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PROCESS BOOK In t egr a t ed C ommunica t ions | Spr ing 2 0 11 B y Nicole R acquel


THE PROJECT

The semester-long focus of this class is on a film director—and subsequent f ilm fest ival— of my choice. T he central project is a hypothetical film festival that will celebrate the work of my chosen director and will take on several forms. The first week I chose 3 possible directors and did some research on all 3. I watched a significant film from each, wrote a short piece on each of them, and assembled a selection of found imager y, photos and found typography to accompany each of the brief reports.


3 DIRECTORS

PAUL THOMAS ANDERSON

Often set in San Fernando Valley, California, Paul Thomas

Baker Hall) reaching out to their estranged children before

Anderson’s movies usually depict suburban America as a

they go, Earl Partridge’s son is a misogynist motivational

place of alienation. His characters are often themselves

speaker (Tom Cruise) and Jimmy Gator’s daughter (Melora

alienated and must find a way to assimilate themselves

Walters) is a disturbed cokehead. A compassionate nurse

in a family environment. His large ensemble casts and

(Philip Seymour Hoffman) helps Earl make contact with his

encyclopedic knowledge of film technique stands him apart

son, while a good-natured cop (John C. Reilly) meets and

from the average director. He’s been nominated for 5 Oscars

gives hope to Gator’s daughter. Meanwhile, Earl’s young

in his career thus far.

wife (Julianne Moore) is consumed with guilt and two whiz

Paul Thomas Anderson, born June 26, 1970, is an American self-taught director who was involved in filmmaking as young as highschool. His career began as a production assistant on television movies, music videos and game shows in Los Angeles and New York. His style is very much shaped by his upbringing in The Valley and his exposure to the oddball celebrity through his father. His first full-length feature was

kids, one grown (William H. Macy) and one young (Jeremy Blackman) feel the resentment and pressure put on them by their parents. The message of the film is that strange things happen all the time and the past is hard to escape. The raining of frogs at the end is absurd, but acts as a metaphor for the absurdity of planning. Ebert describes the film as operatic and the struggle against chance.

Hard Eight (1996). Boogie Nights (1997), was Anderson’s

Anderson went on to directed successful films, Punch-Drunk

breakout film, considered to be the best depiction of the porn

Love (2002) and There Will Be Blood (2007). The self-taught

film industry.

director lists Martin Scorsese, Robert Altman, and Jonathan

Boogie Nights’ success raised the bar for Magnolia (1999), Anderson’s massive mosaic. The film has a huge range of characters and story plots all intertwined throughout a rainy day in Los Angeles and things sometimes take place at the same moment. According to Roger Ebert, the significant themes that develop are the death of fathers, the resentments of children, the failure of early promise and the way all plans and ambitions can be undermined by sudden and astonishing events. Throughout the 24 hours in LA, it’s pouring rain, two stories follow two dying men (Jason Robards and Philip

Demme as his main influences. The characters in Anderson’s movies

are

addressing

often

realistically

dysfunctional

family

flawed

and

desperate,

dynamics,

alienation,

regret, loneliness, chance and fate. Characters search for a place to call home and cope with the ghosts of their past. The interconnections between characters have a significant impact on their fragility. Stylistically, Anderson often does very large takes, without cuts, sweeping narratives, there is usually some kind of visual flair and memoriable audiovisual imagery in his films.


3 DIRECTORS

MARTIN SCORSESE

With a prominent body of work, Scorsese’s films often carry

rise and fall of three gangsters over three decades. The film

out themes like, Italian-American identity, Catholic guilt

starts out with the main character, Henry Hill (Ray Liotta),

and redemption ideas, violence and machismo. Many of his

as a child. He narrates how he had always wanted to be a

movies are landmarks in American films, with consistent

gangster and be part of something significant. The story

award-winning films throughout his career.

follows his life and how he is taken under the wing of mob

Martin Scorsese, born November 17, 1942, is a New York film director, screenwriter, producer, actor and film historian. He’s the founder of the World Cinema Foundation and a recipient of the AFI Life Achievement Award for his contributions to the film industry. President of the nonprofit organization, The Film Foundation, he was also won awards from the Oscars, Golden Globe, BAFTA, and the Directors Guild of America. Scorsese developed admiration for neorealist cinema early in his life, especially inspired by movies that portrayed his Sicilian genes. He has cited movies like The Bicycle Thief, Rome, Open City and Paisà, as influences, along with Indian filmmaker Satyajit Ray. His initial desire to become a priest

capo, Paulie Cicero (Paul Sorvino) and his associates Jimmy Conway (Robert De Niro), who loves hijacking trucks, and Tommy DeVito (Joe Pesci) who has a trigger-happy temper. As the story unfolds, the gang is seen enjoying criminal life and the seduction of a glamorous lifestyle. At one point Henry and most of his crew serve time in prison where they sell drugs to support family on the outside. After his release, Henry, Tommy and Jimmy enter into the drug trade and the crew commits the infamous Lufthansa heist. It turns sours quickly and the crew is killed one by one. To save himself and family, Henry enrolls in the Witness Protection Program to live the rest of his life like a “schnook.”

was forsaken in 1964, when he received his MFA in film

Like other films, Scorsese uses a lot of red and red lighting

directing from New York University Tisch School of the Arts.

throughout the film and like other characters in his movies,

His early work in Mean Streets (1973) provided benchmarks for his signature style, with settings in New York, loners fighting inner demons rock /opera soundtracks and cold violence. Collaborations with his friend Robert De Niro also helped shape his style. Taxi Driver (1976) really established Scorsese as an accomplished filmmaker. It also marked the start of a series of collaborations with writer Paul Schrader. The most successful was Raging Bull (1980), a biography of fighter, Jake LaMotta, earning two Oscars, and later selected as the best film of the decade by Siskel and Ebert. After a series of films with mixed results, Goodfellas (1990) revitalized Scorsese’s New York gangster theme but is also a significant shift in tone or his work. The films is considered to be one of his greatest achievements and created the Scorsese archetype character. Based on the non-fiction book Wiseguy by Nicholas Pileggi, Goodfellas follows the

the main character is a sociopath wanting to be accepted into society (or a specific society). In his films protagonists often have the Madonna-whore complex, where blond characters’ first scene often shows them wearing white and as the story unfolds they’re revealed to be less than perfect. Scorsese uses long tracking shots and freezes frames for emphasis or pause. A Rolling Stones song often plays in a scene and his movies are cut to the music.


3 DIRECTORS

JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET {chosen director}

With warm golds and greens present in all his films, Jeunet

untimely death of her mother, Amélie did not have a lot of

creates a mood that gives both a nostalgic and fantastical

real life contact with other people and resorted to her own

feel, with a touch of grotesque. His stories are always

fantasies and dreams. As a young woman, she moves to

playful, quirky and sometimes surreal, but still can capture

Paris where she begins helping the people around her just

innate human qualities.

because it makes her feel good. Through the course of the

Jeunet is a self-taught French director born September 3, 1953. Most of his movies are in collaboration with designer/ comic book artist Marc Caro, including his early short animated movies L’évasion (1978) and Le manège (1980). He has been influenced by the slapstick of Charlie Chaplin in The Great Dictator and Kubrick with Dr. Strangelove. His first fullfeature film, Delicatessen (1991) is a black comedy that is set in a post-apocalyptic famine-plagued world. It’s a Sweeny

movie, Amélie finds love (Mathieu Kassovitz), sending him on a wild goose chase to discover her identity. Aside from the charming story, the movie is filmed with a warm and saturated quality that can be compared to the cross processing techniques used in still photography. The camera is often used for dramatic affect, with extreme zooming in and out, and elaborate crane movements that allow the viewer to follow a character’s feet or gaze.

Todd-like story of a butcher who kills people in order to feed

Jeunet went on to direct another movie with Audrey Tautou,

the people living in the block of flats above him. Its success

A Very Long Engagement (2004), along with Jodie Foster.

won Jeunet 4 Césars including the awards for the best new

His most recent films Micmacs (2009), stays true to Jeunet’s

director(s) and the best scenario. With Caro, Jeunet went on

whimsical fantasy and attention to detail.

to make the black tale, The City of Lost Children (1995), which was so innovative for the time that they had to create new software for the special effects. The worldwide success of Amélie was the result of the details brought in from Jeunet’s personal written material, along with collaboration with Guillaume Laurant.

Some common trademarks distinguish Jeunet’s movies from the rest. He always casts Dominique Pinon and likes to cast people with unusual facial features. Along with his sweeping crane camera angles, he often uses wide camera angles. His characters are usually orphans or have lost a parent and usually focus on the romance of two mavericks.

Amélie is the story of a naïve dreamer (Audrey Tautou),

His use of color in films give it a specific ambience and his

with her own sense of justice. Each character is describes

films always end with credits that show images of all the

through their idiosyncrasies and the details that make them

actors in their role.

unique. Growing up with a single father (Rufus) after the


DESIGN BRIEF

A f ter watch i ng f ive f i l ms Jeunet directed, I wrote a design brief for the film festival that served as a guide for development of all the deliverables to follow. The most important part of this stage was ident i f y i ng t he “ t h read � or underlying theme or link that can be found throughout all of the films that will be shown at the festival.


BIOGRAPHY OF DIRECTOR

With warm golds and greens present in all his films,

Jeunet has often been criticized for prioritizing highly

Jeunet creates a mood in all of his films that give

produced and stylized films over the content of the

both a nostalgic and fantastical feel, with a touch of

story and his first full-feature film, Delicatessen

grotesque and absurd. His stories are playful, quirky

(1991), is no exception. Delicatessen is a black comedy

and sometimes surreal, but capture innate human

that is set in a post apocalyptic famine-plagued world

qualities and emotions.

and like many of his stories, the themes are conveyed

Jean-Pierre Jeunet is a self-taught French director and auteur who developed his distinct structure and style in his early through music videos and animated short films. His early work was often in collaboration with designer/comic book artist Marc Caro, including the animated shorts L’évasion (1978) and Le manège (1980). Common links within his films derive from his experience as an only child and the idea of amusing oneself. As the writer or co-writer to almost all of his films, he has maintained a high degree of control over his, lending him to many reoccurring themes—the orphan or innocent fighting a monster, the significance

through the look of the film. It’s a Sweeny Todd-like story of a butcher who kills people in order to feed the people living in the block of flats above him. Its success won Jeunet 4 Césars including the awards for the best new director(s) and the best scenario. With Caro, Jeunet went on to make the black tale, The City of Lost Children (1995), which was so innovative for the time that they created new software for the special effects. The worldwide success of Amélie (2001) was the amalgamation of details brought in from Jeunet’s personal written material, along with Guillaume Laurant’s collaboration.

of the past and memory and its relationship to the

Jeunet continued on to direct another movie with

present, and the importance of causality. His themes

Audrey Tautou, A Very Long Engagement (2004), along

are further supported through his film style using

with American actress Jodie Foster. His most recent

color schemes reminiscent of the late 20th century

films Micmacs (2009), stays true to Jeunet’s whimsical

French film style, cinéma du look, quirky characters

fantasy and attention to detail, and he intended it to

often played by reoccurring cast members, including

parallel a slapstick cartoon.

Dominique Pinon, absurd and often dark humor, and elegant sweeping camera movements that are used for dramatic effect.


DESIGN BRIEF

JEUNET’S CATALOG OF FILMS L’évasion (short); 1978 Le manège (short); 1980 Le Bunker de la dernière rafale /The Bunker of the Last Gunshots (short); 1981 Pas de repos pour Billy Brakko (short); 1984 Foutaises/Things I Like, Things I Don’t Like (short); 1989 Delicatessen; 1991 The City of Lost Children/La Cité des enfants perdus; 1995 Alien: Resurrection; 1997 Amélie/Le Fabuleux destin d’Amélie Poulain; 2001 A Very Long Engagement /Un Long dimanche de fiançailles; 2004 Micmacs/Micmacs à Tire-Larigot; 2009


THR EA D

TITLE OPTIONS

Overcoming traumatic life-changing experiences from childhood help shape who we become, but we are never completely severed from our past. Bygones Not Gone

What Makes Us Stronger

Flights of Fantasy

A Vase of Faded Flowers

The Eternal Return

Loose Ends

Ashes to Ashes

What Shapes Me

Cendres Aux Cendres

SUBTITLE OPTIONS

* Daydreams on Rooftops

Maneuvering Through Rocky Pasts In The

Repressed Memory and Lost Fantasy in

Films Of Jean-Pierre Jeunet.

the Films of Jean-Pierre Jeunet

Elaborate Quests and Persistent Pasts in

The Calamitous Past & Whimsical Fantasy

the films of Jean-Pierre Jeunet.

in the Films of Jean-Pierre Jeunet

Hurdling Over the Lingering Past in the

Triumphs over a calamitous Past in the

Films of Jean-Pierre Jeunet

Films of Jean-Pierre Jeunet

The Past is Never Past in the Films of Jean-Pierre Jeunet

* The Eternal Return of Calamity & Whimsy in the Films of Jean-Pierre Jeunet


DESIGN BRIEF

HISTORY

This festival is the first event that showcases Jean-Pierre

The purpose of the design brief was to

Jeunet’s full-length films in the United States. Aside from

chart my goals and define the project

celebrating his unique and intoxicating aesthetic style, the

w it h i n a number of para meters. It

festival will be driven by the underlying theme of nostalgia

served as a guide for the project.

and the inter connectedness between our past and present. The festival itself with have a distinct visual personality, mixing modern carnival with antique collections and live music. The intentions of the festival will be to attract an American film-goer audience to Jeunet’s French cinema

AUDIENCE

the festival. Every decision for the festival had to connect back to the thread.

The targeted audience of the festival are older kids, young

things. The goal is to open modern French cinema to a broader audience in an environment that already has a rich cinema culture. The Santa Monica Pier. As a historical landmark in Santa Monica, this location gives a nod to the unforgotten past, while also taking advantage of the Pacific Park amusement rides and carnival spirit. August 5 –7. Summertime will allow visitors to parttake in the festival and good weather is almost gauranteed. OTHER EVENTS

t he t h re ad, t it le a nd subt it le f or

and quirky humor.

carnivals, farmer’s markets, daydreaming and collecting

DATE

brainstor m ing sessions, I sol idif ied

influences and broaden the appeal of light-hearted fantasy

people, and the young at heart. It is for the people who love

LOCATION

After weeks of research and multiple

Unique collections displays, including collections from the filmsLive Junk yard and Street Sound Music Carnival games, a photo booth, food stands and French cuisine.


BUCKETS

I began by developing “buckets” or styles of visuals from which to pull from. Each bucket is supposed to be filled with an assortment of pieces that all work together—within each of the buckets and across buckets. T hroughout the f irst few weeks I refined 5 bucket styles with different elements within each of them.


STR ANGE ANGLES AND DETAIL SHOTS

DR EAM LIK E IM AGES, TILT SHIFT IM AGES

CROSS PROCESSING FILTERS


BUCKETS

PHOTO STYLE {first attempts} These can include: Black and white, low and high contrast, muted color, color filters, photos of specific subject matter, etc. A lthough a lot more imager y would follow, my first attempt to define a photo style went well. I already had a st rong sen se of how I wa nted t he photography to work.


STR ANGE ANGLES AND DETAIL SHOTS


BUCKETS

PHOTO STYLE {final directions}

SELECTIVE FOCUS

I finally took my inspiration from the

AND BLUR R ING,

selective focus and blurry distortions

DISTORTIONS, TILT

st yle. A phot og r aphed a l l of my

SHIFT IM AGES

images wit h a lens baby to achieve the look. I applied my own color filter to give it a warm and nostalgic look to carnival photographs I took, playing off amber and blue-green tones of ten found in cross-processing techniques. I wanted to juxtapose these with a darker side of the same images, using xerox scans to create dark and grainy images.


TR ANSPAR ENCY OVER LAYS

DISTR ESSED, OLD AND GR AIN Y

OLD CAR NIVA L; RUSTIC


BUCKETS

GRAPHIC STYLE {first attempts}

COM BINATION OF

T hese can i nclude : Text ures, l i nes,

SILHOUET TE AND

patterns, shapes, transparencies, etc.

TEX TUR E

W hat I struggled to the define more t han any ot her bucket, my graph ic style bucket had to go through many transformations before settling on a specific style.


GR APHIC AND R ECOGNIZA BLE SHAPES, IM AGE M ASKING


BUCKETS

GRAPHIC STYLE {final directions}

TR ANSPAR ENT

For my final look, I took inspiration from

OVER LAYS, IM AGE

argyle patterns and geometric shapes to

FR AGMENTATION

create a collage of images that created a

AND SELECTIVE

pat ter n of sl ig ht ly disor ient at i ng

DESATUR ATION

imagery that hinted at both decorative fantasy and a dark foreboding feel.


FR IENDLY, CURV Y

BOLD, CIRCUS, R ETRO


BUCKETS

TYPE STYLE {first attempts}

MODER N TAK E ON

Beyond just identif ying sans or sefit,

OLD-ST YLE SER IF

these can include: Big brackets, tightly spaced caps, squared-off sans, etc. This category was also one hard to pin down. I went through several different styles and variations before narrowing them down.


CIRCUSY, BOLD AND

VICTOR IAN

BLOCKY

PACK AGING


BUCKETS

TYPE STYLE {final directions}

THIN, AIRY,

My final direction was a combination of

GEOMETR IC

three ver y different t ypefaces. ITC Benguiat was used for the festival logo and large titles because of its curves and decorative look. Univers was used for the festival subtitle and other secondary t it le s

b ec au se

it s

c le a n

s h ap e s

complimented the geometric shapes of the graphic patterns. Stempel Schneidler was mainly used for body type.


R ANDOM AND A BSUR D

Even artichokes have a heart. When you’re born in the gutter you end up in the port. Without you, today’s emotions would be the scurf of yesterday’s.

INSIGHTFUL SAYINGS

We pass the time of day to forget how time passes. A woman without love wilts like a flower without sun. The fool looks at a finger that points at the sky.

QUESTIONS

How do you amuse yourself? What are your dreams made of? How many people are having an orgasm right now? How many feet does it take to wear down stairs?


BUCKETS

LANGUAGE STYLE

These could include: big questions, bold statements, etc. Since Jeunet’s films all have some sort of fantasy element throughout, I decided that quotes from the movie would tie in well for advertisements and full spreads because of all of their randomness and absurdity. These can sometimes came in the form of a question.


OLD, WOR N WOODEN

RUST, META L AND HAR DWAR E

FA BR ICS AND LAYER ED M ATER IA LS


BUCKETS

FORMAT & MATERIALS {first attempts} These could include: brown paper, newsprint, black leather, vellum, wood, transparencies, plastic, etc. I immediately narrowed in on material that looked worn and old to play off the nostalgia and vintage feeling that my thread evokes.


CAR DBOR D, OLD PAPER


BUCKETS

FORMAT & MATERIALS {final directions}

META L HAR DWAR E,

In the end, I decided on using old metal

COVERS AND

cont ainers and cardboard boxes as

CONTAINERS

materials. The containers were rusty a nd i mperfect on t he out side a nd prett y and decorative on the inside. This is to continue the play off of the idea of dark and l ight elements of traumatic childhood memories.


IDENTITY

The creation of the overall look of my festival consisted of an identit y mark or logo, and a business system including a letterhead, business card and envelope. The most important element to this is t he ident it y mark and logo t hat consisted of f i nd i ng a successf ul lock up of the festival title and the subtitle often displayed with it.


IDENTIT Y


IDENTIT Y


ROOFTOPS

E AMS D A Y DORN

R

PS O OF TO

D A Y D ORN

D A Y D R E A M S O N

ROOFTOPS

E AMS

OPS R OOFT

Raphael Beau


IDENTIT Y


Calamities & fantasies in the films of Jean-Pierre Jeunet

Calamities & fantasies in the films of Jean-Pierre Jeunet

Calamities & fantasies in the films of Jean-Pierre Jeunet

Calamities & fantasies in the films of Jean-Pierre Jeunet

Calamities & fantasies in the films of Jean-Pierre Jeunet

Calamities & fantasies in the films of Jean-Pierre Jeunet

Calamities & fantasies in the films of Jean-Pierre Jeunet


IDENTIT Y

The eternal return of calamity and whimsy

THE ETERNAL RETURN OF CALAMITY AND WHIMSY

THE FILMS OF JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET

the eternal return of calamity and whimsy in the films of jean-pierre jeunet

The films of Jean-Pierre Jeunet

the eternal return of calamity and whimsy

THE ETERNAL RETURN OF CALAMITY & WHIMSY IN THE FILMS OF JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET

in the films of JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET

the eternal return of calamity and whimsy in the films of

JEAN-PIERRE the eternal return of calamity and whimsy in the films of jean-pierre jeunet

JEUNET

THE ETERNAL RETURN OF

the eternal return of calamity and whimsy

CALAMITY & WHIMSY IN THE FILMS OF JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET

the eternal return of calamity and whimsy

in the films of JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET

in the films of JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET

the eternal return of calamity and whimsy

THE ETERNAL RETURN OF CALAMITY & WHIMSY IN THE FILMS OF JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET THE ETERNAL RETURN OF

in the films of JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET

CALAMITY & WHIMSY IN THE FILMS OF JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET

THE ETERNAL RETURN OF CALAMITY & WHIMSY IN THE FILMS OF JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET

THE ETERNAL RETURN OF CALAMITY & WHIMSY IN THE FILMS OF JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET THE ETERNAL RETURN OF CALAMITY & WHIMSY IN THE FILMS OF JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET

THE ETERNAL RETURN OF CALAMITY & WHIMSY IN THE FILMS OF JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET

THE ETERNAL RETURN OF CALAMITY & WHIMSY IN THE FILMS OF JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET

THE ETERNAL RETURN OF CALAMITY & WHIMSY IN THE FILMS OF JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET

T HE E T E RN A L R E T U RN O F C A L A M I T Y & W H I M S Y

T

IN THE FILMS OF JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET


Joe T. Shmoe EVENT COORDINATOR 200 Santa Monica Pier, Suite C Santa Monica, CA 90401 T 424.555.7425 ext. 255 3 jshmoe@rooftopfilms

w w w.daydreamsonroof tops.com

EVENT PLANNING DEPARTMENT 200 Santa Monica Pier, Suite C Santa Monica, CA 90 4 01

EVENT PLANNING DEPARTMENT 200 Santa Monica Pier, Suite C Santa Monica, CA 90 4 01 T 310.555.7425 F 310.555.7424 info@rooftopfilms.com www.daydreamsonroof tops.com

30 APRIL 2011

Dear Mr. Yann Tiersen, I’m writing to inquire about an performance opportunity in beautiful Santa Monica California on the infamous Santa Monica Pier. This summer, we are hosting the fi rst annual Film Festival featuring the work of Jean-Pierre Jeunet. We will be screening 5 fi lms from his collection and there will be several other activities. Because you have worked with Jeunet your musical style is linked to the sights and sounds that we’re looking for for this festival. We would be honored if you would do us the pleasure of performing a short set during the festival. This would be a paid event, and you would be given the choice of time slots that work be for you. The festival is the weekend of August 5-7 and parts of the Pier will be closed off for our guests. If you are interested, please call or email me at your earliest convenience so that we may go over the details and practicalities. Or if you have any questions or concerns, I’m available at any time. Thank you for your time and we hope to hear from you soon! Sincerely,

Joe T. Shmoe Event Coordinator jshmoe @rooftopfilms.com T 424.555.7425 ext. 2553


IDENTIT Y

FINAL LOCK UP

Aside from the logo lock up, I designed the letterhead, envelope and business card.

THE

IN THE FILMS OF

ETERNAL RETURN JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET OF CALAMITY & WHIMSY


OUT IN THE FIELD

For my photography style, I wanted to incorporate carnival images. I was able to photograph my own images and had several succesful photography outings. I also slowly but surely acquired all of the materials and housing that I would use for some of the deliverables.


OUT IN THE FIELD

MY PHOTOGRAPHY

The first shoot was at a carnival in Oakland. After the shoot, I created my own filter. I also started playing around with textures. I printed out some of t he images, xeroxed them, scanned them back in, and then multiplied the scanned image over the digital image. This helped me achieve the darker look that the images all needed. I also went around the cit y to find images that might portray nostalgia while shooting on somewhat off-kilter angles and perspectives. The most successful shoot was when I went down to Santa Cruz and took photos on the boardwalk.


POSTER

T he poster’s goal is to announce the film festival and include the title (logo lock-up), director, date/times, location and the films that will be pl ayed . T he p o st er d i men s ion s are 30x40 on a high qualit y paper, appropriate for the festival. T he poster w i l l a r r ive rol led or in a tube and the “roll� should be considered f rom a design point of view as if it would be purchased as is. I ended up hav i ng more post er versions than any other deliverable because I used this it to establish t he overa l l look a nd feel of t he film festival.


Delicatessen

City of Lost Children

A Very Long Engagement

Amélie

Micmacs

Rocky Roads & Radiant Rebounds in the Films of Jean-Pierre Jeunet Delicatessen City of Lost Children

Delicatessen City of Lost Children Amélie A Very Long Engagement Micmacs

Amélie A Very Long Engagement Micmacs

Rocky Roads & Radiant Rebounds in the Films of Jean-Pierre Jeunet

April 15–17 El Capitan Rooftop, Los Angeles

April 15–17 El Capitan Rooftop, Los Angeles

El Capitan Rooftop, Los Angeles

April 15–17

Rocky Roads & Radiant Rebounds in the films of Jean-Pierre Jeunet

El Capitan Rooftop, Los Angeles

April 15–17

El Capitan Rooftop, Los Angeles

April 15–17

El Capitan Rooftop, Los Angeles

April 15–17

April 15–17

El Capitan Rooftop, Los Angeles

April 15–17

El Capitan Rooftop, Los Angeles

April 15–17

April 15–17

El Capitan Rooftop,

El Capitan Rooftop,

Los Angeles

Los Angeles


POSTER

My st ar t i ng process for t he poster was to combi ne element s f rom my El Capitan Rooftop, Los Angeles

photo, type and graphics buckets and

April 15–17

exper i ment wit h a var iet y of ideas combination. For the first few versions I used found photography a nd i mages f rom my f i r st photo shoot at a c a r n iva l i n April 15–17

April 15–17

El Capitan Rooftop,

El Capitan Rooftop,

Los Angeles

Los Angeles

April 15–17 El Capitan Rooftop, Los Angeles

Delicatessen City of Lost Children Amélie Delicatessen City of Lost Children Amélie A Very Long Engagement Micmacs

A Very Long Engagement Micmacs

El Capitan Rooftop, Los Angeles

April 15–17

April 15–17 El Capitan Rooftop, Los Angeles

April 15–17 El Capitan Rooftop, Los Angeles

Hurdling Over the Ever-Present Past in the films of Jean-Pierre Jeunet

Hurdling Over the Ever-Present Past in the films of JeanPierre Jeunet

Oakland and found images.


The past is never past in the films of Jean-Pierre Juenet

The past is never past in the films of Jean-Pierre Jeunet

april 15–17 el capitan rooftop, los angeles

The past is never past in the films of Jean-Pierre Juenet

The past is never past

Films by Jean-Pierre Jeunet

april 15–17

el capitan rooftop, los angeles

april 15–17

el capitan rooftop, los angeles

The films of Jean-Pierre Jeunet

The past is never past in the films of Jean-Pierre Juenet

Delicatessen

Delicatessen

City of Lost Children

City of Lost Children

Amélie

Amélie

A Very Long Engagement

A Very Long Engagement

APRIL 15–17

Micmacs

Micmacs

el capitan rooftop, los angeles

The past is never past in the films of Jean-Pierre Juenet

april 15–17 el capitan rooftop, los angeles

APRIL 15–17

el capitan rooftop, los angeles


POSTER

I started to narrow down my logos, var ying size and started integrating i m ages I took i n dow ntow n Sa n Francisco wit h t he in it ial Oak land Carnival images. At this point I incorporated my own photo style, using xeroxed images to create texture and darker color.

APRIL 15–17 el capitan rooftop, los angeles


The past is never past in the films of Jean-Pierre Juenet

The past is never past in the films of Jean-Pierre Juenet

APRIL 15–17 el capitan rooftop, los angeles

Calamities & fantasies in the films of Jean-Pierre Jeunet

Calamities & fantasies in the films of Jean-Pierre Jeunet


POSTER

After many more versions, styles and another photoshoot—this time on the Sa nt a Cr uz boa rdwa l k— I decided that the argyle-like patterns and the i m age w it h i n a nd i m age ver sion s were the most successful april 15–17 santa monica pier delicatessen city of lost children amélie a very long engagement micmacs

www.daydreamsonrooftops.com

AUG 5~AUG 7

AUG 5~AUG 7

on the santa monica pier

delicatessen city of lost children amélie a very long engagement micmacs

on the santa monica pier

delicatessen city of lost children amélie a very long engagement micmacs

the eternal return of calamity and whimsy in the films of

JEAN-PIERRE

JEUNET

delicatessen city of lost children the eternal return of calamity and whimsy in the films of

amélie a very long engagement the eternal return of calamity and whimsy in the films of

micmacs

JEAN-PIERRE

AUG 5~AUG 7

JEAN-PIERRE

JEUNET

JEUNET

on the santa monica pier

www.daydreamsonrooftops.com

www.daydreamsonrooftops.com

delicatessen city of lost children amélie a very long engagement micmacs

the eternal return of calamity and whimsy

the eternal return of calamity and whimsy

in the films of JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET

delicatessen city of lost children

in the films of JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET

amélie

the eternal return of calamity and whimsy in the films of

JEAN-PIERRE

JEUNET

a very long engagement micmacs

08.05–08.07 on the santa monica pier

8/5–8/7 on the santa monica pier

www.daydreamsonrooftops.com

Friday AUG 5 to Sunday AUG 7 santa monica pier | 2pm to 11:30pm


don’t forget borders

www.daydreamsonrooftops.com

the eternal return of calamity and whimsy

AUG 5–AUG 7

delicatessen

on the santa monica pier

city of lost children

delicatessen city of lost children

the eternal return of calamity and whimsy in the films of JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET

delicatessen

amélie

city of lost children

a very long engagement

amélie

micmacs

amélie a very long engagement

a very long engagement micmacs

micmacs

the eternal return of calamity and whimsy

delicatessen

THE ETERNAL RETURN OF CALAMITY & WHIMSY

city of lost children amélie a very long engagement

in the films of JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET

micmacs

IN THE FILMS OF JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET

delicatessen city of lost children amélie a very long engagement micmacs

aug 05 – aug 07 on the santa monica pier

in the films of JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET

aug 05 – aug 07

the eternal return of calamity and whimsy in the films of

AUG 5–AUG 7

JEAN-PIERRE

on the santa monica pier

www.daydreamsonrooftops.com

delicatessen

delicatessen

city of lost children

city of lost children

amélie

amélie

a very long engagement

a very long engagement

micmacs

micmacs

on the santa monica pier

www.daydreamsonrooftops.com

delicatessen city of lost children

delicatessen

delicatessen

city of lost children

amélie a very long engagement micmacs

AUG 5–AUG 7

city of lost children

amélie

amélie

a very long engagement

a very long engagement

micmacs

micmacs

AUG 5–AUG 7

santa monica pier

santa monica pier

THE ETERNAL RETURN OF CALAMITY & WHIMSY IN THE FILMS OF JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET

aug 5–7

JEUNET

on the santa monica pier

THE ETERNAL RETURN OF CALAMITY & WHIMSY IN THE FILMS OF

THE ETERNAL RETURN OF CALAMITY & WHIMSY

THE ETERNAL RETURN OF CALAMITY & WHIMSY IN THE FILMS OF JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET IN THE FILMS OF JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET

AUG 5–AUG 7 santa monica pier

JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET THE ETERNAL RETURN OF CALAMITY & WHIMSY IN THE FILMS OF JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET

aug 5– aug 7 santa monica pier

AUG 5–AUG 7 santa monica pier

www.daydreamsonrooftops.com

www.daydreamsonrooftops.com

www.daydreamsonrooftops.com


POSTER

Between the two different directions, I chose to continue on with the argyle pattern and started to refine the logo and type.


delicatessen city of lost children amélie a very long engagement micmacs

THE IN THE FILMS OF ETERNAL RETURN JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET OF CALAMITY & WHIMSY FRI AUG 5 TO SUN AUG 7 www.daydreamsonrooftops.com


POSTER

FINAL VERSION


CATALOG

This is a narrative and multi-page piece designed to showcase the films in the festival along with information about t he di rector, locat ion a nd viewing schedule. The catalog also includes information about the Santa Monica Pier, historical landmarks in Santa Monica, imagery and stills from the featured films, the film’s plot summaries, critics’ reviews, more infor mat ion about t he addit ional events at the festival, and practical information for the guests. The final deliverable is a 8x10 perfect bound book.


full spread with quote

xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx

About the festival Schedule The director Featured films Caro & collaboration Film technique Historical landmarks Festival highlights Practicalities Directions & map

Daydreams on Roof tops © 2011 Nicole Racquel Design A ll rights Reser ved. Manufactured in the Un ited States of A merica

Friday, August 5 to Sunday August 7 Santa Monica Pier Santa Monica, CA 2pm to 11pm

Daydreams on Rooftops marks the first American film festival celebrating the body of work of French film director Jean-Pierre Jeunet. More than just a regular film festival, Daydreams on Rooftops offers a weekend getaway full of whimsy and imagination that will bring the inner-child out of all of us. Whether you want to learn about a modern French cinematic style, get nostalgic in carnival galore on the beautiful Santa Monica pier, or immerse yourself in the fantastical (and sometimes dark) film plots, you’re in for a fantastical experience! We hope that you’ll enjoy this opportunity to explore outside the vast supply of Hollywood productions that littered at our feet and discover the humor and unique aesthetic of an up-and-coming international director. We look forward to welcoming you!

Includes references and sources

the director

schedule 5:00 PM

FRI FESTIVAL OPENS* Get there early for parking and to witness the beautiful sunset over the Pacific!

2:00 PM

Rides in Pacific Park and all carnival booths will be open. A variety of traditional French dishes will be available before the fi lm.

7:30 PM

11:30 PM

DELICATESSEN To kick off the fi lm festival, the opening night screening will start around dusk on the Santa Monica Pier main screen. FESTIVAL CLOSES

2:30 PM

SAT

2:00 PM

FESTIVAL OPENS* Come early to partake in all the festivities! Ride the rides in the Pacific Park, listen to live music, play and win carnival games, see the art exhibits and eat delicious French cuisine. ORCHESTRE NATIONAL DE FR ANCE*

3:45 PM

YANN TIERSEN*

5:00 PM

CITY OF LOST CHILDREN playing in the screening tent

7:30 PM

AMÉLIE playing on the main screen

10:00 PM

THE MAKING OF AMÉLIE In the screening tent, watch Jeunet discuss how Amélie came was created.

11:30 PM

FESTIVAL CLOSES

SUN

2:30 PM 4:15 PM 5:00 PM

R APHAËL BEAU*

7:30 PM

MICMACS

10:00 PM

11:30 PM

featured films new) technologies of handheld cameras and highsensitivity film stock that allowed Godard and Truffaut to take to the streets to make their films. In the 1990s and 2000s, however, the streets have become clogged with cars whose drivers are sealed off from the world through which they glide. To be fresh and innovative is no longer only a question of going outward but of turning inward as well, to the real and virtual worlds of memory, history and desire. And it is to these worlds that Jeunet has gone and to which he returns with each new film.1

FESTIVAL OPENS* All the same fun and games as the day before! Make sure to enter in the photobooth contest before 3:00pm!

A POPULAR AUTEUR Jeunet never attended film school; he is entirely self-taught. Born in 1953 in Roanne, he came from a modest background. His father worked for the phone company, and his mother was a schoolteacher. He began making animated films while working for the telephone company and then graduated to filming advertisements and music videos—leading him on his journey toward feature films.

PHOTO CONTEST RESULTS*

ize him among film scholars and academics, some of whom regard his films with suspicion. Critics have dismissed Jeunet from what they see as his privileging of form over content. Yet this form itself contains a great deal of substance. Jeunet’s films are historically resonant in their association with the late twentieth-century French film style known as the cinéma du look and in their persistent allusions—even within films set in a postapocalyptic future, which nonetheless manage to look like costume dramas— to earlier film movements such as German expressionism, French poetic realism, and the French New Wave. Jeunet’s films thematize issue such as the technological mediation of social relations, cultural

“dolorro reperoreris aborate cation remOpul hoctatus pubadduci porterf ecerita, quam dienterra nunum facibus”

A VERY LONG ENGAGEMENT

THE MAKING OF MICMACS Watch Jeunet explain the story behind the story, playing in the screening tent. FESTIVAL CLOSES The prevailing tread among film scholars has been to view JeanPierre Jeunet’s work with a certain amount of disdain, claiming that it is too slick, too heavily influenced by advertising aesthetics, and too sentimental—in short, too popular, but not populist enough. Distinguished colleagues, mentors, and friends of mine dismiss Jeunet for being too theatrical and not spontaneous enough—in other words, not being Jean-Luc Godard, Agnès Varda, or François Truffaut. But today, slick is the new populism: the revolutionary spontaneity of May 1968 has transmogrified into flash mob happenings meticulously orchestrated by text messaging, podcasts, and blogs that, like the best art, appear deceptively

*Further information on festival events on page x x.

Jean-Pierre Jeunet is that rare breed, a popular auteur. He has written or co-written all but one of the screenplays for the films he has directed and has maintained a high degree of creative control over his projects, which bear his distinctive stylistic stamp and have been generally well regarded by critics. At the same time, his films have attracted increasingly large audiences, with accordingly expanding budgets. Yet his success is also his Achilles’ heel: his popularity with audiences has tended to marginal-

anxieties surrounding advances in biotechnology, and the repression and subsequent revelations of historical trauma, especially in the context of war and decolonization. Looking to the past and the future, his films invariably express the millennial anxieties and preoccupations of the present.2

spontaneous to spectators and bystanders. As theatrical and minutely planned as Jeunet’s films are, they show us what populism looks like today: advertising, music videos, and computer games. The energy that Jeunet’s films tap into is a high-voltage as the energy that fueled the French New Wave. The new digital and computer graphics-based technologies embraced by Jeunet and his collaborators are similar in impact to the (at the time, equally

featured films

dark and highly imaginative fin de siècle is a fantastic fairytale and visual treat. Evil man Krank locks himself away in an isolated off-shore rig, surrounded by six cloned henchmen, a dwarf assistant and an uncle who exists as a brain in an aquarium, plagued by migraines. But worse still, Krank is unable to enjoy sweet dreams. In true Chitty Chitty Bang Bang child-catcher fashion, Krank becomes children’s

slots into place. Jean Paul Gaultier’s costumes are a constant source of ingenuity and wit, with more of a wink than a nod to Berlin’s famous transvestite Charlotte von Mahlsdorf in the uniformed dressing of The Octopus. Angelo Badalamenti’s haunting, fairgroundesque score provides a suitably sinister and lilting melody and the final morphing sequence is a digital delight.4

Adventure | Fantasy Comedy | Sci-Fi Rated R for disturbing and grotesque images of violence and menace. Runtime 112 minutes Released 1995 Writers Gilles Adrien ; Jean-Pierre Jeunet Producer Félicie Dutertre Codirecter Marc Caro Music A ngelo Badalamenti Cast Ron Perlman, Dan iel Emilfork, Judit h Vittet, and Domin ique Pinon

assertive Miette, are forced to track down the deranged Krank after One’s angelic brother is stolen, meeting a catalogue of nightmarish characters along the way.

featured films

A sugar-rush of a movie, Amélie has what could be called meticulous clutter, a placement of imagery that covers every square centimeter of the screen. Jeunet’s sense of humor gives the movie heart; his real affection for the medium can be seen in all the funny little curlicues and jottings around the action. It has a hypnotic sense of romance; it’s a fable filled with longing, with a heroine who constantly flirts with failure. Jeunet and Guillaume Laurant, with whom he wrote the script, tell the story of Amélie (Tautou) from her conception through her adult life, which is filled with the kind of offhand cruelty normally found in the novels of John Irving and Kurt Vonnegut. Her parents are described as ‘’a neurotic and an iceberg,’’ and part of Amélie’s

Orphaned when his father was blown to bits by a land mine, Bazil (Boon) grows up to be a video store clerk content to pass the time watching classic films. A stray bullet from a drive-by changes everything. Removing it from Bazil’s brain box, as someone puts it, would turn him into a vegetable, and so it stays. In short order, he is discharged by the doctor, then his boss, then left waiting to see if the bullet will eventually discharge him too.

The City of Lost Children / La Cité des enfants perdus 1995 A lien : Resurrection 1997 Amélie / Le Fabuleux destin d’Amélie Poulain 2001 A Very Long Engagement / Un Long dimanche de fiançailles 2004

2009

Micmacs / Micmacs à Tire-Larigot 2009

dinner table via the butcher’s block. When Louison innocently falls for the butcher’s myopic daughter, the knife is held back to spare her feelings. But as bellies begin to rumble, will love be enough to keep Louison out of le charcuterie? This troubled romance provides the bare skeleton on which Jeunet and Caro hang their dreams. A hugely enjoyable film, “Delicatessen” welds comedy and magic into a bizarre, grotesque fantasy of an oddball dystopian future.

With screenwriting collaborator Guillaume Laurant, Jeunet created in this film an unexpected charm, with irony rich like candy and worth savoring along with the surprise. When Bazil happens upon a street occupied by the company that made the land mine that killed his father, the conglomerate responsible for the bullet that penetrated his brain turns out to be right across the way.13 Some-

Combining the cruel humor of Grimm’s fairy stories, with the spirit of Terry Gilliam and that peculiarly French knack of putting magic into film, this feverish tale of star-crossed lovers and small town cannibalism has endured as a true masterpiece of the fantastique. With “Delicatessen”, Jeunet and Caro gave the world a canny and confident calling card for that most coveted of talents—commercial arthouse cinema.3

Dark Comedy | Fantasy Rated R for violence. Runt ime 99 minutes Released 1991 Writers Gilles Adrien ; Marc Caro ; Jean-Pierre Jeunet Producer Claudie Ossard Codirecter Marc Caro Music Carlos D’A lessio Cast Pascal Benezech, Domin ique Pinon, Marie-Laure Dougnac, Jean-Claude Dreyf us, and Karin Viard

featured films

Sunday at 5:00pm | Santa Monica Pier screening tent charm is that she is preternaturally levelheaded and survives her youth with her dark, glowing eyes wide open.6

Comedy | Fantasy | Romance Rated R for sexual content. Runt ime 122 minutes

A waitress in a Parisian café, Amélie sees it as her mission in life to right wrongs and improve the lives of her customers. But she proves rather less successful at bettering her own lot, despite fall7

ing for a handsome loner (Kassovitz) with his own bizarre quest.

Jeunet uses the city as more of a character than a mere backdrop, although the director’s surreal and timeless vision should not be confused with the place seen by tourists (or even ordinary citizens). This is Jeunet’s city, where magic abounds in the strangest places, where fate and predestination lurk around every corner, where photographs talk, and where one sprightly young woman

Released 2001 Writers Guillaume Laurant; Jean-Pierre Jeunet Producers Jean-Marc Deschamps and Claudie Ossard Music Yan n Tiersen Cast Audrey Tautou, Mat hieu Kassovitz, Ruf us, and Domin ique Pinon

can orchestrate small miracles.8

Sebastien Japrisot’s World War I-set novel is a story of five French soldiers who are sentenced to death for self-inflicted wounds (done so that they could be evacuated from the front lines) and condemned to march out into the no man’s land between the Germans’ trenches and theirs, it’s a tricky mix of war epic, black comedy, and heart-stirring romance that would have left many filmmakers flummoxed.9 The film is seen largely through the eyes of Mathilde (Tautou), an orphan with a polio limp, who senses in her soul that her man, Manech (Ulliel ) is not dead. After the war, Mathilde comes upon a letter that seems to hint that not all five died on the battlefield, and she begins the long task of tracking down eyewitnesses and survivors to find the Manech she is sure is still alive and needs her help.10

1,3 Neil Smith; BBC film review 2 Elvis Mitchell New York Times film review 4 James Berardinelli Reel View film review

The pair’s feature debut, Delicatessen, launched both their careers, and their second feature-length film, the visually opulent Cité des enfants perdus, solidified their reputation as filmmakes with a strong visual aesthetic, a predilection for dystopian fantasy, and an off-kilter sense of humor. Both films credited by a collection of freaks who make their home in the scrap yard. In Paris, even the dumps are beautiful. There’s a contortionist (Ferrier) who folds herself up in the fridge when she needs to get away from it all and a cannonball man (Pinon) still pining to make the Guinness Book. There are seven in all, as Jeunet says he was reminded of Snow White’s Seven Dwarfs.

a tangent, such as a rhythm of creaking beds rippling out through the hotel, or two boys spying on an old man breeding escargots in his flooded apartment.

The directors are constantly playing curveball with the audience’s expectations and nothing can prepare you for the sheer weirdness of it all. Every so often, the plot stops to watch a scene spiral off at

caro & collaboration

Sunday at 7:30pm | Santa Monica Pier main screen

Jeunet as he settles into a Paris junkyard where discards, human and otherwise, find a second life.

Delicatessen 1991

2001

2004

Friday at 7:30pm | Santa Monica Pier main screen Somewhere in the mist-shrouded future and apocalyptic rubble of France, Louison (Pinon), a grieving ex-clown takes a job as janitor in a crumbling apartment block. Unbeknown to him, this job has a history and previous incumbents have ended up on the neighbor’s

a very long engagement This beguiling fable whipped up a storm of controversy in France, with some commentators arguing its nostalgic whimsy brushed the realities of modern multicultural Paris under the carpet.5

micmacs

This good-versus-evil fable soon reveals itself to be a wide-ranging philosophical playground for French filmmaker Jean-Pierre

Foutaises / Things I Like, Things I Don’t Like (short) 1989

1991

1997

Saturday at 7:30pm | Santa Monica Pier main screen The frenetic deluge of beautiful, grotesque and surreal images can be exhausting, but viewed as a stream of conscious carnival of ideas, much like dreams themselves, then the unfolding chaos

public enemy number one as he kidnaps the innocent in order to ‘steal’ their dreams. Street freak strongman One, along with the

A whimsical whirligig of a movie, Micmacs is filled with salvaged metal and salvaged lives, where a bullet to the brain brings insight and a bunch of clever misfits bring a couple of weapons-making giants to their knees.

Le Bunker de la dernière rafale / The Bunker of the Last Gunshots (short) 1981 Pas de repos pour Billy Brakko (short) 1984

1989

1995

amélie

Saturday at 5:00pm | Santa Monica Pier screening tent Following the success of Delicatessen, collaborators Jeunet and Caro inspire the weird and the wonderful with outlandish extrava-

L’évasion (short) 1978 Le manège (short) 1980

1981

1984

featured films

city of lost children gance in The City of Lost Children. Armed with a bigger budget and enough special effects to sink a computerised battleship, this

1978 1980

delicatessen

Comedy | Crime Rated R for some sexualit y and brief violence. Runtime 105 minutes Released 2009

to be done that couldn’t have been, previously…in turn, reviving the writing, in proposing new things, thanks to the new techniques” (Alain Schlockoff and

in the traditional sense of the word, that is, the direction of the actors, etc.,

Producers Frédéric Brillion, Gilles Legrand

“dolorro reperoreris aborate cation remOpul hoctatus pubadduci porterf ecerita, quam dienterra nunum facibus”

while I do the artistic direction. Beyond that, in the day-to-day workings of the shoot or pre-

Music Raphaël Beau Cast Dany Boon, A ndré

production, it’s obviously much more of a mixture. We write together, film together, edit together. According to each of our specialties, sometimes we’ll be drawn to what we do best. There’s a real complicity between us” (Frank Debemardi ( 14 March 2006). “Entretien avec Marc Caro.” Faille Temporelle).

Dussollier, Nicolas Marié and Domin ique Pinon

thing must be done to stop the killing and the maiming, and like much of Jeunet’s work, the story’s outcome displays the director’s quirky brilliance.

Both Bazil and his world are infused with a surreal circus quality to start with, but that sensibility grows sharper when he’s taken in

This almost symbiotic partnership—like that of

Jeunet’s career has been defined by a series of collaborative partnerships, some more long-standing than others. Of these working relationships, perhaps the most influential was his collaboration with the illustrator and graphic artist Marc Caro. Jeunet met Caro at a animation festival in Annecy in the 1970s, and the pair clicked right away. They made two short animated puppet films together, L’évasion (The Escape; 1978) and Le manège (The Carousel); 1979), before going on to make two more short films in the 1980s, Le Bunker de la dernière rafale (The Bunker of the Last Gunshots; 1981) and Pas de repos pour Billy Brakko (No rest for Billy Brakko; 1983). Marc Caro has described the way in which he and Jeunet complement each other: “[Jeunet] loves Charlie Chaplin, whereas I love Buster Keaton; he loves Truffaut, while I love Jacques Tati; he likes dogs, and I like cats. What we have most in common is the love of making things. It’s true that we had this desire, more than anything else, to make a film, rather than simply to help another director or filmmaker” (Alexandre Drubigny (23 Nov 2005). Auto/ Focus Interview with Jeunet).

especially interests me is developing universes, and multimedia can enable me to explore a universe that I will construct.” Jeunet responded somewhat differently: “I’d like to continue writing screenplays… something like Forrest Gump, where the special effects aren’t neccesarily see bu can enable things

Jeunet and Caro as codirectors, and the filmmakers worked in tandem, with Caro taking more responsibility for the films’ visual style and Jeunet working more with the actors. Caro has explained their working relationship thus: “Jean-Pierre handles the direction

Writers Guillaume Laurant; Jean-Pierre Jeunet

Cathy Karani (18 July 2006). Excerpts from a conversation with Jeunet and Caro). Other members of Jeunet’s coterie have maintained closer ties with the director. The producer Claudie Ossard, who helped Jeunet and Caro finance Delicatessen, stayed with Jeunet throughout the next decade of his career, producing his two subsequent French films. Pierre-Jacques Bénichou has worked as

the conjoined twins in La Cité des enfants perdus, who finish each other’s sentences and scratch each

casting director on all Jeunet’s films except for Alien Resurrection, when there was a Hollywood casting

other’s arms—came to an end when Jeunet and Caro were offered the chance to direct the fourth Alien film. Caro was not interested in working on a film over which he lacked creative control, whereas Jeunet relished the challenges and constraints that ocme with working on a big-budget Hollywood movie. Although Caro was eventually persuaded to spend three weeks in Hollywood doing some costume and set design for the film, he then parted company with Jeunet to pursue a solo career in illustration and computer graphics. Caro subsequently declined to participate in any of the “making-of” documentaries or interviews to accompany the DVD editions of the pair’s films, and the two have not worked together since. This parting of ways

director in place. The special-effects supervisor Pitof, who has worked on several of Jeunet’s films, and the director of photography Darius Khondji, who had worked on Delicatessen and La Cité des enfants perdus, when with Jeunet to Hollywood to work on Alien Resurrection. The set designer of Jeunet’s French films, as have the screenwriters Guillaume Laurant and Gilles Adrian. Bruno Delbonnel has worked on all of Jeunet’s films in several different roles, from screenwriter and sound technician to director of photography. Several actors have appeared in more than one of Jeunet’s films, including the late Ticky Holgado, Serge Merlin, Rufus, Ron Perlman, Jean-Claude Dreyfus, Audrey Tautou, and Dominique Bettenfeld. Dominique Pinon has acted in all

could perhaps have been foreseen in their differing responses when asked, in a joint interview, “Cin-

of the director’s feature films as well as the short film Foutaises (Trifles; 1990).14

ematically, what are your aspirations?” Caro replied, “I feel I’d like to explore other narrative forms, ones in which there’s a little media interactivity. What

full spread with quote

With his typically pixie-ish sense of humor, Jeunet brings a light and jaunty tone to a tale that could easily have been rendered brooding and overly artful. Bits of absurdity speckle the story, from Mathilde’s incongruous tuba-playing to a subplot about one of the dead soldiers’ lovers who resorts to impossibly complex methods of killing off those she believes responsible for his death.11 The implacable logic of revenge and the barbarity of war are softened by the voluptuous beauty of Jeunet’s visuals and the magic of his storytelling.12

Drama | Myster y Romance | War Rated R for violence and sexualit y. Runt ime 133 minutes Released 2004 Writers Guillaume Laurant; Jean-Pierre Jeunet Producers Francis Boespf lug, Bill Gerber, Jean-Louis Mont hieux, Fabien ne Tsaï Novel Author Sébastien Japrisot Music A ngelo Badalamenti Cast Audrey Tautou, Gaspard Ulliel, Jodie Foster, Domin ique Pinon and Ticky Holgado


CATALOGUE

film technique

Jeunet has been at the cutting edge of French cinema’s use of computer-generated images (CGI) and digital technology to produce special effects. At the time of its release in 1995, La Cité des enfants perdus could boast the greatest number of digital effects of any French film ever made. Marc Caro has recalled working on that film and the sea change that the advent of digital technology made possible: “We came from the world of animation, where you’re used to doing everything image by image…And then, digital technology came along and turned everything upside down, and hit us over the head, but at the same time, we were partly responsible for it,

it was the film’s use of digital technology to transform Paris into an idealized version of itself that attracted the most attention. Digital technology allowed Jeunet both to film on location and to transform his locations into an enormous set. This blend of authenticity and artifice evokes aspects of the 1980s and 1990s cinéma du look, the late 1950s and early 1960s French New Wave, and the big-budget, postwar cinéma de qualité. What is distinctive about Jeunet’s films is the way they combine the past and the present to

actively participating in the innovation—it’s really fascinating. You sort of get that feeling of pride that ‘pioneers’ sometimes have” (Alexandre Drubigny (23 Nov 2005). Auto/ Focus Interview with Jeunet). When Jeunet went on to release Amélie in France in 2001,

create a style that is discernible across all his films, even the two he made with Marc Caro. Jeunet’s trademarks include a quirky sense of humor; characters who exhibit slightly neurotic, ritualistic behavior or “magical thinking;” obsessive collections; and a preoc-

cupation with feet (the large number of shots at ground level in all of Jeunet’s feature films). Jeunet is renowned for his meticulous preparation and storyboarding, and his films have sometimes come under attack for perceived lack of spontaneity. He has claimed, however, that he is not wedded to his storyboard: “‘I’m the first to say that a storyboard isn’t made to be respected but to be transcended. If an actor finds a brilliant idea or if you think of a way of shooting the same thing differently and better, then you have to change everything, no doubt about it. In other words the storyboard is like a highway:

go beyond the surface of the character, because it is not the psychological complexity of the character which gives pleasure, but the way in which the character behaves. In other words, what matters is what can be seen, what is presented, rather than what can be worked out, or constructed” (Phil Powrie (2001) Jean-Jacques Beineix). The emphasis on what can be seen also results in a fascination with technologies of vision and visual representation, expecially in Micmacs and Amélie (telescopes and binoculars but also photography, painting, postcards, video, television, and cinema) and A Very Long Engagement

you can turn off it from time to time to follow prettier country roads, but if you lose your way, you can always return to the highway’” (Laurent Tirard (2002). Moviemakers’ Master Class).

(in which point-of-view shots through microscopes, magnifying glasses, cameras, and the viewfinders of machine guns proliferate). Jeunet’s films offer a tremendous degree of surface pleasure, but what makes them so interesting for the film analyst is their imaginative use of the surface or “look” of the films as a vehicle with which to conceal and convey a great deal of information about contemporary cultural preoccupations, which, like Edgar Allen Poe’s purloined letter, can be hidden in plain sight.15

The high degree of advance preparation, the emphasis on visual style, and the obvious influence of advertising and music-video aesthetics underscore Jeunet’s loose affiliation with the films and filmmakers of the cinéma du look. The cinéma du look emerged in the early 1980s, beginning with Diva (dir. Jean-Jacques Beineix; 1981), a cult film hailed by Fredric Jameson as the first “postmodern” French film (Jameson (1990) Signatures of the Visible) that soon became the signature film of the look style. The directors most closely associated with the cinéma du look are Beineix, Luc Besson, and Léos Carax, who made a number of stylish thrillers characterized by sleek, colorful urban settings, a high degree of artifice, and whata Sue Harris has called “a celebration of the visual and sensory elements of the filmic text” (Harris (2004) “The Cinéma du Look.” European Cinema). The influence of commercials and popmusic videos can be seen in virtually every frame of look films. In these films, critics often commented , plot and character development seemed to be little more than pretexts for the dazzling visual display. In his study of Beineix, Phil Powrie describes the look effect as “the immersion of the spectator, not in some kind of ‘depth’ but paradoxically, in an infinite ‘surface.’ That surface is seen as the screen surface: the spectator does not go beyond the surface of the narrative, which functions more like a peg on which to hang the coat of style. The spectator does not

historical landmarks wind Dipper – in 1924. They also added one of the richest chapters in the Pier’s history – the La Monica Ballroom. Vast and ornate, the ballroom consumed so much of the Pier that, when viewed from the beach, it appeared as a monumental building floating magically above the sea. In 1948, famed country swing music star Spade Cooley televised his weekly TV program from this ballroom; it was the first time that a musical TV show was ever televised live. Almost as soon as the Pier was conceived in the early 1900’s the notion that a breakwater and yacht harbor would make an ideal companion to the pier circulated regularly. In 1933 this became a reality, and Santa Monica Yacht Harbor was born. The harbor was home to a collection of yachts, fishing boats and a cruise liner to Catalina. It was also the home base for a shuttle service to offshore gambling operations run by mobster Tony Cornero until 1939 when then-Attorney General Earl Warren led a legal crusade to shut them down. The last to go was Cornero’s flagship, the “Rex”, which was raided in 1939 during what came to be known as “The Battle of Santa Monica Bay”. After a three day standoff, Cornero surrendered because he “needed a haircut”. Government agents boarded the “Rex” and threw all of the gambling machines and tables overboard. Warren subsequently went on to become governor of California, and ultimately Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. The 1930’s also brought about another very popular attraction to the Pier’s atmosphere – world famous “Muscle Beach”. Famous bodybuilders such as Jack LaLanne and Joe Gold (Gold’s Gym) regularly worked out here, establishing Santa Monica as the birthplace of the physical fitness boom. In 1940 the famous neon sign at the top of the Pier ramp was installed by the Santa Monica Pier Businessmen’s Association to celebrate the opening of the newly-built ramp. It is an internationally-recognized tourist destination and a symbol of the Southern California lifestyle. In 1943 Walter Newcomb purchased the Looff Amusement Pier. Newcomb had been managing the Pier’s operations at the time, and also owned the arcade and gift shop. Not long thereafter, his name had become so associated with the southern half of the Pier that it became known as the Newcomb Pier. His family (some of whom are present here tonight) owned the amusement pier for 40 years until they sold it to the City in the early 1970’s. In the 1950’s Enid Newcomb suggested to family friend Morris

TO

MORE PLACES SEE

historical landmarks “Pops” Gordon that his two sons, George and Eugene, purchase and operate the Pier’s arcade. It didn’t take much persuasion, for the Gordons instantly took to the Pier and ultimately made Playland Arcade into the Pier’s longest running enterprise offering the day’s contemporary games alongside those of yesterday, providing inexpensive entertainment to a diverse crowd. George’s daughters Marlene and Joannie have kept the business within the family, and the next generation of Gordons is already in training to maintain the family tradition. The Pier managed to carry on through the 1950’s and 60’s, satisfying fishermen, tourists and locals alike. The other famous piers along the Gold Coast, however, disappeared one by one. The glamour of the amusement piers had given way to the inland theme parks such as Disneyland. In 1973, the fate of Santa Monica Pier seemed to be the same as that of its neighbors. The City Council had slated the Pier for destruction in favor of a man-made island which would host a resort hotel. Santa Monica, often referring to itself as a “sleepy little beach town”, woke up – its citizens in a rage over the thought of losing the last of its famous landmarks. After much publicity and the deliverance of a petition to their attention, the Council rescinded their plans to build the island. Three of the councilmen who had voted to destroy the Piers were overwhelmingly defeated in their run for re-election, and their replacements saw to it that the Pier would never be destroyed. In 1983 Mother Nature was determined to accomplish what the former City Council could not. A pair of violent winter storms destroyed over one-third of the Pier’s length. Gone were the cafes, the bait shop, the rock shop

put forth the effort to save the Pier again. The City formed the Pier Restoration and Development Task Force, which later became the PRC, to oversee the reconstruction, and the day-to-day operations of the Pier. By April 1990 the entire western structure had been rebuilt. The harbor patrol station reopened, along with a bait shop and restaurant – today known as Mariasol. To bring attention to the Pier during its reconstruction, “Save the Pier Week” was held in 1983 sparking a series of annual concerts known as “The Twilight Dance Series”. Today the concerts are as regular a part of Southern California summer as sunshine, the sea and the sand. In 1996 Pacific Park opened, bringing back the first full-scale amusement park on the Pier since the 1930’s, and the first roller coaster, the West Coaster, since the Whirlwind Dipper let off its last customers over six decades earlier. The opening of the park was an invitation for families to visit the Pier again. The new millennium has continued with that momentum and today the Pier is as vital as it has ever been, drawing over four million visitors annually. Today’s Pier atmosphere is decorated with a variety of street performers and artists who put their talents on display for crowds of admirers every day. Below the Pier’s eastern deck is the Santa Monica Pier Aquarium, where you can experience some of the denizens of the Santa Monica Bay up close and personal. And, of course, the Pier’s Carousel still offers old-fashioned entertainment for under a dollar. The Pier today is a popular recreational destination as well as a vibrant reminder of the past.16

On September 9, 1909, after sixteen months of construction, the Santa Monica Municipal Pier opened to the public. Thousands of people swarmed onto the 1,600-foot-long concrete pier to enjoy a festive day of band concerts, swimming races and the novelty of walking above the waters of the Pacific Ocean. While originally built to satisfy the City’s sanitation needs, the Pier quickly became a magnet for the fishing community and fueled the imagination of many local entrepreneurs. Within just a few years, plans were put forth to build an amusement pier adjacent to the Municipal Pier. Famous carousel manufacturer Charles I.D. Looff arrived in February 1916, purchasing the land immediately south

and the harbor patrol station. The Pier in its entirety seemed too badly beaten to survive. But the people, true to their mission in 1973,

of the Municipal Pier for development. Looff provided Santa Monica’s north beach with its first successful amusements, including the Blue Streak Racer roller coaster. The Hippodrome housed the Pier’s Carousel, and the building still stands today with the distinction of being Santa Monica’s first National Historic Landmark.

Ro et faccum landae rerum nullitatusam excero blacias periation res et ut imus net et, suntis venit, officiendus debit ullam quo occum, ommo blaceped quaeperata sanderi

In 1918 Looff passed away, and his family continued to run the pier until 1923, when they sold it to the Santa Monica Amusement Company, a group of local businessmen intent on expanding the famed amusement man’s dream. Their plans included expanding the Pier’s thrill rides, beginning with the removal and replacement of the Blue Streak Racer with a larger, faster coaster – the Whirl-

historical landmarks

festival events LIVE MUSIC Orchestre National de France is a symphony orchestra run by Radio France. Since 1944, the orchestra has been based in the Théâtre des Champs-Élysées in Paris, where it occasionally plays in the pit for opera productions. Joining us to represent the best of France’s musical talent, are seven members of the Orchestra. In additional to popular classical composters, the musicians will be playing musical numbers from Jeunet’s films.x

Santa Monica’s Landmarks Program has been committed to historic preservation for decades. The city has designated two historic districts, more than 64 landmarks and structures of merit, and has identified approximately 1,350 potential historic resources. Route 66 In 1926, Route 66 was created as a link between Chicago and Los Angeles. It totaled over 2,400 miles and was dramatized in John Steinbeck’s Grapes of Wrath and popularized in Nat King Cole’s hit song Get Your Kicks on Route 66. There’s no question that Route 66 ends in Santa Monica. But there is great debate and speculation about where the actual ending point is located. Where do you think Route 66 ends? The original pre 1939 alignment of Route 66 ended in Downtown Los Angeles. In 1936, Route 66 was extended from Downtown Los Angeles to Santa Monica, terminating at US 101 ALT, today the intersection of Olympic Blvd and Lincoln Blvd (a segment of State Route 1).

According to the California Route 66 Preservation Foundation, Route 66 officially ends when it merges into Highway 101 at the intersection of Lincoln and Olympic Blvd. Route 66 is said to end a block away from the pier at the intersection of Santa Monica Blvd and Ocean Ave. A bronze plaque dedicating Route 66 as the Will Rogers Highway is located across the street in Palisades Park, a few feet from the Santa Monica Visitor Center Kiosk. On November 11, 2009, the Santa Monica Pier was designated as the official Western Terminus of Route 66 by the Route 66 Alliance, an organization that promotes and preserves the historic roadway between Chicago, Ill. and Santa Monica, CA. Stop by for a

practicalities

photo at The End of The Trail Sign. No matter where the ending point is, Santa Monica is a wonderful place to celebrate the Spirit of Route 66 and its many contributions to American culture. Marion Davies Estate, North Guest House Located at 321 Palisades Beach Road which has now been transformed into the Annenberg Community Beach House, the Marion Davies Estate was built by William Randolph Hearst and was home to many famed Hollywood parties in the 1930’s. The North Guest House is the only original structure remaining on the property. Santa Monica Conservancy docent tours of the Guest House are available for free.

Historical Downtown Santa Monica Take a walking tour of some of Santa Monica’s oldest landmarks. In approximately two hours and six blocks, experience more than 130 years of Santa Monica history including the 1875 Rapp Saloon, The Majestic Theatre and much more. Docent-guided walking tours by the Santa Monica Conservancy take place every Saturday morning at 10am. Self-guided tour booklets are also available.

Yann Tiersen is a French musician and composer. His music is recognized by its use of a large variety of instruments in relatively minimalist compositions, often with a touch of either European classical music or French folk music, using primarily the piano, accordion or violin together with instruments like the melodica, xylophone, toy piano, ondes martenot, harpsichord and typewriter. The Amélie soundtrack features compositions from Tiersen’s first three albums and also new work for the film.x Raphaël Beau’s score for Micmacs is an invigorating, intriguing affair that fl its from relaxed shuffle to furious fl ights with grace. With each frame of a Jeunet fi lm a work of art in itself, anything less than at least a serviceable, quirkily charming score would have spoiled things. Get energized and

location Coming from the North on Pacifi c Coast Highway Go south on Pacifi c Coast Highway. After reaching the California incline, watch for directional signs for Pier/Beach parking and deceleration lane on the right. Coming from the North on Ocean Avenue Go south on Ocean Avenue. The Pier is located two blocks south of Santa Monica Blvd. at corner of Ocean Ave. and Colorado Ave. If the parking lot is full, proceed two blocks and make a right turn on Seaside Terrace. Follow signs to Pier/Beach parking. Coming from the South on Ocean Avenue Go north on Ocean Avenue. Turn left at Colorado Avenue and drive onto Pier. If lot is full, proceed north on Ocean Avenue to California Incline and go left. Turn left at the signal Pacifi c Coast Highway. Move to the right hand lane and follow signs into Pier/ Beach parking. Coming from I-10 Go west on I-10. Exit the freeway at 4th/5th Street exit. Stay in the left lane, taking you to 4th Street. Turn left on 4th Street and proceed to Pico Blvd. Make a right on Pico Blvd., proceed to Ocean Avenue. Turn right on Ocean Avenue and follow signage to the Pier. Coming from 405

$125 3-day tickets $100 3-day tickets for children 12-years-old or younger. Children under 5 are free. $ 55 for 1-day tickets

Tickets go on sale on Tuesday, May 17th at 10am PDT and can be purchased on the festival website or directly from the Santa Monica Pier Box Office located in Pacific Park. Guests with valid student identification and groups of 4 or larger are eligible for a 15% discount on 3-day tickets. All online ticket sales are for 3-day festival tickets and include a $10 voucher to any of the pier restaurants and unlimited access to the historical carousel and the Pacific Park rides the days of the festival. Parking rates are $7 for advanced ticket holders and guests will be asked to present tickets or proof of purchase. One-day and 3-day tickets will be available the day of. Normal parking rates will apply to one-day ticket holders. All festival films are Rated R and minors must be accompanied by an adult. No ads or trailers are shown with the films, so please don’t be late!

From the north or south on the 405 Freeway, take I-10 West. Drive west on I-10 and exit freeway at 4th/5th Street exit. Go north on 5th St. to Colorado Ave. Make a left on Colorado Ave. and drive straight to the Pier at Ocean Avenue. If the parking lot is full, make a left turn on Ocean Avenue and proceed two blocks. Make a right turn on Seaside Terrace. Follow sign to Pier/Beach parking.

enchanted as you watch him perform his jaunty arrangements live!x

CARNIVAL FESTIVITIES During the festival, the historic carousel and all rides and booths will be open in the Pacific Park. Emerse yourself in play and let your imagination run wild. Whether you’re a child or an adult, youth is a matter of mood and mentality!

FOUND ART SCULPTURE EXHIBIT On a break from the rides, be sure to check out the sculpture exhibit, featuring work from reknowned artist Robert Hudson and a selection of other local artists. All the work on display are assemblages of recycled material creating fresh and funky pieces that toy with our predisposed ideas of form and function.

PHOTO BOOTH CONTEST Explore your own creativity and take a unique self-portrait! Tack your best photo on the Portrait Wall next to the booth to win a DVD box set of Jeunet’s featured films! Don’t forget to vote yourself and two other runner-ups. The winners will be announced before the first movie on Sunday. Runner ups will take home a small festival poster.

FILM STILL GALLERY Jeunet’s films come alive with colourful characters and audacious designs. His lens onto the cinematic world is unique and make for beautiful film stills. Make sure to check out the large display of photography that will evoke the magical adventure of the featured films.

FRENCH CUISINE No festival would be complete without a wide assortment of treats and eats! Experience traditional French fare, from freshly baked sweet and savory brioches to Fried Camembert to Duck Confit. Quench your thirst with an old-fashioned soda from the soda fountain next to the carousel. Although we are all children at heart, alcoholic beverages will be available for purchase by guests 21 or older.


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ABOUT THE FESTIVAL

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SCHEDULE

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THE DIRECTOR

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FEATURED FILMS

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CARO & COLLABORATION

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FILM TECHNIQUE

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HISTORICAL LANDMARKS

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FESTIVAL EVENTS

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PRACTICALITIES

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LOCATION

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SOURCES

Friday, August 5 to Sunday August 7 Santa Monica Pier Santa Monica, CA 2pm to 11: 30pm

Daydreams on Roof tops

Daydreams on Rooftops marks the fi rst American fi lm festival celebrating the body of work of French fi lm director Jean-Pierre Jeunet. More than just a regular fi lm festival, Daydreams on Rooftops offers a weekend getaway full of whimsy and imagination that will bring the inner-child out of all of us. Whether you want to learn about a modern French cinematic style, get nostalgic in carnival galore on the beautiful Santa Monica pier, or immerse yourself in the fantastical (and sometimes dark) fi lm plots, you’re in for a fantastical experience! We hope that you’ll enjoy this opportunity to explore outside the vast supply of Hollywood productions that littered at our feet and discover the humor and unique aesthetic of an up-andcoming international director. We look forward to welcoming you!

© 2011 Nicole Racquel Design A ll rights Reser ved. Manufactured in the Un ited States of A merica Includes references and sources

THE DIRECTOR

schedule 5:00 PM

FRI FESTIVAL OPENS* Get there early for parking and to witness the beautiful sunset over the Pacific!

2:00 PM

Rides in Pacific Park and all carnival booths will be open. A variety of traditional French dishes will be available before the fi lm.

7:30 PM

11:30 PM

DELICATESSEN To kick off the fi lm festival, the opening night screening will start around dusk on the Santa Monica Pier main screen. FESTIVAL CLOSES

2:30 PM

JEUNET SAT AND SUN COTERIE FESTIVAL OPENS* Come early to partake in all the festivities! Ride the rides in the Pacific Park, listen to live music, play and win carnival games, see the art exhibits and eat delicious French cuisine. ORCHESTRE NATIONAL DE FR ANCE*

3:45 PM

YANN TIERSEN*

5:00 PM

CITY OF LOST CHILDREN playing in the screening tent

7:30 PM

AMÉLIE playing on the main screen

10:00 PM

THE MAKING OF AMÉLIE In the screening tent, watch Jeunet discuss how Amélie came was created.

11:30 PM

FESTIVAL CLOSES

FEATURED FILMS

collaborators are similar in impact to the (at the time,

suspicion. Critics have dismissed Jeunet from what they

equally new) technologies of handheld cameras and

see as his privileging form over content. Yet this form

high-sensitivity film stock that allowed Godard and

itself contains a great deal of substance. Jeunet’s films

Truffaut to take to the streets to make their films. In

are historically resonant in their association with the

the 1990s and 2000s, however, the streets have become

late twentieth-century French film style known as the

clogged with cars whose drivers are sealed off from

cinéma du look and in their persistent allusions—even

2:00 PM

FESTIVAL OPENS* All the same fun and games as the day before! Make sure to enter in the photobooth contest before 3:00pm!

2:30 PM 4:15 PM 5:00 PM

R APHAËL BEAU*

A VERY LONG ENGAGEMENT

modest background. His father worked for the phone

7:30 PM

MICMACS

telephone company and then graduated to filming

THE MAKING OF MICMACS Watch Jeunet explain the story behind the story, playing in the screening tent.

Jean-Pierre Jeunet is a rare breed, a popular auteur.

his fi lms invariably express the millennial anxieties

He has written or co-written all but one of the screen-

and preoccupations of the present.2

10:00 PM

11:30 PM

the world through which they glide. To be fresh and innovative is no longer only a question of going outward but of turning inward as well, to the real and virtual worlds of memory, history and desire. And it is to these worlds that Jeunet has

To be fresh and innovative is no longer only a question of going outward but of turning interward.

gone and to which he returns with each new film.1

within fi lms set in the post apocalyptic future, which

Jeunet never attended film school; he is entirely self-

PHOTO CONTEST RESULTS*

taught. Born in 1953 in Roanne, he came from a company, and his mother was a schoolteacher. He began making animated films while working for the advertisements and music videos—leading him on his journey toward feature films.

nonetheless manage to look kind of like costume

such as the technological mediation of social relations, cultural anxieties surrounding advances in biotechnolof historical trauma, especially in the context of war and decolonization. Looking to the past and the future,

FESTIVAL CLOSES

which bear his distinctive stylistic stamp and have been generally well regarded by critics. At the same time, with accordingly expanding budgets. Yet his success

Pierre Jeunet’s work with a certain amount of disdain, claiming that

is also his Achilles’ heel: his popularity with audiences has tended to marginalize him among film scholars and academics, some of whom regard his films with

1968 has transmogrified into flash mob happenings meticulously orchestrated by text messaging, podcasts, and blogs that, like the best art, appear deceptively spontaneous to spectators and bystanders. what populism looks like today: advertising, music videos, and computer games. The energy that Jeunet’s films tap into is a high-voltage as the energy that fueled the French New Wave. The new digital and computer graphics-based technologies embraced by Jeunet and his

FEATURED FILMS

1978

L’évasion (short)

1980

Le manège (short)

1981

Le Bunker de la dernière rafale / The Bunker of the Last Gunshots (short)

1984

Pas de repos pour Billy Brakko (short)

1989

Foutaises / Things I Like, Things I Don’t Like (short)

city of lost children

Delicatessen The City of Lost Children / La Cité des enfants perdus

1997

Alien: Resurrection

2001

Amélie / Le Fabuleux destin d’Amélie Poulain

2004

A Very Long Engagement / Un Long dimanche de fiançailles

2009

Micmacs / Micmacs à Tire-Larigot

FEATURED FILMS

a very long engagement

amélie Saturday at 7:30pm | Santa Monica Pier main screen

Saturday at 5:00pm | Santa Monica Pier screening tent

rounded by six cloned henchmen, a dwarf assistant and an uncle who

1991 1995

FEATURED FILMS

The frenetic deluge of beautiful, grotesque and surreal images can be exhausting, but viewed as a stream of conscious carnival of ideas, much

Jean Paul Gaultier’s costumes are a constant source of ingenuity and

Adventure | Fantasy Comedy | Sci-Fi Rated R for disturbing and grotesque images of violence and menace.

wit, with more of a wink than a nod to Berlin’s famous transvestite

Runtime 112 minutes

Charlotte von Mahlsdorf in the uniformed dressing of The Octopus.

Released 1995

Angelo Badalamenti’s haunting, fairgroundesque score provides a suit-

exists as a brain in an aquarium, plagued by migraines. But worse

ably sinister and lilting melody and the final morphing sequence is

Writers Gilles Adrien ; Jean-Pierre Jeunet

still, Krank is unable to enjoy sweet dreams. In true Chitty Chitty Bang

a digital delight.4

Producer Félicie Dutertre

Bang child-catcher fashion, Krank becomes children’s public enemy

Codirector Marc Caro

number one as he kidnaps the innocent in order to ‘steal’ their dreams. Street freak strongman One, along with the assertive Miette, are forced to track down the deranged Krank after One’s angelic brother is stolen, meeting a catalogue of nightmarish characters along the way.

This beguiling fable whipped up a storm of controversy in France, with some commentators arguing its nostalgic whimsy brushed the realities of modern multicultural Paris under the carpet.5 A sugar-rush of a movie, Amélie has what could be called meticulous

Sunday at 5:00pm | Santa Monica Pier screening tent is preternaturally levelheaded and survives her youth with her dark, glowing eyes wide open.6 A waitress in a Parisian café, Amélie sees it as her mission in life to right wrongs and improve the lives of her customers. But she proves rather

clutter, a placement of imagery that covers every square centimeter

less successful at bettering her own lot, despite falling for a handsome

of the screen. Jeunet’s sense of humor gives the movie heart; his real

loner (Kassovitz) with his own bizarre quest.

affection for the medium can be seen in all the funny little curlicues and jottings around the action. It has a hypnotic sense of romance; it’s a fable filled with longing, with a heroine who constantly flirts with failure.

7

and jaunty tone to a tale that could easily have been rendered brooding and overly artful. Bits of absurdity speckle throughout the story, from

into the no man’s land between the Germans’ trenches and theirs, it’s that would have left many a filmmaker a bit flummoxed.9

Producers Jean-Marc Deschamps and Claudie Ossard Music Yan n Tiersen

Jeunet’s city, where magic abounds in the strangest places, where fate

Jeunet and Guillaume Laurant, with whom he wrote the script, tell

and predestination lurk around every corner, where photographs talk,

the story of Amélie (Tautou) from her conception through her adult life,

and where one sprightly young woman can orchestrate small miracles.8

Cast Audrey Tautou, Mat hieu Kassovitz, Ruf us, and Domin ique Pinon

which is filled with the kind of offhand cruelty normally found in

FEATURED FILMS

CARO & COLLABORATION

The pair’s feature debut, Delicatessen, launched both

A whimsical whirligig of a movie, Micmacs is filled with salvaged

even the dumps are beautiful. There’s a contortionist (Ferrier) who

metal and salvaged lives, where a bullet to the brain brings insight and

folds herself up in the fridge when she needs to get away from it all and a cannonball man (Pinon) still pining to make the Guinness Book of

to their knees. This good-versus-evil fable soon reveals itself to be a wide-ranging philosophical playground for French fi lmmaker Jean-Pierre Jeunet as he settles into a Paris junkyard where discards, human and otherwise, find a second life. Orphaned when his father was blown to bits by a land mine, Bazil (Boon) grows up to be a video store clerk, content with passing the time watching classic films. A stray bullet from a drive-by changes everything. Removing it from Bazil’s brain box, as someone puts it, would turn him into a vegetable, and so it stays. In short order, he is discharged

Records. There are seven in all, as Jeunet says he was reminded of Snow

where the special effects aren’t neccesarily see but can enable things to be done that couldn’t have been,

in this film an unexpected charm, with irony rich like candy and worth savoring along with the surprise. When Bazil happens upon a street occupied by the company that made the land mine that killed his father, the conglomerate responsible for the bullet that penetrated his brain turns out to be right across the street.13 Something must be done to stop the killing and the maiming, and like much of Jeunet’s work, the story’s outcome displays the director’s quirky brilliance.

ing new things, thanks to the new techniques” (Alain Schlockoff and Cathy Karani (18 July 2006). Excerpts

Caro taking more responsibility for the films’ visual explained their working relationship thus: “Jean-Pierre handles the direction in the traditional sense of the word, that is, the direction of the actors, etc., while I do the artistic direction. Beyond that, in the day-to-day workings of the shoot or preproduction,

Music Raphaël Beau

it’s obviously much more of a mixture. We write together, film together, edit together. According to

Cast Dany Boon, A ndré

each of our specialties, sometimes we’ll be drawn to what we do best. There’s a real complicity between us” (Frank Debemardi (14 March 2006). “Entretien avec Marc Caro.” Faille Temporelle).

by the doctor, then his boss, then left waiting to see if the bullet will eventually discharge him too.

from a conversation with Jeunet and Caro). Other members of Jeunet’s coterie have maintained closer ties with the director. The producer Claudie Ossard,

“What we have most in common is the love of making things.”

Producers Frédéric Brillion, Gilles Legrand

Dussollier, Nicolas Marié and Domin ique Pinon

previously…in turn, reviving the writing, in propos-

a predilection for dystopian fantasy, and an off-kilter

style and Jeunet working more with the actors. Caro has

Runtime 105 minutes Released 2009 Writers Guillaume Laurant; Jean-Pierre Jeunet

sense of humor. Both films credited Jeunet and Caro as codirectors, and the filmmakers worked in tandem, with

Comedy | Crime Rated R for some sexualit y and brief violence.

White’s Seven Dwarfs. With screenwriting collaborator Guillaume Laurant, Jeunet created

writing screenplays…something like Forrest Gump,

their careers, and their second feature-length film, the visually opulent Cité des enfants perdus, solidified their reputation as filmmakes with a strong visual aesthetic,

Sunday at 7:30pm | Santa Monica Pier main screen

This almost symbiotic partnership—like that of the

who had helped Jeunet and Caro finance Delicatessen, stayed with Jeunet throughout the next decade of his career, producing his two subsequent French films. Pierre-Jacques Bénichou has worked as casting director on all Jeunet’s films except for Alien Resurrection, when there was a Hollywood casting director in place. The special-effects supervisor Pitof, who has worked on several of Jeunet’s fi lms, and the director of photography Darius Khondji, who had worked on Delicatessen and La Cité des enfants perdus, when with Jeunet to Hollywood to

Both Bazil and his world are infused with a surreal circus quality to

conjoined twins characters in La Cité des enfants perdus,

start with, but that sensibility grows sharper when he’s taken in by a

who finish each other’s sentences and scratch each

work on Alien Resurrection. The set designer for Jeunet’s

other’s arms—came to an end when Jeunet and Caro

French films, as have the screenwriters Guillaume

collection of freaks who make their home in the scrap yard. In Paris,

were offered the chance to direct the fourth Alien film.

Jeunet’s entire career has been defined by a series of collaborative partnerships, some more long-standing than others. Of these working relationships, perhaps the most influential was his collaboration with the illustrator and graphic artist Marc Caro. Jeunet met Caro at a animation festival in Annecy in the 1970s, and the pair clicked right away. They made two short animated puppet films together,

on all of Jeunet’s films within several different roles, from screenwriter and sound technician to director of

challenges and constraints that ocme with working on a

one of Jeunet’s fi lms, including the late Ticky Holgado, Serge Merlin, Rufus, Ron Perlman, Jean-Claude Dreyfus,

doing some costume and set design for the film, he then

Audrey Tautou, and Dominique Bettenfeld. Dominique

parted company with Jeunet to pursue a solo career

Pinon has acted in all of the director’s feature films as

in illustration and computer graphics. Caro subsequently

well as the short film Foutaises (Trifles; 1990).14

declined to participate in any of the later “making-of” documentaries or interviews to accompany the DVD editions of the pair’s films, and the two have not worked together since. This parting of ways could perhaps have

Billy Brakko (No rest for Billy Brakko; 1983). Marc Caro has described

been foreseen in their differing responses when asked,

the way in which he and Jeunet complement each other: “[Jeunet] loves

in a joint interview, “Cinematically, what are your

Charlie Chaplin, whereas I love Buster Keaton; he loves Truffaut,

photography. Several actors have appeared in more than

big-budget Hollywood movie. Although Caro was eventually persuaded to spend three weeks in Hollywood

L’évasion (The Escape; 1978) and Le manège (The Carousel; 1979), before

aspirations?” Caro replied, “I feel I’d like to explore other

while I love Jacques Tati; he likes dogs, and I like cats. What we have

narrative forms, ones in which there’s a little media

most in common is the love of making things. It’s true that we had

interactivity. What especially interests me is developing

this desire, more than anything else, to make a film, rather than

Laurant and Gilles Adrian. Bruno Delbonnel has worked

Caro was not interested in working on a film over which he lacked creative control, whereas Jeunet relished the

going on to make two more short fi lms in the 1980s, Le Bunker de la dernière rafale (The Bunker of the Last Gunshots; 1981) and Pas de repos pour

a tricky mixture of war epic, black comedy, and heart-stirring romance

The film is seen largely through the eyes of Mathilde (Tautou), an orphan with a polio limp, who senses in her soul that her man, Manech (Ulliel ) is not dead. After the war, Mathilde comes upon a letter that seems to hint that not all five soldiers died on the battlefield, and she

Mathilde’s incongruous tuba-playing to a subplot about one of the dead soldiers’ lovers who resorts to impossibly complex methods of killing

Drama | Myster y Romance | War Rated R for violence and sexualit y. Runt ime 133 minutes

off those she believes responsible for his death.11 The implacable logic of

Released 2004

revenge and the barbarity of war are softened by the voluptuous beauty

Writers Guillaume Laurant; Jean-Pierre Jeunet

of Jeunet’s visuals and the magic of his storytelling.12

Producers Francis Boespf lug, Bill Gerber, Jean-Louis Mont hieux, Fabien ne Tsaï

begins the long task of tracking down eyewitnesses and survivors

Novel Author

to find the Manech she is sure is still alive and needs her help.10

Sébastien Japrisot Music A ngelo Badalamenti Cast Audrey Tautou, Gaspard Ulliel, Jodie Foster, Domin ique Pinon and Ticky Holgado

the novels of John Irving and Kurt Vonnegut. Her parents are described as ‘’a neurotic and an iceberg,’’ and part of Amélie’s charm is that she

micmacs

With his typically pixie-ish sense of humor, Jeunet brings a light

who are sentenced to death for self-inflicted wounds (done so they could be evacuated from the front lines) and condemned to march out

Released 2001 Writers Guillaume Laurant; Jean-Pierre Jeunet

Jeunet uses the city as more of a character than a mere backdrop,

Music A ngelo Badalamenti

Sebastien Japrisot’s WWI-set novel is a story about fi ve French soldiers

Comedy | Fantasy | Romance Rated R for sexual content. Runt ime 122 minutes

although the director’s surreal and timeless vision shouldn’t be confused with the place seen by tourists (or even ordinary citizens). This is

Cast Ron Perlman, Dan iel Emilfork, Judit h Vittet, and Domin ique Pinon

a bunch of clever misfits bring a couple of weapons-making giants

Music Carlos D’A lessio Cast Pascal Benezech, Domin ique Pinon, Marie-Laure Dougnac, Jean-Claude Dreyf us, and Karin Viard

it all. Every so often, the plot stops to watch a scene spiral off at a

his films have attracted increasingly large audiences,

The prevailing thread among film scholars has been to view Jean-

*Further information on festival events on page x x.

As theatrical and minutely planned as Jeunet’s films are, they show us

like dreams themselves, then the unfolding chaos slots into place.

Producer Claudie Ossard Codirector Marc Caro

dystopian future. The directors are constantly playing curve ball with the audience’s expectations and nothing can prepare you for the sheer weirdness of

plays for the films he has directed and has maintained

for being too theatrical and not spontaneous enough—in other words,

special effects to sink a computerised battleship, this dark and highly

Runt ime 99 minutes Released 1991 Writers Gilles Adrien ; Marc Caro ; Jean-Pierre Jeunet

confident calling card for that most coveted of talents—commercial

ogy, and the repression and subsequent revelations

Dark Comedy | Fantasy Rated R for violence.

spirit of Terry Gilliam and that peculiarly French knack for putting magic into film, this feverish tale of star-crossed lovers and small town cannibalism has endured as a true masterpiece of the fantastique. With Delicatessen Jeunet and Caro gave the world a canny and arthouse cinema.3

not being Jean-Luc Godard, Agnès Varda, or François Truffaut. But

imaginative fi n de siècle is a fantastic fairytale and visual treat.

flooded apartment. Combining the cruel humor of Grimm’s fairytale stories, with the

This troubled romance provides the bare skeleton on which Jeunet and Caro hang their dreams. A hugely enjoyable fi lm Delicatessen welds

today, slick is the new populism: the revolutionary spontaneity of May

Evil man Krank locks himself away in an isolated off-shore rig, sur-

for the butcher’s myopic daughter, the knife is held back to spare her feelings. But as bellies begin to rumble, will love be enough to keep Louison out of le charcuterie?

a high degree of creative control over his projects,

it is too slick, too heavily influenced by advertising aesthetics, and

Following the success of Delicatessen, collaborators Jeunet and Caro

tangent, such as a rhythm of creaking beds rippling out through the hotel, or two boys spying on an old man breeding escargots in his

a crumbling apartment block. Unbeknownst to him, this job has a history and previous incumbents have ended up on the neighbor’s dinner table via the butcher’s block. When Louison innocently falls

comedy and magic into a bizarre, grotesque fantasy of an oddball

dramas—to earlier film movements such as German

too sentimental—in short, too popular, but not populist enough. Dis-

inspire the weird and the wonderful with outlandish extravagance

Friday at 7:30pm | Santa Monica Pier main screen Somewhere in a mist-shrouded future and apocalyptic rubble of France, Louison (Pinon), a grieving ex-clown takes a job as janitor in

Expressionism, French Poetic Realism, and the French New Wave. Most of Jeunet’s films thematize issue

tinguished colleagues, mentors, and friends of mine dismiss Jeunet

in The City of Lost Children. Armed with a bigger budget and enough

delicatessen

universes, and multimedia can enable me to explore

simply to help another director or filmmaker” (Alexandre Drubigny

a universe that I will construct.” Jeunet responded in

(23 Nov 2005). Auto/Focus Interview with Jeunet).

a somewhat different manner: “I’d like to continue


CATALOGUE

FILM TECHNIQUE

or if you think of a way of shooting the same thing

the viewfinders of machine guns proliferate). Jeunet’s

differently and better, then you have to change every-

films offer a tremendous degree of surface pleasure, but

thing, no doubt about it. In other words the storyboard

what makes them so interesting for the film analyst is

is like a highway: you can turn off it from time to time

their imaginative use of the surface or “look” of the films

to follow prettier country roads, but if you lose your

as a vehicle with which to conceal and convey a great

way, you can always return to the highway’” (Laurent Tirard (2002). Moviemakers’ Master Class). The high degree of advance preparation, the emphasis

deal of information about contemporary cultural preoccupations, which, like Edgar Allen Poe’s purloined letter, can be hidden in plain sight.15

on visual style, and the obvious influence of advertising and music video aesthetics underscore Jeunet’s loose affiliation with the films and filmmakers of the cinéma du look. The cinéma du look emerged in the early 1980s, beginning with Diva (dir. Jean-Jacques Beineix; 1981), a cult film hailed by Fredric Jameson as the first “postmodern” French film ( Jameson (1990) Signatures of the Visible) that soon became the signature film of the look style. The directors most closely associated with the cinéma du look are Beineix, Luc Besson, and Léos Carax, who made a number of stylish thrillers characterized by sleek, colorful urban settings, a high degree of artifi ce, and whata Sue Harris has called “a celebration of the visual and sensory elements of the filmic text” (Harris (2004) “The Cinéma du Look.” European Cinema). The

Jeunet has been at the cutting edge of French cinema’s use of computer-generated images (CGI) and digital technology to produce special effects. At the time of its release in 1995, La Cité des enfants perdus could boast the greatest number of digital effects

locations into an enormous set. This blend of authenticity and artifice evokes aspects of the 1980s and 1990s cinéma

of any French film ever made. Marc Caro has recalled

du look, the late 1950s and early 1960s French New Wave,

working on that film and the sea change that the advent

and the big-budget, postwar cinéma de qualité. What is

of digital technology made possible: “We came from the

distinctive about Jeunet’s films is the way they combine

world of animation, where you’re used to doing every-

the past and the present to create a style that is discern-

thing image by image…And then, digital technology

ible across all his fi lms, even the two he made with Marc

came along and turned everything upside down, and hit

Caro. Jeunet’s trademarks include a quirky sense of

us over the head, but at the same time, we were partly

humor; characters who exhibit slightly neurotic, ritualistic

responsible for it, actively participating in the innova-

behavior or “magical thinking;” obsessive collections;

tion—it’s really fascinating. You sort of get that feeling

and a preoccupation with feet (the large number of shots

of pride that ‘pioneers’ sometimes have” (Alexandre

at ground level in all of Jeunet’s feature films). Jeunet is

Drubigny (23 Nov 2005) Auto /Focus interview with

renowned for his meticulous preparation and storyboard-

Jeunet). When Jeunet went on to release Amélie in France in 2001, it was the film’s use of digital technology to

ing, and his films have sometimes come under attack for perceived lack of spontaneity. He has claimed, how-

transform Paris into an idealized version of itself that

ever, that he is not wedded to his storyboard: “‘I’m the

attracted the most attention. Digital technology allowed

first to say that a storyboard isn’t made to be respected

Jeunet both to film on location and to transform his

but to be transcended. If an actor finds a brilliant idea

influence of commercials and pop music videos can be seen in virtually every frame of look films. In these films, critics have often commented, plot and character development seemed to be little more than pretexts for the dazzling visual display. In his study of Beineix, Phil Powrie describes the look effect as “the immersion of the spectator, not in some kind of ‘depth’ but more paradoxically, in an infinite ‘surface.’ That surface is seen as the screen surface: the spectator does not go beyond the surface of the narrative, which functions more like a peg on which to hang the coat of style. The spectator does not go beyond the surface of the character, because it is not the psychological complexity of the character which gives pleasure, but the way in which the character behaves. In other words, what matters is what can be seen, what is presented, rather than what can be worked out, or constructed” (Phil Powrie (2001) Jean-Jacques Beineix). The emphasis on what can be seen also results in a fascination with technologies of vision and visual representation, expecially in Micmacs and Amélie (telescopes and binoculars but also photography, painting, postcards, video, television, and cinema) and A Very Long Engagement (in which point-of-view shots through microscopes, magnifying glasses, cameras, and

HISTORICAL LANDMARKS

HISTORICAL LANDMARKS

ballroom; it was the first time ever that a musical T V show was ever

the Gold Coast, however, disappeared one by one.

structure had been rebuilt. The harbor patrol station

televised live.

The glamour of the amusement piers had given way to

reopened, along with a bait shop and restaurant—today

Almost as soon as the Pier was conceived in the early 1900’s the notion

To bring attention to the Pier during its reconstruction, Save the Pier Week was held in 1983 sparking a series Today the concerts are as regular a part of Southern California summer as sunshine, the sea and the sand.

The last to go was Cornero’s flagship, the Rex which was raided in 1939 during what came to be known as The Battle of Santa Monica Bay. After a three day standoff, Cornero surrendered because he “needed a haircut”. Government agents boarded the “Rex” and threw all of the gambling machines and tables overboard. Warren subsequently went on to become governor of California, and ultimately Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. The 1930’s also brought about another very popular attraction to the Santa Monica Pier’s atmosphere—world famous Muscle Beach. Famous bodybuilders such as Jack LaLanne and Joe Gold (Gold’s Gym) regularly worked out here, establishing the city as the birthplace of the physical fitness boom. In 1940 the famous neon sign at the top of the Pier ramp was installed

construction, the Santa Monica Municipal Pier opened to the public. Thousands of people swarmed onto the 1,600-foot-long concrete pier to enjoy a festive day of band concerts, swimming races and the novelty of walking above the waters of the Pacific Ocean. While originally built to satisfy the city’s sanitation needs, the Pier quickly became a magnet for the fi shing community and fueled the imagination of local entrepreneurs. Within just a few years, plans were put forth to build an amusement pier adjacent to the Municipal Pier. Famous carousel manufacturer Charles I.D. Looff arrived in February 1916, purchasing the land immediately south of the Municipal Pier for development. Looff provided Santa Monica’s north beach with its first successful amusements, including the Blue Streak Racer coaster. The Hippodrome housed the Pier’s Carousel, and the

being Santa Monica’s first National Historic Landmark. In 1918 Looff passed away. His family continued to run the Pier until 1923, when it was sold to the Santa Monica Amusement Company, a group of local businessmen intent on expanding the famed amusement man’s dream.

Movies w ith Scenes Filmed on the Pier Night Tide 1961 Bean 1997 The Sting 1973 A Night at the Roxbury 1998 Miracle Beach 1992 Titanic 1997

In 1924, their plans included expanding the Pier’s thrill

Forrest Gump 1994

rides, beginning with the removal and replacement of the

Not Another Teen Movie 2001

Blue Streak Racer with a larger, faster roller coaster—the Whirlwind Dipper. They also added one of the richest chapters in the Pier’s history—the La Monica Ballroom.

Hancock 2008

Route 66 is said to end a block away from the pier at

Beach House, the Marion Davies Estate was built by William Randolph

the intersection of Santa Monica Blvd and Ocean Ave.

Hearst and was home to many famed Hollywood parties in the 1930’s.

miles and was dramatized in John Steinbeck’s Grapes of

A bronze plaque dedicating Route 66 as the Will Rogers

owned the arcade and gift shop. Not long thereafter, his name had become so associated with the southern half of the Pier that it became known as the Newcomb Pier. His family (some of whom are present here tonight) owned the amusement pier for 40 years until they sold it to the City in the early 1970’s. In the 1950’s Enid Newcomb suggested to family friend Morris “Pops” Gordon that his two sons, George and Eugene, purchase and operate

the Pier’s longest running enterprise offering the day’s contemporary games alongside those of yesterday, providing inexpensive entertainment to a diverse crowd. George’s daughters Marlene and Joannie have kept the business within the family, and the next generation of Gordons is already in training to maintain the family tradition. The Pier managed to carry on through the 1950’s and 60’s, satisfying fishermen, tourists and locals alike. The other famous piers along

The North Guest House is the only original structure remaining on the

Wrath and popularized in Nat King Cole’s hit song, Get

Highway is located across the street in Palisades Park,

property. Santa Monica Conservancy docent tours of the Guest House

Your Kicks on Route 66. There’s no question that Route 66

a few feet from the Santa Monica Visitor Center Kiosk.

are available for free.

ends in Santa Monica. But there is great debate and speculation about where the actual ending point is located. Where do you think Route 66 ends? The original pre-1939 alignment of Route 66 ended in downtown Los Angeles. In 1936, Route 66 was extended from downtown Los Angeles to Santa Monica, terminating at US 101 A LT, today the intersection of Olympic Blvd and Lincoln Blvd (a segment of State Route 1). According to the California Route 66 Preservation

On November 11, 2009, the Santa Monica Pier was

Historical Downtown Santa Monica Take a walking tour of some

designated as the official Western Terminus of Route 66

of Santa Monica’s oldest landmarks. In approximately two hours and

by the Route 66 Alliance, an organization that promotes

six blocks, experience more than 130 years of Santa Monica history,

and preserves the historic roadway between Chicago,

including the 1875 Rapp Saloon, The Majestic Theatre and much more.

Ill. and Santa Monica, CA. Stop by for a photo at The

Docent-guided walking tours by the Santa Monica Conservancy take

End of The Trail Sign.

place every Saturday morning at 10am. Self-guided tour booklets are

No matter where the ending point is, Santa Monica is

also available.

a wonderful place to celebrate the Spirit of Route 66 and its many contributions to American culture.

Foun-dation, Route 66 officially ends when it merges

Marion Davies Estate, North Guest House

into Highway 101 at the intersection of Lincoln and

Located at 321 Palisades Beach Road which has now

Olympic Blvd.

been transformed into the Annenberg Community

PRACTICALITIES

festival events LIVE MUSIC

CARNIVAL FESTIVITIES

Orchestre National de France is a symphony orchestra run by Radio France. Since 1944, the orchestra has been based in the Théâtre des Champs-Élysées in Paris, where it occasionally plays in the pit for opera productions. Joining us to represent the best of France’s musical talent, are seven members of the Orchestra. In additional to popular classical composters, the musicians will be playing musical numbers from Jeunet’s films.x

During the festival, the historic carousel and all rides and booths will be open in the Pacific Park. Emerse yourself in play and let your imagination run wild. Whether you’re a child or an adult, youth is a matter of mood and mentality!

Yann Tiersen is a French musician and composer. His music is recognized by its use of a large variety of instruments in relatively minimalist compositions, often with a touch of either European classical music or French folk music, using primarily the piano, accordion or violin together with instruments like the melodica, xylophone, toy piano, ondes martenot, harpsichord and typewriter. The Amélie soundtrack features compositions from Tiersen’s first three albums and also new work for the film.x Raphaël Beau’s score for Micmacs is an invigorating, intriguing affair that fl its from relaxed shuffle to furious fl ights with grace. With each frame of a Jeunet fi lm a work of art in itself, anything less than at least a serviceable, quirkily charming score would have spoiled things. Get energized and enchanted as you watch him perform his jaunty arrangements live!x

FOUND ART SCULPTURE EXHIBIT On a break from the rides, be sure to check out the sculpture exhibit, featuring work from reknowned artist Robert Hudson and a selection of other local artists. All the work on display are assemblages of recycled material creating fresh and funky pieces that toy with our predisposed ideas of form and function.

to check out the large display of photography that will evoke the magical adventure of the featured films.

FRENCH CUISINE No festival would be complete without a wide assortment of treats and eats! Experience traditional French fare, from freshly baked sweet and savory brioches to Fried Camembert to Duck Confit. Quench your thirst with an old-fashioned soda from the soda fountain next to the carousel. Although we are all children at heart, alcoholic beverages will be available for purchase by guests 21 or older.

PHOTO BOOTH CONTEST Explore your own creativity and take a unique self-portrait! Tack your best photo on the Portrait Wall next to the booth to win a DVD box set of Jeunet’s featured films! Don’t forget to vote yourself and two other runner-ups. The winners will be announced before the first movie on Sunday. Runner ups will take home a small festival poster.

FILM STILL GALLERY Jeunet’s films come alive with colourful characters and audacious designs. His lens onto the cinematic world is unique and make for beautiful film stills. Make sure

$125 3-day tickets $100 3-day tickets for children 12-years-old or younger. Children under 5 are free. $ 55 for 1-day tickets

the Pier again. The City formed the Pier Restoration and

operations of the Pier. By April 1990 the entire western

Santa Monica’s Landmarks Program has been committed to historic preservation for decades. The city has designated two historic districts, more than 64 landmarks and structures of merit, and has identified approximately 1,350 potential historic resources. Route 66 In 1926, Route 66 was created as a link

and the harbor patrol station. The Pier in its entirety seemed too badly beaten to survive. But the people, true to their mission in 1973, put forth the effort to save

tourist destination and a symbol of the Southern California lifestyle. In 1943 Walter Newcomb purchased the Looff Amusement Pier. Newcomb had been managing the Pier’s operations at the time, and also

HISTORICAL LANDMARKS

between Chicago and Los Angeles. It totaled over 2,400

what the former City Council could not. A pair of violent winter storms destroyed over one-third of the Pier’s length. Gone were the cafes, the bait shop, the rock shop

Development Task Force, which later became the PRC,

the Pier’s arcade. It didn’t take much persuasion, for the Gordons

Ruthless People 1986 Falling Down 1993 Love Stinks 1980 The Hannah Montana Movie 2009

tion, and their replacements saw to it that the Pier would never be destroyed. In 1983 Mother Nature was determined to accomplish

to oversee the reconstruction, and the day-to-day

instantly took to the Pier and ultimately made Playland Arcade into

Dark Ride 2006

Council rescinded their plans to build the island. Three of the councilmen who had voted to destroy the piers were overwhelmingly defeated in their run for re-elec-

by the Santa Monica Pier Businessmen’s Association to celebrate the

Iron Man 2008

The Hottie and the Nottie 2008

as a monumental building floating magically above the sea. In 1948, famed country swing music star Spade Cooley televised his weekly T V program from this

woke up – its citizens in a rage over the thought of losing the last of its famous landmarks. After much publicity and the deliverance of a petition to their attention, the

opening of the newly-built ramp. It is an internationally-recognized

Desperate Teenage Lovedolls 1984 Cellular 2004

Vast and ornate, the ballroom consumed so much of the Pier that, when viewed from the beach, it appeared

of annual concerts known as The Twilight Dance Series.

island which would host a resort hotel. Santa Monica, often referring to itself as a “sleepy little beach town”,

by mobster Tony Cornero until 1939 when then-Attorney General Earl

Ro et faccum landae rerum nullitatusam excero blacias periation res et ut imus net et, suntis venit, officiendus debit ullam quo occum, ommo blaceped quaeperata sanderi

slated the Pier for destruction in favor of a man-made

of yachts, fishing boats and a cruise liner to Catalina. It was also the home base for a shuttle service to offshore gambling operations run Warren led a legal crusade to shut them down.

building still stands today with the distinction of

known as Mariasol.

In 1973, the fate of Santa Monica Pier seemed to be the same as that of its neighbors. The City Council had

Monica Yacht Harbor was born. The harbor was home to a collection

On September 9, 1909, and after sixteen months of

the inland theme parks such as Disneyland.

that a breakwater and yacht harbor would make an ideal companion to the Pier circulated regularly. In 1933 this became a reality, and Santa

Tickets go on sale on Tuesday, May 17th at 10am PDT and can be purchased on the festival website or directly from the Santa Monica Pier Box Office located in Pacific Park. Guests with valid student identification and groups of 4 or larger are eligible for a 15% discount on 3-day tickets. All online ticket sales are for 3-day festival tickets and include a $10 voucher to any of the pier restaurants and unlimited access to the historical carousel and the Pacific Park rides the days of the festival. Parking rates are $5 for advanced ticket holders and guests will be asked to present tickets or proof of purchase. Oneday and 3-day tickets will be available the day of. Normal parking rates will apply to one-day ticket holders. All festival fi lms are Rated R and minors must be accompanied by an adult. No ads or trailers are shown with the fi lms, so please don’t be late!

In 1996 Pacific Park opened, bringing back the first full-scale amusement park on the pier since the 1930’s, and the first roller coaster, the West Coaster, since the Whirlwind Dipper let off its last customers over six decades earlier. The opening of the park was an invitation for families to visit the Pier again. The new millennium has continued with that momentum. Drawing over four million visitors annually, the Pier is just as vital as it has ever been. The atmosphere is decorated with a variety of street performers and artists who put their talents on display for crowds of admirers every day. Below the Pier’s eastern deck is the Santa Monica Pier Aquarium, where you can experience some of the denizens of the Santa Monica Bay up close and personal. And, of course, the Pier’s Carousel still offers old-fashioned entertainment for under a dollar. The Pier today is a popular recreational destination as well as a vibrant reminder of the past.16

COLLECTING MATERIALS


6 ABOUT THE FESTIVAL 8 SCHEDULE

“Even artichokes have hearts.”

10 THE DIRECTOR 12 FEATURED FILMS 22 CARO & COLLABORATION 27 FILM TECHNIQUE 30 HISTORICAL LANDMARKS 38 FESTIVAL EVENTS

Friday, August 5 to Sunday August 7

40 PRACTICALITIES

Santa Monica Pier Santa Monica, CA 2pm to 11: 30pm

42 LOCATION 46 SOURCES

Daydreams on Rooftops marks the first American film festival celebrating the body of work of French film director Jean-Pierre Jeunet. More than just a regular film festival, Daydreams on Rooftops offers a weekend getaway full of whimsy and imagination that will bring the inner-child out of all of us. Whether you want to learn about a modern French cinematic style, get nostalgic in carnival galore on the beautiful Santa Monica pier, or immerse yourself in the fantastical (and sometimes dark) film plots, you’re in for a fantastical experience! We hope that you’ll enjoy this opportunity to explore outside the vast supply of Hollywood productions that littered at our feet and discover the humor and unique aesthetic of an up-andcoming international director. We look forward to welcoming you!

Daydreams on Roof tops © 2011 Nicole Racquel Design A ll rights Reser ved. Manufactured in the Un ited States of A merica Includes references and sources

FEATURED FILMS

THE DIRECTOR

schedule 5:00 PM

FRI FESTIVAL OPENS* Get there early for parking and to witness the beautiful sunset over the Pacific!

2:00 PM

Rides in Pacific Park and all carnival booths will be open. A variety of traditional French dishes will be available before the film.

7:30 PM

11:30 PM

DELICATESSEN To kick off the film festival, the opening night screening will start around dusk on the Santa Monica Pier main screen. FESTIVAL CLOSES

2:30 PM

SAT JEUNET SUN FESTIVAL OPENS* Come early to partake in all the festivities! Ride the rides in the Pacific Park, listen to live music, play and win carnival games, see the art exhibits and eat delicious French cuisine.

2:00 PM

ORCHESTRE NATIONAL DE FR ANCE*

3:45 PM

YANN TIERSEN*

5:00 PM

CITY OF LOST CHILDREN playing in the screening tent

7:30 PM

AMÉLIE playing on the main screen

10:00 PM

THE MAKING OF AMÉLIE In the screening tent, watch Jeunet discuss how Amélie came was created.

11:30 PM

FESTIVAL CLOSES

COTERIE

FESTIVAL OPENS* All the same fun and games as the day before! Make sure to enter in the photobooth contest before 3:00pm!

2:30 PM 4:15 PM 5:00 PM

R APHAËL BEAU*

7:30 PM

MICMACS

10:00 PM

11:30 PM

collaborators are similar in impact to the (at the time,

suspicion. Critics have dismissed Jeunet from what they

equally new) technologies of handheld cameras and

see as his privileging form over content. Yet this form

high-sensitivity film stock that allowed Godard and

AND

are historically resonant in their association with the late twentieth-century French film style known as the

clogged with cars whose drivers are sealed off from

cinéma du look and in their persistent allusions—even

the world through which they glide. To be fresh and innovative is no longer only a question of going outward but of turning inward as well, to the real and virtual worlds of memory, history and desire. And it is to these worlds that Jeunet has

To be fresh and innovative is no longer only a question of going outward but of turning interward.

gone and to which he returns with each new film.1

PHOTO CONTEST RESULTS*

within films set in the post apocalyptic future, which

Jeunet never attended film school; he is entirely self-

A VERY LONG ENGAGEMENT

taught. Born in 1953 in Roanne, he came from a modest background. His father worked for the phone company, and his mother was a schoolteacher. He began making animated films while working for the telephone company and then graduated to filming

THE MAKING OF MICMACS Watch Jeunet explain the story behind the story, playing in the screening tent.

journey toward feature films.

FESTIVAL CLOSES

plays for the films he has directed and has maintained

advertisements and music videos—leading him on his

nonetheless manage to look kind of like costume dramas—to earlier film movements such as German Expressionism, French Poetic Realism, and the French New Wave. Most of Jeunet’s films thematize issue

has tended to marginalize him among film scholars and academics, some of whom regard his films with

orchestrated by text messaging, podcasts, and blogs that, like the best

what populism looks like today: advertising, music videos, and computer games. The energy that Jeunet’s films tap into is a high-voltage as the energy that fueled the French New Wave. The new digital and computer graphics-based technologies embraced by Jeunet and his

FEATURED FILMS

1978

city of lost children

Le manège (short)

1981

Le Bunker de la dernière rafale / The Bunker of the Last Gunshots (short)

1984

Pas de repos pour Billy Brakko (short)

1989

Foutaises / Things I Like, Things I Don’t Like (short)

1991

Delicatessen

1995

The City of Lost Children / La Cité des enfants perdus

1997

Alien: Resurrection Amélie / Le Fabuleux destin d’Amélie Poulain

2004

A Very Long Engagement / Un Long dimanche de fiançailles

2009

Micmacs / Micmacs à Tire-Larigot

Angelo Badalamenti’s haunting, fairgroundesque score provides a suit-

exists as a brain in an aquarium, plagued by migraines. But worse

ably sinister and lilting melody and the final morphing sequence is

still, Krank is unable to enjoy sweet dreams. In true Chitty Chitty Bang

a digital delight.4

Bang child-catcher fashion, Krank becomes children’s public enemy

Adventure | Fantasy Comedy | Sci-Fi Rated R for disturbing and grotesque images of violence and menace. Runt ime 112 minutes Released 1995 Writers Gilles Adrien ; Jean-Pierre Jeunet

This beguiling fable whipped up a storm of controversy in France, with some commentators arguing its nostalgic whimsy brushed the realities of modern multicultural Paris under the carpet.5 A sugar-rush of a movie, Amélie has what could be called meticulous

affection for the medium can be seen in all the funny little curlicues and jottings around the action. It has a hypnotic sense of romance; it’s a fable filled with longing, with a heroine who constantly flirts

stolen, meeting a catalogue of nightmarish characters along the way.

wrongs and improve the lives of her customers. But she proves rather less successful at bettering her own lot, despite falling for a handsome loner (Kassovitz) with his own bizarre quest.

Producer Félicie Dutertre

Cast Ron Perlman, Dan iel Emilfork, Judith Vittet, and Domin ique Pinon

Sunday at 5:00pm | Santa Monica Pier screening tent is preternaturally levelheaded and survives her youth with her dark, glowing eyes wide open.6 A waitress in a Parisian café, Amélie sees it as her mission in life to right

clutter, a placement of imagery that covers every square centimeter of the screen. Jeunet’s sense of humor gives the movie heart; his real

Codirector Marc Caro Music A ngelo Badalamenti

number one as he kidnaps the innocent in order to ‘steal’ their dreams. Street freak strongman One, along with the assertive Miette, are forced to track down the deranged Krank after One’s angelic brother is

Runtime 133 minutes

a very long engagement Saturday at 7:30pm | Santa Monica Pier main screen

Jean Paul Gaultier’s costumes are a constant source of ingenuity and

Drama | Myster y Romance | War Rated R for violence and sexualit y.

FEATURED FILMS

amélie

Saturday at 5:00pm | Santa Monica Pier screening tent

rounded by six cloned henchmen, a dwarf assistant and an uncle who

L’évasion (short)

1980

2001

FEATURED FILMS

wit, with more of a wink than a nod to Berlin’s famous transvestite

With his typically pixie-ish sense of humor, Jeunet brings a light

his films have attracted increasingly large audiences, with accordingly expanding budgets. Yet his success is also his Achilles’ heel: his popularity with audiences

art, appear deceptively spontaneous to spectators and bystanders.

Charlotte von Mahlsdorf in the uniformed dressing of The Octopus.

Music Carlos D’A lessio

and overly artful. Bits of absurdity speckle throughout the story, from

it all. Every so often, the plot stops to watch a scene spiral off at a

a high degree of creative control over his projects,

As theatrical and minutely planned as Jeunet’s films are, they show us

The frenetic deluge of beautiful, grotesque and surreal images can be

Producer Claudie Ossard Codirector Marc Caro

Mathilde’s incongruous tuba-playing to a subplot about one of the dead

ogy, and the repression and subsequent revelations of historical trauma, especially in the context of war his films invariably express the millennial anxieties

not being Jean-Luc Godard, Agnès Varda, or François Truffaut. But

exhausting, but viewed as a stream of conscious carnival of ideas, much

Runtime 99 minutes Released 1991 Writers Gilles Adrien ; Marc Caro ; Jean-Pierre Jeunet

Cast Pascal Benezech, Domin ique Pinon, Marie-Laure Dougnac, Jean-Claude Dreyf us, and Karin Viard

dystopian future. The directors are constantly playing curve ball with the audience’s

and preoccupations of the present.2

today, slick is the new populism: the revolutionary spontaneity of May

like dreams themselves, then the unfolding chaos slots into place.

Dark Comedy | Fantasy Rated R for violence.

confident calling card for that most coveted of talents—commercial

expectations and nothing can prepare you for the sheer weirdness of

Jean-Pierre Jeunet is a rare breed, a popular auteur.

1968 has transmogrified into flash mob happenings meticulously

imaginative fin de siècle is a fantastic fairytale and visual treat.

magic into film, this feverish tale of star-crossed lovers and small town cannibalism has endured as a true masterpiece of the fantastique. With Delicatessen Jeunet and Caro gave the world a canny and arthouse cinema.3

such as the technological mediation of social relations,

too sentimental—in short, too popular, but not populist enough. Dis-

Evil man Krank locks himself away in an isolated off-shore rig, sur-

flooded apartment. Combining the cruel humor of Grimm’s fairytale stories, with the spirit of Terry Gilliam and that peculiarly French knack for putting

This troubled romance provides the bare skeleton on which Jeunet and Caro hang their dreams. A hugely enjoyable film Delicatessen welds

cultural anxieties surrounding advances in biotechnol-

He has written or co-written all but one of the screen-

tinguished colleagues, mentors, and friends of mine dismiss Jeunet

inspire the weird and the wonderful with outlandish extravagance

for the butcher’s myopic daughter, the knife is held back to spare her feelings. But as bellies begin to rumble, will love be enough to keep Louison out of le charcuterie?

and decolonization. Looking to the past and the future,

for being too theatrical and not spontaneous enough—in other words,

in The City of Lost Children. Armed with a bigger budget and enough

tangent, such as a rhythm of creaking beds rippling out through the hotel, or two boys spying on an old man breeding escargots in his

a crumbling apartment block. Unbeknownst to him, this job has a history and previous incumbents have ended up on the neighbor’s dinner table via the butcher’s block. When Louison innocently falls

which bear his distinctive stylistic stamp and have been

The prevailing thread among film scholars has been to view JeanPierre Jeunet’s work with a certain amount of disdain, claiming that

special effects to sink a computerised battleship, this dark and highly

Friday at 7:30pm | Santa Monica Pier main screen Somewhere in a mist-shrouded future and apocalyptic rubble of France, Louison (Pinon), a grieving ex-clown takes a job as janitor in

comedy and magic into a bizarre, grotesque fantasy of an oddball

generally well regarded by critics. At the same time, *Further information on festival events on page x x.

it is too slick, too heavily influenced by advertising aesthetics, and

Following the success of Delicatessen, collaborators Jeunet and Caro

delicatessen

itself contains a great deal of substance. Jeunet’s films

Truffaut to take to the streets to make their films. In the 1990s and 2000s, however, the streets have become

with failure.

7

Jeunet uses the city as more of a character than a mere backdrop, although the director’s surreal and timeless vision shouldn’t be confused with the place seen by tourists (or even ordinary citizens). This is Jeunet’s city, where magic abounds in the strangest places, where fate

Jeunet and Guillaume Laurant, with whom he wrote the script, tell

and predestination lurk around every corner, where photographs talk,

the story of Amélie (Tautou) from her conception through her adult life,

and where one sprightly young woman can orchestrate small miracles.8

Comedy | Fantasy | Romance Rated R for sexual content.

Sebastien Japrisot’s WWI-set novel is a story about five French soldiers who are sentenced to death for self-inflicted wounds (done so they

Runtime 122 minutes

could be evacuated from the front lines) and condemned to march out

Released 2001

into the no man’s land between the Germans’ trenches and theirs, it’s

Writers Guillaume Laurant; Jean-Pierre Jeunet Producers Jean-Marc Deschamps and Claudie Ossard

a tricky mixture of war epic, black comedy, and heart-stirring romance that would have left many a filmmaker a bit flummoxed.9 The film is seen largely through the eyes of Mathilde (Tautou), an

Music Yan n Tiersen

orphan with a polio limp, who senses in her soul that her man, Manech

Cast Audrey Tautou, Mat hieu Kassovitz, Ruf us, and Domin ique Pinon

seems to hint that not all five soldiers died on the battlefield, and she

(Ulliel ) is not dead. After the war, Mathilde comes upon a letter that begins the long task of tracking down eyewitnesses and survivors to find the Manech she is sure is still alive and needs her help.10

and jaunty tone to a tale that could easily have been rendered brooding

soldiers’ lovers who resorts to impossibly complex methods of killing off those she believes responsible for his death.11 The implacable logic of revenge and the barbarity of war are softened by the voluptuous beauty of Jeunet’s visuals and the magic of his storytelling.12

Released 2004 Writers Guillaume Laurant; Jean-Pierre Jeunet Producers Francis Boespf lug, Bill Gerber, Jean-Louis Mont hieux, Fabien ne Tsaï Novel Author Sébastien Japrisot Music A ngelo Badalamenti Cast Audrey Tautou, Gaspard Ulliel, Jodie Foster, Domin ique Pinon and Ticky Holgado

which is filled with the kind of offhand cruelty normally found in the novels of John Irving and Kurt Vonnegut. Her parents are described as ‘’a neurotic and an iceberg,’’ and part of Amélie’s charm is that she

FEATURED FILMS

CARO & COLLABORATION

micmacs

The pair’s feature debut, Delicatessen, launched both

writing screenplays…something like Forrest Gump,

their careers, and their second feature-length film, the

where the special effects aren’t neccesarily see but can

visually opulent Cité des enfants perdus, solidified their

Sunday at 7:30pm | Santa Monica Pier main screen A whimsical whirligig of a movie, Micmacs is filled with salvaged

even the dumps are beautiful. There’s a contortionist (Ferrier) who

metal and salvaged lives, where a bullet to the brain brings insight and

folds herself up in the fridge when she needs to get away from it all and

a bunch of clever misfits bring a couple of weapons-making giants

a cannonball man (Pinon) still pining to make the Guinness Book of

to their knees. This good-versus-evil fable soon reveals itself to be a wide-ranging philosophical playground for French filmmaker Jean-Pierre Jeunet as he settles into a Paris junkyard where discards, human and otherwise, find a second life. Orphaned when his father was blown to bits by a land mine, Bazil (Boon) grows up to be a video store clerk, content with passing the time watching classic films. A stray bullet from a drive-by changes everything. Removing it from Bazil’s brain box, as someone puts it, would turn him into a vegetable, and so it stays. In short order, he is discharged

Records. There are seven in all, as Jeunet says he was reminded of Snow White’s Seven Dwarfs. With screenwriting collaborator Guillaume Laurant, Jeunet created in this film an unexpected charm, with irony rich like candy and worth

previously…in turn, reviving the writing, in proposing new things, thanks to the new techniques” (Alain

codirectors, and the filmmakers worked in tandem, with Caro taking more responsibility for the films’ visual style and Jeunet working more with the actors. Caro has

Released 2009

explained their working relationship thus:

Writers Guillaume Laurant; Jean-Pierre Jeunet

“Jean-Pierre handles the direction in the traditional sense of the word, that is, the

Producers Frédéric Brillion, Gilles Legrand

direction of the actors, etc., while I do

occupied by the company that made the land mine that killed his father,

Music Raphaël Beau

the artistic direction. Beyond that, in the

the conglomerate responsible for the bullet that penetrated his brain

Cast Dany Boon, A ndré Dussollier, Nicolas Marié and Domin ique Pinon

savoring along with the surprise. When Bazil happens upon a street

turns out to be right across the street.13 Something must be done to stop

day-to-day workings of the shoot or preproduction, it’s obviously much more of a mixture. We write each of our specialties, sometimes we’ll be drawn to

outcome displays the director’s quirky brilliance.

what we do best. There’s a real complicity between us” (Frank Debemardi (14 March 2006). “Entretien avec Marc Caro.” Faille Temporelle).

Both Bazil and his world are infused with a surreal circus quality to start with, but that sensibility grows sharper when he’s taken in by a collection of freaks who make their home in the scrap yard. In Paris,

Jeunet’s entire career has been defined by a series of collaborative

with the illustrator and graphic artist Marc Caro. Jeunet met Caro at a animation festival in Annecy in the 1970s, and the pair clicked right away. They made two short animated puppet films together, L’évasion (The Escape; 1978) and Le manège (The Carousel; 1979), before

on all Jeunet’s films except for Alien Resurrection, when there was a Hollywood casting director in place. The special-effects supervisor Pitof, who has worked on several of Jeunet’s films, and the director of photography Darius Khondji, who had worked on Delicatessen and La Cité des enfants perdus, when with Jeunet to Hollywood to work on Alien Resurrection. The set designer for Jeunet’s French films, as have the screenwriters Guillaume Laurant and Gilles Adrian. Bruno Delbonnel has worked on all of Jeunet’s films within several different roles,

he lacked creative control, whereas Jeunet relished the

from screenwriter and sound technician to director of

challenges and constraints that ocme with working on a

photography. Several actors have appeared in more than

big-budget Hollywood movie. Although Caro was even-

one of Jeunet’s films, including the late Ticky Holgado,

tually persuaded to spend three weeks in Hollywood

Serge Merlin, Rufus, Ron Perlman, Jean-Claude Dreyfus,

doing some costume and set design for the film, he then

Audrey Tautou, and Dominique Bettenfeld. Dominique

parted company with Jeunet to pursue a solo career

Pinon has acted in all of the director’s feature films as

in illustration and computer graphics. Caro subsequently

well as the short film Foutaises (Trifles; 1990).14

declined to participate in any of the later “making-of” documentaries or interviews to accompany the DVD

going on to make two more short films in the 1980s, Le Bunker de la

editions of the pair’s films, and the two have not worked together since. This parting of ways could perhaps have been foreseen in their differing responses when asked,

the way in which he and Jeunet complement each other: “[Jeunet] loves

in a joint interview, “Cinematically, what are your

Charlie Chaplin, whereas I love Buster Keaton; he loves Truffaut,

aspirations?” Caro replied, “I feel I’d like to explore other

while I love Jacques Tati; he likes dogs, and I like cats. What we have

stayed with Jeunet throughout the next decade of his career, producing his two subsequent French films. Pierre-Jacques Bénichou has worked as casting director

other’s arms—came to an end when Jeunet and Caro were offered the chance to direct the fourth Alien film.

dernière rafale (The Bunker of the Last Gunshots; 1981) and Pas de repos pour Billy Brakko (No rest for Billy Brakko; 1983). Marc Caro has described

who had helped Jeunet and Caro finance Delicatessen,

This almost symbiotic partnership—like that of the

Caro was not interested in working on a film over which

partnerships, some more long-standing than others. Of these working

closer ties with the director. The producer Claudie Ossard,

conjoined twins characters in La Cité des enfants perdus, who finish each other’s sentences and scratch each

relationships, perhaps the most influential was his collaboration

Schlockoff and Cathy Karani (18 July 2006). Excerpts from a conversation with Jeunet and Caro). Other members of Jeunet’s coterie have maintained

“What we have most in common is the love of making things.”

together, film together, edit together. According to

the killing and the maiming, and like much of Jeunet’s work, the story’s

by the doctor, then his boss, then left waiting to see if the bullet will eventually discharge him too.

enable things to be done that couldn’t have been,

reputation as filmmakes with a strong visual aesthetic, a predilection for dystopian fantasy, and an off-kilter sense of humor. Both films credited Jeunet and Caro as

Comedy | Crime Rated R for some sexualit y and brief violence. Runt ime 105 minutes

narrative forms, ones in which there’s a little media

most in common is the love of making things. It’s true that we had

interactivity. What especially interests me is developing

this desire, more than anything else, to make a film, rather than

universes, and multimedia can enable me to explore

simply to help another director or filmmaker” (Alexandre Drubigny

a universe that I will construct.” Jeunet responded in

(23 Nov 2005). Auto/Focus Interview with Jeunet).

a somewhat different manner: “I’d like to continue

“When you’re born in the gutter,.”

you end up in the port.”


COLLECTING MATERIALS

FILM TECHNIQUE

or if you think of a way of shooting the same thing

the viewfinders of machine guns proliferate). Jeunet’s

differently and better, then you have to change every-

films offer a tremendous degree of surface pleasure, but

thing, no doubt about it. In other words the storyboard

what makes them so interesting for the film analyst is

is like a highway: you can turn off it from time to time

their imaginative use of the surface or “look” of the films

to follow prettier country roads, but if you lose your

as a vehicle with which to conceal and convey a great

way, you can always return to the highway’” (Laurent Tirard (2002). Moviemakers’ Master Class). The high degree of advance preparation, the emphasis

deal of information about contemporary cultural preoccupations, which, like Edgar Allen Poe’s purloined letter, can be hidden in plain sight.15

on visual style, and the obvious influence of advertising and music video aesthetics underscore Jeunet’s loose affiliation with the films and filmmakers of the cinéma du look. The cinéma du look emerged in the early 1980s, beginning with Diva (dir. Jean-Jacques Beineix; 1981), a cult film hailed by Fredric Jameson as the first “postmodern” French film ( Jameson (1990) Signatures of the Visible) that soon became the signature film of the look style. The directors most closely associated with the cinéma du look are Beineix, Luc Besson, and Léos Carax, who made a number of stylish thrillers characterized by sleek, colorful urban settings, a high degree of artifice, and whata Sue Harris has called “a celebration of the visual and sensory elements of the filmic text” (Harris

Jeunet has been at the cutting edge of French cinema’s use of computer-generated images (CGI) and digital technology to produce special effects. At the time of its release in 1995, La Cité des enfants perdus could boast the greatest number of digital effects

locations into an enormous set. This blend of authenticity and artifice evokes aspects of the 1980s and 1990s cinéma

of any French film ever made. Marc Caro has recalled

du look, the late 1950s and early 1960s French New Wave,

working on that film and the sea change that the advent

and the big-budget, postwar cinéma de qualité. What is

of digital technology made possible: “We came from the

distinctive about Jeunet’s films is the way they combine

world of animation, where you’re used to doing every-

the past and the present to create a style that is discern-

thing image by image…And then, digital technology

ible across all his films, even the two he made with Marc

came along and turned everything upside down, and hit us over the head, but at the same time, we were partly

Caro. Jeunet’s trademarks include a quirky sense of humor; characters who exhibit slightly neurotic, ritualistic

responsible for it, actively participating in the innova-

behavior or “magical thinking;” obsessive collections;

tion—it’s really fascinating. You sort of get that feeling

and a preoccupation with feet (the large number of shots

of pride that ‘pioneers’ sometimes have” (Alexandre

at ground level in all of Jeunet’s feature films). Jeunet is

Drubigny (23 Nov 2005) Auto /Focus interview with

renowned for his meticulous preparation and storyboard-

Jeunet). When Jeunet went on to release Amélie in France

ing, and his films have sometimes come under attack

in 2001, it was the film’s use of digital technology to

for perceived lack of spontaneity. He has claimed, how-

transform Paris into an idealized version of itself that

ever, that he is not wedded to his storyboard: “‘I’m the

attracted the most attention. Digital technology allowed

first to say that a storyboard isn’t made to be respected

Jeunet both to film on location and to transform his

but to be transcended. If an actor finds a brilliant idea

(2004) “The Cinéma du Look.” European Cinema). The influence of commercials and pop music videos can be seen in virtually every frame of look films. In these films, critics have often commented, plot and character development seemed to be little more than pretexts for the dazzling visual display. In his study of Beineix, Phil Powrie describes the look effect as “the immersion of the spectator, not in some kind of ‘depth’ but more paradoxically, in an infinite ‘surface.’ That surface is seen as the screen surface: the spectator does not go beyond the surface of the narrative, which functions more like a peg on which to hang the coat of style. The spectator does not go beyond the surface of the character, because it is not the psychological complexity of the character which gives pleasure, but the way in which the character behaves. In other words, what matters is what can be seen, what is presented, rather than what can be worked out, or constructed” (Phil Powrie (2001) Jean-Jacques Beineix). The emphasis on what can be seen also results in a fascination with technologies of vision and visual representation, expecially in Micmacs and Amélie (telescopes and binoculars but also photography, painting, postcards, video, television, and cinema) and A Very Long Engagement (in which point-of-view shots through microscopes, magnifying glasses, cameras, and

HISTORICAL LANDMARKS

HISTORICAL LANDMARKS

ballroom; it was the first time ever that a musical T V show was ever

the Gold Coast, however, disappeared one by one.

structure had been rebuilt. The harbor patrol station

televised live.

The glamour of the amusement piers had given way to

reopened, along with a bait shop and restaurant—today

Almost as soon as the Pier was conceived in the early 1900’s the notion

To bring attention to the Pier during its reconstruction, Save the Pier Week was held in 1983 sparking a series

slated the Pier for destruction in favor of a man-made

of annual concerts known as The Twilight Dance Series.

of yachts, fishing boats and a cruise liner to Catalina. It was also the

island which would host a resort hotel. Santa Monica,

Today the concerts are as regular a part of Southern

home base for a shuttle service to offshore gambling operations run

often referring to itself as a “sleepy little beach town”,

California summer as sunshine, the sea and the sand.

by mobster Tony Cornero until 1939 when then-Attorney General Earl Warren led a legal crusade to shut them down. The last to go was Cornero’s flagship, the Rex which was raided in 1939 during what came to be known as The Battle of Santa Monica Bay. After a three day standoff, Cornero surrendered because he “needed a haircut”. Government agents boarded the “Rex” and threw all of the gambling machines and tables overboard. Warren subsequently went on to become governor of California, and ultimately Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. The 1930’s also brought about another very popular attraction to the Santa Monica Pier’s atmosphere—world famous Muscle Beach. Famous bodybuilders such as Jack LaLanne and Joe Gold (Gold’s Gym) regularly worked out here, establishing the city as the birthplace of the physical fitness boom. In 1940 the famous neon sign at the top of the Pier ramp was installed by the Santa Monica Pier Businessmen’s Association to celebrate the

On September 9, 1909, and after sixteen months of

building still stands today with the distinction of being Santa Monica’s first National Historic Landmark.

to the public. Thousands of people swarmed onto the 1,600-foot-long concrete pier to enjoy a festive day of band concerts, swimming races and the novelty of walking above the waters of the Pacific Ocean. While originally built to satisfy the city’s sanitation needs, the Pier quickly became a magnet for the fishing community and fueled the imagination of local entrepreneurs.

In 1918 Looff passed away. His family continued to run the Pier until 1923, when it was sold to the Santa Monica Amusement Company, a group of local businessmen intent on expanding the famed amusement man’s dream. In 1924, their plans included expanding the Pier’s thrill rides, beginning with the removal and replacement of the Blue Streak Racer with a larger, faster roller coaster—the

Within just a few years, plans were put forth to build

Whirlwind Dipper. They also added one of the richest

an amusement pier adjacent to the Municipal Pier. Famous

chapters in the Pier’s history—the La Monica Ballroom.

carousel manufacturer Charles I.D. Looff arrived in February 1916, purchasing the land immediately south of the Municipal Pier for development. Looff provided Santa Monica’s north beach with its first successful amusements, including the Blue Streak Racer coaster. The Hippodrome housed the Pier’s Carousel, and the

Thousands of people swarmed onto the 1,600-foot-long concrete pier to enjoy a festive day of band concerts, swimming races and the novelty of walking above the waters of the Pacific Ocean.

MOVIES WITH SCENES FILMED ON THE PIER Night Tide 1961 Bean 1997 The Sting 1973 A Night at the Roxbury 1998

Council rescinded their plans to build the island. Three of the councilmen who had voted to destroy the piers were overwhelmingly defeated in their run for re-election, and their replacements saw to it that the Pier would never be destroyed. In 1983 Mother Nature was determined to accomplish what the former City Council could not. A pair of violent winter storms destroyed over one-third of the Pier’s length. Gone were the cafes, the bait shop, the rock shop and the harbor patrol station. The Pier in its entirety seemed too badly beaten to survive. But the people, true to their mission in 1973, put forth the effort to save the Pier again. The City formed the Pier Restoration and Development Task Force, which later became the PRC,

opening of the newly-built ramp. It is an internationally-recognized

to oversee the reconstruction, and the day-to-day operations of the Pier. By April 1990 the entire western

In 1996 Pacific Park opened, bringing back the first full-scale amusement park on the pier since the 1930’s, and the first roller coaster, the West Coaster, since the Whirlwind Dipper let off its last customers over six decades earlier. The opening of the park was an invitation for families to visit the Pier again. The new millennium has continued with that momentum. Drawing over four million visitors annually, the Pier is just as vital as it has ever been. The atmosphere is decorated with a variety of street performers and artists who put their talents on display for crowds of admirers every day. Below the Pier’s eastern deck is the Santa Monica Pier Aquarium, where you can experience some of the denizens of the Santa Monica Bay up close and personal. And, of course, the Pier’s Carousel still offers old-fashioned entertainment for under a dollar. The Pier today is a popular recreational destination as well as a vibrant reminder of the past.16

In 1943 Walter Newcomb purchased the Looff Amusement Pier. Newcomb had been managing the Pier’s operations at the time, and also owned the arcade and gift shop. Not long thereafter, his name had become so associated with the southern half of the Pier that it became known as the Newcomb Pier. His family (some of whom are present here tonight) owned the amusement pier for 40 years until they sold it to the City in the early 1970’s.

Miracle Beach 1992 Titanic 1997 Forrest Gump 1994

In the 1950’s Enid Newcomb suggested to family friend Morris “Pops” Gordon that his two sons, George and Eugene, purchase and operate

Not Another Teen Movie 2001

the Pier’s arcade. It didn’t take much persuasion, for the Gordons instantly took to the Pier and ultimately made Playland Arcade into

Cellular 2004 The Hottie and the Nottie 2008

as a monumental building floating magically above

Ruthless People 1986 Falling Down 1993

the sea. In 1948, famed country swing music star Spade

woke up – its citizens in a rage over the thought of losing the last of its famous landmarks. After much publicity and the deliverance of a petition to their attention, the

tourist destination and a symbol of the Southern California lifestyle.

Iron Man 2008 Desperate Teenage Lovedolls 1984 Dark Ride 2006

Vast and ornate, the ballroom consumed so much of the Pier that, when viewed from the beach, it appeared

Love Stinks 1980

Cooley televised his weekly T V program from this

known as Mariasol.

In 1973, the fate of Santa Monica Pier seemed to be the same as that of its neighbors. The City Council had

Monica Yacht Harbor was born. The harbor was home to a collection

construction, the Santa Monica Municipal Pier opened

the inland theme parks such as Disneyland.

that a breakwater and yacht harbor would make an ideal companion to the Pier circulated regularly. In 1933 this became a reality, and Santa

the Pier’s longest running enterprise offering the day’s contemporary games alongside those of yesterday, providing inexpensive entertainment to a diverse crowd. George’s daughters Marlene and Joannie have kept the business within the family, and the next generation of Gordons is already in training to maintain the family tradition.

The Hannah Montana Movie 2009

The Pier managed to carry on through the 1950’s and 60’s, satisfying

Hancock 2008

fishermen, tourists and locals alike. The other famous piers along

HISTORICAL LANDMARKS

festival events

Santa Monica’s Landmarks Program has been committed to historic preservation for decades. The city has designated two historic districts, more than 64 landmarks and structures of merit, and has identified approximately 1,350 potential historic resources. Route 66 In 1926, Route 66 was created as a link

Route 66 is said to end a block away from the pier at

Beach House, the Marion Davies Estate was built by William Randolph

between Chicago and Los Angeles. It totaled over 2,400

the intersection of Santa Monica Blvd and Ocean Ave.

Hearst and was home to many famed Hollywood parties in the 1930’s.

miles and was dramatized in John Steinbeck’s Grapes of

A bronze plaque dedicating Route 66 as the Will Rogers

The North Guest House is the only original structure remaining on the

Highway is located across the street in Palisades Park,

Wrath and popularized in Nat King Cole’s hit song, Get Your Kicks on Route 66. There’s no question that Route 66 ends in Santa Monica. But there is great debate and speculation about where the actual ending point is located.

The original pre-1939 alignment of Route 66 ended in

at US 101 A LT, today the intersection of Olympic Blvd and Lincoln Blvd (a segment of State Route 1). According to the California Route 66 Preservation Foun-dation, Route 66 officially ends when it merges

are available for free. Historical Downtown Santa Monica Take a walking tour of some of Santa Monica’s oldest landmarks. In approximately two hours and

by the Route 66 Alliance, an organization that promotes

six blocks, experience more than 130 years of Santa Monica history,

and preserves the historic roadway between Chicago,

including the 1875 Rapp Saloon, The Majestic Theatre and much more.

Ill. and Santa Monica, CA. Stop by for a photo at The

downtown Los Angeles. In 1936, Route 66 was extended from downtown Los Angeles to Santa Monica, terminating

property. Santa Monica Conservancy docent tours of the Guest House

a few feet from the Santa Monica Visitor Center Kiosk. On November 11, 2009, the Santa Monica Pier was designated as the official Western Terminus of Route 66

Where do you think Route 66 ends?

End of The Trail Sign. No matter where the ending point is, Santa Monica is a wonderful place to celebrate the Spirit of Route 66 and its many contributions to American culture.

Docent-guided walking tours by the Santa Monica Conservancy take place every Saturday morning at 10am. Self-guided tour booklets are also available.

LIVE MUSIC

CARNIVAL FESTIVITIES

Orchestre National de France is a symphony orchestra run by Radio France. Since 1944, the orchestra has been based in the Théâtre des Champs-Élysées in Paris, where it occasionally plays in the pit for opera productions. Joining us to represent the best of France’s musical talent, are seven members of the Orchestra. In additional to popular classical composters, the musicians will be playing musical numbers from Jeunet’s films.x

During the festival, the historic carousel and all rides and booths will be open in the Pacific Park. Emerse yourself in play and let your imagination run wild. Whether you’re a child or an adult, youth is a matter of mood and mentality!

Yann Tiersen is a French musician and composer. His music is recognized by its use of a large variety of instruments in relatively minimalist compositions, often with a touch of either European classical music or French folk music, using primarily the piano, accordion or violin together with instruments like the melodica, xylophone, toy piano, ondes martenot, harpsichord and typewriter. The Amélie soundtrack features compositions from Tiersen’s first three albums and also new work for the film.x Raphaël Beau’s score for Micmacs is an invigorating, intriguing affair that flits from relaxed shuffle to furious flights with grace. With each frame of a Jeunet film a work of art in itself, anything less than at least a serviceable, quirkily charming score would have spoiled things. Get energized and enchanted as you watch him perform his jaunty arrangements live!x

FOUND ART SCULPTURE EXHIBIT On a break from the rides, be sure to check out the sculpture exhibit, featuring work from reknowned artist Robert Hudson and a selection of other local artists. All the work on display are assemblages of recycled material creating fresh and funky pieces that toy with our predisposed ideas of form and function.

to check out the large display of photography that will evoke the magical adventure of the featured films.

FRENCH CUISINE No festival would be complete without a wide assortment of treats and eats! Experience traditional French fare, from freshly baked sweet and savory brioches to Fried Camembert to Duck Confit. Quench your thirst with an old-fashioned soda from the soda fountain next to the carousel. Although we are all children at heart, alcoholic beverages will be available for purchase by guests 21 or older.

PHOTO BOOTH CONTEST Explore your own creativity and take a unique self-portrait! Tack your best photo on the Portrait Wall next to the booth to win a DVD box set of Jeunet’s featured films! Don’t forget to vote yourself and two other runner-ups. The winners will be announced before the first movie on Sunday. Runner ups will take home a small festival poster.

FILM STILL GALLERY Jeunet’s films come alive with colourful characters and audacious designs. His lens onto the cinematic world is unique and make for beautiful film stills. Make sure

Marion Davies Estate, North Guest House

into Highway 101 at the intersection of Lincoln and

Located at 321 Palisades Beach Road which has now

Olympic Blvd.

been transformed into the Annenberg Community

PRACTICALITIES

LOCATION

Coming from the North on Pacific Coast Highway Go south on Pacific Coast Highway. After reaching the California PCH

SANTA MONICA BLVD

OCEAN WAY

incline, watch for directional signs for Pier/Beach parking and thedeceleration lane on the right. Coming from the North on Ocean Avenue Go south on Ocean Avenue. The Pier is located two blocks south of Santa Monica Blvd. at the corner of Ocean Ave. and Colorado Ave. If

BROADWAY

the parking lot is full, proceed two blocks and make a right turn on Seaside Terrace. Follow signs to Pier/Beach parking.

COLORADO BLVD PIER

10 NEILSON WAY

4TH ST

California Incline and go left. Turn left at the signal at Pacific Coast

2ND ST

SEASIDE

Coming from the South on Ocean Avenue Go north on Ocean Avenue. Turn left at Colorado Avenue and drive onto the Pier. If the lot is full, proceed north on Ocean Avenue to

PICO BLVD

Highway. Move to the right hand lane and follow signs into Pier/ Beach parking. BICKNELL AVE

Coming from I-10 Go west on I-10. Exit the freeway at 4th/5th Street exit. Stay in the left lane leading to 4th Street. Turn left on 4th Street and proceed Turn right on Ocean Avenue and follow signage to the Pier. Coming from 405

Children under 5 are free. $ 55 for 1-day tickets

Tickets go on sale on Tuesday, May 17th at 10am PDT and can be purchased on the festival website or directly from the Santa Monica Pier Box Office located in Pacific Park. Guests with valid student identification and groups of 4 or larger are eligible for a 15% discount on 3-day tickets. All online ticket sales are for 3-day festival tickets and include a $10 voucher to any of the pier restaurants and unlimited access to the historical carousel and the Pacific Park rides the days of the festival. Parking rates are $5 for advanced ticket holders and guests will be asked to present tickets or proof of purchase. Oneday and 3-day tickets will be available the day of. Normal parking rates will apply to one-day ticket holders. All festival films are Rated R and minors must be accompanied by an adult. No ads or trailers are shown with the films, so please don’t be late!

From the north or south on the 405 Freeway, take I-10 West. Drive

OCEAN PARK BLVD BARNAR D WAY

to Pico Blvd. Make a right on Pico Blvd., proceed to Ocean Avenue.

$125 3-day tickets $100 3-day tickets for children 12-years-old or younger.

N

west on I-10 and exit freeway at 4th/5th Street exit. Go north on 5th St. to Colorado Ave. Make a left on Colorado Ave. and drive straight to the Pier at Ocean Avenue. If the parking lot is full, make a left turn on Ocean Avenue and proceed two blocks. Make a right turn on Seaside Terrace. Follow sign to Pier/Beach parking.

Pier and Festival Park ing Open 5 : 30am to 2: 30pm


contents

Film Festival Guide

Film Festival Guide

Film Festival Guide

F IL M F ES T I VA L GUIDE Design b y Nicole R acquel

6 ABOUT THE FESTIVAL SCHEDULE THE DIRECTOR

2

3

14 FEATURED FILMS DELICATESSEN CITY OF LOST CHILDREN AMÉLIE A VERY LONG ENGAGEMENT MICMACS

4

5

6

7

26 CREATING A STYLE JEUNET AND COTERIE CINÉMA DU LOOK

34 GET YOUR BEARINGS THE SANTA MONICA PIER

FRIDAY, August 5 to SUNDAY August 7

MORE PLACES TO SEE

Santa Monica Pier Santa Monica, CA 2pm to 11:30pm

42 FESTIVAL INFO EVENTS PRACTICALITIES LOCATION 48

Daydreams on Rooftops marks the first American film festival that celebrates the body of work of French film director Jean-Pierre Jeunet. More than just a regular film festival, Daydreams on Rooftops offers a weekend getaway full of whimsy and imagination that will bring the inner-child out of all of us. Whether you want to learn about a modern French cinematic style, get nostalgic in carnival galore on the beautiful Santa Monica Pier, or immerse yourself in the fantastical (and sometimes

SOURCES

dark) film plots, you’re in for a fantastical experience! We hope that you’ll

These are hard times for dreamers

enjoy this opportunity to explore outside the vast supply of Hollywood productions that littered at our feet and discover the humor and unique aesthetic of an up-and-coming international director. We look forward to welcoming you! Daydreams on Roof tops

— amélie

© 2011 Nicole Racquel Design A ll rights reser ved. Manufactured in the Un ited States of A merica. Includes references and sources.

2:00 PM

Rides in Pacific Park and all carnival booths will be open all day for festival guests. A variety of traditional French dishes will be available before the film. 7:30 PM

DELICATESSEN

2:30 PM

YANN TIERSEN* THE PACIFIC STAGE

To kick off the film festival, the opening night screening will start around dusk. 11:30 PM

ORCHESTRE NATIONAL DE FR ANCE* THE PACIFIC STAGE

3:45 PM

THE PIER MAIN SCREEN

8

FESTIVAL OPENS* Come early to partake in all the festivities! Ride the rides in the Pacific Park, listen to live music, play and win carnival games, see the art exhibits and eat delicious French cuisine.

5:00 PM

CITY OF LOST CHILDREN

7:30 PM

AMÉLIE

THE SCREENING TENT

10:00 PM

THE MAKING OF AMÉLIE THE SCREENING TENT

Watch Jeunet discuss how Amélie was created. 11:30 PM

2:30 PM

R APHAËL BEAU*

4:15 PM

PHOTO CONTEST RESULTS*

world through which they glide. To be fresh and innovative is no longer only a question of going outward but of turning inward aswell, to the real and virtual

worlds of memory, history and desire. And it is to these worlds that Jeunet has gone and to which he returns with each new film.1

a modest background. His father worked for the

MICMACS

He began making animated films while working for

self-taught. Born in 1953 in Roanne, he came from phone company, and his mother was a schoolteacher.

THE PIER MAIN SCREEN

9

the telephone company and then graduated to filming

10

advertisements and music videos—leading him on

THE MAKING OF MICMACS

his journey toward feature films.

THE SCREENING TENT

Film Festival Guide

FRIDAY at 7:30pm | The Pier Main Screen Somewhere in a mist-shrouded future and apocalyptic rubble of

tangent, such as a rhythm of creaking beds rippling out through the

Dark Comedy | Fantasy

France, Louison (Pinon), a grieving ex-clown takes a job as janitor in

hotel, or two boys spying on an old man breeding escargots in his

Rated R for violence.

a crumbling apartment block. Unbeknownst to him, this job has a history and previous incumbents have ended up on the neighbor’s dinner table via the butcher’s block. When Louison innocently falls for the butcher’s myopic daughter, the knife is held back to spare her feelings. But as bellies begin to rumble, will love be enough to

cinéma du look and in their persistent allusions—even

keep Louison out of le charcuterie?

within films set in the post apocalyptic future, which dramas—to earlier film movements such as German

flooded apartment.

Runt ime 99 minutes

Combining the cruel humor of Grimm’s fairytale stories, with the spirit of Terry Gilliam and that peculiarly French knack for putting magic into film, this feverish tale of star-crossed lovers and small town cannibalism has endured as a true masterpiece of the fantastique. With Delicatessen Jeunet and Caro gave the world a canny and

This troubled romance provides the bare skeleton on which Jeunet

confident calling card for that most coveted of talents—commercial

and Caro hang their dreams. A hugely enjoyable film Delicatessen welds

arthouse cinema.3

dystopian future. The directors are constantly playing curve ball with the audience’s expectations and nothing can prepare you for the sheer weirdness of

11

of historical trauma, especially in the context of war

12

13

Released 1991 Writers Gilles Adrien ; Marc Caro ; Jean-Pierre Jeunet Producer Claudie Ossard Codirector Marc Caro Music Carlos D’A lessio Cast Pascal Benezech, Domin ique Pinon, Marie-Laure Dougnac, Jean-Claude Dreyf us, and Karin Viard

comedy and magic into a bizarre, grotesque fantasy of an oddball

Expressionism, French Poetic Realism, and the French New Wave. Most of Jeunet’s films thematize issue such as the technological mediation of social relations, cultural anxieties surrounding advances in biotechnology, and the repression and subsequent revelations

it all. Every so often, the plot stops to watch a scene spiral off at a

14

15

and decolonization. Looking to the past and the future, and preoccupations of the present.2

He has written or co-written all but one of the screenplays for the films he has directed and has maintained a high degree of creative control over his projects,

FESTIVAL CLOSES

which bear his distinctive stylistic stamp and have been generally well regarded by critics. At the same time,

The prevailing thread among film scholars has

*Furt her information on festival events on page x x.

FESTIVAL CLOSES

been to view Jean-Pierre Jeunet’s work with a certain amount of disdain, claiming that it is too slick, too heavily influenced by advertising aesthetics, and too sentimental—in short, too popular, but not populist enough.

JEUNET’S FILMOGR APHY

his films have attracted increasingly large audiences,

1978

with accordingly expanding budgets. Yet his success is also his Achilles’ heel: his popularity with audiences

Distinguished colleagues, mentors, and friends of mine dismiss Jeunet for being too theatrical and not spontaneous enough—in other words,

Le manège (short)

1981

Le Bunker de la dernière rafale / The Bunker of the Last Gunshots (short) Pas de repos pour Billy Brakko (short)

1989

Foutaises / Things I Like, Things I Don’t Like (short)

1991

not being Jean-Luc Godard, Agnès Varda, or François Truffaut. But today, slick is the new populism: the revolutionary spontaneity of May

art, appear deceptively spontaneous to spectators and bystanders.

The City of Lost Children / La Cité des enfants perdus Alien: Resurrection Amélie / Le Fabuleux destin d’Amélie Poulain A Very Long Engagement / Un Long dimanche de fiançailles

2009

Micmacs / Micmacs à Tire-Larigot

FEATURED FILMS

Film Festival Guide

puter games. The energy that Jeunet’s films tap into is a high-voltage

Film Festival Guide

Delicatessen

1995

1997 2001

2004

As theatrical and minutely planned as Jeunet’s films are, they show us what populism looks like today: advertising, music videos, and com-

L’évasion (short)

1980

1984

1968 has transmogrified into flash mob happenings meticulously orchestrated by text messaging, podcasts, and blogs that, like the best

FEATURED FILMS

FEATURED FILMS

delicatessen

— amélie

his films invariably express the millennial anxieties

Jean-Pierre Jeunet is a rare breed, a popular auteur.

Watch Jeunet explain the story behind the story. 11:30 PM

Even artichokes have hearts

nonetheless manage to look kind of like costume

Jeunet never attended film school; he is entirely

A VERY LONG ENGAGEMENT THE SCREENING TENT

7:30 PM 10:00 PM

FEATURED FILMS

itself contains a great deal of substance. Jeunet’s films are historically resonant in their association with the late twentieth-century French film style known as the

To be fresh and innovative is no longer only a question of going outward but of turning inward.

whose drivers are sealed off from the

THE PACIFIC STAGE

has tended to marginalize him among film scholars and academics, some of whom regard his films with suspicion. Critics have dismissed Jeunet from what they see as his privileging form over content. Yet this form

handheld cameras and high-sensitivity film stock that allowed Godard and Truffaut to take to the streets to make their films. In the 1990s and 2000s, however, the streets have become clogged with cars

Film Festival Guide

as the energy that fueled the French New Wave. The new digital and computer graphics-based technologies embraced by Jeunet and his collaborators are similar in impact to the (at the time, equally new) technologies of

5:00 PM

THE PIER MAIN SCREEN

FESTIVAL CLOSES

THE DIRECTOR

FESTIVAL OPENS* All the same fun and games as the day before! Make sure to enter in the photobooth contest before 3:00pm!

Film Festival Guide

SUN 2:00 PM

FEATURED FILMS

FEATURED FILMS

Film Festival Guide

FESTIVAL OPENS* Get there early for parking and to witness the beautiful sunset over the Pacific!

Film Festival Guide

2:00 PM

Film Festival Guide

SAT

FRI

schedule

micmacs Micmacs à tire-larigot

SUNDAY at 7:30pm | The Pier Main Screen A whimsical whirligig of a movie, Micmacs is filled with salvaged metal and salvaged lives, where a bullet to the brain brings insight and a bunch of clever misfits bring a couple of weapons-making giants to their knees. This good-versus-evil fable soon reveals itself to be a wide-ranging philosophical playground for French filmmaker Jean-Pierre Jeunet as he settles into a Paris junkyard where discards, human and otherwise, find a second life. Orphaned when his father was blown to bits by a land mine, Bazil (Boon) grows up to be a video store clerk, content with passing the time watching classic films. A stray bullet from a drive-by changes everything. Removing it from Bazil’s brain box, as someone puts it, would turn him into a vegetable, and so it stays. In short order, he is discharged

even the dumps are beautiful. There’s a contortionist (Ferrier) who folds herself up in the fridge when she needs to get away from it all and a cannonball man (Pinon) still pining to make the Guinness Book of Records. There are seven in all, as Jeunet says he was reminded of Snow

Comedy | Crime Rated R for some sexualit y and brief violence. Runt ime 105 minutes

White’s Seven Dwarfs.

Released 2009

With screenwriting collaborator Guillaume Laurant, Jeunet created

Writers Guillaume Laurant; Jean-Pierre Jeunet

in this film an unexpected charm, with irony rich like candy and worth savoring along with the surprise. When Bazil happens upon a street

Producers Frédéric Brillion, Gilles Legrand

occupied by the company that made the land mine that killed his father,

Music Raphaël Beau

the conglomerate responsible for the bullet that penetrated his brain turns out to be right across the street.13 Something must be done to stop the killing and the maiming, and like much of Jeunet’s work, the story’s

Cast Dany Boon, A ndré Dussollier, Nicolas Marié and Domin ique Pinon

outcome displays the director’s quirky brilliance.

by the doctor, then his boss, then left waiting to see if the bullet will

18

20

SATURDAY at 7:30pm | The Pier Main Screen

SATURDAY at 5:00pm | The Screening Tent Following the success of Delicatessen, collaborators Jeunet and Caro

The frenetic deluge of beautiful, grotesque and surreal images can be

inspire the weird and the wonderful with outlandish extravagance

exhausting, but viewed as a stream of conscious carnival of ideas, much like dreams themselves, then the unfolding chaos slots into place.

special effects to sink a computerised battleship, this dark and highly imaginative fin de siècle is a fantastic fairytale and visual treat.

Jean Paul Gaultier’s costumes are a constant source of ingenuity and wit, with more of a wink than a nod to Berlin’s famous transvestite

Evil man Krank locks himself away in an isolated off-shore rig, sur-

Charlotte von Mahlsdorf in the uniformed dressing of The Octopus.

rounded by six cloned henchmen, a dwarf assistant and an uncle who

Angelo Badalamenti’s haunting, fairgroundesque score provides a suit-

exists as a brain in an aquarium, plagued by migraines. But worse

ably sinister and lilting melody and the final morphing sequence is

still, Krank is unable to enjoy sweet dreams. In true Chitty Chitty Bang

a digital delight.4

This beguiling fable whipped up a storm of controversy in France,

Adventure | Fantasy Comedy | Sci-Fi

with some commentators arguing its nostalgic whimsy brushed the realities of modern multicultural Paris under the carpet.5

Rated R for disturbing and grotesque images of violence and menace.

A sugar-rush of a movie, Amélie has what could be called meticulous clutter, a placement of imagery that covers every square centimeter

Runt ime 112 minutes

of the screen. Jeunet’s sense of humor gives the movie heart; his real

Released 1995

affection for the medium can be seen in all the funny little curlicues

Writers Gilles Adrien ; Jean-Pierre Jeunet

and jottings around the action. It has a hypnotic sense of romance; it’s a fable filled with longing, with a heroine who constantly flirts

Producer Félicie Dutertre

Bang child-catcher fashion, Krank becomes children’s public enemy

Codirector Marc Caro

with failure.

number one as he kidnaps the innocent in order to ‘steal’ their dreams.

Music A ngelo Badalamenti

Jeunet and Guillaume Laurant, with whom he wrote the script, tell

Street freak strongman One, along with the assertive Miette, are forced to track down the deranged Krank after One’s angelic brother is stolen, meeting a catalogue of nightmarish characters along the way.

Cast Ron Perlman, Dan iel Emilfork, Judit h Vittet, and Domin ique Pinon

collection of freaks who make their home in the scrap yard. In Paris,

the story of Amélie (Tautou) from her conception through her adult life,

SUNDAY at 5:00pm | The Screening Tent is preternaturally levelheaded and survives her youth with her dark, glowing eyes wide open.6 A waitress in a Parisian café, Amélie sees it as her mission in life to right wrongs and improve the lives of her customers. But she proves rather less successful at bettering her own lot, despite falling for a handsome

Comedy | Fantasy Romance Runt ime 122 minutes

Writers Guillaume Laurant; Jean-Pierre Jeunet Producers Jean-Marc Deschamps and Claudie Ossard

although the director’s surreal and timeless vision shouldn’t be confused

and jaunty tone to a tale that could easily have been rendered brooding and overly artful. Bits of absurdity speckle throughout the story, from soldiers’ lovers who resorts to impossibly complex methods of killing off those she believes responsible for his death.11 The implacable logic of

Released 2004

revenge and the barbarity of war are softened by the voluptuous beauty

Writers Guillaume Laurant; Jean-Pierre Jeunet

orphan with a polio limp, who senses in her soul that her man, Manech

Music Yan n Tiersen

(Ulliel ) is not dead. After the war, Mathilde comes upon a letter that

Cast Audrey Tautou, Mat hieu Kassovitz, Ruf us, and Domin ique Pinon

begins the long task of tracking down eyewitnesses and survivors

of Jeunet’s visuals and the magic of his storytelling.12

Producers Francis Boespf lug, Bill Gerber, Jean-Louis Monthieux, Fabien ne Tsaï

seems to hint that not all five soldiers died on the battlefield, and she

Novel Author Sébastien Japrisot

to find the Manech she is sure is still alive and needs her help.10

Music A ngelo Badalamenti

which is filled with the kind of offhand cruelty normally found in

Cast Audrey Tautou, Gaspard Ulliel, Jodie Foster, Domin ique Pinon and Ticky Holgado

the novels of John Irving and Kurt Vonnegut. Her parents are described

where the special effects aren’t neccesarily see but can enable things to be done that couldn’t have been,

visually opulent Cité des enfants perdus, solidified their

Schlockoff and Cathy Karani (18 July 2006). Excerpts from a conversation with Jeunet and Caro).

Caro taking more responsibility for the films’ visual style and Jeunet working more with the actors. Caro has explained their working relationship thus: “Jean-Pierre handles the direction in the traditional sense of the word, that is, the direction of the actors, etc., while I do the artistic direction. Beyond that, in the

it’s obviously much more of a mixture. We write together, film together, edit together. According to each of our specialties, sometimes we’ll be drawn to what we do best. There’s a real complicity between us” (Frank Debemardi (14 March 2006). “Entretien avec Marc Caro.” Faille Temporelle).

25

26

Jeunet’s entire career has been defined by a series of collaborative partnerships, some more long-standing than others. Of these working relationships, perhaps the most influential was his collaboration with the illustrator and graphic artist Marc Caro.

declined to participate in any of the later “making-of” documentaries or interviews to accompany the DVD

1979), before going on to make two more short films in the 1980s, Le Bunker de la dernière rafale (The Bunker of the Last Gunshots; 1981) and has described the way in which he and Jeunet complement each other: “[Jeunet] loves Charlie Chaplin, whereas I love Buster Keaton; he loves Truffaut, while I love Jacques Tati; he likes dogs, and I like cats. What we have most in common is the love of making things. It’s true that we had this desire, more than anything else, to make a film, rather than simply to help another director or filmmaker” (Alexandre Drubigny (23 Nov 2005). Auto/Focus Interview with Jeunet).

of digital technology made possible: “We came from the

editions of the pair’s films, and the two have not worked

responsible for it, actively participating in the innova-

aspirations?” Caro replied, “I feel I’d like to explore other

Film Festival Guide

ballroom; it was the first time ever that a musical T V show was ever

After a three day standoff, Cornero surrendered because he “needed a haircut”. Government agents boarded the “Rex” and threw all of the gambling machines and tables overboard. Warren subsequently went on to become governor of California, and ultimately Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. The 1930’s also brought about another very popular attraction to the Santa Monica Pier’s atmosphere—world famous Muscle Beach. Famous bodybuilders such as Jack LaLanne and Joe Gold (Gold’s Gym) regularly worked out here, establishing the city as the birthplace of the physical

36

fitness boom. In 1940 the famous neon sign at the top of the Pier ramp was installed

Within just a few years, plans were put forth to build an amusement pier adjacent to the Municipal Pier. Famous carousel manufacturer Charles I.D. Looff arrived in February 1916, purchasing the land immediately south

In 1918 Looff passed away. His family continued to run

In 1924, their plans included expanding the Pier’s thrill rides, beginning with the removal and replacement of the Blue Streak Racer with a larger, faster roller coaster—the

Thousands of people swarmed onto the 1,600-foot-long concrete pier to enjoy a festive day of band concerts, swimming races and the novelty of walking above the waters of the Pacific Ocean.

MOVIES WITH SCENES FILMED ON THE PIER Night Tide 1961 Bean 1997

operations of the Pier. By April 1990 the entire western

become so associated with the southern half of the Pier that it became known as the Newcomb Pier. His family (some of whom are present

The Sting 1973

here tonight) owned the amusement pier for 40 years until they sold it

A Night at the Roxbury 1998

to the City in the early 1970’s.

Titanic 1997

In the 1950’s Enid Newcomb suggested to family friend Morris “Pops” Gordon that his two sons, George and Eugene, purchase and operate

Not Another Teen Movie 2001

the Pier’s arcade. It didn’t take much persuasion, for the Gordons

Iron Man 2008

instantly took to the Pier and ultimately made Playland Arcade into

Dark Ride 2006 Cellular 2004

the Pier’s longest running enterprise offering the day’s contemporary games alongside those of yesterday, providing inexpensive entertain-

The Hottie and the Nottie 2008

ment to a diverse crowd. George’s daughters Marlene and Joannie

Ruthless People 1986

have kept the business within the family, and the next generation of

Falling Down 1993 Love Stinks 1980

to their mission in 1973, put forth the effort to save the Pier again. The City formed the Pier Restoration and

tourist destination and a symbol of the Southern California lifestyle. In 1943 Walter Newcomb purchased the Looff Amusement Pier. Newcomb had been managing the Pier’s operations at the time, and also owned the arcade and gift shop. Not long thereafter, his name had

Miracle Beach 1992 Forrest Gump 1994

what the former City Council could not. A pair of violent winter storms destroyed over one-third of the Pier’s length. Gone were the cafes, the bait shop, the rock shop and the harbor patrol station. The Pier in its entirety seemed too badly beaten to survive. But the people, true

Development Task Force, which later became the PRC,

Desperate Teenage Lovedolls 1984

the sea. In 1948, famed country swing music star Spade Cooley televised his weekly T V program from this

tion, and their replacements saw to it that the Pier would never be destroyed. In 1983 Mother Nature was determined to accomplish

to oversee the reconstruction, and the day-to-day

chapters in the Pier’s history—the La Monica Ballroom. Vast and ornate, the ballroom consumed so much of the Pier that, when viewed from the beach, it appeared as a monumental building floating magically above

amusements, including the Blue Streak Racer coaster. The Hippodrome housed the Pier’s Carousel, and the

the last of its famous landmarks. After much publicity and the deliverance of a petition to their attention, the Council rescinded their plans to build the island. Three of the councilmen who had voted to destroy the piers were overwhelmingly defeated in their run for re-elec-

by the Santa Monica Pier Businessmen’s Association to celebrate the opening of the newly-built ramp. It is an internationally-recognized

Whirlwind Dipper. They also added one of the richest

of the Municipal Pier for development. Looff provided Santa Monica’s north beach with its first successful

also results in a fascination with technologies of vision and visual representation, expecially in Micmacs and Amélie (telescopes and binoculars but also photography, painting, postcards, video, television, and cinema) and A Very Long Engagement (in which point-of-view shots through microscopes, magnifying glasses, cameras, and

Gordons is already in training to maintain the family tradition.

The Hannah Montana Movie 2009

The Pier managed to carry on through the 1950’s and 60’s, satisfying

Hancock 2008

fishermen, tourists and locals alike. The other famous piers along

GETTING YOUR BEARINGS

reopened, along with a bait shop and restaurant—today known as Mariasol. To bring attention to the Pier during its reconstruction, Save the Pier Week was held in 1983 sparking a series

slated the Pier for destruction in favor of a man-made island which would host a resort hotel. Santa Monica, often referring to itself as a “sleepy little beach town”, woke up – its citizens in a rage over the thought of losing

Warren led a legal crusade to shut them down.

the Pier until 1923, when it was sold to the Santa Monica

structure had been rebuilt. The harbor patrol station

The glamour of the amusement piers had given way to the inland theme parks such as Disneyland. In 1973, the fate of Santa Monica Pier seemed to be the same as that of its neighbors. The City Council had

home base for a shuttle service to offshore gambling operations run by mobster Tony Cornero until 1939 when then-Attorney General Earl

The last to go was Cornero’s flagship, the Rex which was raided in

35

Amusement Company, a group of local businessmen

the Gold Coast, however, disappeared one by one.

that a breakwater and yacht harbor would make an ideal companion

1939 during what came to be known as The Battle of Santa Monica Bay.

34

intent on expanding the famed amusement man’s dream.

first to say that a storyboard isn’t made to be respected but to be transcended. If an actor finds a brilliant idea

to the Pier circulated regularly. In 1933 this became a reality, and Santa Monica Yacht Harbor was born. The harbor was home to a collection

building still stands today with the distinction of

for perceived lack of spontaneity. He has claimed, however, that he is not wedded to his storyboard: “‘I’m the

attracted the most attention. Digital technology allowed Jeunet both to film on location and to transform his

GETTING YOUR BEARINGS

of yachts, fishing boats and a cruise liner to Catalina. It was also the

being Santa Monica’s first National Historic Landmark.

the character which gives pleasure, but the way in which the character behaves. In other words, what matters is what can be seen, what is presented, rather than what can be worked out, or constructed” (Phil Powrie (2001) Jean-Jacques Beineix). The emphasis on what can be seen

renowned for his meticulous preparation and storyboarding, and his films have sometimes come under attack

in 2001, it was the film’s use of digital technology to transform Paris into an idealized version of itself that

writing screenplays…something like Forrest Gump,

televised live.

On September 9, 1909, and after sixteen months of construction, the Santa Monica Municipal Pier opened to the public. Thousands of people swarmed onto the 1,600-foot-long concrete pier to enjoy a festive day of band concerts, swimming races and the novelty of walking above the waters of the Pacific Ocean. While originally built to satisf y the city’s sanitation needs, the Pier quickly became a magnet for the fishing community and fueled the imagination of local entrepreneurs.

Phil Powrie describes the look effect as “the immersion

humor; characters who exhibit slightly neurotic, ritualistic and a preoccupation with feet (the large number of shots at ground level in all of Jeunet’s feature films). Jeunet is

Jeunet). When Jeunet went on to release Amélie in France

a somewhat different manner: “I’d like to continue

31

influence of commercials and pop music videos can be seen in virtually every frame of look films. In these films, critics have often commented, plot and character development seemed to be little more than pretexts

beyond the surface of the narrative, which functions more like a peg on which to hang the coat of style. The spectator does not go beyond the surface of the character, because it is not the psychological complexity of

behavior or “magical thinking;” obsessive collections;

tion—it’s really fascinating. You sort of get that feeling of pride that ‘pioneers’ sometimes have” (Alexandre Drubigny (23 Nov 2005) Auto /Focus interview with

narrative forms, ones in which there’s a little media interactivity. What especially interests me is developing universes, and multimedia can enable me to explore a universe that I will construct.” Jeunet responded in

visual and sensory elements of the filmic text” (Harris

for the dazzling visual display. In his study of Beineix,

and the big-budget, postwar cinéma de qualité. What is distinctive about Jeunet’s films is the way they combine ible across all his films, even the two he made with Marc Caro. Jeunet’s trademarks include a quirky sense of

(2004) “The Cinéma du Look.” European Cinema). The

of the spectator, not in some kind of ‘depth’ but more paradoxically, in an infinite ‘surface.’ That surface is seen as the screen surface: the spectator does not go

the past and the present to create a style that is discern-

thing image by image…And then, digital technology came along and turned everything upside down, and hit us over the head, but at the same time, we were partly

together since. This parting of ways could perhaps have been foreseen in their differing responses when asked, in a joint interview, “Cinematically, what are your

Almost as soon as the Pier was conceived in the early 1900’s the notion

33

and artifice evokes aspects of the 1980s and 1990s cinéma du look, the late 1950s and early 1960s French New Wave,

world of animation, where you’re used to doing every-

— micmacs

32

30

locations into an enormous set. This blend of authenticity

perdus could boast the greatest number of digital effects of any French film ever made. Marc Caro has recalled working on that film and the sea change that the advent

well as the short film Foutaises (Trifles; 1990).14

GETTING YOUR BEARINGS

Film Festival Guide

GETTING YOUR BEARINGS

Mom always told me to avoid twisted girls

At the time of its release in 1995, La Cité des enfants

in illustration and computer graphics. Caro subsequently

Jeunet met Caro at a animation festival in Annecy in the 1970s, and

Pas de repos pour Billy Brakko (No rest for Billy Brakko; 1983). Marc Caro

29

Jeunet has been at the cutting edge of French cinema’s use of computer-generated images (CGI) and digital technology to produce special effects.

one of Jeunet’s films, including the late Ticky Holgado, Audrey Tautou, and Dominique Bettenfeld. Dominique Pinon has acted in all of the director’s feature films as

the pair clicked right away. They made two short animated puppet films together, L’évasion (The Escape; 1978) and Le manège (The Carousel;

by sleek, colorful urban settings, a high degree of artifice, and whata Sue Harris has called “a celebration of the

28

Serge Merlin, Rufus, Ron Perlman, Jean-Claude Dreyfus,

tually persuaded to spend three weeks in Hollywood doing some costume and set design for the film, he then parted company with Jeunet to pursue a solo career

Visible) that soon became the signature film of the look style. The directors most closely associated with the cinéma du look are Beineix, Luc Besson, and Léos Carax, who made a number of stylish thrillers characterized

27

French films, as have the screenwriters Guillaume Laurant and Gilles Adrian. Bruno Delbonnel has worked on all of Jeunet’s films within several different roles,

he lacked creative control, whereas Jeunet relished the challenges and constraints that ocme with working on a big-budget Hollywood movie. Although Caro was even-

affiliation with the films and filmmakers of the cinéma du look. The cinéma du look emerged in the early 1980s, beginning with Diva (dir. Jean-Jacques Beineix; 1981), a cult film hailed by Fredric Jameson as the first “post-

several of Jeunet’s films, and the director of photography Darius Khondji, who had worked on Delicatessen and La

from screenwriter and sound technician to director of

cupations, which, like Edgar Allen Poe’s purloined letter, can be hidden in plain sight.15

modern” French film ( Jameson (1990) Signatures of the

Pierre-Jacques Bénichou has worked as casting director on all Jeunet’s films except for Alien Resurrection, when there was a Hollywood casting director in place. The

photography. Several actors have appeared in more than

as a vehicle with which to conceal and convey a great deal of information about contemporary cultural preoc-

Tirard (2002). Moviemakers’ Master Class). The high degree of advance preparation, the emphasis on visual style, and the obvious influence of advertising

special-effects supervisor Pitof, who has worked on

Cité des enfants perdus, when with Jeunet to Hollywood to

what makes them so interesting for the film analyst is their imaginative use of the surface or “look” of the films

to follow prettier country roads, but if you lose your way, you can always return to the highway’” (Laurent

and music video aesthetics underscore Jeunet’s loose

stayed with Jeunet throughout the next decade of his

work on Alien Resurrection. The set designer for Jeunet’s

who finish each other’s sentences and scratch each other’s arms—came to an end when Jeunet and Caro were offered the chance to direct the fourth Alien film. Caro was not interested in working on a film over which

the viewfinders of machine guns proliferate). Jeunet’s films offer a tremendous degree of surface pleasure, but

thing, no doubt about it. In other words the storyboard

career, producing his two subsequent French films.

This almost symbiotic partnership—like that of the conjoined twins characters in La Cité des enfants perdus,

or if you think of a way of shooting the same thing differently and better, then you have to change everyis like a highway: you can turn off it from time to time

Other members of Jeunet’s coterie have maintained closer ties with the director. The producer Claudie Ossard, who had helped Jeunet and Caro finance Delicatessen,

“What we have most in common is the love of making things.”

day-to-day workings of the shoot or preproduction,

24

CREATING A STYLE

previously…in turn, reviving the writing, in proposing new things, thanks to the new techniques” (Alain

a predilection for dystopian fantasy, and an off-kilter sense of humor. Both films credited Jeunet and Caro as codirectors, and the filmmakers worked in tandem, with

Film Festival Guide

The pair’s feature debut, Delicatessen, launched both their careers, and their second feature-length film, the reputation as filmmakes with a strong visual aesthetic,

— a very long engagement

Film Festival Guide

CREATING A STYLE

Film Festival Guide

Doggie farts, gladdens my heart

Runt ime 133 minutes

a tricky mixture of war epic, black comedy, and heart-stirring romance

with the place seen by tourists (or even ordinary citizens). This is

and where one sprightly young woman can orchestrate small miracles.8

Mathilde’s incongruous tuba-playing to a subplot about one of the dead

Drama | Myster y Romance | War Rated R for violence and sexualit y.

that would have left many a filmmaker a bit flummoxed.9 The film is seen largely through the eyes of Mathilde (Tautou), an

Jeunet’s city, where magic abounds in the strangest places, where fate and predestination lurk around every corner, where photographs talk,

With his typically pixie-ish sense of humor, Jeunet brings a light

who are sentenced to death for self-inflicted wounds (done so they could be evacuated from the front lines) and condemned to march out into the no man’s land between the Germans’ trenches and theirs, it’s

Released 2001

loner (Kassovitz) with his own bizarre quest.

Jeunet uses the city as more of a character than a mere backdrop,

7

Sebastien Japrisot’s WWI-set novel is a story about five French soldiers

Rated R for sexual content.

as ‘’a neurotic and an iceberg,’’ and part of Amélie’s charm is that she

CREATING A STYLE

23

Both Bazil and his world are infused with a surreal circus quality to start with, but that sensibility grows sharper when he’s taken in by a

Un long dimanche de fiançailles

Le fabuleux destin d’Amélie Poulain

in The City of Lost Children. Armed with a bigger budget and enough

eventually discharge him too.

22

a very long engagement

amélie

La cité des enfants perdus

21

Film Festival Guide

city of lost children

19

Film Festival Guide

17

Film Festival Guide

16

of annual concerts known as The Twilight Dance Series. Today the concerts are as regular a part of Southern California summer as sunshine, the sea and the sand. In 1996 Pacific Park opened, bringing back the first full-scale amusement park on the pier since the 1930’s, and the first roller coaster, the West Coaster, since the Whirlwind Dipper let off its last customers over six decades earlier. The opening of the park was an invitation for families to visit the Pier again. The new millennium has continued with that momentum. Drawing over four million visitors annually, the Pier is just as vital as it has ever been. The atmosphere

Santa Monica’s Landmarks Program has been committed to historic preservation for decades. The city has designated two historic districts, more than 64 landmarks and structures of merit, and has identified approximately 1,350 potential historic resources.

is decorated with a variety of street performers and artists who put their talents on display for crowds of admirers every day. Below the Pier’s eastern deck is the Santa Monica Pier Aquarium, where you can experience some of the denizens of the Santa Monica Bay up

37

38

close and personal. And, of course, the Pier’s Carousel still offers old-fashioned entertainment for under a dollar. The Pier today is a popular recreational destination as well as a vibrant reminder of the past.16

HISTORICAL LANDMARKS Route 66 In 1926, Route 66 was created as a link

Route 66 is said to end a block away from the pier at

Marion Davies Estate, North Guest House

between Chicago and Los Angeles. It totaled over 2,400

the intersection of Santa Monica Blvd and Ocean Ave.

Located at 321 Palisades Beach Road which has now been transformed

miles and was dramatized in John Steinbeck’s Grapes

A bronze plaque dedicating Route 66 as the Will Rogers

into the Annenberg Community Beach House, the Marion Davies Estate

of Wrath and popularized in Nat King Cole’s hit song, Get Your Kicks on Route 66. There’s no question that Route 66 ends in Santa Monica. But there is great debate and speculation about where the actual ending point is located. Where do you think Route 66 ends? The original pre1939 alignment of Route 66 ended in downtown Los

Highway is located across the street in Palisades Park, a few feet from the Santa Monica Visitor Center Kiosk. On November 11, 2009, the Santa Monica Pier was designated as the official Western Terminus of Route 66 by the Route 66 Alliance, an organization that promotes and preserves the historic roadway between Chicago,

was built by William Randolph Hearst and was home to many famed Hollywood parties in the 1930’s. The North Guest House is the only original structure remaining on the property. Santa Monica Conservancy docent tours of the Guest House are available for free. Historical Downtown Santa Monica Take a walking tour of some of Santa Monica’s oldest landmarks. In approximately two hours and

Angeles. In 1936, Route 66 was extended from downtown

Ill. and Santa Monica, CA. Stop by for a photo at The

six blocks, experience more than 130 years of Santa Monica history,

Los Angeles to Santa Monica, terminating at US 101

End of The Trail Sign.

including the 1875 Rapp Saloon, The Majestic Theatre and much more.

ALT, today the intersection of Olympic Blvd and Lincoln Blvd (a segment of State Route 1). According to the California Route 66 Preservation Foundation, Route 66 officially ends when it merges into Highway 101 at the intersection of Lincoln and Olympic Blvd.

No matter where the ending point is, Santa Monica is a wonderful place to celebrate the Spirit of Route 66 and its many contributions to American culture.

Docent-guided walking tours by the Santa Monica Conservancy take place every Saturday morning at 10am. Self-guided tour booklets are also available.

39


CATALOGUE

LIVE MUSIC

CARNIVAL FESTIVITIES

Orchestre National de France is a symphony

During the festival, the historic carousel and all rides and booths will be open in the Pacific Park.

acters and audacious designs. His lens onto the

Emerse yourself in play and let your imagination

cinematic world is unique and make for beauti-

Champs-Élysées in Paris, where it occasionally

run wild. Whether you’re a child or an adult,

plays in the pit for opera productions. Join-

youth is a matter of mood and mentality!

ing us to represent the best of France’s musical

FOUND ART SCULPTURE EXHIBIT On a break from the rides, be sure to check

additional to popular classical composters, the

out the sculpture exhibit, featuring work from

musicians will be playing musical numbers from Jeunet’s films. Yann Tiersen is a French musician and com41

42

ful film stills. Make sure to check out the large display of photography that will evoke the magical adventure of the featured films.

FRENCH CUISINE No festival would be complete without a wide

reknowned artist Robert Hudson and a selection

assortment of treats and eats! Experience tra-

of other local artists. All the work on display are

ditional French fare, from freshly baked sweet

assemblages of recycled material creating fresh

and savory brioches to Fried Camembert to

poser. His music is recognized by its use of

and funky pieces that toy with our predisposed

Duck Confit. Quench your thirst with an old-

a large variety of instruments in relatively

ideas of form and function.

fashioned soda from the soda fountain next to

minimalist compositions, often with a touch of

PHOTO BOOTH CONTEST

either European classical music or French folk

Explore your own creativity and take a unique

music, using primarily the piano, accordion or

self-portrait! Tack your best photo on the

violin together with instruments like the melod-

practicalities

FILM STILL GALLERY Jeunet’s films come alive with colourful char-

orchestra run by Radio France. Since 1944, the orchestra has been based in the Théâtre des

talent, are seven members of the Orchestra. In

40

FESTIVAL INFO

Film Festival Guide

FESTIVAL INFO

events

43

the carousel. Although we are all children at

44

45

heart, alcoholic beverages will be available for purchase by guests 21 or older.

Portrait Wall next to the booth to win a DVD

ica, xylophone, toy piano, ondes martenot, harp-

box set of Jeunet’s featured films! Don’t forget

sichord and typewriter. The Amélie soundtrack features compositions from Tiersen’s first three albums and also new work for the film.

to vote yourself and two other runner-ups.

TICK ET OPTIONS

Tickets go on sale on Tuesday, May 17th at 10am PDT and can be pur-

$125 3-day tickets

The winners will be announced before the first

chased on the festival website or directly from the Santa Monica Pier Box

$100 3-day tickets for children 12-years-old or younger.

movie on Sunday. Runner ups will take home a

Raphaël Beau’s score for Micmacs is an invigo-

$ 55 for 1-day tickets

small festival poster.

Children under 5 are free.

rating, intriguing affair that flits from relaxed

Office located in Pacific Park. Guests with valid student identification and groups of 4 or larger are eligible for a 15% discount on 3-day tickets. Prior to July 5th, all online ticket sales are for 3-day festival tickets and include a $10 voucher to any of the pier restaurants and unlimited access to the

shuffle to furious flights with grace. With each

historical carousel and the Pacific Park rides the days of the festival. Parking

frame of a Jeunet film a work of art in itself,

rates are $5 for advanced ticket holders and guests will be asked to present

anything less than at least a serviceable, quirk-

tickets or proof of purchase. One-day and 3-day tickets will be available

ily charming score would have spoiled things.

the day of. Normal parking rates will apply to one-day ticket holders.

Get energized and enchanted as you watch him

All that’s left of your childhood fits in a little box

Film Festival Guide

Film Festival Guide

FESTIVAL INFO

perform his jaunty arrangements live!

All festival films are Rated R and minors must be accompanied by an adult. No ads or trailers are shown with the films, so please don’t be late!

LOCATION Coming from the North on Pacific Coast Highway Go south on Pacific Coast Highway. After reaching the California

SOURCES

Film Festival Guide

FESTIVAL INFO

PCH

the deceleration lane on the right. Coming from the North on Ocean Avenue Go south on Ocean Avenue. The Pier is located two blocks south of Santa Monica Blvd. at the corner of Ocean Ave. and Colorado Ave. If the parking lot is full, proceed two blocks and make a right turn on Seaside

5 Neil Smit h (2001). BBC Film Review. 6 Elvis M itchell. (2 Nov 2001). “Litt le M iss Sunshine as Urban Sprite.” New York Times Film Review. 7 Neil Smit h (2001). BBC Film Review.

10 NEILSON WAY

Coming from 405 From the north or south on the 405 Freeway, take I-10 West. Drive west on I-10 and exit freeway at 4th/5th Street exit. Go north on 5th St. to Colorado Ave. Make a left on Colorado Ave. and drive straight to

4TH ST

SEASIDE

2ND ST

Coming from I-10 Go west on I-10. Exit the freeway at 4th/5th Street exit. Stay in the left lane leading to 4th Street. Turn left on 4th Street and proceed to Pico Blvd. Make a right on Pico Blvd., proceed to Ocean Avenue. Turn right on

8 James Berardinelli (2001). Reel View Film Review. 9 Chris Barsanti (14 Dec 2004). A MC Film Critic Review.

Email: info @ santamon icapier.org UR L : w w w.santamon icapier.org

COLORADO BLVD PIER

Ocean Avenue and follow signage to the Pier.

46

3 Matt Ford ( 8 Feb 2001). BBC Film Review. 4 Clare Norton-Smit h (1995). BBC Film Review.

380 Santa Mon ica Pier Santa Mon ica, CA 90401 Phone: ( 310 ) 458-8901

BROADWAY

the Pier. If the lot is full, proceed north on Ocean Avenue to California Incline and go left. Turn left at the signal at Pacific Coast Highway. Move

2 Elizabet h Ezra (2008 ). “Prost hetic Visions.” Jean-Pierre Jeunet.

THE SA NTA MONICA PIER R ESTOR ATION COR POR ATION (SM PRC), established in 1983, is a non-profit, public benefit cor poration made up of business and com mun it y leaders who represent t he f ull range of com mun it y interests. It was created by t he Santa Mon ica Cit y Council to manage and promote t he Pier, and is f unded by t he Cit y of Santa Mon ica. Members of t he Board ser ve wit hout compensation.

Terrace. Follow signs to Pier/Beach parking. Coming from the South on Ocean Avenue Go north on Ocean Avenue. Turn left at Colorado Avenue and drive onto

to the right hand lane and follow signs into Pier/Beach parking.

1 Elizabet h Ezra (2008 ). “Preface and Ack nowlegements.” Jean-Pierre Jeunet.

DAYDR EA MS ON ROOFTOPS Box Office: ( 310 ) 260 -7521 Toll Free: 800.555.7521 Email: info @ daydreamsonroof tops.com UR L : w w w.daydreamsonroof tops.com

SANTA MONICA BLVD

OCEAN WAY

incline, watch for directional signs for Pier/Beach parking and

10 Roger Ebert (17 Dec 2004). Movie Review.

PACIFIC PAR K Phone: ( 310 ) 260 -8744

11 Chris Barsanti (14 Dec 2004). A MC Film Critic Review.

UR L : w w w.pacpark.com

12 Roger Ebert (17 Dec 2004). Movie Review.

CAROUSEL Phone: ( 310 ) 394 -8042

13 Betsy Sharkey (4 June 2010 ). Los Angeles Times Film Critic Review.

SANTA MONICA CONVENTION & VISITORS BUR EAU 1920 Main St. Ste B Santa Mon ica, CA 90405

15 Elizabet h Ezra (2008 ). “Prost hetic Visions.” Jean-Pierre Jeunet.

14 Elizabet h Ezra (2008 ). “Prost hetic Visions.” Jean-Pierre Jeunet.

16 Santa Monica Pier Restoration Corporation (2011). Santa Monica Pier History.

Phone: 310.319.6263 Toll Free: 800.544.5319

47

48

Film Festival Guide

— amélie

17 Santa Monica Convention and Visitors Bureau (2008). Historical Landmarks

Email: info @ santamon ica.com UR L : w w w.santamon ica.com

in Santa Monica.

49

PICO BLVD

the Pier at Ocean Avenue. If the parking lot is full, make a left turn on Ocean Avenue and proceed two blocks. Make a right turn on Seaside Terrace. Follow sign to Pier/Beach parking.

BICKNELL AVE

N

OCEAN PARK BLVD BARNAR D WA

Pier and Festival Parking Open 5: 30am to 2: 30pm

Y

DAYDREAMS ON ROOFTOPS A JEAN-PIERRE

JEUNET FILM FESTIVAL GUIDE

www.daydreamsonrooftops.com © 2011 Design by Nicole Racquel

F I L M F E S T I VA L G U I D E Design by Nicole Racquel

FINAL SPREADS


ADVERTISEMENTS

To be used to promote the festival, I created three different ads—a bus shelter ad, a billboard and an ad on the side of a bus. The final deliverables are letter sized, virtually comped images, showing the ads where they would be displayed.


www.daydreamsonrooftops.com

IT’S BETTER TO HELP PEOPLE THAN GARDEN GNOMES HOW MANY FEET DOES IT TAKE TO WEAR DOWN STAIRS?

www.daydreamsonrooftops.com

THE ETERNAL RETURN

OF CALAMITY & WHIMSY IN THE FILMS OF JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET


ADVERTISEMENTS

I chose to do a billboard, the side of a bus and a bus shelter for my advertisements. I decided to use quotes from the movie because some of them are so quirky and it would help grab attention to the ads.

FRI AUG 5 TO SUN AUG 7

www.daydreamsonrooftops.com

Even have artichokes

hearts.

FRI AUG 5 TO SUN AUG 7

www.daydreamsonrooftops.com

THE ETERNAL RETURN OF CALAMITY & WHIMSY


ADVERTISEMENTS

FINAL VERSIONS

I chose to do a billboard, the side of a bus and a bus shelter for my advertisements. I decided to use quotes from the movie because some of them are so quirky and it would help grab attention to the ads.


DVD PACKAGING

The packaging for each of the 5 films is housed in a metal clam box and includes a booklet with information about the f ilms and actors. It is intended to be sold as a limited edition box set. The DVD cases are intended to look like book covers.


SOME PEOPLE FOLLOW THEIR DREAMS. OTHERS STEAL THEM.

DELICATESSEN A

CITY LOST

OF CHILDREN

A JEUNET & CARO FILM

JEUNET & CARO FILM

DAYDREAMS ON ROOFTOPS © 2011 ARTWORK & PHOTOGRAPHY BY NICOLE RACQUEL. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. WWW.DAYDREAMSONROOFTOPS.COM

A VERY LONG

ENGAGEMENT A

JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET FILM

AMÉLIE A

A JEUNET & CARO FILM WRIT TEN BY GILLES ADRIEN & JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET | PRODUCED BY FÉLICIE DUTERTRE RUNTIME 112 MINUTE | COLOR | RATED R | RELEASED 1995 | SUBTITLES | A WIDESCREEN SPECIAL EDITION

MICMACS A

JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET FILM

JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET FILM


DVD PACK AGING

SCENE INDEX

SCENE INDEX 1 Start [4:23]

1 The Butcher Shop [6:24]

2 The City [2:16]

2 Odd Job [5:24]

3 Mr. One [6:14]

3 Life at 129A [5:42]

4 Birthday Party [2:08] 5 Making Krank Cry [2:19]

4 Mailman [3:59]

6 The Octopus [1:40]

5 Hunting Frogs [2:18]

7 The Robbery [4:25]

6 Blind Date [6:27]

8 Retrieving One [2:41] 9 Informing the Octopus [6:41]

7 Livingstone’s Favorite Song [4:39]

10 Cyclops Meeting [5:22] 11 Selling Information [2:31]

8 Nightmare [2:53]

12 Recruiting Marcello [2:21]

9 Squeaky Springs [1:59] 10 Madame Interligator [5:19]

SPECIAL FEATURES

11 Julie Joins the Troglodistes [9:14]

Feature Commentary by Director Jean-Pierre Jeunet

12 Fresh Meat [5:08]

Fine Cooked Meats: A Nod to Delicatessen

13 Objective: Louison [1:55]

The Archives of Jean-Pierre Jeunet

14 Antenna Adjustment [4:42] 15 Mistake, Escape, Rescue [7:14]

Theatrical Trailer and Teasers Photo Gallery

13 Santa Krank [6:50]

16 Saving One [3:02] 18 Nightmares [4:44] 19 Finishing Marcello [:43] 21 Sore Feet [2:12] 22 Tattoo Artist [1:53]

18 End Credits [5:26]

Costume Design Gallery Production Sketch Gallery Talent Files

25 Marcello’s Revenge [10:55]

Jean-Pierre Jeunet & Marc Caro (Directors)

26 Miette Meets Irvin [1:25] 27 Inside the Dream [6:57]

Ron Perlman Angelo Badalamenti (Composer) Jean-Paul Gaultier (Costumes) Theatrical Trailer

CHAPTERS 1 Opening Credits [1:34] 2 …Five Men on Death Row [2:41]

1 Opening Credits: Amélie's Childhood [9:04]

4 Benoît Notre-Dame [1:32]

2 Montmartre [5:09]

5 Ange Bassignano [2:02]

3 Six-Sous [1:26]

30 The Soldier With German Boots [2:34] 31 On the Trail of Sorrow [3:13] 32 God Spared French Soldier… [1:59] 33 Try to Be Happy and Don’t… [3:04]

3 The Memory Box [7:15]

6 Cornflower [3:53]

4 Looking For Bredoteau [9:09]

7 Bingo Crépuscule [3:06]

34 He Who Pries Flies… [4:32]

8 The Mess Hall Marauder [1:49]

35 The End of the World Farm [4:44]

5 Amélie, Guardian Angel [8:18]

9 No-Man’s-Land [2:01]

36 The Hospital of Combles [8:40]

10 Let’s Hear It Then [2:35]

6 Soul Mates [8:35] 7 Amélie Strikes Again [17:28] 8 Grumpy Collignon [7:43] 9 Amélie Looks For Nino [6:17]

SPECIAL FEATURES The Look of Amélie Fantasies of Audrey Tautou

11 If Chickpea Comes In… [2:49]

37 Stay Where You Are, Mathilde… [4:06]

12 The White Widow [2:13]

38 The Milly Expedition [4:22]

13 In This Whole Story… [1:26]

39 Final Credits [4:24]

14 Germain Pire, the Peerless Pry [4:05] 15 The Chick Has Flown the Coop [4:08]

10 Games [1:31]

Q&A With Director Jean-Pierre Jeunet

16 A Good Glass of Wine… [2:54]

11 New Strategies [1:58]

Q&A With Director and Cast

17 Secret Defense [4:39]

Storyboard Comparison

18 Reward for Information… [1:00]

12 The Mystery Man Unveiled [2:28] 13 "When and Where?" [8:07] 14 Rendezvous at the Photo Booth [7:05] 15 Absence Makes... [6:24] 16 Seizing an Opportunity [6:11] 17 End Credits [6:28]

An Intimate Chat With Jean-Pierre Jeunet Home Movies Inside the Making of Amélie Trailer and T V Spots US Theatrical Trailer French Theatrical Trailer US T V Spots French T V Spots The Amélie Scrapbook Cast and Crew Filmographies

19 An Albatross Is Stubborn [1:30] 20 A Letter From… [1:38] 21 A Flood of Letters [4:45] 22 I Want to Understand!!! [2:52] 23 The Borrowed Woman [:33] 24 Can One See Far From… [8:42] 25 The Departure for the War [4:38] 26 The Military Cemetery Of… [2:13] 27 Let’s Meet Under… [1:40] 28 The Roaming Poux [1:14] 29 For France…Charge!!! [8:51]

CHAPTERS 1 Chapter 1 [7:09] 2 Chapter 2 [3:19] 3 Chapter 3 [4:03] 4 Chapter 4 [4:45] 5 Chapter 5 [4:03] 6 Chapter 6 [4:00] 7 Chapter 7 [5:52] 8 Chapter 8 [1:48] 9 Chapter 9 [2:08] 10 Chapter 10 [2:30] 11 Chapter 11 [2:22] 12 Chapter 12 [3:19] 13 Chapter 13 [2:32]

SPECIAL FEATURES

14 Chapter 14 [2:34]

Commentary With Director Jean-Pierre Jeunet

15 Chapter 15 [2:30]

The Making of Micmacs

16 Chapter 16 [3:21] 17 Chapter 17 [4:50] 18 Chapter 18 [4:08] 19 Chapter 19 [3:56] 20 Chapter 20 [1:26] 21 Chapter 21 [1:46] 22 Chapter 22 [4:05] 23 Chapter 23 [:12] 24 Chapter 24 [3:56] 25 Chapter 25 [5:06] 26 Chapter 26 [4:51] 27 Chapter 27 [5:29] 28 Chapter 28 [1:50]

Q&A With Director Jean-Pierre Jeunet and Actress Julie Ferrier Animations: Absurd Deaths Theatrical Trailer Micmacs Soundtrack

OF CHILDREN

SPECIAL FEATURES Jean-Pierre Jeunet & Ron Perlman Commentary

24 Chain Reaction [4:53]

28 Escape [9:09]

CHAPTERS

CITY LOST

17 One’s Past [2:21]

20 Dinner Guest [2:20]

23 Farewell Song [2:27]

16 The Flood [8:13] 17 The Australian [7:56]

WIDESCREEN

14 Underwater Rescuer [5:10] 15 Miette & Friends [3:59]

SPECIAL FEATURES A Year at the Front: Behind the Scenes of A Very Long Engagement Parisian Scenes Before the Explosion… Deleted Scenes With Commentary by Jean-Pierre Jeunet

A JEUNET & CARO FILM

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COVERS & INSIDE


DVD PACK AGING

FINAL DELIVERABLE


SCENE INDEX 1 Start [4:23] 2 The City [2:16]

CAST OF CHARACTERS

3 Mr. One [6:14] 4 Birthday Party [2:08] 5 Making Krank Cry [2:19] 6 The Octopus [1:40] 7 The Robbery [4:25]

One

8 Retrieving One [2:41]

Krank

9 Informing the Octopus [6:41]

Miette

10 Cyclops Meeting [5:22]

Le scaphandrier / Les Clones

11 Selling Information [2:31] 12 Recruiting Marcello [2:21]

Marcello

13 Santa Krank [6:50]

La Pieuvre

Judith Vittet Dominique Pinon Jean-Claude Dreyfus Geneviève Brunet

La Pieuvre

Odile Mallet

Mademoiselle Bismuth

Mireille Mossé

16 Saving One [3:02] 17 One’s Past [2:21] 18 Nightmares [4:44] 19 Finishing Marcello [:43] 20 Dinner Guest [2:20] 21 Sore Feet [2:12] 22 Tattoo Artist [1:53] 23 Farewell Song [2:27] 24 Chain Reaction [4:53]

RON PERLMAN A classically trained actor with strong features who is often cast as a mutant, a misfit or a villain, Ron Perlman was born in Washington Heights, N.Y., on April 13, 1950. He honed his skills on the New York stage and made his Broadway debut in “Teibele and Her Demon” in 1979 before making the transition to feature films.

Ron Perlman Daniel Emilfork

14 Underwater Rescuer [5:10] 15 Miette & Friends [3:59]

Gabriel Marie (Cyclops leader)

Serge Merlin

Peeler

Rufus

Ex-acrobat

Ticky Holgado

Denree

Joseph Lucien

Lune

Mapi Galán

Bottle

Briac Barthélémy

Pipo

Pierre-Quentin Faesch

DOMINIQUE PINON With rubbery facial features that have led themselves perfectly to the surreal universe of the films of Jeunet and Caro, Pinon has captivated audiences with idiosyncratic portrayal of characters. Born March 4, 1955, in Saumur, France, Dominique Pinon has appeared in all of Jeunet’s films and 100s of other films and television shows.

SPECIAL FEATURES Jean-Pierre Jeunet & Ron Perlman Commentary Costume Design Gallery Production Sketch Gallery Talent Files Jean-Pierre Jeunet & Marc Caro Angelo Badalamenti (Composer) Jean-Paul Gaultier (Costumes) Theatrical Trailer

DANIEL EMILFORK (April 7, 1924 – October 17, 2006) A Chilean stage and film actor who lived in France most his life, Emilfork’s face was out of the norm and had made him a choice character actor for villain roles. He carried on acting up until his death, his last film appearing in 2007. Emilfork’s voice and accent when speaking French was extremely striking and unique.

25 Marcello’s Revenge [10:55]

This special edition would not have been possible without the generous participation of Jean-Pierre Jeunet.

26 Miette Meets Irvin [1:25] 27 Inside the Dream [6:57] 28 Escape [9:09]

F IL M F ES T I VA L COL L EC T ION

When you’re born in the gutter, you end up in the port

CITY OF LOST

CHILDREN A LITTLE ABOUT THE FILM

CREDITS

Following the success of Delicatessen, collaborators Jeunet and Caro inspire the weird and the wonderful with outlandish extravagance in The City of Lost Children. Armed with

Directors

a bigger budget and enough special effects to sink a computerised battleship, this dark

Jean-Pierre Jeunet & Marc Caro

Writers

Gilles Adrien, Jean-Pierre Jeunet & Marc Caro

Producer

Félicie Dutertre

and highly imaginative fin de siècle is a fantastic fairytale and visual treat. Evil man Krank locks himself away in an isolated

conscious carnival of ideas, much like dreams themselves,

Cinematography

Darius Khondji

off-shore rig, surrounded by six cloned henchmen, a

then the unfolding chaos slots into place.

Production Design

Marc Caro & Jean Rabasse

dwarf assistant and an uncle who exists as a brain in an aquarium, plagued by migraines. But worse still, Krank is unable to enjoy sweet dreams. In true Chitty Chitty Bang Bang child-catcher fashion, Krank becomes children’s public enemy number one as he kidnaps the innocent in order to ‘steal’ their dreams. Street freak strongman One, along with the assertive Miette, are forced to track down the deranged Krank after One’s

Jean Paul Gaultier’s costumes are a constant source

Editors

Ailo August & Herve Shneid

of ingenuity and wit, with more of a wink than a nod

Music

Angelo Badalamenti

to Berlin’s famous transvestite Charlotte von Mahlsdorf

Casting

Pierre-Jacques Bénichou

in the uniformed dressing of The Octopus. Angelo Badalamenti’s haunting, fairgroundesque score provides a suitably sinister and lilting melody and the final

Art Director

Jean Rabasse

Costume Design

Jean-Paul Gaultier

mor-phing sequence is a digital delight.

angelic brother is stolen, meeting a catalogue of nightmarish characters along the way. The frenetic deluge of beautiful, grotesque and surreal image s can be exhausting, but viewed as a stream of

SCENE INDEX 1 The Butcher Shop [6:24] 2 Odd Job [5:24]

6 Blind Date [6:27]

CAST OF CHARACTERS

7 Livingstone’s Favorite Song [4:39]

Tried to Escape

3 Life at 129A [5:42] 4 Mailman [3:59] 5 Hunting Frogs [2:18]

Louison

8 Nightmare [2:53]

Dominique Pinon Marie-Laure Dougnac

Clapet

Jean-Claude Dreyfus

11 Julie Joins the Troglodistes [9:14]

Mademoiselle Plusse

Karin Viard

12 Fresh Meat [5:08]

Marcel Tapioca

Ticky Holgado

9 Squeaky Springs [1:59]

13 Objective: Louison [1:55]

Madame Tapioca

Anne-Marie Pisani

14 Antenna Adjustment [4:42]

Young Rascal

Boban Janevski

15 Mistake, Escape, Rescue [7:14]

Young Rascal 2

Mikael Todde

Grandmother

Edith Ker

16 The Flood [8:13]

Robert Kube

JEAN-CLAUDE DREYFUS, a French actor born in Paris in February 18, 1946, began his career in film acting in 1973 in the film Comment réussir quand on est con et pleurnichard. Aside from Delicatessen, Dreyfus also appears in two other of Jeunet’s films— City of Lost Children and A Very Long Engagement.

Pascal Benezech

Julie Clapet

10 Madame Interligator [5:19]

Rufus

17 The Australian [7:56]

Roger

Jacques Mathou

18 End Credits [5:26]

Frog Man

Howard Vernon

Postman

Chick Ortega

Aurore Interligator

Silvie Laguna

DOMINIQUE PINON With rubbery facial features that have led themselves perfectly to the surreal universe of the films of Jeunet and Caro, Pinon has captivated audiences with idiosyncratic portrayal of characters. Born March 4, 1955, in Saumur, France, Dominique Pinon has appeared in all of Jeunet’s films and 100s of other films and television shows.

TICKY HOLGADO ( June 24, 1944 – January 22, 2004) pseudonym of Joseph Holgado, was a French actor and a frequent collaborator with Jean-Pierre Jeunet. His role in Delicatessen got him noticed and he went on to receive the Caesar of the best male bit part in 1992 for Une époque formidable and in 1996 for Gazon maudit. He succombed to lung cancer in 2004.

SPECIAL FEATURES Feature Commentary by Director Jean-Pierre Jeunet Fine Cooked Meats: A Nod to Delicatessen The Archives of Jean-Pierre Jeunet Theatrical Trailer and Teasers Photo Gallery

This special edition would not have been possible without the generous participation of Jean-Pierre Jeunet.

F IL M F ES T I VA L COL L EC T ION

Nobody is entirely evil…

DELICATESSEN A LITTLE ABOUT THE FILM CREDITS

Somewhere in a mist-shrouded future and apocalyptic rubble of France, Louison (Pinon), a grieving ex-clown takes a job as janitor in a crumbling apartment block. Unbeknownst to

Directors

him, this job has a history and previous incumbents have ended up on the neighbor’s

Jean-Pierre Jeunet & Marc Caro

Writers

Gilles Adrien, Jean-Pierre Jeunet & Marc Caro

dinner table via the butcher’s block. When Louison innocently falls for the butcher’s myopic Producer

daughter, the knife is held back to spare her feelings. But as bellies begin to rumble, will love be enough to keep Louison out of le charcuterie?

Claudie Ossard

Cinematography

Darius Khondji

Production Design

Marc Caro

This troubled romance provides the bare skeleton

Combining the cruel humor of Grimm’s fairytale stories,

Editors

Hervé Schneid

on which Jeunet and Caro hang their dreams. A hugely

with the spirit of Terry Gilliam and that peculiarly French

Music

Carlos D’Alessio

enjoyable film Delicatessen welds comedy and magic into a bizarre, grotesque fantasy of an oddball dystopian future. The directors are constantly playing curve ball with the audience’s expectations and nothing can prepare you for the sheer weirdness of it all. Every so often, the plot stops to watch a scene spiral off at a tangent, such as a

knack for putting magic into film, this feverish tale of star-crossed lovers and small town cannibalism has endured as a true masterpiece of the fantastique. With Delicatessen Jeunet and Caro gave the world a canny and

Casting

Pierre-Jacques Bénichou

Art Director

Miljen Kreka Kljakovic

Costume Design

Valérie Pozzo di Borgo

confident calling card for that most coveted of talents— commercial arthouse cinema.

rhythm of creaking beds rippling out through the hotel, or two boys spying on an old man breeding escargots in his flooded apartment.

SCENE INDEX 1 Opening Credits: Amélie's Childhood [9:04] 2 Montmartre [5:09] 3 The Memory Box [7:15] 4 Looking For Bredoteau [9:09] 5 Amélie, Guardian Angel [8:18] 6 Soul Mates [8:35] 7 Amélie Strikes Again [17:28] 8 Grumpy Collignon [7:43] 9 Amélie Looks For Nino [6:17]

CAST OF CHARACTERS Amélie Poulain Nino Quincampoix Raphaël Poulain

Audrey Tautou Mathieu Kassovitz Rufus

Amandine Poulain Lorella Cravotta Raymond Dufayel

Serge Merlin

10 Games [1:31]

Lucien

Jamel Debbouze

11 New Strategies [1:58]

Gina

Clotilde Mollet

Madame Suzanne

Claire Maurier

12 The Mystery Man Unveiled [2:28]

Georgette

Isabelle Nanty

13 "When and Where?" [8:07]

Joseph

Dominique Pinon

Hipolito

Artus de Penguern

14 Rendezvous at the Photo Booth [7:05] 15 Absence Makes... [6:24] 16 Seizing an Opportunity [6:11] 17 End Credits [6:28]

AUDREY TAUTOU was born on August 9, 1976 in Beaumont, France, and showed an interest for comedy at an early age starting her acting lessons at `Cours Florent’. In 1999 she won a Best New Actress Cesar for her role in Vénus beauté (institut) and was again nominated for her role in Amélie, which was a phenominal success for her career.

Madeleine Wallace Yolande Moreau Collignon

Urbain Cancelier

Dominique Bretodeau

Maurice Bénichou

Mr. Collignon

Michel Robin

SPECIAL FEATURES The Look of Amélie Fantasies of Audrey Tautou Q&A With Director Jean-Pierre Jeunet Q&A With Director and Cast

MATHIEU KASSOVITZ was born in Paris, the son of Chantal Rémy, a film editor, and Peter Kassovitz, a director and writer. Also a director, screenwriter and producer, he is best known for his Canneswinning drama La Haine. Kassovitz is also the founder of MNP Entreprise, a film production company.

RUFUS, is the stage name of French actor Jacques Narcy. Born 19 December 1942 in R iom, Puy-de-Dôme, France, he has appeared in numerous French T V series and productions, including most of the films directed by Jean-Pierre Jeunet. He had the lead role in the movie Train de vie (1998), an award-winning tragicomedy about the Holocaust.

Storyboard Comparison An Intimate Chat With Jean-Pierre Jeunet Home Movies Inside the Making of Amélie Trailer and T V Spots US Theatrical Trailer French Theatrical Trailer US T V Spots French T V Spots The Amélie Scrapbook Cast and Crew Filmographies

This special edition would not have been possible without the generous participation of Jean-Pierre Jeunet.


DVD PACK AGING

F IL M F ES T I VA L COL L EC T ION

We pass the time of day to forget how time passes

AMÉLIE A LITTLE ABOUT THE FILM CREDITS

This beguiling fable whipped up a storm of controversy in France, with some commentators arguing its nostalgic whimsy brushed the realities of modern multicultural

Directors

Paris under the carpet.

Jean-Pierre Jeunet & Marc Caro

Writers

A sugar-rush of a movie, Amélie has what could be called meticulous clutter, a placement of imagery that covers every square centimeter of the screen. Jeunet’s sense of humor gives the movie heart; his real affection for the medium can be seen in all the funny little curlicues and jottings around the action. It has a hypnotic sense of romance; it’s a fable filled with longing, with a heroine who constantly flirts with failure. Jeunet and Guillaume Laurant, with whom he wrote the script, tell the story of Amélie (Tautou) from her conception through her adult life, which is filled with the kind of offhand cruelty normally found in the novels of John Irving and Kurt Vonnegut. Her parents are described as ‘’a neurotic and an iceberg,’’ and part of Amélie’s charm is that she is preternaturally level-

headed and survives her youth with her dark, glowing

Gilles Adrien, Jean-Pierre Jeunet & Marc Caro

Producer

Claudie Ossard, Jean-Marc Deschamps, Arne Meerkamp van Embden, Helmut Breuer

eyes wide open. A waitress in a Parisian café, Amélie sees it as her mission in life to right wrongs and improve the lives of her customers. But she proves rather less successful at bettering her own lot, despite falling for a handsome loner (Kassovitz) with his own bizarre quest. Jeunet uses the city as more of a character than a mere backdrop, although the director’s surreal and timeless vision shouldn’t be confused with the place seen by tourists (or even ordinary citizens). This is Jeunet’s city,

Cinematography

Bruno Delbonnel

Production Design Editors

Aline Bonetto Hervé Schneid

Music

Yann Tiersen

Casting

Pierre-Jacques Bénichou, Valerie Espagne, Alberte Garo

Art Director

Volker Schäfer

Costume Design

Madeline Fontaine Emma Lebail

where magic abounds in the strangest places, where fate and predestination lurk around every corner, where photographs talk, and where one sprightly young woman can orchestrate small miracles.

SCENE INDEX 1 Opening Credits [1:34] 2 …Five Men on Death Row [2:41] 3 Six-Sous [1:26]

26 The Military Cemetery Of… [2:13]

29 For France…Charge!!! [8:51]

5 Ange Bassignano [2:02]

30 The Soldier With German Boots [2:34]

6 Cornflower [3:53]

CAST OF CHARACTERS

27 Let’s Meet Under… [1:40] 28 The Roaming Poux [1:14]

4 Benoît Notre-Dame [1:32]

Mathilde Manech

Gaspard Ulliel

Sylvain

Dominique Pinon

Amandine Poulain Lorella Cravotta

9 No-Man’s-Land [2:01] 10 Let’s Hear It Then [2:35]

Bénédicte

11 If Chickpea Comes In… [2:49]

Pierre-Marie Rouvières

André Dussollier

Germain Pire

Ticky Holgado

12 The White Widow [2:13] 13 In This Whole Story… [1:26]

Tina Lombardi

14 Germain Pire, the Peerless Pry [4:05] 15 The Chick Has Flown the Coop [4:08] 16 A Good Glass of Wine… [2:54]

Chantal Neuwirth

Marion Cotillard

Ange Bassignano

Dominique Bettenfeld

Elodie Gordes

Jodie Foster

Benjamin Gordes

Jean-Pierre Darroussin

31 On the Trail of Sorrow [3:13]

Esperanza

Jean-Pierre Becker

Six-Soux

Denis Lavant

Bastoche

Jérôme Kircher

19 An Albatross Is Stubborn [1:30]

33 Try to Be Happy and Don’t… [3:04]

Célestin Poux

Albert Dupontel

20 A Letter From… [1:38]

34 He Who Pries Flies… [4:32]

18 Reward for Information… [1:00]

21 A Flood of Letters [4:45] 22 I Want to Understand!!! [2:52] 23 The Borrowed Woman [:33] 24 Can One See Far From… [8:42] 25 The Departure for the War [4:38]

GASPARD ULLIEL’S dream has always been to direct a movie, and after completing his studies at the lycée, he majored in cinema at the University of Saint-Denis. However, he is currently pursuing an acting career. He won a Most Promising Male Newcomer at the César Awards in 2005.

SPECIAL FEATURES A Year at the Front: Behind the Scenes of A Very Long Engagement Parisian Scenes Before the Explosion… Deleted Scenes With Commentary by Jean-Pierre Jeunet

Benoît Notre-Dame Clovis Cornillac 32 God Spared French Soldier… [1:59]

17 Secret Defense [4:39]

AUDREY TAUTOU was born on August 9, 1976 in Beaumont, France, and showed an interest for comedy at an early age starting her acting lessons at `Cours Florent’. In 1999 she won a Best New Actress Cesar for her role in Vénus beauté (institut) and was again nominated for her role in Amélie, which was a phenominal success for her career.

Audrey Tautou

7 Bingo Crépuscule [3:06] 8 The Mess Hall Marauder [1:49]

JODIE FOSTER, born Alicia Christian Foster in Los Angeles has spent nearly her entire life in the spotlight. She has had nearly constant success throughout her substantial film career. She is one of the most respected and highest-paid actresses in Hollywood, and there is no doubt that there will be many great things ahead for this two-time Oscar-winning actress.

This special edition would not have been possible without the generous participation of Jean-Pierre Jeunet.

35 The End of the World Farm [4:44] 36 The Hospital of Combles [8:40] 37 Stay Where You Are, Mathilde… [4:06] 38 The Milly Expedition [4:22] 39 Final Credits [4:24]

F IL M F ES T I VA L COL L EC T ION

Doggie farts, gladdens my heart

A VERY LONG

ENGAGEMENT

A LITTLE ABOUT THE FILM

CREDITS

Sebastien Japrisot’s WWI-set novel is a story about five French soldiers who are sentenced to death for self-inflicted wounds (done so they could be evacuated from the front lines)

Directors

and condemned to march out into the no man’s land between the Germans’ trenches and

Jean-Pierre Jeunet

Writers

Sébastien Japrisot (novel), JeanPierre Jeunet, Guillaume Laurant

theirs, it’s a tricky mixture of war epic, black comedy, and heart-stirring romance that Producer

would have left many a filmmaker a bit flummoxed. The film is seen largely through the eyes of Mathilde

dead soldiers’ lovers who resorts to impossibly complex

(Tautou), an orphan with a polio limp, who senses in

methods of killing off those she believes responsible for

her soul that her man, Manech (Ulliel ) is not dead.

his death.11 The implacable logic of revenge and the

After the war, Mathilde comes upon a letter that seems

barbarity of war are softened by the voluptuous beauty

to hint that not all five soldiers died on the battlefield,

of Jeunet’s visuals and the magic of his storytelling.

and she begins the long task of tracking down eyewit-

Jean-Pierre Jeunet, Bill Gerber, Jean-Louis Monthieux, Francis Boespflug, Fabienne Tsaï

Cinematography

Bruno Delbonnel

Production Design Editors

Hervé Schneid Angelo Badalamenti Pierre-Jacques Bénichou, Valerie Espagne, Marie-Sylvie Caillierez

Costume Design

Madeline Fontaine

nesses and survivors to find the Manech she is sure is still alive and needs her help. With his typically pixie-ish sense of humor, Jeunet

Aline Bonetto

Music Casting

brings a light and jaunty tone to a tale that could easily have been rendered brooding and overly artful. Bits of absurdity speckle throughout the story, from Mathilde’s incongruous tuba-playing to a subplot about one of the

SCENE INDEX 1 Chapter 1 [7:09] 2 Chapter 2 [3:19]

CAST OF CHARACTERS

3 Chapter 3 [4:03] 4 Chapter 4 [4:45] 5 Chapter 5 [4:03] 6 Chapter 6 [4:00] 7 Chapter 7 [5:52]

Bazil

8 Chapter 8 [1:48]

Nicolas Thibault de Fenouillet

9 Chapter 9 [2:08]

François Marconi

Nicolas Marié

11 Chapter 11 [2:22]

Placard

Jean-Pierre Marielle

12 Chapter 12 [3:19]

Tambouille

Yolande Moreau

13 Chapter 13 [2:32]

La Môme Caoutchouc

Julie Ferrier

14 Chapter 14 [2:34] 15 Chapter 15 [2:30]

Remington

Omar Sy

16 Chapter 16 [3:21]

Fracasse

Dominique Pinon

Petit Pierre

17 Chapter 17 [4:50]

Michel Crémadès

18 Chapter 18 [4:08]

Calculette

Marie-Julie Baup

19 Chapter 19 [3:56]

Le gardien de nuit de Marconi

Urbain Cancelier

Gerbaud

Patrick Paroux

20 Chapter 20 [1:26] 21 Chapter 21 [1:46]

Libarski

22 Chapter 22 [4:05] 23 Chapter 23 [:12] 24 Chapter 24 [3:56]

DANY BOON was born Daniel Hamidou on June 26, 1966 in Armentières, France and is a French comedian who has acted both on the stage and the screen. He takes his stage name from the television show Daniel Boone. In 2003, he made a whole show in his local dialect of ch’ti, or Picard.

Dany Boon André Dussollier

10 Chapter 10 [2:30]

ANDRE DUSSOLLIER Born February 17, 1946, the French actor was first seen by international filmgoers in Francois Truffaut’s Such a Gorgeous Kid Like Me (1973). The biggest moneymaker with which Andre Dussolier was aligned was 1987’s Three Men and a Cradle, which was remade by Hollywood as Three Men and a Baby (1988).

JULIE FERRIER is a French actress and comedian, born 5 December 1971 in Courbevoie, France. She is in the eighth generation of actresses on the maternal side of her family. In 2001, she was in the Théâtre de la Jacquerie directed by Alain Mollot. In 2004, she played Today is Ferrier in a mise en scène by Isabelle Nanty. In 2006, her one-woman show Today is Ferrier was a public and critical success.

Jean-Pierre Becker

Matéo

Stéphane Butet

Gravier

Philippe Girard

25 Chapter 25 [5:06]

SPECIAL FEATURES Commentary With Director JeanPierre Jeunet The Making of Micmacs Q&A With Director Jean-Pierre Jeunet and Actress Julie Ferrier Animations: Absurd Deaths Theatrical Trailer Micmacs Soundtrack

This special edition would not have been possible without the generous participation of Jean-Pierre Jeunet.

26 Chapter 26 [4:51] 27 Chapter 27 [5:29] 28 Chapter 28 [1:50]

F IL M F ES T I VA L COL L EC T ION

People who stay on track have a goal

MICMACS A LITTLE ABOUT THE FILM A whimsical whirligig of a movie, Micmacs is filled with salvaged metal and salvaged lives, where a bullet to the brain brings insight and a bunch of clever

their home in the scrap yard. In Paris, even the dumps are beautiful. There’s a contortionist (Ferrier) who

filmmaker Jean-Pierre Jeunet as he settles into a Paris

CREDITS Directors

misfits bring a couple of weapons-making giants to their knees. This good-versus-evil fable soon reveals itself to be a wide-ranging philosophical playground for French

folds herself up in the fridge when she needs to get away

Jean-Pierre Jeunet & Marc Caro

Writers

Gilles Adrien, Jean-Pierre Jeunet & Marc Caro

Producer

Frédéric Brillion, Jean-Pierre Jeunet, Souad Lamriki, Gilles Legrand

junkyard where discards, human and otherwise,

from it all and a cannonball man (Pinon) still pining to

Cinematography

Tetsuo Nagata

find a second life.

make the Guinness Book of Records. There are seven

Production Design

Aline Bonetto

Orphaned when his father was blown to bits by a land mine, Bazil (Boon) grows up to be a video store clerk, content with passing the time watching classic films. A

in all, as Jeunet says he was reminded of Snow White’s

Editors

Hervé Schneid

Seven Dwarfs.

Music

Raphaël Beau

With screenwriting collaborator Guillaume Laurant,

Casting

Pierre-Jacques Bénichou, Valerie Espagne

stray bullet from a drive-by changes everything. Remov-

Jeunet created in this film an unexpected charm, with

ing it from Bazil’s brain box, as someone puts it, would

irony rich like candy and worth savoring along with the

Art Director

Volker Schäfer

surprise. When Bazil happens upon a street occupied

Costume Design

Madeline Fontaine

turn him into a vegetable, and so it stays. In short order, he is discharged by the doctor, then his boss, then left

by the company that made the land mine that killed

waiting to see if the bullet will eventually discharge him

his father, the conglomerate responsible for the bullet

too. Both Bazil and his world are infused with a surreal circus quality to start with, but that sensibility grows sharper when he’s taken in by a collection of freaks who make

that penetrated his brain turns out to be right across the street.13 Something must be done to stop the killing and the maiming, and like much of Jeunet’s work, the story’s outcome displays the director’s quirky brilliance.

FINAL BOOKLETS


WEBSITE

The website extends the look and feel of the film festival from navigation to imagery. The site includes: homepage, 3 secondary pages and 3 tertiary pages. The deliverable is sized to fit on a 1024x768 monitor and presented on letter sized paper.


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Daydreams on Rooftops marks the first American film festival celebrating the body of work of French film director Jean-Pierre Jeunet. More than just a regular film festival, Daydreams on Rooftops offers a weekend getaway full of whimsy and imagination that will

FRIDAY, AUGUST 5 TO SUNDAY AUGUST 7

2PM TO 11:30PM

bring the inner-child out of all of us. Whether you want to learn about a modern French cinematic style, get nostalgic in carnival galore on the beautiful Santa Monica pier, or immerse yourself in the fantastical (and sometimes dark) film plots, you’re in for a fantastical experience! We hope that you’ll enjoy this opportunity to explore outside the vast supply of Hollywood productions that littered at our feet and discover the humor and unique aesthetic of an up-and-coming international director. We look forward to welcoming you!

ABOUT US | PRESS RELEASES | CONTACT | SITEMAP | PRIVACY

COPYRIGHT 2010 DAYDREAMS ON ROOFTOPS WEBSITE BY NICOLE RACQUEL

A FILM FESTIVAL ON THE SANTA MONICA PIER

HOME

THE SCOOP:

FESTIVAL INFO

TICKETS

GETTING THERE

Daydreams on Rooftops marks the first American film festival celebrating the body of work of French film director Jean-Pierre Jeunet. More than just a regular film festival, Daydreams on Rooftops offers a weekend getaway full of whimsy and imagination that will bring the inner-child out of all of us. Whether you want

FRIDAY, AUGUST 5 TO SUNDAY AUGUST 7

2PM TO 11:30PM

to learn about a modern French cinematic style, get nostalgic in carnival galore on the beautiful Santa Monica pier, or immerse yourself in the fantastical (and sometimes dark) film plots, you’re in for a fantastical experience! We hope that you’ll enjoy this opportunity to explore outside the vast supply of Hollywood productions that littered at our feet and discover the humor and unique aesthetic of an up-and-coming international director. We look forward to welcoming you!

ABOUT US | PRESS RELEASES | CONTACT | SITEMAP | PRIVACY

COPYRIGHT 2010 DAYDREAMS ON ROOFTOPS WEBSITE BY NICOLE RACQUEL


WEBSITE

ABOUT FILMS TICKETS OTHER EVENTS

A JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET FILM FESTIVAL

THE PIER

FRI AUGUST 5 TO SUN AUGUST 7 SANTA MONICA PIER

2PM TO 11:30PM

© 2011 DAYDREAMS ON ROOF TOPS WEBSITE BY NICOLE R ACQUEL

A JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET FILM FESTIVAL

ABOUT the director film style FILMS TICKETS OTHER EVENTS THE PIER

A POPULAR AUTEUR To be fresh and innovative is no longer only a question of going outward but of turning interward. Jeunet never attended film school; he is entirely self-taught. Born in 1953 in Roanne, he came from a modest background. His father worked for the phone company, and his mother was a schoolteacher. He began making animated films while working for the telephone company and then graduated to filming advertisements and music videos—leading him on his journey toward feature films.

FRI AUGUST 5 TO SUN AUGUST 7 SANTA MONICA PIER

2PM TO 11:30PM

films with suspicion. Many critics have dismissed Jeunet from what they see as his privileging form over

Jean-Pierre Jeunet is a rare breed, a popular auteur.

content. Yet this form itself contains a great deal

He has written or at least co-written all but one of

of substance. Jeunet’s films are historically resonant

the screenplays for the films he has directed and has

in their association with the late twentieth-century

maintained a high degree of creative control over his

French film st yle k nown as the cinéma du look and in

projects, which bear his distinctive stylistic stamp and

their persistent allusions—even within films set in

have been generally well regarded by critics. At the

the post apocalyptic future, which nonetheless manage

same time, his films have attracted increasingly large

to look like costume dramas—to earlier film move-

audiences, with accordingly expanding budgets. Yet

ments such as German Expressionism, French Poetic

his success is also his Achilles’ heel: his popularity

Realism, and the French New Wave. Most of Jeunet’s

with audiences has tended to marginalize him among

films thematize issues such as the technological

fi lm scholars and academics, some of whom regard his ABOUT US | PRESS RELEASES | CONTACT | SITEMAP | PRIVACY

MORE >

© 2011 DAYDREAMS ON ROOFTOPS WEBSITE BY NICOLE RACQUEL


THE FESTIVAL | FILMS | TICKETS | OTHER EVENTS | THE PIER THE FESTIVAL | FILMS | TICKETS | OTHER EVENTS | THE PIER

A JE AN-PIERRE JEUNET

ABOUT

FILM FESTIVAL

THE DIRECTOR SCHEDULE

ABOUT THE FESTIVAL Daydreams on Rooftops marks the first American film festival celebrating the body of work of French director Jean-Pierre Jeunet. More than just a regular fi lm festival, Daydreams on Rooftops offers a weekend getaway full of whimsy and

SANTA MONICA PIER

imagination that will bring the inner-child out of all of us. Whether you want to learn about a modern

FRI AUG 5 TO SUN AUG 7

yourself in the fantastical (and sometimes dark) fi lm plots, you’re in for an amazing experience! We hope

French cinematic style, get nostalgic in carnival galore on the beautiful Santa Monica Pier, or immerse that you’ll enjoy this opportunity to explore outside the vast supply of Hollywood productions that

2PM TO 11:30PM

are littered at our feet and discover the humor and unique aesthetic of an up-and-coming international director. We look forward to welcoming you!

PRESS RELEASES | CONTACT | SITEMAP | PRIVACY

© 2011 DAYDREAMS ON ROOF TOPS WEBSITE BY NICOLE R ACQUEL

PRESS RELEASES | CONTACT | SITEMAP | PRIVACY

ABOUT

ABOUT

THE FESTIVAL | FILMS | TICKETS | OTHER EVENTS | THE PIER

FILMS

THE FESTIVAL | FILMS | TICKETS | OTHER EVENTS | THE PIER

FILMS

TICKETS

ABOUT THE DIRECTOR SCHEDULE

a popular auteur

© 2011 DAYDREAMS ON ROOF TOPS WEBSITE BY NICOLE R ACQUEL

TICKETS

THE FEATURED FILMS

OTHER EVENTS

OTHER EVENTS THE PIER

To be fresh and innovative is no longer only a question of going outward but of turning inward. Jeunet never attended film school; he is entirely self-taught. Born in 1953 in Roanne, he came from a modest background. His father worked for the phone company, and his mother was a schoolteacher. He began making animated films while working for the telephone company and then graduated to filming advertisements and music videos—leading him on his journey toward feature films.

amélie

Jean-Pierre Jeunet is a rare breed, a popular auteur. He has written or at least co-written all but one of the screenplays for the films he has directed and has maintained a high degree of creative control over his projects, which bear his distinctive stylistic stamp and have been generally well regarded by critics. At the same time, his films have attracted increasingly large audiences, with accordingly expanding budgets. Yet his success is also his Achilles’ heel: his popularity with audiences has tended to marginalize him among film scholars and academics, some of whom regard his films with suspicion. Many critics have dismissed Jeunet from what they see as his privileging form over content. Yet this form itself contains a great deal of substance. Jeunet’s films are historically resonant in their association with the late twentieth-century French film style known as the cinéma du look and in their persistent allusions—even within films set in the post apocalyptic future, which nonetheless manage to look like costume dramas—to earlier film movements such as German Expressionism, French Poetic Realism, and the French New Wave. Most of Jeunet’s films thematize issues such as the technological mediation of social relations, cultural anxieties surrounding advances in biotechnology, and the repression and subsequent revelations of historical trauma, especially in the context of war and decolonization. Looking to the past and the future, his fi lms invariably express the millennial anxieties and preoccupations

PRESS RELEASES | CONTACT | SITEMAP | PRIVACY

© 2011 DAYDREAMS ON ROOF TOPS WEBSITE BY NICOLE R ACQUEL

PRESS RELEASES | CONTACT | SITEMAP | PRIVACY

© 2011 DAYDREAMS ON ROOF TOPS WEBSITE BY NICOLE R ACQUEL


WEBSITE

THE FESTIVAL | FILMS | TICKETS | OTHER EVENTS | THE PIER

DELICATESSEN CITY OF LOST CHILDREN AMÉLIE A VERY LONG ENGAGEMENT MICMACS

amélie

TRAILER | CLIPS

SATURDAY at 7:30pm | Santa Monica Pier Main Screen This beguiling fable whipped up a storm of controversy all over in France, with some commentators arguing its nostalgic whimsy brushed the realities of modern multicultural Paris under the carpet. A sugar-rush of a movie, Amélie has what could be called meticulous clutter, a placement of imagery that covers every square centimeter of the screen. Jeunet’s sense of humor gives the movie heart; his real affection for the medium can be seen in all the funny little curlicues and jottings around the action. It has a hypnotic sense of romance; it’s a fable filled with longing, with a heroine who constantly flirts with failure. Jeunet and Guillaume Laurant, with whom he wrote the script, tell the story of Amélie (Tautou) from her conception through her adult life, which is filled with the kind of offhand cruelty normally found in the novels of John Irving and Kurt Vonnegut. Her parents are described as ‘’a neurotic and an iceberg,’’ and part of Amélie’s charm is that she is preternaturally levelheaded and survives her youth with her dark, glowing eyes wide open. A waitress in a Parisian café, Amélie sees it as her mission in life to right wrongs and improve the lives of her customers. But she proves rather less successful at bettering her own lot, despite falling for a handsome loner (Kassovitz) with his own bizarre quest. Jeunet uses the city as more of a character than a mere backdrop, although the director’s surreal and timeless vision shouldn’t be confused with the place seen by tourists (or even ordinary citizens). This is Jeunet’s city, where magic abounds in the strangest places, where fate and predestination lurk around every corner, where photographs talk, and where one sprightly young woman can orchestrate small

PRESS RELEASES | CONTACT | SITEMAP | PRIVACY

© 2011 DAYDREAMS ON ROOF TOPS WEBSITE BY NICOLE R ACQUEL

ABOUT THE FESTIVAL | FILMS | TICKETS | OTHER EVENTS | THE PIER

FILMS

TICKETS $125 3-DAY TICKETS $100 3-DAY TICKETS for children 12-years-old or younger. $55 FOR 1-DAY TICKETS Children under 5 are free.

FILM FESTIVAL TICKETS

OTHER EVENTS

THE PIER Tickets go on sale on Tuesday, May 17th at 10am PDT. Guests with valid student identifi cation and groups of 4 or larger are eligible for a 15% discount on 3-day tickets. Prior to July 5th, all online ticket sales are for 3-day festival tickets and include a $10 voucher to any of the pier restaurants and unlimited access to the historical carousel and the Pacifi c Park rides the days of the festival. Parking rates are $5 for advanced ticket holders and guests will be asked to present tickets or proof of purchase. One-day and 3-day tickets will be available the day of. Normal parking rates will apply to one-day ticket holders. All festival fi lms are Rated R and minors must be accompanied by an adult. No ads or trailers are shown with the fi lms, so please don’t be late!

SANTA MONICA PIER

PURCHASE NOW!

FRI AUG 5 TO SUN AUG 7

2PM TO 11:30PM

PRESS RELEASES | CONTACT | SITEMAP | PRIVACY

© 2011 DAYDREAMS ON ROOF TOPS WEBSITE BY NICOLE R ACQUEL

THE FESTIVAL | FILMS | TICKETS | OTHER EVENTS | THE PIER

ABOUT THE FESTIVAL | FILMS | TICKETS | OTHER EVENTS | THE PIER

FILMS

A JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET

FILM FESTIVAL $125 3-DAY TICKETS

$100 3-DAY TICKETS for children 12-years-old or younger. $55 FOR 1-DAY TICKETS SANTA MONICA PIER Children under 5 are free.

FRI AUG 5 TO SUN AUG 7

TICKETS

PASS PURCHASE

OTHER EVENTS

3-Day Festival Pass

THE PIER

(*) Denotes required fields.

First Name:

Last Name:

Address 1:

2PM TO 11:30PM

Address 2: City

State:

Zip: SANTA MONICA PIER

FRI AUG 5 TO SUN AUG 7

Phone:

Country:

(

)

Email:

2PM TO 11:30PM

PROCEED TO CHECKOUT > THE ALL-IMPORTANT SMALL PRINT No refunds/no exchanges. Cameras and recording devices are NOT PER MITTED in the screening areas. Please turn off all cell phones upon entering festival screening areas. All programs and events subject to change. Screening areas are cleared between each fi lm. Event tickets are non-transferable, non-assignable and non-refundable. If, in the opinion of Daydreams on Rooftops management, the behavior of a badge, pass or ticket holder is considered inappropriate, Daydreams on Rooftops may revoke tickets, in its sole discretion, with refund or credit. Upon revocation, the ticket holder must leave the premises and will not be permitted to return to the event or attend any future Daydreams on Rooftops events. PRESS RELEASES | CONTACT | SITEMAP | PRIVACY

PRESS RELEASES | CONTACT | SITEMAP | PRIVACY

© 2011 DAYDREAMS ON ROOF TOPS WEBSITE BY NICOLE R ACQUEL

© 2011 DAYDREAMS ON ROOF TOPS WEBSITE BY NICOLE R ACQUEL

FINAL VERSIONS


TICKETS

These are designed for entry into the show and will be mailed to the guest and housed in a metal box.


JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET FILM FESTIVAL

FE STIVAL

AUG

FILM

FRI SAT SUN

I 3-DAY PASS I ADULT

ADMIT ONE

NO REFUNDS/NO EXCHANGES

5PM FRIDAY I 2PM SATURDAY & SUNDAY

$125.00

5 AUG – 7 AUG

5–7

OPENS AT 2:00 PM

DAYDREAMS ON ROOFTOPS

SANTA MONICA PIER SANTA MONICA, CA

EFL0525

WWW.DAYDREAMSONROOFTOPS.COM

EF L0525

SANTA MONICA PIER FILM FESTIVAL

3-DAY PASS

EFL0525

WWW.DAYDREAMSONROOFTOPS.COM

EFL0525

EFL0525

SANTA MONICA PIER 3-DAY PASS 2:00 PM

W W W.DAYDRE AMSONROOF TOPS.COM

I 3-DAY PASS I ADULT NO REFUNDS/NO EXCHANGES

SANTA MONICA PIER SANTA MONICA, CA

FRI 5 AUG – SUN 7 AUG

A JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET FILM FESTIVAL

$125.00

JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET FILM FESTIVAL

ADMIT ONE

ADMIT ONE

NO REFUNDS/NO EXCHANGES

5PM FRIDAY I 2PM SATURDAY & SUNDAY

$55.00

5 AUG – 7 AUG

SATURDAY I 1-DAY PASS I ADULT

FRI 5 AUG – SUN 7 AUG


MAIN SCREEN

delicatessen

FRIDAY 5 AUG | 7:30PM

ADMIT ONE

3-DAY PASS 5 AUG–7 AUG

EFL0525

SANTA MONICA PIER

NO REFUNDS/NO EXCHANGES

A JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET FILM FESTIVAL

$125.00 I ADULT I GA SEATING

TICKETS

w w w.daydreamsonroof tops.com


amélie

SATURDAY 6 AUG | 7:30PM

ADMIT ONE

3-DAY PASS 5 AUG–7 AUG

3-DAY PASS 5 AUG–7 AUG

A JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET FILM FESTIVAL SANTA MONICA PIER

w w w.daydreamsonroof tops.com

a very long

engagement SUNDAY 7 AUG | 5:00PM

ADMIT ONE

3-DAY PASS 5 AUG–7 AUG

w w w.daydreamsonroof tops.com

EFL0526

EFL0525

SCREENING TENT

NO REFUNDS/NO EXCHANGES

MAIN SCREEN

ADMIT ONE

w w w.daydreamsonroof tops.com

EFL0526

SANTA MONICA PIER

children

SATURDAY 6 AUG | 5:00PM

$125.00 I ADULT I GA SEATING

A JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET FILM FESTIVAL

w w w.daydreamsonroof tops.com

city of lost

NO REFUNDS/NO EXCHANGES

3-DAY PASS 5 AUG–7 AUG

SANTA MONICA PIER

$125.00 I ADULT I GA SEATING

ADMIT ONE

NO REFUNDS/NO EXCHANGES

FRIDAY 5 AUG | 7:30PM

A JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET FILM FESTIVAL SCREENING TENT

EFL0525

delicatessen

$125.00 I ADULT I GA SEATING

MAIN SCREEN

NO REFUNDS/NO EXCHANGES

SANTA MONICA PIER

$125.00 I ADULT I GA SEATING

A JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET FILM FESTIVAL


MAIN SCREEN

micmacs

SUNDAY 7 AUG | 7:30PM

ADMIT ONE

3-DAY PASS 5 AUG–7 AUG

EFL0525

SANTA MONICA PIER

NO REFUNDS/NO EXCHANGES

A JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET FILM FESTIVAL

$125.00 I ADULT I GA SEATING

TICKETS

w w w.daydreamsonroof tops.com

FINAL VERSIONS


PRODUCTS

T hese products are intended to be sold at the film festival and should be relevant extentions of my ideas. I chose to have 3 different products: a Diana camera, a chess set and a stereoscope (or French view master). Each of the products are packaged to car r y on t he look and feel of t he fest iva l. T hey come w it h a l it t le booklet, as well.


© 2010. NICOLE RACQUEL DESIGN, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

NOBODY IS ENTIRELY EVIL…

© 2010. NICOLE RACQUEL DESIGN, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

Nobody is entirely evil…


PRODUCTS

Battle your nightmares in the most basic game of good versus evil.

www.daydreamsonrooftops.com Made in France > Collector’s Edition © 2011

CL ASSIC CHECKERS

A HISTORY OF CHECKERS

FROM ITS ANCIENT ORIGINS AS ALQUERQUE TO ITS MODERN VARIANTS AROUND THE WORLD. Though most people don’t know it, the game we know today as Checkers has a long history. From ancient Egypt all the way to your own living room, Checkers has remained a popular pastime for most of recorded history.

Ancient Alquerque Checkers, as we know it today, probably began as a game called Alquerque, or Quirkat. Alquerque boards and pieces have been found in archeological digs dating as far back as 600 BCE, and images of Alquerque have been found carved into temple walls dating as far back as 1400 BCE. It was played throughout the Middle East and the Mediterranean basin. It was enjoyed by the Ancient Egyptians, mentioned by both Plato and Homer, and even made its way into India. We do not know exactly how the ancients played Alquerque, but what we do know about the game strongly resembles modern Checkers. Like Checkers, Alquerque features round, flat pieces divided into light and dark colors, the capture of opponent pieces, and a grid-based board. Unlike Checkers, an Alquerque board is only a 5x5 grid and sports intersecting diagonal lines; and in Alquerque, there are only 10 pieces per side, moving along the intersections of lines instead of within squares.

From Fierges to Draughts Historians place the invention of “modern” Checkers in the 12th century CE, when someone, somewhere (probably in the south of France) combined the rules and pieces of Alquerque with the 8x8 grid of a common chessboard. They called the game Fierges, and the pieces “ferses,” the same name given to the queen in Chess; at that time the queen moved like a Fierges piece, one space at a time. Later, Ferses also became a name for the game, and by the 15th century both Fierges and Ferses had been replaced by the name Jeu De Dames, or simply Dames. By the 16th century, Dames was hugely popular in France. Formalized rule sets began to appear. In 1535 the Forced

Capture rule was introduced to Dames, and players began to call Forced Capture Dames “Jeu Force.” It was as Jeu Force that the game made its way to England, where it was known as Draughts, and eventually to North America, where it was renamed Checkers. Along the way the rules adjusted and variants rose, but the basic form of Jeu Force remained surprisingly intact. Dames without the Forced Capture rule remained popular in France, under the name Le Jeu Plaisant De Dames, or Plaisant. In the 18th Century, Plaisant replaced the 8x8 grid with a 10x10 grid and expanded the piece count to 20 per side. This variant likely came out of Holland.

Checkers Around the World Checkers is only called “Checkers” in North America. For most other English-speaking countries, it’s called Draughts, and in much of Europe the game is called “English Variant Draughts.” Today, 10x10 Plaisant is known as International Draughts or Continental Draughts. Countries around the world also have their own local names for the game, as well as their own local variant rules, boards, and even pieces. Many European countries use a local variant of the name Dames, such as the German name Damenspiel. Many European variants, including International Draughts, use a “flying king” that can move more than one square at a time, while in both Germany and Italy, kings can only be captured by other kings. In Turkey, they use both dark and light squares, and pieces can move either forward or side to side. Canadian Checkers, or Jeu De Dames Canadien, uses a 12x12 grid with 30 pieces per side! Both Checkers/Draughts and International Draughts remain popular games to this day. For each version, national and international tournaments exist, with the first World Championship tournament for English Draughts taking place in 1847. shttp://www.essortment.com History of Checkers

CHECKERS


A HISTORY OF CHECKERS

FROM ITS ANCIENT ORIGINS AS ALQUERQUE TO ITS MODERN VARIANTS AROUND THE WORLD. Though most people don’t know it, the game we know today as Checkers has a long history. From ancient Egypt all the way to your own living room, Checkers has remained a popular pastime for most of recorded history.

Ancient Alquerque Checkers, as we know it today, probably began as a game called Alquerque, or Quirkat. Alquerque boards and pieces have been found in archeological digs dating as far back as 600 BCE, and images of Alquerque have been found carved into temple walls dating as far back as 1400 BCE. It was played throughout the Middle East and the Mediterranean basin. It was enjoyed by the Ancient Egyptians, mentioned by both Plato and Homer, and even made its way into India. We do not know exactly how the ancients played Alquerque, but what we do know about the game strongly resembles modern Checkers. Like Checkers, Alquerque features round, flat pieces divided into light and dark colors, the capture of opponent pieces, and a grid-based board. Unlike Checkers, an Alquerque board is only a 5x5 grid and sports intersecting diagonal lines; and in Alquerque, there are only 10 pieces per side, moving along the intersections of lines instead of within squares.

From Fierges to Draughts Historians place the invention of “modern” Checkers in the 12th century CE, when someone, somewhere (probably in the south of France) combined the rules and pieces of Alquerque with the 8x8 grid of a common chessboard. They called the game Fierges, and the pieces “ferses,” the same name given to the queen in Chess; at that time the queen moved like a Fierges piece, one space at a time. Later, Ferses also became a name for the game, and by the 15th century both Fierges and Ferses had been replaced by the name Jeu De Dames, or simply Dames. By the 16th century, Dames was hugely popular in France. Formalized rule sets began to appear. In 1535 the Forced

Capture rule was introduced to Dames, and players began to call Forced Capture Dames “Jeu Force.” It was as Jeu Force that the game made its way to England, where it was known as Draughts, and eventually to North America, where it was renamed Checkers. Along the way the rules adjusted and variants rose, but the basic form of Jeu Force remained surprisingly intact. Dames without the Forced Capture rule remained popular in France, under the name Le Jeu Plaisant De Dames, or Plaisant. In the 18th Century, Plaisant replaced the 8x8 grid with a 10x10 grid and expanded the piece count to 20 per side. This variant likely came out of Holland.

Checkers Around the World Checkers is only called “Checkers” in North America. For most other English-speaking countries, it’s called Draughts, and in much of Europe the game is called “English Variant Draughts.” Today, 10x10 Plaisant is known as International Draughts or Continental Draughts. Countries around the world also have their own local names for the game, as well as their own local variant rules, boards, and even pieces. Many European countries use a local variant of the name Dames, such as the German name Damenspiel. Many European variants, including International Draughts, use a “flying king” that can move more than one square at a time, while in both Germany and Italy, kings can only be captured by other kings. In Turkey, they use both dark and light squares, and pieces can move either forward or side to side. Canadian Checkers, or Jeu De Dames Canadien, uses a 12x12 grid with 30 pieces per side! Both Checkers/Draughts and International Draughts remain popular games to this day. For each version, national and international tournaments exist, with the first World Championship tournament for English Draughts taking place in 1847. www.essortment.com; “History of Checkers.”

A B R I E F H I S TO R Y © 2010. NICOLE RACQUEL DESIGN, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

Nobody is entirely evil…

www.daydreamsonrooftops.com Made in France > Collector’s Edition © 2011

CLASSIC CHECKERS


PRODUCTS

CHECKERS {final deliverable} The checkers game comes with colored washers as the pieces and housed in a tin box. The booklet that comes with it gives a little history on the game.


PRODUCT BROCHURE A V I N TAG E 3 D V I E W E R

A Little History Stereographs (also know as stereograms, stereoviews and stereocards) present three-dimensional (3D) views of their subjects, enabling armchair tourists to have a “you are there” experience. The term “stereo” is derived from the Greek word for “solid,” so a “stereograph” is a picture that depicts its subject so that it appears solid. Stereographs feature two photographs or printed images positioned side by side about two and half inches apart, one for the left eye and one for the right. When a viewer uses a stereoscope, a device for viewing stereographs, these two fl at images are combined into a single image that gives the illusion of depth. When stereographs were fi rst made, between the 1840s and the 1930s, they were supplanted by movies and other media, millions of stereographs were produced. In the late 1830s and 1840s, scientists such as Niépce, Daguerre and Talbot created the processes that made photography possible and these were soon used to produce stereographs. In 1850 Sir William Brewster invented an inexpensive viewing device for stereographs called the lenticular stereoscope. This device is a

LESTRADE

STÉRÉOSCOPE

closed box that has one or two openings

www.daydreamsonrooftops.com Made in France > Collector’s Edition © 2011

ABOUT THE STÉRÉOSCOPE

for light; two lenses are located on the top and enable the

media such as television and movies. As Burke Long

viewer to see a three-D image on the fl oor of the box.

argues, “Mass-produced and relatively cheap, the integrated system of mechanical viewer and photographs became

In 1851, stereographs captured the public notice when they were displayed at the Great Exhibition and praised by Queen Victoria. Businesses such as the London Stereoscopic Company quickly developed technologies for mass producing stereographs; indeed, between 1854 and 1856 the company sold over half a million stereographs. In America, doctor and writer Oliver Wendell Holmes helped to popularize stereographs by inventing a hand viewer and promoting the creation of stereograph libraries. Ultimately stereoscopes ranged from small, inexpensive hand-held devices to large pieces of furniture that could display a changing series of up to 100 stereographs.

fashionable for classroom pedagogy, tourist mementos, and parlor travel to exotic places of the world” (90). People viewed stereographs at homes, schools, and churches, gazing at images documenting almost every subject imaginable from astronomy to zoology. According to stereograph collector and historian William Darrah, stereographs were used to teach millions of American children about geography, natural history, and a range of other subejcts (50). Many in the nineteenth century embraced photography as a medium that, unlike other arts such as painting, presented the “truth” through exact rendering of a scene. Stereographs seemed

Stereographs came in a variety of formats that refl ected

even more real and more engaging by simulating three dimensions. Oliver Wendell Holmes called stereographs “sun

the era and region in which they were produced. At first stereotypes were produced as daguerrotypes (printed on copper) and ambrotypes (printed on glass), but stereographs became much more common once they began to be printed

sculptures” and commented, “All pictures in which perspective and light and shade are properly managed, have more or less the effect of solidity; but by this instrument that effect is so heightened as to produce an appearance of reality which

With the image names facing you, insert the slide card from the top of the viewer, without pushing down. To advance the slide push down on the lever on the front of the viewer.

on card stock, which was less expensive and more stable. Paper stereographs mounted on fl at cards were generally

cheats the senses with its seeming truth”

Do not pull the slide card out once it has been advanced. To remove the card, continue to advance the images until it is released from the viewer.

sizes emerged, including the 4x7 inch “cabinet,” the 4½x7 inch “deluxe,” and the 5x7 inch “imperial” cards. By the late 1850s, the standard thickness of cards was .04 inches.

EASY INSTRUCTIONS

The Lestrade Stéréoscope The French stéréoscope, like the popular ViewMaster, was fashioned after the earliest form a 3D viewing—the Brewster Design. The only basic difference between

produced between 1857 and 1890, while those mounted on a “warped” gray card were generally produced between 1892 and 1940 (Darrah, 10-11). Early stereographs measured approximately 3½x7 inches, but during the 1870s larger

Curved mounts became prominent in the 1880s, after B.W. K illburn found that a mount with a slight curvature could increase the illusion of depth. Between the 1840s and the 1920s, stereographs served as an important method of entertainment, education, and virtual travel—predecessors to contemporary forms of

the Lestrade and the ViewMaster is the confi guration of the stereographs. The rectangular Lestrade cards pass through the stereoscope body, while the View-Master’s circular reel spins inside its housing. Both are advanced by a ratchet mechanism. This gives the Lestrade the advantage of 3 extra views per card (10 to the ViewMaster’s 7).

A reproduction Holmes stereoscope


PRODUCTS

STÉRÉOSCOPE {final deliverable}


SPECIAL EDITION

HISTORY OF THE DIANA

The Myth of the Great Wall Plastic Factory Like a true legend, the original Diana camera’s birth is shrouded in mystery and conjecture. The popular account reads as follows: Back in the early 1960s, a Kowloon Bay, Hong Kong, company called the Great Wall Plastics Factory created an extremely inexpensive and completely plastic compact camera. Called the “Diana,” this little beauty was constructed of a lightweight plastic body and a cheap plastic single-element lens. Only the shutter and a few necessary parts were crafted in metal. The original specs consisted of two shutter speeds, three aperture settings, and manual focusing from about 1m to infinity. The original Diana film format was 120, which was quite popular in Asia at the time. It shot 16 4x4cm images per roll.

DIANA F+

PARISIAN

www.daydreamsonrooftops.com Made in France > Collector’s Edition © 2011

regular—but its days were very much numbered. The march of progress had slain the humble Diana in its wake.

The Loving Afterglow Just as the Diana was in its final death throes in Asia, it was gaining a new lease on life in the West. Photographers and artists began to realize the full creative potential of these cheapo cameras with their inherent light leaks, lens aberrations, and plastic construction. These visionaries saw the Diana’s characteristics not as faults, but as unique abilities to be treasured and vigorously employed. In the Diana, they found a tool to make the boring look intoxicating—and a way to completely let go of control. For many of them—especially established photographers, the unpredictability, cheapness, and insanity of the Diana held an irresistible appeal. Its blurry, leaky, vignetted, and often random images were the cornerstone of many an exhibit and porfolio. As the Diana became more rare and increasingly sought-after, its price skyrocketed from $1.00 at the local thrift shop to $150 on Ebay. Seriously, the guys over at Great Wall would have been kicking themselves in the rear if they knew.

Back from the Ashes (The Diana+ by Lomography) Ask any Lomographer and they’ll quickly tell you about our love for plastic medium format cameras. It began with the Holga, a similarly constructed, yet more modern take on the Diana. Designed in the ‘80s as a dirt cheap 120 camera, the Holga rose to cult status and attained a huge popularity throughout our international Lomographic community—so much so that we created several extremely successful products and book around it. As

Diana clones and Copies It’s assumed that this original Diana met with significant success in its domestic and export markets, so much so that a flood of knockoffs, copies, and derivatives were

A challenge we set out on our table: how can we supply this incredible item to our loyal Lomographic Community? The initial production had ceased decades ago, so going to the original factory was out of the question. Luckily, our extensive experience with plastic camera design and production equipped us to pull apart the camera and literally rebuild it from the ground up. Like a radiant phoenix, the Diana could rise from the ashes and burn once again in the hearts of true analog-lovers around the world. And they wouldn’t have to fork out a ton of money on Ebay to get one. From the beginning, we decided that our reproduction would have to add something to the original. We weren’t out to merely copy the design; rather, we wanted to retain its greatest features and improve upon them. This meant

the Diana F+, we carted a handy plug-to-hotshoe converter. As icing on the cake, we also engineered a small slot in front of the flash element, allowing it to accept plastic color filters. Of course, the Diana F+ retained the original innovations of the Pinhole & Endless Panorama. Add that to the staggering possibilities of nighttime, daylight, and color flashing—and you have simply the most flexible and exciting plastic camera ever available. So far!

The Diana+ System That “so far” is really key. For this is just the start of a very long journey. You can expect to see a full range of Diana+ accessories, interchangeable lenses, limited editions, seriously exciting camera variants, bags, and a whole lot more heading down the pipeline. We aim to create an entire world around the Diana—a full system that allows you to extend your creative potential to virtually limitless extremes. A comprehensive plastic camera collection the likes of which the world has never seen. From the day that we received our first film back from the lab, we knew there was no turning back. Long live the Diana!

“Windsor,” and “Zodiac,” the clones offered a huge range of var ying features, including simplified apertures, extra shutter speeds, electronic flashes, fake light meters, longer lenses, and a 620 film format. Several versions were private-label commissions by large American companies such as GE, Reader’s Digest, JC Penny, and Avis Rent-a-Car. It’s not clear which copies were made by the original Great Wall Plastic Factory, and which were made by rival manufacturers.

Death of the Dream As the stor y goes, production of the Diana and its various clones came to a close in the mid-1970s. As 35mm film and Instamatic cameras grew in popularity, the clumsy roll-film Dianas fell to the wayside. The camera would continue to be widely available for a few more years—often as a free novelty gift or a thrift store

Endless Panorama

interest exploded around the Holga, we began to look into the camera that is misidentified as its predecessor: The Diana. Ah, we can clearly remember the day when this ironic blue-and-black beauty first arrived at the Lomographic headquarters in Vienna. We had seen photos of it online, but no one in our company had touched one in the flesh. From the second that we held it in our quivering fingers, we fell hopelessly in love. Our first batch of leaky, blurry, dreamy, and definitely slightly screwed up images only served to confirm that warm feeling. It was kind of magic!

quickly introduced to capitalize on the demand. With names like “Future Scientist,” “Megomatic,” “Snappy,”

This is a time-tested Holga favorite, but it’s always a bit hard to judge how far to advance. When you use this special setting for the Diana, it places sequential frames right next to each other (well, very close at least—nothing is too precise with the Diana). You can shoot a long, concurrent, and unlimited panoramic image, simply by twisting your body and firing every now and then.

A Shining Star (Diana F+ by Lomography)

adding all-new functionality to the camera and dramatically expanding its creative potential. We’d call it the Diana PLUS . A factory in China with the tools and expertise was located and contracted for Diana production. The body was re-cast using a duplication of the original mold. The color scheme was tweaked to get that crazy shade of blue just right. The lens was designed and tweaked about a thousand times to obtain that “perfectly imperfect” mix of sharp, blurry, and “What the hell is that?” looks. The variable shutter speeds of the original were built inside. And then we sprinkled some of our very own pixie dust on the whole project.

Pinhole Setting Remove the lens, set the aperture to a super-small pinhole and shoot a soft-focus, severely old-school image. With a nearly unlimited depth of field, these dreamlike long-exposure photos have a signature look all their own.

As we browsed through the images of classic Diana cameras, it was impossible to resist the charms of the rare Diana flash variants. The oversized electronic flash was nearly half the size of the camera itself—and it came dipped in reflective silver paint to [supposedly] amplify its power. To see the two pieces together was absolutely stunning—a true 1960s throwback. To wield this camera is to look like an all-plastic lo-fi version of Jimmy Olsen, shooting soft-focus and off-kilter images of Superman for the Daily Planet. After our Diana+ design was nailed down and in production, designing an authentic recreation of this incredible flash camera was next on the list. The original Diana flash gave us the design and shape inspiration for our new Diana F+ flash. We employed a modern capacitor and a single “A A” batter y power system. Keeping true to its roots, we opted to keep the original flash’s two-pronged “plug” adapter. The existing Diana+ was then retrofitted to accept this unique flash plug and sync perfectly with it. For those wishing to either use the Diana F+ flash on another camera with a standard hotshoe, or to use another hotshoe flash on


PRODUCTS

SPECIAL EDITION

DIANA F+

www.daydreamsonrooftops.com Made in France > Collector’s Edition © 2011

PARISIAN

DIANA CAMERA {product booklet}


PRODUCTS

DIANA CAMERA {final product}


SCHEDULE

This is a smaller, folded, unbound piece t hat i ncludes t he t i me a nd dates, as well as ancillary information about the festival and director.


The closing credits of his movies show images of every actor from the movie.

© 2011 Nicole Racquel Design

www.daydreamsonrooftops.com

F IL M F ES T I VA L SCHEDUL E

Makes extensive use of color grading in order to give his movies the desired (often fantastic) ambiance.

SANTA MONICA PIER

Uses a lot of elaborate camera (crane) movements. His movies often focus on the romance between two mavericks (Amélie and Nino, Mathilde and Manech, Louison and Julie). Often casts Jean-Claude Dreyfus, Ticky Holgado and Rufus. His main characters are often orphans, or have lost one of their parents. Often uses wide camera angles. Likes to cast actors with unusual facial features. Always casts Dominique Pinon.

JEUNET’S TRADEMARKS FRI AUG 5 TO SUN AUG 7

SAT

FRI 2:00 PM

FESTIVAL OPENS Get there early for parking and to witness the beautiful sunset over the Pacifi c!

2:00 PM

FESTIVAL OPENS Come early to partake in all the festivities! Ride the rides in the Pacific Park, listen to live music, play and win carnival games, see the art exhibits and eat delicious French cuisine.

2:30 PM

ORCHESTRE NATIONAL DE FRANCE

Rides in Pacifi c Park and all carnival booths will be open. A variety of traditional French dishes will be available before the fi lm. 7:30 PM

11:30 PM

DELICATESSEN To kick off the fi lm festival, the opening night screening will start around dusk on the Santa Monica Pier main screen. FESTIVAL CLOSES

3:45 PM

YANN TIERSEN

5:00 PM

CITY OF LOST CHILDREN playing in the screening tent

7:30 PM

AMÉLIE playing on the main screen

10:00 PM

THE MAKING OF AMÉLIE In the screening tent, watch Jeunet discuss how Amélie was created.

11:30 PM

FESTIVAL CLOSES

SUN 2:00 PM

FESTIVAL OPENS All the same fun and games as the day before! Make sure to enter in the photobooth contest before 3:00pm!

2:30 PM

R APHAËL BEAU

4:15 PM

PHOTO CONTEST R ESULTS

5:00 PM

A VERY LONG ENGAGEMENT playing in the screening tent

7:30 PM

MICMACS playing on the main screen

10:00 PM

THE MAKING OF MICMACS Watch Jeunet explain the story behind the story, playing in the screening tent.

11:30 PM

FESTIVAL CLOSES


SCHEDULE

WE PASS THE TIME OF DAY TO FORGET HOW TIME PASSES


The closing credits of his movies show images of every actor from the movie.

© 2011 Nicole Racquel Design

www.daydreamsonrooftops.com

F IL M F ES T I VA L SCHEDUL E SANTA MONICA PIER

Makes extensive use of color grading in order to give his movies the desired (often fantastic) ambiance. Uses a lot of elaborate camera (crane) movements. His movies often focus on the romance between two mavericks (Amélie and Nino, Mathilde and Manech, Louison and Julie). Often casts Jean-Claude Dreyfus, Ticky Holgado and Rufus. His main characters are often orphans, or have lost one of their parents. Often uses wide camera angles. Likes to cast actors with unusual facial features. Always casts Dominique Pinon.

JEUNET’S TRADEMARKS FRI AUG 5 TO SUN AUG 7

SAT

FRI 2:00 PM

FESTIVAL OPENS Get there early for parking and to witness the beautiful sunset over the Pacific!

2:00 PM

FESTIVAL OPENS Come early to partake in all the festivities! Ride the rides in the Pacific Park, listen to live music, play and win carnival games, see the art exhibits and eat delicious French cuisine.

2:30 PM

ORCHESTRE NATIONAL DE FRANCE

Rides in Pacific Park and all carnival booths will be open all day for festival guests. A variety of traditional French dishes will be available before the film. 7:30 PM

DELICATESSEN THE PIER MAIN SCREEN

To kick off the film festival, the opening night screening will start around dusk. 11:30 PM

FESTIVAL CLOSES

SUN 2:00 PM

2:30 PM

YANN TIERSEN

PHOTO CONTEST RESULTS A VERY LONG ENGAGEMENT THE SCREENING TENT

7:30 PM

CITY OF LOST CHILDREN

10:00 PM

Watch Jeunet explain the story behind the story.

AMÉLIE THE PIER MAIN SCREEN

10:00 PM

THE MAKING OF AMÉLIE THE SCREENING TENT

Watch Jeunet discuss how Amélie was created. 11:30 PM

FESTIVAL CLOSES

THE MAKING OF MICMACS THE SCREENING TENT

THE SCREENING TENT

7:30 PM

MICMACS THE PIER MAIN SCREEN

THE PACIFIC STAGE

5:00 PM

R APHAËL BEAU THE PACIFIC STAGE

4:15 PM 5:00 PM

THE PACIFIC STAGE

3:45 PM

FESTIVAL OPENS All the same fun and games as the day before! Make sure to enter in the photobooth contest before 3:00pm!

11:30 PM

FESTIVAL CLOSES


SCHEDULE

FINAL VERSIONS

The schedule folds into a tri-fold, with a small poster on the inside.

We pass the time of day to forget how time passes


SOUNDTRACK

This soundtrack, which will be sold at the festival comes in the form of a r ec ord , b ec au s e t h i s f or m at i s nostalgic and is in line w it h the fest ival’s concept of never being severed from your past. The songs are a compilation from each of the films.


FRONT COVER

F IL M F E S T I VA L SOUNDT R ACK

INSIDE; LEFT SIDE OF BOX

tracklist 1

Generique Debut – The Orchestre national de France. Composed by Carlos D’Alessio (Delicatessen) – 2:38

2

Diabolique (Diabolic) – Raphaël Beau (Micmacs) – 1:38

3

La Valse d’Amélie (The Waltz of Amélie) – Yann Tiersen (Amélie) – 2:15

4

Generique (Marcello / Who Will Take My Dreams Away? / Theme De La Cite Des Enfants Perdus) – The Orchestre national de France. Composed by Angelo Badalamenti (City of Lost Children) – 7:08

5

Mathilde’s Theme – The Orchestre national de France. Composed by Angelo Badalamenti. (A Very Long Engagement) – 4:19

6

Comptine d’un autre été: L’après-midi (The Nursery Rhyme From Another Summer: After Noon) – Yann Tiersen (Amélie) – 2:20

7

Droit De Cité – Raphaël Beau (Micmacs) – 1:28

8

Tika Tika Walk – The Orchestre national de France. Composed by Carlos D’Alessio (Delicatessen) – 2:43

9

Duo – The Orchestre national de France. Composed by Carlos D’Alessio (Delicatessen) – 2:38

10

L’Anniversaire D’Irvin – The Orchestre national de France. Composed by Angelo Badalamenti (City of Lost Children) – 3:13

11

A Very Long Engagement – The City Of Prague Philharmonic

12

Les Bulles – The Orchestre national de France. Composed by Carlos

13

Dernier Vol (Last Flight) – Raphaël Beau (Micmacs) – 3:58

Orchestra. Composed by Angelo Badalamenti (A Very Long Engagement) – 5:06

D’Alessio (Delicatessen) – 2:55


SOUNDTRACK

FRONT VINYL SLEEVE FOOT-TAPPING SONGS FROM THE FILMS OF JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET

BACK VINYL SLEEVE

© 2011 Nicole Racquel Design

www.daydreamsonrooftops.com


FRONT COVER

F IL M F E S T I VA L SOUNDT R ACK

INSIDE; LEFT SIDE OF BOX

tracklist THE SOUNDTR ACK

1

The Daydreams on Rooftops Film Festival Soundtrack is a

Generique Debut – The Orchestre national de France. Composed by Carlos D’Alessio (Delicatessen) – 2:38

compilation of songs from the fi lms of Jean-Pierre Jeunet that were featured at the festival. Memorable live performances were given by members of the Orchestre National de France, Yann Tierson and Raphaël Beau.

2

Diabolique (Diabolic) – Raphaël Beau (Micmacs) – 1:38

3

La Valse d’Amélie (The Waltz of Amélie) – Yann Tiersen (Amélie) – 2:15

4

Generique (Marcello / Who Will Take My Dreams Away? / Theme De La Cite Des Enfants Perdus) – The Orchestre national de France. Composed by Angelo Badalamenti (City of Lost Children) – 7:08

Bring back the magic of the fi lms and the Festival as you sit back and listen to the quirky sounds of unconventional instruments and the energetic beats of truly French tunes.

FEATURED ARTISTS Orchestre National de France is a symphony orchestra

5

Mathilde’s Theme – The Orchestre national de France. Composed by Angelo Badalamenti. (A Very Long Engagement) – 4:19

6

Comptine d’un autre été: L’après-midi (The Nursery Rhyme From Another Summer: After Noon) – Yann Tiersen (Amélie) – 2:20

run by Radio France. Since 1944, the Orchestra has been based in the Théâtre des Champs-Élysées in Paris, where it occasionally plays in the pit for opera productions. Joining us to represent the best of France’s musical talent, are seven members of the Orchestra. In additional to popular classical composers, the musicians will be playing musical numbers from Jeunet’s fi lms. Yann Tiersen is a French musician and composer. His music

7

Droit De Cité – Raphaël Beau (Micmacs) – 1:28

8

Tika Tika Walk – The Orchestre national de France. Composed by Carlos D’Alessio (Delicatessen) – 2:43

9

Duo – The Orchestre national de France. Composed by Carlos D’Alessio (Delicatessen) – 2:38

is recognized by its use of a large variety of instruments in relatively minimalist compositions, often with a touch of either European classical music or French folk music, using primarily the piano, accordion or violin together with instruments like the melodica, xylophone, toy piano, ondes martenot, harpsichord and typewriter. The Amélie soundtrack features compositions from Tiersen’s fi rst

10

L’Anniversaire D’Irvin – The Orchestre national de France. Composed by Angelo Badalamenti (City of Lost Children) – 3:13

11

A Very Long Engagement – The City Of Prague Philharmonic

12

Les Bulles – The Orchestre national de France. Composed by Carlos

13

Dernier Vol (Last Flight) – Raphaël Beau (Micmacs) – 3:58

three albums and also new work for the fi lm. Raphaël Beau’s score for Micmacs is an invigorating, intriguing affair that fl its from relaxed shuffl e to furious fl ights with

Orchestra. Composed by Angelo Badalamenti (A Very Long Engagement) – 5:06

grace. With each frame of a Jeunet fi lm a work of art in itself, anything less than at least a serviceable, quirkily charming score would have spoiled things. Get energized and enchanted as you watch him perform his jaunty arrangements live!

D’Alessio (Delicatessen) – 2:55


SOUNDTRACK

FRONT VINYL SLEEVE

The soundtrack comes in a flat box, with a vinyl sleeve inside it. FOOT-TAPPING SONGS FROM THE FILMS OF JEAN-PIERRE JEUNET

BACK VINYL SLEEVE

© 2011 Nicole Racquel Design

www.daydreamsonrooftops.com


PRESENTATION

All of the delivables fit inside the old rusty metal toolbox, which from the outside looks dirty and unappealing, while inside in decorative and cheerful.


PRESENTATION

COLLECTED MATERIALS

I found an old tool box that was perfect for the housing for all the deliverables. Because it was so dirty and grungy, I needed to bring an element that would tie it back to something nostalgic and inviting. I found a victorian inspired print and lined the inside to create the juxtaposition between the materials.


PRESENTATION

FINAL DELIVERABLES

Everything was more than able to fit into the box. It was intended to be all jumbled together, as if you were going through an old chest of lost treasuress.

FINA L T YPEFACES USED WER E: ITC Benguiat Univers Stempel Scheidler


Film Festival Process Book  

Daydreams on Rooftops: The Eternal Return of Calamity and Whimsy in the films of Jean-Pierre Jeunet