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Name that alley in the name of more fun Christine Lyon clyon@nsnews.com

GASTOWN has Blood Alley, Chinatown has Shanghai Alley and soon Lower Lonsdale could have a uniquely named lane of its very own.

NEWS photo Cindy Goodman

ROMA Wilson believes alleys can have character and has founded the More Fun Alley Association to name the one between Esplanade and First Street east of Lonsdale Avenue In North Vancouver. Scan with Layar for more photos and information.

Last spring, North Vancouver resident Roma Wilson founded the More Fun Alley Association, which aims to turn alleys into cultural and community spaces. The association is now launching a contest to name the stretch of lane between Esplanade and First Street east of Lonsdale Avenue. “It would be nice to give it a descriptor because sometimes it can be a little bit tough to refer to an alleyway just by street names or by landmarks,” Wilson said. “By naming the alley, we hope to also create a connection between the alley and the residents and small business owners who call the alley home.” See Intent page 3

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Keating made himself the first to declare a bid for the job on Thursday morning. “It was a decision that came over the course of the summer talking to hundreds of members and supporters of the NDP who

were as shocked as I was about the loss we suffered in May and who are as dedicated as I am to making sure we put in the hard work right now that we need to win in 2017 — so we don’t lose a fifth consecutive election and that we can begin to win on a regular basis in the 21st century politics that we have now,” Keating said. Party presidents oversee how the party raises funds and uses its resources, manage the party’s paid staff and work with the leader and caucus to keep everyone on the same page. Specifically, Keating said the NDP needs to be doing a better job

of “articulating bold policies” and seriously revamping the way the party conducts voter identification intel. “We need to get in touch with some of the latest methods of organizing and using data in modern elections. We’ve seen this in the states. The Democratic Party, with low resources, has been able to withstand the onslaught of the hugely funded Republican machine by doing modern forms of organizing, data collection and using it in elections,” Keating said. That will be a long-term project on which the NDP can’t waste any time, added Keating. “It’s only three-and-a-half years until the next election,” he said.

LLOYD

CITY of North Vancouver councillor and former candidate for North Vancouver-Lonsdale Craig Keating is hoping he can help steer the provincial New Democratic Party to a win in 2017 as party president.

City councillor wants revamped party policy and data collection

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A2 - North Shore News - Friday, August 30, 2013


Friday, August 30, 2013 - North Shore News - A3

Water-from-air units on display

Technology attracting worldwide interest

Intent is to create community From page 1

Anne Watson awatson@nsnews.com

A new machine is making water availability possible even in the most remote areas around the world.

The atmospheric water harvester creates drinkable water from the air through a process similar to a regular dehumidifier. “In dehumidification, you’re extracting moisture from the air and then disposing of the water,” said Phil Fraser, vice-president of Splash Water Canada and creator of the machine. “In my technology, we extract the moisture from the air, we store it, then purify it and make it into drinking water.” The machine, which is NEWS photo Cindy Goodman on display in a showroom at 113 East First St. in North PHIL Fraser, executive vice-president of Splash Water for Life shows off his company’s Atmospheric Harvester Vancouver, operates through units in a North Vancouver showroom. The machines extract water from the air and then purify and store it. three moving parts and then a pump and a condenser, like a “It can be used for disaster relief, areas where The idea for the machine came to Fraser in the refrigerator, he said. there is no electricity, and the likes. Or if the cost of “We pull the air into the machine. Hot air on a most unusual way. “I was in a boardroom meeting and I was looking fuel is cheaper than the cost of electricity, obviously cool surface makes the surface sweat so the coil in our machine is cold,” said Fraser. “We pull warm air into out the window and I noticed an air conditioner it would be wise to use it in that context as well,” he the machine and it makes the coil sweat and the water dripping water down and I thought if there’s a way said. The timing is right with so many water needs drips down into a storage tank. And then from that that we could contain that it would be helpful for process it’s a matter of pumping the water through everybody,” said Fraser. “My first thought was to use around the world right now, said Fraser, and they are it just for agriculture, for plants or watering lawns, getting inquiries from all around the world. the purification system and to the dispersal tank.” “The interest is definitely there, the needs are Once the machine is full, it automatically shuts off and then I expanded it into the drinking water definitely there and the product is ready to go,” he and once an hour, it turns back on to re-purify the process.” It took Fraser approximately a year to come up said. “We’re in full production and we can certainly water through the filters. “So you can basically go away for a month or two with the prototype and three-and-a-half years to fill anybody’s needs as far as supply of the machines and the training on the operation.” months and come back and the water is still fresh and come up with the production model. The machines were first introduced on the North “Our home office machines generate up to ready to drink,” said Fraser. The water must pass through multiple filtration eight gallons per day, and our commercial machines Shore, but Fraser said they are also being introduced into the United States, Florida in particular. He’s also systems, including ultra violet light, prior to the generate up to 3,000 gallons per day,” he said. Both machines can be run from a local power had interest from Indonesia, Cambodia, China and consumer drinking it. “We use a Food Safe technology so the water that source, such as a wall plug-in, but the larger commercial India. “Its viable and cost effective, and it definitely is extracted from the air is never in touch with any machines can also be run using an outsourced motor materials that would contaminate it in any way,” said of a vehicle, or a six-horsepower gas or diesel engine produces the best drinking water available,” said Fraser. with a shaft and pulley, said Fraser. Fraser.

The Name That Alley contest runs Sept. 2 to 5. Residents are invited to enter as many name ideas as they please on the More Fun Alley Association’s Facebook page, or in person at the Café for Contemporary Art on Esplanade. “The only criterion for the names is that they be fun and creative,” said Wilson. A team of judges will pick a name on Sept. 6. Two Daughters Bakeshop and Rayne Longboards have donated prizes for the person who submits the winning entry. While the new alley name may not show up on Google Maps, Wilson hopes it will find its way into the community’s collective geographical vocabulary. “The contest is more of an unofficial, fun contest. Eventually if the name catches on and gets popular then I guess there could be a small ceremony down the road to acknowledge the name.” Wilson said she was inspired to start the More Fun Alley Association after seeing successful alley improvement projects in Seattle, Wash., and Australia. “I thought, ‘Why not try to do something like that here in North Vancouver?’” she said, explaining that alleys needn’t be thought of as crime-ridden, graffiti-laden places. Earlier this summer, Wilson and a team of volunteers built a “tire garden” out of colourfully painted rubber car tires, which they decoratively placed in the same lane Wilson is now hoping to name. “One of the core values of the More Fun Alley Association is reducing and reusing stuff,” she said, adding, “Next year I’d like to do urban gardens in alleyways.”

NV coal, grain drive increase in port exports Brent Richter brichter@nsnews.com

PORT Metro Vancouver is on its way to posting a record year for handling cargo, owing largely to increased output from North Vancouver’s coal and grain terminals. PMV released its mid-year report on Tuesday, showing six-per-cent growth over the same period last year. “The drivers of growth for the bulk exports in particular are coal, grain and potash. Of course they’re all quantities handled on the North Shore. Coal is up about nine per cent overall. Grain, five per cent and potash, 26 per cent,” said Robin Silvester, PMV’s president and CEO. “The two grain terminals, (Richardson

International and Cargill Canada) and Neptune Terminal must be having a good year, which is good news.” Silvester attributes the growth to continuous demand in the Chinese market and slight increases in capacity at the North Shore’s terminals. “Even with talk of China slowing down a bit, it’s still a big economy and it’s still growing at a pretty strong rate and thus the metallurgical coal and grain and potash are all in demand,” he said. But with Neptune and Richardson already having applications to expand their operations approved by the port, and the Low Level Road project making room for more rail lines, the real growth in shipping from the North Shore is yet to come. Richardson is in the engineering phase of a $120million expansion of its grain

NEWS photo Paul McGrath

GRAIN cars sit next to Richardson Grain Terminal in North Vancouver. Grain exports are up five per cent according to Port Metro Vancouver’s mid-year report, but storage capacity is set to expand. silos to add 54-metre (17storey) high silos stretching 172 metres, which will hold

another 80,000 tonnes of grain. Neptune is planning to double its coal handling.

While the approval process at council and the construction impacts of the Low Level Road project have left many North Vancouver feathers ruffled, the tangible benefits beyond increased economic activity will soon be plain to see, Silvester said. “I think once it’s finished, the community will see the benefits of the project much more clearly with the Spirit Trail and bikes lanes and obviously that potentially dangerous slope being fully stabilized,” Silvester said. In the last year, the port has drawn protests from environmental activists who accused PMV of being a handmaiden to climate change for its role in expanding coal exports destined for boilers in Chinese factories. But it is unfair to put the blame on the port, Silvester said, as it has no role in deciding what

commodities Canada trades with other nations. And the port’s own environmental record is stellar, Silvester added. “We operate a carbonneutral organization. We have had a lot of accolades for the work we’ve done to improve theenvironmentalperformance of the supply chain and reduce environmental impact. So we are absolutely doing our part, in fact doing it much more than many individuals and organizations,” Silvester said. And when it comes to problem of rising sea levels and unpredictable weather that climate change brings, no one is without sin, he added. “Lets face it: things like carbon emissions and climate change are down to everyone. It’s everyone driving cars, going in airplanes just as much as it is the export of coal,” he said.


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Friday, August 30, 2013 - North Shore News - A5

2 BMX cyclists ride over fallen man, 57 Jeremy Shepherd jshepherd@nsnews.com

POLICE are looking for a witness after an incapacitated 57-year-old West Vancouver man was run over and beaten by bicycles ridden by two young men Wednesday night The West Vancouverite had collapsed in the 100-block of Whonoak Road shortly after 10 p.m., according to police. A witness was moving to help when he saw two BMX cyclists ride across the fallen man. One of the suspects allegedly returned, picked up his bike, and used it to hit the victim in the head. The man suffered superficial injuries to his upper body and head. He was released from hospital the next morning. “Fortunately his injuries aren’t going to be life-altering,” said West Vancouver Police Department spokesman Const. Jeff Palmer.

The case is complicated by the victim’s limited recollection. “He recalls falling . . . and then recalls nothing after that,” Palmer said. Police have been left with several questions to answer. “What we don’t know is: How long was he lying there?” Palmer said. There is no indication the man was targeted for any particular reason, according to Palmer. “We have nothing to indicate motive. Nothing said that was heard,” Palmer said. “(This) may just be an ugly crime of opportunity.” The suspects are described as being between 20 and 30 and wearing black hoodies and jeans. Palmer is hopeful police may gather a more detailed description from any witnesses who saw the duo leaving the area. “We have relatively little to go on at this point,” Palmer said. West Vancouver Police are asking anyone with information to call 604-925-7300.

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Use Layar app with iOS and Android mobile devices to scan this legend to access more digital content in today’s issue of the North Shore News: Name That Alley page 1 Cedar Cove page 13 Closed Circuit page 19 Fall fashion trends page 29 Deep Cove Daze page 36 Jeep Grand Cherokee SRT page 43 Self-driving car page 43

Incumbent Moe Sihota yet to state his plans From page 1 “It’ll go by in a flash unless we’re doing hard work right now.” The NDP is scheduled to hold its convention in November, at which time delegates from constituencies around the province will meet to vote for their president, a paid position, and executive. Current president Moe Sihota, who was elected in 2009, has not stated his plans yet.

“I think Moe’s done some great work but the members I’ve talked to this summer have been very keen to see some substantial change in how we move in the party. Arguably that means the personalities that are involved,” Keating said. As for whether that also means New Democrats ought to be selecting a new leader, Keating said it’s too soon to say. “I think we need to give Adrian (Dix) the opportunity

to make up his own mind on his future. . . . I think, quite frankly, leadership is almost immaterial to the challenges we face right now,” he said. “If I’m successful as party president, I have to work with whomever the leader of the party is and it has to be a close relationship. I think it would be inappropriate at this stage to get out and say, ‘favourites, not favourites, whathave-you.’” If elected, Keating will

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remain on city council and he intends to run again in 2014. If his workload becomes too heavy, Keating said he will likely cut back the hours he puts in as a political science instructor at Langara College. “Bruce Ralston. . . for many years served as a Surrey city councillor, was a practising lawyer and was party president as well,” Keating said, “I think it’s something that can be done and has been done.”

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A6 - North Shore News - Friday, August 30, 2013

VIEWPOINT Published by North Shore News a division of LMP Publication Limited Partnership, 100-126 East 15th Street, North Vancouver, B.C. V7L 2P9. Doug Foot, publisher. Canadian publications mail sales product agreement No. 40010186.

On the record

H

OMEOWNERS in West Vancouver should pay attention to the latest point longtime council-watcher George Pajari is attempting to make with district council and its planning staff. Why? Because the answer might possibly affect how much property tax they pay over the next few years. When a property is rezoned, for example from single-family to multifamily, its value increases in proportion to what can now be built there. That increase in value is referred to in West Van bureaucratese as “uplift.” InWestVancouver,themunicipality’s share of the uplift profit is 75 per cent — but it is calculated purely on the increase in base land value, not the “improved” or built-out sale price. Obviously for the formula to be meaningful, a current and accurate land

value must be assessed on the property in question and a value calculated for the new zoning. Pajari has questioned the valuations West Vancouver has used on two recent developments and argues that the municipality — and its taxpayers — are being shortchanged. He points out that when it comes to calculating the municipality’s percentage on the Grosvenor deal in the 1300-block of Marine Drive, millions of dollars are involved. We are in no position to judge whether the district has received the correct uplift contributions in the two developments that Pajari has questioned to date. But one thing is crystal clear: in the interest of transparency, the appraisal documentation should be part of the public record and not require an FOI application to ferret it out.

Liberals need to meter Nestlé’s water tap

STEWART Phillip and the Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs aren’t the only ones who should be outraged by the Swiss behemoth Nestlé sucking free water out of its well near Hope. All British Columbians should be furious that this many-tentacled corporate octopus — domiciled in a nation that deserves far more hard-eyed criticism than it ever gets — is drawing 265 million litres of water every year from the well. And sells it. In little bottles. Doesn’t have a permit. Doesn’t need one. Know of any other enterprise that pays zero for its raw product and without the annoyance of fussy permits? How can other bottlers compete with that? Anyone for a level playing pond? How this can happen in a country with bureaucratic regulatory agencies to the sky, and grossly over-governed — we need more MPs and MLAs like we need more privilege abusers like Pamela Wallin

This Just In

Trevor Lautens and Mike Duffy at the Senate trough — beggars belief. Grand Chief Phillip, president of the Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs, unsurprisingly supports the Chawathil First Nation, which claims the well is in its traditional territory — a concept, as an aside, guaranteed to screw up B.C. forever except for enriching band councils, lawyers and bureaucrats. But the groundwater issue concerns all. So deploy some of your famous moxie, Christy Clark, to put revisions to the B.C. Water Act scheduled for

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2014 right at the top of the priority list for the legislature fall session. And make Nestlé pay big-time — somewhat more than the cost of a driver’s licence — if it wants to continue the business. Might this caricature of competition haughtily get up and leave? I’d personally hold the door. Not likely, though. Nestlé defines corporate obesity. It’s the biggest food company by revenue in the world. It’s No. 1 in the FT (Financial Times) Global 500 and the Fortune Global 500. If you tried to boycott Nestlé-linked products, you could starve, or die for lack of medicine, or even from ugliness. Wikipedia lists just some of the 8,000 companies it owns, co-owns, has big shares in, or has distribution or other deals with. You’ll recognize some past and present names: Kraft, Carnation, Pfizer, Gerber, Libby’s, Ovaltine, Crosse & Blackwell, San Pellegrino, Perrier (water for those connoisseurs who eschew some of the best tap water from on and below the earth).

Nescafé, Stouffer’s and Belgian chocolate and Greek ice cream makers you’ve never heard of, not to overlook Haagen-Dazs. Also Rowntree Mackintosh, Aero, Cheerios, Shreddies, Coffee Crisp, Kit Kat, Smarties. Not to forget the pets: Purina, Friskies, Dog Chow. For the body healthy and the face beautiful: ColgatePalmolive, Novaris, Jenny Craig, L’Oreal’s many brands, The Body Shop. With clout like that, Nestlé defines the gulf between market-makers and markettakers. Nestlé’s homeland, Switzerland, is an anomaly, for sure. There’s something to be said for a neutral country as the clearing house for back-channel diplomacy, wartime refugees, spies, and art contraband and safekeeping. Shrewdly, the Swiss took 57 years to join the United Nations (2002) and never seem to help anyone but themselves. The government officially described its peacekeeping contribution:

“In early 2012 the number of Swiss citizens deployed abroad totalled 265. However, the Swiss government plans to increase the number of Swiss soldiers available for peacekeeping missions to 500 by 2014.” Wow. What a helping hand. (Or, to be fair, a model for all countries?) Its banks are dragged kicking and screaming into lifting secrecy on US$2.2 trillion stored by international tax evaders — isn’t that laundering the proceeds of crime, hurting the honest in the democracies and the world’s poor? Arguably there’s a better reason for invading Switzerland than Afghanistan, Iraq and other countries where it’s getting late in the year for the “Arab spring.” ••• Further solving the world’s problems, concerning the allegation of the use of nerve gas by the Syrian government and the reaction: I don’t trust Russia. I don’t trust the West. I don’t trust media coverage. I don’t trust the Syrian government, knowing little

about it except as reported by (especially American) media. I don’t trust the Syrian rebels, knowing little about them except as reported by (especially American) media. I trust Voltaire: “In the case of news, we should always wait for the sacrament of confirmation.”

••• I’d claim that Horseshoe Bay’s Troller Pub serves Vancouver’s finest salmon burger, except that now I rarely try others. It’s that good. Troller has moved one block into the former Japanese restaurant and rebranded itself as the Troller Ale House. No doubt the burger will be just as succulent, but, oh my, the loss of the pub’s character. ••• Increasing the number of Commons seats is stupid. The Federal Electoral Boundaries Commission’s creation of the riding of Burnaby NorthSeymour is the triumph of idiocy over stupidity. rtlautens@gmail.com

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Friday, August 30, 2013 - North Shore News - A7

Dix looks like he’s alone with the NDP sharks WHEN then-premier Mike Harcourt’s government was engulfed in scandal and controversy in the mid-1990s, speculation began to build on whether he could hang on as leader. There was mounting tension within the NDP caucus over his leadership, but no one was speaking out publicly about that elephant in the room. At the time, an NDP cabinet minister told me: “There’s blood in the water, but so far no sharks.” Well, there is blood in the water once again when it comes to an NDP leader’s hold on the job, and there are indeed sharks in the party who smell that blood. Ironically, Harcourt is now one of those sharks. Harcourt has become the latest in a growing crowd of NDP notables calling on

View from the Ledge Keith Baldrey

embattled NDP leader Adrian Dix to step down. He told the Globe and Mail’s Gary Mason it was time for him to go, and his public criticism puts even more pressure on Dix to throw in the towel. Former NDP cabinet ministers Ian Waddell and Bob Williams (both once close to Dix), ex-party president Sav Dhaliwal, and former MLAs David Schreck and Guy Gentner preceded

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Harcourt in calling on Dix to quit. Interestingly and perhaps more telling is that no NDP notable, past or present, has publicly called on Dix to stay on as leader. His own caucus has offered only tepid support for him, with members saying they are confident Dix will “reflect” on his situation and “come to a decision.” Even one of his closest associates, MLA John Horgan, would not say out loud that Dix should stay as leader in a lengthy scrum with reporters at the end of the recent legislature session. While Horgan didn’t exactly throw Dix under the bus, he parked it close by. Now Harcourt has moved that bus even nearer. Unless key people in the party start issuing public calls for Dix to continue, it won’t be long before he pulls the plug himself. Dix’s leadership is

bleeding, and sharks like Harcourt and others are starting to fill up the NDP pool. ••• The board of directors at B.C. Ferries has once again displayed a key flaw in the model the B.C. Liberals came up with to govern the company soon after the 2001 election. The board has approved large salary hikes and bonuses for senior executives, even though the provincial government is about to reduce service levels on many of its routes while at the same time increasing the taxpayer subsidy to the company. The strange private/public hybrid that is B.C. Ferries is trying to have it both ways: insisting on operating as a private entity, yet sticking its hand into the public trough, looking for more cash. The board has long argued it models the company on

private sector companies, and not Crown corporations. Yet no other “private” company gets a subsidy of close to $200 million a year from the provincial government. Without that subsidy, the company would have to make massive service cuts or it would, on paper, suffer a huge monetary loss. So the board’s directors (who also created controversy a few years ago for paying themselves much higher fees than any other Crown’s board) have made a politically tone-deaf decision that many frustrated ferry users will undoubtedly unfavourably contrast with constantly rising fares and looming service cuts. The company’s private/ public model has made Transportation Minister Todd Stone look weak, as he’s expressed dissatisfaction with the bonuses yet appears powerless to do anything

about it (which is a bizarre situation for a cabinet minister to be in when you consider how much money his government gives to that company each year). If the B.C. Ferries board keeps making decisions that blow back politically on the provincial government, don’t be surprised if that government changes the model for the company yet again. The current model was created on Gordon Campbell’s watch. Premier Christy Clark has shown a willingness to revisit other Campbell legacies (raising both the minimum wage and corporate taxes, for example) and she may take another look at this one as well. Keith.Baldrey@globalnews.ca Keith Baldrey is chief political reporter for Global BC.

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A8 - North Shore News - Friday, August 30, 2013

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Friday, August 30, 2013 - North Shore News - A9

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Common sense needed in WV cell tower debate

Dear Editor: I write regarding the cell towers proposed for West Vancouver. I am a retired independent telecommunication engineer, with more than 60 years experience working with and around radio transmission equipment and associated antennas. I have never been employed by a cellular telephone service provider and have no financial interest in any such company. Recently, after attending an event at the Harmony Arts Festival in West Vancouver, I found a flyer on my windshield produced by the West Vancouver Cell Tower Action Group (CTAG). I commend them on publicly identifying themselves as a group. The flyer expresses concern about the supposed harmful effects of radio emissions from the proposed cellular antenna sites, and urges people to protest against those installations. Much has been published regarding studies of the possible harmful effects of radio emissions — many by persons having apparently little knowledge or understanding of the basic physics involved — most of which have concluded that “more study is needed.” My own conclusion, based on my years of experience and years of exposure, is that there is no harmful effect at the power levels permitted by Safety Code 6 — the Health Canada guideline for radio-frequency exposure, which Industry Canada uses in regulating and licensing all radio transmitter installations

in Canada. However, science will never completely resolve this issue; science can only establish degrees of certainty, or uncertainty, always searching for new and more revealing information. In the end, this can only be adjudicated through a political process. My concern is that the political process will work properly only if the politicians involved educate themselves properly, using reason and common sense, not letting themselves be unduly swayed be emotions and the loudness of the voices championing one position or the other. One final comment: If the protesters truly are concerned about the effects of radio emissions, they need to recognize that the radio field power density falls off as the square of the distance from the source — doubling the distance reduces the field power density to one-quarter. Therefore, a higher tower will result in less exposure than a short tower, for a given source of radio-frequency energy. You can’t have it both ways — if you want less exposure, accept higher towers; if you want shorter towers, accept more exposure. Bill Tracey North Vancouver

Editor’s note: The District of West Vancouver is hosting a town hall meeting to discuss the three cell tower applications currently before council on Wednesday, Oct. 2 at 7 p.m. at the Seniors’ Activity Centre, 695 21st. St.

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A10 - North Shore News - Friday, August 30, 2013

INQUIRING REPORTER WITH the race underway for a new International Olympic Committee president, many might be wondering if there will be changes in the way the organization is run. The 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi are fast approaching and Russia’s stance on homosexuality has some calling on the IOC to take a stand. But the organization has its own Olympic Charter, including a code of ethics that governs the way the Games are run. In the case of the human rights issues surrounding the Sochi games, is the IOC really adhering to it’s own charter and making its stance known? — Anne Watson

r us o f k Loo

Robert Wire North Vancouver “It would be nice if they could, but I think it’s impossible with the circumstances.”

Should the IOC remain politically neutral on human rights?

Chris Atkins Lions Bay “I think its possible but it’s a pretty tall order with what’s at stake.”

Maricris Negrana North Vancouver “They have to be neutral to a point but they also have to listen to the political leaders because they have to get approval of the country it’s held in.”

David Deresh Surrey “No, because they’re the ones that host it and they have to stand on some kind of ground.”

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WEST Vancouver Fire and Rescue came to the aid of a 21-year-old Gibsons man who found himself stuck amid the steep cliffs overlooking Horseshoe Bay as darkness fell Tuesday.

The man took a short hike while waiting for his ferry but got lost in a precarious spot on his way back, according to WVPD spokesman Const. Jeff Palmer. “Had he slipped and fallen, he could’ve been looking at some pretty serious injuries,” said Palmer. West Vancouver police were called shortly after 9 p.m., but found the terrain too steep to walk the disoriented ferry passenger to safety, necessitating a call to West Van Fire and Rescue. “Fortunately the firefighters and their rope rescue training was close at hand,” Palmer said. The Fire and Rescue crew completed a rope rescue just before midnight. The man missed his ferry. Police caution that even a short hike in unfamiliar territory can be dangerous, and advise hikers to pack proper equipment and make sure they can finish their trek before the sun goes down. — Jeremy Shepherd

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Friday, August 30, 2013 - North Shore News - A11

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A12 - North Shore News - Friday, August 30, 2013

BRIGHT LIGHTS

Party in the Garden

by Cindy Goodman

Barbara McGregor and Jeanne Coleman

Lorraine Whelan and Alexandra Buesse

Cathy Kuzel, founder of The Connected Woman Association Members of The Connected Woman Association gathered at Park and Tilford gardens around the traditional Japanese tea house for the groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s third annual summer social event, Party in the Garden. The sold-out meet-and-mingle event featured appetizers, refreshments and prizes, including a strand of pearls and matching earrings, won by one lucky attendee. A portion of the proceeds from the event will go toward Goats for Kenya, which provides goats to women in Africa as a source of food and income. The Connected Woman Association is a networking organization for female entrepreneurs and business professionals.

Karen Hirschmiller, Machiko Shiroki and Donna Zwickel

Brandee Carter, Terry McAlduff, Colleen Eadie and Heather Walker

Cathy Burrell, Verena Inhoff and Mary Gray

Donna Rodman, Elizabeth Shewchuk, Linda Evans and Jennifer Neudecker

Please direct requests for event coverage to: emcphee@nsnews.com. For more Bright Lights photos go to: nsnews.com/galleries.

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Friday, August 30, 2013 - North Shore News - A13

PULSE

YOUR NORTH SHORE GUIDE to ARTS & CULTURE

North Shore International Film Series Throughout the fall, winter and spring the North Vancouver Community Arts Council brings 14 unique films to the Park and Tilford Cineplex. The recently announced fall lineup is as follows:

photo Katie Yu/Hallmark

ANDIE MacDowell stars as Judge Olivia Lockhart in the new Hallmark Channel drama Cedar Cove based on the novels of Debbie Macomber. The show is largely filmed in North Vancouver. Scan photo with Layar to watch a preview.

CEDAR COVE SHOT IN NORTH VANCOUVER

The Sapphires Sept. 18, 7 p.m. Twenty Feet From Stardom Oct. 2, 7 p.m. Amour Oct. 23, 7 p.m. Much Ado About Nothing Oct. 30, 7 p.m. Hannah Arendt Nov. 13, 7 p.m. Visit nvartscouncil.ca for complete film bios and trailers.

More online at nsnews.com/ entertainment twitter.com/ NSNPulse

Jeremy Shepherd jshepherd@nsnews.com

Safe harbour

THERE are shows where your favourite characters might be brutally murdered at a wedding for no particular reason — and then there’s Debbie Macomber’s Cedar Cove. It’s an enclave where longtime friends can watch snowflakes drift past a windowpane while trading love stories over piping hot cups of mulled cider. Inspired by the series of novels penned by Macomber, the tiny northwest hamlet is a place where basketfuls of puppies are mysteriously left on doorsteps. The show is largely filmed in North Vancouver, where producer Connie Dolphin shoulders the task of bringing Macomber’s world to life. “I was born in North Vancouver so I like returning,” Dolphin says. “I think it’s comfortable. It’s like a really nice cashmere sweater,” Dolphin says of the show’s appeal. “You’re learning about these people and there’s not darkness and death and violence. . . . It’s a really refreshing respite from everything else that’s available for viewers nowadays.” In keeping with the author’s Christian beliefs, Cedar Cove’s residents never veer too deeply into the sensual or sexual. “It’s much more emotionally based,” Dolphin says. Starring Andie MacDowell as Judge Olivia Lockhart, the show is something new for the Hallmark network, which tends to focus on talk shows, feel-good reality programs and re-runs. However, Debbie Macomber’s Cedar Cove blends well with the Hallmark esthetic, according to Dolphin “Things are gentler and more delicate and I think that Cedar Cove epitomizes a Hallmark show in the sense that it’s beautifully shot. Nice sweet stories. There are bumps along the way . . . but it’s a nice drive,” she says. A Vietnam war veteran commits suicide in one of Macomber’s books, but that storyline was dropped for the show.

CLOSED CIRCUIT PAGE 19

LIGHTS PAGE 22

“That was too heavy for Hallmark,” Macomber says, discussing the story change with the Seattle Times. “The books, because there’s so many of them, there’s way more storylines and she has more depth, but really I think it comes down to relationships,” Dolphin says. “It’s relationships from a female’s perspective whether it’s with a mother, a daughter, a lover, an ex-husband or a husband, it’s relationships of all sorts.” Dolphin is the show’s on-the-ground producer, meaning it’s her job to make sure Cedar Cove looks as good as it should look. While the director and actors are focused on the show currently filming, Dolphin meets with the editor to talk about last week’s show and casts actors for next week’s broadcast. “Every day is different. That’s why I like it,” she says. “You have two responsibilities: your one responsibility is logistically to make sure that all the components and all of the spokes to the wheel all turn at the same time. . . . Your other responsibility is on the creative side to make sure that the quality is maintained, that the production value makes it to the screen and that you’re true to the stories.” For Dolphin, the key to the new show’s longevity is in unearthing new characters and finding new depth in the old ones. “No different than The Beachcombers in its day,” she says. “Each person has their own story. And so even if you just focus on one person, it’s how their story interacts and intersects with other people.” Since first finding a readership for her brand of romantic restraint in 1988, Macomber has averaged approximately one novel or novella every two months for a quarter of a century. She has sold more than 100 million books and been translated into nearly two-dozen languages. The Cedar Cove series includes 15 titles dating back to 16 Lighthouse Road, which kicked off the collection in 2001. The show airs Sundays on the W Network in Canada.

DUBAI PAGE 32

DEEP COVE DAZE PAGE 36


A14 - North Shore News - Friday, August 30, 2013

CALENDAR

Music in the mountains

NEWS photo Cindy Goodman

MUSICIAN Don Strom invites the public to attend the Music in the Park grand finale, which takes place Monday, Sept. 2 from noon to 6 p.m. at Cleveland Park, North Vancouver. Presented by the North Vancouver Community Arts Council in partnership with Metro Vancouver, the free event features live jazz, folk, blues, rock, gypsy and Celtic swing music. There will also be art displays, and a plein-air demonstration.

Train with

GALLERIES Artemis Gallery: 104C-4390 Gallant Ave., North Vancouver. Hours: Tuesday-Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. Info: 778-233-9805 or artemisgallery. ca. High Colour: A series of acrylic paintings by Catherine Fraser will be on display from Sept. 6 to 22. Opening reception: Friday, Sept. 6, 79 p.m. Catherine Fraser will be present at the opening and most weekends. Caroun Art Gallery: 1403 Bewicke Ave., North Vancouver. Info: caroun.net, 778-372-0765 or artgallery@caroun.com. Gallery hours: Tuesday to Sunday, noon to 8 p.m. Call for Submissions: Caroun Art Gallery is currently accepting works for a group exhibition in October. Deadline: Friday, Aug. 30. Painting Exhibition: Kathryn Bozman’s work will be on display from Sept. 1 to 14. Opening reception: Saturday, Sept. 7, 4-9 p.m. Photography Competition: Professional and amateur photographers are invited to submit works for this annual competition. Deadline for submissions: Sept. 30. Delany’s Coffee House: The Village at Park Royal, West Vancouver. Exhibit: Framed oil on canvas and paper paintings by the late Waldermar Smolarek will be on display until Sept. 4. Info: smolarekart.com. District Foyer Gallery: 355 West Queens Rd., North Vancouver. Gallery hours: Monday-Friday, 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Info: 604-988-6844 or nvartscouncil.ca. The North Vancouver Community Arts Council will present an exhibition of acrylic paintings by Maxine Wolodko and model ships by Kenneth Mitchell until Sept. 3. The North Vancouver Community Arts Council will present an exhibition of acrylic paintings by Jeff Wilson and blown glass works by Miyuki Shinkai Sept. 4-Oct. 29. Opening reception: Thursday, Sept. 5, 6:30-8:30 p.m. District Library Gallery: 1277 Lynn Valley Rd., North Vancouver. Info: nvartscouncil.ca. See more page 15

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Friday, August 30, 2013 - North Shore News - A15

CALENDAR From page 14 The North Vancouver Community Arts Council will present an exhibition of semi abstracted landscapes by Tina Townsend until Sept. 17. Ferry Building Gallery: 1414 Argyle Ave., West Vancouver. Admission to all shows is free. Info: 604-925-7290 or ferrybuildinggallery. com. Gallery hours: Tuesday-Sunday, 11 a.m.5 p.m. Closed Mondays. Painters’ Landing: Local artists will work, exhibit and sell art outdoors at Ambleside Landing and Millenium Park Saturdays and Sundays from noon to 4 p.m. until Oct. 27. Life’s a Beach: A mixed media exhibition with artists Cheryl Painter, Mary Touhey, Joanne Waters and Leslie McGuffin will run until Sept. 8. Fire: An exhibition of West Vancouver Fire Museum paintings, artifacts and fire trucks Sept. 10-29. Vintage fire trucks will be on display Sept. 14 and 21, 2-5 p.m. Opening reception: Tuesday, Sept. 10, 6-8 p.m. Call for Artists: The Ferry Building Gallery is looking for unique crafts, fine artwork and distinctive gifts for its annual Christmas exhibition and sale. Jury drop-off Sunday, Sept. 22, 9-11 a.m. and pick-up 2-3 p.m. at the Music Box, 1564 Argyle Ave., West Vancouver. Call for Entry: All past and present North Shore, Sea to Sky Corridor, Bowen Island and Sunshine Coast artists are invited to submit works for an upcoming exhibit. Jury dropoff Sunday, Sept. 29, 9-11 a.m. and pick-up 3-4 p.m. at the West Vancouver Community Centre, 2121 Marine Dr. 128 West 27th St., North Vancouver. Art in the Atrium: A community exhibit of 27+ local artists will take place with a reception Sept. 7, 6-8:30 p.m. and Sept. 8, 9:30 a.m.1:30 p.m. Info: 604-929-4431. Lynnmour Art Studio and Gallery: 3011467 Crown St., North Vancouver. Info: nsartists.ca/garyeder or 604-929-4001. Gallery hours: Saturday and Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. or by appointment. Contemporary and abstract

paintings by Gordon Oliver, Robert Botlak and Gary W. Eder. North Vancouver Community History Centre: 3203 Institute Rd., North Vancouver. Hours: Tuesday-Saturday, noon-5 p.m. Info: 604-990-3700, ext. 8016 or nvma.ca. Imagining North Vancouver: Learn about the beginnings of North Vancouver and how it came to be with an exhibit about dreamer Edward Mahon. Runs until Sept. 30. Presentation House Gallery: 333 Chesterfield Ave., North Vancouver. Gallery hours: Wednesday-Sunday, noon-5 p.m. Info: 604986-1351 or presentationhousegall.com. Collected Shadows and Another Happy Day: Photographs from the Archive of Modern Conflict and found photographs collected by Jonah Samson will be on display from Sept. 12 to Oct. 27. Opening reception: Saturday, Sept. 14, 7 p.m. Ron Andrews Community Space: 931 Lytton St., North Vancouver. Info: 604-9878873 or 604-347-8922. Wabi Sabi and Impressions of Stillness: Eco-art sculptural objects by Heather Fowler and paintings of animals and people in their environment by Graham Coulthard will be on display until Sept. 8. Travelling: Photographs taken by Dennis Badgley while travelling in Turkey and watercolours and pottery by Trevor Holgate will be on display Sept. 8-Oct. 27. Seymour Art Gallery: 4360 Gallant Ave., North Vancouver. Gallery hours: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. daily. Info: 604-924-1378 or seymourartgallery. com. Transformation and Renewal: An exhibition of three of Luke Parnell’s carving works will run until Sept. 7. Art Party: A fundraising exhibition of original artwork by more than 50 local artists selling for $100, $200 or $300. Sept. 10-Oct. 5. Opening reception: Tuesday, Sept. 10, 7 p.m. Silk Purse Arts Centre: 1570 Argyle Ave., West Vancouver. Gallery hours: Tuesday to

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A16 - North Shore News - Friday, August 30, 2013


Friday, August 30, 2013 - North Shore News - A17

CALENDAR

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A18 - North Shore News - Friday, August 30, 2013

CALENDAR From page 15 Sunday, noon-4 p.m. Info: 604-925-7292 or silkpurse.ca. Beautiful Canada: Husband and wife artists Bob and Masako Araki will exhibit their artistic interpretations of our country, from coast to coast, until Sept. 1. Leaves and Tides: Ann Willsie’s impressionistic forests and landscapes and Jeff Wilson’s coastal compositions will be on display from Sept. 3 to 22. Opening reception: Tuesday, Sept. 3, 6-8 p.m. Silent Poetry Art Studio: 1079B Roosevelt Cres., North Vancouver. Gallery hours: Monday-Friday, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. or by appointment. Info: 604-312-1184, 604-781-4606 or silentpoetryartstudio. wordpress.com. Original Art, mentoring and classes with Sharka Leigh and Sandrine Pelissier. 195 Studios — Artists on Pemberton: 195 Pemberton Ave., North Vancouver. Info: 195studios.ca. A Touch of Paris: A Parisian themed

Open House in celebration of Culture Days Sept. 27, 6-9 and Sept. 28 and 29, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Fifteen artists will be on hand to give personalized tours, chats and answer questions. West Vancouver Memorial Library: 1950 Marine Dr., West Vancouver. Info: 604-925-7400 or westvanlibrary.ca. West Vancouver Art Instructors Exhibit: A show that demonstrates the wide variety of media, styles and approaches employed by District of West Vancouver art instructors in the creation of their own work will run until Oct. 2. West Vancouver Municipal Hall: 750 17th St., West Vancouver. Hours: Monday-Friday, 8:30 p.m. Info: 604925-7290. Art in the Hall: Mario Traina’s images created using digital infrared techniques will be on display until Sept. 11. West Vancouver Museum: 680 17th St., West Vancouver. Museum hours: TuesdaySaturday, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Info: 604-9257295 or westvancouvermuseum.ca.

West Coast Points East — Ron Thom and the Allied Arts: A multifaceted exhibition of Ron Thom’s architecture will run until Sept. 21. CONCERTS Capilano River Regional Park: Cleveland Dam, Capilano Road, North Vancouver. Music in the Park: Bring a picnic and enjoy an afternoon of music and art. Musical performances from 2 to 4 p.m. Schedule: Sept. 2, David Blair, noon; Rose Ranger, 1 p.m.; Justin O’Donahue Trio, 2 p.m.; Patrick Ernst Trio, 3 p.m.; Blackberry Wood, 4 p.m.; High Society Band, 5 p.m. Info: nvartscouncil.ca or 604-988-6844. Capilano University Performing Arts Theatre: 2055 Purcell Way, North Vancouver. Tickets: 604-990-7810 or capilanou.ca/nscucentre. Cap Jazz Series: The Vinicius Cantuaria See more page 33

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Tribute show CAYLA Brooke will be performing three consecutive shows at Kay Meek Theatre Sept. 11 to 13 at 7:30 p.m. each night. Her show, entitled How Can I Keep From Singing, pays tribute to the life and music of Eva Cassidy. The evening features more than 25 songs ranging from jazz and blues, to gospel, country and folk. Brooke will be joined on stage by Tom Pickett, adding some funk and soul to the mix. Tickets: $15 to $35 available at kaymeekcentre.com or by calling the box office at 604-981-6335.

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Friday, August 30, 2013 - North Shore News - A19

FILM

supplied photo

ERIC Bana (left) and Ciaran Hinds star in the conspiracy thriller Closed Circuit. Scan photo with Layar to watch the movie trailer.

Closed Circuit depicts life under surveillance Julie Crawford Contributing writer

IF you think we have Big Brother trouble on this side of the Atlantic, stay away from London, which by one estimate has almost half a million closed circuit TV cameras: one for every 14 people in the city. Before the opening credits are through, these cameras document a suicide bombing at a London market that claims the lives of 120 people. It’s an immensely relevant thriller; a smart one too, which makes it a breath of fresh air after all that summer silliness (how many times can we watch the White House blow up, anyway?).

Six months after the bombing defense attorney Martin Rose (Eric Bana) is assigned to the high-profile case after the previous counsel takes a leap from a very tall building. Also assigned to Martin’s team is Claudia SimmonsHowe (Rebecca Hall), but as special advocate she is privy to secret evidence that may threaten national security, to be argued behind locked doors. Under British law the two may not chat, meet or have tea and crumpets. Too bad they’ve already slept together. The attorney-general (Jim Broadbent, playing the baddie for a change) promises that the proceedings will be “open and transparent” but what he really wants is neat and tidy, a scapegoat on which to hang a quick conviction. They try and build a defense for their client, a Turkish national named Farroukh Erdogan (Denis Moschitto) who isn’t particularly cooperative. Martin delves deeper only to discover

Fresh, handmade scones available every Saturday! Try some with our delicious jam.

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The British Newsagent 3195 Edgemont Blvd, 604-770-2826

“smoldering intensity . . . Deeply soulful” “...a voice that sounds like it saw creation and followed the devil down to hell...” “...Byrnes is a veritable national treasure, and if you like the blues you should know about him...” "Cross-breeding of soul and country, which recalls Otis Redding or Percy Sledge...” “...a modern twist on the blues tradition...backed by a killer band, dominated by soulful vocals...”

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n Closed Circuit. Directed by John Crowley. Starring Eric Bana and Rebecca Hall. Rating: 7 (out of 10)


A20 - North Shore News - Friday, August 30, 2013

NORTH SHORE CREDIT UNION CENTRE FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

FILM

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PAT METHENY UNITY GROUP VOGUE THEATRE

March 3, 2014 @ 8 pm

Winner of 20 Grammy Awards. $57/$54

ARLO GUTHRIE

KAY MEEK CENTRE

April 26, 2014 @ 8 pm

Here Come the Kids tribute to Woody, folk icon and father. $55/$48/$25

REGINA CARTER

April 23, 2014 @ 8 pm

Southern Comfort from acclaimed American violinist. $35/$32

NITIN SAWHNEY TRIO KAY MEEK CENTRE

November 9, 2013 @ 8 pm

One of the most distinctive and versatile musical voices. $37/$32/$25

UPCOMING SHOWS

RON SEXSMITH KAY MEEK CENTRE

October 1, 2013 @ 8 pm Forever Endeavour tour. $55/$48/$25

VINICIUS CANTUÁRIA QUARTET

October 4, 2013 @ 8 pm

Brazilian jazz with sulty bossa novas and smooth sambas. $32/$29

THE BAD PLUS

October 21, 2013 @ 8 pm

Jazz trio known for unconventional covers. $30/$27

Save on all shows with our Flex Packs: ! See 6 shows or more for a 15% discount. ! See 10 shows or more for a 20% discount.

Flex Packs on sale Tuesday, September 3, 2013. Single tickets on sale Friday, September 5, 2013.

Box Office: 604.990.7810 Online: capilanou.ca/nscucentre

SHOWTIMES EMPIRE ESPLANADE 6 200 West Esplanade, North Vancouver 604-983-2762 Lee Daniels’ The Butler (PG) — Fri 3:30, 6:30, 9:25 p.m.; Sat-Mon 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9:25 p.m.; Tue-Thur 6:30, 9:25 p.m. Elysium (14A) — Fri 3:40, 6:40, 9:30 p.m.; Sat-Mon 12:40, 3:40, 6:40, 9:30 p.m.; Tue-Thur 6:40, 9:30 p.m. We’re The Millers (14A) — Fri 3:45, 6:45, 9:35 p.m.; Sat-Mon 12:45, 3:45, 6:45, 9:35 p.m.; Tue-Thur 6:45, 9:35 p.m. The Grandmaster (PG)

— Fri 3:35, 6:35, 9:20 p.m.; Sat-Mon 12:35, 3:35, 6:35, 9:20 p.m.; Tue-Thur 6:35, 9:20 p.m. The World’s End (14A) — Fri 3:50, 6:50, 9:40 p.m.; SatMon 12:50, 3:50, 6:50, 9:40 p.m.; Tue-Thur 6:50, 9:40 p.m. Planes (G) — Fri 3:55, 9:15 p.m.; Sat-Mon 1, 3:55, 9:15 p.m.; Tue-Wed 9:15 p.m. Riddick (18A) — Thur 8 p.m. Planes 3D (G) — Fri-Wed 1, 6:25 p.m. PARK & TILFORD 333 Brooksbank Ave., North Vancouver 604-985-3911 Despicable Me 2 3D (G) — Fri-Sat, Mon 2 p.m. Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters 3D (PG) — Fri-Mon 4:40, 7:20, 9:50 p.m.; TueThur 7:20, 9:50 p.m. The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones (PG) — FriMon 1:10, 4:10, 7:10, 10:10 p.m.; Tue-Thur 7:10, 10 p.m. The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones (PG) — Star & strollers screening Thur 1p.m. One Direction: This Is Us (G) — Fri-Mon 2:35 p.m.

One Direction: This Is Us 3D (G) — Fri-Mon 4:55, 7:15, 9:35 p.m.; Tue-Thur 7:15, 9:35 p.m. National Theatre Live: The Audience Encore — Sun 12:30 p.m. Getaway (PG) — Fri-Sat, Mon 3:05, 5:25, 7:45, 10:05 p.m.; Sun 2, 5:25, 7:45, 10:05 p.m.; Tue-Thur 7:40, 9:55 p.m. Getaway (PG) — Star & strollers screening Thur 1 p.m. Closed Circuit (PG) — FriMon 2:20, 5:05, 7:30, 9:55

p.m.; Tue-Thur 7:30, 9:45 p.m. Blue Jasmine (PG) — FriMon 1:30, 4:20, 6:45, 9:20 p.m.; Tue-Thur 7, 9:20 p.m. PACIFIC CINEMATHEQUE 1131 Howe St., 604-688-FILM www.cinematheque.bc.ca. VLAFF The 11th Vancouver Latin American Film Festival runs Aug. 31 to Sept. 8. Visit vlaff.org for schedule and information.

Gunplay absent in Crowley’s stylish thriller From page 19 that the real responsibility for the act of terrorism lies elsewhere, and a journalist (Julia Stiles) implies that the original lawyer may have been pushed from that ledge. The two deduce separately that they are being followed and watched, by an MI5 agent (Riz Ahmed, very good), by taxi drivers, and by those ubiquitous CCTV cameras. Right when they are ready to concede defeat and wave a white flag, the stakes are upped when it is discovered

that Farroukh’s teenage son (Hasancan Cifci) could blow the whole thing open. If you sat through some of the movies that boomed through theatres this summer, you may be unused to the fact that, other than the dramatic explosion at Closed Circuit’s beginning, there is a dearth of pyrotechnics and — gasp! — no gunplay at all. There are plenty of bobbies walking around in SWAT gear, however, and the bad guys have quieter methods for offing their victims. A love story may seem unlikely and contrived under the circumstances but

director John Crowley makes it work: no torrid bedroom scenes here, just a flashback to happier times intercut with the miserable present (the affair clearly destroyed Martin’s marriage). Despite spending much of the film working separately, Bana and Hall make a convincing pair. This isn’t a particularly twisty thriller, and you won’t have to work very hard to keep up — it is still officially summer, after all — but Closed Circuit is a stylish and admirably acted film that taps into jitters about our surveillance state.

FREE YOGA CLASSES Classes for all ages and abilities are taught with care and attention to individual needs. Wed Sept 4 • 7:30pm Thurs Sept 5 • 10:00am Thurs Sept 5 • 6:00pm Thurs Sept 5 • 7:30pm Men’s Yoga Fri Sept 6 • 5:30pm Sat Sept 7 • 1:00pm Come visit our charming studio and enjoy a free one hour yoga class! TWO FREE CLASSES for Physiotherapists, Chiropractors and MassageTherapists: Sat Sept 7 11:00-12:30pm Sun Sept 8 11:00-12:30pm

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supplied photo

THE Mexican film Ciclo will be screened Sept. 6 as part of the Vancouver Latin American Film Festival.

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Friday, August 30, 2013 - North Shore News - A21

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A22 - North Shore News - Friday, August 30, 2013

MUSIC

Electro-pop artist lights up the PNE stage n Lights performs at the PNE Sept. 1 at 8:30 p.m. Concert is free with fair gate admission. Reserved seats start at $15. Visit pne.ca for info.

Nicholas M. Pescod Contributing Writer

WHEN Valerie Anne Poxleitner was a little girl and felt scared at night, she often sought comfort from the sounds of her father’s guitar.

“I grew up in the Philippines for a number of years and if I was ever scared at night my dad would play his guitar downstairs and it made everything go away and feel OK.” It was her father’s musical teachings that led Poxleitner, better known as Lights, to create her own sound of music. On Sept. 1 Lights will be making her first ever performance at the Pacific National Exhibition in Vancouver. “I am excited about it, I’ve actually never been to the PNE before,” she says. “I know we’re going to have a full band set.” Following her performance at the PNE, the electro-pop musician will embark on a small university tour, which will see her perform at the University of Alberta, University of Waterloo, McMaster University, Mount Royal University, and Algonquin College.

In November, the 2009 Juno Award winner will be opening for American rock band Paramore at their Toronto and Montreal performances. “That’s going to be awesome, I love getting to share the stage with other female fronted acts, or all female acts,” Lights says. “It’s not as common as you think. We just got off a couple of dates with Tegan and Sara, which was another great feeling.” Lights was born in Timmins, Ont., but spent the majority of her childhood living in the Philippines and Jamaica, due to her parents work as missionaries. She also lived in Surrey and Langley, B.C., for a short time. The Ontario native’s musical beginnings started to light up around the time she was 11 years old. “Probably the first thing that got me into music was my dad teaching me how to play the guitar when I was 11. He had been playing for as long as I had been around,” Lights says. As a teenager Lights spent a large portion of her time writing songs in her bedroom and experimenting with musical production. When she was 18-years-old, she moved to Toronto and legally changed her name to Lights. “I think I recognized the power of music,” Lights says about her involvement with music. “There is some kind of magic that is there and I wanted to get involved with that and learn how to use that craft, and I am working on that every day.” Growing up Lights listened to music

by artists such as Björk, Supertramp and Genesis. She says that Björk has had a very big influence on her. “Just her efforts and her whole genre that she has created. She’s Björk and she’s very recognizable for who she is,” Lights says. “I think that is so important, you do things differently and there are rules. You see that with somebody like Björk and I’ve always thought that was cool.” During her youth, Lights was often times a victim of bullying. There were incidents where her car was keyed, or people wanted to fight her. She says her own personal goals and aspirations helped her get through the tough times. “I think my own strength and ambitions kept me through that. I knew that I was going to do great things and that is part of the vision of becoming who you are,” Light says. In 2007, Lights spent one week writing and recorded songs at Centennial College’s Centre for Creative Communication in Toronto for the fourth season of CTV’s Instant Star. Since then, she has released three studio albums and three EPs. Her albums The Listening and Siberia were both gold certified by the Canadian Recording Industry Association and both Juno nominated. Lights explains that she is constantly trying to improve and grow with each album that she releases. See Lights page 26

supplied photo

JUNO winner Lights is embarking on a university tour following this weekend’s performance at the Pacific National Exhibition.

INITIATIVE PETITION An initiative to amend the Police Act

KNOW THE RULES

If you plan to participate in the initiative campaign, it’s important that you know the rules. ■

The Recall and Initiative Act allows registered voters to propose new laws or changes to existing laws.

On Monday, September 9, 2013, petition sheets for the initiative to amend the Police Act will be issued to the proponent, Dana Larsen.

The proponent has 90 days to collect signatures from at least 10% of the registered voters in each of the province’s 85 electoral districts. The petition must be returned to the Chief Electoral Officer by Monday, December 9, 2013.

To sign the initiative petition, a person must be a registered voter on September 9, 2013 and may sign the petition only for the electoral district in which they are currently registered.

A person may sign the initiative petition only once.

Only registered canvassers may collect signatures.

Initiative advertising may be conducted only by the proponent or a registered advertising sponsor.

Elections BC is a non-partisan Office of the Legislature responsible for the administration of the Election Act, Recall and Initiative Act, and conduct of referenda under the Referendum Act.

elections.bc.ca / 1 - 8 0 0 - 6 6 1 - 8 6 8 3

Help fix the farm! WE NEED YOUR DONATIONS. 604.985.3276 • www.maplewoodfarm.bc.ca


Friday, August 30, 2013 - North Shore News - A23

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A24 - North Shore News - Friday, August 30, 2013

More 4G wireless coverage…

99% of Canadians have access to 4G wireless networks compared to only 1 in 4 Europeans.* Canada leads the mobile world in quality in terms of reliability, speed and coverage. In fact, Canadians can enjoy speeds that are on average 3.5X faster than those in major Western European countries.† Most Canadians enjoy access to 4G wireless service just about anywhere they live, work and play in the country. Now that’s something we can all croak about.

We want to hear from you, visit CanadaPlayFair.com


Friday, August 30, 2013 - North Shore News - A25

than our friends across the pond.

“The EU is teetering on the edge of network collapse.” “I’m on the side of the citizens, the taxpayers, the voters, who just want their phones and tablets to work. It’s frustrating when my phone stops working in Brussels because we only have 3G.” European Commission VP, Neelie Kroes

* The

European Commission issued a Press Release on July 25, 2013 commenting on the poor quality of wireless service across Europe noting that three-quarters have no access to 4G services. †Comparison to average of advertised mobile download speeds in France, Germany, Italy, United Kingdom, and Spain from the OECD Communications Outlook 2013. Of OECD countries, Canada was second only to Denmark in average advertised mobile download speeds.

TELUS, the TELUS logo and the future is friendly are trademarks of TELUS Corporation, used under licence. © 2013 TELUS. 13_00400


A26 - North Shore News - Friday, August 30, 2013

MUSIC

Lights expects to release new album next year From page 22

“It is a constant challenge and I think that’s how it always will be. It will always be harder and harder to one-up yourself and evolve and find inspiration in a different way than you did before,” Lights says. “As far as I want to take my career, I don’t want to do the same thing over again.” “I would have said Siberia was the hardest record before I started recording this new one. It’s definitely challenging making it to find out where you want to go and make it something you’re really proud of,” Lights adds. Lights is currently hard at work on a new album, which she hopes to have out sometime

next year. “It’s just writing at this stage,” she says. “It could go anywhere in terms of the way it could get produced. I’m still just searching at this point.” When it comes to writing music, the Juno nominee says she often writes on the road or at a friend’s place in Fort Erie, Ont. “One thing that I do like to do is get out of my house. It’s one thing to write and stay at home but it is easier when you’re not there.” According to the electro-pop singer, her biggest challenge throughout her career has been maintaining her integrity. “There are so many options along the way to sell out, and I don’t mean sell out in the way

of working for a big corporation or anything, I mean letting your sense of self slip away,” she says. “It is important not to falter because of that. Stick to who you are, take your vision. There always has to be a vision that you chase or else you will become like everyone else.” “Be who the artist that you’ve created yourself to be,” she adds. Earlier this year Lights travelled more than 4,000 kilometres from Toronto to Inuvik, NWT, to perform songs from her album Siberia at Our Lady of Victory Catholic Church, which is also known as the Igloo Church. “The people and the surroundings were out of this world. You really felt like you were on another planet,” Light says. “It just made me

realize that there is so much about Canada that I have never seen and don’t know. There are some fans up there, which blew my mind. I guess that’s the power of the Internet.” Although Lights has played across North America and received three Juno nominations, taking home one trophy, she says performing at the Canadian National Exhibition in Toronto was one moment in her career that stands out for her. “There are lots of different moments that are special,” she says. “One that I remember being really special was playing the CNE in Toronto. That’s what I hope for at the PNE. It is a great vibe. People are happy and it is summer. I’m looking forward to it.”

FESTIVAL 2013 AMBLESIDE PARK WEST VANCOUVER

NEWS photo Lisa King

Seaside songs

Sunday, September 8

ALT-COUNTRY singer Lindsay May performs at West Vancouver’s Ambleside Beach during the Harmony Arts Festival held earlier this month.

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Friday, August 30, 2013 - North Shore News - A27


A28 - North Shore News - Friday, August 30, 2013

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LOOK

Friday, August 30, 2013 - North Shore News - A29

YOUR NORTH SHORE GUIDE to FASHION & STYLE

Editors share their fall favourites Christine Lyon clyon@nsnews.com

TREND followers flocked to the new Loblaws City Market on Lonsdale Avenue mid-month to hear two Canadian style experts weigh in on what’s hot for fall 2013.

Erin McLaughlin, editor-inchief at Style at Home magazine, and Jennifer Reynolds, editorin-chief at Canadian Living magazine, flew in from Toronto to discuss fresh fads in food, fashion and home decor. According to the pair, here’s what’s in vogue for the upcoming season:

Follow us on Twitter @NSNLook.

Fashion

Expect to see the “preppy look” everywhere, says McLaughlin, who attended the trend event sporting her own interpretation of the classic student style. In black corduroy pants with a cuff, nude pumps, a patterned top layered beneath a jean jacket and topped with multiple necklaces, McLaughlin said she was trying to blend preppy and Parisian esthetics to create a more personalized ensemble. When it comes to colour, she said she is loving ink blue — a grey-blue shade and contemporary alternative to navy. “We’re looking at navy right now in a whole new way. Navy used to be that safe colour,” McLaughlin says, explaining it’s no longer a fashion faux pas to pair dark blue with black. Animal prints are also popular, she says, but expect to see the typically loud motifs take a more subtle turn this fall. Meanwhile, Reynolds showed up to the trend event in timeless black and white: a white collarless long-sleeved blouse, slim-fitting black pants and black and white pointytoed pumps. She added a burst of colour with a pair of pink chandelier earrings. “It’s interesting that pink keeps creeping up, even in the

NEWS photo Paul McGrath

STYLE at Home’s Erin McLaughlin and Canadian Living’s Jennifer Reynolds see what’s in store at Joe Fresh on Lonsdale. The Toronto-based magazine editors were in town recently to chat trends in food, fashion and decor for fall. Scan with the Layar app for a video clip of their presentation. fall,” Reynolds says, noting pink is now especially prevalent in the world of high fashion. Both editors agree the best way to save money and avoid falling out of fashion in a matter of months is to invest in highquality basics and experiment with trendy accessories. “It’s all about personal style and pulling together your favourite pieces and rocking them,” Reynolds says. “If you walk with the right swagger you can put together any outfit.”

Home decor Preppy pieces and ink blue aren’tjustpoppingupinclothing stores, they can also be found in the home, says McLaughlin, adding that harvest-inspired hues such as rusty red are also hot for fall. When it comes to interior

decor, expect to find more non-traditional materials on the market. “We’reseeingalotofmixtures of modern and contemporary lines in more interesting natural materials,” McLaughlin says. “We’re seeing a lot of bamboo now, which is great because it’s more environmentally friendly.” She encourages people to play around with decor trends — without breaking the bank. “Inexpensive things like toss cushions or even picture frames or a ceramic vase in different colours or patterns that you want to experiment with aren’t a huge financial commitment,” she says. McLaughlin reminds people: “The most important thing is to buy what you love, not what people tell you to buy.” As with fashion, Reynolds says it’s OK to splurge on

timeless essentials. “In your closet it’s that great black pair of pants and that really nice structured jacket and in your home it’s that killer couch, it’s those really good armchairs,” she says.

Food Look for protein-packed Greek yogurt and the South American super-grain quinoa in your local grocery store this fall. According to Reynolds, these healthy and versatile foods are still riding a wave of popularity. In the produce department, check out the baby vegetable selection. They’re nutrient-rich, fun to cook and kid-friendly, Reynolds says. “They always look so pretty on the plate as well,” she adds. Pulled pork is a popular and

economical family dinner. “It’s a cheap cut of meat,” Reynolds says, explaining the shredded pork can be prepared in the slow cooker and added to pizza, burgers or even tacos. McLaughlin, meanwhile, is noticing a health trend with grocery stores stocking more organic products and guilt-free snacks, such as kale chips. “You used to see these things only in tiny health food stores so it’s really great to see grocery stores bringing those things in because that’s what people want,” she says. When it comes to holding dinner parties, Reynolds and McLaughlin both agree that today, the host needn’t do all the work. “We’re definitely seeing a lot of ultra-chic potlucks,” Reynolds says, “which is a really nice, refreshing way to entertain.”

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A30 - North Shore News - Friday, August 30, 2013

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Friday, August 30, 2013 - North Shore News - A31

LOOK Street style

Special sale: Mark your calendars for a special sale with Vancouver brands Adhesif Clothing and Bronsino Designs on Saturday, Aug. 31. Enjoy live music, refreshments, wine by donation, discounts on current season stock from both designers, and the chance to win a prize. The party is from noon to 8 p.m. and is located at Adhesif Clothing Store at 2202 Main St. in Vancouver. Space is limited. RSVP to info@adhesifclothing.com. Saturday showcase: A wide array of local artisans offer up their unique spin on jewelry, art, and fashion at the Portobello West Fall Market. Explore vendors and more on Saturday, Sept. 7 and Sunday, Sept. 8, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. at Creekside Community Centre in Vancouver’s Olympic Village. The day will be filled with live music to tune into, decadent treats courtesy of the food trucks, and locally crafted wares. For more info on events and vendors, visit portobellowest.com. Art, Vintage Pieces & Jewelry will be on offer at a special sale on Saturday, Sept. 28 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Mount Seymour United Church, 1200 Parkgate Ave. (off Mount Seymour Parkway). Details about the volunteerrun thrift shop can be found at mtseymourunited.com. Thrifty chic: The Thrift Shop

See our

*in selected areas

NEWS photo Paul McGrath

INSURANCE broker Anna-Marie Chua chose a bright tropical print for the recent Best in the West event at Ambleside Pier. The 23-year-old paired a dress from Aritzia with a sweater from Urban Behavior for the evening of food, wine and live entertainment on the waterfront in West Vancouver.

at Mount Seymour United Church (1200 Parkgate Ave., just off Mount Seymour Parkway) is open Thursdays, 2-8 p.m. North Shore Needle Arts Guild meets the second Thursday of the month and offers instruction in embroidery and beading at St. Martin’s Anglican Church

hall in North Vancouver. Info: 604-922-4032. — Compiled by Layne Christensen Fashion File is a weekly column. Priority is given to North Shore events and organizations. If your business or charity is planning an event, send your information as early as possible to lchristensen@nsnews.com.

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A32 - North Shore News - Friday, August 30, 2013

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MUSIC

Dubai set to debut first full-length CD n Dubai Fill the Sky CD release, Sept. 1, 8 p.m. at The Media Club, 695 Cambie St., Vancouver. Cover: $10.

Sam Smith Contributing writer

DUBAI: a veritable promised land where the rich play on manmade ski hills, tan on a palm tree-shaped island and rest at night in underwater hotel rooms. Dubai: four-person Vancouver-based alternativeindie-progressive rock band releasing their first full-length album Sept. 1. One of these things is not like the other and the irony is not lost on them. “There’s nothing really connecting us at all,” says Marina Bennett, co-singer/ songwriter for Dubai, and also a born and raised North Vancouverite. “They’re the richest city in the world, supplied photo and we’re this band from Vancouver, these struggling THE members of Dubai met while studying jazz at musicians . . . . for some Capilano University. The progressive rock band is set reason it eventually stuck.” to officially release its first full-length album Fill the The juxtaposition of Sky this weekend at the Media Club in Vancouver. Dubai the city and Dubai In one song on the new album they the band might slap a grin on your face, and maybe that’s where the hidden genius lies: the playfully quip about Facebook and the “luxury” of always being connected. lyrics — a focal point of this band comprised “Everywhere you go you’ll never be of Marina Bennett; co-singer/songwriter/ alone,” Bennett recites. A lyric in any other lead guitar Eric Severinson; drummer Mark song which might inspire hope or comfort, Kerrey; and bass player/back-up vocalist Nic but from them it’s all tongue-in-cheek. Bermudez. But that’s not to say this band, which “We don’t shy away from our lyrics being was only formed a year and a half ago after something we want people to hear,” Bennett they officially met in Capilano University’s told the North Shore News. “They’re sort of playful lyrics, and there’s a couple of fun lyrics.” See Fill page 34

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This offer is available at select stores with pharmacies in British Columbia only. Offer expires October 18, 2013. *4x Superbucks™ rewards are calculated as 4% of the portion of the prescription that is not paid for or reimbursed by the province of B.C. under PharmaCare, with a maximum value of $99.99 per coupon. Superbucks™ rewards are provided by host supermarket to redeem for merchandise in-store excluding prescriptions, tobacco, alcohol, lottery tickets and any other products which are provincially regulated. Redemption is also excluded at all third party operations (post office, drycleaners, gas bar, etc.). Superbucks™ rewards are issued only for individual customer in-store prescription purchases (excludes healthcare and other facilities). ®/TM Trademarks of Loblaws Inc. All rights reserved. © 2013.

Help fix the farm!

WE NEED YOUR DONATIONS.

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Friday, August 30, 2013 - North Shore News - A33

CALENDAR From page 18 Quartet will perform Brazilian jazz Friday, Oct. 4 at 8 p.m. Tickets: $32/$29. Deep Cove Shaw Theatre: 4360 Gallant Ave., North Vancouver. Intimate Evening: Canadian music legend Roy Forbes will perform a fundraising concert for First Impressions Theatre Sept. 13 and 14 at 8 p.m. Admission: $30. Tickets: firstimpressionstheatre.com. Info: 604-929-9456 Ferry Building Gallery: 1414 Argyle Ave., West Vancouver. Outdoor Chamber Concert: Percussion professionals Daniel Tones and Ed Reifel will perform alongside participants from the 2013 Contemporary Percussion Intensive Saturday, Aug. 31 at 4 p.m. Free. Kay Meek Centre: 1700 Mathers Ave., West Vancouver. Tickets: kaymeekcentre.com or 604-981-6335. How Can I Keep From Singing: Cayla Brooke will perform a tribute to the life and music of Eva Cassidy Sept. 11-13 at 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $35/$25/$15. A portion of the proceeds will be donated to OVCARE which does research in finding a cure for ovarian cancer. Jim Byrnes will be joined by Babe Gurr for a concert Saturday, Sept. 14 at 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $32. Early Music Vancouver: Tanya Tomkins will perform three Bach suites on the baroque cello Sunday, Sept. 22 at 3 p.m. There will be a pre-concert chat with host Matthew White at 2:15 p.m. Tickets: $36/$18. Cap Global Roots Series — Forever Endeavour Tour: Ron Sexsmith will perform songs from his new album Tuesday, Oct. 1 at 8 p.m. Jenn Grant will open for Sexsmith with a batch of new material. Tickets: $55/$48/$25. Lonsdale Quay: 123 Carrie Cates Court, North Vancouver. Info: lonsdalequay.com. Concert Series Sundays: A

free summer concert series Sundays from 1 to 3 p.m. Schedule: Sept. 1, Studio Cloud 30 Showcase. Shipbuilders’ Square: 15 Wallace Mews, North Vancouver. Dino DiNicolo will perform a solo show Friday, Oct. 4, from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Info: northshoregreenmarket.com. Silk Purse Arts Centre: 1570

Argyle Ave., West Vancouver. Info and reservations: 604925-7292 or silkpurse.ca. Art Songs of Matthew Emery: Soprano Madeline Lucy Smith will perform the songs of Canadian composer Matthew Emery Thursday, Sept. 5 at 10:30 a.m. Tickets: $15/$12. Pianist Maggie Zhang will perform a diverse repertoire Thursday, Sept. 12 at 10:30

a.m. Tickets: $15/$12. Zaidenberg and West Vancouver Community Centre: 2121 Marine Dr., West Vancouver. Chamber Concert: Percussion professionals Daniel Tones and Ed Reifel will perform alongside participants from the 2013 Contemporary Percussion Intensive Friday, Aug. 30 at 7:30 p.m. There

will be a pre-concert talk and introduction at 7 p.m. Free. THEATRE Anne MacDonald Studio: 333 Chesterfield Ave., North Vancouver. Grand Theft Impro: An improv sketch show that uses audiences suggestions to create 90 minutes of stories, scenes, songs and comedic chaos, the

last Saturday of every month at 10:30 p.m. Tickets: $12. Firehall Arts Centre: 280 East Cordova St., Vancouver. Fringe Festival — Changing Minds: A musical comedy about a mind swap with a male/female switch Sept. 7, 7:45 p.m.; Sept. 8, 2 p.m.; Sept. 9, 9 p.m.; Sept. 10, 6:45 See more page 35

vancouver.ca

After

Before

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Construction at the south end of the Burrard Bridge – Expect delays Effective August 26 The Burrard and Cornwall intersection at the south end of the Burrard Bridge will be under construction beginning August 26. This project will improve traffic safety and accessibility around the Burrard Bridge. The improvements to the intersection will: , 13)"*3:( 45! 3&4!97!%43$& '( ).03&8 34 !.73!9 4$ &.+38.4! .&# safer for motorists, cyclists and pedestrians to use. , /)"9$+! 7.:!4( .&# #!%9!.7! 49.+!* 43)! :$9 "!#!7493.&7 .4 45! intersection by reducing the maximum number of pedestrian crossings from five down to two. , 6!%9!.7! 45! +$*2)! .&# 7"!!# $: +!53%*! 49.:-% %$)3&8 $:: the Burrard Bridge onto Cornwall Avenue.

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A34 - North Shore News - Friday, August 30, 2013

MUSIC

Fill the Sky captures feeling of live music

From page 32

bachelor of music in jazz studies degree program, is aiming for laughs or societalreflection. Their music also offers stories chalk-full with depth and meaning, such as their release entitled “Relapse.” “A shot glass and it’s half full, compliments of some other fool,” sings Severinson on the track, which can be found on YouTube. “With that old look it’s hopeless, I’ve never been able to resist. But I try to remember everything that happened last time. I try, but I forget about it all as she walks by.” Addiction to a venomous love? Dependency on alcohol? Joking about Facebook? No topic is taboo to Dubai. “We run in circles, we all relapse,” sings

Bennett. “Twelve steps forward and 12 steps back.” Listen to them a little while and it’s hard to put the band under just one label. Even their self-described “progressive rock” sound is followed by a brief pause and a “kind of” from Bennett and Severinson. “We love indie music, love modern rock music, there’s a sort of common bond there,” Severinson said. “The music is mostly rockbased, but there’s lots of jazz and progressive rock there as well.” The two laugh as they remember a choir they used for a few songs on their upcoming album, Fill the Sky, as well. While some might think too many chefs spoil the broth, Dubai’s poignant lyricism, harmonious vocals and wide range of sound seem to work like pieces from different

puzzles somehow fitting together and producing something entirely original. Kerrey and Bennett were born and raised in Deep Cove, attending both Cove Cliff and Seycove schools growing up before attending Capilano University. Both Severinson and Bennett point to the Capilano music program as the reason they all work so well together and why they’re not afraid to try new things. “We find it really nice because we have come from the same place and articulate our ideas in an efficient way,” Bennett said. And work they did. Their album Fill the Sky was recorded in two weeks inside Hive Creative Labs in Burnaby with the band working 12-hour days. “We were recording all at the same time,” Severinson said. “We wanted to capture that

live element instead of just playing the drums all by themselves, then the guitars, and then the lyrics. We tracked together to get that energy.” In celebration of all their hard work the band is putting on a CD-release party at The Media Club on Cambie Street in Vancouver on Sept. 1. “All our hearts and minds have been poured into this one, and we couldn’t be more excited for you to get this disc in your hands!” writes Dubai on their Facebook page. The doors will be open at 8 p.m. and the show starts at 9 p.m. on Sept. 1. Cover is $10 and albums will be available for purchase. To listen to more music or for more information visit dubaitheband.bandcamp.com, or check them on facebook.com/dubaitheband or youtube.com/dubaitheband.

NORTH SHORE’S

restaurant guide $ Bargain Fare ($5-8) $ $ Inexpensive ($9-12) $ $ $ Moderate ($13-15) $ $ $ $ Fine Dining ($15-25) LIVE MUSIC

AUSTRIAN Jagerhof Restaurant

BRITISH $$$

Best Little Schnitzel House in Town

71 Lonsdale Ave, N. Van. 604-980-4316

BISTRO Cindy’s Café

$$$

Local favourite Cindy’s Café is now open for diner every Friday and Saturday night.Come for the good food,stay for the friendly atmosphere and enjoy our free BYOWine policy. Corkage is for strangers! Cindy’s is for neighbours.Visit www.cindyscafe.ca for details and reserve with Patrick at 604-925-2880.

1850 Marine Dr., W. Van. 604-925-2880

Larson Station West Coast Bistro & Banquets $$$ For 2 or 200! Enjoy sweeping views through the 6th fairway,to the ocean at Gleneagles Clubhouse.Larson Station West Coast Bistro,a fabulous little restaurant and banquet facility, tucked away on the Gleneagles Golf Course.LIVE MUSIC Fridays & Saturdays BRUNCH on weekends. Family friendly & casual,with flavours of the West Coast.

6190 Marine Drive, West Vancouver 778-279-8874

Truffle House & Café

$$

The Truffle House & Café is truly a warm place to eat European cuisine with friendly service and reasonable price. Philippe & Fabienne Chaber have created a cozy and comfortable atmosphere and offer a delicious combination of French, Italian and West Coast specialties that your taste buds will love.Already well known for their brunch & lunch, the Truffle House is pleased to offer you DINNER! Join us Friday & Saturday evenings from 5-10 pm for delicious seasonal menus.

2452 Marine Drive, W. Van. 604-922-4222 www.trufflehousecafe.com

OPEN MIC/KARAOKE

The Salmon House

The Cheshire Cheese Restaurant & Bar

$$

Excellent seafood and British dishes on the Waterfront. Friday and Saturday, Prime Rib Dinner. Sunday, Turkey Dinner.Weekends and Holidays, our acclaimed Eggs Benny. Open for lunch or dinner, 7 days a week.

2nd Floor Lonsdale Quay Market, N. Van. 604-987-3322

CHINESE Neighbourhood Noodles House

$

North Shore’s best variety & quality Chinese food.Serving Lunch & Dinner 7 days a week.Eat in,10% off takeout. Free delivery min.$20.00 order within 3 kms.

1352 Lonsdale Ave., N. Van. 604-988-9885

Chef Hung Taiwanese Noodle

$$

Critically acclaimed worldwide for its delectable beef noodle, Chef Hung has won numerous Championships in Taiwan and now crowned the Best Noodle House in Vancouver! Come see what all the excitement is about.

1560 Marine Dr., W. Van. 778-279-8822 UBC Wesbrook Village: 102 - 3313 Shrum Lane, Vancouver 604-228-8765 Aberdeen Centre: 2800 - 4151 Hazelbridge Way, Richmond • 604-295-9357 www.chefhungnoodle.com

FINE DINING The Observatory

DJ

$$$$

An epicurean experience 3700’ above the twinkling lights of Vancouver.

Grouse Mtn, 6400 Nancy Greene Way, N. Van. 604-998-4403

BIG SCREEN SPORTS $$$$

Serving spectacular views and fine, indigenous west coast cuisine for over 30 years. Lunch, dinner and Sunday brunch. Live entertainment in Coho Lounge on weekend evenings.

2229 Folkestone Way, W. Van. Reservations: www.salmonhouse.com or call 604-926-3212

FRENCH Chez Michel

$$$

Classic French cuisine served in an elegant and graceful setting. For over 34 years, Chez Michel has treated guests to only the best. Traditional seafood and meat entrees, dressed in rich, tempting sauces, are specially featured alongside a superb selection of wines and a decadent dessert list. Superior service with a waterfront view helps complete your lunch or dinner experience.

1373 Marine Dr. (2nd flr) W. Van. 604-926-4913

GREEK Kypriaki Taverna

$$

For the BEST quality and the BEST prices, come visit or call for delivery today. Open everyday @ Noon for lunch.Voted one of the top 5 Greek restaurants in the Lower Mainland.With our outstanding food, reasonable prices, friendly service and candle-lit charm you will see why so many people call it their favourite restaurant. Call for delivery/ take out tonight or come in for a relaxing Mediterranean experience.

1356 Marine Dr, N. Van. 604-985-7955

WIFI

INDIAN Handi Cuisine of India

$$

Reader’s Choice 2006 Winner offering Authentic Indian Cuisine. Open for lunch and dinner,7 days a week.Weekend buffet,ocean view, free delivery.

1340 Marine Dr., W. Van. 604-925-5262 www.handi-restaurant.com Where one spicy sauce does not fit all.Readers’Choice award winning restaurant for 5 years! Open for Lunch & Dinner.Lunch Buffet $10.95.

116 East 15th St, N. Van. 604-986-7555 www.palkirestaurant.com

PUB $$

Voted the North Shore’s favourite pub 16 years running by you. The Bear is your local, friendly, comfortable pub that is 100% smoke free.We have ample free parking, Take-Out menu, Daily drink and food specials, full sports coverage, and a large, heated veranda. Come in for a bite and a drink.

$$

A Lower Lonsdale legend for 23 years. Home to the best in live music Wed, Fri, Sat & Sun nights. Great food selection that surpasses the norm. The best weekend breakfasts ‘til 2pm. Great selection of import draft. All Canucks PPV games on the big screens.

175 East 1st St., N. Van. 604-988-5585

$$

Offers an excellent menu, the best craft brewed ales & lagers in Vancouver, live music, satellite sports, pool table, dart boards & heated patio with a spectacular city view.

86 Semisch Ave., N. Van. 604-984-3087

$$

Damn good pub! We try to take everything that’s good about a pub, and leave out what’s not, then add lots more good… Start with a comfortable room around a giant fireplace, add 20 ice cold brews on tap, really damn good food, some awesome events, and pretty much the most personable group of folks you’ll ever meet… and welcome to the Village Tap House! Come in for dinner, to catch the game on our dozens of high-def flat screens, or check the events page to see what’s happening this week.

1C - 900 Main Street, Village at Park Royal, West Vancouver 604-922-8882 info@villagetaphouse.com

SEAFOOD C-Lovers Fish & Chips

$$

The best fish & chips on the North Shore!

1177 Lynn Valley Road, N. Van www.blackbearpub.com 604.990.8880

The Rusty Gull

Sailor Hagar’s Neighbourhood Pub

Village Tap House

Palki Best Indian Cuisine $ $

The Black Bear Neighbhourhood Pub

WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE

Marine Dr. @ Pemberton, N. Van. 604-980-9993 & OUR NEW LOCATION: 6640 Royal Ave., Horseshoe Bay, W. Van. 604-913-0994

Montgomery’s Fish & Chips$

The fastest growing Fish & Chips on the North Shore.

International Food Court, Lonsdale Quay Market 604-929-8416

THAI Thai PudPong Restaurant

$$

West Vancouver’s original Thai Restaurant. Serving authentic Thai cuisine. Open Monday-Friday for lunch. 7 days a week for dinner.

1474 Marine Dr., W. Van. 604-921-1069 www.thaipudpong.com

WEST COAST The Lobby Restaurant at the Pinnacle Hotel

$$$

Inspired by BC’s natural abundance of fabulous seafood and the freshest of ingredients, dishes are prepared to reflect west coast cuisine. Open 7-days a week for breakfast, lunch, dinner and late night lounge.We are located on the corner of Lonsdale & Esplanade. The Lobby Bar: We now have Live music every Friday night from 8-11pm!

138 Victory Ship Way, N. Van. 604-973-8000 www.pinnaclepierhotel.com

WATERFRONT DINING The MarinaSide Grill

$$

Enjoy your Waterfront dining experience with our extensive menu. From eggs benny to juicy burgers during our popular brunches to our famous prime rib,hot scallop salad, clam chowder,king crab,steaks, seafood style cordon bleu.Rooms available for private parties and free parking.Breakfast/Lunch/Dinner seven days a week.View full menu www.marinasidegrill.com.

1653 Columbia St, N. Van. (2 blks South of Main & Mtn Hwy under the bridge) 604-988-0038 www.marinagrill.com


Friday, August 30, 2013 - North Shore News - A35

CALENDAR From page 33 p.m.; Sept. 11, 7:15 p.m.; Sept. 12, 5 p.m.; Sept. 14, 2 p.m. and Sept. 15, 3:45 p.m.|Admission: $12/$10 plus Fringe membership. Tickets: vancouverfringe.com or 604-637-6380. Kay Meek Centre: 1700 Mathers Ave., West Vancouver. Tickets: kaymeekcentre.com or 604-981-6335. Frankie and Johnny in the Claire De Lune: A romantic comedy about the meeting of two lonely middle-aged restaurant workers Oct. 16-19 and 23-25 at 8 p.m. Tickets: $50/$42/$25. The Revue Stage: Granville Island, Vancouver. Fringe Festival — Glowing: A Reproduction Production: Mary-Jo Dionne in a one woman comedy chronicling her journey to get pregnant and then finding out she had melanoma near the end of her pregnancy Sept. 6, 10:30 p.m.; Sept. 7, 3:55 p.m.; Sept. 8, 2:45 p.m.; Sept. 9, 6:45 p.m.; Sept. 12, 8:25 p.m. and Sept. 14, 9 p.m. Admission: $15. Tickets: vancouverfringe. com. Audience members are invited to bring a donation of baby food to be donated to local food banks. Theatre at Hendry Hall: 815 East 11th St., North Vancouver. Reservations: 604-983-2633 or northvanplayers.ca. The Kitchen Witches: A comedy where reality TV meets cooking show Sept. 6, 7, 11-14, 18-21 (preview Sept. 5) at 8 p.m. Tickets: $18/$16. DANCE CityScape Community Art Space: 335 Lonsdale Ave., North Vancouver. Info and tickets: 604-988-6844 or nvartscouncil.ca/ events/trolley-dances. Trolley Dances: A trolley ride that will transport guests to four secret outdoor locations where dancers will perform cultural dances chosen relative to the location Sunday, Sept. 29 from noon to 5 p.m. Tickets: $20/$15 or $60 for a family of four. CLUBS AND PUBS Finch and Barley: 250 East First St., North Vancouver. Info: finchandbarley.com. Dino DiNicolo will perform a solo show Thursday, Oct. 3, from 8:45 p.m. to midnight. The Raven Pub: 1052 Deep Cove Rd., North Vancouver. Info: theravenpub.com. Adam Woodall performs acoustic music every Thursday, 7:30-11:30 p.m.

Red Lion Bar & Grill: 2427 Marine Drive, West Vancouver. Info: 604-926-8838. Jazz Pianist Randy Doherty will perform every Thursday, Friday and Saturday from 8 to 11 p.m. Rusty Gull: 175 East First St., North Vancouver. Live music every Wednesday, Friday and Saturday; Mostly Marley performs every Sunday, 7 p.m. Waves Coffee House: 3050 Mountain Hwy., North Vancouver. The Celtic Medley Song and String Player’s Showcase comes to Waves Saturday, Sept. 14, 7: 30-9:30 p.m. Free. Anyone interested in performing can phone Doug Medley at 604985-5646. OTHER EVENTS North Vancouver City Library: 120 West 14th St., North Vancouver. Info: 604-9983450 or nvcl.ca. The Many Methods of Storytelling: To celebrate Culture Days the library will host free storytelling events on Sept. 27. Local Nonagenarians Tell Their Tales will take place 2-4 p.m. and no registration is needed. Adventures in Immigration will take place 7-8:30 p.m. and registration is required at northshorestoriesseptember2013.eventbrite.com. Info: culturedays. ca. Parkgate Library: 3675 Banff Court, North Vancouver. Songs and Stories: Composer Michael Conway Baker will share show biz, film and concert music stories past and present Tuesday, Sept. 3, 12:30-1:30 p.m. Registration required: 604929-3727. West Vancouver Memorial Library: 1950 Marine Dr., West Vancouver. Info: 604-9257407 or westvanlibrary.ca. Jazz Talks — The Great Piano Players: Neil Ritchie will explore the music of great jazz pianists Tuesdays, Sept. 17, 24, Oct. 1 and 8, 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. SFU Philosopher’s Café: Everyone is welcome to join a discussion with moderator Randall Mackinnon Friday, Sept. 20 from 10:30 a.m. to noon. Topic: Is the relentless promotion of positive thinking a plague? Info: 778-782-8000 or philosopherscafe.net.

Help fix the farm!

— compiled by Debbie Caldwell Email information for your North Shore event to listings@nsnews.com.

WE NEED YOUR DONATIONS.

604.985.3276 • www.maplewoodfarm.bc.ca

MAKING A STATEMENT PRESENTED BY


A36 - North Shore News - Friday, August 30, 2013

In a daze

NEWS photos Cindy Goodman

THE sun was shining for the annual Deep Cove Daze event held Sunday, Aug. 25 at Panorama Park. Clockwise from top left: A crowd gathers in front of the main stage to hear live music; Sylas Koop, 6, tucks into a shaved ice treat; Dorreh Assadi and Laela Ateah, both 11, ride the spinning swings; Saege Bramely, 9, and Chloe Arnold, 10, try jousting; and Mackenzie Eldon retrieves a disabled vessel during the build-your-own-boat race. Scan page with Layar for more photos.

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A38 - North Shore News - Friday, August 30, 2013


Friday, August 30, 2013 - North Shore News - A39


A40 - North Shore News - Friday, August 30, 2013


Friday, August 30, 2013 - North Shore News - A41


A42 - North Shore News - Friday, August 30, 2013


Friday, August 30, 2013 - North Shore News - A43

REV

YOUR NORTH SHORE GUIDE to THE ROAD

Cars that drive on their own merging into traffic Brendan McAleer Contributing Writer

photo Brendan McAleer

THE comically overpowered Jeep Grand Cherokee SRT doesn’t make much sense in this age of hybrids and hatchbacks but there’s no denying the joy it brings when you stomp on the throttle.

thing is underpinned by the Mercedes-Benz ML chassis, the ride is very smooth. The exterior of the SRT version of the Grand Cherokee gets a wee bit more wild. Slitted LED headlights give the truck a menacing glower, and the massive, chromed lower intakes look like the flared nostrils of an angry rhinoceros. The hood ripples with horsepower, and is deeply slashed with cooling vents. The fenders bulge to contain massively wide, dark-chromed 20-inch alloy wheels. Out back a pair of vuvuzela-sized exhaust pipes stand ready to trumpet that Hemi V-8 bellow to the world. Environment

Sadly, roughly 2.5 billion other drivers seemed to have had the same idea, and as I approached the city sometimes known as Stumptown, traffic coagulated into the sluggish crawl that’s familiar to any resident of the Lower Mainland. No problem — I set the cruise control, pushed my seat back, cracked open a bottle of water and stared out the side window at the riverside scenery. Now I know what you’re thinking: isn’t this part of some old urban myth about the guy in the Winnebago sticking the cruise on and then going in the back to make a sandwich? In that hoary old tale, the ‘bago leaves the road at speed, and then the lawyers get involved. However, in this case, the Merc’ I’m auto-piloting comes equipped with a selfsteering mechanism that’s fully functional below 28 kilometres per hour. It’s also equipped with an excellent radar-guided cruise-control system that actually monitors two cars ahead to assist with smooth acceleration and braking inputs, and it can stop the car entirely if need be.

See Chrysler’s page 44

See Human page 47

2014 Jeep Grand Cherokee SRT

Jeep flexes its muscles

www.taylor motive.com

Scan this page with the Layar app to see a video of the Jeep Grand Cherokee SRT taking on some high-powered challengers on the drag strip, as well as a demonstration of one of Google’s selfdriving cars.

WITH the 40th anniversary of American Graffiti just past, many people have been telling me, “youngsters these days with their mePads and facetwitters — they’ll never know what it was like to grow up when hot rods were around.”

Grinding Gears

Oh, horsefeathers. Just take a look at this thing. On paper, it’s just the sort of machine that makes me despair about the state of the modern automotive industry. It’s a wildly over-powered SUV that shrugs off the laws of physics by the application of plenty of horsepower, big, sticky rubber, and dinner-

plate-sized brakes. Worse, this monstrosity’s badged as a Jeep — you know, the brand that’s made their name as purveyors of rugged, dirt-clambering 4x4s — and you can’t really take it offroad. It’s almost ridiculously aggressive in appearance,

Brendan McAleer

and even though there are hardly any kilometres on my test vehicle, it appears to be halfway through chewing up its front tires. An entirely stupid behemoth then, some ridiculous ego-machine with no practical application and a vendetta against the environment? Maybe, or at least it would be if it wasn’t so much damn fun. Hulk smash! Design In many ways, the Jeep Grand Cherokee is essentially an American Range Rover. You get clean, reserved styling, a spacious, well-thought-out interior, it can tackle just the same roughness of terrain as its more agricultural cousin the Wrangler and, as the whole

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A44 - North Shore News - Friday, August 30, 2013

REV

Chrysler’s infotainment system one of the best From page 43

Inside the Death Star, things are only slightly more reserved. Yes, it’s a Chrysler product, so you might expect a lack of refinement, but the Grand Cherokee is actually surprisingly well stitched together. The dash layout is nicely ergonomic, featuring a large touch-screen display mounted above a set of functional knobs and buttons to handle climate control functions. There’s double-row stitched leather everywhere, and a strangely reserved amount of carbon fibre trim. The chunky steering wheel is far more sensible than you’d find in a Mustang GT,

photo Brendan McAleer

A pair of massive exhaust pipes add to the Cherokee SRT’s slightly menacing look and deliver the beautiful bellow that is produced by the Hemi V-8 engine.

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without a ton of plastic on it, and while the paddle shifters are located a little too high, all the other driver controls are quite intuitive. Mastering the console shifter, with its tendency to skip reverse on the way to park, can make three-point turns a little tricky, but you soon get the hang of it. Front seat comfort is great, and the suede centre sections of the seats do a great job of holding the driver in place without so much bolstering that it’s hard to get in and out of the truck. Chrysler’s UVO infotainment system is one of the best ones on the market (no, really), easy to pair to a smartphone, and capable of deciphering unpronounceable last names. The one niggle is that the satellite navigation locks out the touchpad when you start moving — an annoyance for the co-pilot. Rear seat space and trunk space are both very good. This is a full-size SUV, and while there are bigger, more cavernous options out there, the added performance of the SRT has no drawbacks in the passenger carrying line. That is, apart from your ride-alongs getting crushed by g-forces. Performance Powered by a gargantuan 6.4-litre V-8, the SRT Cherokee is a burly bruiser in the manner of 1960s-era Mopar lead-sleds. It simply growls on startup, the driver getting a little tingle of

anticipation every time you press that lipstick-red starter button. Being a fairly squaredoff design, it’s actually not that difficult to pilot the Grand Cherokee around at city speeds. It’s got decent sightlines and large side mirrors, and if that wasn’t enough, having the road presence of an angry mastiff makes people tend to give way. It’s a bit like being Darth Vader and walking into an Imperial staff meeting — suddenly everyone remembers that they’ve got to be somewhere else, anywhere else, right now. Get this big heffalump out on the highway, and there’s a bit of fidgeting from the steering. With steamrollersized rubber equipped, the truck has the tendency to follow in the ruts left by semis and dumptrucks, and it’s a bit annoying until you get used to it. Dialling back the annoyance, my tester came equipped with radar-guided cruise control, allowing us to follow along in heavy traffic without having to spend a lot of time adjusting the throttle. Most impressively, travelling at highway speed shows some pretty decent numbers for fuel economy. With cruise control on for a run to Seattle, the Cherokee sipped fuel, rather than quaffing it, returning an average fuel consumption of See Launch page 45

7-airbag safety system and RISE (Reinforced Impact Safety Evolution) body structure. 10-Year/160,000-km Powertrain Warranty Available automatic air conditioning Available Bluetooth® 2.0 Hands-free Cellular Phone Interface with streaming audio & USB input with voice control and much more...

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Friday, August 30, 2013 - North Shore News - A45

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THE Cherokee SRT’s interior layout is nicely ergonomic, featuring comfortable seats, stitched leather and a chunky steering wheel.

THAT’S IT. THAT’S ALL. THAT’S RIGHT.

Launch Control a lot of fun From page 44

10.5 litres/100 kilometres. So you can live with it, but here’s why you’d want to. Flick the drive selector to Track, press the brightly coloured button marked Launch Control, hold down the brake and then floor the accelerator. This makes the

Jeep very angry indeed. Then let go of the brake. With all-wheel drive to handle traction, the SRT Cherokee simply dumps all 470 horsepower on the pavement and snaps you forward as though it was attempting to achieve escape velocity. The soundtrack is that of a Saturn V moon

rocket, and so is the thrust. It’s utterly hilarious, and very good fun. The passing power of this big machine will also get you laughing. Winding it up the twisting road to Mount Rainier, we’d periodically get stuck behind some slow-

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A46 - North Shore News - Friday, August 30, 2013

REV

Souped up Cherokee channels hot rod culture From page 45

photo Brendan McAleer

THE Cherokee SRT’s infotainment system is top-notch but it locks the touchpad when the vehicle is in motion which can be annoying for co-pilots.

moving trailer and have just a short distance to get around. Faster than you can say, “Punch it, Chewie!” the Jeep kicks down a few gears — it’s an eight-speed transmission — and the wall of power comes in with all the subtlety of an afterburner. It handles well too. You’d hardly think such a big, heavy vehicle would have any kind of road feel, but the Grand Cherokee drives quite like its SRT8 Challenger cousin, overpowering the corners

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km in the city and 10.7 l/100 km on the highway. Normally, this is the part of the review where I roll around on the ground laughing and saying, “Oh dearie me!” while wiping tears from my eyes, but the thing is, the Jeep actually hit its official highway number without hypermiling techniques or any special treatment. City mileage was closer to — gulp — 20 l/100 km, but for this colossal power to do that well on longer trips deserves a round of applause. Green light Gargantuan street presence; colossal power; nicely appointed interior; easy to use technology controls. Stop sign Terrible fuel consumption in-city; eye watering price tag; fearsome appetite for brakes and tires; not exactly subtle. The checkered flag Like the muscle cars of the past, a machine that exists simply to put a big, dumb grin on your face. Competitors BMW X5 xDrive50i ($75,700) Aside from the silly name, this variant of BMW’s strong-selling X5 lineup has most of the performance of the zany SRT, and delivers it in a far more genteel fashion with a liberal application of torque from its twin-turbo smaller-displacement V-8. Being a BMW, it also handles the corners quite well, and in terms of prestige, is far more likely to get parked out front by the valet. Yes, it’s far more expensive than the Jeep (especially once you start to pile the options on), but strong BMW leasing residuals close the gap quickly. The only complaint about the Bimmer? It’s a far too rational choice. mcaleeronwheels@gmail.com

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with mechanical grip and then powering out of them with sheer torque. It’s amazing good fun, as long as you don’t look at the sobering stats on the average fuel consumption readout. Big brakes and massive tires make the Jeep capable of taking on a track day, but there’s more to it than that. On the street, even when you’re only tickling the throttle, the big, burly, muscle car character of the thing can’t fail to put a grin on your face. It’s a bit cartoonish, a bit of an over-muscled Marvel Superhero. The price tag, the power, the entire concept of the thing — none of this will make any sense at all, until you drive it. Features As mentioned, Chrysler’s UVO infotainment package is a stellar solution for most of the controls, and handles navigation and entertainment duties without a hitch. Bluetooth streaming audio is standard, though I suggest you leave the Vivaldi at home and only play Motörhead and AC/DC instead. An upgraded 19-speaker sound system is $995, and is outstandingly powerful. An optional $3,195 Luxury package adds in the leather-covered dashboard as well as adaptive cruise control and safety features like a blind spot system and collision prevention. Expensive, but worth it for the way it improves the interior appearance. Turning to cosmetic options, polished wheels are standard, but the slightly more subtle satin or black chrome finish will set you back $895. A dual-pane sunroof will bring a little light to the backseat for $1,595. Average fuel economy is officially rated at 16.6 l/100

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Jim Pattison Hyundai Northshore 855 Automall Dr. North Vancouver, 604-985-0055 D#6700

photo Brendan McAleer

THE Cherokee SRT’s bulging fenders contain massively wide, dark-chromed 20-inch alloy wheels.

Help fix the farm! 604.985.3276 www.maplewoodfarm.bc.ca


Friday, August 30, 2013 - North Shore News - A47

REV

Human acceptance of self-driving cars the biggest hurdle people are jerks when they get behind the wheel. A meekly programmed autonomous car must be engineered to give way and keep a safe driving distance, so what does it do if a swervin’ Mervin comes along and carves up traffic? Guys in high powered Audis would be going through traffic like a cheetah through a pack of gazelles. That’s all the bad stuff, but there’s plenty that is good about the idea of a self-driving car. As much as automotive writers praise a machine for drawing you into the experience, for thrilling and rewarding and engaging the driver, most

From page 43

people want boring, reliable transportation. Many commuters must feel like they’re wasting their lives in traffic — what if they could claw a little of that time back in office work or even just kicking back with a coffee? What if your crappy post-Friday commute back over the Lions Gate Bridge was a chance to look around and find yourself atop one of the most scenic bridges in the world — you could take up photography. What if you could have your car drop you off out front of Park Royal around Christmastime and then tell it to go find

its own parking? It’s a long way off, that’s for sure, but here, outside Portland, after a long day behind the wheel, I was only too happy to let somebody else drive for a bit. And, after a while, the traffic cleared up, and away we went. After 130 years of the internal combustion, Mercedes has just reinvented the horse. An electronic coachman can’t be far behind. Brendan McAleer is a freelance writer and automotive enthusiast. E-mail: mcaleeronwheels@ gmail.com. Twitter: @brendan_mcaleer.

If you’re stationary for more than three seconds the system kicks off, but in the slowly bunching Slinky making its way into Portland, the car happily drove itself for 10 kilometres. Quite literally, this is the least engaging driving experience I’ve had all year, and simultaneously one of the coolest. Earlier this week, Nissan announced their intention to sell a fully autonomous car by 2020 — they’ve a prototype already functional and are just working out the kinks. Google has already made waves with their numerous self-driving camera cars roaming around California. Last year, a fully selfdriven Audi TT raced up the challenging Pikes Peak course just a few minutes off the pace of the top human drivers. If you want to know what the next thing coming down the pipeline is, it’s automotive autopilot. And the challenges aren’t going to be electronic. THE ALL-NEW, TECHNOLOGICALLY Let’s suppose you’re on a passenger airliner and your pilot ADVANCED 2014 OUTLANDER gets up to use the washroom, STANDARD GT S-AWC FEATURES leaving the plane set on FORWARD COLLISION MITIGATION automatic. How comfortable are you? Still happily munching LANE DEPARTURE WARNING away? Those pretzels makin’ ya ADAPTIVE CRUISE CONTROL thirsty, but not another care in the world? SUPER ALL-WHEEL CONTROL Now transpose the same situation where you’re on a long-haul Greyhound bus and the driver squeezes back through the rows to answer a call of nature. How tightly do you grip your armrests until he Insurance Institute for Highway Safety gets back? Acceptance of these technologies is going to be one Available on of the biggest hurdles for the Outlander GT Outlander GT S-AWC model shown‡ self-driving car to clear. Imagine steeling yourself as a pedestrian at a crosswalk. Naturally, the Vancouverite thing to do is merely stride out without looking as if you were made of depleted uranium, but let’s pretend you at least make the effort to establish eye contact with the driver and receive some sort of indication that it’s OK to cross. How long are you going to be there if everyone’s cruising around reading the newspaper? Then there’s the legislative side of things. While Google trumpets a perfect safety record — only one crash recorded and it was when a human pilot took over the controls — and while human beings seem perfectly satisfied with the current state LANCER RVR SPORTBACK EVOLUTION of affairs where somebody’s getting mowed down every five minutes or so, just wait until the first time a self-driven car kills or injures someone. It’ll happen too, these things are machines and machines are imperfect because they’re built by humans, who are REALLY imperfect. In a civil lawsuit against a distracted driver who killed or maimed the plaintiff, the damages could amount to millions. They might take NORTH VANCOUVER MITSUBISHI someone’s house, their property, drain their bank 1695 MARINE DRIVE YEAR account. Now consider the NORTH VANCOUVER | 983-2088 160,000 KM legal battles involved if a POWERTRAIN northvanmitsubishi.ca LTD WARRANTY** self-driving Nissan clips an § S-AWC standard on Outlander GT.* Best backed claim does not cover Lancer Evolution, Lancer Ralliart or i-MiEV. ® MITSUBISHI MOTORS, BEST BACKED CARS IN THE WORLD are trade-marks of Mitsubishi Motors North America, Inc. and are used under license. inattentive cyclist. It’d make the ** Whichever comes first. Regular maintenance not included. See dealer or mitsubishi-motors.ca for warranty terms, restrictions and details. Not all customers will qualify. O.J. Simpson trial look like an episode of The People’s Court. Then there’s the tricky issue MITSUBISHI-MOTORS.CA of how to deal with the fact that

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A48 - North Shore News - Friday, August 30, 2013

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CASH PURCHASE INCENTIVE ON SELECT 2013 MODELS.*

Model GE8G2DEX Model CR2E3DE

Model YF4H9DKN

Model RL5H9DK

STARTING FROM

25,630

$

**

INCLUDES FREIGHT & PDI

OR

STARTING FROM

31,630

$

**

INCLUDES FREIGHT & PDI

0.99

%

STARTING FROM

36,630

$

Model FB2E2DEX

**

INCLUDES FREIGHT & PDI

STARTING FROM

16,935

$

FIT

CR-V

CIVIC

PILOT

ODYSSEY

ACCORD

Model RM4H9DKNS

**

INCLUDES FREIGHT & PDI

STARTING FROM

27,630

$

**

INCLUDES FREIGHT & PDI

STARTING FROM

16,075

$

**

INCLUDES FREIGHT & PDI

ON SELECT 2013 HONDA VEHICLES. LEASE OR FINANCE.#¥

The ongoing benefits of owning a Honda. High resale value. Low cost of ownership. Affordable. Reliable. Fuel Efficient. Advanced safety. Fun to drive.

bchonda.com bchonda.com

816 Automall Drive, North Vancouver 604-984-0331

www.pacifichonda.ca

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North Shore News August 30 2013  
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