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N ORTHWEST M ISSISSIPPI C OMMUNITY C OLLEGE F OUNDATION

Northwest

P.O. Drawer 7015 • 4975 Highway 51 North Senatobia, MS 38668

NORTHWEST MISSISSIPPI COMMUNITY COLLEGE

ADDRESS SERVICE REQUESTED

Now

FALL 2016

Parting

shot Ole Miss art professor and Northwest alumnus Jared Spears (right) visits with renowned artist Glennray Tutor, cousin and Lana Tutor Bridges, sister of Lane Tutor at the opening reception for the Lane Tutor Exhibition at Northwest. Tutor was a beloved local artist who taught at Northwest for 35 years. He passed away in August, 2016. Photo by Julie Bauer

Bobby Dunlap, founder of Gateway Tire: Celebrating generosity and giving

INSIDE: scholarship ceremony • 2+2 tourney • Legacies • fall sports


Now

Northwest Fall 2016

A publication of Northwest Mississippi Community College

President Dr. Gary Lee Spears Vice President for Finance Gary Mosley Vice President for Student Services/Chief of Staff Dan Smith Vice President for Education Richie Lawson Chairman, Northwest Board of Trustees Mike Moore

Northwest Foundation Associate Vice President of Development & Special Projects/Associate Editor Sybil R. Canon • srcanon@northwestms.edu Director of Alumni Affairs & Development Operations Dolores Wooten • dbwooten@northwestms.edu Scholarship Coordinator & Foundation Assistant Patti Gordon • pgordon@northwestms.edu

Communications Director of Communications/Editor Julie R. Bauer • jrbauer@northwestms.edu Assistant Director of Communications/ Graphic Designer LaJuan Tallo • ltallo@northwestms.edu Assistant Director of Marketing/ Digital Media KayLeigh McCool • kmccool@northwestms.edu Graphic Designer Lindsay Crawford • lcrawford@northwestms.edu Coordinator for Sports Information Kevin Maloney • kmaloney@northwestms.edu Assistant Coordinator for Sports Information Brian Lentz • blentz@northwestms.edu

For address changes, please contact Alumni Affairs at (662) 560-1105. Northwest Now is published bi-annually as a joint effort of the Northwest Foundation and the Office of Communications.

AFFIRMATIVE ACTION Please visit the Northwest website at www.northwestms.edu/affirmativeaction to view the College’s Notice of Non-Discrimination, Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action.

contents features

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recognizing excellence Faculty, staff are recognized for excellence in customer service and teaching.

celebrating giving Foundation scholarship students thank donors at annual ceremony and reception.

cover story: generous one Bobby Dunlap is an example of selfless generosity both at Northwest and in Mississippi.

celebrating community Homecoming returns to Thursday, brings fun for Northwest community.

teaching nurses to teach Alumna comes full circle to teach nursing at Northwest.

departments 1 2 3 18 25 33

student snapshot/leroy charles president’s reflections/dr. gary lee spears alumni president’s notes/mike boren around campus the legacy continues the sporting life from the heart of northwest/sybil canon alumni news/dolores wooten

On the cover: Dunlap and Kyle CEO Bobby Dunlap (center) visits with some of the students who receive the Gateway Tire Endowment. Photo by Julie Bauer

from the

heart of Northwest

Sybil R. Canon I am writing this article on November 1, and you should be reading it sometime during the first week of December. Today, we are one week away from the Presidential election and, when you read this, everyone will know who will be leading our nation for the next four years. I read an amusing quote by President Abraham Lincoln: Elections belong to the people. It's their decision. If they decide to turn their back on the fire and burn their behinds, then they will just have to sit on their blisters. No matter who wins the Presidency, the vast majority of Americans will be doing the same thing after the election that they were doing before the election—getting up each morning, tending to their families, going to work, cheering at football games, worshipping in their churches, trying to make each day count for something. We at Northwest will be about our usual business of teaching and encouraging students. I want to share with you a portion of an email that I received from a student who is receiving a Foundation scholarship: Three years ago, I moved to the USA. I did not know anybody, I did not drive, and my English was not good enough to communicate freely. I went through a very challenging time. First, I thought it would be impossible to get an education for me because I am an immigrant and I was not sure I would be welcomed to school on the same level as Americans. My adviser at Northwest encouraged me to try and then decide if I wanted to pursue it further. I did, and I did it successfully, making all A’s. You are doing a great job to cover our expenses with such great scholarships, and I mean it. It is not just financial help. It is enormous motivation that you plant in our minds. Every time I receive help from you and others, I encourage myself to work more and more, so that one day I want to be in your place and help new students to gain success in their lives, just as you have helped me. I have always heard that the USA is a country where dreams can come true and where opportunities are available to anyone who is willing to work hard enough to achieve their goals. I am proof of keeping that dream alive. I am an eternal optimist, and I believe that the American dream will continue for the sons and daughters who are born in this country and for those who follow the pathway to citizenship and come to our country seeking better lives. Northwest opens its arms to all of our students with the belief that we can make a difference in their lives. It is such an enormous blessing to work at Northwest because, every day of my past 20 years here at this college, I have experienced goodness and generosity from our donors, and I have experienced hope, promise, and possibility in the lives of the students we are able to help because of these good and generous donors. Truly, this is the “Heart of Northwest.”

alumni news Dolores Wooten “Reflections” Merriam-Webster defines reflection as “an effect produced by an influence.” I would like to ask all the alumni to take a few minutes to reflect on your time here at Northwest. Perhaps you met your spouse here. How about that instructor who influenced you in a way that no one ever has? Do you remember the skill or course that had a great impact on your career path? Was your involvement in a squad, club or group one that provided you with lifechanging experiences? Do you have a best friend or a group of friends who are still there for you today? And the ultimate question: “would I be where I am today if it had not been for my experiences and start at Northwest?” If you can affirm all these thoughts then ask yourself, “What can I do to provide that same influence for students today?” We can all begin by giving back to where it all started. You may say to yourself that what little you can give wouldn’t make a difference. But remember our little can become much. Then you are probably wondering how you can help. As you consider your end-of-year giving please consider making a contribution to the Northwest Foundation. There are many areas that could use your help. Consider scholarship support, textbook assistance or a particular endowment. Every dime given to the Northwest Foundation provides much-needed financial assistance to our students. I challenge every alumnus to make a contribution, regardless of amount, to the Northwest Foundation. If you need help deciding what fund, please give me a call and I will walk you through some suggestions. Reflect on your time at Northwest, and your decision to give will be simple. Thank you for all you do for our students and the path that you have made. Our students can walk this path and know they can succeed simply because they’ve seen that in so many of you. Please drop by for a visit anytime you are in the area. We would love to show you the new buildings and share with you all the changes.


student snapshot Leroy Charles Coldwater • Sophomore Pathway: General College Scholarship: The Coach Bobby Franklin and Ranger Football Coaching Staff (1979-2005) Endowed Scholarship You got an opportunity to meet Coach Franklin at a recent scholarship ceremony. How did you feel about that? I was really excited to meet him. Coach Franklin is a legend. I work at Wesley Meadows retirement home and someone told me he had a Super Bowl ring. He let me see it, and I was fascinated by this man and what he has accomplished. I am really honored to have his scholarship. You have faced a number of personal challenges in your life. What gives you the motivation to succeed at Northwest? First off, I found Christ, and I have people in my life who help me, including my grandmother, and Northwest’s Transfer Specialist, Sandra Vaughn. I am in the Student Support Services (SSS) program, and Mrs. Vaughn has been a mentor to me here at Northwest. My relationship with Christ and those who have supported me along the way give me motivation to succeed. You are a full-time student and you work 28 hours a week. How do you persevere with that kind of a load? Perseverance is a very strong word. I take advantage of the SSS program, and I study in the library when I have the time. Wesley Meadows works with my schedule, and that has definitely been a big help. We just kind of work together. I’ve been blessed with some good people in my life.

Photo by Julie Bauer

Where do you see yourself in five years? In five years I see myself with a bachelor’s degree with a good job living in Alaska. I feel like that isolation and environment would be good for me. I plan to attend the University of Mississippi DeSoto Center, but I am not sure what I want to study just yet. I do have an interest in counseling, but I really haven’t found my niche in life just yet. I’m still searching. Fun Facts about Leroy Charles: • Originally from Little Rock, Arkansas • Has a sister who lives in England

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president’s reflections Northwest Mississippi Community College has just completed a rigorous examination and evaluation by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACSCOC). A committee from this accrediting organization visited our campus in October. The purpose of the visit was twofold: to complete their review of our compliance with all components of the Principles of Accreditation exclusive of the Quality Enhancement Plan, and to conduct a comprehensive study of our Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP), Rangers Write! I am pleased to report that as to the first part of their review, the Committee found Northwest fully in compliance with all Core Requirements, Comprehensive Standards, and Federal Requirements contained in the Principles. As to the QEP, the Committee accepted the plan and were very complimentary regarding its design, offering us only one recommendation regarding the refinement of the assessment process described in the plan. In an article in this issue, the QEP is further discussed, and I believe you will agree that it is a tremendous plan to help our students to write with clarity and understanding. This once-a-decade effort began 18 months ago and has involved over 200 members of our College community at its various stages. There were those who helped in compiling our Compliance Certificate, who served on a committee that formulated our QEP, who made our facilities shine for our visitors, or who offered them superior hospitality. At every step of the way, the faculty, staff, and administration of Northwest told the story of our college with professional and realistic documentation before the visit and through personal interaction with the committee during the visit. As president, I am grateful to each and every person who participated in this study, and I am excited that the committee affirmed what we already knew to be true --- Success Starts at Northwest!

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Dr. Gary Lee Spears

alumni president’s notes Mike Boren I am a banker and have been head of a local bank in my community for many years. Like many of you, I received my educational foundation at Northwest. Every day, I meet successful people who are alums of Northwest. They are in fields of law, government, medicine, dentistry, education, agriculture, business and, just like you and me, they started at Northwest. The same excellent education that I received is available to students today. Of course, there are a lot more attending now than when I was a student–right at 8,000 students on three campuses! Many Northwest alums, because they have gone on to a four-year university, will put more emphasis and give greater loyalty to the four-year colleges. But, I have to wonder if that is what we should do. Coach Bear Bryant of the University of Alabama had this folksy saying, “Always dance with the one what brung you!” That was his way of saying to be loyal to the one who helped you get started. I feel the same way. It is not an “either-or” but a “both-and.” We can be loyal both to Northwest and to the four-year college. While our support for the four-year school may be larger than our support for Northwest, it is important not to forget what Northwest did in our lives. What can you do? Join the Alumni Association for only $30 for lifetime dues. Give an annual gift to the Northwest Foundation. Consider establishing an endowed scholarship to help someone just as you were helped. Attend the athletic and fine arts events. Whatever you choose to do, just know that it is appreciated. It is always good to come home to Northwest!


around campus College receives positive results from SACSCOC On-Site Committee College officials were pleased to tation will be made by the SACSCOC QEP Search Committee was formed to receive good news regarding Northwest’s Board of Trustees. identify the college’s QEP, a document reaffirmation of accreditation by the In 2014, Northwest began its decenni- developed by the college that includes a Southern Association of Colleges and process identifying key issues taken from Schools (SACSCOC) through a process an institutional assessment. It also focuswhich began more than two years ago es on learning outcomes and/or the enviand has involved a broad spectrum of ronment supporting student learning. The more than 200 Northwest faculty, staff document identifies goals and a plan to and students. assess their achievement. The QEP is Following an on-site visit by the SACsubmitted four to six weeks before the SCOC Reaffirmation Committee Oct. 4-6, college’s on-site review by the the committee found that Northwest was Commission. in compliance with all but one of the Core “One important benefit of a SACSCOC Requirements, Comprehensive Standards review is that it forces you to look at your and Federal Requirements contained in al reaffirmation process by SACSCOC. The operations with a critical eye,” said the Principles of Accreditation all SAC- last reaffirmation of the SACSCOC Northwest Chief of Staff and Vice SCOC-accredited institutions must accreditation was in 2007. The college President for Student Services Dan Smith, adhere by. The committee accepted the began the process in July by creating who also serves on the college’s SACcollege’s Quality Enhancement Plan teams to complete the two components SCOC Leadership Team. “You see where (QEP)—which focusthere are areas of deficienes on improving stucies or areas where dent writing. The improvements would make committee issued a difference. That culture one recommendation of continuous improveregarding the QEP’s ment is central to the reafsustainability and firmation process.” assessment. Among the improve“I am so pleased ments the college has by this very positive made during the reaffirmareport regarding the tion process are creation state of our college,” of a new strategic plan to said Northwest be integrated with the new President, Dr. Gary statewide strategic plan; Lee Spears. “The introduction of academic committee offered us pathways to improve acaa number of complidemic advising and help ments regarding the Members of the SACSCOC Leadership Team, the group responsible for the students track progress enthusiasm and pro- overall management and guidance of the reaffirmation process, are (standing, toward a four-year degree fessionalism of facul- left to right) Dr. Spears; Matt Sellers, director of Accounting; Dr. Matthew program; reduction of ty, staff and students, Domas, associate vice president for Education and SACSCOC liaison; Dan hours required for an the quality of our pro- Smith, chief of staff and vice president for Student Services; (seated) Carolyn Associate of Arts to 60 grams and facilities, Wiley, director of Institutional Research and Effectiveness; Leelee Haraway and proposal to reduce Photo by Julie Bauer hours required for an and the warm wel- and Dr. Sherry Lusk, QEP co-chairs. come they received.” Associate of Applied The findings of the visiting committee that are required for reaffirmation. Science to 60, designed to increase gradrepresent a preliminary assessment of The Compliance Certification docu- uation and completion rates; new and the institution at this time; final action on ment, in which the college must provide revised employee evaluation processes; the report rests with the Commission on verification of compliance with approxi- and new and revised student and employColleges. The on-site committee’s report mately 100 requirements, was success- ee policies and procedures. will be reviewed in June, 2017 when a fully completed and sent to the Off-Site —Julie Bauer and LaJuan Tallo final decision on reaffirmation of accredi- Committee in February, 2016. Next, a

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around campus Northwest sees increase in fall 2016 enrollment New mini-terms bring potential increase Northwest was one of only four colleges in the state’s community/junior college system to see an increase in fall 2016 enrollment. According to figures recently released by the college, 7,894 students enrolled for the fall semester at all campus locations, marking a 1.2 percent increase over the previous fall enrollment of 7,799 students. One reason for the increase is the number of dual enrolled students—high school students taking college-level courses—this fall. Dual enrollment has seen a 27.7 percent increase, for a total of 797 students, over last fall’s number of 624. “Our steady increase in dual enrolled students gave us the boost we needed to grow the enrollment by 1.2 percent,” said Northwest President, Dr. Gary Lee Spears. Another area of enrollment which has seen growth over the past few years is

the college’s online classes. This year, the eLearning Division saw a 7.6 percent increase with 1,298 students over last year’s total of 1,206. Of those students, 806 are full-time, 492 are part-time and 21 are dual enrolled. On the Senatobia campus there are 2,482 students in day classes and 48 in the evening school program for a total campus enrollment of 2,530 students. At DeSoto Center in Southaven/Olive Branch, 1,818 are attending day classes and 490 are enrolled in the evening program for a total of 2,308 students. At Lafayette-Yalobusha Technical Center in Oxford, 772 students attend day classes, while 189 are in evening school for a total of 961 students. In the 11-county district that Northwest serves, DeSoto County provided the most students with 3,701 (46.9 percent). Lafayette County furnished the second-highest number of students with

835 (10.6 percent), followed closely by Tate County with 767 students (9.7 percent). Other district counties included Panola, 667 (8.4 percent); Marshall, 483 (6.1 percent); Yalobusha, 228 (2.9 percent); Calhoun, 126 (1.6 percent); Tunica, 86 (1.1 percent); Tallahatchie, 78 (1 percent); Benton, 69 (0.9 percent); and Quitman, 58 (0.7 percent). Students from other Mississippi counties totaled 500 (6.3 percent), while the number of out-of-state students was 296 (3.7 percent). Enrollment figures could potentially increase even further following completion of the college’s second session of eight-week mini-terms, now offered at each campus as well as online. Miniterms allow students to take highdemand classes such as Algebra, American History, English Composition and Public Speaking in half the time of a traditional class. —Julie Bauer

Two Oxford faculty are 2016 Lamplighters Two Northwest instructors, Dr. Carol Cleveland and Renee O’Neill were selected to attend the annual Lamplighters Conference on Oct. 6-7 at Copiah-Lincoln Community College in Wesson. Cleveland and O’Neill were chosen for this honor by the academic leadership of the college. Dr. Cleveland, who teaches biology at the Lafayette-Yalobusha Technical Center (LYTC), has worked at Northwest since 2001. O’Neill, who teaches English at LYTC, began as an adjunct instructor in 2003 and became a full-time instructor in 2010. The Lamplighters Program was begun in 1990 by the Academic Deans Association to honor excellence in teaching. —LaJuan Tallo

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Northwest Now

At the October Board of Trustees meeting, Northwest President, Dr. Gary Lee Spears (far left) and Mike Moore, chairman of the Board of Trustees (far right) honored Oxford campus instructors Dr. Carol Cleveland (center left) and Renee O’Neill (center right) for being chosen to represent the college at the annual Lamplighters Conference held Oct. 6-7 at Copiah-Lincoln Community College in Wesson. Photo by Julie Bauer

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around campus State releases 2015 Community College Report Card The Education Achievement Council (EAC) has approved the 2015 Report Card for Northwest Mississippi Community College. In 2010, the Education Achievement Council was created by the state legislature to bring Mississippi's educational attainment and skill levels of the working-age population to the national average by 2025. Pursuant to §37-163-1, an electronic copy can be viewed at www.northwestms.edu/reportcard. The report cards show the progress that has been made toward educational goals for each community college and university. The measures that are used align closely with the Voluntary Framework of Accountability developed by the American Association of Community Colleges. College officials were pleased to report Northwest’s performance in retention and college readiness was higher than the state averages. While retention in the college’s

Associate of Arts programs was slightly above the state average at 59.4 percent, retention in Associate of Applied Science programs was 3 percent higher than the state average at 61.9 percent. Total retention was at 59.7 percent, half a percentage point above the state’s total retention average. The percentage of students who took developmental English and went on to successfully complete college-level English courses was 72.7 percent, slightly higher than the state average. The percentage of students who took developmental math and went on to successfully complete intermediate algebra was 74.9 percent, almost 10 percentage points higher than the state average. The percentage of students who took developmental math and went on to successfully complete college algebra was 78.1 percent, two percentage points higher than the state average. The report card also showed the sig-

nificance of adequate training in providing higher wages to the state’s workforce. Among those who acquired new or upgraded skills through training from Workforce Development, annual earnings jumped nearly $5,000 from salaries prior to receiving training. For Northwest graduates, earnings rose even higher, with Associate of Arts graduates earning nearly $6,000 more, Career Certificate graduates receiving more than $8,000 more and Associate of Applied Science graduates earning more than twice the previous average salary at $13,000 more. Information on the Community College Report Card includes student enrollment, degrees awarded, student success, student retention, student progress, workforce development information, GED and adult basic education statistics, as well as enrollment and success in development or remedial coursework (college readiness). —Julie Bauer

Haraway wins Grisham Excellence in Teaching award Northwest English instructor Leelee Haraway was presented the Sandy Grisham Excellence in Teaching Award at the college’s opening faculty meeting on Aug. 15. This award is given to an academic faculty member on the Senatobia campus in honor of Sandy Grisham, a retired instructor in the Social Science Division. The selection is made by the Academic Division directors on the Senatobia campus. The award winner receives a check in the amount of $1,000 from the Northwest Foundation, which represents earnings on the endowment

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Dr. Gary Lee Spears (left) and Sybil Canon, associate vice president of Development and Special Projects present Leelee Haraway, English instructor (center) with the Sandy Grisham Excellence in Teaching award for her work on the Senatobia campus. Photo by LaJuan Tallo

established by faculty and staff. Haraway received her associate degree from Northwest, and her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in English from the University of Mississippi. She has been teaching at Northwest for 19 years. Haraway serves as her division’s online program coordinator and has served on various committees. This year she is co-chair of the college’s Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP) committee for the college’s process of reaffirmation of accreditation with SACSCOC. The QEP is “Rangers Write!” and is focused on improving student writing. —LaJuan Tallo

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around campus Shaheen recognized for teaching excellence Second recipient of DC award Northwest history instructor Robert Shaheen was presented the DeSoto Center Excellence in Teaching Award at the college’s opening faculty meeting on Aug. 15. The DeSoto Center Excellence in Teaching Award was established last year to recognize one DeSoto Center faculty member each year. Both academic and career technical faculty are eligible for the award. The award was voted on by the entire DeSoto Center faculty, and the recipient receives a plaque and a cash award, which is part of a growing endowment through the Northwest Foundation, according to Robert Shaheen, history instructor (center) was the 2016 recipient of the Jeremy Isome, dean of the DeSoto Center. DeSoto Center Excellence in Teaching Award. Presenting the award were Shaheen began his association with Northwest Northwest President, Dr. Gary Lee Spears (right) and Jeremy Isome, dean over 40 years ago as a student. He earned his bachof DeSoto Center (left). Photo by LaJuan Tallo elor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Mississippi and began teaching as an adjunct at DeSoto Center in 1994. He also taught at Independence and DeSoto Center. Since then he has served on various committees, and currently serves as the chairman of the Appeals South Panola High Schools. In 2003, Shaheen was hired as a full-time instructor at Committee, which oversees everything from parking ticket to grade appeals. In 2014, Shaheen was chosen to represent Northwest at the Lamplighters Conference, which recognizes excellence in teaching. “Bobby Shaheen has continued to show his passion for teaching, and he continually states how he relishes the opportunity to be able to teach at Northwest. Each semester, students ask for this instructor by name. Students remark that his teaching style engages and captivates their desire to learn about a subject that is viewed as unimportant in today’s world,” Isome said. —LaJuan Tallo

Scherer, Stuart receive 2016 Faculty, Staff Customer Service awards Dr. Gary Lee Spears (left) presented the 2016 Faculty and Staff Customer Service Awards at the Aug. 15 opening day faculty meeting. Dan Scherer, DeSoto Center computer information systems instructor (top photo, center) received the faculty award, and Angie Stuart, secretary to the vice president for Education (bottom photo, center) received the staff award. Congratulating Scherer and Stuart is Richie Lawson, vice president for Education (right). Photo by LaJuan Tallo

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around campus New Board of Trustees members, officers recognized

Dr. Gary Lee Spears (center) congratulates newly-elected Board of Trustees officers Mike Moore of Calhoun County (left), chairman and Dr. Adam Pugh of Lafayette County (right), vice chairman after their election during the board’s monthly meeting on Sept. 8. Both men are superintendents of education in their counties. Photo by Julie Bauer

Also during the September meeting, Dr. Spears (left) welcomes Dr. Carrie Skelton (center), interim superintendent of education for Marshall County School District as the newest member of the Northwest Board of Trustees. Congratulating Skelton is Bill Dawson, board member from Marshall County. Photo by Julie Bauer

Wicker visits new Mechanical Technology Building

U.S. Sen. Roger Wicker (both photos, right) toured Northwest’s new Mechanical Technology Building on Aug. 12, during a visit to the Senatobia Rotary Club. He got a chance to see the Precision Manufacturing and Machining Technology, Welding and Cutting and Heating, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Technology labs. PMM instructors Jim Gilliam and Jeff Covington (above photo, l to r) and HVAC instructor Josh Buchanan (right photo) explained how the equipment is used during the tour. Photo by LaJuan Tallo

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2016 Foundation Scholarship Ceremony Donors, students celebrate giving at annual ceremony Northwest Foundation Board member Barry Bouchillon (left) visited with recipients of the A.W. and LaNelle S.Bouchillon Endowment, established in memory of his parents. Photo by LaJuan Tallo

Attending the Annual Scholarship Ceremony has become a tradition for many of those who have established endowments and annual scholarships. The event has become much like a reunion, and this year's event attracted more than 700 scholarship sponsors and students. The two-day event, held Sept. 20-21, also recognizes newly established scholarships, which included nine new endowments that were established between October, 2015 and September, 2016. The Foundation awarded 497 scholarships for the 2016-17 academic year for a total of $425,000. The current Northwest Foundation Endowment Fund is valued at approximately $9.5 million, and Northwest has awarded $4,152,315 in scholarships since 1997. All students, regardless of income, are encouraged to apply. Applications are available at www.northwestms.edu under “Financial Aid,� and applications are due April 1.

New Endowments The Bluff City Funeral Directors and Morticians Association Endowment The Melvin E. (Dooney) and Dot Childress Endowment The Larry Dhority Endowment The Mike Dottorey Endowment The Victoria Parker Hale Endowment The Kitty Lee Jenkins Endowment The Mary Alice Moorman Endowment The Lena Rivers Harris Riley Endowment The Sledge Family Endowment

Associate Vice President of Development and Special Projects Sybil Canon (far left) speaks with scholarship recipients who share their lives and the importance of receiving Foundation scholarships. Photo by Julie Bauer

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Cathryn Hyde (left) welcomes freshman Dikisha Wilbourn of Sardis, recipient of the Robert A. and Cathryn M. Hyde Endowed Scholarship. Photo by LaJuan Tallo The Northwest Singers, under the direction of Susanne Spencer VanDyke, director of Choral Activities (top photo) sang a beautiful rendition of “Climb Ev’ry Mountain” for the ceremony this year. Music instructor Dr. Saundra Bishop is the accompanist for the group. Photo by LaJuan Tallo

Retired Division Directors Rosemary Simmons (Fine Arts) and Jean Moore (Languages and Communications) visited during the meet and greet time. Photo by Julie Bauer

Donors, recipients and guests enjoy the delicious refreshments during the reception. Photo by Julie Bauer

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2016 Foundation Scholarship Ceremony

Northwest history instructor and alumnus James Baker was proud of his nephew, Baker West, a freshman pre-nursing student from Batesville, (center) who receives the Sheriff David Bryan Endowment. West was one of the students interviewed on the panel. Pictured right is West’s mother, Martha West. (above) Photo by LaJuan Tallo

Alice Hammersmith (left) visits with sophomore EMT student Karina Romero of Como, recipient of the Alice Hammersmith Endowed Scholarship.The scholarship was established by DETER, a DeSoto County-based organization whose mission is to educate the public about the consequences of driving under the influence. Photo by Julie Bauer

Northwest President, Dr. Gary Lee Spears (left) and Northwest First Lady Marilyn Spears (right) welcomed students (center, left to right) Kristy Wilkerson of Coldwater and Treva Benson of Batesville to the ceremony. WIlkerson, a freshman studying elementary education, is the recipient of the Dr. Gary Lee Spears Endowed Scholarship, and Benson, a sophomore studying early childhood education technology, receives the Marilyn R. Spears Endowed Scholarship. Photo by LaJuan Tallo

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cover story

Bobby Dunlap, CEO of Dunlap and Kyle, has given over $400,000 to help students at Northwest. Here, he points out a photo of the “old mule barn” where his business began to Sybil Canon, associate vice president of Development and Special Projects. Photo by Julie Bauer

From a barn to a business: leading by example By LaJuan Tallo

Bobby Dunlap, founder of Gateway Tire and CEO of Dunlap and Kyle in Batesville has a simple philosophy that has made him successful in business and in life. He believes in people and is not afraid to help them when they need help. “We have a lot of good people working for us,” Dunlap says, smiling. “The main thing I have learned is as long as you have good people, you don’t have any prob-

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lems. And the only way to keep good people is to reward them. You help people, and in a sense it is kind of selfish, but if you get good people there is no way to lose. You are going to do well. And if you compensate them well, they are not going to leave,” he says decisively. When he begins to tell you stories about the people who work for him, or the people who have crossed his path, you

know that he lives by that philosophy. Dunlap was born on Nov. 8, 1929 to John Calvin “Jack” Dunlap and Frances Lenora (Nickle) Dunlap. He grew up in Batesville, graduating from Batesville High School in 1947 as president of his class. He was one of the first Eagle Scouts in Batesville. “We hunted, fished and played sports. I played baseball, football and continued on next page

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Dunlap’s Batesville High School class composite hangs in his office. Dunlap was president of the class of 1947. He is pictured beneath the word “Class.” Photo courtesy Bobby Dunlap

basketball,” Dunlap said. Dunlap’s father owned Southside Chevrolet dealership in Batesville, and at one time had an International Harvester dealership, restaurant and motel, Dunlap said. Dunlap completed his freshman year at Millsaps College, and then his dad sent him to the Naval ROTC at the University of Mississippi (Ole Miss), where he graduated. He went into the U.S. Navy as an officer, serving on the USS Everglades, one of four Klondike class destroyer tenders used during the Korean conflict. Dunlap served in the Mediterranean. His dad also had a small side business they called the Mule Barn, which was a junkyard basically, but where they sold car parts and tires. When he returned from the Navy, he began selling car parts and tires. “I didn’t really like the automobile business, but I liked this. We had several World War II veterans, which I like to call the ‘Greatest Generation’ working for us. They were hardworking guys—just happy to work. That is really how I got started,” he said. Dunlap’s father had a stroke in 1960, which really took him out of the family’s business picture. His father’s partner and first cousin, Hudson Kyle, was still part of the business at that time. At the end of that year, Dunlap and his brother did not want to continue with the automobile business, so they divided it all up. He ended up with the tire company and the junkyard. They continued calling the tire company Dunlap and Kyle. Dunlap and Kyle is both a retail and wholesale business, but most of their business is wholesale, he said. Their 58 retail locations are mostly in the South. The 16 wholesale dis-

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tribution centers are located from northern Ohio to south Texas with over 1,500 employees. Dunlap says he gets letters from customers all the time about how well his customers are treated by his employees, and that is something he insists that they do. “When we send letters out, I always include this motto: ‘The best advertising is printed on the wagging tongue of a satisfied customer.’ I have found that if you are nice to people, you are going to succeed,” Dunlap said. Dunlap’s office walls are covered with plaques, photos and framed letters, but if you ask him about all the awards and accolades, he waves you off with a sigh. “It’s a nice thing to get an award, but you just come out better if you help, especially in a place like Mississippi. A lot of kids need help, and as long as the schools are helping them, I don’t mind helping the schools,” he says. He credits the example his own father set for him to be generous to others. “My dad was very generous. He was always helping people who needed help,” Dunlap said. Northwest has been a constant recipient of Dunlap’s generosity and his support over the past several years. Over the years, he has helped countless Northwest students through the Gateway Tire Endowment, a Foundation scholarship program. Dunlap has supported the basketball and football teams for many years, even providing money to help buy the football team championship rings for their Brazos Valley Bowl win in 2012 and their NJCAA National Championship rings in 2015. He generously supported the Northwest Singers when they were asked to appear at Carnegie Hall in 2014. “I think Northwest and the other community colleges do more for the community than people realize. I know there are a lot of good kids at Northwest,” Dunlap said. In 2015, Northwest President, Dr. Gary Lee Spears presented Dunlap with a commemorative plaque thanking him for his

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generosity to Northwest’s students. Dr. Spears expressed the college’s appreciation by saying, “Bobby Dunlap is noted for his philanthropy to many worthy causes. In addition, he has a true compassion for young people and wants to help them attend college. We are honored to be among the colleges and universities that he supports.” Dunlap is the father of five children, and has several grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Many of his family members work for Dunlap and Kyle. His wife Cyd is active as president of the Oxford-Lafayette Humane Society. In addition to helping local high schools, colleges and universities, Dunlap also supports community organizations, Boy Scouts and wildlife conservation. He holds an honorary doctorate from Millsaps College and is a member of the Tire Industry Hall of Fame. “In my 40 years of fundraising, I have been blessed by knowing many philanthropists. Bobby Dunlap stands out among that group, not only by the amount of money he has given but by the spirit with which he gives. His compassion is genuine. He gives, not so that others will notice, but out of a sincere desire to help people have better lives. It is the attitude that has governed his business and his philanthropy. I am grateful for the personal inspiration he has been to me, and, of course, I am grateful for all that he has done to help the students of Northwest,” said Sybil Canon, associate vice president of Development and Special Projects.

A photo of the Old Mule Barn, where Dunlap began his tire business hangs on the “memory wall” at his office in Batesville. Photo courtesy Bobby Dunlap

Northwest Ranger football players and their coach paid Dunlap (center) a visit to thank him for his support in getting them rings for winning the 2015 NJCAA National Championship. Left to right are, Matt Davis of Batesville, K.T. McCollin of Oxford, Head Coach Benjy Parker and David Herrington of Senatobia. Photo by Julie Bauer

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2+2 scholarship golf tourney hosts 41 teams The annual BancorpSouth/Northcentral Electric Power Association (NCEPA) 2+2 Scholarship Golf Tournament, founded and directed by Mike and Debra Herrington and benefitting students from Northwest and The University of Mississippi at DeSoto Center, was held on Thursday, Sept. 22 at Cherokee Valley Golf Course in Olive Branch. The tournament has raised over $200,000 in scholarships and nearly $22,000 this year. Taking first place in the contest were (top left, l to r) Wayne Williamson of Olive Branch, Trey Goode of Memphis and Perry Arrington and Cameron Thomas, both of Oxford. Second place winners were (top right, l to r) Jimmy Hill of Hernando, Ned Shorr of Desert Springs, California, Greg Courts of Memphis and Shelly Henry of Alexandria, Louisiana. Third place winners were (right, l to r) Mike Rowan, Jake Long, Bubba Skelton and Matt Sellers, all of Senatobia. Photos by Julie Bauer

Brown Golf Classic raises $31,000 Dr. Gary Lee Spears (center) recently visited with Hugh (left) and Tatum Brown, both of Oxford, to thank them for their support of the Northwest Foundation through the Brown Golf Classic, held each year at the Country Club of Oxford. Thus far, proceeds from the tournament have resulted in a total of $31,000 being contributed to The Thomas Edward (Tommy) Brown Endowed Scholarship. In thanking Tatum and Hugh, Dr. Spears noted, “Tommy Brown was a wonderful supporter of Northwest. He served for many years on the Northwest Foundation Board of Directors, including a term as president of this board, and he established The R. L. Brown Endowment in memory of his father and was a generous contributor to other scholarships. I commend Tatum and Hugh for continuing the legacy of generosity to our college started by their father. Indeed, we are grateful.” Tatum and Hugh have continued Brown Insurance Agency established by their grandfather and continued by their father. On behalf of the entire Brown family, Tatum accepted the gratitude extended by Dr. Spears and said, “It is our job to give back to our community, and this is one way that we try to do that.”

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Legacy

sharing the

Many of those who have established endowed scholarships return to campus each year during the annual Scholarship Recognition Ceremony to meet the many students who have benefitted from their generosity. This year’s event, held Sept. 20-21, welcomed several large groups who have endowed one or more Foundation scholarships. Some have long-established endowments that have been assisting students since as far back as 1997.

The Edna Teasler Endowment This endowment was established at Northwest by her six children in 1997. Five of the six children, one grandson, and two great-granddaughters were on hand for the annual Scholarship Recognition Ceremony held on the Senatobia campus. Other scholarships recognizing members of this family include The Joan Teasler Rose Endowment and The Rachel Ann and Landon Scott Etheridge Endowment, established by family members and the Northwest Education Division. Recipients at the ceremony included Mikel Sessums of Oxford, recipient of The Edna Teasler Endowment, Emily Cockrell of Como, recipient of The Joan Teasler Rose Endowment, and Tearrica Martin of Holly Springs, recipient of The Rachel Ann and Landon Scott Etheridge Endowment (not pictured). Pictured are front row (left to right) Sessums, Rachel Etheridge, Landrey Etheridge, Cockrell; second row (left to right) Janie Smith of Oxford, Joan Rose of Senatobia; third row (left to right) Lagina Etheridge, Brenda Iglinsky of Sardis, Dottie Teasler Merritt of Sardis and fourth row (left to right) Jack Etheridge and Daniel Ross Teasler of Senatobia.

The Graeber Foundation Scholarships Through the generosity of The Graeber Foundation of Marks, 15 scholarships were awarded for the 2016-17 academic year. On hand to celebrate these awards were first row (left to right) Lucas Dabalos of Senatobia, Elaina Gurley of Marks, Sarah Craig of Marks, Madison McBride of Oakland; second row (left to right) Renz Delubio of Marks, Markevius Williams of Lambert, Patrick Asis of Marks; third row (left to right) Crews Franklin of Charleston, George Bouler of Marks, Caleb Bryant of Batesville and fourth row (left to right) Matthew Brooks of Clarksdale and Chase Fowler of Charleston. Graduating seniors of Delta Academy are eligible to receive these scholarships for four semesters at Northwest, provided the students maintain a 2.5 grade point average and remain full-time students. Graeber Foundation scholarships have been awarded since 1999, benefitting approximately 200 students in Quitman and Panola counties. Photos by Julie Bauer

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Fall 2016

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Celebrating

Giving


N O RT H W E Dear North west Frien ds,

ST

MISSISSIP

Senatobia ,

PI COM MUNITY Mississipp i 38668

COLLEGE

I hope you will take ju st a mome only a few nt to look of the 500 at the face students w s of our stu ho are rec Some of m dents on th eiving Fou y favorite th e opposite n d a tion schola ings to do students a page. The rships this as preside s they go se are n ye t ar. of this coll to classes and conce ege is to w , to attend rts, to che alk on our a fine arts er for our a campuses event and nis, golf, a th and observ le s e te e s o as they pa ur talented nd rodeo, e our rticipate in students p and to rea football, b e lize that th ing online rf o rm in g a s in classes. ere are ma eball, bask plays ny more s etball, soc tudents wh cer, softba The colleg ll o , tenm I don’t s e exists fo ee becaus r our stud their dream e they are ents, and s and goa takit is inspiring ls. to see the Your suppo fa ces of the rt is neede se studen d to help th education ts as they ese studen , we still h pursue ts . While No ave stude nts who a rt Northwest h w e st is an aff re struggli Foundatio ordable op ng to pay n is their o tion to beg tuition and nly hope to Please con in a colleg to re p u c rc sider givin eive this m e h a s e te xt g a year-e b u o c o h k -n students. s eeded ass . For man nd gift. I Whatever is y, ta th c n a e c n e . assure you your gift, p have desig lease know that it will nated. make a dif that we are ference in grateful an the lives o d that we My wife, M f our will use it arilyn, and in just the I extend to ness. way that yo you and yo u ur family a Merry Chri stmas and a New Yea r filled with happi-

Sincerely yo urs,

Dr. Gary L ee Spears President


The Legacy Continues

Legacy

the

It is, indeed, both a pleasure and an honor to announce new scholarship endowments, the beginning of a new legacy for those being honored by these scholarships and for the students who will be assisted for generations to come. The beauty of an endowment is that it will continue to help students for as long as this college exists. It is also wonderful to think of how these students will use their education to make better lives for themselves, for their families and for the communities in which they will live. Thus, it is appropriate to name these pages, “The Legacy Continues,” because the effects of these extraordinary acts of generosity will last forever.

The Northwest Foundation was fortunate to have a matching gifts program from 1997 through 2013. While the program is no longer in place, we want to continue to express appreciation to those who provided these funds to help our scholarship endowment grow at such a rapid pace. At the end of October, the value of the endowment was $9.5 million. Morgan Freeman, the acclaimed actor and producer of national and international fame, was the largest benefactor of the matching gifts program, providing $515,000. In addition, we received a generous gift from the Estate of Clarence Thomas Hill, Jr., in the amount of

The Larry Dhority Endowment The Larry Dhority Endowed Scholarship was established by his wife, Pat Dhority, and his children, Mitchell Dhority and Rachel Dhority, as a lasting tribute to his life of dedicated and exemplary service to his family, his country, and his career. Born in 1943 to Julia Hoffman and Newton Lavern Dhority, Larry and his family moved from the Como area to Senatobia when he was in the fifth grade. He graduated from Senatobia High School in 1961 and counted among his favorite activities that of serving as team manager for the football team. Immediately after graduating from high school, while most young men were waiting to be drafted, Larry enlisted in the U.S. Navy at the height of the Vietnam War. It was in the Navy that he received his training in avionics, which would become his chosen career. Dhority returned to Senatobia in 1964 and entered

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continues

Larry Dhority

$180,000. Other matching gifts sponsors included Horseshoe Casino and Hotel, the Youth Progress Association, Sycamore Bank, Gateway Tire, Coca-Cola Bottling Company, Williams-Sonoma, Inc., Sam’s Town Hotel and Gambling Hall, ThyssenKrupp Elevator, and Schulz Xtruded Products. Through the generosity of so many, the endowment continues to grow. As it grows, so does the realization of the hopes and dreams of our students as well as the legacy of the special people who are honored by these endowments. —Sybil Canon

Northwest where he reconnected with Patricia Berryhill, whom he would later marry in June of 1965 upon her graduation from Northwest. They moved to Hernando in 1967. Dhority’s career with American Airlines, Northwest and FedEx spanned almost 40 years. His career at FedEx as a Ground Support Equipment (GSE) mechanic and later as a GSE troubleshooting specialist took him around the world. His fondest travel was to Russia where he set up outer space shuttles and other ventures. Family was always a priority for Dhority, who dedicated himself to ensuring that his children would be able to enjoy things he had not

At this year’s scholarship ceremony a plaque of appreciation was presented by Northwest President, Dr. Gary Lee Spears (far left) to the family of Larry Dhority for the establishment of the Larry Dhority Endowment. Pictured left to right are Dr. Spears, Pat Dhority, Rachel Dhority, Mitchell Dhority, Nathan Dhority, Donnielle Dhority, Julia Hall (seated), Patsy Gulbin and Roberta Mayfield, Foundation board member.

Photo by Julie Bauer

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Fall 2016

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The Legacy Continues

recommendation letbeen able to afford, espeter for this presticially, a college education. gious award, Dr. Both of his children graduMarilyn Bateman, ated from college with honretired academic ors. His grandchildren, dean at Northwest Katie, Laurel, and Nathan, wrote the following: were a special delight to “Mike stands tall in him. the eyes of our stuDhority’s hobbies dents. He expects included hunting, fishing, them to assume woodworking, and gardenand responsibility ing. After retirement, he holds them accountand Pat enjoyed extenable for their behavsive traveling throughout the United States. An A host of Dottorey’s family and friends attended this year’s scholarship ceremo- ior. He has a tender heart but carries a endearing quality enjoyed Photo by Julie Bauer ny to support Dottorey on his special day. big stick. by all of his friends was Mike participates in no negativism. his story telling that always brought encouragement from their mother until He is always cheerful and optimistic. He smiles and laughter. At the time of his her death in 1990 at the age of 55. Dottorey graduated with honors from doesn’t focus on problems but instead death in October of 2013, he and Pat had been married 48 years. Devoted to Vicksburg High School, where he was directs his energy toward solutions.” Dottorey also received the Customer each other and to their children and elected “Mr. Vicksburg High School” by grandchildren, they carved out a life of his peers, was a member of the National Service Award in 2008, an award given love and faithfulness to each other, of Honor Society, and was a stellar football to a faculty or staff member who goes service to their communities and player. During his senior year, he was on beyond job responsibilities to meet the careers, and of joy and laughter that they the top recruiting lists of 14 major uni- needs of Northwest’s students. versities, but he chose to play for the leg- Throughout his career at Northwest, he shared with their friends. The scholarship will benefit a veteran endary Coach Bear Bryant for three years has made significant contributions in the lives of students that span the entire who is returning from active service in campus --- in the classrooms, in the dorthe Navy, Army, Air Force, or Marine mitories, on the playing fields, at the Corps, who has received an honorable Ranger Outdoor Complex (ROC) --- everydischarge, who is a resident of DeSoto or where Northwest students are, Tate County, and who has demonstrated Dottorey’s presence has been felt. a financial need. The first scholarship When asked what philosophy guides him, will be awarded in the 2017-18 academMike has said, “Every man is enthusiasic year. tic at times. One man has enthusiasm The Mike Dottorey for thirty minutes, another man has it for thirty days. But it is a man who has it for Endowment thirty years who makes a success in life.” Dottorey is dedicated to his daughter, The Mike Dottorey Endowment was Shelia, and he is using his retirement to established by Brenda Holmes and Dr. mentor young people in his church. He Michael Butts, colleagues from the has also returned to Northwest on a partOxford campus of Northwest, and by a time basis to assist in recruiting. host of friends, family, and colleagues on Mike Dottorey The first scholarship will be awarded the occasion of Dottorey’s retirement in the 2017-18 academic year. from Northwest after 35 years of dedicated service to the college. His career before going to Jackson State for his senNorthcentral Electric began as assistant football coach and ior year. He was later drafted as a free evolved into other positions, to include agent with the Philadelphia Eagles. Power Association He received his bachelor’s degree in being track coach, academic adviser, Gifts and Veterans Affairs coordinator. At the Social Work from Jackson State Northcentral Electric Power time of his retirement, he was an aca- University and his master’s degree in demic counselor, recruiter and Disability Educational Counseling from the Association is an electric power distribuUniversity of Mississippi. tion cooperative owned by its members. Support Services Officer. He was chosen as the 2005 The association is a distributor of TVA The son of Lola Dottorey, Mike and his brother, Ronny, received love and Mississippi Counselor of the Year. In her electricity and serves eastern DeSoto


The Legacy Continues

County, western Marshall County, and small areas in Tate and Lafayette counties. Founded in 1940, Northcentral EPA serves 30,142 customers.

While there is not an endowment that bears the name of Northcentral, this association has been instrumental in either establishing or contributing generously to four other endowed scholarships: The Jimmy Neal Andrews Endowment, The Melvin E. (Dooney) and Dot Childress Endowment, The Wayne D. Hollowell Endowment, and The Ray Magee Endowment. Hollowell and Magee were former general managers of Northcentral, Andrews served on the Board of Directors, and both Mr. and Mrs. Childress were long-time employees. Under the leadership of Kevin Doddridge, general manager, Northcentral has chosen to honor these who have been associated with the association with permanent tributes to honor their lives while, at the same time, helping students for generations to come. In addition to contributing to the scholarship program, Northcentral served as co-title sponsor of the 2016 Two Plus Two Scholarship Golf Tournament, held annu-

ally to raise scholarship funds for Northwest and Ole Miss students. Northcentral has also helped with fundraising efforts to benefit the athletic and fine arts programs at Northwest. Doddridge serves as vice president of the Northwest Foundation board of directors.

The Gail Wilborn Endowment

The Gail Wilborn Endowed Scholarship was established by the Northwest Nursing Division with funds generated by Shoot for the Heart, an annual fundraiser jointly held by the Nursing Division and The Community Foundation of Northwest Mississippi and founded by Keith Wilson. Gail Wilborn died on April 19, 1982, which was also her 25th birthday. A beloved instructor at Northwest, Anita Stratton Wilborn Graham, who had loved and cared for Wilborn as her own, began a special fund at that time and was joined by others to honor Wilborn’s memory. The fund was used by nursing students to help with special needs, to include paying the fees for state board examinations, scholarships, textbook assistance, etc. The fund was just recently depleted. As a demonstration of appreciation for this help over these many years, the N u r s i n g Division, under the leadership of Dr. Denise B y n u m , director, voted to establish The Gail Wilborn Endowed Scholarship Fund as a permanent At this year’s scholarship ceremony a plaque of appreciation was pre- tribute to sented by Northwest President, Dr. Gary Lee Spears (far left) to repre- W i l b o r n ’ s sentatives of Northcentral Electric Power Association (NCEPA) to com- life. memorate a generous gift given to add Dot Childress’ name to the G a i l Melvin E. (Dooney) Childress Endowment. Pictured left to right are Dr. W i l b o r n ’ s Spears, NCEPA representatives Mark Nichols, Kevin Doddridge and brief life was Michael Bellipanni and Charles Veazey, Foundation board member. marked by Photo by Julie Bauer both tragedy

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Gail Wilborn and triumph. Because of family circumstances in her childhood, she had lived with Dr. and Mrs. Michael Shaheen of Como from ages four to seven before being adopted by Connie and Thomas Wilborn. When she was eight years old, she suffered a tragedy that would cause health problems her entire life. A four-year-old child, who thought he was playing with a toy gun, fired a shot which hit Wilborn, and she lost her spleen and part of a kidney. While the prognosis at that time was favorable, Wilborn was told that the loss of the spleen might cause more severe illnesses, a prediction that came true as she experienced upper respiratory infections and even chicken pox. Graham remembers Wilborn’s desire to become a nurse. “Gail was never going to be Clara Barton or Florence Nightingale, but she truly wanted to be a nurse. The world heard her cry of joy when she got her practical nursing license.” She had begun the Associate Degree Nursing program at Northwest when yet another bout of upper respiratory infection took her life. While her life was brief and filled with tragedies beyond her control, Wilborn triumphed through her perseverance to become a nurse. It is fitting that this permanent tribute to her life will help other nursing students achieve their goals as well. The first scholarship will be awarded in the 2017-18 academic year.

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In Memoriam ing father and grandfather, avid sportsman, beloved member of the community, and a true Southern gentleman. He was a longtime supporter of Ole Miss and, more recently, became a generous supporter of Northwest Mississippi Community College. A graduate of the U.S. Military Academy in 1946, he was commissioned in the Corps of Engineers as second lieutenant and was stationed in Germany as part of the U.S. Army of Occupation after World War II. After resigning

John and Stelloise Basinger

J

ohn L. Basinger of Winona died on Aug. 21, 2016, at the age of 85. He graduated from Northwest in 1957 after serving in the U.S. Navy during the Korean War. Basinger worked for 33 years with the Mississippi Department of Public Safety, first as a highway patrolman and later as a master sergeant. After retirement, he was an investigator for a law firm in Winona. Basinger’s son suffered from diabetes and died of a heart attack at the age of 49. His first wife died of cancer. He chose to honor their memories by donating to charitable organizations such as the American Diabetes Association and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. The next good cause in his life was his alma mater, Northwest, where he established two endowments of $100,000 each, The John L. Basinger Endowment, which is awarded to business students, and The John L. and Stelloise Basinger Endowment, which is awarded to nursing students. He was a charter member of North Winona Baptist Church, giving over 60 years of dedicated service. He was also a deacon. He and his wife worked tirelessly to help restore and document the historic Broom Cemetery in Coffeeville, where Basinger’s parents are buried. He funded the construction of a pavilion in memory of his mother, Cora. While his wife, Stelloise Watts Basinger, will continue to cherish his memory, his legacy will also continue for generations to come in the lives of the Northwest students who will receive the Basinger scholarships. ames “Jim” McClure, Jr., a lifelong resident of Sardis, died on July 8, 2016, at the age of 92. He was a respected attorney, lov-

J

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Jim and Angelé McClure his commission as first lieutenant in 1950, he returned to the University of Mississippi School of Law where he graduated with distinction in 1953. He served as a Mississippi state senator from 1952-56, during which time he met Angelé Kazar. They were happily married for 53 years until her death. Retiring form the Mississippi Senate, he devoted more than 60 years to the law practice of McClure and Shuler. In addition, he was an active member of Holy Innocents Episcopal Church of Como and greatly involved with the University of Mississippi Alumni Association, serving as president of the association in 1985 and inducted into the University of Mississippi Hall of Fame in 2007 and into the inaugural class of the University of Mississippi School of Law Hall of Fame in 2010. His four children, Jimmy, Angelé, Susan, and Jay, along with their families will remember him fondly as a man who loved God and Jesus Christ, his country, his family, his church, hunting, fishing, the Ole Miss Rebels, and his home. In 2010, McClure generously established The Jim and Angelé McClure Endowed

Scholarship at Northwest in memory of his wife and in honor of Roberta Wilson Mayfield, Dan Smith, and James Baker. ane Tutor joined the art faculty of Northwest in 1972 after earning bachelor’s and master’s degrees from The University of Mississippi. He retired in 2007 as the chairman of the Art Department. Tutor died on Aug. 20, 2016, at the age of 68. A native of Crowder, he was an accomplished and prolific potter and painter. In both mediums, he created extraordinary works of art that have been exhibited throughout the South and are continuing to grace the homes of countless admirers of Tutor’s paintings and pottery. Tutor was an active member of First Baptist Church of Senatobia, where he acted in dramatic presentations. He also designed and painted sets for many church productions. He volunteered for many years in the children’s and youth departments. Not only will he be fondly remembered by his two sons, Chad and Jared, and by his granddaughter, Charlie Kate Tutor, Tutor will have a permanent place in the hearts of his Northwest colleagues, his fellow church mem-

L

Lane Tutor bers, and artists who appreciate his exceptional pottery and paintings. An art scholarship has been established at Northwest to honor Tutor and his colleague, Terry Pegram. Those wishing to contribute may send gifts to NWCC Foundation, 4975 Hwy 51. N., Senatobia, MS 38668.

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Homecoming 2016 Homecoming celebration brings fun for all This year, Northwest’s Homecoming celebration was held on Thursday, Sept. 29 and featured a carnival and dinner prior to the game. The Rangers defeated the Holmes Bulldogs 27-12 in front of a capacity crowd. Alandrea Haywood of Olive Branch, a sophomore studying pre-dental hygiene and a member of the Rangerettes was crowned 2016 Homecoming Queen during halftime festivities.

“Danger” greets Heather Owens, a sophomore studying Medical Office Technology, and her son Ayden of Senatobia. (above) Practical nursing students at Lafayette-Yalobusha Technical Center in Oxford find a sunny spot to enjoy their Homecoming lunch. (top right) Residence Hall Supervisors Becky Moore and D’Shaunta Catchings get in a little train ride during the carrnival before the game. (middle right) Alumni from the classes of 1956-1959 visit during the Homecoming picnic. (bottom right) Photos by Julie Bauer and LaJuan Tallo

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Homecoming 2016

Freshman maid Alyssa Wilson of Olive Branch and her escort Hayden Scoggins of Southaven visit with family before heading to the game.

2016 Northwest Homecoming Queen Alandrea Haywood smiles for the crowd moments after being crowned.

Students enjoy a Homecoming Picnic Luncheon served by staff members at DeSoto Center. Students try out the bungee jump and rock climb at the Homecoming Carnival. Photos by Julie Bauer and LaJuan Tallo

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2016 Homecoming Court

Northwest President, Dr. Gary Lee Spears (right) congratulates 2016 Northwest Homecoming Queen Alandrea Haywood of Olive Branch as selected by the student body. Haywood is a sophomore studying pre-dental hygiene. She is the daughter of Orlantha and Pierre Jenkins. The queen and court were presented during halftime festivities. Photos by Julie Bauer

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Northwest Now

SOPHOMORE COURT Sophomore maids and their escorts (left to right) from the DeSoto Center, Daniel Moore of Lakeland, Tennessee, escorting Andrea Galloway of Columbia and Julian Gray of Marks escorting Andrea Green of Cleveland; from the Oxford campus Hunter Champion of Oxford escorting Allison Caldwell Champion, also of Oxford and Shelby McElwan of Oxford escorting Khadijah Thompson of Bruce; from the Senatobia campus, Rodney Hall of Olive Branch escorting Queen Alandrea Haywood, also of Olive Branch and Aaron Meek of Columbus escorting Kendall Newton of Hernando. FRESHMAN COURT Freshman maids and their escorts (left to right) Frank Rayford of Byhalia escorting Jerrica Birks of Cascilla, representing the Senatobia campus; Kindall Lumpkin of Houston, Texas escorting Jalliyah Hardiman of Grenada, representing the Oxford campus; Garrett Nickens of Senatobia escorting Gabrielle Paterson of Oxford, representing the Senatobia campus; Hayden Scoggins of Southaven escorting Alyssa Wilson of Olive Branch, representing the DeSoto Center; Noah Johnson of Olive Branch escorting Kathryn Lee of Olive Branch, representing the DeSoto Center and Trey McGovern of Batesville escorting Ralyn Bowling of Raymond, representing the Oxford campus.

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the sporting life

Rangers fall short in MACJC title defense No. 4 Northwest to face Trinity Valley in HOT Bowl Northwest's bid to defend its MACJC Championship fell just short on Saturday, Nov. 12 at Sullivan-Windham Field in Scooba, with the Rangers dropping a hardfought 38-30 decision at East Mississippi. EMCC (10-1) won its fifth conference championship in the last nine seasons, while Northwest fell to 9-3-1 all-time in championship games. Northwest (9-2) outgained EMCC 405317, controlled the time of possession and sacked De'Andre Johnson six times, but two costly interceptions led to two Lion touchdowns, which proved to be the difference in the game. After Northwest won the coin toss and elected to go on defense first, EMCC took its opening drive of the game 63 yards on six plays, capped by Jacquez Horsley's 8yard touchdown run. Northwest responded with confidence on its first drive, covering 62 yards on eight plays and knotting the game at 7-7 on Clay Holgorsen's 10-yard touchdown pass to Romeel Cochran. Wesley Bush's team-leading fifth interception of the year setup Northwest for its second scoring drive minutes later. Four straight running plays, highlighted by Cole Rotenberry's 34-yard gain, allowed Marquisian Chapman to give the Rangers a 13-7 lead with 6:57 left in the first quarter. The ensuing PAT was blocked. An unsportsmanlike conduct penalty after the touchdown allowed EMCC to start its next drive at their own 41-yard line and the Lions proceeded to drive 58 yards on five plays, capped by De'Andre Johnson's 46-yard quarterback keeper, to go back in front 14-13. Three plays later it was the EMCC defense who made the momentum-shifting play, with Ryan Lee making a splendid onehanded interception of Holgorsen and taking it 30 yards for a touchdown to make it 21-13 Lions. Northwest answered once again, this time with a lengthy 11-play, 66-yard drive, capped by Quarderman Sloan's 2-yard touchdown run. The Rangers benefited from a pass interference call in the end zone and face mask penalty before punching it in.

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After holding EMCC to a 24-yard Taylor Crabtree field goal, Northwest marched down the field for the go-ahead touchdown with 5:09 left in the first half. Cam Bowman entered for an injured Holgorsen and completed 3-of-4 passes for 54 yards, including a 17-yard touchdown pass to Cochran, his second of the night, to put the Rangers on top 27-24 at halftime. Northwest's opening drive of the second

in the third quarter all season in 10 previous games but allowed 14 unanswered and trailed by 38-27 after three quarters. After holding EMCC to back-to-back punts, Northwest strung together a lengthy scoring drive but had to settle for a 30-yard Drake McCarter field goal. Northwest traveled 77 yards on 12 plays, 60 yards coming from Sloan on the ground, but stalled on the EMCC 11-yard line with 3:31 to play. Northwest's on-side kick attempt was recovered by EMCC's Daniel Crowell at the

Northwest sacked EMCC quarterback De'Andre Johnson six times and held the Lions to 317 yards, their second-lowest offensive output of the season. Photo by jucoweekly.org

half stalled out at their own 40-yard line, and after a shanked punt, EMCC took over with fantastic field position at its own 40yard line. EMCC scored seven plays later to go back in front, 31-27, benefiting from backto-back pass interference calls that placed the ball at the Rangers' 2-yard line. Backup quarterback Vijay Miller scored a play later from two yards out. Bowman was intercepted on the Rangers' ensuing drive by Alex Lipscomb and returned it to the Northwest 48-yard line. Four plays later, Johnson hit Raphael Leonard for a 3-yard touchdown. Northwest had only given up 20 points

Rangers' 44-yard line and the Lions were able to run the clock all the way down to 12 seconds remaining in the game. Taking over from its own 13-yard line with no timeouts, Bowman completed a pair of passes to Darius Thomas and KyKy Austin out to the 40-yard line before the clock ran out. Northwest accepted an iinvitation to play in the 2016 C.H.A.M.P.S. Heart of Texas Bowl, marking the school’s 11th alltime bowl appearance and third in the last five years. Northwest (9-2) will face Trinity Valley (10-1) at 11 a.m. on Saturday, Dec. 3 at Bulldawg Stadium. —Kevin Maloney

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the sporting life

Lady Rangers, Rangers seek return to playoffs Success wasn’t hard to come by for the Northwest women’s basketball team last season. A 16-6 overall record and a 9-3 mark in the tough MACJC North Division is certainly one to be proud of, even if a hot CopiahLincoln prematurely ended the Lady Rangers’ postseason stay. Northwest jumped out to a 6-0 start to the season for a second straight year and entered the NJCAA Top 25 poll for the first time in nearly 15 years. One thing that the Lady Rangers will be missing heading into the 2016-17 season, however, is experience. Gone are consistent playmakers like WBCA All-American Sara Lytle, Brianna Williams and Kelsey Brown, three of the team’s top five scorers and rebounders from last season. Now entering his 30th season at the helm with 436-300 career record, Northwest Head Coach Don Edwards knows that replacing that type of talent won’t be easy. “Both Brianna and Kelsey could fill it up and shoot the three,” Edwards said. “They knew how to play and could handle the ball. This bunch we have this year might be more athletic than they were at this point last year, but they’re not as skilled.” Two sophomores that could be poised for big seasons are Janesha Johnson and Averyale Joy. Both players started at least 20 games last season and finished at third and fourth on the team in scoring, respectively. Both players averaged well over 10 points per game last season and will be called upon to lead the offense. “Losing Sara, Kelsey and Brianna accounted for about 80 percent of our scoring and about 70 percent of our rebounding,” fifth-year assistant coach Troy Howell said. “(But) I think the extra work that Joy and Johnson are putting in will help them fill those gaps. What they bring to the table is that they’re a little more vocal and they’ve been there and know how tough this league can be.” Other returning faces include forwards BrayLee Landreth and Destiny Gardner.

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Sophomore Averyale Joy (Middleton HS) averaged 12.3 points, 5.1 assists and 4.3 rebounds in 34 minutes per game last season. Photo by Gather Lacefield Both received ample playing time and gained great experience last year, playing in at least 19 of the team’s 28 contests. Landreth, a Benton native, also pulled in 108 total rebounds last season, good for third on the team. Northwest will welcome a total of 11 newcomers to the roster this season, highlighted by a pair of guards from Horn Lake in Chrissah Shaw and Shernique Adams. The duo helped the Lady Eagles to back-toback Class 6A state titles in 2014-15 and the second round of the playoffs last season. “They know what it takes to win,” Howell said, on Adams and Shaw. “They play hard and when you have two girls that have been to the high school state tournament all four years and winning a couple of championships, they bring that kind of effort and energy out onto the floor.” Also joining the Lady Rangers this year are guards Samantha Bridges, Shelbi Buford, Kordaja King, Destiny Gaylor and Emily Bush. Forwards Astraea Moore, Brooke Walker and Deja Faulkner round out the newcomers. On the men’s side, Northwest finished just three points shy from its first NJCAA National Tournament berth since the 2005-06 season a year ago in Clinton.

The Rangers rallied from a 15-point halftime deficit in the NJCAA Region 23 Semifinals before falling 75-73 to eventual region champion Northeast to end its season at 17-9 overall. Even with the final outcome, 13th-year Head Coach Bubba Skelton, the winningest coach in program history, is still pleased with the effort of last year’s team. “I was proud of what our team accomplished,” Skelton said. “We came on as the year went on, but we came so close to winning the north division and we came so close to making the national tournament. When you’re that close, it’s a little disappointing. With that being said, however, I thought we played awfully well several times to give us those opportunities. We just couldn’t quite get over the hump.” In order to replicate or even surpass last season’s success, the Rangers are going to have to replace Division I signees such as Seth LeDay (Virginia Tech) and Dre’Kalo Clayton (Austin Peay) in addition to losing two-year veterans Mark Partee and Tyrin Jones (Arkansas-Monticello). “This isn’t unusual for junior college,” Skelton said. “Obviously we’re going to miss high-level D1 guys like Seth and Dre. Mark and Tyrin were also steady for us at the guards and tough kids that really did a good job. We only have four guys returning but they all sprinkled in some minutes last year, so I think they can tell the other guys what they’re going to be looking at.” Northwest’s roster will be made up of six sophomores and nine freshmen. Leading the returning sophomore group is Clarksdale native Keelin Jackson who started in 11 of the team’s 26 contests and averaged 7.2 points and 4.7 rebounds per game. Jackson scored in double figures seven times, including a career-high 19 points at Northeast. “He’s not a real vocal person,” Skelton said. “But he’s real steady and real coachable. The great thing about him is that he’s going to play anywhere from point guard to the four-spot for us this year. He’s a natural too tight player, but we’re going to play continued on next page

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the sporting life him a little bit everywhere this year.” Among the other sophomores returning are guards Shelby McEwen and Trey Skelton and forward Isaiah Austin, all of whom saw time in at least 21 games. A mix of transfers and true freshmen comprise the latest group of newcomers. Dante Sterling, a 6-6, 200-pound forward, comes to Northwest after splitting time at Northwest Florida State College and at the Division I level at James Madison University. Sterling played in all 33 games last season at Northwest Florida, averaging 6.5 points and two rebounds per game while helping the Raiders to the NJCAA Quarterfinals. Therrell Gosier II was his team’s coleading scorer for nationally-ranked Blanche Ely High School and helped the Cougars to a 28-1 record and the Florida Class 7A state title. Although Gosier initially signed with Kentucky to play football, the Pompano Beach native eventually made his way to

Sophomore Keelin Jackson (Clarksdale) is the lone returning starter in 2016-17. He scored in double figures seven times last season, including a career-high 19 points at Northeast. Photo by Gather Lacefield

Northwest for hoops. Raekwon Bush, a 6-5, 220-pound forward and native of New Orleans, had several Division I offers out of Edna Karr High School while averaging a doubledouble his senior year. Transfers Alex Shepard and Dakota Dailey arrive from Ole Miss and Delta State along with Simpson Academy standout Brandon Cranford who should all provide immediate scoring for the Rangers. Shepard was the MAIS Player of the Year at Leake Academy his senior year after averaging 25.7 points, 5.5 rebounds and 5.0 assists per game and holds the school record with 3,260 career points. Dailey was a four-time AllMAIS selection out of Marshall Academy and was an MAIS Preseason Fab 15 from 2012-14 for three different sports, the only athlete to accomplish that feat. —Brian Lentz

Ranger soccer closes out shortened 2016 season Following one of the most successful men’s soccer seasons in 2015 that yielded a semifinal appearance in the MACJC Tournament and a tie for the most wins (12) in school history, the Northwest Rangers didn’t replicate that success in the win-loss column but did return to the postseason for a third time in four years. Under the leadership of fourthyear Head Coach Charlie Baldwin, the Rangers finished the 2016 season with a 6-7-1 overall record and a 4-31 mark in north division play. The Rangers took a thrilling 2-1 overtime victory against Itawamba in the regular season finale to claim the No. 3 seed from the north division. Northwest faced off at Jones County in the first round of the MACJC Playoffs but fell to the Bobcats in a gritty 5-2 decision to close out the season. The Rangers opened the first six matches of the season 4-1-1, claiming victories against Copiah-Lincoln, Jones County, East Central and Holmes. Of the Rangers’ six regular

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season losses, five came by two goals or less. On the women’s side, the Lady Rangers remained competitive under fourth-year Head Coach Levi Nunnally missing out on the MACJC Playoffs for a second straight year. Northwest finished 2-9-1 overall with a freshman-heavy lineup, with wins coming against Copiah-Lincoln and Southwest Mississippi. Both soccer seasons were cut short of what is normally an 18-game schedule, with season injuries and opponent scheduling hard to come by. Overall, five soccer players were selected to represent Northwest in the MACJC All-Star Game on Saturday, Nov. 12 at Freedom Ridge Park in Ridgeland. Sophomores Sierra Lasher and Kimbre Watros received bids from the Lady Rangers, while the trio of Lance Crabtree, David Raymundo and Bryant Young earned selections from the men’s team. —Brian Lentz

Freshman forward Peyton McKnatt (Germantown, Tenn.) scored five goals and added nine assists for a team-leading 19 points to help lead the Rangers to the postseason. Photo by Kevin Maloney

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ABE/GED program receives $10,000 grant from Dollar General Northwest’s Adult Basic Education/GED program recently received a $10,000 grant from the Dollar General Literacy Foundation to help students with literacy programs and to help pay GED testing fees. According to Betty Cossar, ABE/GED transition coordinator, she heard about the grant from a colleague at another college and decided to apply for a grant for Northwest. Cossar stated that the largest amount Dollar General will grant to an individual program is $15,000, so the ABE staff was very excited to have been awarded $10,000. “I have written and been awarded grants before, but usually they were no more than $2,000 or so. We were absolutely shocked when we opened the envelope and saw the check for $10,000,” Cossar said. She added that she thought it was the largest single grant that the ABE program has ever been awarded. “We could not be more grateful to Dollar General,” Cossar said. In order to receive the grant, Northwest needed to demonstrate their program objectives and how those objectives are met and measured. She also showed proof that the program has been supported by the community by recognizing that the program has received grants from Entergy, the Batesville Rotary Club and churches and individuals in the past. They also noted the illiteracy and high school drop out rates in the

state and the unemployment rates in the state and in our local area, Cossar said. The Dollar General Literacy Foundation was established in 1993 in honor of Dollar General's co-founder, J.L. Turner, who was functionally illiterate with only a third grade education. He was a farmer's son who dropped out of school when his father was killed in an accident. With determination and hard work, he began what has now become a successful company. Since 1993, the Dollar General Literacy Foundation has awarded more than $110 million in grants to nonprofit organizations and schools that have helped more than 6.8 million individuals learn to read, prepare for the high school equivalency test, or learn the English language. Northwest ABE provides opportunities for persons age 17 or above within the college’s 11-county district to receive basic skills education through the high school level. All adults, regardless of age, are able to attend classes to acquire basic education skills or to work for a certificate of high school equivalence (GED), the legal equivalent of a high school diploma. The GED certificate may be used for employment or further education. Northwest offers three authorized GED testing sites, and no tuition fees are charged for classes or for books, instructional materials or supplies. A fee is charged for those who take the GED test. —LaJuan Tallo

Northwest’s Adult Basic Education/GED program recently received a $10,000 grant from the Dollar General Literacy Foundation to help students with literacy programs and to help pay GED testing fees. ABE instructors gathered at their fall in-service meetings to celebrate receiving the grant. Instructors pictured include Shannon Long, Victor Richardson, Ada Armstrong, Margarett Mays, Carrie Bradley, Martha Strong, Kandi Tippit, Shonnie Sullivan, Jennifer Williams, Kay Barron, Karen Harris, Mary Julia Moore, Kim Brown, Ketia Francis Johnson, Anthony Tolbert, Shana Blakely, Bob Bunkley, Beth Little,lead instructor and Betty Cossar, transition specialist. Photo by LaJuan Tallo

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Nursing preceptor program benefits one of its own When Austin Mabry was a nursing student at Northwest, she told Lacey Gentry, her Freshman II instructor, that she wanted to “be like her” and teach others to become nurses. Mabry has come full circle since then. She has earned her Master of Science in Nursing Education and is now a member of the Northwest nursing faculty. “Lacey was actually the reason I wanted to teach. I knew I did not want to stop with just my ADN, and I didn’t envision myself as a nurse practitioner,” Mabry said. After working as an RN for a couple of years, she decided to go to the University of Mississippi Medical Center (UMMC) School of Nursing in Jackson. As a part of her studies, Mabry had to participate in two Nurse Education Practicums. In these practicums, students have to work with a preceptor, or a nurse educator, who will Nursing Instructors Austin supervise them as they learn to teach. Mabry decided to return to Northwest for her practicum and requested that Gentry be her preceptor. “I loved everybody here. They were all so supportive of me when I was a student here, and they really care that you are successful as a student. That was very important to me,” Mabry said. “It’s the equivalent of student teaching, except they are learning to be nurse educators,” said Dr. Denise Bynum, director of Northwest’s School of Nursing. Bynum said that Northwest has been providing nurse educator preceptors for graduate nursing students for the past several years. “About half of the faculty here graduated from Northwest, and half of those instructors came back here to do their practice teaching,” Bynum said. She explained that nursing graduate students have to complete certain objectives such as teaching lectures, preparing test questions, teaching in the simulation laboratory or teaching clinicals all under the guidance of a preceptor for a certain number of hours in each practicum. “We probably started doing this close to 10 years ago. At first we would only have one or two, but these days we have three every semester. We take students on a first-come, first- served basis, and we get a lot of requests for our instructors to act as these preceptors. We have a good reputation here, and we are recommended to students at the universities. We take as many as we can,” Bynum said. Gentry, who coordinates the preceptor program at Northwest, said that the nursing faculty carefully screen graduate students who request an instructor from Northwest as a preceptor. “There

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are a lot of checks and balances in place to insure we have the best graduate students we can get,” Gentry said. She stated preceptors must get a copy of the graduate student’s syllabus and course objectives and must sign a contract or preceptor agreement. It is up to them to guide their students in teaching, help them with projects and provide the resources they need to complete the course and be successful. “They are carefully screened, because this directly affects our program and our students. It is a lot of work for the preceptor, but training nurse educators is very important,” Bynum said. Mabry graduated with her ADN from Northwest in 2010. After becoming licensed, she worked as a registered nurse at Tri Lakes Medical Center for a year before joining the staff as a clinical field staff supervisor at Sta Home Health and Mabry and Lacey Gentry Hospice. In 2012, she worked as an RN at Preferred Nurse Staffing while studying for her master’s degree at UMMC. She graduated in 2014 and worked as an adjunct instructor at Northwest before becoming full time in fall, 2015. Bynum said that Mabry is a great asset to the nursing faculty at Northwest. “She is very quiet and does her job well. She gets along well with everybody and is a good team player,” Bynum said. She and her husband are the parents of a one-year-old daughter. She received the “Rising Star Award” at Tri Lakes in 2010. Her professional memberships include Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society, Mississippi Nurses Association, Northwest Student Nurses Association, Institute for Healthcare Improvement, Medscape Health Professional Network and Faculty Focus Higher Education Teaching Strategies. She is very active with her family and at her local church as their festival activities coordinator, junior class coordinator and sanctuary committee. “Austin’s greatest attribute is her caring heart. She has a nurse’s heart, truly. I saw that in her when she was a student,” Gentry said. For Mabry, coming back to Northwest as an instructor has been a challenge, but is a challenge she loves. “It has been very rewarding. Everyone has welcomed me with open arms and has been very encouraging. It felt pretty funny being on the other side of the lectern, but I’m getting acclimated. I think Northwest is the greatest program. We are a family, and we do everything we can to make sure every student who needs to be successful is successful,” Mabry said. —LaJuan Tallo

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Building on

Tradition

Rendering of Health Sciences Building with attached covered walkway to existing Division of Nursing Building.

Rendering of Football Field House front view (north side).

Projects completed in FY2016 HEALTH SCIENCES BUILDING PROJECT HIGHLIGHTS • Construction began January, 2016 • 30,089 total square feet • $4.7 million contract amount • Programs: EMT-Paramedic, Practical Nursing, Medical Assistant, Physical Therapy Assistant • Four classrooms, two computer labs, specialized training labs for each program, simulation lab, 14 faculty offices • Scheduled for completion in 2017 FOOTBALL FIELD HOUSE PROJECT HIGHLIGHTS • Construction began January, 2016 • 24,569 total square feet • $4.8 million contract amount • Coaches offices, weight room & locker/dressing rooms for football, player viewing rooms, player meeting rooms/visitor dressing rooms, training/PT center for all sports • Scheduled for completion in spring, 2017

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• Tech I South Interior Renovations: completed in September • Taylor Residence Hall Energy Efficiency Renovations: completed in August • Elevator Modernizations at Humanities and Tunica Buildings: completed in August • Baseball Field Project: completed January • Lighting Efficiency Projects Phase III: completed FY2016 • DeSoto Center-Olive Branch ADA Restroom Renovations: completed Spring 2016 • Humanities Egress Improvements: completed Summer 2016

Projects currently underway • Tech III Re-roof anticipated completion; Energy efficiencies and interior renovation projects - anticipated completion Summer 2017 • Trane HVAC controls upgrades-anticipated completion Spring 2017

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honorariums/memorials

The Legacy of Memorial and Honorarium Gifts A great many of the gifts that are received by the Northwest Foundation are given to pay tribute to the men and women who have profoundly impacted the lives of others—parents, siblings, teachers, sons and daughters. Some gifts are designated for permanently endowed scholarship funds, which means the gift “keeps on giving” forever. The memorial and honorarium gifts listed were given between June 1, 2016 and Oct. 31, 2016, in appreciation both to those who gave the gifts and to those who have lived extraordinary and inspirational lives. If you wish to make a memorial or honorarium gift, please contact the Foundation Office at (662) 560-1103. MEMORIALS Fran Alexander by Ms. Betsy Scott Sam Allison by Mr. Marty Allison De Anderson by Mr. and Mrs. Guy Purdy Virginia Stewart Anderson by Ms. Linda Ferguson Cox Mr. N.C. Ferguson, Jr. Ms. Ruby Ferguson Walton Jerry Baker by Arkabutla Baptist Church–Men’s Sunday School Class Mr. Whit Perry

Joe Broadway by Ms. Julia Austin Mr. Taylor and Dr. Bonnie Buntin Mr. and Mrs. Al Canon Mr. N.C. Ferguson, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Keith Godbold Dr. and Mrs. David Haraway Mr. and Mrs. William Harden Mr. and Mrs. Fred T. Ogg Mr. and Mrs. Guy Purdy Tyler M. Brooker by Mr. and Mrs. Guy Purdy Robbie H. Butts by Mr. Joe Elliott Howard & Edna Carpenter by Mr. and Mrs. Herman Coats

Virginia Farris by Mr. N.C. Ferguson, Jr.

James Jackson by Mr. Dennis Cobb

Hope O. Forrester by Mr. and Mrs. Guy Purdy

Kitty Jenkins by Mr. George M. Lee, Jr.

Jessica Gresham by Ms. Linda S. Laine

Bert Johnson by Col. Charles R. Johnson and Ms. Trudy Hall

Russell Hadksey by Mr. and Mrs. Todd Latham Janet Lynn Hailey by Mr. and Mrs. William Correro Joyce Halfacre by Dr. Larry Sylvester

Charlotte Johnston by Mr. Wayne Ferguson Mr. Marcus Perkins Mr. and Mrs. Greg Steinman Dr. Amy Stewart James R. Jumper by Mr. and Mrs. Guy Purdy Khalid Khouri by Mr. Bud Donahou

Joseph “Bert” Bertucci by Mr. and Mrs. William Correro

Regina Clark by Dr. Darrell Barnes Ms. Patricia Field Mr. Richie Lawson Mr. John David Randall Dr. Larry Sylvester

Ross Boatright, Sr. by Mrs. Sandra Roy

Philip W. Correro by Mr. and Mrs. Richard Tallo

A.W. and LaNelle Bouchillon by Mr. and Mrs. Barry Bouchillon

Holli Pond Day by Mr. Zabron A. Davis, IV

Claude Haraway by Mr. and Mrs. George P. Aldrich Mr. Taylor D. and Dr. Bonnie Buntin Mr. and Mrs. Al Canon Ms. Jane M. Donnelly Mr. and Mrs. Bill Felts Mr. and Mrs. Laney Funderburk Dr. and Mrs. David Haraway Ms. Diane A. Hawks Mr. and Mrs. Bill Mitchell Mr. and Mrs. Fred T. Ogg Mr. and Mrs. Howard Patterson Mr. and Mrs. Guy Purdy Dr. and Mrs. James A. Truly Mr. James E. Woods

Charles & Elizabeth Dean by Mrs. Delores Jennings

Pete & Pauline Harris by Mr. and Mrs. Dean Wright

Lillian McKenzie by Mr. N.C. Ferguson, Jr.

Larry E. Dhority by Mr. and Mrs. C.J. Burti Mrs. Pat Dhority Mr. and Mrs. Marion Wells

Tommy Hogan by Mr. and Mrs. Ken Harris

Pennie Pullen McKinney by Ms. Toni Barden Mrs. Toni Blair Mrs. Pam Briscoe

W.T. Beavers by Mr. and Mrs. Guy Purdy Joe Beckum by Mrs. Jean Beckum Mr. and Mrs. Al Canon Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Paul Wooten

Jerry Boutwell by Mr. and Mrs. Howard Patterson Buddy Boyer by Mr. Whit Perry Calvin Bradford by Mrs. Peggie Harden Ms. Jean Steadham

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Bela J. & Ruby Black Chain by Dr. and Mrs. Buddy Chain, Jr.

Judge Anthony Farese by Mr. and Mrs. Scott Thomas

Lucille T. Hollister by Dr. Denise Bynum Robert Hyde by Rev. and Mrs. Rufus L. Lloyd

Paul W. Lawrence, Jr. by Mrs. Barbara Lawrence Betty Manning by Mr. N.C. Ferguson, Jr. Tyson McAlexander by Mr. Whit Perry Gloria Kay McCarson by Mr. and Mrs. Guy Purdy James “Jim” McClure, Jr. by Mr. and Mrs. Al Canon J.W. McElhaney by Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy Young

Jonathan Mills by Ms. Lynn Kirkpatrick Mr. Scott Mills

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honorariums/memorials Chief Bill Moore by Mrs. Becky Moore Mary Alice Moorman by Mr. David Hargett Mr. James R. Haynes, III Ms. Kelley Magee

Dr. Michael Shaheen by Mr. and Mrs. Bobby Shaheen

Tim Mote by Mr. and Mrs. William Correro

Tim Shorter by Ms. Kathy Buchanan Mr. Joe Elliott Mr. and Mrs. Scott Holmes Mr. Matthew Johnson Ms. Suzette Logan Ms. Lisa Russell

Jeffrey Nichols by Mrs. Elizabeth Dickerson

Natalie Stovall-Frady by Mr. and Mrs. Guy Purdy

John S. Orrell by Mr. Carson Hughes

Dorothy E. Sutton by Mr. and Mrs. Guy Purdy

Michael Ozier by Mr. and Mrs. William Correro

James L. (Trey) Sylvester by Dr. Darrell Barnes Dr. Larry Sylvester

W.P. Perkins by Ms. Betsy Scott

Lauren Elizabeth Tallo by Ms. Sondra Holliday

Scott Potts by Mr. and Mrs. Ken Harris Mr. and Mrs. Todd Latham

Elizabeth Tanner by Mr. and Mrs. Guy Purdy

Nannie Presley by Ms. Gail Clubb Stephen Purdy by Mr. and Mrs. Clifton Dandridge Robbie and Margie Merrick Mr. and Mrs. Guy Purdy Marie Ann Ray by Robbie and Margie Merrick Mr. and Mrs. Guy Purdy Dr. Augustinus Rinaldy by Dr. Darrell Barnes Tony Roberson by Mr. Kevin Wulff Ross & Lucile Robison by Mr. and Mrs. Mike Robison Isabelle Roth by Mr. Whit Perry Helen Rush by Mr. and Mrs. Guy Purdy Robert Sanders by Mr. and Mrs. Paul Brown W.A. Sanders by Mr. N.C. Ferguson, Jr.

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Charles Taylor by Mrs. Ella Taylor

Calvin Grover Youngblood by Mrs. Ruth Wiliams-Hooker HONORARIUMS Ruth Ann Allison by Mr. Marty Allison Dr. Marilyn Bateman by Mrs. Pam Briscoe Mrs. Elizabeth Harvey Mrs. Phyllis Johnson Mr. and Mrs. Walter Scott Ms. Judy E. Wilbanks Dr. Gordon Bigelow by Mr. Larry Anderson Dr. Jack Butts by Mr. Joe Elliott Earline Cocke by Mr. and Mrs. Perry Arrington Ms. Glynda Hall Jim and Alda Tesar Jane Davis by Mr. Jerry Davis

Lane Tutor by Mr. Jim Anderson Mr. David E. Beavers Mr. and Mrs. William Correro Mr. and Mrs. Sledge Floyd, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Brent Harding Mr. and Mrs. John McCrary Mr. and Mrs. Pete Moran Mr. and Mrs. John Norton University of Mississippi Foundation

Mike Dottorey by Mr. Chuck Adams Mrs. Suzanne Brown Dr. Denise Bynum Mr. and Mrs. Robert Disney Dr. Matthew Domas Ms. Darlene Greenlee Mrs. Elizabeth Harvey Mrs. Jere Herrington Mr. Richie Lawson Mr. and Mrs. Larry Simpson Mrs. Betty Spence Dr. Chuck Strong

C.B. & Marjorie Norton Walker by Mr. and Mrs. Ken Dossett

Keith Godbold by Mrs. Phyllis Johnson Mrs. Dawn Stevens

Garnett B. West, Sr. by Ms. Debby Rutledge

Sandy Grisham by Mr. Bud Donahou Ms. Susanne VanDyke

Gail Wilborn by Mrs. Anita Graham C. Chad Williams by Mr. and Mrs. Steve Sturgeon Drew Young by Hinds Chapel and Horn Lake United Methodist Churches - Senior Adults Mrs. Jean Steadham Mr. & Mrs. Jimmy Young

Jo Ellen Logan by Mr. and Mrs. Al Canon Mr. and Mrs. Milton Cushman Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Respess Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Rogers Ms. Katherine Roos Dr. and Mrs. Ken Sipley Dr. Patsy Sledge Dr. and Mrs. Robert L. Smith, Jr. Mrs. Becky Triplett Mariglyn N. Meacham by Ms. Audrey C. Breeding Mr. and Mrs. Al Canon Mr. and Mrs. Donny Castle Mr. and Mrs. Ellington Massey Mr. and Mrs. Joe West Patricia Miller by Dr. Carol Cleveland Jodie Moore by Mr. and Mrs. Guy Purdy Jonathan Nichols by Mrs. Elizabeth Dickerson Frances C. Perkins by Ms. Betsy Scott Jayne River by Mr. Joe Elliott Dr. Gary Lee Spears by Dr. Darrell Barnes Marilyn R. Spears by Mrs. Carol Peterson Jean Steadham by Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy Young Vivian Sharon Tallo by Mr. and Mrs. Richard Tallo

Dr. Jerry Hollis by Dr. Darrell Barnes Mr. Bud Donahou Brenda Gentry Holmes by Mr. Joe Elliott Cathryn Hyde by Rev. and Mrs. Rufus L. Lloyd Richie Lawson by Dr. Darrell Barnes

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Now

Northwest Fall 2016

A publication of Northwest Mississippi Community College

President Dr. Gary Lee Spears Vice President for Finance Gary Mosley Vice President for Student Services/Chief of Staff Dan Smith Vice President for Education Richie Lawson Chairman, Northwest Board of Trustees Mike Moore

Northwest Foundation Associate Vice President of Development & Special Projects/Associate Editor Sybil R. Canon • srcanon@northwestms.edu Director of Alumni Affairs & Development Operations Dolores Wooten • dbwooten@northwestms.edu Scholarship Coordinator & Foundation Assistant Patti Gordon • pgordon@northwestms.edu

Communications Director of Communications/Editor Julie R. Bauer • jrbauer@northwestms.edu Assistant Director of Communications/ Graphic Designer LaJuan Tallo • ltallo@northwestms.edu Assistant Director of Marketing/ Digital Media KayLeigh McCool • kmccool@northwestms.edu Graphic Designer Lindsay Crawford • lcrawford@northwestms.edu Coordinator for Sports Information Kevin Maloney • kmaloney@northwestms.edu Assistant Coordinator for Sports Information Brian Lentz • blentz@northwestms.edu

For address changes, please contact Alumni Affairs at (662) 560-1105. Northwest Now is published bi-annually as a joint effort of the Northwest Foundation and the Office of Communications.

AFFIRMATIVE ACTION Please visit the Northwest website at www.northwestms.edu/affirmativeaction to view the College’s Notice of Non-Discrimination, Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action.

contents features

6 8 11 22 29

recognizing excellence Faculty, staff are recognized for excellence in customer service and teaching.

celebrating giving Foundation scholarship students thank donors at annual ceremony and reception.

cover story: generous one Bobby Dunlap is an example of selfless generosity both at Northwest and in Mississippi.

celebrating community Homecoming returns to Thursday, brings fun for Northwest community.

teaching nurses to teach Alumna comes full circle to teach nursing at Northwest.

departments 1 2 3 18 25 33

student snapshot/leroy charles president’s reflections/dr. gary lee spears alumni president’s notes/mike boren around campus the legacy continues the sporting life from the heart of northwest/sybil canon alumni news/dolores wooten

On the cover: Dunlap and Kyle CEO Bobby Dunlap (center) visits with some of the students who receive the Gateway Tire Endowment. Photo by Julie Bauer

from the

heart of Northwest

Sybil R. Canon I am writing this article on November 1, and you should be reading it sometime during the first week of December. Today, we are one week away from the Presidential election and, when you read this, everyone will know who will be leading our nation for the next four years. I read an amusing quote by President Abraham Lincoln: Elections belong to the people. It's their decision. If they decide to turn their back on the fire and burn their behinds, then they will just have to sit on their blisters. No matter who wins the Presidency, the vast majority of Americans will be doing the same thing after the election that they were doing before the election—getting up each morning, tending to their families, going to work, cheering at football games, worshipping in their churches, trying to make each day count for something. We at Northwest will be about our usual business of teaching and encouraging students. I want to share with you a portion of an email that I received from a student who is receiving a Foundation scholarship: Three years ago, I moved to the USA. I did not know anybody, I did not drive, and my English was not good enough to communicate freely. I went through a very challenging time. First, I thought it would be impossible to get an education for me because I am an immigrant and I was not sure I would be welcomed to school on the same level as Americans. My adviser at Northwest encouraged me to try and then decide if I wanted to pursue it further. I did, and I did it successfully, making all A’s. You are doing a great job to cover our expenses with such great scholarships, and I mean it. It is not just financial help. It is enormous motivation that you plant in our minds. Every time I receive help from you and others, I encourage myself to work more and more, so that one day I want to be in your place and help new students to gain success in their lives, just as you have helped me. I have always heard that the USA is a country where dreams can come true and where opportunities are available to anyone who is willing to work hard enough to achieve their goals. I am proof of keeping that dream alive. I am an eternal optimist, and I believe that the American dream will continue for the sons and daughters who are born in this country and for those who follow the pathway to citizenship and come to our country seeking better lives. Northwest opens its arms to all of our students with the belief that we can make a difference in their lives. It is such an enormous blessing to work at Northwest because, every day of my past 20 years here at this college, I have experienced goodness and generosity from our donors, and I have experienced hope, promise, and possibility in the lives of the students we are able to help because of these good and generous donors. Truly, this is the “Heart of Northwest.”

alumni news Dolores Wooten “Reflections” Merriam-Webster defines reflection as “an effect produced by an influence.” I would like to ask all the alumni to take a few minutes to reflect on your time here at Northwest. Perhaps you met your spouse here. How about that instructor who influenced you in a way that no one ever has? Do you remember the skill or course that had a great impact on your career path? Was your involvement in a squad, club or group one that provided you with lifechanging experiences? Do you have a best friend or a group of friends who are still there for you today? And the ultimate question: “would I be where I am today if it had not been for my experiences and start at Northwest?” If you can affirm all these thoughts then ask yourself, “What can I do to provide that same influence for students today?” We can all begin by giving back to where it all started. You may say to yourself that what little you can give wouldn’t make a difference. But remember our little can become much. Then you are probably wondering how you can help. As you consider your end-of-year giving please consider making a contribution to the Northwest Foundation. There are many areas that could use your help. Consider scholarship support, textbook assistance or a particular endowment. Every dime given to the Northwest Foundation provides much-needed financial assistance to our students. I challenge every alumnus to make a contribution, regardless of amount, to the Northwest Foundation. If you need help deciding what fund, please give me a call and I will walk you through some suggestions. Reflect on your time at Northwest, and your decision to give will be simple. Thank you for all you do for our students and the path that you have made. Our students can walk this path and know they can succeed simply because they’ve seen that in so many of you. Please drop by for a visit anytime you are in the area. We would love to show you the new buildings and share with you all the changes.


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Now

FALL 2016

Parting

shot Ole Miss art professor and Northwest alumnus Jared Spears (right) visits with renowned artist Glennray Tutor, cousin and Lana Tutor Bridges, sister of Lane Tutor at the opening reception for the Lane Tutor Exhibition at Northwest. Tutor was a beloved local artist who taught at Northwest for 35 years. He passed away in August, 2016. Photo by Julie Bauer

Bobby Dunlap, founder of Gateway Tire: Celebrating generosity and giving

INSIDE: scholarship ceremony • 2+2 tourney • Legacies • fall sports

Northwest Now Fall 2016  

Northwest Mississippi Community College's magazine for alumni and friends of the college is published bi-annually as a joint effort of the N...

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