Shirley Gromley Christian Weber James Prater

15 05

Jonathan Shiver Stefanie Barron

Burt Moreau

YEARS

Upcoming Recognition Opportunities • Society of Women Engineers (SWE) Awards • Procurement Round Table 2018 Elmer B. Staats Contracting Professional Excellence Award • ASN Financial Management and Comptroller Awards

For award information, contact your Department Awards Coordinator or access the NSWC PCD Awards and Recognition portal.

SAILORS

of the

QUARTER

Sailor of the Quarter Aviation Structural Mechanic First Class Petty Officer

Christopher Robbins

PANAMA CITY, Florida – Commanding Officer Capt. Aaron Peters of the Naval Surface Warfare Center Panama City Division (NSWC PCD) selected Petty Officer First Class Christopher Robbins as Sailor of the Quarter, First Quarter 2018. “As Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Systems Program coordinator and operator, Robbins was instrumental in the coordination of the Unmanned Air Vehicle program at NSWC PCD allowing for the safe testing and evaluation of advanced unmanned surveillance systems,” said Peters. “It has been an honor to serve our country,” said Robbins. “I’ve gotten to see the world and work with some amazing shipmates. In addition, my current position has allowed me to qualify as an Autonomous Vehicle Operator. This will enable me to operate drones and other autonomous vehicles, all experiences that have been long-held career objectives of mine since I worked on the MQ-8B Firescout.” Peters commended Robbins highly for his dedicated service.

14 | COASTAL COMPASS | NSWC PANAMA CITY DIVISION

Junior Sailor of the Quarter Navy Diver Second Class

Logan Dillenburger

PANAMA CITY, Florida – Commanding Officer Capt. Aaron Peters of the Naval Surface Warfare Center Panama City Division (NSWC PCD) selected Petty Officer Second Class Logan Dillenburger as Junior Sailor of the Quarter, First Quarter 2018, while serving as a First Class Diver, from October 2017 to December 2017. “Dillenburger has shown outstanding performance. He has served as lead diver for six Research, Development, Testing, and Evaluation projects and other diving services to include the Diver Heads Up Display, Advanced Undersea Weapons System, Clandestine Mine Recovery, Office of Naval Research Underwater Communication System, Sea Fighter (FSF-1), and the Dive Buddy Remotely Operated Vehicle culminating in over 42 hours of mishap-free bottom time,” said Peters. Peters commended Dillenburger for his steadfast dedication and for exhibiting exemplary reliability and capability in maintaining such high-level standards of performance.


2018 NSPE Federal Engineer of the Year Award Agency Winner

Dr. Theresa Shirey, NSWC PCD science and technology analyst, receives the 2018 National Society of Professional Engineers (NSPE) 2018 Federal Engineer of the Year Agency Award as the representative for the U.S. Navy during a ceremony held Feb. 23, 2018. Courtesy photo.

Internal

QUALITY AUDIT QUALITY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

Congratulations to the following projects that successfully passed their Internal Quality Audit

A DEPARTMENT

• AN/SSN-2(V)5 Precise Integrated Navigation System (PINS) • AN/SLQ-48 Mine Neutralization System In-Service Engineering Agent (ISEA) • Littoral Combat Ship Mission Package ISEA • Advance Sonar Technology/High Rate Clearance MARCH 2018 | 15


Workforce Development

OPPORTUNITIES FOR LIFELONG LEARNING

ONSITE TRAINING April

18

CYBERSECURITY FOR NAVY CONTROL SYSTEMS (CNCS) Time: 0800 Instructor: NAVSEA Instructors

18

MICROSOFT WORD 2016 (INTERMEDIATE) Time: 0745 Location: Gulf Coast State College (GCSC)

REGISTRATION

23

DESIGN OF EXPERIMENTS (DOE) TBD Time: 0745

PCD University is pleased to announce registration for several onsite and peer courses. For a list of available courses and to register for classes that are open, visit: http://navsea.navy.deps.mil/wc/supernma/ Training/SitePages/PCDU.aspx

23

SOLIDWORKS ESSENTIALS REFRESHER Time: 0745 Instructor: Trimech Instructors

ONLINE

PEER COURSE TRAINING April

19

For more information, visit the Training page on iNAVSEA! PCD-U Onsite Training or PCD-U Peer Course Training

LEADERSHIP 101 (DIRECTION, ALIGNMENT, COMMITMENT) Time: 0800-1030 Location: Bldg. 389, Classroom C Instructor: CDR Samuel Brasfield

2018 MANDATORY TRAINING APR 30

Antiterrorism Training (Level 1)

N

MAY 31

APR 30

Prevention of Sexual Harassment (POSH)

T

APR 9-24

NAVSEA Intro to Controlled Unclassified N Info Training NAVSEA Counterintelligence Awareness Training

i

*see page 21 for more information

MAY 31

DOD Cyber Awareness Challenge

TBD

N

T

TWMS: https://twms.navy.mil/selfservice

i

Instructor Training

N

NAVSEA Physical Security Training

NeL (new NKO): https://learning.nel.navy.mil/ELIAASv2p/

16 | COASTAL COMPASS | NSWC PANAMA CITY DIVISION

i


Community

LIVING IN THE PANHANDLE

Future Physici sts of Flor ida Naval Surface Warfare Center Panama City Division (NSWC PCD) hosted over 200 Future Physicists of Florida middle school students for a tour of facilities and learn about science, technology, engineering, and mathematics March 13 and 14, 2018.

y r a t i l i M Affairs ee t t i m m Co t i s i V r Chai

NSWC PCD hosted Bay County Chamber of Commerce Military Affairs Committee Chair Claire Sherman for a tour to learn how NSWC PCD #ExpandstheAdvantage through research, development, test, and evaluation March 1, 2018.

U.S. Navy photos by Katherine Mapp and Susan H. Lawson MARCH 2018 | 17


U.S. Navy photo by Ronnie Newsome

People of

PANAMA CITY FEATURING BRENNA WILLIAMS

AVID QUILTER, TENNESSEE VOLUNTEER, CLOSES CHAPTER ON PRESTIGIOUS CAREER WITH U.S. NAVY By Katherine Mapp, NSWC PCD Public Affairs Brenna Williams, Naval Surface Warfare Center Panama City Division’s (NSWC PCD) strategic analyst, provides support by overseeing the development of the division’s strategic plans, investments, and long-term corporate business planning. Williams’ duties and functions of strategic planning include: managing and overseeing the development of business and strategic plans; managing and overseeing the development of Division strategic investments; managing and overseeing the development of the strategic planning process; collaborating with portfolio managers in portfolio assessment and development of integrated strategy development, longterm implementation planning; providing guidance, tools, and instructions in support of the Division’s strategic planning process. “The work I do impacts the Navy’s mission by preparing the division to be ready for the future and support innovation,” said Williams. Williams has over 29 years of civilian service with NSWC PCD. 18 | COASTAL COMPASS | NSWC PANAMA CITY DIVISION

The work I do impacts the Navy's mission by preparing the division to be ready for the future and support innovation. - Brenna Williams Strategic Analyst NSWC PCD


off duty Williams, a native of Murray, Kentucky, and University of Tennessee football super fan, earned a Bachelor’s of Science in Engineering Physics from the University of Tennessee in 1984, in addition to a Master’s of Science in Physics from the University of Tennessee in 1986. Williams has remained an active NSWC PCD recruiter for the past several years at her alma mater. “I love recruiting. I am very passionate about hiring ever since I've been a branch head,” said Williams. “Being able to see the potential in people and then watch that potential grow is very rewarding to me.” Among serving her Command, Williams is an active volunteer in many organizations. One of them is Children’s Christmas Party Committee (CCPC), a local charity that provides a Christmas experience to approximately 100 underprivileged Bay County children. Williams has been involved with the CCPC since the mid 1990’s and currently acts as the co-lead for clothes shopping. Williams has served as a science fair judge, including the annual Three Rivers Regional Science Fair, for the past 20 year at several schools around the region.

U.S. Navy photo by Katherine Mapp

There's a sense of community and core purpose that makes working here a joy, not a job. - Brenna Williams Strategic Analyst NSWC PCD

Within the last year, Williams has become an avid self-taught quilting hobbyist. The interest stemmed from memories with her grandmother. “I've always loved quilts since I was a little girl,” said Williams. “My grandmother made them and I remember watching her sew them by hand.” Williams said the most enjoyable part of quilting for her is the mathematical aspect behind it. “Quilting is very mathematical. You have to be very precise or it won't go together correctly. I really enjoy seeing the patterns emerge when it’s all put together.”

U.S. Navy photo by Katherine Mapp

Courtesy Photo

MARCH 2018 | 19


NSWC PCD CELEBRATES WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH FOCUSES ON

FUTURE WORKFORCE

By Jacqui Barker, Public Affairs Officer, NSWC Panama City Division

U.S. Navy Photo by Eddie Green

The 2018 Women’s History Month theme focused on women who have fought discrimination.

Panelists included men and women from NSWC PCD and Navy Experimental Diving Unit whose Navy career length in service ranges from 10 years to more than 30 years.

Naval Surface Warfare Center Panama City Division (NSWC PCD) learned from history to focus on workforce diversity and inclusion to build more innovative capabilities. The Division hosted a forum that localized content delivered at the November 2017 Leaders in Diverse Environment (LDE) Event hosted at NSWC Carderock Division and included a four person panel discussion of men and women to speak about diversity and inclusion, innovation, recruiting and retention, and barriers to success. NSWC PCD Commanding Officer Capt. Aaron Peters, USN, is an Explosive Ordnance Disposal officer who has served with women his entire career explained that to be the best command possible, the workforce must be diverse and inclusive. "Today’s event, today’s message, today’s discussion is not just about women. This is a discussion for men, women, supervisor, non-supervisor and personnel at all career levels and our efforts to recruit and retain the best and brightest have only begun,” said Peters.

20 | COASTAL COMPASS | NSWC PANAMA CITY DIVISION

The Division continues to take steps to further the workforce knowledge base about the importance of diversity and inclusion, identifying conscious and unconscious biases and retain the brightest men and women recruited by implementing new initiatives, such as Lean-In Circles. Currently, more than 61 people have signed up for the NSWC PCD Lean-In Circles that kick off March 27, 2018. NSWC PCD LDE change agents are also developing a strategy that addresses ways the command may recruit and retain women in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields in support of a national trend of declining women in STEM career fields. Furthermore, the Division recently signed Education Partnership Agreements with Florida State University, Gulf Coast State College, and Bay District Schools with the intent to strengthen community partnerships and further develop tomorrow’s diverse and technical workforce.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS APRIL TACO TUESDAY Every Tuesday in April!

Time: Doors open at 1500 Location: MWR Main Deck Pub & Grille

14

21st Annual Blessing of the Fleet & Burning of the Socks

18 26

3-Mile SAPR Fun Run/Walk

Time: 1000 Location: St. Andrews Marina

Time: 0700 Location: MWR Gym

Free Outdoor Movie Night Time: Dusk Location: MWR Marina Featuring Star Wars: The Last Jedi

27 28 28

Free Popcorn Friday

COUNTERINTELLIGENCE/ EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY BRIEFS

Invention Convention

Location: NSA Long Glass

Time: 1000-1400 Location: MWR Marina

Time: 1300-1600 Location: FSU Panama City and Gulf Coast State College

Sand Jam

April 28-29 Location: M.B. Miller Pier

MAY

15 19

Jeep Jam

May 15-20 Location: Aaron Bessant Park

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WOMEN'S

HISTORY MONTH

U.S. Navy photos MARCH 2018 | 21


Lifestyle

CREATING A BETTER BUSINESS CLIMATE

SAFETY

FLEET AND FAMILY

Support Center

By Patrick Beacom, NSWC PCD Safety Specialist

WHAT IS HUMAN TRAFFICKING?

CARING FOR YOUR BACK

Human trafficking is modern-day slavery and involves the use of force, fraud, or coercion to obtain some type of labor or commercial sex act.

A SCHOLARLY APPROACH

Every year, millions of men, women, and children are trafficked in countries around the world, including the United States. It is estimated that human trafficking generates many billions of dollars of profit per year, second only to drug trafficking as the most profitable form of transnational crime. Human trafficking is a hidden crime as victims rarely come forward to seek help because of language barriers, fear of the traffickers, and/or fear of law enforcement.

Back injuries account for

1 in 5

workplace injuries/illnesses. Back problems also account for many lost work days. Simple steps to care for the back can prevent injury. Risk factors for back injuries include:

• Improper lifting or lifting objects that are too heavy • Repetition (repetitive motions can lead to muscle fatigue and injury) • Poor posture while sitting, standing, or working • Stress, which leads to muscle tension and tightness and back pain • Age (occasional back pain often starts between ages 30 and 40 and becomes more common as you age) • Excess weight, which puts extra strain on the back • Presence of other diseases, such as arthritis • Cigarette smoking, which can increase the risk of low back pain and sciatica Back injuries can be very painful, difficult to heal, and may cause long-term or permanent disability. After one back injury, people are more likely to experience another one sometime in their lifetime. It is important to learn techniques and procedures that may help prevent a reoccurrence.

Traffickers use force, fraud, or coercion to lure their victims and force them into labor or commercial sexual exploitation. They look for people who are susceptible for a variety of reasons, including psychological or emotional vulnerability, economic hardship, lack of a social safety net, natural disasters, or political instability. The trauma caused by the traffickers can be so great that many may not identify themselves as victims or ask for help, even in highly public settings.

                                                                                         The below statistics are based on the signals ‐‐ phone calls, emails, & webforms ‐‐ received by the National Human Trafficking    The below statistics are based on the signals ‐‐ phone calls, emails, & webforms ‐‐ received by the National Human Trafficking    Hotline (NHTRC) that reference Florida. To protect the identity of the people we serve, the NHTRC does not disclose exact  Hotline (NHTRC) that reference Florida. To protect the identity of the people we serve, the NHTRC does not disclose exact    statistics related to venues, industries, or caller information when referenced fewer than three times.   The below statistics are based on the signals ‐‐ phone calls, emails, & webforms ‐‐ received by the National Human Trafficking    statistics related to venues, industries, or caller information when referenced fewer than three times.   2016 statistics are current as of December 31, 2016.  Hotline (NHTRC) that reference Florida. To protect the identity of the people we serve, the NHTRC does not disclose exact  2016 statistics are current as of December 31, 2016.  The below statistics are based on the signals ‐‐ phone calls, emails, & webforms ‐‐ received by the National Human Trafficking  statistics related to venues, industries, or caller information when referenced fewer than three times.   2016 statistics are current as of December 31, 2016.  Hotline (NHTRC) that reference Florida. To protect the identity of the people we serve, the NHTRC does not disclose exact  statistics related to venues, industries, or caller information when referenced fewer than three times.   2016 statistics are current as of December 31, 2016. 

Many myths and misconceptions exist. Recognizing key indicators of human trafficking is the first step in identifying victims and can help save a life. Not all indicators listed are present in every human trafficking situation, and the presence or absence of any of the indicators is not necessarily proof of human trafficking. The safety of the public, as well as the victim is paramount. Do not attempt to confront a suspected trafficker directly or alert a victim to any suspicions. It is up to law enforcement to investigate suspected cases of human trafficking.

The below statistics are based on the signals -- phone calls, emails, & webforms -- received by the National Human Trafficking Hotline (NHTRC) that reference Florida. TYPE OF TRAFFICKING

The human back operates on a 10:1 force ratio. Bending over to lift a 10-pound object puts 100 pounds of pressure on your lower back. When you add in the 105 pounds of the average human upper torso weighs, lifting a 10-pound object puts 1,150 pounds of pressure on the lower back. If you are 25 pounds overweight, it would add an additional 250 pounds of pressure on your back every time you bend over. 22 | COASTAL COMPASS | NSWC PANAMA CITY DIVISION

Lifting and Your Back

The amount of force placed on your back under certain conditions can be significant. When bending over to pick up an item, tremendous pressure is put on the lower back. If you think of your back as a lever with the fulcrum in the center of the lever, it would take 10 pounds of force to lift a 10-pound object. With the fulcrum shifted to one side, it takes more force to lift the object.

AGE

 

TOP VENUES/INDUSTRIES FOR SEX TRAFFICKING

GENDER

To report suspected human trafficking: 1-866-347-2423 To get help from the National  Human Trafficking Hotline: 1-88-373-7888, or text: HELP or INFO to "BeFree" (23373)

 


FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY PANAMA CITY, GULF COAST STATE COLLEGE, NAVAL SURFACE WARFARE CENTER PANAMA CITY DIVISION & BAY DISTRICT SCHOOLS PRESENT

ION CONVENT

E S U O H N E P O M E & ST

1-4 P .M. | APRIL 28 GULF COAST STATE C0LLEGE & FSU PANAMA CITY REGISTRATION: The grassy area between FSU PC and GCSC INVENTION CONVENTION JUDGING: 1-3 p.m. | Holley Academic Center AWARDS CEREMONY: 3-4 p.m. | Advanced Technology Center, GCSC

Discover the exciting world of STEM through demonstrations & learning opportunities HANDS-ON LEARNING • Participate in activities with professors and students from FSU PC and GCSC STEM IN ACTION • Discover technology at work at both campuses • Watch demonstrations by high school and college students • See the technology Naval Surface Warfare Center uses, designs and builds • Explore submissions to the Invention Convention STEM CAREERS • Learn about STEM careers •

Meet STEM professionals and explore STEM career possibilities

Questions contact Ginger Littleton (850)770-2152, glittleton@pc.fsu.edu

Gulfcoast.edu/InventIonconventIon

MARCH 2018 | 23


Naval Surface Warfare Center Panama City Division 110 Vernon Avenue Panama City, Florida 32407 (850) 230-7400

Distribution A: Approved for public release.

Coastal Compass March 2018  
Coastal Compass March 2018  

Naval Surface Warfare Center Panama City Division features ways to Manage Your Career at NSWC Panama City Division in the March 2018 edition...

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