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Getting Out There

2014

The Empowerment Starts Here.


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The Empowerment Starts Here.

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Getting Out There

2014


Getting Out There

2014

The Empowerment Starts Here.

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Contents 4

The Dias Collective Information and Services

41

Profile of Jesse James

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A Word from Jonny Wilkinson, CEO of Tiaho Trust

42

Whanau Ora and its Inclusive Inter-agency Approach

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Alzhiemers Northland Works in our Communities

43

2014-15 Tiaho Events

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Profile of Rod Coe , Community Adviser of Alzheimer’s Northland

45

Angel Flight for those in need

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Arthritis New Zealand is committed to Northland

46

Age Concern Whangarei Services promote wellbeing

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Profile of Leanne Kemp

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Businesses Supporting “Getting Out There”

12

Blind Foundation Provides Services and support for Craig Jessop

50

Childcare Agencies Supporting those Children with Disabilities

13

Profile of Craig Jessop and Erik Witting

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Community Services Supporting “Getting Out There”

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The Brain Injury Association and the Life Changing Results for the Injured Person and their Whanau

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Home and Community Support with Geneva Northlink Healthcare

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Profile of Karlene Joyce

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Idea Services Provide Support

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CCS Disability Action launch their new resource ‘In the Know’

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Papermill Supports Disabled People

55

Radius Care offers Quality Care

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CCS Disability Action Shared or Foster Care

56

The Special Olympian’s get ready for National Games

18

Deaf Aotearoa New Zealand Supports Hearing Impaired People

57

Spectrum Care Supports People with Disabilities

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Supporting Families Northland offers Support

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Profile of Farrell Cunliffe

59

Retirement Villages Supporting Our Senior Citizens

20

Epilepsy New Zealand Provides Support for People with Epilepsy and their Families

60

St John Medical Alarm Assistance

61

TLC4U2 Provides Live In Care for the Elderly

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Northland’s Halberg Disability Foundation Changes Lives Through Sport

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Directory of Important Events

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Profile of James Roberston 1 Year On

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Huntingtons Disease Association Provides Support and Advocacy for those Sufferers of the Disease

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Jane Devine works with Huntington’s Sufferers

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Motor Neurone Disease Association Cares for those with the Disease

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Lin Field speaks of her role with the Motor Neurone Disease Association

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Multiple Sclerosis Northland Offers a Wide Range of Services

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Profile of Brenda McCreedy

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The New Zealand Down Syndrome Offers Support

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Profile of Freedom Harrison

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The Northland 2015 ‘Getting Out There’ Expo

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The Disability Advisory Group provides vital input into Council Plans

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The Accessibility Map of Whangarei City Centre

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NorthAble is Your First Stop for Accessible Disability Resources

35

Profile of Stephen Waite

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Parent to Parent and Altogether Autism Northland has a new co-ordinator Lynne Hansen

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Profile of Karen Wallace and Parent to Parent Services

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Parkinson’s Society Northland provides Support to those with the disease and their Caregivers

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Profile of Allen Smith

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Stroke Foundation of New Zealand works to reduce risk and Improve Outcomes for Stroke Sufferers

Your Introduction to ‘Getting Out There’

W

elcome to the third annual publication of ‘Getting Out There’ our great resource for those with disabilities or those who have family members with disabilities.

This booklet offers support, advocacy, information or education about all 15 member organisation’s of the DIAS Collective, and and other supporting services and businesses,. has been greatly supported by these organisation’s and the Tiaho Trust. It gives insight into the lives of those persons living in our local communities suffering from these diseases or disabilities. and the trials some of our Northlander’s face on a day to day basis with their disability, showing the motivation these sufferers have to lead full lives. Whether you are a person in need of these services, or a carer there is information in this publication for you, or the information provided will benefit you or your family. Each year the team at the Northern Advocate get great pleasure in putting this publication together, and want to thank all of you in assisting to make it happen again, and for those of you featured in our 2014 ‘Getting Out There’ for telling your personal stories.


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Getting Out There

The Empowerment Starts Here.

Information & Services

2014

Edition Seven May 2014

Relating to disability in Northland Linking people, families and carers living with a disability to information, advice and support in their community.

Visit www.tiaho.org.nz/dias about what services these organisations provide in Northland.

In Northland, there are a range of organisations providing a Disability Information Advisory Service. These are known as the ‘Northland DIAS Collective’. Tiaho Trust supports these organisations by helping to improve the access to and utilization of their you are unsure who to contact or have any questions, call us on: FREEPHONE: 0800 430 3406.

" " " " "

Advice and information Advocacy Community education and awareness Support groups and networking Home visits

" " " " "

Access to health professionals Referrals and assessments Equipment Seminars/workshops Resources

Together, Tiaho Trust and the DIAS Collective, empower the Northland community by promoting the disabled community as valued citizens who contribute, participate and add to the diversity of New Zealand society.

For DIAS contact details please refer overleaf Tai Tokerau Maori Trust Board Building 3-5 Hunt Street, Whangarei PO Box 374, Whangarei FREEPHONE 0800 430 3406 Phone 09 430 340# " Fax 09 438 1679 info@tiaho.org.!$ " www.tiaho.org.nz


Getting Out There

2014

The Empowerment Starts Here.

Information & Services

Relating to disability in Northland

A Tiaho Trust Project

Your A –Z directory of disability support providers: Alzheimer’s

www.tiaho.org.nz/alzheimers

www.tiaho.org.nz/arthritis

Arthritis New Zealand

Blind Foundation

148 Corks Road, Tikipunga PO Box 1179, Whangarei Phone: (09) 438 7771 Fax: (09) 438 2974 northland@alzheimers.org.nz www.alzheimers.org.nz

Suite 1, 1 James Street P O Box 1978 Whangarei 0140 Freephone: 0800 663 463 www.arthritis.org.nz

277 Kamo Road, Whangarei Phone: (09) 437 1199 Freephone: 0800 243 333 general@blindfoundation.org.nz www.blindfoundation.org.nz

Brain Injury Association

www.tiaho.org.nz/blind_foundation

www.tiaho.org.nz/brain_injury

www.tiaho.org.nz/ccs

CCS Disability Action

Deaf Aotearoa Northland

PO Box 4001, Kamo, Whangarei Phone: (09) 459 5013 Fax: (09) 437 0714 northland@brain-injury.org.nz www.brain-injury.org.nz

291 Kamo Road, Whangarei PO Box 8035, Kensington, Whangarei Phone: (09) 437 1899 Fax: (09) 437 0209 northland@ccsdisabilityaction.org.nz www.ccsdisabilityaction.org.nz

1A Deveron Street PO Box 1834, Whangarei 0140 Phone: (09) 437 2022 Fax: (09) 437 2028 Mobile: 021 641 178 aklrception@deaf.org.nz www.deaf.org.nz

Down Syndrome Support Group

www.tiaho.org.nz/deaf_aotearoa

www.tiaho.org.nz/down_syndrome

www.tiaho.org.nz/epilepsy

Epilepsy Northland

Huntington’s

Kara Road, RD 9, Whangarei Phone: (09) 434 6723 Freephone: 0800 693 724 national.coordinator@nzdsa.org.nz www.nzdsa.org.nz

Suite 5, 71 Bank Street PO Box 712, Whangarei 0140 Phone: (09) 438 5498 Freephone: 0800EPILEPSY northland@epilepsy.org.nz www.epilepsy.org.nz

PO Box 16181, Sandringham Auckland 1351 Phone: (09) 815 9703 Freephone: 0800 432 825 huntingtonsakld@xtra.co.nz www.hdauckland.org.nz

Multiple Sclerosis Northland

Motor Neurone Disease www.tiaho.org.nz/mnda

www.tiaho.org.nz/northable

Suite 6, 71 Bank Street PO Box 1555, Whangarei Phone/Fax: (09) 438 3945 Mobile: 027 539 9883 nthldms@xtra.co.nz www.msnz.org.nz

Yarnton House, 14 Erson Ave, Royal Oak, Auckland PO Box 24036, Auckland 1345 Phone: (09) 624 2148

40 John Street, Whangarei Freephone: 0508 637 200 drc@northable.org.nz www.northable.org.nz Equipment Showroom: (09) 430 3469 LYNKZ: (09) 430 3470 98 Victoria Street, Dargaville

www.tiaho.org.nz/ms

Stroke Foundation

www.mnda.org.nz

Parent to Parent Northland

www.tiaho.org.nz/stroke

www.tiaho.org.nz/parent2parent

PO Box 1937, Whangarei Mid North/Far North Mobile 0274 599 545 Freephone: 0800459954 northland@stroke.org.nz www.stroke.org.nz

291 Kamo Road, Kamo PO Box 4295, Whangarei 0141 Phone: (09) 437 3337 Freephone: 0508 236 236 northland@parent2parent.org.nz www.parent2parent.org.nz

www.tiaho.org.nz/huntingtons

NorthAble

Parkinson’s Northland

www.tiaho.org.nz/parkinsons PO Box 641, Whangarei 0141 Phone/Fax: (09) 438 4282 Freephone: 0800 473 4636 northland@parkinsons.org.nz www.parkinsons.org.nz

Tai Tokerau Maori Trust Board Building 3-5 Hunt Street, Whangarei PO Box 374, Whangarei FREEPHONE 0800 430 3406 Phone 09 430 340# " Fax 09 438 1679 info@tiaho.org.!$ " www.tiaho.org.nz

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The Empowerment Starts Here.

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Getting Out There

2014

A word from Jonny Wilkinson CEO Tiaho Trust

I’

m very excited to welcome all Northlanders to the third edition of ‘Getting Out There’. I think you’ll find this publication brimming with relevant information, stories and inspiring individuals that make up our deliciously diverse community of Northland. It has been a very exciting year for Tiaho Trust and the disabled community in Northland. We have had some great events since the last ‘Getting Out There’ was published, such as International Day of People with Disabilities, Surf’s Up, photo/ art exhibitions, local elections, Support the Supporter events, expo’s, disability responsiveness training , our Whanau Ora Plans, and supporting our Northland DIAS Collective in their events and awareness dates. I’ve been witnessing a convergence of the older population and the younger disabled population to make a powerful segment of our community. This convergence is particularly important

as the 2014 General Elections looms; it’s time to shake our democratic tail feathers! I encourage you all to engage in our 20 percent campaign featured in this supplement. As with the last edition we have made this one even bigger and better! In this edition you can read about the ‘Getting Out There Expo’ planned in 2015 which promises to be a fantastic event. This will be held in conjunction with the Northern Advocate who I would like to acknowledge for their consistent support for the disability community in Northland. In the age of information technology, regional newspapers like the Northern Advocate are finding it hard to stay afloat. We need to support our local newspaper because without them our voice will be homogenised amid the plethora of digital information. The Northern Advocate has been publishing my fortnightly column, “A Different Light”, which gives a different perspective on every day issues viewed

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CEO of Tiaho Trust Jonny Wilkinson

through a disability lens. We hope that this year’s “Getting Out There” will do the same.


Getting Out There

2014

The Empowerment Starts Here.

Tiaho Trust

T

iaho Trust is a disabled led organisation that is proactive in providing advice, education and support to develop communities that are inclusive of disabled people and who value their contribution to the community of Northland. We are unique in that the majority of the staff at Tiaho Trust have an impairment of one sort or another, as compared to the majority of disability providers in New Zealand who are predominantly run by able-bodied people. This gives us a strong sense of disability culture and we can truly empathize with the people we support.

What we do:

We deliver specialist disability awareness and responsiveness training to both the public and private sectors on how to provide exceptional service to disabled and mature service users, advocacy, disability advoce and information. Tiaho Trust also provides a Wha¯nau Ora

service that supports families with disabled whanau members. You can find out more in the “Whanau Ora” section of this supplement. This year we have been contracted to run the “20 percent” campaign, to engage with and encourage the disabled community of New Zealand to think about disability issues when they vote in this year’s general election. Tiaho Trust supports a range of organisations that provide disability information and advisory services about a specific disability, or disability in general for people in Northland. These organisations are showcased in this supplement and they are part of the ‘Northland DIAS Collective’. Current news and information relating to disability, events and seminars that Tiaho Trust and the DIAS Collective hosts are publicised on our website: www.tiaho.org.nz and our Facebook page:

Tiaho Trust – Empowering Communities. You are welcome to create discussion around disability issues, and make comments on any articles posted.

The staff and participants of Getting Out There 2013

Ground Floor Tai Tokerau Maori Trust Board Building 3 - 5 Hunt Street / PO Box 374 Whangarei Phone: 09 430 3406 Free phone: 0800 430 3406 Fax: 09 438 1679 Email: info@tiaho.org.nz Web: http://www.tiaho.org.nz Tiaho Trust – Empowering Communities

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Getting Out There

The Empowerment Starts Here.

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2014

Alzheimers Society

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significant part of our work in communities is raising awareness, increasing education and reducing stigma surrounding dementia. Raising community awareness provides the opportunity for people to access our services to learn coping strategies to maintain their safety, autonomy, dignity and well-being. This reduces the incidence of crisis situations and helps to de-stigmatise the disease enabling people with dementia to live in their own home and an inclusive society. There are many published findings to support the fact that keeping people at home assists a faster recovery because of familiar surroundings and with dementia this is even more important as change is confusing and upsetting.

Alzheimers Society Northland (Inc) Anne Wilson and General Manager of Alzheimers Northland, Kevin Salmon

Most people are aware of our ageing population and statistics show that the number of people affected by dementia will at the very least, double over the next 20 years. Our new building on Corks Road, Tikipunga will offer specialist day programs and training facilities for carers and those with dementia. Due to be completed July 2014 we have offered office space for Stroke Foundation, Parkinson’s and the Neurological Society staff which they have accepted.

We are a not for profit organisation which provides Support, Information, and Education to anyone in the Northland community, from Te Hana to Cape Reinga, affected by dementia, their family and whanau. Home visits Education sessions Support Groups Mobile Day Centre Maori Focus Workers Library Resources/Information Telephone Information We are just a phone call away. All contact will be kept strictly confidential. Whangarei

Ph/Fax (09) 438 7771 148 Corks Road, Tikipunga P O Box 1179, Whangarei

Kerikeri

Ph/Fax (09) 407 3010 Kingston House, 123 Hone Heke Rd, Kerikeri

Kaitaia

Ph/Fax (09) 408 1123 Kaitaia Community House, 12 Puckey Ave, Kaitaia 0800 004 001 | northland@alzheimers.org.nz

Alzheimers Northland We provide support and education to all people affected by Alzheimer’s disease or Dementia living in Northland communities. Contact Us Phone Whangarei (09) 438-7771 Kerikeri (09) 470-3010 Kaitaia (09) 408-1123

Fax Whangarei (09) 438-2974 Kerikeri (09) 407-3010 Kaitaia (09) 408-1123

8807258AA

Email: northland@alzheimers.org.nz

We walk beside all people affected by Dementia Kia piki te ora mo nga tangata mate porewarewa


Getting Out There

2014

The Empowerment Starts Here.

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Getting Out There - Rod Coe, Community Adviser, Alzheimer’s Society Northland

R

od Coe works passionately at connecting families with the support they need as a love one travels the emotional road of Dementia. “Every client has a different situation,” he says. “They have had a full life. I find out about them and what they want now. Often they are not so aware that they have dementia. I have empathy for their situation.” Firstly, Rod checks in with the individual and this first visit is most important. After an initial package of care is organised, appropriate for the situation, it is then up to the family to take up the package which is partially government funded. “We have a responsibility to those who still live independently,” Rod says. The hard working carers also have ongoing Support Groups throughout Northland where carers are welcome to join with others who understand and to get the support required for the journey.

To offer the carers a break and the individual a fun outing, the Alzheimer’s Society offer a day centre where those with dementia can go along from 10 - 3pm. Here, they are offered life activities, morning tea, lunch and afternoon tea. This is a fantastic facility and looks to grow this year with new premises planned for Tikipunga offering purpose built facilities, a commercial kitchen, secure gardens and meeting rooms for Whangarei Support Groups. Rod trained in England before he moved to New Zealand under two years ago. Here, he helps people move from one position to another as comfortably as possible supported by Carer Education Seminars run by our team at locations around Northland. “There are quite a few people who live alone successfully with right supports in place.” Rod and his colleagues who include four other Community Advisors throughout Northland work closely with all the other health

professionals specialising in the support of our elders and their carers. “Suddenly peoples roles change and this can be confusing and painful. It is helping people find a new way to look after their loved one.” The biggest benefit where dementia is concerned is in lifestyle- ‘to live well with dementia’, the opposite of stress and fatigue for carer and cared for.

Community advisor Anne Wilson, administrator Jeannie Tindall in the background, and General Manager Kevin Salmon have now moved into their new Alzheimer’s Residential Centre which opens in September

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Getting Out There

The Empowerment Starts Here.

2014

Arthritis New Zealand committed to Northland

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rthritis New Zealand holds workshops, seminars, clinics, and other events across the country, but thanks to a generous bequest from the Ham Estate, a substantial series of events is being held in the Far North and Mid North Arthritis is one of New Zealand’s leading causes of disability. It can occur to anyone at any age. There are 530,000 New Zealanders living with arthritis, including a thousand children. And while it is certainly true that many older people have arthritis, it is completely misleading to think of arthritis as being an old person’s disease. There are children in New Zealand who are taking chemotherapy drugs, not because they have cancer, but because they have arthritis. There are over 140 different types of arthritis, the most common being osteoarthritis, gout and rheumatoid arthritis. Arthritis New Zealand is the national organisation focussed on raising awareness, advocating

for those with the condition, and providing advice and support. It offers a range of services designed to assist and support people living with arthritis and its team of arthritis educators provide advice, education, and up-to-date information on how to self-manage the condition including physical activity, joint protection, medications and complementary treatments and products. And Arthritis New Zealand runs an annual children’s camp, and children from Northland were funded to attend the most recent ones. There are also support groups that meet regularly, hydrotherapy and water based exercise classes, clinics, seminars and other events. Sue Baker, Arthritis New Zealand’s Regional Coordinator will be able to tell you more about what is happening locally. You can phone her on 09 459 6100. To speak with an Arthritis Educator, phone Arthritis New Zealand on 0800 663 463. Or visit www.arthritis.org.nz. Arthritis, it could surprise you.

The following arthritis support groups are currently meeting in Northland. Kerikeri Kerikeri support group Meets on the 4th Thursday of each month. Email Heather at lakeviewwatea@slingshot.co.nz for further information.

Warkworth Warkworth support group Meets on the last Thursday of each month. Email charlotte. tohi@arthritis.org.nz for further information.

Whangarei 20+ support group Meets on the first Saturday of every month. Email Maree at 20plussupportgroup@hotmail. co.nz for further information.

Autoimmune support group Meets on the second Tuesday of odd-numbered months (i.e. July, September etc). Email Leanne at sjogrenslupusgroup@gmail.com for further information.

Fibromyalgia support group Phone 0800 663 463 or 09 459 6100 or email sue.baker@arthritis. org.nz to register or for further information.

Whangarei hydrotherapy support group Email Brenda at whg.hydroclass@ gmail.com for further information.


Getting Out There

2014

The Empowerment Starts Here.

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Living with lupus

L

eanne Kemp had lived with vague but debilitating symptoms for many years, such as joint pain, rashes, flu-like symptoms, fatigue, and issues during pregnancy. Then, about six years ago, when she was in her mid thirties, Leanne was diagnosed with lupus. Lupus is a form of arthritis that affects joints, muscles and other parts of the body, but it can also affect the skin, kidneys, lungs, heart, nervous system and blood and in particular the immune system. It is an auto-immune disease, which means that some people with lupus develop antibodies that attack healthy tissues. As a result, different parts of the body become inflamed and this causes pain and swelling. Lupus can mimic other diseases and can be difficult to diagnose. The most difficult part for Leanne was the constant fatigue, and she had to stop working, and had to manage her life to enable her to spend more time with her family. However, she has now been able to return to working one day a week as a Teacher Aide, and is thoroughly enjoying it. Leanne is grateful for the support she got from Arthritis New Zealand, especially when it came to finding ways of exercising without pain. It was Arthritis New Zealand that

introduced her to hydrotherapy, which she found very helpful. Leanne also belongs to an autoimmune support group, which meets every second month, and anybody with any autoimmune condition is welcome. She says this has been really helpful, because it has enabled her to share her experiences with those who know first hand what it is like, and can offer their strength and hope. Over the last three years, Leanne has become actively involved with the Steampunk group in Whangarei, which has given her something positive to focus on, and given her an outlet for her creativity.

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Do you or someone you know have arthritis? Over 530,000 New Zealanders are living with arthritis. For further information, phone 0800 663 463. Or visit our website www.arthritis.org.nz Arthritis, it could surprise you.


Getting Out There

The Empowerment Starts Here.

12

Blind Foundation

Craig Jessop

T

C

he Blind Foundation is New Zealand’s main provider of sight loss services to people who are blind or have low vision. We have over 11,700 members and every day an average of three New Zealanders who are blind, deaf/blind or have low vision sign up as members. The Blind Foundation equips its members with the adaptive skills, technology and resources they need to overcome the barriers they face to participating fully in society and leading independent lives. It does this by providing services, at no charge, including Rehabilitation and Counselling, Adaptive Daily Living, Orientation and Mobility, Guide Dog Services, Accessible Format Production and Library Services, Adaptive Communications Technology, Employment and Recreation. For example, Adaptive Daily Living Instructors

teach new skills or help a client adapt to different ways of doing things, such as managing everyday tasks safely and independently. We also offer recreation and peer support, from card games and scrabble to ski trips and Outward Bound experiences. We also provide confidential peer support so members can share their experiences through caring conversation. And for orientation and mobility, members can choose to have a Blind Foundation guide dog. Blind Foundation guide dogs help people who are blind or have low vision get around safely, with greater speed and confidence. They mean freedom, independence, confidence and companionship. Guide dogs are taught how to guide their handlers around hazards, negotiate traffic, locate common destinations such as the supermarket or bus stop, and travel on public transport.

For more information about the Blind Foundation, please contact your local Whangarei office: 277 Kamo Road, Kamo, Whangarei 0112 Ph: (09) 437 1199 or call 0800 24 33 33 or visit www.blindfoundation.org.nz

raig Jessop knows the Blind Foundation well. He has worked for the Foundation for 16 months and volunteered for the last 25 years. “The Blind Foundation is a fantastic

2014

organisation,” says Craig. “I feel very privileged to be able to help our members get the most out of life.” Craig juggles two roles at the Foundation. He


Getting Out There

2014

The Empowerment Starts Here.

13

Erik Witting is part of the Adaptive Communications and Technology Department and also works in volunteer services. He has been blind since 1989 so he knows what a difference the services the Foundation offers can make. Craig trains people who are blind or have low vision with adaptive equipment for computers. This includes magnification software so people can read enlarged text on their computer screen or speech software. He also helps people use their iPhone or cellphone. “It is amazing what people can achieve with a bit of training,” says Craig. “Some of my clients absolutely refused to go near a computer before but then learned to touch type and access the Internet in a couple of months. One client who races pigeons was able to look up the pigeon results on his computer for the first time. Another is now able to keep in touch with his parents who live overseas.” In his volunteer services role, Craig recruits volunteers and then teams them up with blind people who need their help. Craig works closely with the Blind Foundation Community Committee in this role too. Craig is amazed by the Whangarei committee’s dedication to the Foundation and the community as a whole. “They do so much, including taking up guest speaking opportunities; holding regular socials for members; the promotion of a low vision clinic in Northland; and even the establishment of a garden for children who are blind or have low-vision at the Whangarei centre.”

A

disease that affects the optic nerve took Erik Witting’s sight when he was 25, and it happened almost immediately. Within a couple of months he was left with only 2.5 percent vision and faced a very different future from his career driving coaches for one of the biggest travel agencies in Europe. A couple of years after he lost his sight, Erik met a Kiwi girl, and came to New Zealand. It was the first time he’d ever been in an aircraft. The couple live on a lifestyle block which they originally set up to grow orchids, but are now growing vegetables for the local market. “It’s mainly my wife’s business, so I do all the cooking and housework,” Eric explains. “And that’s been a bonus, because I never used to cook, but now I love it.” And another new passion is his digital reading machine, which means he can store books on a flash drive or audio CD. But it would not have been possible without the help of the Blind Foundation, which introduced Erik to the computer age.

“When I lost my sight I decided I could do without computer technology, and in the intervening years I forgot how the keyboard was set up,” he says. “But I realised I needed it when I had to deal with some issues around my parents, who are in rest homes in Holland, and I had to keep going over there to sort things out. That wasn’t practical or economical so I thought, I’ll ring the Blind Foundation and talk to someone who knows about these things.” Experts from the Foundation introduced Erik to speaking software, got him reacquainted with keyboards and within a month, he was up and running. “I got outstanding help from

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them, and they’ve been very, very important in all of that,” he says. The Blind Foundation is the country’s main provider of sight loss habilitation and rehabilitation services, working to equip people with the adaptive skills, technology and resources they need to participate fully in society and lead independent lives.

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Getting Out There

The Empowerment Starts Here.

14

2014

Brain Injury Association

B

rain injury is often called the ‘silent epidemic’ and referred to as a ‘hidden injury’ as more often than not there are no outwardly visible changes to a person after a brain injury. However, a brain injury can have life changing results for both the injured person and their whanau that may lead to loss of careers, businesses and at times result in family fracture. After a brain injury, life can become confusing and difficult to navigate and understand for those affected. Brain Injury Northland provides a safe, barrier free access to support for both individuals who have been injured and their families.

In New Zealand brain injuries are categorised into Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and Acquired Brain Injury (ABI). A Traumatic Brain Injury results from a sudden impact to the head. Common causes include motor vehicle crashes, violence, falls and sporting injuries. Acquired Brain Injury occurs as a result of health related events such as strokes, infections such as meningitis, brain tumours and neurotoxic disorders. Chemical Brain Injury occurs as a result of poisoning by drugs, alcohol, gases, solvents and pesticides. Typical difficulties experienced by a person after a brain

injury are: memory issues, fatigue, sensory impairment, balance problems, but the most challenging issue is that of cognitive impairment which affects the ability to think, concentrate, formulate ideas, reason and remember. Brain Injury Northland was established in 1998 as an Incorporated Society and is a Registered Charity. The organisation struggles for funding and relies totally on grants and donations. Currently the organisation has two liaison officers covering an area from Wellsford to Cape Reinga. Our focus is on supporting clients and their families and whanau who have suffered a brain injury.

We offer information and education for people with brain injuries and their families so that they can better understand the implications and effects of the injury.

98 Cairnfield Road PO Box 4001, Whangarei

Phone: (09) 459 5013 Fax: (09) 437 0714 Email: northland@ brain-injury.org.nz Web: www.brain-injury. org.nz

Bennett & Associates Chartered Accountants

PROUD TO PROVIDE SERVICES TO THE NORTHLAND BUSINESS COMMUNITY NORTHLAND owned, focused and operated accounting firm providing services in: • Audit, Investigation & Forensic Research • Office of the Auditor General Approved School Auditor • Small to Medium Size Direct Business Support and Tax Services • Business Recovery, Turn Around & Insolvency Management • Maori Business Advisory & Mentoring Contact us at: 57 Clyde Street, P O Box 627, Whangarei 0140 Ph: (09) 438 2312 Fax: (09) 438 2912 Email: info@bennettca.co.nz Web: www.bennettca.co.nz


Getting Out There

2014

The Empowerment Starts Here.

15

Karlene Joyce

K

arlene Joyce was living a busy, happy life before her brain injury. She was happily married with three teenage children, working full time, studying social services, playing rugby and working as a delegate for Maori woman’s rugby, managing the local men’s rugby team, singing karaoke weekly and getting ready to spend some time on the Triumph motorbike she had just scored. “My life was full of goals, dreams and I could do almost anything I put my hand to,” she says. “But in July 2005 while playing rugby I was kicked in the head. I blacked out briefly but stayed on until I felt dizzy, nauseous and as if I wasn’t there. Two days later I went to hospital and was diagnosed with delayed traumatic brain injury syndrome. I was tired and slept heaps, with mean headaches. “My brain injury took a big toll on my family. My marriage ended, my children grew up and left home. I felt lonely and useless. I couldn’t sing, play sports, work, or keep my house… my life sucked. I tried to go back playing sport but all it did was trigger headaches, dizziness and blackouts. I joined

Jehovah Witness. This I could handle - it was peaceful, steady and little things didn’t seem to worry me so much.” Five years on Karlene tried to return to work, but her brain went into overload and she crashed. “I was so disappointed but I learnt about my limitations,” she says. “Now I work 10 hours a week and the balance of living, loving and doing seems right. Once I owned my injury I was able to move on.” “The Brain Injury Association continues to support me. My brain doesn’t multi task. I find it hard to learn, remember, find the right words. Their help gives me a sense of control and order in my life. “I am now married to a man who understands my brain injury and loves me for what I am able to do.”

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16

Getting Out There

The Empowerment Starts Here.

2014

Helping Parents Get In the Know

A

fter many months in development, CCS Disability Action is delighted to launch In the Know in Northland. In the Know is a free information and advocacy guide aimed at giving families the tips and tools they need to get the best for their young child. The 100 page book was a labour of love for a team of local disability agency representatives, parents of disabled children and CCS Disability Action staff. It covers disability and family life, community-based support options, financial help, navigating the medical system and education in the early years. It also lists local agencies and support groups. The book aims to fill the information void many parents and caregivers experience when they learn their child has a disability. For mum Jo Ellis, it feels great to be able to share some of the knowledge she’s gleaned over many years navigating the disability system with her son Harvey. “I wish that there was a book like this when Harvey was young. I had to do a lot of research, a lot of networking and ask a lot of questions to understand what our support options were. It feels really rewarding to think that, with this book, other parents won’t need to go through that experience as I’ve tried to pass on as much knowledge as we can

118mmW X92mmH

The team were committed to creating a gorgeous, uplifting resource.

fit in! It makes all the hard work I’ve been through worthwhile to help someone else,” she says. For Moira Geerkens Branch Team Leader for Northland, Jo Ellis’ experience is far from isolated. “Getting good, timely information about the support available and how you negotiate your options is possibly the biggest challenge parents and caregivers face.”

In the Know is available for free via our Northland branch or can be collected at local Plunket offices.

09 437 1899 Northland@ccsDisability Action.org.nz www.YouAreIntheKnow. wordpress.com

THE MOBILITY PARKING PERMIT SCHEME – connecting you with your community

The mobility parking permit • You have a medical condition scheme supports people with or disability that requires you mobility impairments to get out to have physical contact or into their communities. close supervision to safely get around and cannot be You are eligible if you meet the left unattended. following criteria: There are two types of permit: • You are unable to walk and always require the use of a • Long term (if you have a wheelchair or permanent medical condition or disability that affects your • Your ability to walk distances is mobility; valid for 5 years) severely restricted by a medical condition or disability or

You can get an application form and more information by visiting

www.MobilityParking.org.nz

• Short term (if you have a temporary medical condition that affects your mobility; issued for 3 – 12 months) How to apply for a mobility parking permit: You will need to complete an application form and pay the permit fee. Your doctor needs to confirm your eligibility.

or by phoning

0800 227 2255


Getting Out There

2014

The Empowerment Starts Here.

You Can Make a Difference in One Child’s Life We have children and young people who need a safe, stable and nurturing home away from home. If you’re interested in welcoming a child into your family, $!)"$, /0 - *"/,) /, 3/0# )$,2 +-*!*. #!&$ (* - '-33 )/ 10% /() 2/,$ about Shared Care or Foster Care with CCS Disability Action.

We’d Love To Hear From Y ou ! 09 437 1899 or 0800 227 2255 @ Northland@ccsDisabilityAction.org.nz f www.Facebook.com/ccsDisabilityAction www.Northern.ccsDisabilityAction.org.nz

17


18

Getting Out There

The Empowerment Starts Here.

2014

Deaf Aotearoa New Zealand

T

he Deaf Aotearoa Northland office works with more than 150 Deaf and hearing impaired people from Wellsford to Kaitaia. Deaf Aotearoa is the national service provider for Deaf people in New Zealand, working with Deaf communities and providing information and resources on a range of services. Community Relations Officer’s works with the local Deaf and hearing communities and they are the main source of contact for the local Deaf community. Service Coordinators work with Deaf people, and their families, to identify and coordinate services to meet their specific needs, including: • Accessing specialist equipment to make life easier – eg baby cry alert, flashing doorbell, smoke alarms. • Connecting Deaf community members with the right people for information and services – housing, legal, finance, etc. • Communication – understanding documents, making phone calls, booking interpreters • Life direction – working with Deaf people and their families to develop plans and identify goals.

Employment Consultants work with Deaf people to find the right employment and offer a range of services including: • Cover letter and CV preparation • Building confidence and self esteem – learning career goals

and matching the right job with interests, skills and experience • Preparing for interviews • Job and training fund applications • Ongoing communication while in employment • Supporting employers to ensure hiring a Deaf person is as straightforward as possible • Assisting with booking interpreters for meetings and arranging specialised equipment. Deaf Aotearoa also works closely with government agencies, other not-forprofit organisations and the corporate sector to increase awareness of Deaf people’s lives, promote New Zealand

Sign Language and strengthen the rights of Deaf people. Deaf Aotearoa is a Disabled Person’s Organisation and the New Zealand representative for the World Federation of the Deaf, the international body for Deaf people.

Please contact the office us for advice and help or visit www.deaf.org.nz to find out more. Contact Details: 1A Deveron Street PO Box 1834 Whangarei Phone: (09) 437 2022 / Text: 021641178 Fax: (09) 437 2028 www.deaf.org.nz


Getting Out There

2014

The Empowerment Starts Here.

19

Deaf Aotearoa and farrell Cunliffe

“I

’m in big demand around Northland,” says Farrell, in his eighties and still working as a carpenter. “People keep asking him to come work for them even though he’s old, adds his wife Judith. And that’s fine with Farrell, who loves his job and doesn’t want to retire yet. Born deaf in Wellington in 1932, he started Deaf school at the age of five. At 16, he joined the Wellington Deaf Society and led an exciting life playing various sports, partying until late and immersing himself in the Deaf community. He worked at the naval base in Devonport for seven years and later moved to Kerikeri with his wife, who is also deaf. They started a family which now includes 20 grandchildren and seven

great-grandchildren, and continue an involvement with Northland Deaf Club based in Whangarei. Farrell has some great stories to share and a favourite is when he was at school during the war, and there was a special training for deaf children to keep them from bombing. “We all had to practice running to the safety bunker and staying quiet while the warning siren was blaring. One day the teachers were concerned that we weren’t quiet enough – we made noises with our throats and being deaf, we couldn’t hear the noise we were making. So they came up with a plan: we had to run and sit on our hands to prevent us from signing or fidgeting in the dark, and bite down on a cork to prevent us making noises.”

He also loves to tell about the new bicycle he bought when he was 18. He rode the bicycle from Johnsonville to the railway station, caught a train with his bike to New Plymouth where met his friend Grant and his brother Barry for a bicycle trip. They cycled a loop

around Mt Taranaki, from New Plymouth to Opunake, Hawera, Stratford , Inglewood and back to New Plymouth. They covered the 122km in two days. It’s another indication that Farrell is no stranger to adventure and challenge – even at 82!

Calling all family, wha ¯ nau, friends and educators of Ma ¯ ori D/deaf children. Would you like to:

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EMAIL: .9-QD8'3>=9L>:>93N8H&C85/


Getting Out There

The Empowerment Starts Here.

20

2014

Epilepsy New Zealand

O

ne in fifty people in New Zealand will develop epilepsy at some point in their life. This common neurological disorder affects 1% to 2% of the population. The people affected have recurring and spontaneous seizures as a result of uncontrolled bursts of electrical-chemical activity in the brain. They experience a sudden burst of “mixed up” messages from the brain. Anyone of any age can develop epilepsy at some stage during their lifetime as a result of a brain injury, trauma or infection, or structural changes in the brain. In many cases no structural cause is found and the cause is unknown. Epilepsy is what people with the condition have; it does not define who they are. Epilepsy New Zealand provides support for those

with the condition and awareness for those around them. Trained Epilepsy Information and Support Specialists offer support and epilepsy education to people with epilepsy, their families and whanau. In Northland our services include: • information and support for people who have epilepsy and their families/ whanau • personal appointments anywhere in Northland to assist a person who has epilepsy, covering medication, improvement in seizure control, employment and education issues, and information about medical and other community services. The organisation focuses on helping individuals with epilepsy learn to manage their

Margaret Dunn, Fiield Officer Epilepsy Northland

condition, with the goal of becoming seizure-free • Representation for people with epilepsy to health services, schools, employers and community agencies • Information including brochures, information sheets, ENZ Magazine, etc. • Understanding Epilepsy seminars, suitable for health professionals, education professionals, students, community agencies, workplaces, care facilities, government departments, or anyone interested in learning how to recognise and manage seizures. Seminars cover what epilepsy is, the causes, recognition of seizure types, managing and recording seizures, triggers, principles of anti-epileptic medication,

and lifestyle issues. There are also basic seminars (30 to 40 minutes). Upcoming seminars are listed on the Epilepsy New Zealand homepage. To register or to request in house training for your organisation or a personal visit please contact Margaret, Northland’s Epilepsy Information and Support Specialist. Epilepsy Information and Support Specialist 71 Bank Street, Whangarei, 0110 Phone: 09 438 5498 or 0800 epilepsy Mob 0272 916869 or send a text and you will receive a call back Email: northland@ epilepsy.org.nz


Getting Out There

2014

The Empowerment Starts Here.

21

Epilepsy

J

ames Robertson admits he was his own worst enemy when it came to dealing with his epilepsy. He was busy having fun as a 16 year old when he had his first seizure, and was far more interested in parties and drinking than in dealing with his health, even though he knew the seizures were linked to his drinking. “I carried on that way until I was 26 and at that point I realised I was sick of it ruling my life,” he says. This led to a decision to return to New Zealand from Perth, where he had been living, and get control of his life. He came back, moved in with his Mum, and started dealing with his drinking and looking after his health. In that first year home he decided it was all going to be about him and his health, and living a life that didn’t include seizures every two weeks. He changed his lifestyle, reducing stress, eating well, getting plenty of exercise and plenty of

sleep. And it worked. He’s had only one minor seizure in the past year, is living independently with a friend, and hoping to get his driver’s licence back soon. Epilepsy New Zealand in Whangarei has given him great support for his journey and James is now returning the favour by talking to others with epilepsy, particularly young people. It has become a passion and he has decided to further his education, do a degree in social services, and work in the area of drug and alcohol problems. “I’ve been through it, so I know what it’s about,” he says. “And working with Margaret at Epilepsy New Zealand has taught me a lot more. I think now I’ll be able to offer something.”

James Robertson

Recovery Solutions Recovery Solutions empowers people to reach their full recovery potential. We believe everyone is capable of living a meaningful life and are committed to helping clients be the best they can beresulting in improved overall community wellbeing and participation. Our Northland services include: supported accommodation, respite, community support, employment support, community participation, child & youth and education.

For further information on our services contact us via phone: (09) 4703530 email: info@recoverysolutions.co.nz or website: www.recoverysolutions.co.nz

UNDERSTANDING EPILEPSY SEMINAR Followed by an informal hour to meet, ask questions and have a chat about epilepsy management with the Northland Epilepsy Information and Support Specialist Dargaville: Seminar at Community Health Centre (next to medical centre) Awakino Road, Dargaville 14 August 2014, 20 November 2014 - 10.00am to 12.00 noon Informal hour - 12.00 noon to 1.00pm Whangarei: Seminar at Suite 5, 71 Bank Street, (Old Town Hall) Whangarei 21 August 2014 , 23 October 2014, 4 December 2014 - 10.00am to 12.00 noon Informal hour - 12.00 noon to 1.00pm Walking group every Tuesday - 10.00am to 11.00am

RSVP and for more information please contact Margaret Dunn on (09) 438-5498 or email northland@epilepsy.org.nz


22

Getting Out There

The Empowerment Starts Here.

2014

Huntington’s Disease Association

T

he Huntington’s Disease Association (Auckland) Inc is currently working with 700+ people living with symptoms, or at risk of developing symptoms of, Huntington’s Disease in the Auckland and Northland regions. With the hard work and dedication of Manager Jo Dysart and Senior Family Liaison Co-ordinator Jane Devine, we support the carers, family members, GP’s, medical specialists and support agencies. In the past 12 months alone we have worked with over 1,250 people, amassing over 17,500 contacts and 4,312 home visits.

Family Liaison Service Our professional staff are Huntington’s Disease specialists who help families and professionals respond to the unique challenges of H.D. The clients of the Individual and Family Services programme are the person living with H.D., their caregivers and family members including people at risk. Support Service Our staff provide counselling and facilitate the process whereby people living with H.D. adjust in all areas of life to losses brought about by the progression of the disease. This service includes assessing people’s needs through one to one consultations, educating clients about H.D. and giving information about community services, finding sources of support, facilitating appropriate referrals and then following up. The service can involve setting goals with the clients, strategising and solution focused problem solving, either working individually with clients or in groups.

Providing: Information, education, support, Resource materials, seminars and Liaison with clinical/genetic specialists and researchers Contact us:

Free phone 0800 43 28 25 (0800 HDAUCK) Office phone 09 815 9703 Postal Address PO Box 16181 Sandringham Auckland 1351 Email huntingtonsakld@xtra.co.nz Or search Huntington’s Auckland on Facebook Givealittle.co.nz to donate

Service Development This service includes assessing the needs of families living with H.D., identifying the gaps in local services and then preparing and carrying out plans to ensure clients receive appropriate medical, social service and other community services. Our staff educate generic agencies about H.D. and provide support. They deliver consulting services to health and social service professionals, and advocate for the development of new services; or they work to tailor existing services to meet the needs of individuals and families living with H.D. This service is performed by working with service providers individually or in a group setting and by influencing them to provide a complete continuum of care for H.D. families. Education and Awareness For over 30 years we have been providing information about Huntington’s disease to those living with H.D., their carers as well as the support agencies and medical professionals. Information ranges from symptomology of H.D. to how to manage the symptoms. What is Huntington’s Disease? Huntington’s Disease (H.D.) is an inherited brain disorder. It was named after the doctor who first described it in 1872 – George Huntington – and it used to be called Huntington’s chorea. H.D. causes cells in specific parts of the brain to die: The Caudate, the Putamen and, as the disease progresses, the Cerebral Cortex. As the brain cells die, a person with Huntington’s become less able to control movements, recall events, make decisions and control emotions. The disease leads to incapacitation and, eventually, death. Who gets it? Huntington’s Disease is a genetic disorder. About one in every 10,000 people has H.D. and approximately 5 in every 10,000 are at risk of developing the disease. The H.D. gene is dominant, which means that each child of a parent withHD has a 50% chance of inheriting the disease and is said to be “at risk”. Males and females have the same risk of inheriting the disease. Huntington’s occurs in all races. Primarily, HD affects adults. Symptoms usually appear between the ages of 30 and 45, but there is Juvenile H.D. which appears in children and late onset H.D. in adults in their 60s.

Professor Richard Faull

What are the symptoms? There are three main types of symptoms in Huntington’s Disease: Physical symptoms, including involuntary movements and diminished coordination, Emotional symptoms, including depression, irritability and obsessiveness, Cognitive symptoms, including loss of ability to recall information, loss of attention and difficulty with decision making. There is a lot of variation in symptoms, and not every person will have all the symptoms to the same degree. Symptoms also vary with each stage of the disease. Liaison We are privileged to work alongside Clinical Experts and DHB’s offering a Multi-Disciplinary Team approach to the individuals and family/whanau affected by H.D. Along with this we have tight links with the Auckland University Centre for Brain Research and our Patron Professor Richard Faull. We therefore have ongoing updates on Clinical Research and research to help develop treatments and one day a cure.

Photo of our staff from left to right Jane Devine, Jo Dysart (Manager) & Juliet Caldwell (Office Administrator).


Getting Out There

2014

The Empowerment Starts Here.

23

From the Senior Family Liaison’s perspective

J

ane Devine describes her clients as ‘like my extended family’. The Huntington’s Association Senior Family Liaison Co-ordinator has a deeply felt admiration for the courage and resilience of those with the disease. Jane Devine has worked with Huntington’s for 14 years, 6 here in New Zealand and previously 8 years in Australia. The 2 staff deal with a large client base of 759 people between Cape Reina and Bombay. “We do everything we can to take the stress out of the situation for our clients.” She says. “Huntington’s affects the frontal lobe so those who have it may think and see things differently. What we might think are just normal stresses can affect them hugely and things can snowball very

quickly. So we walk the journey with them.” Maintenance visits are an important part of the support the organisation offers. “We see how they are going and can predict problems coming,” Jane says. “The families/whanau struggle to ask for help because although they may know what they need, they have difficulty initiating a request for help.” If we can get in early enough, we can enable preventative measures. Jane says she meets wonderful families through her work. People with Huntington’s are disadvantaged, there is still a huge amount of stigma associated with H.D. and therefore they have issues with things such as gaining insurance and employment opportunities.

CONTACTS Jo Dysart HD Association (Auckland) Inc 7A Taylors Road Sandringham Auckland 1351, NZ P O Box 16 181 Sandringham Auckland 1351, NZ Freephone: 0800 HD AUCK (0800 432 825) Office: 09 815 9703 Fax: 09 815 9704 Mobile: 027 432 8255 Email: huntingtonsakld@xtra.co.nz Website: www.hdauckland.org.nz/ http://www.givealittle.co.nz/org/ HuntingtonsAuckland

Two of our amazing volunteers coin collecting.


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Getting Out There

The Empowerment Starts Here.

2014

MND Association

T

he Motor Neurone Disease Association NZ Inc. is an incorporated society and registered charity and formed over 25 years ago to offer support, information and advocacy. We work closely with service providers which exist across the Northland area to give the best care for those living with Motor Neurone Disease, including the families, carers, health professionals and service providers involved. The MND Association offers: • One to one Fieldworker support • Information packs and newsletters • An MND management booklet for health professionals • An active website www. mnda.org.nz • Education sessions for health professionals and service providers • Public promotions and awareness activities We rely on grants and fundraising and welcome donations so that we can offer our services FREE of charge. In the Whangarei and Northland area there are generally around 10-20 people living with MND. There are estimated to be 300 people in New Zealand at any one time.

What is Motor Neurone Disease (MND)? MND is also known as Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) or Lou Gehrig’s Disease. The term refers to a group of progressive conditions in which the nerve cells – motor neurones – that control muscle movement deteriorate, muscles

MND Field Worker Lin Field

gradually weaken and waste away affecting mobility, speech, swallowing and breathing. Who gets Motor Neurone Disease? MND is most common in adults between 50 -70 years but can occur in both younger and older adults. It is a little more common in men and is seen across all ethnic groups. In over 90% of cases there is no known family history. It is not contagious and cannot be transmitted from one person to another. Several famous people have had MND such as David Niven (Actor), Jarrod Cunningham (NZ rugby player) and Stephen Hawking (British Theoretical Physicist). MND presents differently from person to person

making it difficult to predict the course of the condition but people living with MND become increasingly dependent on others and their life expectancy is much shorter than it might have been. The cause of MND is unknown. Currently there is no known cure although researchers are excited about the progress they are making in understanding the disease. People living with MND face many challenges but much can be done to support them in: • Living with a progressive condition • Adjusting to changes in their ability to move, speak, swallow, breathe

• Becoming increasingly dependent • Remaining positive in the face of so many changes Please contact the MND Fieldworker for the Northland area to find out more:

Lin Field Contact Details: Motor Neurone Disease Association: Yarnton House, 14 Erson Avenue Royal Oak, Auckland PO Box 24036, Auckland 1345 Phone: (09) 624 2148 Mobile: 021 2303038 Email: nthfieldwork@ mnda.org.nz www.mnda.org.nz


Getting Out There

2014

The Empowerment Starts Here.

25

Lin Field

I

t’s no accident that a parallel is drawn between the blue cornflower and people with Motor Neurone Disease. The blue cornflower is the international flower of hope for motor neurone disease because it can withstand both frost and drought, and its strong blue colour never fades, no matter what it faces. It symbolises courage. And that’s appropriate, according to MND field worker Lin Field, who says people with MND show tremendous courage and strength of character to cope with this very challenging condition. Motor Neurone Disease refers to a group of

The MND National Council

progressive disorders where there is destruction of motor neurons - the nerves that control voluntary muscle activity such as speaking, walking, breathing, and swallowing. Symptoms include gradual weakening, shrinking of muscles and uncontrollable twitching of the muscles. Sensation, memory and personality are not affected. There is no cure or treatment for MND. Physical therapy, occupational therapy and rehabilitation improve posture, prevent joint immobility, and slow muscle weakness and wasting. Lin sees the most important facet of the field

worker’s role as providing a continuation of support. “We’re linked in really early and stay there right through the process,” she says. “We give emotional support, we provide information and research, and we share the load, making people feel they are not alone.” Probably the most difficult challenge for those with the disease is the shock of the diagnosis. ”It might be some really small symptom, like one finger not working as it should, and eventually you see the neurologist and get this diagnosis. Then there’s the shock of facing that your life will not be going where you thought it was going.”

Part of the field worker’s role is to help people pick up their lives from this point and find a way to go ahead positively. Time frames for getting to this point vary hugely, because different types of the disease proceed at different rates. “But people do manage to get quality of life,” Lin says. Working in this field has also given Lin a special quality of life. “I surprised myself by finding I had a lot to contribute,” she says. “And I get great satisfaction out of helping people walk this journey.”


Getting Out There

The Empowerment Starts Here.

26

2014

MS Northland

N

orthland Multiple Sclerosis Society offers a wide variety of services to people with MS, Family/Whanau members and Carers. The service provides information, education and support, encouraging a proactive approach to managing this disease. The Northland area extends from Wellsford, coast to coast to Cape Reinga. If you have MS the Society provides: • A MS Field Officer/ Educator, who is a NZ Registered Nurse.

• Home visits, support and information to you and your family about your condition or in your role as a caregiver. • Educates you, your family and other health

professionals about MS and related disorders. • Advocates for you with other support agencies and health professionals. Informs you of services available in the community. Provides educational material, books, videos, CD’s etc from the MS office. Holds support groups for those with MS in Whangarei, Kaikohe/ Kerikeri & Dargaville, plus a carers group in Whangarei. • Free Yoga classes every Tuesday, from 11.30am to 1pm in Bank Street, Whangarei. The following free resources are available: • Comprehensive explanatory booklets and MS library books to take out on loan.

The Forget Me Not Adult Day Centre is a day care service provided by the Northland Disabled Charitable Trust and available to the elderly, frail, those with memory loss or other disabilities.

Open Monday to Friday from 8.30- 4pm for 49 weeks of the year. Transport and a cooked lunch are provided daily. Programme content includes exercise, fun, companionship, challenges and excursions. All ages welcome

110 Boundary Rd, Tikipunga, Whangarei. 09-437 1144

• Activity books to help children understand MS.

• Loss of balance or coordination.

• Jigsaw library available.

• Tremor and weakness.

• Bi-monthly newsletter which includes useful information on research and development of MS and advice on staying well.

• Blurred or double vision, eye pain (usually only affecting one)

• Advocacy service. • Field Officer outreach service from Wellsford to Cape Reinga, coast to coast. • Ten pin bowling has commenced with both day and night sessions. • Other outdoor activities are planned for later in the year, when the weather gets warmer. As our Office Administrator, is only available 12 hours per week, urgent contact can be made through the Field Officer/Educator’s cell phone. What is MS? Multiple Sclerosis is one of the most common diseases of the central nervous system. A fatty substance called the myelin sheath covers the fibres of the nervous system. The myelin protects the nerves and helps the messages move between the brain and the rest of the body. In MS, the myelin sheath covering the nerves in the brain and spinal cord become scarred in scattered patches. This is multiple scarring, or sclerosis. Essentially, this distorts or prevents the flow of messages from the brain and the spinal cord to other parts of the body. The distortions to the messages travelling through the nervous system cause a range of problems for the people with multiple sclerosis. Although it is important to note that there is no typical set of MS symptoms, the following are common (in varying combinations or severity):

• Difficulty with legs, arms and hand movements. • Bladder and bowel problems. • Numbness and pain. • Problems with thinking and remembering. • Sexual problems. • Fatigue. What causes MS? At this time the cause of MS is still unknown. However, research suggests it is likely to be a combination of the following: reaction to a virus, possibly years after infection, exposure to an unknown environmental agent before puberty, an auto-immune reaction in which the body attacks its own tissue for an unknown reason or genetic susceptibility to the above triggers. How is MS treated? While MS still cannot be cured, much can be done to help manage the condition. There are MS-specific treatments available. These directly target the immune system. A Neurologist determines whether these are relevant for each person. Generally the person with MS works with their GP on the day to day management of the condition.

Gay Dickie, Field Officer, Northland Multiple Sclerosis Society


Getting Out There

2014

The Empowerment Starts Here.

Profile on Brenda McCreedy t was funny really,” says Brenda McCreedy as she recalls the first indication that something was not right with her health. “We were moving house and I thought I’d done something to my back. It was a two storeyed house and when we got in there it got to the point where I couldn’t even go up and down the stairs.” Brenda went to the doctor and was ultimately referred to a neurologist, who ordered an MRI scan and diagnosed her with multiple sclerosis. “I said to him: “I don’t even know what that is,” she says. MS is an inflammatory disease in which the insulating covers of nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord are damaged. This damage disrupts the ability of parts of the nervous system to communicate, resulting in a wide range of signs and symptoms, including physical, mental, and sometimes psychiatric problems. Very early in the piece Brenda contacted the MS Society to find out more, and was promptly visited by a nurse who came to

Dannevirke to see her and give her all the information she needed. She’s been involved with the society ever since, and is now the vice president. “I think the most important thing we do is support people,” she says. “We have field officers, and when people are diagnosed the society becomes a way to learn more about MS, and to meet other people with the same issues and find out how they are dealing with it.” Brenda counts herself lucky that she is able to pursue a lifestyle that helps her to keep on top of her MS. She’s no longer working in an office, and follows quite a physical regime, working in her large garden and doing plenty of walking. “It’s good to be able to get out in the sun – that’s important for MS because we need the Vitamin D,” she says. She’s also become involved in yoga. “Our MS society is running yoga classes now and although there are only a few going along so far, it’s really good to do, and to be in a class with others with MS.”

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Getting Out There

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28

2014

The New Zealand Down Syndrome Association

T

he New Zealand Down Syndrome Association (NZDSA) was formed in 1981 with our mission statement being, ‘To enhance the inclusion of people with Down syndrome within the community’.

Our aims are: • To provide information and support families/ Whanau of people with Down syndrome • To promote and advocate for positive attitudes in the wider community • To further the understanding of Down syndrome • To promote the rights and inclusion of people with Down syndrome • To review policies and lobby Government and other institutions • To promote positive public awareness through educational and media initiatives

Our objectives are: The NDSA is established for educational and charitable objectives and purposes within New Zealand. In particular the NZDSA is established to • Promote the welfare of people with Down syndrome and their families/Whanau • Provide up to date information that is accessible to families/Whanau: particularly new parents and other interested parties • Publish and distribute a quarterly magazine to members nationally and internationally. Members include families & friends, school’s, hospitals, doctors, other disability agencies, governments

• • •

departments and international Down syndrome associations. Provide information to medical practitioners, students, educators and community organisations, to enhance their interactions with people with Down syndrome Provide ongoing links with and among families Establish and maintain relationships with other disability organisations Respond to political and social issues by making submissions to government bodies and/or through the media Initiate and manage projects that will have direct benefits to people with Down syndrome and their families Maintain links with international Down Syndrome Associations to ensure a flow of current knowledge and information To do any other legal and lawful act to attain these objectives and conducive to our mission statement

Governance is administered by nine elected committee members, supported by a national team of

Contact Details: Kathryn Sadgrove Kara Road, RD 9, Whangarei Phone 09 434 6723 Freehome 0800 693 724 (press 3) My email is ksadgrove@xtra.co.nz www.nzdsa.org.nz www.tiaho.org.nz/down_syndrome

What we provide: • We have nineteen regions with regional volunteer support people for new parent, face-to-face and telephone support. Additionally we have an adult support and grandparent support contacts. • 0800 number • Website • Quarterly journal providing up to date information, real life stories, and a pull out section for people with Down syndrome which is written by people with Down syndrome. • Provide information and resources which include a New Parent Pack, Transition to School DVD, Creating a Positive Hospital Experience kit, Plan for the Future DVD and Turn the Page DVD. • Bi annual Forums

New Zealand Down Syndrome Association contacts: Support Telephone: 0800 693 724 Website: www.nzdsa.org.nz Emai: National Executive Officer - national.coordinator@nzdsa.org.nz National Administrator - nzdsai@xtra.co.nz National Editor - editor@nzdsa.org.nz Charities Commission Number – CC24524

Northland Down Syndrome Support Group Main Functions: • Support and information • New parent support • Resource material • Monthly meetings

four staff, all home-based in three different cities. The NZ Down Syndrome Association is a registered non profit organisation.

Kathryn Sadgrove Regional Contact for the NZDSA My role as volunteer coordinator is to provide support and information to the family/whanau who have a new baby born with Down Syndrome. I visit the family in the hospital or locally in their own home. The NZDSA has produced a New Parent information pack and DVD which is given out at the time of visit. We also provide support and information to our existing families and their extended family members. With the family’s permission I can link them to another family in their own area to provide them with extra support. I run a support meeting in Whangarei, please contact me for details. I am the Regional contact for the NZDSA for the Northland Area. I am on the NZDSA committee and are able to take any issues affecting Northland families to our National committee meetings. The area we cover is from Wellsford to Kaitaia.


Getting Out There

2014

The Empowerment Starts Here.

Down Syndrome

F

reedom Harrison is a daughter, a sister, an aunty, a niece, a cousin and a friend. She also has Down Syndrome, writes her sister ROXANNE HARRISON. Growing up with Freedom was much like growing up with anyone. We fought over who got to sit in the front seat, who got the most ice-cream, we pinched each other’s clothes and squabbled over the computer. Freedom is much like everybody else. She loves hip hop dancing, ten pin bowling, baking and watching movies. She loves writing to her friends and family on Facebook and they love to hear from her. She has her own flat which, much to the delight of her nieces and nephews, is right next door to a fantastic new playground. It’s also a sweet place to go when the nightclubs close on Saturday night. Having Down Syndrome definitely made life a bit harder for Freedom but it has never stopped her from achieving anything she wanted to. She has danced before massive crowds with her hip hop crew ‘Strong Beatz’, been an awesome aunty to her two nieces and nephew, has worked for CCS, has played a major role in the establishment of the recently opened Whangarei Youth Space and, as well as having a weekly paper round, currently works at the Ministry of Education. She is a wonderfully positive, happy, caring person and is an inspiration to all those around her. She never lets what she can’t do stop her from doing what she can do. Freedom and others with Down Syndrome can find support from

The Northland Down Syndrome Support Group, which promotes the participation of people with Down Syndrome in their community by providing information packs, support for new parents and regional support groups.

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The Empowerment Starts Here.

Getting Out There

2014

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Getting Out There

2014

The Empowerment Starts Here.

31

Disability Advisory Group provides vital input to Council plans

W

hangarei District Council established a Disability Advisory Group to improve communication with people in our community who are experiencing disability, and to assist Council in responding more effectively to their needs. WDC Community Services Adviser Carla Janssen said that group provides a forum for members to raise issues and to discuss Council matters, particularly those concerning accessibility or personal safety. “The group meets monthly to share experiences and work towards common solutions, and aims to represent the wide scope of the disability sector in the Whangarei District,” she said.

The Disability Advisory Group aims to: • Build strong partnerships / relationships between disabled persons and Council

• Promote and enhance the interests, perspectives, knowledge and judgement of disabled persons • Provide opportunities for disabled persons to gain more confidence in working with local authorities • Ensure disabled persons are included and encouraged to be involved in decision-making and problem solving on all aspects of disability issues.

The Disability Advisory group advises Council on a range of issues including: • disability issues in the planning and development of Council services • how the views and opinions of disabled persons can be represented and progressed • accessibility advice to Council on matters of

The WDC Disability Advisory Group meets monthly to share experiences and advise Council on the interests and needs of the disability sector in Whangarei. The group supports Council’s commitment to enhance the accessibility and safety of its amenities. For further information please contact our Community Services Adviser on 4304230 ext 8830 or carlaj@wdc.govt.nz For information on our Disability Working Parking Permit visit www.wdc.govt.nz/disabilityservices For any concerns regarding safety in the community please call 0800 258258 (For emergencies dial 111)

urban design, planning and infrastructure, and • matters relating to policy and strategic development. “DAG members are keen to participate in the shaping of their city, so at most meetings a Council staff member will discuss a relevant project or topic of interest with the group.” “The group’s extensive collective experience makes a valuable contribution to Council, particularly to project development and future planning,” Ms Janssen said. DAG Chairperson, Jonny Wilkinson, said that to allow the group to continue to evolve they are holding a re-election. “We hope to encourage greater involvement of people who have personal experience or have lived experience of disabilities,” he said. “The group has become an important source of practical

advice on the application of accessibility standards for Council departments, and regularly works together to develop and deliver submissions to Council”. “Service providers are welcome to nominate one of their users to be part of the group and may attend the meetings in a supporting role. We are keen to ensure we hear the personal perspectives of those living with disability,” Mr Wilkinson said.

If you are interested in finding out more about DAG please contact Council’s Community Services Adviser, Carla Janssen, carlaj@wdc.govt.nz or on 430 4230 ext 8830 or DAG chairperson, Jonny Wilkinson, jonny@tiaho.org.nz


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Northable

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Getting Out There

The Empowerment Starts Here.

NorthAble – Accessible Disability Resources

North EQUIPMENT PLUS E

2014

+

N

orthAble is the Northland-Te Tai Tokerau primary Disability Resource Centre. We’ve been serving local communities for over 23 years with offices in Whangarei and NorthAble Link Centres in Dargaville, Maungaturoto, Kaitaia and Te Kao plus a Mobile Service. NorthAble provides disability support and information in the Whangarei district, Mid and Far North, and the Kaipara. Our online equipment and daily living aids shop also allows us to service the national and international community. NorthAble Disability Services operates a Disability, Information and Advisory Service (DIAS); a Needs Assessment and Service Coordination (NASC); a Community Participation and Vocational Programme (LYNKZ); a Very High Needs Service (VHN); and an Equipment Shop with associated website and mobile van (Equipment Plus) Access these disability resources and services through NorthAble: DIAS: Free, friendly, independent advice and links to a range of information across all disabilities. Equipment Plus Shop: In Whangarei, come to NorthAble Equipment Plus shop for equipment and aids for daily living, available for purchase or hire. Free parking is available right outside the door and you can easily navigate around the spacious shop on your own mobility scooter, wheelchair or walking frame while looking at a wide product range: from mobility to kitchen utensils, to continence products, dressing aids and more! Mobile Information and Equipment Service: Packed with equipment and aids for

daily living, the NorthAble Mobile Information and Equipment Van is on the move around Northland on a regular schedule, providing easy access to equipment, information and support at a location near you. Present at many expos and events. In-home demonstrations of equipment is easily arranged. NASC: Access to support with daily life skills and routines and to disability support services. Free to those 0-65 with a physical, intellectual or sensory disability who meet Ministry of Health criteria. See our website for a referral form. LYNKZ: A hands-on programme of practical activities in Whangarei and Dargaville that offers cooking, arts and crafts, community outings and employment support. For 16-64 year olds who have a physical, intellectual or sensory disability – or a combination of these. VHN: Provides appropriate vocational and day programmes for people who have been assessed

by the ongoing resources scheme (ORS) as having very high needs. NorthAble also offers many other services: Our LYNKZ programme sells bagged and loose firewood. Is an assessing agency for the Total Mobility subsidised taxi fares scheme. Produces and distributes a weekly email update and quarterly newsletter. Sources funding options for people with disabilities. Can advertise your preloved equipment for sale. Speaks to groups about disability services and equipment Promotes the disability information website for disabled people, their families, whanau and caregivers at www.weka.net.nz Accessible Whangarei meeting room for hire, discounted to Not-for-Profit groups. Has disabled access toilets for public use, during business hours. Operates a library of disability-themed books, DVDs and information.

Contact NorthAble 40 John Street Whangarei 0110 Freephone: 0508 637 200 Phone: 09 430 0988 Fax: 09 438 9468 E-mail: drc@northable.org.nz Equipment Plus Shop 73 John Street (Corner John and Dent Streets) Whangarei 0110 Phone: 09 430-3469 at Greenways Trust 16 Edward St, Dargaville and Greenworld Health and Lifestyle, 97 Broadway, Kaikohe Phone: 09 439-8133 Mobile Information and Equipment Van 027 453 8797 LYNKZ Community Participation Programme: 65 John Street Whangarei 0110 and Tirarau St Dargaville Phone: 09 430-3470 NorthAble Online: www.northable.org.nz OR for online shopping: www.equipmentplus.org.nz Also visit www.facebook.com/ northable www.facebook. com/NorthAble.LYNKZ


Getting Out There

2014

The Empowerment Starts Here.

35

NorthAble LYNKZ and Stephen

S

tephen Waite has found his recipe for a happy life. His happy place is cooking at home or at LYNKZ, the community participation and vocational programme in Whangarei for people with disabilities. Stephen is a “hands-on, practical sort of person” with cooking an expression of that. The 46-year-old with an intellectual disability is a volunteer leader at the LYNKZ cooking programme. “I pass on cooking skills, help with food budgeting and encourage people to clean up any mess they make!” Stephen is perfecting his skills towards his goal to work in the hospitality industry. “I’m aiming to upskill and hoping to become a fulltime chef.”

As well, Stephen studies at NorthTec, the National Certificate in Hospitality (Leve 3) - an introduction to cookery within the commercial catering industry. Stephen’s CV shows a track record in the hospitality field before he took time out to study. In addition to studying, he works part-time as cleaning assistant at NorthAble Disability Services, parent organisation to LYNKZ. Stephen was involved with LYNKZ first as a client and now as a volunteer. He has participated in all aspects of the programme including Friday Job Club which helped him develop work skills and independence, fundraising including carwashes, bushwalks and artwork. Other key ingredients in Stephen’s life

are going out with friends, bowling and movies. An experienced 10 pin bowler, Stephen last year was on the gold-winning team at the Special Olympics Summer Nationals. “I am a competitive person.” Stephen is also a goal setter: supported by CCS Disability Action, he has found and moved into a onebedroom flat and bettered his budgeting skills and money management. “I’ve achieved a lot over the last year and I have changed a lot.” At the time of going to press, Stephen was leaving NorthAble to concentrate on his studies and his goal of becoming a fulltime chef. We wish him all the best for the future.

Purchase from a source you can trust Equipment to buy or hire: • • • • • •

NorthAble Equipment Plus Cnr John & Dent Sts Whangarei Ph: 09 430 3469 also at Greenways Trust 16 Edward St Dargaville also at Greenworld Health and Lifestylee 97 Broadway Kaikohe Ph: 09 439 8133 Freephone: 0508 637 200 email: equipment@northable.org.nz Mon-Fri 9am-5pm

Mobility Bathroom/toilet Continence Bedroom Aids for daily living Clothing/footwear and more Home demonstrations readily arranged If we haven’t got it, we’ll source it for you a Free accessible parking

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NorthAble Information and Equipment Mobile van service

Visiting a town near you on a regular monthly schedule - In home demonstrations readily arranged |Coopers Beach |Dargaville |Hikurangi |Kaeo| Kaikohe |Kaitaia |Kawakawa |Kerikeri |Mangawhai |Mangonui |Maungakaramea |Maungatapere |Maungaturoto | Ngunguru |Onerahi|Paihia|Parua Bay |Pukenui |Rawene |Ruakaka |Ruawai |Russell |Taipa |Tutukaka |Waipu

CALL 0508 637 200 or 09 430 3469 or 027 453 8797 for information on when the mobile service is next near you

Purchase Equipment Plus products safely & securely online www.equipmentplus.org.nz


Getting Out There

The Empowerment Starts Here.

36

2014

Parent to Parent and Altogether Autism Northland

Regional Coordinator Lynne Hansen speaks about her new role

P

arent to Parent has a new Regional Coordinator for the Northland area. Lynne Hansen has only recently taken on the role of Regional Coordinator after studying for several years at NorthTec to complete an NZIM diploma in Management, Lynne has a background in working with teenagers and people with disabilities, marketing, finance and insurance, she is also a mum

to Amy who is six and a half years old who attends Hurupaki Primary school. When asked what attracted her to the role with Parent to Parent and Altogether Autism simply put, “I know from a parents perspective how lonely and isolated one can feel having a child with a disability especially in the early stages when you are still confirming a diagnosis. There are a lot of services out there,

but often as a parent it is a mine field, you have no idea where to start and where to get relevant information from that’s specific to your child’s disability, nor do you know where to access support. My husband Carl and I have faced this challenge with our little girl Amy who was diagnosed with ADD and traits of ASD (Asperger’s) and presented with very challenging behaviors. Parent

to Parent and Altogether Autism provide such a critical service to parents of children with disabilities a lifeline of support and information.”

Lynne Hansen, Regional Co-ordinator of Parent to Parent

Images of the 2013 SIB (Siblings Support) Camp held at Waiwera


Getting Out There

2014

The Empowerment Starts Here.

Karen Wallace

Parent to Parent

W

hen your child is diagnosed with a disorder or condition that makes life much more challenging, it can sometimes feel very isolating and lonely. Who could I talk to who will truly understand what I’m feeling, thinking, imagining? Who could truly comprehend my fears, and even my extreme joy when my child achieves something that is typically taken for granted? Who will be able to listen to me without judgement? The answers lie, more often than not, in being able to connect with someone who has asked themselves these very same questions. I was led to Parent to Parent Northland through Plunket, when my daughter Edin had starting having seizures at 6 weeks old. At the time of our first contact, Edin had just been diagnosed with ‘a catastrophic form of childhood epilepsy’, Infantile Spasms. Parent to Parent kicked into high gear. They sent us a huge information pack on Infantile Spasms and put us in touch with a lovely Mum whose child had had this condition. What a difference it made, being able to connect with someone who

Here in Northland our service includes: • Local information: Supports, services and news on local events, workshops and programmes within our region. • Matching: Support Parents are ordinary parents who are also caring for a loved one with special needs, putting them in the unique position of being able to understand the highs and lows of caring for a child with additional needs. Support Parents can offer a listening ear and practical suggestions to parents and carers of children with a diagnosed condition.

truly understood, who could listen, support, encourage, and was willing to answer loads of questions about her own experience! Our eldest son attended a Sib-Support workshop, a safe place where he could share his experience of having a sister with special needs, and just be in the company of kids in the same situation as himself. I feel it is such a gift for the siblings of our children with extra challenges to have this kind of outlet and I am very grateful for it. Edin has now been diagnosed with a genetic disorder called CDKL5. We received another wonderful information pack about this condition from Parent to Parent. They continue to be an amazing support.

• Individualised information: On ALL disabilities and health conditions. Put together especially for you, the information can be very basic such as “What is Autism?” or

more personalised and specific such as “Tips for Managing an Egg Allergy”, “Strategies to Encourage Positive Behaviour in ADHD” or “Therapies for a Seven Year Old Who Has Cerebral Palsy”. • Sibling Support: Designed to provide an experience that will help siblings cope with the challenges of living with a brother or sister who has a disability or additional need. Workshops are delivered by leaders who also have a sibling who has a disability which means they can relate to the children, support them and acknowledge their individual issues. • Altogether Autism: Information and support service for people with Autism Spectrum Disorder, families, whanau and the wider community.

Contact Details: Regional Co-ordinator Lynne Hansen 291 Kamo Road, PO Box 4295,Whangarei Phone: (09) 437 3337 Free phone: 0508 236 236 Email: northland@parent2parent.org.nz Web: www.parent2parent.org.nz

PARENT TO PARENT Empowering families and whanau of people with disabilities and health impairments through support and information • • •

37

Connecting families & whanau Individualised information Training workshops

• •

Sibling support programme Advocacy

FREE AND CONFIDENTIAL SERVICES TOLL FREE 0508 236 236 WWW.PARENT2PARENT.ORG.NZ


The Empowerment Starts Here.

38

Getting Out There

2014

Parkinsons

P

arkinson’s Society Northland provides support, education, information and fellowship for people with Parkinson’s disease, their caregivers, families and whanau. An important function is the provision of the Community Educator service. Covering an area from Te Hana to North Cape, two qualified Community Educators provide these services: Home visits to re-assure, motivate and advise people with Parkinson’s and those associated with them Act as health advocates for health services Monitor medication management and note any beneficial or adverse effects Monitor progress of the condition and advise on effective management strategies

Support Groups: Meetings for all members, caregivers, family and friends of the Society are held monthly in Whangarei and Kerikeri, every second month in Kaitaia and quarterly in Dargaville. Usually there is a guest speaker and the confirmed venues and times are advertised in the monthly Newsletter and local newspapers.

Carers’ Groups: Meetings for Carers only meet periodically in Whangarei and Kerikeri. For information about these, please contact the Division’s CoOrdinator Trisha Ryan Tel.09-438 4282, mobile 021 299 3226, e-mail northland@parkinsons.org.nz

Exercise Groups 1. Walking Group - A group of keen walkers meet in Whangarei every Monday morning and enjoy one of the many beautiful walkways we have around the City and adjacent areas. A very enthusiastic group. There is an opportunity for a second group for those who

Refer clients to other agencies, e.g. for assessment for home support Organise educational courses Hold in-service training in rest homes and other health services. Although there is no charge for Community Educator Support, clients are asked to pay a small annual membership fee to assist with wages and travelling expenses for staff, day-to-day running costs and the printing and postage of the monthly Newsletter. From this membership fee a levy is paid to the National Office which publishes the quarterly magazine The Parkinsonian. This contains up-todate news on research, medications and other items of interest to members. Locally, the Society has a substantial library service to be kept up to date. All clients and interested

can only manage short walks, so here’s a challenge to all Parkinson’s couch potatoes to get walking in a supportive group. Bring your walker if you need to use one, your walking stick or hiking stick, whatever aid is required. Just get out, get fresh air, you’ll always be in good company and there is no charge for the privilege. Please phone Margaret Page on 09 435 6239 and get going. 2.Singing/Voice Training Group - Held every Tuesday morning at New Hope Church, Nixon Street, Whangarei. Come along and join in the singing. The ability to hit the right note or keep a tune is not necessary and does not take away the fun of belting out the good old songs we all know. It’s not about the singing it’s about the posture, expanding the chest, facial exercises and getting your voice out there. The aims of this group are To have fun To counterbalance the softening of the voice and flattening of tone To strengthen the lungs and enunciation Kerikeri also has a singing group which meets prior to their monthly Support Meetings.

persons are supplied with excellent literature to help them understand the Parkinson’s condition. Fundraising is done throughout the year to maintain services and offset the shortfall of funding from Charitable Trusts, Lotteries etc.

For information on these services please contact the Community Educators, Vicki Sadgrove, Tel. 09 459 7331, mobile 0274 268 4973 educator.northland@ parkinsons.org.nz for Whangarei City and Northern clients, or Barbara Leslie, Tel. 09 4376 881, mobile 0275 306 221, e-mail educator.northlandsouth@ parkinsons.org.nz for Whangarei South, Kaipara and Dargaville.

Physiotherapy and Hydrotherapy sessions are held weekly in Whangarei, and Podiatry is available in several areas of Northland. These services are subsidised so for details please contact Community Educator Vicki Sadgrove. Pilates for Parkinsons. Classes are held throughout the year at New Hope Church in Nixon Street, Whangarei, conducted by Barbara Faust or one of her specially trained instructors. Please phone Barbara on 09 432 0386 to register. There is a charge for these classes. Other Pilates classes are held around the North and Barbara will give you times and venues. Upbeat & Newly Diagnosed Upbeat is a special interest group for people under the age of 60 diagnosed with Parkinsons. The National Office organises an Outward Bound Course at Picton each year. An Upbeat Conference is scheduled every second year for its members. For Northland activities please contact Vicki Sadgrove. The tulip is the international emblem of the Parkinson’s Society. Watch for it on our notices and advertisements.


Getting Out There

2014

The Empowerment Starts Here.

Parkinson’s profile

A

llen Smith is quietly pleased that he can still give his opponents at table tennis a run for their money. “I don’t win as often as I used to but I still give people a fright now and then,” he says. Allen was diagnosed with Parkinson’s about eight years ago, and considers himself fortunate that he was fit and active at the time. He was playing table tennis at a reasonable level, kayaking regularly, and had a challenging career managing a large company. “It’s arguable whether it made a difference, but fitness has been good for me,” he says. When his symptoms became more apparent Allan “slowly extracted” himself from work. The process was even slower than he had planned because he was continually asked to stay on and did several six month contracts before stopping altogether. “I miss work terribly but I know I couldn’t have held the same intensity and enthusiasm the job needed,” he says.

While there is no replacement for the satisfaction he gained from his role, he is still well occupied. He plays table tennis regularly and carries out various domestic duties as a member of the club, takes his daughter to work every day, goes walking with his brother, and takes the pressure of his wife by taking over much of the housework. “No cooking, though,” he admits. With typical independence and determination, Allen has made it a mission not to rely on outside help until really necessary, but describes himself as a ‘quiet participant’ in Parkinson’s New Zealand, which provides education, information and support for all people with Parkinson’s, their caregivers, friends and families. “I go to meetings from time to time and find their social workers very friendly and helpful,” he says. “And although you can look on the internet for information, it’s not the same as talking to people who have similar problems.”

WHAKAMANA HAUORA PROGRAMME SELF-MANAGEMENT COURSE FOR PEOPLE WITH LONG-TERM HEALTH CONDITIONS The program is for those of you who; have a long term health condition, or care for someone with a long term health condition.The program is about learning strategies that will help you self manage your condition be it sleep, diet, exercise, pain or anything else that might limit your ability to live your life to the full. Bay of Islands | Kerikeri | Kaikohe

Doubtless Bay / Kaitaia:

Margot Forrest 09 403 8147 Diane Henare 09 402 8562

Diane Henare 09 402 8562

Kawakawa: Ngati Hine HealthTrust, Karen Mackie 0800 737 573 Whangaroa: Health Service, Hillary Sheard 09 405 0355 #865

Whangarei: Manaia PHO Jenny Barrett: 09 438 1015

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2014

The Stroke Foundation of New Zealand Reducing Risks, improving outcomes

S

troke is one of New Zealand’s most pressing health issues. A stroke or “brain attack” occurs when a blood clot blocks an artery or a blood vessel breaks, interrupting blood flow to an area of the brain. When either of these things happen, brain cells begin to die and brain damage occurs. Stroke is the third largest killer in New Zealand and the largest cause of serious adult disability in New Zealand. A stroke can happen at any time and affects people of all ages. While the impact of stroke can be devastating, there is hope for the future. Stroke is largely preventable. The risk of stroke can be significantly reduced by understanding and controlling key risk factors such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, poor diets, physical inactivity and atrial fibrillation (irregular heartbeat). The Stroke Foundation is the only organisation in New Zealand dedicated to reducing the incidence of stroke, improving treatment outcomes, and supporting those affected by stroke. The Stroke Foundation is a charity that supports 30 Community Stroke Advisors (formerly known as Field Officers) and stroke clubs throughout New Zealand. Two trained Community Stroke Advisors in Northland – Jo Mete based in Kaitaia and Merilyn Palmer in Whangarei, work closely with those who have been affected by stroke. They make hospital and home visits, support families/whanau and can advise on accessing carerrelief services and support. Their general focus is on rehabilitating the stroke survivor back into the community and to

Merilyn Palmer , Community Stroke Advisor

assist family/Whanau and caregivers to not only understand a stroke but to adjust to their changed circumstances following stroke. Stroke support organisations are located in Kerikeri, Whangarei and Dargaville and can be contacted through your local Community Stroke Advisor. The Foundation promotes public awareness about the risk factors for stroke and how to recognise

the symptoms through its annual Blood pressure campaign, promotion of FAST and salt reduction programmes. With a focus on health service delivery, the Foundation works to improve acute and rehabilitation hospital services and treatment outcomes by auditing stroke services, publishing guidelines and through its clinical networks, assists all DHB’s to meet standards.

Stroke Services in Northland Jo Mete Community Stroke Advisor – Far and Mid North (Cape Reinga to Kawakawa) 0800 566 383 Merilyn Palmer Community Stroke Advisor – Northland (Kawakawa to Wellsford) 0800 459 954


Getting Out There

2014

The Empowerment Starts Here.

Profile on Jesse James

A

stroke at any age would be devastating for anyone, but for Whangarei teacher Jesse James the message he has taken from it is resoundingly positive. Since his stroke in 2012 Jesse is keen to spread his message to other stroke survivors and more importantly, to those who have not had a stroke but might be heading that way. “Correct food and regular exercise is needed to reduce sickness among ourselves,” says Jesse. “To my Ma¯ori relations I say we should be watching what we eat, less sweets and salt and fatty foods. These are the things that can cause diabetes and strokes, so we have to be strong to bless ourselves.” Jesse wants to encourage others in his position. “I was in the stroke unit at Whangarei Hospital for eight weeks,” he says. “Thanks to the support of my family and the nursing staff I was able to walk out of hospital with the aid of a walking stick.” Not all stroke cases are so lucky. One in three die. Another third make an almost complete recovery

but the other third are left with permanent disability that requires care or has lifechanging effects. “After a stroke you have to retrain your brain to tell your body what to do and how to do it. It takes patience,” says Jesse. “It took me a while to realise that the ball was in my court and if I wanted to become mobile again then I must work to achieve it. You must try hard, even though at first it seems impossible.” Perhaps it is the teacher in him which prompted Jesse to share his experience with others. Before his stroke he taught at Te Kura Kaupapa Ma¯ori o Te Rawhitiroa in Tikipunga, and previously worked in television, translating children’s shows into Ma¯ori. His rehabilitation has included swimming at Whangarei’s hydrotherapy pool where he is sometimes joined by other stroke survivors. “You will get there,” he concludes. “Cheer up. Let’s face it, your brain has had a nasty shock. It has to relearn what it once knew. It needs help from you to be able to do this. It takes lots of practice. Kapai.”

Is it a stroke? check it out the F.A.S.T way Face

Arms

Smile - is one side drooping?

Raise both arms - is one side weak?

Speech

Time

Speak unable to? Words jumbled, slurred?

Act fast & call 111! Time lost may mean brain lost.

STROKE IS A MEDICAL EMERGENCY

CALL 111 IMMEDIATELY

Ways to reduce your risk of stroke • Get your blood pressure checked and if necessary treated • Don’t smoke • Exercise regularly • Limit your intake of alcohol • Eat a healthy balanced diet, reduce your salt intake and control your weight • Get your cholesterol checked and if necessary treated • Find out if you have atrial fibrillation (rapid irregular heartbeat) and if necessary have it treated

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Getting Out There

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2014

Whanau Ora

W

hakatauki: “Naku te rourou nau te rourou ka ora ai te iwi.” With your basket and my basket the people will live. Wha¯nau Ora is an inclusive inter-agency approach to providing health and social services to build the capacity of all New Zealand families in need. It empowers wha¯nau as a whole rather than focusing on the issues of individual family members. What does Wha¯ nau Ora mean for disabled people and their families? Tiaho Trust helps families access Wha¯nau Ora resources so they can generate an enabling environment for the disabled member and the wider family. Issues may include: co-dependency, the need to be independent from parents, having age appropriate peers, access

to services and effective service delivery, ageing parents with no contingency plan for when they are no longer able to look after their son or daughter, and in worst-case scenarios, financial abuse. Tiaho Trust provides a Navigator whose role is one of awhi and guidance for the wha¯nau as they identify needs, goals and aspirations. With the Navigator as support, the wha¯nau create a plan, which acts as the roadmap to achieving those aspirations. Tiaho Trust is holding a series of wa¯nanga/ workshops to assist wha¯nau in the following areas: • Career planning • Transition from a school environment into a nonschool environment

Ngawaiata Naera - she’s our Navigator/Kaiwhakatere.

• Transition from living with ‘mum and dad’ or wha¯nau to supported independent living These were issues that arose again and again in our Whanau Ora programme last year. Wa¯nanga are held in various marae which will be publicised as dates are confirmed. There will be opportunities to engage with service providers who can assist with how to meet potential career and independent living goals and aspirations. Families with disabled people who plan towards the betterment of a family as a whole, not only improve the disabled person’s life, but their own life and the lives of the generations who follow.

If any whanau with a disabled family member is interested in Whanau Ora, contact us at Tiaho Trust. PH: (09) 430 3406 or free phone 0800 430 3406 Email: Ngawaiata@tiaho. org.nz or RinaH@tiaho. org.nz


Getting Out There

2014

The Empowerment Starts Here.

20 percent Campaign for raising the disability sector vote

I

n the 2012 New Zealand General Social Survey (NZGSS), 20 percent of people said they hadn’t voted in the 2011 General Election. Although there is no specific data on the number of non-voting disabled people in the NZGSS, the demographic characteristics of all non-voters such as age, income adequacy, labour force status and migrant status will include disabled people and are similar for both the 2008 and 2011 general elections. This election has seen the launch of ‘20percent’ - a campaign aiming to be the bridge between the disability sector and those seeking election. For politicians to have a better understanding of the disability voting block and key issues for disabled people, we have initiated a bi-partisan campaign to mobilise disabled people and their allies to engage with and ask questions of candidates on key issues. The campaign aims to: • Inform disabled people about political parties’ manifestos and their implications for disabled people • Assist and resource disabled people to engage with politicians on disability related issues

• Create a disability community which values its vote and encourages disabled people and their family/ whanau to vote • Spotlight various electorates informing them about the candidates Campaign Manager, Loren Corbett, has been busy contacting various key players and sitting MP’s, asking their opinions on various issues. “It has been encouraging to hear from some MPs who are excited about the campaign. However there is a bit of hesitancy from some individuals, which is disappointing,” says Loren. Activities include public forums in the Whangarei and Far North electorate, inviting standing candidates to address our local disabled communities. Dates, times and venues will be advertised. Closer towards Election Day (September 20th) the focus will move to informing people about how they can physically get out there and VOTE, including identifying polling stations that are wheel-chair accessible or how to vote with a visual impairment.

You can keep up to date with the campaign and join the conversations on: Facebook:

www.facebook. com/20percent

Twitter:

@20percentNZ

Email:

20percent@tiaho. org.nz

GENERAL ELECTION SEPTEMBER 20TH

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Getting Out There

The Empowerment Starts Here.

2014

Why vitamin D is important Vitamin D can help maintain bone health, improve muscle function and may reduce falls in older people with low vitamin D levels

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# RJM+ )SU!INM N) 9)S O)QM$ S' L)$ OSEUS$5E8 -MNIO5E )$ )UJM$ $M5!)+!2 # .) 9)S J5QM +5US$5EE9 QM$9 N5$G !GI+2 # 1$M 9)S EIQI+K I+ 5 $M!U J)-M2 If you are over 65 and can say yes to any of the above, check with your doctor to see if a vitamin D prescription is right for you.

Want to know more about vitamin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

1//3! =M4!IUMF www.acc.co.nz/vitamin-d "JM ?MN!5LM =M4!IUMF www.medsafe.govt.nz "JM /5+OM$ %)OIMU93! =M4!IUMF www.cancernz.org.nz ?I+I!U$9 )L BM5EUJ =M4!IUMF www.health.govt.nz

# BM5EUJ (S5EIU9 P %5LMU9 /)--I!!I)+ =M4!IUMF www.hqsc.govt.co.nz

www.acc.co.nz 0800 844 657


Getting Out There

2014

The Empowerment Starts Here.

45

What is Angel Flight?

A

ngel Flight New Zealand is a registered New Zealand charity comprising some 120 volunteers, including 50 pilots. We offer free flights to people needing to get to centralised medical facilities. We help those who need to travel long distances for non-urgent medical treatment but don’t qualify for the Air Ambulance service and for whom ground transport is unavailable or would be stressful. We are nationwide and can help people throughout New Zealand. All our volunteer pilots exceed the minimum requirements of the Civil Aviation Authority for private flying in New Zealand. Passengers need to be referred to us by a Healthcare Professional - Social Workers, Nurses, Doctors or PHOs This approach has been successfully adopted in the USA, Canada, and Australia where thousands of people have benefitted from the service.

Now Kiwis can do the same.

Angel Flight NZ guidelines

Health Professionals wishing to initiate an ANGEL FLIGHT NEW ZEALAND mission should register at www.angelflightnz. co.nz and complete the on-line Flight Request Form. We normally require a minimum of seven days notice, especially when the passenger must meet pre-arranged medical bookings.

Angel In Flight: Founder, Lance Weller flies his Cirrus Aircraft over evening cloud

Up Close and personal: Founder, Lance Weller with his aircraft

Precious Cargo: Mother, Shannon Hoani with baby Magic Hoani, assisted by Earth Angel Chris Goddard. With his back to us, Pilot Alastair Leggat prepares his aircraft.

Angel Flight New Zealand might be able to help if the passenger: • Lives rurally and has to travel to central medical facilities • Doesn’t qualify for the Air Ambulance and would find road travel taxing, difficult or unaffordable.

Safely secured: Young Czah Sun with Nana Ruby Waihape about to depart on their return flight after treatment at Starship Hospital.

• Won’t require medical support during the flight. To request a flight, visit www.angelflightnz.co.nz

En route to Starship: Pilot Phil Pacey with Joseph Tebbutt and mum Erica Tebbutt

Contact details

To find out more, contact a team member: Head office:

Lance@angelflightnz.co.nz

North Island:

john.pringle@angelflightnz.co.nz

South Island:

james.turner@angelflightnz.co.nz

War Hero arrives home: Pilot Roger Dickey with WWII pilot, Ken Birdling DFC on arrival.

THE DARGAVILLE AERO CLUB FLYING SCHOOL The Dargaville Aero Club is open to all students who are interested in learning to fly for recreation or as a career. The club offers recreation training in an Italian Fly Synthesis Storch, Texan. The unique feature of the club is tuition is free for the Storch and Texan aircraft (with the student paying only for the cost of operating the aircraft). The club is famous for its lunches, held every Saturday at 12.30pm. As well as being a fun social gathering, this provides a great opportunity for anyone interested in flying to come along and look at the aircraft, meet club members, ask questions and go for a fly.

Come fly with us - $60 Trial Flight

Phone Murray Foster for further information on 0274784308 or 09 4398024.


46

Getting Out There

The Empowerment Starts Here.

2014

Age Concern Age Concern Whangarei Services – Promoting the rights and wellbeing of older people and those who care for them. How do we do this? We provide a number of services; most are at no cost to the client. The following gives an overview of what we provide to enable people to age in a place of their choice. Our focus is to enable people to remain in their own homes. Home Safety Maintenance – We offer a service to enable a range of minor repairs, replacements and advice in the home – there is no job too small. We install hand rails, replace light bulbs, change fuses, change smoke alarm batteries etc…anything that is necessary to improve or maintain safety for the client in the home. Materials are at a cost for people in their own homes and a small charge for the van call-out is required at the

time of the visit. We have a database of numerous skilled professionals to refer the client to if our Home Safety Maintenance officer is unable to do a particular request. Anyone can refer to this service. Health Promotion / Education – We hold seminars and programmes usually once or twice a month focusing on positive ageing, managing own health and well-being. We have an annual calendar of events with a wide range of topics – e.g. Specific medical conditions, management of living at an older age, legal issues; the focus is to keep people informed and to let them know what is available. We teach both the older person who is retired and also the professionals who can use the hours toward their professional development. We welcome suggestions of topics as well. Phone Age Concern Whangarei to express interest and to register. What else do Age Concern offer? • Step Ahead : Falls prevention program. This is held on one day for 4 consecutive weeks, either morning or afternoon sessions of 2 ½ hours each.

Guest speakers are invited to talk on their area of speciality relevant to Falls Prevention and the interactive nature of this course is proved as being very popular. Gentle exercises are also given to build confidence and improve balance. Age Concern Whangarei holds this course twice a year and registration is required for attendance. Contact reception to register your interest. • Weekly Garage Sale; usually on a Thursday morning. Donations are gratefully received. • Opportunities for volunteers. A range of positions are available. Please contact reception to express interest. Field Work – Our field officer provides Information, Advice, Advocacy and Support by appointment in office or person’s own home. Frequently home visiting will uncover other issues which can be improved by assisting the client to the correct service provider. If the client is unhappy about something, our advocacy service will provide support and assistance to help resolve whatever is going on with the client. For an appointment with a Field Worker please phone one of our Receptionists.

No. 1 LJ Hooker Office in NZ 2011, 2012, 2013 & 2014! Winner Highest Number Properties Sold Best Community Relationship Award It costs no more to sell your property with the best!

Proudly supporting Age Concern Whangarei Whangarei

11 James Street Whangarei

Phone 438 1332

Asset Realty Ltd Licensed REAA2008


Getting Out There

2014

The Empowerment Starts Here.

47

Age Concern Total Mobility – Our Field Officer is also an Assessor of eligibility for reduced taxi fares for people with disabilities or health problems for whom mobility is a problem. This can be due to many factors such as sight, pain, immobility, requirement for the use of aids etc. Again home visits are done and the client is assessed and enabled to use the service. Anyone can refer to this service. Accredited Visitors Service – Loneliness can be a major problem with the Older person, and we visit to access the client in order to provide a suitable accredited visitor who will visit, usually weekly, for an hour or so for a chat and a cup of tea. Anyone can refer to this service for a free assessment.

Dedicated Carer Relief Service – An Age Concern staff member will relieve carer/family member on a regular basis. This service focuses upon providing stress and social relief for the full time carer and they may utilize their free time to do whatever they wish…it may be to go out and visit friends, go to a hairdresser, to attend to their own health needs and attend appointments or even just to go and have a catch up on sleep. Our staff are professionally trained and are able to care for the client well, thus ensuring the carer really has a stress free break for a few hours a week. Clients require to have Carer Support hours allocated for provision of this service or they can pay privately.

Resources – Age Concern Whangarei members receive our Age Concern Whangarei newsletters and an annual calendar of events. We have 3 wheelchairs available for hire by the day ($5), week ($25) or for the weekend ($10) and a Reference book and lending library. We also have a brochure information stand in Age Concern House (Administration Block) which has a great selection of pamphlets detailing services and information available in the Whangarei area. We are a Non-Government Organisation and therefor raise all our own funding. We welcome membership and bequests to Age Concern Whangarei from individuals, agencies and businesses.

Our Information Centre is open from 9am-3.45pm Monday-Friday at 16 Manse Street, Regent, Whangarei. Phone 09 438 8043 or Fax 09 430 3750 or email us at ageconcern.whg@ xtra.co.nz

LJ Hooker are proud to offer a 10% discount on our service fee to all Super Gold card holders. Please tell your agent that you are a SuperGold card holder prior to listing your property to receive your discount upon settlement.

Whangarei

11 James Street Whangarei

Phone 438 1332

Asset Realty Ltd Licensed REAA2008


48

Getting Out There

The Empowerment Starts Here.

2014

NORTHLAND BUSINESSES PROUDLY SUPPORT “OUR PEOPLE GETTING OUT THERE”

Don’t get stuck with shoddy tyres in this wet weather. Go and see our friendly sponsor:..

Venue & Catering by the River

BLOM MFIELD D SPE ECIA AL SC CHO OOL L

A’Fare offers a unique wedding & catering venue in Whangarei. We pride ourselves on providing delicious fresh food with menus to suit your budget. We are fully licensed or you may byo at either your venue or ours.

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or call 09 470 2595

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Phone: 09 438 9809

• FINGER FOOD • MORNING TEA • COCKTAIL • CORPORATE • MOBILE CATERING

Located in the Toll Stadium Okara Drive, Whangarei

Open Tuesday to Sunday from 10am "Professional service & advice you can count on"

www.thomsonbagley.co.nz

At Russell Turner, our clients include individuals, families, the self-employed and businesses of all sizes and types - including retailing, marketing, accommodation, food, transport, manufacturing, farming, agriculture and horticulture. • Assisting you to maximise your tax advantages • Assisting your business to run at maximum efficiency. • Assisting you to maximise your income and the time you have to enjoy it. • Assisting you with a clear and accurate idea of your financial position • Assisting you to plan for your financial future and maximise your assets for retirement.

General Auctioneers ! Antiques Plant & Machinery ! Surplus Stock ! Chattel Valuers

58 Otaika Rd, Whangarei Ph: (09) 438 9479 F: (09) 438 7825 E: info@russellturner.co.nz | www.russellturner.co.nz

David Hodson

PURCHASING MANAGER

Mobile 027 498 6809 69 Port Road PO Box 25006 Whangarei 0148 P. 09 438 3759 F. 09 438 8811 E. david@thomsonbagley.co.nz

Bookings Highly Recommended

Phone 438-1028 - Email 10pinwhg@xtra.co.nz

! !


Getting Out There

2014

The Empowerment Starts Here.

My Creative Living Begins At Home

I

t’s important to ‘get personal’ when dealing with the world of independent living. We’ve managed to build good relationships with clients based on our personal experiences in the field of assisted living. As a mum of two children with disabilities, I attribute our everyday life experiences as a valuable tool in helping understand and empathise with those facing the reality of challenging circumstances. Creative Tiling - Our successful tiling business, which I jointly own with my husband Steve, has in recent years been expanded to accommodate a new sector, Creative Living. Creative Living aims to provide a range of products and solutions to assist those with disabilities or reduced mobility, to a more independent lifestyle. Creative Living has just opened a new Independent Living Showroom in Auckland displaying our most popular products including a range of height adjustable bench and basin options, level access showers with specialised doors for carer assistance, shower seating, ramps and commercial accessible resources. For those who are unable to visit our showroom we can assist with no obligation home visits and advise on how to adapt their current situation. We also work closely with Designers/

49

By Hilary Cove-Smith

Architects and Occupational Therapists and pride ourselves on being able to offer excellent advice and reliable service in independent living ensuring the solution for the client is right the first time, taking the fear and uncertainty out of the search for help and products. We’re immensely proud of both of our children. Alice (18) uses a wheelchair and is in her last year at High school. She has an aptitude for English and Writing and is working towards gaining a University Scholarship next year to study towards a Bachelor of Communications Course. Samuel (14), despite having autism, progresses in leaps and bounds every day with his communication and learning new skills. Caring for them is not without its challenges but their achievements, however small, which may seem ordinary to most families, make all the hard work worthwhile.

New Showroom Now Open At: 662 Rosebank Road (within The Tile Depot) Avondale, Auckland Open: Mon - Fri 7.30am - 5.00pm, Sat 9am - 4pm, Sun 10am-3pm Ph 09 815 0703

NZ’s largest range of Quality Disability Products •Bathroom solutions •Kitchen Solutions •Commercial Solutions •Complete design & build service available NEW SHOWROOM NOW OPEN AT: 662 Rosebank Road (within The Tile Depot) Avondale, Auckland Open: Mon - Fri 7.30am - 5.00pm, Sat 9am - 4pm, Sun 10am-3pm Tel: 09 815 0703

Contact us now to start planning for a more independent and enhanced lifestyle

Whangarei Office ph 09 459 6255 email office@disabilityaids.co.nz web www.disabilityaids.co.nz


Getting Out There

The Empowerment Starts Here.

50

2014

Mainly music for your Child

M

ainly music for additional needs has so much to offer parents and their children. The educational aspect tends to leap out as the most obvious feature, with music acting as a language all of its own, fostering learning of spoken language and fundamental concepts such as stop and go, high and low, out and in and so on. However the children also learn many other skills such as turn taking, co-operation, and social interaction with one another. Our sessions are built on an organised framework that assists children with predictability and enhances their learning. Some children take several

For children with additional needs 10-11AM FRIDAYS DURING TERM TIME

c e re m u s i e h W t f u n c re a d an mories and me ar ning le

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT CHRIS WILSON Clark Road Chapel 4-6 Clark Road Kamo, Whangarei Phone 09 437 3016 Cell: 021 064 1108 mimitu@vodafone.co.nz www.mainlymusic.org.nz

sessions before they learn to engage with the songs, but inevitably they are drawn to the tactile and visual props that are part of every session. Mainly music also is about fun. It’s about enjoying each child for who they are and provides wonderful bonding opportunities for the children and those who bring them. Some come with parents, others with caregivers. Preschool siblings are also welcome and often provide great role modelling for others in the group. Over the twelve years we have been operating, we have witnessed the tremendous support the parents provide for one another. Apart from the companionship provided by someone else who often knows just what the journey with a child with special needs is like, parents also bring into the group important information about how to access resources and obtain what their child needs. On occasion we provide special pampering opportunities for our parents – fathers as well as mothers - and look to encourage them where we can. The team are adept at adapting to the needs of the families who attend, be they dietary requirements for morning tea, hygiene needs for infection control, or physical limitations in participating in the music sessions.

Free phone 0800 459 1778

Childcare Services

Txt: 027 438 4535 15 Moody Ave, Whangarei info@bjschildcare.co.nz www.bjschildcare.co.nz

Giving Parents more choices Childcare Centre (Whangarei) Homebased Childcare (Northland wide) e) A combination of both

20 hours ECE / WINZ subsidies

J vacanob c workies: from home

Children with all kinds of additional needs are welcome, these can include shyness (which is helped by the small size of our group), significant mobility challenges, autistic spectrum behaviour and medical challenges that make attending a larger regular group unsuitable. We welcome new faces and look forward to meeting you. Chris Wilson, Mainly music leader

BJ’s offer 3 unique services Get the best of both worlds with us at

BJ’s. Education in a home environment, Join our friendly professional team that in the centre or a combination of both, is dedicated to making learning fun in a which one suits your family?

family homebased environment.

BJ’s are here to help make childcare

BJ’s are always hearing about the

for your family as easy as possible.

importance of work/life balance, well thats

Homebased Childcare:

exactly what we are offering - no stress

from birth-6 years of age.

because you are working from home.

Childcare Centre:

Give BJ’s a call now and discuss the option that suits you and your family.

for 2-5 year olds. (Open 8.00am-5.00pm).

Contact us today!

Job Vacancies:

Call 0800 459 1778. Text Betje on 027 4384 535.

Visit www.bjschildcare.co.nz. Email:info@bjschildcare.co.nz. Follow us on Facebook


Getting Out There

2014

The Empowerment Starts Here.

51

Community Services inside the Municipal Building, Whangarei

T

he Municipal Building, aka the Old Town Hall, at 71 Bank St celebrated its 100th birthday a few years ago.It is worth a visit inside to see the beautiful tiling and woodwork that was characteristic of that era of building craftsmanship –a building fit for the mayors and councillors who once frequented it. Older residents of

Whangarei will remember the dances held in the hall to the rear of the building, which backed on to the train stop. The historic building now is home to several social service groups, and is adjacent to a bus stop. On the ground floor is the Citizens Advice Bureau, Epilepsy Northland, Specific Learning Difficulties Northland, and Multiple Sclerosis support. There is also a counsellor on this floor. Upstairs is Literacy Whangarei, the Out of School Care group OSCAR, the Migrant Centre, Women’s International Newcomers Group, and the new office of Volunteering Whangarei . There is wheelchair access into the ground or first floor of the building at the front and rear, but unfortunately there are only stairs to the second floor. Appointments can be made with organisations upstairs who will be happy to meet you on the ground floor to discuss your needs. There is a toilet with wheelchair access on the ground floor.

The Whangarei District Council has been asked to identify the building as its social services hub, to enable people easy access to support in the city centre. It is also near the IRD, the courts and a short distance to Work & Income offices, Housing NZ and the Department of Internal Affairs. People are welcome to come into the Citizens Advice Bureau to relax in the public lounge and check out the pamphlets on display for local information.

Whangarei migrant centre A Newcomer’s port of

Supporting Whangarei entry to Whangarei Migrant, Newcomers and • community links Our Community • social support • employment assistance

71BANK Bank STREET, Street, WHANGAREI Whangarei 71 Ph: (09)4300571 PH:(09)4300571

www.whangareimigrantcentre.co.nz

Our advice is free. Not getting it could cost you though.

Greenways Trust is a Dargaville based organisation that has been supporting adults with Intellectual Disabilities since 1992. We offer residential accommodation and Vocational Services. Activities offered through our Social Enterprise include Firewood, woodwork, Market Stalls, Section Clean up Audience(s) People with intellectual disabilities aged 18 years upwards. Days/Times Available 9.00am - 5.00pm Monday to Friday. 24 hour residential supervision. Area(s) of Service Kaipara, Northland Costs Free service usually funded by MSD and MOH.

71 Bank Street, Whangarei Phone 438 8046 Te Pou Whakawhirinaki o Aotearoa

cab.whngr@xtra.co.nz www.cab.org.nz

PO Box 5, Dargaville Phone: (09) 439 8133 Fax: (09) 439 8134, Email: greenwaystrust@xtra.co.nz

KAURILANDS SKILLS CENTRE TRUST DARGAVILLE We a rurally located,located, 24 hours 24 a day, holistic Weoperate operate a rurally hours a day, programme for adults with intellectual disability, who holistic programme foran adults with an intellectual disability, prefer rather than prefer countrywho life rather thancountry the busy life city. Our programme the busy city. programme encompasses work,Our leisure, spiritual and encompasses family/whanau work, leisure, spiritual family/whanau involvement. The centre is locatedand on a 15 hectare farm involvement. Thehomes, centre located on aa large 15 with two main group and is 3 cabins. We have hectare withsuch twoasmain group homes, barn wherefarm activities karaoke, cooking and a and fitted 3 cabins. We have a large barn where activities gym are available. For those relaxing moments, we have a such as Karaoke, Cooking, our gym are on offer large spa for use.for Theclients clients are also involved as well asour a clients huge tospa which may ininvolve paid employment, community activities or possibly off on paid employment, community activities a cruise forora holiday. off on a cruise for a holiday. Pleasecontact contact Karen Karen Duncan Please Duncanfor formore more information on on 09 information 09 439 4392147 2140oror kaurilandskills@xtra.co.nz managerklsc@xtra.co.nz


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The Empowerment Starts Here.

Getting Out There

2014

Home and Community Support Living a Full Life

W

yniard Hohaia is an outgoing young man who at the promising age of 18 is striving to lead a full life with the support from Geneva Northlink Healthcare. At three years old, Wyniard was welcomed into a family who were told he would never read and write due to learning delays, vision and hearing impairment. But Wyniard has really shown them to be wrong. Through a strong family environment, dedicated support and mainstream schooling, Wyniard has excelled into an exceptional young man says his mother Shona Hobson who is also Area Coordinator for Strengthening Families and a Queens Honour award recipient. Since leaving school, Wyniard has been gaining valuable work experience in Kaitaia with the assistance of Iris Moore, a dedicated Support Worker, from Geneva Northlink Healthcare. This support enables Wyniard and other young people like him to have meaningful engagement with

the community despite the limited employment opportunities in the area. Wyniard’s ultimate dream is to become a DJ and Radio Announcer. “I’ve been liking it since I was a little kid, says Wyniard. DJing is kind of a cool thing when I used to be able to go on air.” This dream is fuelled by his passion for music. One of his many volunteer jobs is at Te Hiku Media and Radio where he does odd jobs each Wednesday. Here he has been able to get a taste of what it’s like to be on the radio. He has read the weather, announced songs live on air, and even recorded an advert for the SPCA second hand furniture shop where he volunteers four mornings a week. When at work, Iris only guides and prompts Wyniard he has to do the work. Wyniard also learns life skills with Iris like cooking, hanging out washing, making bed and handling money to encourage further independence. “He wouldn’t have these opportunities if Support Workers weren’t able to provide this support” his mother says.

Shona praises the service and the people at Geneva Northlink Healthcare, especially Northland Regional Manager Rick Boraston. “Communication has been fantastic and you know exactly what is going on when it’s going on. Geneva Northlink has been absolutely wonderful when the Support Worker needs time off. Having that relief managed is just superb because in the past I’ve never had relief from other providers.”


Getting Out There

2014

The Empowerment Starts Here.

53

Providing Support

I

DEA Services is part of IHC New Zealand and provides support for people with an intellectual disability so they can live, learn, work and enjoy life as part of their community. Recently IDEA adopted a nationwide strategy titled “The Next Wave of Community Living” with a focus on reviewing our current service provision, and change the options we make available. This is essentially all about expanding the range of living options we could provide. Current kinds of services delivered are not disappearing; we intend only to add to the options.

Our support services include:

Residential – Group Home Living We support from 1 to 5 people in a house - each person has their own bedroom and is encouraged to participate in the running of their home. People are supported to be active socially and are encouraged to have friends and family over to stay or to share a meal. Each person

living in the home is given the level of support they need including help with personal care, preparing meals or going out. Supported Living Our flexible support enables a person to be more independent and be part of local communities. We find out about the persons goals and wishes and develop an individual support plan to help with daily living and provide support to develop skills to become more independent. We work alongside a person in their own home or help them to find a home. Vocational and Day Services We support people to learn, work and enjoy life through accessing training opportunities to develop skills to be able to fully participate in the community. We also provide onsite special interest programmes to help develop hobby based skills such as arts, crafts and gardening. We have an extensive programme for people to select from.

Supported Employment For employers we know you need enthusiastic, loyal, motivated and trustworthy employees and that’s what we provide. We will help match the right person to the job, provide them with one to one support, and work alongside employers to support people to succeed in the workplace. Our support to you is free. Transition Services Is your family member in their last year of school? We support students to plan and move into further education, employment and local community activities in their last year of school.

IDEA Services 14-20 Clyde Street Whangarei Phone:

09 470-2000

email:

northland@idea.org.nz

web:

www.idea.org.nz

PERSEVERANCE AND CONSISTENCY PAY OFF After 18 months of staff perseverance encouragement and support, and the invaluable help of family, Nathan, a highly autistic young man finally succeeds

in enjoying what he loves doing - swimming, spending an hour in the pool smiling and laughing with others. A huge journey for everyone with a great outcome

IDEA is dedicated to providing the best possible support to people with intellectual disabilities and their families offering residential, supported living, vocational and supported employment services.

WAKA AMA 2014

The waka - ama programme has been running for the last 3 years. The programme offers fitness, health and safety, structure, rhythm, water safety, fun, competiveness, empowerment, friendships, team work, life skills and is cherished by all the people that attend the programme. We are very lucky in Northland to have such beautiful coastal beaches to be enjoyed. The group go to Kowharewa Bay on the beautiful Ngunguru coast every Monday depending on the

IDEA is an IHC Service in your community

weather. The group entered a community waka-ama competition in the end of the year held at the town basin and did very well and are looking forward to entering other community based waka-ama competitions that come up in the future. The Plan B option consists of sports at Kensington stadium. We are very fortunate to be able provide such meaningful and cherished recreational community programmes.

www.Idea.org.nz AREA OFFICE 14-20 Clyde St, Whangarei

Ph 09 470 2000

Email: northland@idea.org.nz


Getting Out There

The Empowerment Starts Here.

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2014

The Papermill

T

he Papermill was designed to help intellectually disabled people boost their self-esteem. It has evolved into a delightful tourist attraction and is being hailed as an environmental and social success. The workers obtain job skills, satisfaction and personal growth. Using recycled products like paper, cloth, flowers and weeds, the Papermakers produce handmade paper which is made into a line of stationery, packaging, wedding invitations and art works of an international standard. Visitors watch the paper making processes, or make a sheet of handmade paper under the guidance of a skilled tutor.

groups to come in and learn the art of paper making and paper craft. You will be guaranteed an enjoyable time. • School groups We offer a fun ‘hands-on’ papermaking session incorporating community values, e.g. conservation and breaking down the stigma of disabilities. Visitors are welcome to browse in the shop and tours are available by appointment. • Papermaking workshops Learn to make your own paper. Handmade paper for wedding invitations can be made to order and can include shredded banknotes, embossed paper, rose petals, lavender - the choices are limitless.

We provide the following : • Special-needs creative training This program is customised to individual needs and is aimed at building self- esteem and confidence. It teaches team-building, independence and work skills. Funding is through the Ministry of Social Development, ACC or privately.

We invite you to join us in the production of your order. Just about anything is possible at The Papermill. Just ask! Open: Monday to Friday 9am – 3pm 38 Kamo Road, Kensington Whangarei 0112, New Zealand ph (09) 459 1459 www.thepapermill.co.nz info@thepapermill.co.nz https://www.facebook.com/ thepapermill.co.nz

• Work experience For school-leavers with special needs • Community groups We welcome community groups such as Guides, Rotary, gardening, Church groups and mystery tour

Your Favourite spa & beauty boutique for greater self esteem confidence & simply better skin Tel: 09 430 7377

1 Dent Street, Whangarei, Northland 0110 Mon-Thu: 09:00 - 18:30 • Fri: 09:00 - 17:00 Sat: 09:00 - 14:00

email relax@personatherapy.co.nz • www.personatherapy.co.nz

find us on facebook

Persona Essence of Beauty


Getting Out There

2014

The Empowerment Starts Here.

Radius Care Quality in Care Q&A with Mandy Beazley, Facility Manager of Radius Potter Home What is the history of Potter Home? A: Potter Home started life as a fine residence for Kathleen Sweet in 1901. The grand old residence changed hands a number of times before being purchased by the District Health Board, with funds donated by generous local benefactor Mr Frederick Potter. Set upon sweeping lawns, with beautiful jacaranda trees and rose gardens, the building has retained all of its charm – and the atmosphere is truly welcoming. What levels of care are provided by Potter Home? A: Potter Home is able to provide hospital care, rest home care, palliative care, respite care and young disabled care. We are a professional rest home offering private hospital care; at a hotelservice level. We attend any and every need our patients have immediately:

our trained staff are always on hand to provide care and assistance. What level of training and experience do your staff have? A: Our staff have all completed ACE (Aged Care Education) training up to dementia level, and we always have at least one fully qualified, registered nurse on hand, 24/7. Most of our staff have been here for many years – and I myself am a registered nurse with over 14 years of experience in managing aged care facilities. What facilities do you offer? A: Our onsite facilities consist of a well-stocked, comfortable library, a games and activities room, a modern entertainment unit (we even have a Wii set which has proven to be very popular!), a welcoming dining area and comfortable lounge. We have landscaped grounds with numerous features, including a pond, many shaded seating areas and welltended rose gardens. Do you offer an on-call GP service? A: Of course! We have a GP on call

24/7, as well as a visiting hairdresser, physiotherapist, podiatrist, beauty therapist and manicurist – even a masseuse! We also offer chaplaincy services to all our residents.

Sam Carey MARKETING MANAGER

Radius Residential Care ww.radiuscare.net.nz DDI: 09 304 2425 | Fax: 09 377 6122 Mob: 021 992 530 12 Viaduct Harbour Ave | P.O.Box 450 | Shortland St | Auckland 1140 New Zealand

When You Need Us, We’ll be There REST HOME, HOSPITAL, PALLIATIVE & DEMENTIA CARE Radius Care operates three aged care facilities in Northland; Radius Potter Home and Radius Rimu Park in Whangarei, and Radius Baycare in Paihia. At each facility the staff are selected not just on their XT}hj~p}UjZ[Vy |TU }hVZ Z[ UknjW }UUjUTonx aTW mZZo jV pZZino fresh daily with seasonal ingredients, and our mission is to |Wj[l lZZo Zho m}VkjZ[no ij{j S}hTnV |}pi j[ UZ }lno p}Wnx tm zZT k}Sn }[z XTnVUjZ[V }[o {ZTho hjin UZ hZZi around our m}pjhjUjnV Yhn}Vn oWZY j[y ljSn TV } p}hh ZW SjVjU ZTW {n|VjUn www.radiuscare.net.nz

RADIUS POTTER HOME - 09 438 2668 174 BANK STREET, WHANGAREI RADIUS RIMU PARK - 09 437 3933 fbc sRra _y \uRqvR_wt RADIUS BAYCARE - 09 402 7112 edg `]sw^aqR _y `RututR

Leaders in care

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Getting Out There

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2014

Our Special Olympians Get Ready for National Games

A

fter years of training and have attended a Ribbon Day and a Regional Games, Special Olympians from Whangarei and the rest of New Zealand, if selected in their respective sports have the honour of attending Special Olympics New Zealand National Games. These are held every 4 years and are also held around the world in the same year in their own countries. When these games were last held from 26 November to 1st December in 2013 in Dunedin, we in Whangarei were asked to put forward a team to

attend the Special Olympics New Zealand National Games. On this occasion we had a large team, 31 athletes and 14 coaches and managers. The athletes representing the Special Olympics Whangarei achieved 9 gold medals, 17 silver and 12 bronze medals. These medals covered many sports from athletics ( 5 athletes ), aquatics (7), equestrian (2), indoor bowls ( 8 ), power-lifting ( 1 ) and ten-pin bowling ( 8 ). We had to fundraise to cover a large portion of our costs, and the rest came from the pockets of

all the athletes, coaches and managers attending the games. The National Games around the world are always held in the same year, and between the National Games, the World Games are held. In 2015, the World Games are being held in Los Angeles. Special Olympics Whangarei has put forward the name of a ten-pin bowler to attend this event. We are still waiting for him to be accepted by Special Olympics New Zealand. If anyone out there who is an athlete and would like to participate in Ribbon day’s,

Regional Games and National Games or be a volunteer to help the endeavours of these athletes’ can contact me through our website or post box.

David Fowke, James McGowen, Darcy Collins and Ian Mora

Carolyn Harrison, Craig O’Keefe, Ian Mora, Shannon Morgan, James Mc Gowen, Keegan Bridges, Arfon Davies, Nadia Morgan, Pixie Baker and Susie Clarke.

Frances Mora, Stephen Waite, Carolyn Harrison and Roy Butterfield

Andrew or Trudi at Special Olympics Whangarei, PO Box 1881, Whangarei 0140 or our website www.specialolympicswhangarei.co.nz

Doug the Digger Inclusive Sport and Recreation for all Northlanders Enabling the delivery of quality sport and recreation opportunities for Northlanders experiencing a physical disability We want to work with people in our communities who live with a physical disability and see them included and involved in Sport and Recreation for enjoyment, good health and competition which can lead into Paralympic pathways.

"Proud supporter of Special Olympics Whangarei" www.dougthedigger.co.nz

Please contact me with your queries: Leesa Andrewes leesaa@sportnorth.co.nz Mobile: 027 705 9520


Getting Out There

2014

The Empowerment Starts Here.

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Person-centredness is a way of life

S

pectrum Care supports people with disabilities to live great lives. We do this by focusing on the people we support as individuals and adapting our practices to provide person-centred, Outcomes-focused lives of choice – lives like any other. Nearly 20 per cent of our workforce identifies as being from the Pacific Islands, and a similar percentage of the people we support are of a Pacific Island heritage. That makes us the largest intellectual disability support provider to New Zealand’s Pacific community, which we serve through the Spectrum Care Pacific Cultural Group. Our Pacific Cultural Group’s philosophy is: “Focusing on the person and their family to create appropriate cultural linkages

that allow the person’s needs to be addressed holistically” The four key aims of the Cultural Group are: 1. To support Pacific Island people in a culturally appropriate manner 2. To increase our ability to develop culturally appropriate supports

regions, respite care for adults in the Waikato and Bay of Plenty, and respite care for children in Auckland. We offer specialised Home Support, Behaviour Support and Aspirations services for people in the greater Auckland region, along with a School Holiday Programme of activities for children.

We also offer a Choice in Community Living programme, supporting people with disabilities into their lives of choice in the community. To find out more about Spectrum Care, visit www.spectrumcare.org.nz

3. To develop networks with external Pacific Island organisations, with whom we can form mutual support arrangements 4. To provide a social context for Pacific Island staff , people we support and their families Our services include 24-hour support for people living in residential homes throughout the Auckland and Waikato

Dancer performing with Vaha Fifita at the Luau Night and (inset) Poko Nata

P: (09) 634 3790 E: info@spectrumcare.org.nz www.spectrumcare.org.nz


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Getting Out There

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2014

Supporting Families

I

n any given year, one in five New Zealanders will experience some form of mental illness. This means a huge number of family members will also need to face the challenges of learning about, and coping with a mental illness. Evidence shows that when families have their own support and information, they can make a real difference in the recovery journey – for everyone in the whanau. When family members or loved ones abuse alcohol or drugs, it affects everyone they know, but the experience and strength of families who are affected by a loved one’s use of substances can provide a powerful voice for change. There is no question that gaining a greater understanding of alcohol, drugs and addiction will help you to better handle things.

Our Services

We help by providing FREE personal and emotional support, education, information, and advocacy to families and whanau who support someone affected by mental health and/or addiction issues. Just pop in, give us call, or check out our website for great resources.

Our friendly staff are happy to meet with you, or offer telephone or email support if that suits you better. Our opening hours are Monday to Friday from 8.30am – 5pm.

Support Groups

SF Northland runs an open support group every third Wednesday of the month, 5.307.00pm, at our Kawakawa Office for family members, friends, work colleagues, carers, or any one who supports someone regarding mental health. SF will be running a 6 week Family Support Group in Whangarei for those who have loved ones with addictions. For more information please contact us on 0800 789 134.

On-Line Services

If it’s difficult for you to reach us, we have a website full of information and resources, and a FREE online Family Discussion Forum, where you can connect to families and whanau all over New Zealand to share your views and experiences. Look for the Family Discussion Forum button on our website Home Page. www.supportingfamilies.org.nz

Kids Workshop

Kids Club is a two-day educational programme for children aged 8-12 years of age, who have a parent affected by mental illness. The Kid’s Club workshops help children to learn about and de- stigmatise mental illness, and to develop resiliency and coping strategies. For more information and to register please contact the Northland office on 0800 789 134.

Waves Bereavement Support

Supporting Families now facilitates an adult suicide bereavement programme called WAVES. Our aim is to help people with the opportunity to participate in a psycho-educational program that offers an experience of healing and community by connecting them with other people who have been bereaved by suicide. For more information or to register please contact your Northland Branch on 0800 789 134. We’re here to help.

WHANGAREI AOD FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP When family members or loved ones abuse alcohol or drugs, it affects everyone they know. In September Supporting Families will be running a FREE 2 hour weekly support group for those who have loved ones with addictions. Join us and share experiences, listen to others, learn strategies and enjoy a cup of tea or coffee.

WHERE: 73 WATER ST. WHANGAREI WHEN: 5:00 - 7:00 Thurs. Starts 18th SEPTEMBER 2014 R.S.V.P: KENNY or SHOLAY 0800 789 134 E-mail: kenneth@sfauckland.org.nz


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Rest Homes

T

he Rest Homes & Retirement Villages in Northland are all well managed with a professional but relaxed family feel to them. They offer 24hr care of the highest standard. All staff take a genuine interest in your wellbeing. This is, after all, your home too. Your wishes are respected and guide us in helping you to

be as independent as you need. You get superb service because we are organisations who care for our friends and neighbours. All our facilities are furnished to meet your needs comfortably. The Rest Homes and Retirement Villages consist of units suitable for independent singles or couples. The units have bedrooms, bathrooms,

kitchens and roomy dining/ lounge areas. They have well maintained grounds which are spacious with plenty of car parking and are surrounded by extensive gardens and offer plenty of space to walk and enjoy the outdoors. We have pleasant surroundings which include awesome views. The units are usually grouped together

Maungaturoto Rest Home

Maungaturoto Rest Home is a 16-bed modern home administered by a Trust Board. We offer 24hr care of the highest standard. All our staff are St Johns qualified, and our facilities are furnished to meet your needs comfortably.

45-47 Kamo Road, Whangarei Phone: 09 437 3311

).", ' )&%+&"- ' )&%$.#(&#!*($

Puriri Court Rest Home and Hospital We specialise in providing professional, personal elderly care. Our independently owned rest home facility is fully equipped and staffed with caring professionals. As a care facility, we believe Puriri Court Rest Home and Hospital provides the best clinical care available in the greater Whangarei area.

136 Hurndal Street Maungaturoto, Kaipara

09 431 8696

Riverview

Retirement Village Riverview Retirement Village comprises 13 oyo units which are two bedrooms etc and also 14 one bedroomed rental flats. The pleasant surroundings include views of the Harbour and rural scenes all within a short walk to the medical centre and shops. The well maintained grounds are spacious with plenty of car parking. Riverview Village is immediately adjacent to the Medical Center and our Rest Home.

Ask us about our meals on wheels

202 Kamo Road, Whangarei

Ph: 09 437 9302 • Fax: 09 437 6487 Email: wendy@puriricourt.co.nz Check us out on Facebook

NORFOLK COURT REST HOME “Committed to Caring for the Older Person”

We offer Rest Home, Dementia and Hospital Level Care

Manager Maryanne Thompson, RN Licensed by the Health Department

Home away from home

in a secure environment for everyone’s safety. Extra care and services are available. We will work with the same care, dedication and skill to support your independence. Our Rest Homes and Retirement Villages in Northland are always kept fresh and up to date with modern standards.

136 Hurndal Street Maungaturoto, Kaipara

09 431 8696

Ph (09) 09 439 4285

68-72 Normanby Street, Dargaville Quality for life with care...

Journey for Life with Care

• Independent Units from $170,000 • Assisted Living • Rest Home • Dementia Care • Hospital Level Care Kamo Home and Village Charitable Trust 31 Ford Avenue, Kamo, Whangarei Tel: 09 435 5800 Web: www.kamohome.co.nz


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2014

St John Medical Alarm Assistance Helping your patient to get a St John Medical Alarm.

Falls are the single largest cause of injury for New Zealanders and the second most common reason for phoning 111 for an ambulance. Every year in New Zealand, 1 in 3 people over the age of 65 will fall. For those over the age of 80 the rate increases to 1 in 2 *. Often the amount of time it takes to get help determines how quickly people recover from a fall. The St John Medical Alarm service is designed to help New Zealanders live independently for longer. It’s ideal for seniors who live alone, people with a physical disability and anyone

with a health condition that might require emergency assistance.

Keeping you safe and sound at home

Your St John Medical Alarm will work whether you’re inside your home or out in the garden. It means you can continue to enjoy your independent lifestyle, because help is at hand any time of the day or night.

An instant connection to St John:

In New Zealand, our medical alarms are the only emergency calling devices that are monitored by St John. The technology we use is amongst the very best and ensures you get the help you need quickly.

Make sure it has St John on it! The St John Medical Alarm is the only medical alarm that connects you directly to St John. In an emergency St John are expert at getting the most appropriate help to you. After all, that is what they do. And by choosing a St John Medical Alarm you’re supporting St John Ambulance and their other essential community services. Quote “Northern Advocate” when your St John Medical Alarm is installed and you will receive a FREE pouch first aid kit.

9702136AA

0800 50 23 23 www.stjohnmedicalalarms.org.nz


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2014

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TLC4U2

T

lc4u2 is a company that specialises in providing live-in care for elderly people who need assistance with the activities of daily living and/or maintaining their safety in the home. Offering realistic choices, identifying the appropriate level of care, maintaining or enhancing lifestyles, and promoting independence are prime objectives for directors Jackie McCullough and Jonathan Harris. Why not maintain your lifestyle in the home that you have built with many years of hard work? Suzanne Brocx of Whangarei comments, “It is hard to put in words what it meant to my uncle to be able to stay at home. If not for the carers of tlc4u2 I would not have been able to fulfil my uncle’s wish to remain in his own home. I am eternally grateful of the care he received and the service tlc4u2 provides.” Post-operative, rehabilitative, respite, palliative and convalescence care can also be organized with our team of carers offering a variety of knowledge and skills. Providing relief for family members caring long term for parents, husbands or wives is also an area that tlc4u2 excel in. Respite can be arranged within a relatively short time frame and intermittent care prearranged for peace of mind. Numerous clients have regained their independence and no longer require full time assistance. For example, after being informed during a lengthy stay in hospital that independent living was

4u2 T ender L oving C are In your own home

no longer possible for their mother, tlc4u2 were approached to provide live-in care. During the assessment, the family agreed to a rehabilitative approach to care. Four months later her granddaughter stated, “I never thought Nana would be able to live on her own again after her long stay in hospital. She would never have survived moving to a rest home. We are amazed every day by her return to independence.” Working alongside families to individualize care needs and incorporating a holistic approach, tlc4u2 aim to provide a high quality service that is second to none. In addition, forging relationships with allied health services (Hospice, district nursing, social workers, homebased support services, GPs and community services) means that tlc4u2 have access to the best healthcare resources available for their clients. Our focus is on making your moments, good memories!

Tlc4u2 has recently gained certification against the New Zealand Standard for Home and Community Support Services across all of its services. As a result of this tlc4u2 now has a subcontract with Medibank Healthcare Solutions to provide our services to clients receiving ACC funding. Should you require some tender loving care as a result of an accident you can request for tlc4u2 to be your provider.

For further information please contact us on 0800852482 or visit our website www.tlc4u2.co.nz

tlc4u2 specialises in providing live-in care in your own home, enhancing your life style and independence. -

Respite Care (short term care) Long Term Care Recuperative/Rehabilitation Palliative care (end of life care) ACC referrals accepted

For further information contact P 0800852482 W www.tlc4u2.co.nz


62

Getting Out There

The Empowerment Starts Here.

2014

Northland’s Halberg Disability Sport Adviser is changing lives through sport

N

orthlander Maia Lewis knows the difference sports can have on someone’s life. As the local Disability Sport Adviser for the Halberg Disability Sport Foundation, Maia connects physically disabled people with sport and recreation opportunities. Ngunguru-based Maia achieved sporting success herself as a player and captain of the New Zealand women’s cricket team. The Halberg Disability Sport Foundation was founded by Olympic legend Sir Murray Halberg in 1963. His vision is to live in a society where everyone – regardless of ability – has an equal opportunity to participate in sport. It’s an ethos Maia firmly believes in and one that motivates her in her role. She has been with the Foundation since 2012 and it’s a job that combines her love of sports with helping people. “I really enjoy getting to visit families and schools with physically disabled children as well as working on a national level with sporting organisations. Seeing the holistic benefits of sports inspires me to continue breaking down barriers to provide more sport and recreational opportunities to physically disabled Northlanders.” The highlight of Maia’s role is getting to work both at a grassroots level and an elite level. “It’s a win-win situation for everyone involved - whether I am working

at an elite level with the likes of para-rower Ana Mackie or power-lifter Ming Ming Edgar, or assisting Parafed Northland at a grassroots level to grow its base.” The Foundation distributes grants to help cover the costs of sports equipment, lessons and camps. Maia helped seven year old Reuben Leslie from Whangarei, who has cerebral palsy, successfully apply for a Halberg Activity Fund grant for swimming lessons through the Parafed Northland programme. Swimming lessons have been hugely beneficial for Reuben in increasing

his strength and confidence in the water. Reuben took his new-found confidence to a Surf’s Up Day held at Ruakaka earlier this year. He loved being able to get out on the water and experience the thrill of catching a wave for the first time. Through their equipment pool, the Foundation has also been able to loan Reuben a trike. This is especially beneficial as Reuben and his mum live in a rural area where an off-road trike is ideal, providing heaps of fun, activity and adventure for him. Reuben says “Halberg has loaned me a kickarse blue trike to ride up and down my street. I’ve been lucky to try lots of sports like athletics, golf, sailing, boccia, rocking climbing, roller skating, surfing and swimming and made some cool friends on the way.” Maia works closely with local organisations to create opportunities for physically disabled people, including the newly formed Kerikeri Boccia Club. She is also working towards forming a new Powerchair Football Club with Parafed Northland. For more information, contact Maia on 021 995 951, email maia@halberg.co.nz or go to www.halbergallsports.co.nz.

Sport for physically disabled people in Northland The Halberg Disability Sport Foundation connects physically disabled people to sport and recreational opportunities in your community.

9684803AA

The Foundation works with local sport and recreation organisations, schools, clubs and facilities to support programmes and inclusive opportunities and also provides Halberg Activity Fund grants to physically disabled young people to cover the cost of sports equipment, lessons and camps. For more information, go to www.halbergallsports.co.nz or contact your local Disability Sport Adviser Maia Lewis on 021 995 951 or email maia@halberg.co.nz


Getting Out There

2014

The Empowerment Starts Here.

63

Directory of Important Events AUGUST 2014

JANUARY 2015

3rd - 9th - Heart Awareness Week

4th - World Aids Day

11th - 17th - Parent to Parent

FEBRUARY 2015

29th - Cancer Society - Daffodil Day 30th August - 6th September - Multiple Sclerosis Awareness Week SEPTEMBER 2014

1st - 28 - IHC National Awareness and Appeal Month MARCH 2015 21st - World Down Syndrome Day

1st - 30th - World Alzheimer’s Month 15th - 19th - Alzheimer’s Awareness Week

APRIL 2015

22nd - 28th - International Week of the Deaf

2nd - World Autism Day

23rd - 29th Arthritis Awareness Week

7th - World Health Day

OCTOBER 2014

MAY 2015

1st - International Day of Older Persons 4th - Blood Pressure Day 6th - 12th - Mental Health Awareness Week 13th - 19th - Asthma Awareness Week - Balloon Day 17th

1st - 31st - Huntington’s Awareness Month 8th - World Red Cross Day 15th - International Day of Families

13th - 19th - Cystic Fibrosis Week - Collection Day 17th

JUNE 2015

20th - World Osteoporosis Day

15th - World Elder Abuse Awareness Day

28th October - 3rd - November Blind Foundation Week

21st - Motor Neurone Disease Awareness Day

NOVEMBER 2014

AUGUST 2015

1st - 30th - Epilepsy Awareness Month “Talk about it” 11th - 17th - Diabetes Awareness Month

14th - 15th - Tiaho Trust’s ‘Getting Out There’ Expo, Forum North, Whangarei

1st - 7th - Parkinson’s Awareness Month DECEMBER 2014 1st - World Aids Day 3rd - International Day of Persons with Disabilities 5th - World Volunteers Day

Loads of great events!!! HEARING THERAPY SERVICES

AD SPACE Ph: 09 437 651 6511 5111 62 Mill Road Kensington, Whangarei Fax: 09 437 6510 Email: shalomagedcare@xtra.co.nz

SCOOTER WORKS Mobility scooter specialists in Whangarei Phone Neil or Julie Wood for advice 0508-472-6683 09 433 8085

A FREE independent service for NZ residents or citizens 16 years and over who experience difficulties managing the impact of hearing loss.

AD SPACE

Services may include: •

an initial hearing evaluation

help with hearing aid & tinnitus management

communication strategies

guidance on funding options

advice on helpful equipment to assist everyday living (TV/Phones). Clinics: Whangarei, Kaikohe & Kaitaia.

AD SPACE

For an appointment Phone: 525 6151 or 0800 008 011 www.lifeunlimited.net.nz

112 Mountain View Road, Hikurangi Email: scooterworks@xnet.co.nz www.scooter-works.co.nz

INTEGRITY • EXCELLENCE • ACCOUNTABILITY IN ALL WE DO


Home Support • Residential Services Independent Living Options Supported Independent Living Kuia and Kaumatua Programmes

Hours of Service Office Hours Mon - Fri 8.30am-5.00pm Household Management Mon - Fri 8.00am-5.00pm other times by arrangement Personal Cares and Sleepovers available 7 days per week as per arrangement Kaumatua and Kuia are available if required. Please contact office for further information on this service.

FREEPHONE 0800 737 573 KAWAKAWA OFFICE 2-4 Rayner Street Tel (09) 404 1551 Fax (09) 404 1876

WHANGAREI OFFICE Level 1/5 Walton Street Tel (09) 430 1248 Fax (09) 430 2385

Postal Address: PO Box 1127, Whangarei 0140

Maiaorere is one project of the Ngati Hine Health Trust. The Ngati Hine Health Trust provides Whanau Ora Services and a range of health and disability services such as community nursing, tamariki ora, GP Services, Oral Health, Rongoa clinics, youth services, podiatry, mental health and addiction services, early childhood education services, health promotion, education and training, family start, restorative justice, incredible years, kaitiaki whanau, sages and many other services. The Ngati Hine Health Trust is part of the Te Taitokerau Whanau Ora Collective. Every door is the right door. If you need any support please contact us. We have a Whanau Ora Team leader that can assist you and/or your whanau to develop your own whanau ora plan and access services that you may require. We will walk with you through this process. The Whanau Leadership Group supported by the Ngati Hine Health Trust have visited 16 marae throughout Te Tai Tokerau meeting with Marae Trustees and whanau to discuss ways in which all whanau can fully access and participate in marae life thus enabling whanau to take up their natural roles and responsibilities on the marae. Marae Trustees were encouraged to look at the barriers that hindered full participation e.g. physical barriers and attitudinal barriers and many other barriers. Marae Trustees are encouraged to develop a plan to address these issues. It has been an awesome journey. All 16 marae have committed to improve access to their marae for all whanau. If you would like the Whanau Leadership Group to visit your marae and share their korero and expertise, please contact Janice Gardner, General Manager, Maiaorere, Ngati Hine Health Trust Janice@maiaorere.co.nz

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