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Wednesday, August 28, 2013

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2 major parties spend liberally on election

Liberals outspent NDP, but parties combined to spend $540K in local ridings Jane Seyd jseyd@nsnews.com

THE Liberals and the NDP poured almost $540,000 into campaigns in North Shore ridings for the May provincial election. Overall, the Liberals spent more money campaigning in the four local ridings: approximately $319,000 during both the month-long election campaign and the two month lead-up, compared to $184,000 for the NDP during the same time frame. But the NDP spent some serious cash in the two North Vancouver ridings the party considered winnable — North Vancouver-Lonsdale and North Vancouver-Seymour — only to lose in both of them. In North Vancouver-Lonsdale, considered the closest political race on the North Shore, NDP candidate Craig Keating’s campaign spent $96,700 — $31,000 more than was spent by Naomi Yamamoto’s winning Liberal campaign. Liberal MLA Jane Thornthwaite’s campaign spent $103,000 over three months in North Vancouver Seymour to win back her seat — the most spent by any local candidate during the campaign and pre-campaign period subject to Elections B.C. limits. Jim Hanson, the NDP candidate in that riding, spent $63,000 during the same time period. David Schreck, a former NDP MLA and North Vancouver political commentator, See Liberals page 5

High-pitched Mosquito noise vexes Lower Lonsdale resident

Brent Richter brichter@nsnews.com

IMAGINE an inescapable, high-pitched ringing in your ears that causes severe discomfort at unpredictable hours, day and night.

NEWS photo Paul McGrath

Log driver’s waltz LUMBERJACK Willie McGee battles Johnny Nelson at logrolling during Grouse Mountain’s Lumberjack Show. The show features other contests between the two lumberjacks. Shows go daily noon, 2:30 and 4:30 p.m. weather permitting until the October long weekend. Scan the photo with Layar to see a video.

That’s the case for Alex Millar, a Lower Lonsdale resident who says someone in the neighbourhood is using a high-frequency sound-emitting device, known as a Mosquito, to deter loiterers. But the Mosquito, which is designed to only be heard by and annoy young people, is coming through painfully loud and clear for the 35-year-old former teacher, even in his 14th floor unit on the 100-block of West Second Street. “Everyone I share this story with is pretty flabbergasted and amazed. . . . Last night, it was on from 2 a.m. to 6 a.m,” said a noticeably tired Millar. “I didn’t sleep very much last night because of the noise.”

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Wednesday, August 28, 2013 - North Shore News - A3

WV lets developers off easy: Pajari

Council watcher questions zoning ‘uplift’ appraisals Jeremy Shepherd jshepherd@nsnews.com

HOW much should developers pay to build in West Vancouver?

Uplift measures the increase in land value brought about by a rezoning. In West Vancouver, developers must pay the district 75 per cent of the increase before they can lay down foundation for a new project. In the case of 2074 Fulton Ave., the district rezoned the single-family lot to allow three two-storey infill homes to be built. The uplift, calculated at $60,000, was far too conservative, according to frequent council-spectator George Pajari. “Here’s another example of the

appraiser being woefully inaccurate,” Pajari said. “We’re not off by 10 per cent, 30 per cent, 60 per cent. We’re off by 500 per cent.” Before its rezoning, the home sold for $1.85 million in November, 2012. Appraisal firm Burgess, Cawley, Sullivan and Associates noted downward market trends in their evaluation, which put the Fulton Avenue property’s value at $1.35 million as a single-family lot and $1.41 as a multi-family lot. Pajari had previously objected to the $155,000 uplift on the Hollyburn Mews project. The nine-unit, three-lot development should have been valued at more than $2 million, according to Pajari. However, the appraisal refers strictly to the land value. “We don’t compensate people if they don’t make money,” said district community planning manager Geri Boyle. While land value may increase with a rezoning, the price of a new development

is relevant to the developer — not the district, according to Boyle. After the district released an executive summary rather than the complete report, Pajari filed a successful freedom of information act request in order to double-check the district’s numbers on the lot. The firm’s full report could have been released with only minor redactions, according to Pajari. “I . . . plan to write a letter to council and possibly speak during public question period pointing out that planning (department) pulled the wool over council’s eyes and the public’s eyes unnecessarily. The fact that an FOI released 99.5 per cent of the document proves they could’ve given that to council,” he said. “Their excuse was an exaggeration, to put it politely.” Performing an accurate appraisal is an art, according to Boyle. The Fulton Avenue estimate was complicated by the lack of recent townhouse development in West Vancouver. “That’s a real difficulty in

West Van because we don’t have the volume,” Boyle said. “On the Fulton property, what kind of comparables do we have? We just don’t.” The development is intended to serve as a test case for West Vancouver, with similar developments prohibited everywhere except that block of Fulton Avenue. “For now we have that block, and we’ll see how the community really adapts,” Boyle said. For Pajari, the debate over 2074 Fulton is a skirmish before the battle over Grosvenor’s development in the 1300-block of Marine Drive. “That uplift is estimated to be in the range of $8 million,” Pajari said. Burgess, Cawley, Sullivan and Associates are also scheduled to appraise the land on the south side of the 1300block. “When I need to question the credibility of a BCS report, I now have a second example in which they underestimated the uplift by almost a factor of five,” said Pajari.

VCH confirms noise, can’t locate source From page 1

Millar’s first run-in with a Mosquito was at Lonsdale Quay last year. After complaining to the City of North Vancouver, bylaw enforcement officers tracked down the source of the noise and arranged with management to have the machine turned off. “Ideally, I’d like to see these things outlawed in public spaces. I understand the argument that if playgrounds are being vandalized or graffiti is happening on a recurring basis, OK, let’s put these things in and play them at night. . . . That’s not unreasonable,” he said. “But to play it on a public street in a residential area is unacceptable, in my opinion, whether it’s daytime or nighttime.” Millar suspects the sound is coming from several boxes installed on the side of the neighbouring Sailview building at 125 West Second St. But Vancouver Coastal Health, which the city contracts for noise monitoring, cannot find the source of the high-pitched whine, despite sending inspectors to the neighbourhood several times and confirming the noise exists, according to Randy Ash, senior environmental health officer. And the Sailview manager said there are no Mosquito devices anywhere on the building. “There are sensors in the wall that measure water penetration. They are a wireless device, just like your phone, laptop or other electronic devices. We have double and triple checked with the consulting engineers who oversaw the project and the equipment installer. They do not transmit any sound,” said building manager Jim Allison in an email. Several Sailview residents have reported hearing the noise as well, and speculate that it is coming from the Observatory condo building on the other side of the street, Allison said. “We are very confident the source of the noise is not from the Sailview,” he said. Whoever is controlling the Mosquito is unfairly targeting young people and people with sharp hearing as a means of dealing with noise that simply comes with living in the city, Millar said. “I don’t deny there’s a problem. I hear (loiterers), and I also heard drunk people, yelling at each other in the street. We live in a city. There’s going to be noise on the street. That’s part of living in a city,” he said. In the meantime, Ash has asked Millar to keep a log of when the machine is turned on and off to see if there is an established pattern. Other residents in the area could be helpful by keeping an ear out for it. “If other people are hearing noise that they find bothersome, and particularly if they can identify a source, we’d follow it up,” he said. While the city does not have a policy on the use of high-frequency noise devices and the decibel level they operate at is typically not high enough for a noise complaint, the city could use bylaw enforcement on the machine’s owner on the grounds that it “disturbs peace and enjoyment,” according to Brad

NEWS photo Cindy Goodman

LOWER Lonsdale resident Alex Millar says he is losing sleep from a high-pitched intermittent sound that he believes is coming from an anti-loitering sound-emitting device called a Mosquito located in the neighbourhood. Scan with Layar for a demonstration of the Mosquito. McRae, manager of bylaw services. “We’ve spent some time trying to find out where the sound has been emanating from. It’s not been successful as to date so we’re looking at some proactive measures. “We just have to figure out how we’re going to tackle this and we’re currently doing that,” McRae said.

District says WV data safe during breach Brent Richter brichter@nsnews.com

THE District of West Vancouver says it appears no one’s personal information was stolen when computer hackers breached the district’s servers last month. West Vancouver staff shut down the server they use to operate MyDistrict — the service which allows residents to pay bills and set up preauthorized payments for taxes and utilities — after learning that other municipalities using the same software had been hacked. In the wake of the breach, the district hired an Internet security expert to audit the server and produce a report. “While the report found no evidence that our residents’ information was compromised, we are taking action. Recommendations from the report have already begun to be implemented,” said acting chief administrative officer Nina Leemhuis in a press release. “The security of residents’ information is of the utmost priority for us.” Those recommendations include replacing the server and software with more secure versions and to embark on an ongoing system of checks on the system’s vulnerability. A hacker based somewhere in Europe, according to his or her Internet protocol address, gained access to the server through a weak spot in the Adobe ColdFusion software which is the base of the MyDistrict service. “It is possible that the hackers were looking to access personal information through ColdFusion so that they could spam people, or gather personalinformationincluding banking information, however we don’t know that for certain,” said Jeff McDonald, district spokesman. The consultant performed a number of scans on the server to look in detail at irregularities that show up in the code. “This type of system scanning is usually conducted to gather information about a system to assist with ways to break into the system. The investigation has revealed several attempts to upload various files to the server. These attempts were unsuccessful. The nature of the files themselves is unknown.” Other municipalities that were targeted in July, including the District of Maple Ridge, carried out online security audits and have found similar results. This is the only time the district has had a major security breach, McDonald said. He said West Vancouver police have been kept in the loop.


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Wednesday, August 28, 2013 - North Shore News - A5

Liberals outspent NDP on research, polling From page 1

said the money spent by the NDP was significantly more this time around than it was in previous election campaigns in North Shore ridings. “In past elections in Seymour, it was a bare bones campaign, with hardly anything being spent,” he said. “It was really a full-fledged campaign this time around.” “In the two ridings which were judged possible wins, lots of money was spent by the NDP and they still lost.” Schreck said it’s an important reminder for political parties, “It’s not just how much you spend but how you conduct the campaign.” One notable difference between Liberal and NDP campaigns on the North Shore is that the Liberals reported spending more on research and polling. Yamamoto’s campaign

reported spending more than $14,000 on research and polling compared to $6,000 spent by Keating’s campaign. Even more was spent by other local Liberal campaigns. Both Thornthwaite’s campaign in North Vancouver-Seymour and Ralph Sultan’s Liberal campaign in West VancouverCapilano spent almost $19,000 over a three-month period on research and polling. Jordan Sturdy — the Liberal candidate who won the West Vancouver-Sea to Sky riding over the NDP’s Anna Santos — spent $22,000 on research and polling, almost twice what Santos spent on her entire campaign. Schreck said there was a similar pattern in the central party campaigns, where the Liberals spent about $180,000 more than the NDP on research and polling. “The difference in the $180,000 is seen in the

results,” he said. Keating and Hanson, meanwhile, collectively spent $80,000 on salaries for NDP campaign workers. Besides highlighting the differences in how the parties spent money, Schreck said the election finance reports released recently by Elections B.C. make for sobering reading for third parties and independent candidates. Most winning candidates spent anywhere from $60,000 to $90,000 on their campaigns, he said. That was certainly true on the North Shore. Even in the two West Vancouver ridings — largely considered safe Liberal seats — Sultan’s campaign spent more than $71,000 while Sturdy’s spent about $78,000. That compared to about $12,000 spent by the NDP in each of those ridings. For smaller political players, it’s very hard to raise the kind

Squamish share in water lease A revenue-sharing deal between the province and the Squamish Nation which gives the First Nation a share of royalties on a Skookum Creek run-of-the-river power project will see the band receive $78,000 per year once the project is fully operational. The agreement will provide the Squamish with a share of provincial revenue from the Skookum Creek Power Project, a 25-megawatt $92-million project being developed on Skookum Creek, about 10 kilometres east of Squamish. Once completed, the project is projected to supply enough power for up to 8,400 homes.

The province’s First Nations Clean Energy Business Fund is backing the revenue-sharing deal. Since 2010, the province has deposited half of all revenues from new water leases paid by run-of-the-river licencees into the fund, which started with $5 million. A total of 75 per cent of the deposited funds are shared directly with First Nations whose territories are impacted by run-of-the-river energy projects. The Squamish will receive the shared revenue as long as the project is operating, which could be up to 40 years. The Skookum Creek agreement is the fourth revenue-sharing agreement to be signed under the First Nations Clean Energy Business Fund. — Jane Seyd

of money needed to run a serious campaign, Schreck said. “As long as spending limits are as high as they are, it freezes out the third parties and the independents.” Among smaller parties on the North Shore, Conservative candidates Brian Wilson and David Jones spent $8,100 and $9,7000 respectively on election expenses Richard Warrington of the Green Party spent $3,800 while independent candidates Michael Marwick and Jamie Webbe spent $8,200 and $3,400 respectively. According to the election finance reports, both NDP and

Liberal candidates funded the lion’s share of their campaigns with transfers from party headquarters. Yamamoto also received $18,000incampaigndonations from corporations, including Jacob Bros., Seaspan, Western Stevedoring, the Holiday Inn, Neptune Terminals and North

Shore Studios. Keating’scampaignreceived $19,000 from unions. Sultan’s campaign received $5,000 from Park Royal Shopping Centre. Sultan also donated $5,000 left over from his campaign to Premier Christy Clark’s by-election campaign in Kelowna.

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A6 - North Shore News - Wednesday, August 28, 2013

VIEWPOINT Published by North Shore News a division of LMP Publication Limited Partnership, 100-126 East 15th Street, North Vancouver, B.C. V7L 2P9. Doug Foot, publisher. Canadian publications mail sales product agreement No. 40010186.

Wave action

S

TEP right up. There’s an auction going on for enough bandwidth on Canada’s wireless infrastructure to introduce a whole new carrier to our market of scant few options. The federal government is looking to relax its rules on Canadian ownership to allow U.S. telecommunications giant Verizon to bid, while shutting out Canada’s Big Three wireless companies Bell, Telus and Rogers. It’s gambling that the addition of a fierce competitor will drive down the price of wireless service. Naturally, the Big Three have a hard time with this and you might have noticed the very slick and expensive advertising campaign they’ve launched in order to get Canadians on their side. Draping themselves in red and white, they tell us it’ll mean layoffs

of good Canadian workers while giving preferential treatment to foreign profiteers. Opponents of the government’s plan also make the case that, by being keeping the Big Three out of the auction house, the selling price will go down by about $1 billion. That’s $1 billion we could sorely use as the deficit is not yet under control and every month we learn about more government cutbacks. The points may be valid, but we’d feel a lot more sympathy for the Big Three, if it weren’t for the sky-high prices they’ve already been charging us. According to a 2011 OECD study, Canadians pay more for their wireless service than almost any other nation. Perhaps if they had been more competitive with each other and mindful of consumers before, they wouldn’t be facing this quagmire now.

Mailbox

TransLink’s fare box choice a cash grab

WV needs 2nd ambulance

traffic congestion as more and more families choose to once again use their cars to pick up and drop off passengers. The proposed Compass card is ill-conceived and TransLink must go back to the drawing board and provide fare boxes based on successfully working models that will serve its customers fairly and conveniently for the long-term good of public transit. Ann Gilbert West Vancouver

Dear Editor: Anne Watson’s Aug. 21 story regarding the sole ambulance in West Van, (Union Backs Call for 2nd WV Ambulance) while interesting, fails to ask some key questions. Why do the towns of Pemberton, Whistler, Squamish and Lions Bay each have two ambulances while West Vancouver, a bigger city, only has one? We pay our taxes like everyone else, and when our sole ambulance is used we have to borrow one from North Van or Lions Bay? That doesn’t sound like a fair nor healthy situation for a community with a growing elderly population. Why are there four fire halls in West Van with 120 firefighters (to staff all the different shifts), but only one ambulance with eight paramedics? Isn’t it time that our governments cared about our health as much as they care about our houses burning down? Barbara Forsyth West Vancouver

Dear Editor: I am a senior living on the North Shore, and for anyone using public transit as I do, it is obvious that it is the elderly, nannies, office workers, the disabled, women and students, in other words the underprivileged, who will have to pay for this latest, blatant cash grab by TransLink. TransLink has studied the issue of fare boxes on the rapid transit lines for years and were supposedly basing their decision on models used in Europe that integrate the two systems of buses and rapid transit, so

why did they choose now to deviate from this model, if not in the expectation of making more money at the expense and inconvenience of its users? Furthermore, I find it hard to believe that only 6,000 users a day will be forced to pay twice to travel to or from a rapid transit line. I travel regularly to Victoria to visit family, using a three-zone transfer to the Canada Line and the 601 bus to the ferry, and I see the long line of tourists getting two and three zone transfers at the ferry. This is especially true at YVR and will certainly impact tourists and increase

Use a Compass Card to avoid paying a second fare Dear Editor: I’d like to clarify some details in response to the Aug. 18 North Shore News story, Compass Plan Will Penalize Bus Riders. Currently, just 1.5 per cent (approximately 6,000) of our daily customers purchase fares on buses with cash and then transfer to SkyTrain and/or SeaBus. To be clear, there is a solution here — customers will be able to transfer from bus to rail and SeaBus with the Compass Card or a Compass ticket. Of those bus riders who normally pay by cash, then choose to get onto SkyTrain or the SeaBus, it will be more convenient to use a Compass Card. Adding “stored value” on the Compass Card will be like adding cash to the card, but it will also have the benefit of giving

CONTACT US

a customer a 14 per cent discount over the standard cash fare. It’s perfect for single-use trips and also for transferring easily between all transit modes, including bus, rail and SeaBus. The tap in and tap out process is very simple and easy and takes place in less than a blink of an eye. We take privacy of information very seriously — TransLink strictly adheres to the provincial Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act. Customers can choose not to register their card and, of those who do register, absolutely no personal information is encoded on their card. Personal identification and all trip data will be kept in separate secure and highly encrypted databases. In some cases, a name may be printed on cards used for special programs at their request, such

as the provincial B.C. Bus pass program or CNIB, that provide discounts for which card-holders must qualify. The data we collect through Compass will be used in aggregate form and not contain any specific customer information. This data will be used to help us improve customer experiences and make our transit system better by serving more people, more efficiently. We understand the transition to a card will be a big change for all our customers. We’re committed to ensuring that they are fully educated to ensure a successful transition to Compass. The changes will be introduced over a number of months and we have staff available to help customers adjust. Mike Madill, vice-president enterprise initiatives, TransLink

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North Shore News, founded in 1969 as an independent suburban newspaper and qualified under Schedule 111, Paragraph 111 of the Excise Tax Act, is published each Wednesday, Friday and Sunday by North Shore News a division of LMP Publication Limited Partnership and distributed to every door on the North Shore. Canada Post Canadian Publications Mail Sales Product Agreement No. 40010186. Mailing rates available on request. Entire contents © 2009 North Shore News a division of LMP Publication Limited Partnership. All rights reserved. Average circulation for Wednesday, Friday and Sunday is 61,759. The North Shore News, a division of LMP Publication Limited Partnership respects your privacy. We collect, use and disclose your personal information in accordance with our Privacy Statement which is available at www.nsnews.com.

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Wednesday, August 28, 2013 - North Shore News - A7

Not all rescue helicopters are created equal

The North Shore News published Paul Daniell’s letter to the editor on Friday with the intention of furthering the debate on best practices within search and rescue organizations. The letter was accepted at face value. If, as the North Shore Rescue organization maintains, there were inaccuracies and misinformation contained in it, then we apologize for not discovering them and not consulting with NSR before publishing. There was no intent to impugn the motives of team leader Tim Jones or the skill level of the team members involved in what was a successful rescue of Sébastien Boucher. The News is happy to provide NSR, through its leader, Tim Jones, the opportunity to give their account of the challenging Boucher rescue. The News continues to have the highest respect for NSR and the invaluable work they do in our community.

Tim Jones Contributing writer

WHEN one takes a leadership position to enact positive change in a field that they have dedicated their life to, one has to understand that people will not only challenge what you say but present views not completely based on facts.

Unfortunately sometimes, as in this case, Mr. Paul Daniell, whom I do not know, also presented his challenge (Review Rescue Collaboration Practice, North Shore News, Aug. 23) in a very misleading way. Many members within search and rescue, the media, aviation, communications and the political community are championing my proposals that will now be discussed with the government and the B.C. Search and Rescue Association. These progressive proposals are designed to ensure volunteer search and rescue operational sustainability in helicopter rescue for high-volume SAR teams and private helicopter operators. This also includes a desperately needed provincewide SAR communications system. This is based on my extensive operational experience in these specific

areas. These proposals regarding standby pay for specific skill set SAR volunteers and private helicopter operators as well as a provincial SAR communications system can be viewed on our blog at northshorerescue. com/2013/08/a-step-inthe-right-direction-briefingnote/. Please also listen to CBC’s Aug. 14 B.C. Almanac podcast broadcast. I really encourage readers to read and listen, and to contact me via northshorerescue.com if you have any questions or comments. To address Mr. Daniell’s Aug. 23 letter to the North Shore News specifically: RCAF 442 Squadron is an extremely high-skilled military SAR unit with whom we have had the privilege to work successfully several times. 442 Squadron is required to maintain one Cormorant rescue helicopter and one fixed-wing Buffalo aircraft on 30-minute-to-launch response during weekday working hours and on a two-hour-tolaunch response after hours, weekends and holidays. These times do not include flight time to a search area. 442 Squadron, based at 19 Wing CFB Comox, covers the entire West Coast, the province of B.C. and the Yukon. Its primary mandate is air/sea rescue, and the large Cormorant helicopter they fly was designed to fly out to

sea and back several hundred kilometres and rescue a dozen or more people. Its excessive downwash from the rotors does not make it the most suitable mountain SAR helicopter. However 442’s ability to conduct night operations is the main reason it is requested by volunteer SAR teams such as North Shore Rescue, as part of a risk vs. benefit decision by the volunteer SAR manager. Recently, the Mount Rainer National Park Service has halted using large military helicopters due to this dangerous downwash issue that involved the recent death of a climbing ranger. They are now fast tracking a helicopter long-line program identical to North Shore Rescue’s for their Climbing Rangers. In addition, 442 Squadron, no matter how highly skilled they are, cannot respond to the ever increasing number of helicopter rescue requests in this province.

The vast majority of the helicopter rescues required in B.C. are during daylight hours, performed jointly by strategically placed highly skilled volunteer SAR teams or Parks Canada rescue specialists and highly skilled private helicopter operators flying small agile helicopters exactly suited for mountain SAR. For this exact reason, helicopter long-line rescue during daylight hours performed by SAR volunteers and/or Parks Canada was safely and successfully implemented between the 1970s and 1990s. The help of 442 Squadron is requested on those specific daylight rescue calls, where this longline rescue capability is not immediately available. On the second day of the December 2012 search for missing snowboarder Sébastien Boucher, North Shore Rescue search managers requested a 442 Squadron Cormorant and RCMP Air

1 to conduct specialized night search operations as the weather window cleared briefly. A complete grid air search covering an expanded area which included the exact area where the lost subject had made camp was done by both aircraft several times. When debriefed after his rescue, Boucher stated he heard the aircraft but was too tired to come out of his makeshift tree-well shelter in order to be spotted by the night vision equipment (FLIR) in both aircraft. The weather then socked in again that night. On the third day of this search, the weather cleared again around midday and staged Talon and Air 1 helicopters were back up flying. The Talon helicopter with a NSR helicopter rescue team on board while doing close tactical searching, spotted a single set of fresh tracks nowhere near the

See Operational page 8

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Cypress ski area, that had traversed a steep slope on the west side of Black Mountain. This sighting occurred with a very tight light window left. RCAF 442 Squadron, already on standby, was immediately advised as part of the operational plan NSR developed collaboratively with the West Vancouver Police Department and the Joint Rescue Co-ordination Centre in Victoria. 442 Squadron would be brought in if NSR could not do a long-line rescue due to darkness. A four-man NSR helicopter rescue team led by myself were quickly long-lined by Talon Helicopters to these tracks that were heading downhill into the heavily forested ridgeline. The subject was tracked down a very steep ridge of Disbrow Creek and along with air support from RCMP Air 1 and Talon helicopters we made voice contact with the subject and confirmed his identity. He was 300 feet below us in a box canyon of Disbrow Creek. 442 Squadron was proactively activated on speculation we would need them due to impending darkness. We also had a land-based rope rescue team deploying up from Highway 99. Our four-man team rappelled to the subject in darkness while encountering rock fall hazard. Once on scene with an exhausted subject, we treated him for mild hypothermia and dehydration. Seeing that a night rope rescue extraction was not safe due to the rock fall hazard which would have ensued high above us, we kept the 442 Squadron Cormorant helicopter coming. It was a textbook, maximum-length (285-foot) hoist extraction with our team identifying our position with GPS, parachute flares and VHF radio contact. The subsequent media release by RCAF 19 Wing Comox media relations reflected this. Beyond being a completely successful operation between NSR and 442 Squadron, we jointly conducted what is referred to as a tailgate debrief at Vancouver airport immediately after the rescue. We normally do this on all tasks in order to identify any operational issues. The Cormorant aircraft commander specifically commented on the skill in which we guided them into our location which was in a deep dark hole surrounded by tall trees. This very positive debrief led to yet another 442 Sq./NSR interagency co-ordinating session as we invited them to participate in our major Snowman 3 exercise at Cypress Bowl this past April. They will be participating, if available, in our Snowman 4 exercise in 2014. In addition, we held an operational debrief with the senior WVPD officers who were involved as the overall SAR commanders on this rescue and once again our team was thanked for a job well done. Mr. Daniell, NSR invites you to contact us at anytime in the future if you have any issues to discuss regarding search and rescue or to verify your facts.

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Wednesday, August 28, 2013 - North Shore News - A9

Here’s to fresh starts NEWS photo Cindy Goodman

CITY of North Vancouver firefighters say neighbours’ quick action in damping down a deck fire prevented it from igniting the propane tank in an adjacent barbecue.

Neighbours use hoses to slow fire’s spread Brent Richter brichter@nsnews.com

NORTH Vancouver City Fire Department is praising some Upper Lonsdale residents after their quick action saved a neighbour’s home from a potentially devastating fire. City fire crews responded to a 9-1-1 call just after 2:15 p.m. Tuesday after neighbours spotted smoke and flames coming from the deck of a home at 228 East 27th. No one was home at the time but neighbours

from both sides of the home turned their garden hoses on the growing blaze, according to city fire chief Dan Pistilli. “It wasn’t a huge fire but there was potential. The neighbours being home and getting their garden hoses on it kept the fire at a minimum,” he said. “We arrived on scene and did an expansive overhaul.” Pistilli said it appears an unextinguished cigarette butt in the nearby garbage can triggered the blaze. Thankfully, it did not spread to the adjacent’ barbecue’s propane tank. “It didn’t catch fire so we were kind of lucky there,’ he said.

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A10 - North Shore News - Wednesday, August 28, 2013

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Wednesday, August 28, 2013 - North Shore News - A11

Woman hurt as surprised robber flees Jeremy Shepherd jshepherd@nsnews.com

A 68-year-old woman was assaulted during a botched break and enter in the 800-block of Shakespeare Avenue on the afternoon of Aug. 21, according to police. The suspect strolled through an unlocked front door but soon spotted the homeowner, according to North Vancouver RCMP spokesman Cpl. Richard De Jong. “(He) was probably surprised as much as she was,” De Jong said. The stocky man bowled the woman over during his escape, according to De Jong. “She fell against the glass table and received some injuries,” he said. The woman was treated for superficial injuries to her leg and face at Lions Gate Hospital and released later that day. The suspect is about five feet eight inches tall with glasses, according to police. The break and enter was an isolated incident, De Jong said. “We are actively investigating several B and E’s in North Vancouver to see if there’s any commonality but at this point it appears very random.

Help fix the farm!

NEWS photo Paul McGrath

On a roll PAVING crews give Lonsdale Avenue an asphalt makeover Friday between 13th and 17th streets now that water main reconstruction is completed. The work saw the four-block section closed for much of the day.

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A12 - North Shore News - Wednesday, August 28, 2013

BRIGHT LIGHTS

Brandon Daoust Memorial Golf Tournament

by Kevin Hill

Curtis Johnston and Kirk Westcott

Scott Buchholz and Vik Mann

Lauren, Heather, and Niki Daoust and Mark Savard The third annual Brandon Daoust Memorial Golf Tournament and Fundraiser drew a sizable crowd to Northlands Golf Course in North Vancouver on July 27. The event is held in honour of Brandon Daoust, who passed away in 2005, and money raised goes to support Covenant House. Covenant House is an organization that helps homeless and at-risk youth. Last year, the event raised close to $6,000. This year, more than 200 participants hit the links and/or attended the barbecue and silent auction that followed the golf tournament, helping to raise just over $12,000.

Rob Mitchell, Greg Miles, Sean McAdam and Steve Abercrombie

Rob McLoed, Kenley Tamoto, Spencer Tamoto and Cory Czorna

Drew Gelley, Grant Daoust, Ashley Buchholtz and Elissa Nielsen

Phil Tapping, Tevis Michaud and Devon Finn

Graham Cottons, Jason Grannary and Brent Lapham

Please direct requests for event coverage to: emcphee@nsnews.com. For more Bright Lights photos go to: nsnews.com/galleries.

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Wednesday, August 28, 2013 - North Shore News - A13

HOME IDEAS Columnist Barb Lunter crafts a beachy centrepiece for end of summer entertaining. page 19

YOUR NORTH SHORE GUIDE to HOME & GARDEN

Encourage child play, naturally Nature-based playgrounds are built for fun and exploration

Dig Deep

Todd Major I can hear their gleeful sounds as they run across the pea gravel, each healthy footstep punctuated by laughter. These are some of the sounds you will hear from children playing in spaces built for fun and exploration. Each experience a child has in challenging play areas helps build their sense of confidence and joy in the outdoors. To build a garden for kids you have to watch and learn how they play. They often experience the living world by wandering about to see what’s what. Or they touch as they go to get a sense of the world. And children often create their own make believe worlds or play scenarios in reaction to the type of play areas they experience. For many city-dwelling children, the community playground or park is the only outdoor play area they may experience. Having built and upgraded community parks and playgrounds I can tell you that modern playgrounds are, shall we say “sanitized” to some extent. Not necessarily a bad thing where safety is concerned but modern playgrounds designed by adults limit play experiences. I managed the design and construction of the playground that sits in a park directly across from my house and by virtue of

proximity I can occasionally watch as parents and children experience the playground. It always surprises me how children will find interest in unintended things. For example, those round plastic footstep pods suspended by steel poles mounted with chain on the bottom that are meant for walking on, children like to bang them together with their hands simply to hear the noise. It is also interesting to note that the age appropriate ratings assigned to various playground styles are mostly unnecessary. Children younger than the structure’s age rating will play up to the structure, children who are older than the age rating will usually play down to the structure. I am not against building the traditional modern playground found in our parks, which are fun to a point and suit many uses, but something new is needed to captivate children’s play. And it may be the growing movement to build naturebased playgrounds for public and private use. The natural playground is easier to build in private residences where parents have direct authority over the activities of their children. Natural playgrounds contain features found in nature that are modified or sanitized to provide play and learning experiences for children. Take, for example, the mud pit, hated by some parents as being too dirty and admonished by some officials as being unhygienic, it has been rethought and made into a mud barrel in the natural playground. The mud barrel is made from plastic and is situated near a sensor-controlled water source, because what’s mud without water. Trees are also rethought in the natural playground to provide opportunities for children to play. The

NEWS file photo Cindy Goodman

AN adventurous youngster navigates the stilt forest built out of cedar posts at Heywood Park in North Vancouver. Columnist Todd Major supports the growing movement towards nature-based playgrounds. Scan photo with the Layar app for a video of Heywood Park. larger trees are used to provide some shade, something missing from many playgrounds. Smaller trees can be placed to soften

undesirable views. Proper tree species selection also allows the use of smallgrowing but well-branched trees for climbing. Some

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trees can be chosen to provide hiding places and visual barriers to be explored. See Playgrounds page 18


A14 - North Shore News - Wednesday, August 28, 2013

HOME BUILDING BY DESIGN

Builder’s voice a design-phase reality check Dalit Holzman Contributing Writer

AT the outset of any successful new home build sits a thorough, transparent job cost estimate. As with most of life’s journey, it is the communication that counts. When details, even slightly prickly, hard-to-swallow ones, are laid out clearly from the outset, it allows for all manner of preparation: emotional, logistical, financial. And truly, with every iteration of estimation, the message remains: building a new house is anything but inexpensive. Dear friends of mine recently went through the unfortunate and all-too-common budgetary reality-check: their theoretical square foot build cost was impossible in reality. In theory, they imagined $200 per square foot based on what they had previously built for in Surrey; in reality, once number crunching had concluded based on their actual, newly acquired North Vancouver parcel, it would be $260 per square foot. On the 4,600 square feet they had designed, this would have meant $276,000 over and above their original budget. Instead of barreling forward and trying to squeeze their hopes and dreams into a previous magic number (now seen as unrealistic), my friends were wise enough to see the writing on the wall and pull out before even breaking ground. But the scenario, from my builder-lens, is all too common though really quite avoidable. Thanks to our now infinitely communications-connected world, many property owners are well aware of the trend toward building more affordable green

homes (Postgreen has done a marvelous job documenting their $100-per-square-foot builds in Philadelphia at 100khouse.com), yet many do not commit the extra time to understand the equation thoroughly. First off, a construction estimate is just that: an approximation of how much the physical building of the home will cost. It includes none of the soft costs such as architectural (add 10 to 15 per cent) and engineering fees, permits (add $15,000+ on the North Shore) and zoning. And then there’s the question of apples to apples . . . Vancouver is not North Vancouver is not West Vancouver is not Maple Ridge is not Philadelphia. Tear down/rebuilds are happening within our postcard-perfect homeland in the most remarkable of spots. A level lot in Philly, or Regina for that matter, is not the same as a cliff-side wedge on Indian Arm. The site conditions and resulting sitepreparation, excavation, servicing are not, cannot be remotely the same. (A recent $11 million North Vancouver new home build that came across my desk factored in a whopping $2 million just in excavation, blasting and site prep!) Every property, and every estimate, is completely unique unto itself and must be tackled as such. Then there’s the question of style. A paper-bag budget does not a magazine look afford. Bathrooms and kitchens are the most expensive per-square-foot rooms of a home, so every appliance, countertop, fixture, drawer, tile, bathtub splurge counts enormously. Likewise, complex rooflines translate to extra cost. Fancy windows and trim, and home entertainment systems also grow the price tag quickly.

NEWS photo Cindy Goodman

BUILDING a new house isn’t cheap. Scan photo with Layar for a handy checklist of what every cost estimate should include. All in all, when the design of a new home is done as an artistic endeavour isolated from the reality of budget requirements, the financial ramifications are anyone’s guess. Bringing in the builder’s voice from the outset of the home design phase allows the builder’s real-world knowledge (of process,

product and cost) to positively inform the process before things go too far and hopes get too high. Dalit Holzman is a team-member at Econ Group Construction. Find her at dalit@econgroup.ca or econgroup.ca.

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Wednesday, August 28, 2013 - North Shore News - A15

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A16 - North Shore News - Wednesday, August 28, 2013

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Our staff is friendly, experienced and willing to assist you with your needs. We have excavators and loaders which can assist with loading your vehicle and/or trailer or you can hand load materials into bags, buckets or other containers if you so choose. Most products are sold by the cubic yard, though we’re always willing to For those sell smaller amounts to those looking without the means for less. For those without the means to pick up product, we offer delivery to pick up product, service as well.

Topsoils, soil amenders, bark mulch, aggregate products and more. Headwater Management Ltd has been servicing the North Shore since 1992, specializing in demolition, excavation, trucking, drainage and site services. A couple of years ago, we opened a small topsoil / aggregate supply yard, conveniently located in the Lynmour area, a few blocks from the Iron Workers Memorial Bridge. We are located at 175 Harbour Ave, directly behind Cove Bikes, approx 1 block south of Canadian Tire on Main Street.

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We offer over 20 different products including garden soil, turf blend, bark mulch, drain rock, river rock, 3 types of sand, roadbase, navvy jack and limestone, to name a few. We also accept fill material and clean concrete and asphalt, which we haul to the appropriate dump facilities and recycling depots.

Headwater Management Ltd’s topsoil and aggregate yard is open from 7am-5pm, Monday to Friday and 8am-3pm on Saturdays (closed Sundays and most holidays). We accept Visa, Mastercard, Interac/Debit and cash.

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Wednesday, August 28, 2013 - North Shore News - A17

HOME green guide

CallforVolunteers:Volunteers are required to help plant trees for an upcoming Tree Days event Saturday, Sept. 21 at 1 p.m. in Greenwood Park, North Vancouver. Sign up at tdtreedays.com. Lawn Sprinkling Schedule: Mornings-only (4-9 a.m.) wateringregulationsareineffect until Sept. 30. Even-numbered addresses: Monday, Wednesday or Saturday mornings. Oddnumbered addresses: Tuesday, Thursday or Sunday. Info: metrovancouver.org. Compost Coaching: Free personalized, at-home support for using the Green Can or backyard composter. Whether you’re a beginner or a seasoned pro, you’re guaranteed to learn something new. Offered by the North Shore Recycling Program on behalf of all three North Shore municipalities. Book appointments at coaching.northshorerecycling. ca or 604-984-9730.

NEWS photo Cindy Goodman

Sunny side up A cluster of sunflowers towers over the heads of Edgemont area residents Richard Myhill-Jones and Audrey Elborne. Myhill-Jones planted the flowers around a nearby power pole and waters the insatiable plants three times a day. To date, he has counted 49 heads with 21 more heads still to mature. The tallest flower stands over three metres and the largest leaf is over 43 centimetres in length.

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604.985.3276 • www.maplewoodfarm.bc.ca

Watershed Tours: See where your water comes from with free guided tours through September. Adult tours are offered Thursdays-Sundays in the Capilano and Coquitlam watersheds. Family focused tours are offered on select weekendsattheLowerSeymour Conservation Reserve. Each tour is approximately threefour hours. Registration required: 604-432-6430 or metrovancouver.org. Bee Friendly: Learn about honey and native bees, how they live and work in their colonies and view live bees going about their daily lives Saturday, Sept. 14, 2-3:30 p.m., Capilano library, 3045 Highland Blvd, North Vancouver. Free. All ages welcome. Registration required. 604-987-4471 ext. 8715. GardenSmart

Workshop

— Backyard Composting: Learn simple steps to compost successfully in your own backyard Saturday, Sept. 14, 10-11:30 a.m. at Charros Community Garden, corner of St. Georges and 1st St., North Vancouver. Fee: $8.25. Registration required: 604-990-3755. Info:nor thshorerecycling. ca/programs/gardensmartworkshops. Lynnmouth Park Rehabilitation Project: Help remove invasive plants, plant native plants and learn about the local ecology while restoring the native plant population in the park Sunday, Sept. 15 from 10 a.m. to noon. Meet at Mountain Equipment Co-op,

212 Brooksbank Dr., North Vancouver. Info: dmcdonald@ evergreen.ca. GardenSmart Workshop — Preserving the Harvest: Basic: Learn basic canning techniques to help you preserve food for winter Wednesday, Sept. 18, 6:309:30 p.m. at Salvation Army Community Kitchen, 105 W. 12th St., North Vancouver. Bring paring knife and apron. Fee: $8.25. Registration required: 604-990-3755. Info: northshorerecycling. ca/programs/gardensmartworkshops. Beginner Herbalism Classes: See more page 18

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A18 - North Shore News - Wednesday, August 28, 2013

HOME

Playgrounds provide sensory experience From page 13 And all those old logs we use to cut up for firewood are now piled, planted, stacked and placed for log walking or climbing in the natural playground. Another great rethink creates rolling hills covered with grass and trees to allow kids to run, roll and chase around on. Even the common boxwood hedge can be repurposed to make small mazes, castle-like enclosures and directional barriers. We should never underestimate the effect that flower and foliage colour has on a child’s psyche. Bright cheerful daisies make adults happy and children

like to play on before designing any play space. Even the craziest idea from a young mind can be made safe and possible with some creative thought and planning. I feel that the expensive modern playgrounds I was responsible for building provide less than half of the imagination potential and fun benefit than that of a small pond with frogs, some logs to walk, a mud wallow and some trees to climb.

too. The great variety of green leaves found on plants has a calming effect on parents and children alike. Plant fragrance is also an important natural experience that children respond to. Simple plants like lavender, sage or scented hardy geraniums can easily be incorporated into planted sections of natural playgrounds to provide interesting sensory experiences. Playgrounds built with nature-based features like trees to climb on, water to play in and mud to wallow in appeal to the widest age range of children and cost less to build than modern playgrounds. Ultimately, adults should ask children what features they would

Todd Major is a journeyman horticulturist, garden designer and builder, teacher, skills trainer and organic advocate. For advice contact him at stmajor@shaw.ca.

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All ages are welcome to start herbal learning in a medicine garden and kitchen Saturday, Sept. 21, 2-4 p.m. in the Hamilton Heights area, North Vancouver. Free, space is limited. Registration: Heidi, miss_dandelion@hotmail.com. Fall Sale: The Alpine Garden Club of B.C. will hold a sale Sunday, Sept. 22 from noon to 4 p.m. at VanDusen Botanical Garden, 5251 Oak St., Vancouver. The sale will feature a great variety with a special emphasis on fall blooming plants. Free admission. Cash or cheques only. Info: agc-bc.ca. Capilano Flower Arranging Club meets the second Wednesday of each month (except July and August), 7:30 p.m. at Delbrook Community Centre, 600 West Queens Rd., North Vancouver. They have demonstrations, guest speakers and workshops. New members and guests welcome. Info: Donna, 604-986-9360 or Heather, 604-987-5382. Capilano Garden Club meets the first Monday of each month (except July and August and June is the AGM) at 7:30 p.m. at Canyon Heights Christian Assembly, 4840 Capilano Rd., North Vancouver. New members welcome. Guests: $5. Info: 604-980-4964. Deep Cove Garden Club meets the fourth Thursday of each month (except July, August and December) from 7 to 10 p.m. in the Multicultural Seniors’ Room at Parkgate Community Centre, 3625 Banff Court, North Vancouver.

Meetings include speakers, workshops and field trips. Info: Elaine, 604-929-2928 or Chris, 604-924-1628. Donate Surplus Harvest: The North Shore Recycling program encourages gardeners to donate surplus harvest to local food banks and shelters. No donation is too small and donations are accepted year round. For a list of organizations accepting fresh produce visit nsrp.bc.ca. Edible Garden Project Volunteer Orientation Night takes place the second Monday of every month at 6 p.m. Learn about the projects the Edible Garden Project is running and how to get involved. Location will be provided upon registration. Registration and info: ediblegardenproject. com or email volunteer@ ediblegardenproject.com. Free Eco-Tours: Study the rich heritage and unique natural resources of the West Coast. These walking tours, some available in Mandarin, are designed to educate and promote healthy living. Explore your own backyard with Joseph Lin. Info: 604327-8693 or greenclub.bc.ca. The Upper Lonsdale Garden Club meets every second Thursday of the month, 7:309:30 p.m. in the basement of St. Martin’s Anglican Church, 195 East Windsor Rd., North Vancouver. New members are welcome. Info: Dianne, 604980-3025 or dkkennedy@shaw. ca. — compiled by Debbie Caldwell Email information for your North Shore non-profit, by donation or nominal fee event to listings@nsnews.com.


Wednesday, August 28, 2013 - North Shore News - A19

HOME

Shell centrepiece evokes sun and surf THERE’S something nice about a summer outdoor table glowing with candles.

Candlelight provides a warm ambience that really sets the tone for a calm and serene setting. One of the ways I like to illuminate a summer table is to use elements of nature wherever possible. Here’s a nice idea for a beach theme table that takes only minutes to assemble. I found my large shells at a flea market sale. You never know when you might stumble across a great find.

Home Ideas

Barb Lunter Materials: Large or small shells Sand

Tea lights or small votive Serving tray Bags of fine sand may be found at craft stores such as Michaels if you are in a pinch and do not have access to a nearby beach. Pour the sand into the tray and spread evenly. If you have a tray with a wide outside rim this is best for this idea. Pouring more sand into the tray will help the shells and candles to stand upright. Place your shells into the sand and scatter your tea lights among the candles. If you have large shells then place your tea light or votive in the

centre of the shells. Another variation of this idea is to use coloured sand pails. These may be found at your local dollar store and are wonderful for filling with sand and placing candles inside. Place your shells inside the sand pails and illuminate your candles. Remember to never leave candles unattended when lit.

Barb Lunter is a freelance writer with a passion for home decor, entertaining and floral design. Contact Barb at barb@lunter. ca or follow her on her blog at lunter.ca.

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A20 - North Shore News - Wednesday, August 28, 2013

PARENTING kids’ stuff

Calling for B.C. Winter Games Participants: An on ice and information session will take place for youth between the ages of 12 and 14 who are prolific skaters and interested in playing ringette Wednesday, Sept. 4, 7:15 p.m. at Karen Magnussen Community Centre, 2300 Kirkstone Rd., North Vancouver. Info: four_inn@yahoo.ca. Crafts Funtastic: Children ages six to 12 can discover the wonderful world of art with creative activities; including painting, sponging, drawing, collage and more on Wednesdays, 3:30-5:30 p.m. at John Braithwaite Community Centre, 145 West First St., North Vancouver. Drop-in fee: $3. Info: 604-982-8300 or jbcc.ca. Family Storytime: A free drop-in program of stories, songs, action rhymes and more for the whole family, Wednesdays, 1:30-2 p.m. at West Vancouver Memorial Library, 1950 Marine Dr. Info: 604-925-7408 or westvanlibrary.ca. Imagination

Storytime:

A free drop-in program for children ages one-five every Wednesday, 10-10:30 a.m. at Active Baby, Capilano Mall, North Vancouver. Info: 604986-8977. Joyful Chakra Yoga for Teens: De-stress, relax, improve your flexibility and create new energy from within Wednesdays, 5:30-6:30 p.m. at Molly Nye House, 940 Lynn Valley Rd., North Vancouver. Fee: $2.50. Drop in or register. Info: Andrea 604-761-1474. Mount Seymour United Church Children’s Choir: Children ages five to 10 are invited to join the choir that practises every Wednesday, 3:45 p.m. at 1200 Parkgate Ave., North Vancouver. The program is all about having fun with music. Info: mtseymourunited.com. Mount Seymour United Church Youth Choir: Youth ages 11-15 are invited to join the choir that practises every Wednesday, 4 p.m. at 1200 Parkgate Ave., North Vancouver. No singing or music-reading ability required. Info: 604-929-1336 or mtseymourunited.com. Young Mothers Program: For mothers 24 years old and younger, Wednesdays, 12:302:30 p.m. at John Braithwaite Community Centre, 145 West First St., North Vancouver.

Super Silly Story and Craft: Ready to get a little goofy? Spectacularly silly storytime followed by craft-making for ages four-six Thursday, Aug. 29, 3:30-4:30 p.m. at Cap-

NEWS photo Kevin Hill

Chelsea’s challenge ASHLEIGH Morrison, 7, Emily Morrison, 10, and Holly Tarves, 11, lace up in preparation for the second annual Chelsea’s Challenge on Sept. 8 at 9 a.m. in the Lower Seymour Conservation Reserve. The five-kilometre walk/run is in memory of Chelsea Steyns, a 36-year-old North Shore mother who died from a rare form of brain cancer. Funds raised will go to a family trust fund. Last year’s event drew more than 600 participants and raised more than $25,000. ilano library, 3045 Highland Blvd., North Vancouver. Space limited to 30 children. Registration required: 604987-4471, ext. 8175.

29, 2-3 p.m. at Lynn Valley library, 1277 Lynn Valley Rd., North Vancouver. Registration required: 604-984-0286, ext. 8141.

Space Cadets: Blast off into a universe of fun and games during this “crafternoon” for ages four and older Thursday, Aug.

Pacific Spirit Children’s Choir invites kids ages five to 18 to their new season. Rehearsals take place

Thursdays, 5-6:20 p.m. at West Vancouver United Church, 2062 Esquimalt Ave. Info: Gerald van Wyck, music director, 604-808-5231 or pschildrenschoir.ca.

Summer Reading Club: will hold a medal presentation to celebrate the accomplishments of their young readers on Friday, Sept. 13, 7 p.m. at West Vancouver Memorial Library, 1950 Marine Dr. Info: 604925-7408. See more page 21

MAKING A STATEMENT PRESENTED BY


Wednesday, August 28, 2013 - North Shore News - A21

PARENTING kids’ stuff From page 20 After-school Sports: Children ages eight to 13 can play a variety of sports Fridays, 3:305:30 p.m. at John Braithwaite Community Centre, 145 West First St., North Vancouver. Drop-in fee: $1. Info: 604982-8300 or jbcc.ca.

Time to Reverse Sun Damage! Microdermabrasion treatment $50 (Diamond tip)

Laser Genesis treatment $125

Imagine and Explore — Food Factories: Children ages three to six, accompanied by an adult, will discover the amazing powers of the forest’s food factories. Saturday, Aug. 31 from 10:30 a.m. to noon at Lynn Canyon Ecology Centre, 3663 Park Rd., North Vancouver. Fee: $8.25. Registration required: 604-990-3755.

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Parkgate Days Puppet Show: Two 20 minute puppet shows will be held on Saturday, Sept. 7 at 12:15 p.m. and 1:45 p.m. at Parkgate Branch Library, 3675 Banff Court, North Vancouver. Registration is not required. Info: 604-929-3727. Parent and Tot Gym: Drop-in gym for kids ages one monthfive years, Saturdays, 9:1511:15 a.m. at John Braithwaite Community Centre, 145 West First St., North Vancouver. Drop-in fee: $1. Info: 604982-8300 or jbcc.ca. Youth Drop-In: High school aged kids are invited to hang out and play music, video games and air hockey the first and third Saturday of the month, 7-9 p.m. at

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Mark the spot

OLIVER Kiff won the Up, Up and Away! bookmark contest in the age seven to 10 category at Parkgate Branch Library. Here, he shows off his winning entry and loot. Bookmark winners were announced at the North Vancouver District Public Library’s Summer Reading Club Celebration, which took place Aug. 14 and featured a magician and cake. Lynn Valley United Church, 3201 Mountain Hwy., North Vancouver. Drop-in by a suggested donation of $2-$5. — compiled by

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A22 - North Shore News - Wednesday, August 28, 2013

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Young artist of the week Claire Watts, 11, Eastview elementary Art teachers: Susan Carson and Christine Steunenberg Favourite art: painting Favourite artist: A. J. Casson Her teachers write: Claire has recently discovered A.J. Casson, thanks to her much loved grandma. Claire immediately fell in love with his work. She was inspired by his unique style. In her words, “his art is realistic and yet not. His lines are soft and clean.” Claire was struck by how smooth his brush strokes were and his use of perspective and contrast. Her art reflects the impact his art has had on her. Young Artists of the Week are selected from North Shore schools by Artists for Kids for displaying exceptional ability in their classroom artwork. For details, visit the website artists4kids.com.

NEWS photo Cindy Goodman

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Wednesday, August 28, 2013 - North Shore News - A23

PARENTING

Don’t over-schedule: children need downtime

Parenting Today

Kathy Lynn

BRANDON wants to play hockey and he tells you his friends are also taking up karate this year. And he and his pals have also discovered volleyball and are very keen on joining the team. Oh yes, he also announces that he want to learn how to play the guitar. His sister, Amelia wants to take dance and gymnastics, play soccer and sing in the community choir. She is also going to be on student council this year. It makes your head spin. How can you possibly coordinate all these activities for your kids? Do they need to do all this right now? Choosing extracurricular activities for your children

can be a real challenge. Sometimes it seems that you spend your entire week in the car, ferrying kids from one activity to the other. You want them to have all the wonderful experiences being offered but really, if you are all so frazzled, is it worth it? The trick is to create some sort of balance in our lives, those of our children and ourselves. And that means limiting the amount of time spent in extracurricular activities. Kids need time for family, friends, activities, school, homework, and just relaxing. What does that mean? If you find that you never have a chance to sit down for dinner together, you barely talk to your kids except to verify scheduling plans and you have lost touch with them, you need to adjust your life. Family is every bit as important as hockey or gymnastics so you need to ensure that there are times when you are together with some time on your hands. A relaxing meal together, a trip to the park or time to play a board game (I now it’s oldfashioned but try it, it could be fun!) can be quality time for you as a family. Children also need to

NEWS photo Cindy Goodman

PARENTS need to help their kids create balance in their lives, says columnist Kathy Lynn. Carve out time for family, friends, school, homework, extracurricular activities and relaxation. spend time with friends. They do see them at school and at their activities but there should also be some unstructured time to allow for simply being together. They can go to the mall, throw a

ball around in the backyard or play a video game together. School is a given. They will be in school for a good part of each weekday and they will need to carve out some time for homework. Finally, they

need some downtime. When every waking moment is spoken for, kids have no time to simply relax, to daydream or to read a great book. So you need to help your children create some balance

THE CRUISE N

in their lives and that means making choices. Determine how much time they can spend in extracurricular activities. A good rule of thumb is one team sport at a time, which will include games and practices. It’s great to find a sport kids like because they learn so much. Besides learning how to play the particular game, they learn how to take turns, listen to the coach, work as part of a team and be a good loser and a gracious winner. I generally recommend one other activity. This can be a hobby, a crafts activity or a volunteer commitment. So try for two for this semester and see how that goes. Once you’ve set the parameters, let your kids choose the actual activities from the list. They may have to make some hard choices, but being rested, having some life balance, and removing the stress of constantly rushing from one thing to another will be well worth it.

Kathy Lynn is a professional speaker and author of Who’s In Charge Anyway? and But Nobody Told Me I’d Ever Have to Leave Home. If you want to read more, sign up for her informational newsletter at parentingtoday.ca.

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A24 - North Shore News - Wednesday, August 28, 2013

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A26 - North Shore News - Wednesday, August 28, 2013

salsa on Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m. until Aug. 29, outside the Ferry Building Gallery, 1414 Argyle Ave., West Vancouver (weather permitting). Drop-in fee: $6. Info: ferrybuildinggallery.com or 604925-7290.

The Pacific Spirit Choir is looking for new members. This year’s season will include the Faure Requiem, Handel’s Messiah and the St. John Passion by J.S. Bach, all accompanied by a professional orchestra. Rehearsals take place Wednesdays, 7:45-9:45 p.m. starting Sept. 11 at the West Vancouver United Church, 2062 Esquimalt Ave. Info: Gerald van Wyck, gvanwyck@shaw.ca, 604-8085231 or pacificspiritchoir. com.

NEWS photo Kevin Hill

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Waterfront Theatrical Walking Tours: Shipyard Sal and Sam will sing, dance and tell stories about Burrard Dry Dock during the Second World War Wednesdays-Saturdays, 1:30-3 p.m. during August at Shipbuilder’s Square, 15 Wallace Mews, North Vancouver. Free. Info: 604-990-3700, ext. 8008. Summerfest 2013 will return to Lonsdale Quay Market and will run every weekend until Sept. 1. This family friendly festival will feature a variety of free activities for all ages. For a full schedule of events and info: lonsdalequay.com. E-Magazines are Easy with Zinio: Learn about Zinio, the North Vancouver District Public Library’s online magazine service Wednesday, Aug. 28, 10-11 a.m. at Lynn Valley library, 1277 Lynn Valley Rd., North Vancouver Registration required: 604-984-0286, ext. 8144. Info: nvdpl.ca. E-Magazines are Easy with Zinio: Learn about Zinio, the North Vancouver District Public Library’s online magazine service Thursday, Aug. 29, 2-3 p.m. at Parkgate library, 3675 Banff Court, North Vancouver. Registration required: 604-929-3727. Info: nvdpl.ca. Tech Connect — Introduction to Mac: Learn the essentials like setting preferences and file management as well as apps and other topics Thursday, Aug. 29, 7-8:30 p.m. at North Vancouver City Library, 120 West 14th St. Info: nvcl.ca. Movie Night in the Plaza: Bring a blanket or chair Friday, Aug. 30, 8:45 p.m. for a screening of Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs at North Vancouver Civic Plaza at 14th Street and Lonsdale Avenue. Suitable for the whole family. Hot popcorn and cold drinks will be available for purchase. Free. Info: nvcl.ca. Show and Shine: Mercedes Benz Club of America will host its annual car show Sunday, Sept. 1, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. at Shipbuilders’ Square, 15 Wallace Mews, North Vancouver. Info: tony.millikin@sjrb.ca or mbcavancouver.org. Music in the Park: Bring a picnic and enjoy an afternoon of music and art at Capilano River Regional Park, Cleveland Dam, Capilano Road, North Vancouver. Schedule: Sept. 2, David Blair, noon; Rose Ranger, 1 p.m.; Justin

O’Donahue Trio, 2 p.m.; Patrick Ernst Trio, 3 p.m.; Blackberry Wood, 4 p.m.; High Society Band, 5 p.m. Info: nvartscouncil.ca or 604988-6844. West Vancouver Youth Band will hold a new member information night Wednesday, Sept 4, 7:30 p.m. at West Vancouver Community Centre 2121 Marine Drive. No experience necessary. Accepting all musicians ages nine to 19 for band and string. Two years experience is required for strings. Info: westvanyouthband.ca or 604-922-7996. Fundraiser Barbecue: JJ Bean, 333 Brooksbank Ave, North Vancouver will hold a barbecue on Saturday, Aug. 31 from noon onwards. Proceeds will help send six staff members to El Salvador to build houses for Habitat for Humanity. Info: 604-9848630. Meet and Greet Open House: Carousel Chorus, a non-auditioned community choir based on the North Shore is welcoming men and women of all vocal types to join the choir. Anyone interested in joining is invited to an Open House on the first day of practice Tuesday, Sept. 10, 7:30 p.m. at Cloverly elementary, 440 Hendry Ave., North Vancouver. The choir performs a spring concert for friends, family and the community as well as several outreach concerts at seniors’ residences in late fall and spring. Rehearsals are held every Tuesday, 7:30-9:30 p.m. Info: June, 604-929-1405. One-on-One Computer Assistance: Sign up for 30 minutes of personalized help with the Internet, email, word processing, social media or an e-reader Tuesday, Sept. 10, 2:30-4 p.m. at Parkgate library, 3675 Banff Court, North Vancouver. Registration required: 604-929-3727. Info: nvdpl.ca. West Vancouver SPCA will hold a dog wash fundraiser Sunday, Sept. 22, 11 a.m.3 p.m. at 1020 Marine Dr. All proceeds will help the animals. Minimum donation: $20. Info: 604-922-4622. Computers at the Library: North and West Vancouver public libraries offer free ongoing computer classes. For information, dates and locations, visit nvdpl.ca, nvcl.ca or westvanlibrary.ca. — compiled by Debbie Caldwell Email information for your non-profit, by donation or nominal fee event to listings@ nsnews.com. To post online, go to nsnews.com, scroll to Community Events and click on Add Your Event.

FUTURE SHOP - CORRECTION NOTICE

NEWSPAPER RETRACTION FOR THE FUTURE SHOP AUGUST 23 CORPORATE FLYER

In the August 23 flyer, on page 1, the Virgin LG Nexus 4 16GB was advertised “On a Virgin Mobile Supertab” but the Supertab is no longer available. The offer applies to 2-year Gold Plans (as stated in the fine print.) Also, on page 13, the Sony 47”/55” W802 Series Smart 3D Slim LED TVs (WebCode: 10245469/10245470 ) were advertised with incorrect specs. Please be advised that these TVs have a refresh rate of 120Hz NOT 240Hz, as previously advertised. As well, on page 20, the Bose QuietComfort® 15 Headphones were advertised with an incorrect price. Please be advised that the headphones should be $296.99 save $33, NOT $269.99. We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused our valued customers.


BACK TO CLASS & FALL REGISTRATION

! y d a e r Get

Internet research page 28

Student stories

page 29 & 30

Back to school tips page 31

Online safety page 32

A special feature of the

Coco Cunningham sits atop a pillar at her school with younger brother Julian (left) and friends Ryan and Alyssa Olsen on the steps. The group is ready to return to their studies next week. NEWS photo CINDY GOODMAN


A28 - North Shore News - Wednesday, August 28, 2013

Ready to do research? Q&A with Shannon Ozirny,

head of youth services at West Vancouver Memorial Library

What are some of the pros and cons of doing research online? Pros: 1. Speed is certainly a big pro, though there is a misconception that all online resources are free and all online resources can be accessed within seconds on Google. Not true. While online research is faster, it still takes time. Settling on search terms, wading through search results and even finding the right database can’t be done in a couple of minutes.

2. Access to primary source documents

is much improved online. For instance, students can see scanned historical photographs of West Vancouver from 75 years ago on the library’s Historical Photograph Collection (digital. westvanlibrary.ca) in an easily searched database right from home instead of coming to the library to scroll through microfilm or wade through filing cabinets. Cons: 1. Deciphering authorship can be hard.

2. Quality vs. Quantity: While most online

searches will bring a plethora of results, they are not always particularly relevant.

What types of resources are available online for kids to use for school research projects?

1. One of the best places to look are library databases. There can be lots of confusion over what exactly a database is or how it differs from a search engine like Google. A database is an online, searchable collection of sources, such as newspaper and academic journal articles, encyclopedia entries, and magazine articles. Much of the content from databases cannot be found by googling, or if it can be found by googling, users are often asked to pay to access the content. Anyone with a library card can access library databases 24/7. They cover many topics and subjects and have the latest information. 2. The West Vancouver Memorial Library also offers subject-based homework help for primary, intermediate and secondary school students on our brand new website. This is a great starting point for students and parents when stumped with a math question or starting a research project. Our homework help pages feature Canadian content needed for social studies assignments. 3. The American Association of School Library Association’s puts together a fabulous annual list of the Best Websites for Teaching and Learning: ala.org/aasl/

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photo SARAH MOLDENHAUER, courtesy West Vancouver Memorial Library

Shannon Ozirny, head of youth services at West Vancouver Memorial Library, helps a young student with his research at the library.

standards-guidelines/best-websites/2013. It includes free productivity sites for students to do things like create infographics and timelines in addition to building 21stcentury literacy skills. The Association for Library Service to Children also creates a yearly Great Websites for Kids (gws.ala. org/) list, which has some fantastic subjectbased websites for all grade levels. Are some sources better than others? Why or why not? Definitely. When using a search engine, students will find “promoted” results that are essentially advertisements, which may not be the best sources. It’s also very easy to stumble upon sites that appear to be credible or reliable, but are not.

How can a student know if a resource is a legitimate source of information? My handy acronym is WAA: Why: why was this article written? For example, to publish research (e.g. an academic journal article), to inform without bias (e.g. a news article), to convince someone of the correctness of the author’s position (e.g. editorial or political blog post)? Authorship: who wrote this article? What expertise do they have on the subject? What kind of organization or publication are they representing? See Both page 33


Wednesday, August 28, 2013 - North Shore News - A29

Maintaining a good parent-teacher relationship A good relationship between parents and teachers can help facilitate important communication and promote a positive school experience. The following are a few tips to help set up and maintain a good parent-teacher relationship.

1. Meet your child’s teacher at the beginning of the year. Let the teacher know that you look forward to the coming school year and working with the teacher as the term progresses. 2. Attend school events like open houses. Such events are great opportunities for parents to learn more about their child’s teacher, and teachers may feel encouraged when parents show an active interest. 3. Prioritize parent-teacher conferences. Such conferences may be your only opportunity for a one-on-one, in-person discussion about your child, so make sure you’re on time and that you don’t miss these conferences. 4. Remember that your child’s teacher has many students in class besides your child, so expect a reasonable amount of attention for your child and don’t overburden the teacher with requests. Most teachers will be available for scheduled one-onone meetings if parents have concerns, but don’t monopolize the teacher’s time on a daily basis. 5. Keep the channels of communication open. If it has been awhile since you’ve spoken to your child’s teacher, don’t be afraid to contact the teacher to check in. In addition, if your child really enjoys a teacher’s class, don’t be hesitant to share that with the teacher. Metro Creative Services

A Grade 8 story CATE JARDINE Contributing writer

My soon-to-be reality: high school. A huge building, tons of courses, surrounded by big kids that really look more like adults, getting lost, a locker that won’t open, frightening, more freedom, fun, being the smallest in the school. Those things are only a few of the many thoughts that crowd my head when I think of Grade 8. When I contemplate how little time I actually have now until I step into this brand new world, it worries me but also fills me with excitement. My greatest concern has to be negotiating my way around Rockridge secondary. True, it is the smallest of the three high schools in West Vancouver, but still, it is daunting. I guess the main thing about the size is that I worry about getting lost and ending up in the wrong class, which would be very embarrassing. Also, making the change from elementary school where there are only about 300 students ranging from Kindergarten to Grade 7, to high school where there are at least 900, is, let’s just say, nerve wracking. Making it even more frightening is the fact that I will be changing from being one of the leaders and oldest students in the school to being one of the smallest and youngest.

NEWS photo CINDY GOODMAN

Thirteen-year-old Cate Jardine is set to start high school at Rockridge secondary this fall.

to join. In addition, I am definitely looking forward to meeting new people and to all of the friends that I will make. I have to say that about one-third of me is nervous about high school, while the other two-thirds of me are really looking forward to entering Grade 8. After all, life is just a journey; it is full of challenges and hard work, which also brings along fun and excitement.

On the other hand, thinking about going to high school next year does fill me with excitement. From what I have seen so far, it looks like a ton of fun. There are so many different opportunities and classes that we have never experienced in elementary school. I mean, seriously, look at all of those courses that we will be taking: woodwork, textiles, science, video production. The possibilities to choose from seem endless, and that list does not even include the numerous clubs that are available for us

Cate Jardine was a Grade 7 West Bay elementary student when she wrote this for the North Shore News at the end of the school year in June. She is now heading into high school in September.

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A Grade 12 story ALESSANDRO LANIUS-PASCUZZI Contributing writer

Even though it was almost four years ago, I can still clearly remember my first days of high school. To be honest, I was practically terrified of the Grade 12 students. Movies, TV shows, and books led me to believe that the “big kids” always bullied the young, small, new kids. That being said, the older kids never bothered me and my first year of high school was pleasantly free of freshman hunts (think Dazed and Confused). For me, the weirdest part of going into Grade 12 is knowing that I will be the “big kid” (well, maybe not that big), possibly inspiring unnecessary fear in Grade 8 students as they imagine being stuffed inside a locker along with other stereotypical bully stuff. At every type of graduation I have had so far, family and teachers always made the event such a big deal. I remember how going from Kindergarten to Grade 1 was a big deal at the time. I was thinking: Oh no, a full day of school instead of finishing before lunch will be so difficult. However, now it seems so insignificant. Completing Grade 12 next year will truly be a big deal, an accomplishment. The world really opens up after high school. After we graduate we will receive that freedom that all of us have always longed for. It does not matter whether we choose to pursue a post-secondary education,

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NEWS photo CINDY GOODMAN

Rockridge secondary student Alessandro Lanius-Pascuzzi will be entering into Grade 12 this fall.

jump right into a job, or travel for a while, what matters is that for the first time in our lives the choice will not already be decided for us. There is a certain surrealism in knowing that a year from now I will walk across the stage; a surrealism in knowing that the choice of which way I go with my life will, for the first time, be my choice. I still do not know what my choice will be, but I have trust in myself that by the end of the next school year I will have made the right one. For all of you going into Grade 8, if I had one suggestion it would be to make the most out of high school. After you graduate it will be so much harder to give that sports team a go or to see if you actually enjoy what they teach in that elective class. Alessandro Lanius-Pascuzzi was a Grade 11 Rockridge secondary student when he wrote this piece for the North Shore News at the end of the school year in June. He is now heading into Grade 12.

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Wednesday, August 28, 2013 - North Shore News - A31

P. (604) 986.5534

Ba ck to ip s School T Starting a new school year can be a daunting experience for many students. A recent press release from Sylvan Learning notes that what is often lost in the back-to-school scramble for supplies is the fact that school is about learning. Abbey Pelayo, of Sylvan Learning in North Vancouver, noted in the release that parents need to take the right steps starting now to make sure their students are prepared to tackle new academic challenges with the right habits and daily routines. The following are steps parents can take now to help their children adjust to the new school year.

1. Impose the two-week rule: With later

bedtimes over the summer, children need to ease back into their school routine rather than having a sudden change their first day of school. Using the last two weeks of summer to re-introduce a bedtime routine will make waking up on that first day a lot easier.

2. Re-introduce regular meal times:

During summer months, kids tend to snack throughout the day. Nutrition

is an important factor in academic performance, and eating a healthy, balanced breakfast and lunch keeps kids alert throughout the day.

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management is tricky for everyone, especially kids and teens, but planning is an important way to stay on top of things. Having major deadlines, due dates, events and extracurricular activities in one place helps kids visualize their week, manage their time and stay on track.

4. Don’t ditch good habits: If you and

your child have established a good summer learning routine, when school starts try not to forsake all of the fun reading, writing and art activities that kept your child engaged all summer.

The following are some tips for students:

1. Organize: Organization is not

RIDING THE

overrated. Keeping notes, projects and reading materials in logical order helps students find what they need right away cutting down on time spent tracking things down, and allowing more time for actual studying.

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A32 - North Shore News - Wednesday, August 28, 2013

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The North Shore Neighbourhood House has childcare space available in our 3-5 year old programs. Lynn Valley, Norgate and Westview Kids’Clubs have space available in their before and after school care programs.

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Online safety JEREMY SHEPHERD jshepherd@nsnews.com

In an age of ubiquitous smartphones and instant online access, it can be a big mistake to leave kids to their own devices. While most parents are diligent about taking a look at the playground where their child wants to play, those same parents can be lax about inspecting the websites their child plans to visit. The risks posed by those online playgrounds include threats, cyber bullying, and online predators. “Kids physically can feel like they’re in a safe location; their home or whatever, and yet they’re exposing themselves, their personal information, and other aspects of their life . . . to pretty much the darkest corners of the Earth that you could imagine,” says West Vancouver Police Department spokesman Const. Jeff Palmer. The key to providing safe passage through the Internet is in being both knowledgeable and present, says Palmer. “Parents really need to do what they can to educate themselves so they can be a very effective advocate and educator for their own children about what the risks are and how they can protect themselves,” he says. Children need to be taught

photo CANSTOCK

to exercise caution on social networking sites, advises Palmer. The person on the other side of an Internet avatar may be attempting to find out where a child lives or goes to school, or other sensitive information. “If you don’t know a person in your real day-to-day life you can be opening up the door to a really wide range of risks by allowing a complete stranger through a social media network site,” says Palmer. Police have encountered cases where parents allowed young children unfettered Internet access, says Palmer. “It amounts to fairly tech-savvy young, primary grade kids who are being left completely to their own device with a tablet computer or a home computer and wandering into areas of the Internet that are really not even close to age appropriate and could be exposing them to specific risks.” Palmer recommends parents keep an eye on their kids as they roam

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the online universe, perhaps by keeping the computer in a shared room. “An unsupervised computer means that any knowledge you as a parent have about protecting your kid may not reach the kid when they’re inside the room,” says Palmer. When it comes to online bullying, Palmer notes that there are electronic options to block the messaging. But while the medium is different, the same rules from the schoolyard apply on the Internet. “If somebody is being cyber-bullied or appears to be being targeted by someone for an unlawful purpose, the old see-something-saysomething rule definitely applies,” says Palmer. A child being bullied should tell a counsellor, a teacher, or even a school liaison officer if a criminal offence is involved. “A threat is a threat is a threat, whether it’s smartphone, tablet or desktop,” says Palmer. “It doesn’t matter how it’s delivered.”

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Wednesday, August 28, 2013 - North Shore News - A33

Both online and published sources helpful From page 28 Accuracy: Is this information on a site that anyone can edit? Do the facts line up based on your cursory knowledge of the subject? Is this author or article cited by other experts in the field? Is any website a good source for information? Why or why not? Websites are terrific sources of information and have the obvious advantage over print in their currency and in their multimedia capacity. But unlike published print books there is, of course, no vetting system for putting something on the Internet; as we all know, anyone can put anything on the Internet under any name or under the guise of any organization. While there are certainly sub-par print books, the chances that information is inaccurate (or that the credentials of the author are fudged) are certainly much lower. Are there any online databanks or catalogues that are particularly suited to students? Absolutely. The library has databases like Kids Search and World Book that are terrific for students as young as those in the primary grades. These databases bring back a lot of information that you won’t find on Google. Librarians are also always eager to show young children how to search in the library catalogue. Research skills can start very young, with something as simple as learning how to search for a

book by title or learning how a search box works. How can students use both online and hard copy books in their research? Using a variety of different resources is an important 21st-century skill, and one that librarians and teachers aim to foster in students. But it’s important to keep in mind that using a variety of different sources will require a variety of different searches, which takes time. An example of how to incorporate various media might be an elementary school project on the history of pizza (this is a real question I received): The student could consult a database like Kids Search to check for magazine articles from reputable children’s magazines about pizza (there are several) and then consult an online or print encyclopedia for some basic facts. Print books on Italian culture could be consulted for background information, in addition to some kids non-fiction books about the history of food and food trivia (they exist!) By definition, a research project requires research and the process of gathering and evaluating resources is just as educationally beneficial and important (or more so) than the finished product. Really, a finished essay or project is a demonstration of a student’s research skills, which will go on to serve them in post-secondary education.

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Students and parents can also talk to a youth librarian any time the library is open. In the event that we are busy, we can always take people’s contact information and get back to them. The following are some tips when consulting the library for research help:

1. Bring a copy of your assignment if

possible.

2. Often parents come in to the library

without students wanting to collect resources on their child’s behalf. It is very valuable for us to talk to the student so we can guide them through the process and help foster the research skills they need to succeed in school.

3. If the library is particularly busy, we can get back to you, but we sometimes have students coming the night before a project is due. The earlier you come see us, the better.

Has your child received their kindergarten immunization boosters? Protect your 4 – 6 year old child with the following two vaccines: • Tetanus, Diphtheria, Pertussis (whooping cough), and Polio • Varicella (Chicken Pox)

DROP-IN CLINIC!

Wednesday, September 4 9:30 -11:30 am and 1:30-3:30 pm at Central Community Health Centre 132 W Esplanade, 6th floor, North Vancouver Ongoing clinics are available by appointment.

For more information about immunization visit www.immunizebc.ca

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A34 - North Shore News - Wednesday, August 28, 2013

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Wednesday, August 28, 2013 - North Shore News - A35

YOUR NORTH SHORE GUIDE to EXCEPTIONAL CUISINE

Bidding farewell to summer New eatery has Korean flavours

Romancing the Stove Angela Shellard

SAY farewell to summer with an evening of laidback entertaining by the pool (or on the patio for pool-deprived folks like me).

Chris Dagenais Contributing writer

I love a good mystery.

Invite the gang over for a cool swim followed by delicious, summer food that can be prepped ahead of time. Opt for items that can be eaten with your fingers or just a fork (sawing away at something on a paper plate is no fun). For a pretty, edible centrepiece, cut a watermelon in half lengthwise (cutting the edges in a decorative sawtooth or scallop design). Remove the flesh and cut it into chunks; fill the watermelon shell with the watermelon chunks and other cubed fresh fruit, garnished with mint leaves and lemon slices.

Grilled Stuffed Jalapenos These are really spicy so make sure you have lots of cold drinks on hand. 2 slices of bacon, fried until crisp and crumbled ¾ cup of chive and onion flavoured soft cream cheese (or other flavour if desired) ½ cup shredded pepper jack cheese 2 green onions, finely chopped 1 small clove garlic, minced 2 Tbsp freshly squeezed

Rib Platter for Two $ 36.95

Sunday, Monday & Tuesday Nights join us for our succulent Rib Platter for Two Two Big-Beef Bones, Four Sticky Ribs, Four St. Louis Ribs, Four Baby Back Ribs, Two baked potatoes, One side of seasonal veggies, coffee, tea or soft drinks.

NEWS photo Cindy Goodman

SALMON skewers with teriyaki seasoning are a type of finger food that’s easy to eat at an end-of-summer patio party. lime juice Freshly ground black pepper to taste

TamarindHill

12-15 small to medium-sized jalapeno peppers, cut in half lengthwise, seeds and veins

See Ice Cream page 36

See Sauce page 36

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removed and discarded

Unearthing clues and piecing together snippets of evidence to paint a clear picture can be an exciting exercise. A recent North Shore dining experience rewarded my fascination with mysteries, even if I didn’t fully get the resolution I had hoped for in the end. The puzzle began with the appearance of a giant banner proclaiming: Olé Now Open! Wings and Tapas. The banner was strung outside the space at 19th Street and Lonsdale Avenue, real estate formerly occupied by Ricky’s and Fatburger. As the tapas scene is booming in greater Vancouver right now, I imagined that Olé might offer Spanish-themed small plates, olives, cheeses, sherry and deep red wines. But a visit to Olé’s Facebook page in advance of my meal revealed that, in fact, the menu features principally Korean dishes with no trace of Spanish influence. I was intrigued. Apparently, I was not the only one to draw conclusions about Olé’s menu based on the restaurant’s name, as the first thing I was told by my

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A36 - North Shore News - Wednesday, August 28, 2013

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TASTE

Sauce adds lots of spice to pork From page 35

server upon arrival was “I just need to let you know that we are actually not a Spanish restaurant.” The plot thickened when I noted that the menu presented to me in the restaurant is branded with the name: Olé Wings and Tap rather than Olé Wings and Tapas. The server explained to me that because Olé does not hold a liquorprimary operating license, they are technically not supposed to use the word tapas to describe their business. The preferred, shortened name appears on menus and on social media platforms, but not on official signage. I appreciate Olé’s wish to use the word “tap” given that their menu features several varieties of chicken wings; wings and beer certainly do go hand in hand. However, with that in mind, I was surprised to learn that Olé offers only one variety of draught beer, which seems inconsistent with the restaurant’s aspirations. A restaurateur might well call an establishment Sudsy McLager’s Brew Emporium, but if the selection implied by the name isn’t provided, it is likely to confuse and possibly even alienate patrons. Thoroughly fascinated by the conceptual enigma that is Olé, I got down to the business of sampling their menu. My dining companion for the evening was Mike, a fellow chicken wing enthusiast and long-term North Shore resident. We had been looking forward to trying out a new wing joint, so we proceeded directly to an order of 18 chicken wings in three different flavours: spicy soy, traditional buffalo, and yang nyum, a traditional Korean fried chicken preparation. All of the wings seemed to feature the same heavy-handed batter, a thick and coarse coating that effectively doubled the size of the actual wings. Despite such a dense coating, I have to say the wings were surprisingly light and crispy, although a consistently sweet and sticky character marked each preparation and required a hefty pile of additional napkins and, upon request, fingerbowls. The spicy soy wings were the clear winners in the mix, probably by virtue of being the least cloying of the lot.

NEWS photo Cindy Goodman

OLÉ is a new Korean restaurant on Lonsdale Avenue that also features a variety of chicken wings and meat and seafood skewers. Keen to see what else the kitchen could do, we ordered an assortment of barbecued meat and seafood skewers. The skewers are modestly priced at around $2 each, but a menu stipulation requires that patrons order a minimum of six skewers, making them a more significant investment on par with most of Olé’s entrée prices. Our skewers included grilled prawns, lean beef, asparagus wrapped in pork, scallops, and chicken meatball. The chicken meatball skewer was decidedly the tastiest of the lot, generously seasoned with garlic and ginger, nicely seared and still moist. A variation, the chicken meatball with cheese, was disappointing, featuring a melted rectangle of processed orange cheese atop an otherwise tasty skewer. Far and away the best dish of the evening was the Jeyuk Bokeum, hot and spicy stir-fried pork slathered with a mean, red, chili-laden sauce with onions and cabbage. At $17 it was among the

pricier of Olé’s menu items, but the portion was generous and the tangy, fiery sauce enlivened our palates and made us grateful for our frosty pints of beer. When Mike and I tucked into the pork, our server (who was thoroughly affable, helpful and engaging throughout the meal) seemed to summon two or three additional staff members to stand by to see how we fared with the heat of the dish. I gather the spicing of this menu item is a matter of some pride for Olé. The gesture made me hopeful that one day Olé, admittedly a brand new addition to North Van’s dining scene, will discover a clearer identity and will be able to feel the same pride when diners order any one of its offerings. Olé Wings and Tap(as) is located at 1995 Lonsdale Ave. Phone: 604-770-1737. Chris Dagenais served as a manager for several restaurants downtown and on the North Shore. Contact: hungryontheshore@ gmail.com.

Ice cream bars top patio party menu From page 35 Paprika or chili powder Dipping Sauce: ¼ cup finely chopped cilantro ½ cup sour cream 3 Tbsp freshly squeezed lime juice Sea salt to taste

Join us for a fabulous Lunch or Dinner & Enjoy the Fantastic View Check out our menu at

www.chezmichelvancouver.com Serving West Vancouver for 34 years!

1373 Marine Drive, West Vancouver • 604.926.4913

In a medium bowl, mix together the bacon, cream cheese, pepper jack cheese, green onions, garlic, lime juice and pepper until well blended. Fill each halved jalapeno with the mixture; lightly dust the top with paprika or chili powder. To make the dipping sauce, combine all ingredients in a small bowl until well mixed. Set aside. Preheat grill to mediumhigh and lightly oil the grate. Place peppers on grill; cover grill and cook until peppers are slightly charred and tender and cheese has melted, about eight to 10 minutes. Serve with dipping sauce. Makes 24 to 30 appetizers.

Teriyaki Salmon Skewers

3 Tbsp soy sauce 2 Tbsp hoisin sauce 2 tsp rice vinegar 1 small garlic clove, minced One one-pound, skinless, centre-cut salmon fillet (centre cut ensures strips will be uniform size) 1 green onion, finely chopped Toasted sesame seeds Soaked wooden skewers In a large bowl, combine the soy sauce, hoisin sauce, rice vinegar and garlic. Slice the salmon fillet across the grain into thin strips; add to the soy mixture and marinate for 15 to 30 minutes, turning occasionally. Thread each salmon strip onto a soaked wooden skewer. Preheat barbecue to medium high; place skewers on a well-greased perforated barbecue grill pan (don’t place skewers directly on barbecue grill or they may break when removed from grill). Grill for about four to six minutes, basting once with

marinade, until fish is golden and flaky. Sprinkle with green onions and sesame seeds. Makes about 20 skewers.

S’Mores Ice Cream Bars 20 marshmallows 3 cups slightly softened vanilla ice cream 1½ cups chocolate chips (semisweet or milk chocolate) 2 Tbsp vegetable oil 1 cup graham cracker crumbs 12 small paper cups and 12 Popsicle sticks (or 12 ice pop molds) Line a small baking sheet with foil and butter the foil lightly. Place the marshmallows on the baking sheet and broil them about 12 inches away from the broiler element until marshmallows are golden brown (watch carefully so they don’t burn). Place the ice cream and the warm broiled marshmallows in a blender and blend until smooth. Spoon an

equal amount of the mixture into each of the paper cups; place the cups in a baking dish to keep them upright and freeze until hard enough to hold the Popsicle sticks (about an hour). Insert the sticks and return the molds to the freezer until frozen solid, about six hours or overnight. Melt the chocolate chips in a microwave; stir in the oil and let chocolate cool to room temperature. Remove ice cream bars from freezer and carefully peel off the paper cups; working with one ice cream bar at a time, spoon melted chocolate evenly over each bar, then sprinkle graham crumbs over chocolate. Lay coated bars on a parchment-lined baking sheet; cover loosely with plastic wrap and return to freezer until ready to serve. Makes 12 bars. Angela Shellard is a self-described foodie. She has done informal catering. Contact: ashellard@ hotmail.ca.


Wednesday, August 28, 2013 - North Shore News - A37 EVERY SAT & SUN 10AM-8PM

ALL

CASH LANES

OPEN GUARANTEED† unless we are unable due to unforseen technical difficulties

spend $200 and receive a SunRype pure juice

**Up to $21.48 OR spend

FREE

and selected varieties, 40x200 mL 319117 5796120303

**Spend $200 or more before applicable taxes at any Real Canadian Superstore location and receive free a SunRype pure apple juice 40x200ml and PC® granola bars 930-1120 g. Excludes purchase of tobacco, alcohol products, prescriptions, selected varieties, gift cards, phone cards, lottery tickets, all third party operations (post office, gas bars, dry cleaners, etc.) and any other products which are provincially regulated. 930-1120 g The retail value of up to $21.48 will be deducted from the total amount of your 585940 / 782213 6038398166 / 6038398165 purchase before sales taxes are applied. Limit one coupon per family and/or customer account. No cash value. No copies. Coupon must be presented to the cashier at time of purchase. Valid from Friday, August 23 until closing Thursday, August 29 , 2013. Cannot be combined with any other coupons or promotional offers. No substitutions, refunds or exchanges on free item. 535100

PC® Club Pack® granola bars

Valid until

10000 03990

4

2

48

Ocean Spray cocktails or 100% juice blends, 6 X 295 mL / 1.89 L or Motts clamato cocktail, 1.89 L selected varieties

121894 / 521302 3120044526 / 6591200620

4

Chef Boyardee pasta 119040 6414404302

4/

no name club pack® apple juice 40 X 200 mL

237295 6038369918

frozen, selected varieties, 2 kg 302660 603836994

8

ea

LIMIT 4

AFTER LIMIT

2.97

OR

pkg. of 24

EACH

232534 46038387566

7

Kellogg’s jumbo cereal 235261

product of B.C., Canada No. 1 grade

ea

762079 3338344590

7

Vidal Sassoon hair colour

.88

5

2 LT

blue grapes

2

ea

431850 6148301092

9

2/

OR

5.00

ea

selected varieties, 400-500 g

748466 6810003171

6

97

4.14 /kg

5

Kraft shredded cheese

Kraft cracker barrel natural cheese bar

98

1

247118 286078

EACH

88

ea

LIMIT 2

AFTER LIMIT

selected varieties, 300-400 g 318135 68100089249

8.99

97

ea

LIMIT 4

AFTER LIMIT

6.97

9.89

1.00

selected varieties, 700 g-1.3 kg

.88

00

whole, dressed, 2 per bag

AFTER LIMIT

LIMIT 8

424404 6038366567

3

.68

assorted varieties, 300-375 g

2

fresh wild Pacific pink salmon /lb

Ziggy’s® sliced deli meats

AFTER LIMIT

303401 6038365400

96

10000 03864

4

ea

AFTER LIMIT

selected varieties, 4 X 99 g

8

LIMIT 4

selected varieties, 1’s

no name® puddings

ea

Bakeshop club size kaiser buns or Italian buns

1.47

$25 cash card

selected varieties, 55-65 g LIMIT 4

2 DOZENS

88

98

98

Starting 28 g. e W d. Au

*With this coupon and a purchase of $250 or more before applicable taxes at any Real Canadian Superstore location (excludes purchase of tobacco, alcohol products, prescriptions, gift cards, phone cards, lottery tickets, all third party operations (post office, gas bars, dry cleaners, etc.) and any other products which are provincially regulated) and we will give you a $25 Real Canadian Superstore cash card. Cash card is not a gift card and can only be redeemed at Real Canadian Superstore within the specified effective dates. See cash card for complete redemption details. Limit one coupon per family and/or customer account. No cash value. No copies. Coupon must be presented to the cashier at time of purchase. Cannot be combined with any other coupons or promotional offers. Coupon valid from Wednesday, August 28th until closing Thursday, September 5th, 2013. 924433

no name® thin sliced meat

no name® chicken leg quarters

selected varieties, 411-425 g

$250 and receive a

value

Thur. Aug. 29

FREE

*

406979 3700084852

88

LIMIT 4

AFTER LIMIT

4

size N-6, 100-216’s

40 ct.

7

gas bar and earn

30

Royal Chinet dinner plates

579226 2737889

12.99

Fuel up at our ea

ea

Huggies club size plus diapers

¢

per litre**

60

ea

LIMIT 2

AFTER LIMIT

44.99

in Superbucks® value when you pay with your

251936 694091010122

99

no name® charcoal 18 lb

9 lb

ea

LIMIT 3

AFTER LIMIT

6.99

4 7

572497 6098300487

29

572489 6038301255

ea

LIMIT 6

AFTER LIMIT

6.98

99

LIMIT 6

ea

AFTER LIMIT

13.99

value using Or, get 3.5¢per litre** inanySuperbucks other purchase method ®

®

**Redeem your earned Superbucks® value towards the purchase of Merchandise at participating stores (excluding tobacco, alcohol, lottery tickets, gas and prescriptions). With each fuel purchase when you use your President’s Choice Financial® MasterCard® or President’s Choice Financial® debit card as payment, you will receive 7 cents per litre in Superbucks® value. When you use any other method of payment, you will receive 3.5 cents per litre in Superbucks® value. Superbucks® value expires 60 days after date of issue. Superbucks® value are not redeemable at third party businesses within participating stores, the gas bar, or on the purchase of tobacco, alcohol, lottery tickets and prescriptions. Superbucks® value has no cash value and no cash will be returned for any unused portion. Identification may be required at the time of redemption. See Superbucks® receipt for more details. ® Trademarks of Loblaws Inc. and others. ©2013. † MasterCard is a registered trademark of MasterCard International Incorporated. President’s Choice Bank a licensee of the mark. President’s Choice Financial MasterCard is provided by President’s Choice Bank. President’s Choice Financial personal banking products are provided by the direct banking division of CIBC.

Redeem Superbucks towards purchases made in-store.**

Prices are in effect until Monday, September 2, 2013 or while stock lasts.

97

ea

LIMIT 6

AFTER LIMIT

8.98

Quantities and/or selection of items may be limited and may not be available in all stores. No rainchecks. No substitutions on clearance items or where quantities are advertised as limited. Advertised pricing and product selection (flavour, colour, patterns, style) may vary by store location. We reserve the right to limit quantities to reasonable family requirements. We are not obligated to sell items based on errors or misprints in typography or photography. Coupons must be presented and redeemed at time of purchase. Applicable taxes, deposits, or environmental surcharges are extra. No sales to retail outlets. Some items may have “plus deposit and environmental charge” where applicable. ®/™ The trademarks, service marks and logos displayed in this flyer are trademarks of Loblaws Inc. and others. All rights reserved. © 2013 Loblaws Inc. * we match prices! Applies only to our major supermarket competitors’ flyer items. Major supermarket competitors are determined solely by us based on a number of factors which can vary by store location. We will match the competitor’s advertised price only during the effective date of the competitor’s flyer advertisement. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES (note that our major supermarket competitors may not). Due to the fact that product is ordered prior to the time of our Ad Match checks, quantities may be limited. We match identical items (defined as same brand, size, and attributes) and in the case of fresh produce, meat, seafood and bakery, we match a comparable item (as determined solely by us). We will not match competitors’ “multi-buys” (eg. 2 for $4), “spend x get x”, “Free”, “clearance”, discounts obtained through loyalty programs, or offers related to our third party operations (post office, gas bars, dry cleaners etc.). We reserve the right to cancel or change the terms of this program at any time. Customer Relations: 1-866-999-9890.

superstore.ca


A38 - North Shore News - Wednesday, August 28, 2013

CELEBRATIONS

Jim and Deirdre O’Keeffe Jim and Deirdre O’Keeffe were married in Dublin, Ireland, on Aug. 24, 1963. They celebrated their anniversary on a family vacation with their three children and seven grandchildren. Their family wishes them a very happy 50th wedding anniversary.

Kurt and Helga Brause Kurt and Helga Brause, seen in a recent photo above and in an older photo on top, were married on Sept. 5, 1953, in Berlin, Germany. Instead of a big wedding, the couple bought a 1929 Opel car and travelled through Switzerland and southern France, camping all the way. They arrived in Canada in 1955 and settled in West Vancouver.

Patricia and Bonar Lund Patricia and Bonar Lund were married on Aug. 29, 1953, in Winnipeg. They migrated to Calgary and then out to Vancouver in 1974. Their family and friends with them a happy 60th anniversary.

Jenny McRobbie Douglas H. Franklin Douglas H. Franklin was born on Aug. 21, 1923. He recently celebrated his 90th birthday with his family. His family and friends wish him a happy birthday.

Doug and Elaine Slight Doug and Elaine Slight celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary on Aug. 24. The couple were married in Vancouver and have lived in North Vancouver since the wedding. Their family and friends congratulate them on this special occasion.

Jenny McRobbie (a.k.a. “Ma” and “Nana”) is celebrating her 90th birthday on Sept. 1. She was born in Scotland and spent the last 50 years in Vancouver, more recently in North Vancouver. Her children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren wish her love and a very happy birthday.

TO submit a photo to Celebrations: Email a good-quality photo and a description of your wedding announcement, milestone anniversary (first, fifth and every subsequent five years) or birthday (80 years and every fifth year thereafter) along with a contact name and phone number to rduane@nsnews.com, or bring a hard copy print to the North Shore News building, which is located at #100126 East 15th St., North Vancouver. Celebrations is a free service and there is no guarantee submissions will be published. Text may be edited for style and/or length.


Wednesday, August 28, 2013 - North Shore News - A39

The NorthVancouver RCMP & the RCMP Musical Ride wish to thank all of our sponsors, volunteers and community supporters! With your support, we raised $10,839.63 for Cops for Cancer.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Gendarmerie royale du Canada

PLATINUM PARTNERSHIPS: Assertive Property Management | City of North Vancouver | District of North Vancouver | Lakes, Whyte LLP Barristers and Solicitors Lynn Valley Lions | Mercedes-Benz | Neptune Terminals | North Shore News | Pacific Honda | Re/Max Dodi Thorhaug Realty | Tsleil-Waututh Nation GOLD PARTNERSHIPS: Cupe Local 389 | London Drugs | Lordco Auto Parts | OK Tire | Save On Foods | Skyline Dental Centre

supplied photo

Fair friends NORTH Vancouver teens Jena Roper (left), 16, and Sarah Walker, 16, ride the Orbiter at the PNE. The annual end-of-summer fair features more than 700 shows, exhibits and attractions that are free with admission. The fair runs daily through Labour Day.

what’s going on

Ambleside Orchestra rehearses Wednesdays, 3:15-5:30 p.m. at Highlands United Church, 3255 Edgemont Blvd., North Vancouver. Intermediate level of musicianship required. Bring a music stand. Info: David, 604-922-1035. Caroun Photo Club: Meetings are held the third Wednesday of every month, 7-9 p.m. at the Silk Purse Arts Centre, 1570 Argyle Ave., West Vancouver. Visitors are welcome. Info: carounphotoclub.com. Circle Dance: Learn easy dances with music and steps from many traditions the second Wednesday of each month, 7-9 p.m. (arrive 6:45 p.m.). Admission by donation. Registration and location: Wendy Anne, 604-988-3522. Dare to be Heard, presented by the North Shore Writers Association, meets the first Wednesday of every month, 79 p.m. at Mollie Nye House, 940 Lynn Valley Rd., North Vancouver. The association invites writers of all genres, fiction and non-fiction, to read their work in a friendly, comfortable atmosphere and to listen to other writers share their work and talk about the writing

process. Readers are invited to attend to get to know established and new local writers. Free for members and nonmembers by donation. Deep Cove Ladies’ Lions Club meets at 6:30 p.m. on the second and last Wednesday of each month at Lions Garey Ham Court, 936 Bowron Court, North Vancouver. New members are welcome. Info: Sally Scott, 604-924-1923. The Dutch Koffieclub meets the third Wednesday of every month, 10 a.m. to noon at the food court, Park Royal, south mall, West Vancouver. Meet new people and keep up your Dutch language or improve it. The club welcomes Flemish and South African people also. Used Dutch magazines and books will be available. Info: Henk, 604-987-4978 or Nel, 604-987-6879. ESL Book Club: A free club to read and talk about Canadian novels Wednesdays, 10:30-11:30 a.m. at the West Vancouver Memorial Library, 1950 Marine Dr. Registration required: 604-925-7403. Gleneagles Scottish Country Dance Club: Experienced classes every Wednesday, 7:30-9:30 p.m. at Hollyburn Elementary, 1329 Duchess Ave., West Vancouver. Info: Simon, 604-925-9333. Meals on Wheels needs volunteers on Monday, Wednesday or Friday mornings. Info: 604-922-3414 or northshoremealsonwheels.org. North Shore Chamber Orchestra meets Wednesdays, 7:30-9:30 p.m. at Sutherland Secondary, 1860 Sutherland Ave., North Vancouver and is See more page 40

If you see a wildfire call *5555 on your cell. Nearly half of all wildfires are preventable. Please, be responsible in our forests.

To learn more visit BCWildfire.ca


A40 - North Shore News - Wednesday, August 28, 2013

what’s going on

604-980-3132.

From page 39 looking for new string players (especially bass players). Info: jeanaireland1@hotmail.com or

North Shore Chorus meets Wednesdays, 7:15-9:45 p.m., at Mount Seymour United Church, 1200 Parkgate Ave., North Vancouver. New members are welcome. Info: 604985-2559, nschorus.com or audreyowen@shaw.ca.

North Shore Toastmasters Advanced Leaders meet every third Saturday from 10 a.m. to noon at Second Floor, 145 Chadwick Court, North Vancouver. Info: quayspeakers. com. Sing Along Wednesdays: “Mr. Music” Peter Vanderhorst

will play the piano to lead a sing along of favourite songs the first Wednesday of every month, 10 a.m.-noon at the Silk Purse Arts Centre, 1570 Argyle Ave., West Vancouver. Song books will be provided. Drop-in fee: $5 at the door. For details, call 604-925-7292 or visit silkpurse.ca.

2X

SEARS CLUB

TM

POINTS

EVERYDAY!

When you use your Sears MasterCard or Sears Card at Sears

Soroptimist International of North and West Vancouver, a volunteer service organization for business and professional women, meets on the second Wednesday of each month, September to June, 7 p.m. Info and location: 604-9800108 or soroptimist@shaw.ca. Guests are welcome.

OFFERS IN EFFECT AUG. 29 - SEPT. 4, 2013 UNLESS OTHERWISE STATED, WHILE QUANTITIES LAST. SALE PRICED MERCHANDISE MAY NOT BE EXACTLY AS ILLUSTRATED.

OPEN HOLIDAY MONDAY SEPTEMBER 2ND • 11 AM TO 6 PM

SEARS OUTLET “BEAT-THE-RUSH” SEASONAL BLOWOUT CONTINUES!!

FASHION BLOWOUT!! OVER 30,000 ITEMS ARRIVING

HUGE SELECTION OF

CHOOSE FROM

WOMEN’S, MEN’S, & PANTS, SKIRTS, CHILDREN’S CASUAL & SHORTS, TOPS, DRESSWEAR! FOOTWEAR & MORE!

WAS: $19.99 TO $99.99 ea.

9

NOW: $ 72 TO $

14

While quantities last

SAVE THE TAX* ON ALMOST ALL RANGE, WASHER, DRYER & DISHWASHER PURCHASES WHEN YOU USE YOUR SEARS FINANCIAL™ CREDIT CARD†

SEARS ORIGINAL TICKETED PRICES ON

ALMOST ALL IN-STOCK

REFRIGERATORS

MAJOR APPLIANCE OFFERS EXCLUDE NEW BOXED ITEMS *Sears will charge and remit any applicable taxes and deduct an amount equivalent to the taxes you will be charged from the item price, so that your total purchase will be no more than the item price. Applicable tax(es) will be shown on your receipt. Excludes delivery fees, installations, protection agreements and catalogue purchases.

(OVER 300 TO CHOOSE FROM)

EXAMPLE OF SAVINGS:

LG 22.7 CU.FT. STAINLESS STEEL FRIDGE

Some items may be reconditioned or refurbished

109999 EA

IF NEW, WAS: $219999 NOW: $

SELECTED PATIO SET BLOWOUT!! WHOLE HOME® CARMEL 7-PC. PATIO SET

Soup and Sandwich with coffee or tea in a warm, friendly atmosphere is $5, $3 for children, every Wednesday and Friday at John Braithwaite Community Centre, 145 West First St., North Vancouver.

INCLUDES 4 CHAIRS, TABLE, UMBRELLA & BASE

While quantities last

Community Recycling Depot: Do you want to recycle more? Take all products (such as Styrofoam, vinyl, flower pots and electronics) not accepted by the Blue Box program to Presentation House, 333 Chesterfield Ave., North Vancouver, on the third Saturday of every month, from 9 a.m. to noon. Donations go toward recycling costs and to programs at the theatre. For more information: 604-5687027 or visit pacificmobiledepots.com. — compiled by Debbie Caldwell

SAVE 60% OFF!

SEARS ORIGINAL TICKETED PRICES ON ALL IN-STOCK

SOFAS, LOVE SELECTED UPHOLSTERED SOFA SEATS & $59999 CHAIRS EXAMPLE OF SAVINGS: IF NEW, WAS: $149999

MON-TUES 9:30am-7:00pm $ WED-FRI 9:30am-9:00pm SAT 9:00am-6:00pm $ SUN 11:00am-6:00pm

Some items may be reconditioned or refurbished

EA.

9850 AUSTIN RD. BURNABY

LOUGHEED TOWN CENTRE

604-421-0757

Personal shopping only. Savings offers do not include Parts & Service or Sundry Merchandise, Items with #195XXX & Sears ‘Value’ Programs with prices ending in .97. All merchandise sold “as is” and all sales final. No exchanges, returns or adjustments on previously purchased merchandise; savings offers cannot be combined. No dealers; we reserve the right to limit quantities. Prices do not include home delivery. Although we strive for accuracy, unintentional errors may occur. We reserve the right to correct any error. ‘Reg.’, ‘Was’ and ‘Sears selling price’ refer to the Sears Catalogue or Retail store price current at time of merchandise receipt. Offers valid at Sears BURNABY Outlet Store only. © 2013 Sears Canada Inc. †Sears Financial™ MasterCard®, Sears Financial™ Voyage™ MasterCard® or Sears Card offers are on approved credit. Sears® and Voyage™ are a registered Trademarks of Sears, licensed for use in Canada. ®/TM - MasterCard and the MasterCard Brand Mark are registered trademarks of MasterCard International Incorporated.

IN AUST

LOUGHEED SKYTRAIN STATION

LOUG

ROAD

X

HEED

NORTH ROAD

NOW:

West Vancouver Rotary Sunrise Club meets for breakfast every Thursday, 7:15-8:30 a.m. at Capilano Golf and Country Club, 420 Southborough Dr., West Vancouver. Info: 604-9133959.

English Conversation: A weekly friendly conversation class to practise English meets every Friday, 1-2:30 p.m. at Mollie Nye House, 940 Lynn Valley Rd., North Vancouver. Drop-in fee: $2. Info: 604987-5820.

WAS: $35993

NOW ONLY:

Community Connections Program: Make a newcomer feel more welcome in the community. North Shore Multicultural Society, 207123 East 15th St., North Vancouver is looking for volunteers to participate in a variety of community events with newcomers. Recruitment is ongoing. For more information contact Sochell at 604-988-2931 or sochellr@ nsms.ca. St. Martin’s Church Choir: Choristers of all ages and abilities are invited to sing with St. Martin’s Church choir, a traditional Anglican church located at St. Georges Avenue and Windsor Street, North Vancouver. Rehearsals are on Thursday evenings. The choir sings at the 10 a.m. Sunday service. Info: David Millard, 604-990-5289.

72 EA.

PLUS!

SAVE 50% OFF!

SpeakerHub Toastmasters meets every Wednesday, 5:457:15 p.m. in the Education Centre at St. Andrews United Church, 1044 St. Georges Ave., North Vancouver. The organization is dedicated to help others improve their public speaking and leadership skills in a friendly supportive environment. Guests are welcome. Info: justin.dyer@ shaw.ca.

HWY

Email information for your nonprofit, by donation or nominal fee event to listings@nsnews.com. For our online listings, go to nsnews. com, scroll to Community Events and click on Add Your Event.


SPORT

Wednesday, August 28, 2013 - North Shore News - A41

YOUR NORTH SHORE GUIDE to THE GAMES PEOPLE PLAY

Royals make the leap to AAA

Season starts Friday as Handsworth hosts West Van Andy Prest aprest@nsnews.com

THE sun is setting a little sooner these days and the odd drop of rain is hitting the pavement, sure signs that fall is on its way and high school football is about to get cracking.

Scan this page with the Layar app to see more photos from Handsworth’s training camp.

ItmightbeastormyseasonaheadfortheHandsworth Royals as a the school’s population has forced the team to make the jump from the AA level to AAA for the first time in nearly a decade. The promotion has boosted the Royals into a powerhouse AAA conference featuring B.C. superteams such as Mount Douglas, Notre Dame and Vancouver College. It’ll be a tall order for a team whose roster remains relatively short, but Handsworth head coach Jay Prepchuk said his boys are tackling it head on. “We’re super excited about the challenge, all the boys are super keen,” he said Tuesday, a couple a preseason practices already under his belt. “I think there’s a little bit more of an edge to our preparation and a little bit more attentiveness and a little bit more excitement.” Prepchuk said he knows the road the team is setting out on is a difficult one but it’s not going to change the way they do business. “It’s going to be a huge jump but you know what, it doesn’t matter whether you’re getting ready for a Sunday flag football game or you’re getting ready for playing Notre Dame or Vancouver College or Mount Douglas . . . you prepare the best you can. It’s not like because you’re playing AAA you’re going to prepare more. We’ve always prided ourselves on working as hard as we can as coaches and getting our players to work as hard as they can whether they’re going to play a Tier 2 team or a AAA team.” Adding to the pressure is the fact that the Royals didn’t even make the playoffs last season when they played at the AA level. That, however, was a young team that only carried four Grade 12 students. This year the team has about a dozen Grade 12s, including quarterback Michael Lemoine who is entering his third year as the senior team’s starter. “He looks great — he’s excited about the season and he’s having a good camp so far,” said Prepchuk. “He’s a very fast player, he’s got a good, quick release. . . . He’s intelligent, he understands the game. He’s a threat to run the ball too.” Other senior players expected to lead the team are Alex Banning and Eli Matsell, a pair of grinders who play running back on offence and linebacker on defence, as well as two-way lineman Ryan Matheson. The Royals will get an early test this Friday when NEWS photo Lisa King the host the West Vancouver Highlanders, the only other North Shore team in this year’s AAA league. The A member of the Handsworth Royals football team smashes a tackling mat during preseason Highlanders made the playoffs for the first time since camp Monday. The Royals open their season against West Vancouver on Friday. 2007 last year, led by the power trio of quarterback “We found out very quickly that we’ve got a lot of learning to do with a lot of Johnny Franklin, receiver Blake Whiteley and running back/linebacker James Oswald. new guys in key positions that haven’t even played football before,” said Anderson. All three of them, however, graduated last year leaving some very big holes to fill. “They were hugely important,” said head coach Shawn Anderson. “We knew “We want to be competitive in every game. We’re low on numbers and we have a Blake was going to be good, we knew James was going to be good but Johnny we good group of Grade 11s and 12s this year but really we’re very young at all of our weren’t sure, it was his first year at quarterback. But he blew it away last year, was a positions.” Anderson will be counting on Grade 12 linebacker Bjorn Knutson to lead the huge part of our offence.” Training camp for this season started Sunday night and it was obvious from the start that the Highlanders have a lot of work to do. See West page 42

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A42 - North Shore News - Wednesday, August 28, 2013

SPORT

IT’S ON

BUCHANAN BOWL XXVII: CARSON GRAHAM

EAGLES

vs.

HANDSWORTH

ROYALS

Saturday September 7, 2013 4 teams • 2 games • 1 day • All the Marbles!

JUNIOR VARSITY GAME TIME: 11:00 SENIOR VARSITY GAME TIME: 1:30

AM

PM

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NEWS photo Cindy Goodman

Watch where you’re going

CANADA’S Antoine Bernadet executes a tricky shot during the North American Championships of table tennis Monday at Capilano Sportsplex. The championships wrapped up Tuesday but the Canadian Junior Open will run Thursday to Sunday at Capilano. Scan with Layar for more images.

West Van has big shoes to fill

From page 41

charge on defence. “He’s a small guy but really fast, a really tough kid. We’re really hoping he can help solidify the defensive side of things.” On offence running back Marcus Schwandner and receiver Matteo Lepur are the most experienced playmakers. Grade 11 quarterback Finn Morales will bump up to senior starter after playing the position with the junior team last season. “He’s a really smart football player, he understands what we do in a pass-happy offence,” said Anderson. “He’s not the strongest kid yet and needs to kind of grow into his body but he knows what to do with the ball The Royals and Highlanders, each with less than a week of training camp under their belts, will test out their systems in a scrimmage Friday starting at 2 p.m. at Handsworth. “If it was soccer it would be called a friendly,” said Prepchuk with a big laugh. “I don’t like soccer terms.” Anderson, a former Handsworth player and

coach, is happy to have a natural rival in the AAA league again after being the only North Shore team at that level last season. The two teams will meet again Oct. 11 at West Van in a regular season matchup. “We’re going to work hard to compete against the Mount Douglases and Vancouver Colleges of the world . . . but my view of a successful season is if we can really be competitive and come out with wins against Handsworth and Carson Graham and the other teams we play on the North Shore,” said Anderson. “It’s always nice to go over and play Jay. He’s always a fun guy to play against, he’s got about 100,000 plays so it makes it entertaining.” ••• AA action kicks off Friday as well with Windsor hosting Rick Hansen for a 1 p.m. start. Argyle will host Frank Hurt at William Griffin Park Sept. 6 starting at 2:30 p.m. while Windsor will get another home game that same day with a 3:45 p.m. start against Earl Marriot. The annual Buchanan Bowl between Handsworth and Carson Graham is scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 7 starting at 1:30 p.m. at Carson.

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North Shore News August 28 2013