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Summer 2013 Viking Days Edition

Viking Bugle

Eric Nelson, CEO Michael Ide, Volunteer Coordinator, (206) 789-5707 x12, michaeli@nordicmuseum.org

A Note from the Volunteer Coordinator INSIDE THIS ISSUE:

From the Volunteer Coordinator

1

Welcome New Volunteers

1

Museum News

2

Volunteer News

3-5

Special Appreciation

6

Volunteer Appreciation

7

Volunteer Opportunities

8

Calendar of Spring Events

9

My what a spring we’ve had—busy and successful! We have the hard work and dedication of many volunteers to thank for some major achievements in the spring. Our Northern Lights Auktion was a fantastic success, raising $265,000 (before expenses). The Nordic American Voices “Voices of Ballard and Beyond” received an

award from AKCHO award for which it was nominated, and the NAV project itself received an award from the Washington Museum Association. And our Nordic Heritage Teen Council grew from 6 in the winter, to 9 in the spring, and kept us busy and entertained. Finally, thanks to all who helped in any capacity in our daily activities and regular schedule of events. Viking Days is the major event on the horizon. It will take place on August 17 and 18, feature a pancake breakfast, salmon BBQ, beer garden, vendors, Vikings, kids crafts—the usual, but with a few

jxÄvÉÅx àÉ ÉâÜ Çxã? ÜxàâÜÇ|Çz? tÇw Üxtáá|zÇxw äÉÄâÇàxxÜá tÇw |ÇàxÜÇá Meera Parmar Cecilie Roaldset Jason Rudd Lindsey Castle Camilla Koczara Marina Winther Mackensie Hotz Allison Goetz Emily McDade Carleen See

exciting changes as well. We’ll need all the help we can get, so please sign up to help and invite your friends and family, too! Let’s make it a great one! This edition of the Viking Bugle has a distinct food theme, from food blog articles, to krumkake recipes. The Teen Council focused on food and heritage this spring, so it seemed like an appropriate and fun focus for the Bugle as well. I hope you’ll visit Jill’s blog, try your hand at Louise’s krumkake, and enjoy the rest. Have a great summer, and we’ll see you at Viking Days! ~Michael

On-line and In Color The Viking Bugle is now available on-line and in color! If you are reading the electronic version, but would like a paper copy instead, just let me know. I’m open to suggestions to improve your Viking Bugle experience, so send me your feedback. The trees and I thank you.

Contribute to the Bugle!

Update your Info!

Send any ideas, announcements, articles and other Viking Bugle submissions to michaeli@nordicmuseum.org

Let me know if your contact information or volunteer availability has changed


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Museum News New Staff Members Facilities and Rental Coordinator, Dylan High Dylan is a recent graduate of the University of Washington’s Museology Graduate Program. Growing up near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, he explored his own roots by working with several local heritage organizations such as the Mennonite Heritage Center and the Goschenhoppen Historians. Dylan loves the community focus and strong roots of the Nordic Heritage Museum and the Ballard community. He hopes to help the museum share the rich history and spirit of community of these Nordic peoples with Seattle’s diverse, ever-changing community.

Brandon McCann, Custodian Brandon joined the Museum in May as part time custodian of the building. Originally from the Midwest, Brandon has lived in Seattle off and on for the past several years. We are delighted to have Brandon on board! Please make him feel welcome.

Development Director, Jan Colbrese Jan Woldseth Colbrese joined the Nordic Heritage Museum this past May as Development Director. A graduate of Seattle Pacific, she started her professional life as a high school English teacher with a stint at Ballard High School. Coming to the Museum after almost 9 years of experience in development with United Way of King County, Jan brings experience in both Major Gifts and Corporate partnerships. Born and raised near Pacific Lutheran University, Jan’s grandfather emigrated from Stavanger, Norway. A past president of the Issaquah School Board, she is the mother of three grown sons and wife to Mike Colbrese, the Executive Director of the Washington Interscholastic Activities Association. Jan’s office is located on the third floor in the Development office.

Reflection: Museum Work This edition of the Viking Bugle includes major contributions by guest Editor, and recent graduate of King’s High School, Kristina Mannes. I asked Kristina to provide a short reflection of the time she spent job shadowing my position. Thanks Kristina!

Facilities Coordinator Mike Olson left the Museum in May to pursue a career in commercial carpentry. His duties have been distributed between Dylan and Brandon, with Dylan focusing on maintenance and rentals, and Brandon focusing on custodial services. We wish Mike the best!

through my own volunteer work, I figured it was worth a try to attempt to pursue a job shadow opportunity at the museum. To my luck I was allowed to spend the last four days job shadowing Michael Ide in the Operations Department at NHM. Museum work initially grabbed my attention, as someone planning to study history, because of the strong focus it has As a high school student confronted on preserving the past and sharing with the obstacle of tackling a job a culture and heritage. I really shadow experience while also enjoyed seeing past that to the working on the important task of operation of the museum, and to graduating and getting things in the people working hard to make order for attending university, I the sharing of Nordic culture was stressed, to say the least, possible. Through this opportunity I about my last few weeks of school. was able to educate myself on Remembering my ties with the many different and important roles museum through my family and

at the museum; I was able to observe and learn from volunteers in the gift shop, information desk, admissions desk, and from docents, staff and volunteers. Getting a look at what goes on behind the scenes of the museum, the meetings and planning, the Bugle, the recruitment of volunteers, and a number of other projects, provided me with a more than adequate view of what the work at the Nordic Heritage Museum is like. I am thankful for the time I was able to spend at the museum and learn from the many talented and dedicated people working and volunteering there. ~Kristina Mannes


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Volunteer News

Jiill’s Blog: Kimchi and Meatballs An Email Interview with Jill Wasberg, by Kristina Mannes

Jill Wasberg has been a volunteer at the Nordic Heritage Museum since October 2012. This May Jill expanded on another passion of hers by creating a food blog entitled “Kimchi and Meatballs”.

What was your inspiration for creating a food blog? Why 'Kimchi and Meatballs'? The inspiration for Kimchi and Meatballs comes from a family melding of cultures, foods and ingredients that took place when I was growing up. My mom is from Seoul, South Korea. On my dad’s side of the family, my grandpa was a Finn Swede and my grandma was born and raised in a town called South Bend, a small town in Willapa Bay where several Norwegian and Swedish families historically settled to work in the logging and fishing industries. I’m fourth generation from South Bend. I don’t know how many Korean Swedes raised in small seafood industry towns there are out there, so the audience for my blog might be few and far between! Several of the blog posts about food combine some ideas and ingredients of the different

places in the world that came together at our dinner table – Korea, Sweden and Willapa Bay. My food staples definitely leaned heavily toward Korean dishes, but all of our family gatherings from birthdays to the Fourth of July to Christmas had elements of Scandinavian flavors and forms. I often brought home leftovers from my grandparents’ after whatever family gathering was taking place and threw them in a bowl with rice and kimchi with a soft boiled egg and mixed it all up to scoop up in squares of sesame roasted seaweed. The memory of this habit is where the title of the blog came from. My friend and I were driving back from Portland after a disheartening food truck experience with some bland kimchi. I vowed to start making my own based on how my mom made it— I’d had it with bad kimchi! This got us talking about what type of niche it would take to start a food truck, and I recalled, “You know what goes really well with kimchi is Swedish meatballs.” And she said, “Well, that’s certainly a niche.” But a food truck sounded really time consuming and complicated. And expensive. So I started a blog instead.

Dragon and Viking Deviled Eggs

What volunteer work have you done at the museum and has your experience at the museum taught you anything or inspired you in any way in your cooking? I’ve lived in Seattle for almost 20 years and just visited the Museum for the first time in October, 2012. I don’t know how it came to be that I hadn’t been in before. As soon as I walked in, I told my friend, “This place feels like my grandparents’ house. It even smells like my grandparents’ house!” She had to drag me out of there that day. I would have stayed the night and slept in the section about the logging camp display if I could have. I came home and immediately contacted the Volunteer Coordinator and told her I’d do anything as a volunteer; yard work if they needed it! I helped out at Yulefest in 2012 (a delight!) and then I started volunteering in the gift shop on a regular basis – and this definitely inspired my cooking from that point forward. As I’m interested in food, I immediately pounced on the cookbooks and pored through them. I first went for the contemporary cookbooks, the large coffee table ones with beautiful, glossy photos of open -faced sandwiches set out for picnics under birch trees and venison stews before large hearths with glowing fires. Then I found a connection with the more traditional ones, the spiral -bound paperback editions I’d seen in kitchens and gift shops in my hometown produced by the American Daughters of Sweden or the American Swedish Institute. I remembered


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some of the standard ingredients, flavors and recipes, not even really realizing until now they were associated with Sweden, Finland or Norway. I even found one that was based on recipes from Naselle, Washington, in the Willapa Hills, south of my hometown. After a while, I started bringing a journal with me to record recipes. I had already tried my hand at Korean cooking, so this was the other half of the equation. My volunteer time at the museum really was the starting point in my interest in finding ways to blend the flavors and foods of my heritage that is now a really fun

Volunteer News creative outlet. What does your heritage mean to you? My heritage is a way of life that has been passed on to me by people who loved and raised me and made me what I am today. I was very, very close to my grandparents. They lived two miles from me the first 18 years of my life and were supportive and very involved in my daily life. And I’m close to my mom. I know it wasn’t easy for her to leave her country on her own at 26 years old to move to a small town that didn’t yet know anything about Korean culture, until she showed them. Out of respect for their love of me and the aspects of the “old country” that shaped

Nordic Heritage Teen Council

Eli, Gates and Asa, making krumkake.

Louise Torseth instructs Dylan, Cari and Sofia on krumkake baking.

Visit the Nordic Teen Council Blog at: http://nordicmuseum.blogspot.com/

The Teen Council wrapped up a successful spring session at the beginning of June. We had several returning students and a handful of new ones. Throughout the 10-week session, the council members considered the idea of food and heritage. Students brought in favorite family recipes to contribute to a Teen Council cook book; prepared food-themed tours of our permanent exhibit; learned to make krumkake with an expert teacher, Louise Torseth; had a behind-the-scenes tour of Scandinavian Specialties, and ended with a celebratory cookoff for friends and family, where they made smoked salmon sandwiches, Finnish potato casserole, Swedish cucumber salad and Norwegian meatballs, with krumkake for dessert. It was a delicious success! A special thanks to Dylan, all our teen council members and their families, and everyone who came out to support the program this year!

them, it means a lot to me to be able to keep their heritage and memory alive. For me, the medium for doing so is food.

Roasted Beet Kimchi

Visit Jill’s Blog at: www.kimchiandmeatballs.com

Krumkake Courtesy of Louise Torseth Makes 50 2 c. cream 2 c. flour 1 c. sugar 1 egg yolk Few drops (no more) almond extract Beat the cream and sugar. Beat egg and add to above mixture. Add flour. Mix almond extract to a little milk and then add to mixture. Bake in krumkake iron. Smooth and Creamy Filling 4 oz. instant pudding 1/4 c. confectioners’ sugar 1 c. cold milk 8 oz. Cool Whip Combine pudding mix, sugar and milk in small bowl. Beat slowly at lowest speed until well blended, about 1 minute. Fold in Cool Whip. Berry Filling 2 c. whipping cream 3 T. powdered sugar 1/3 c. raspberry preserves *1 c. fresh raspberries In large bowl, whip cream until soft peaks form. Add powdered sugar; beat until stiff peaks form. In medium bowl, combine berries and preserves. Fold into whipped cream. *Other berries may be substituted.


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Volunteer News Volunteer Treats Little would get done at the Museum without the help of volunteers. In addition to the daily tasks they perform, we also appreciate the many treats that they bring to keep everyone fat and happy. (It’s worth it!) Here is a rough schedule of our week in treats.

Occasionaly on Mondays, the scent of Dorothy’s freshly baked scones lifts our spirits.

On Tuesday Chris fills the candy jar, and gets us through the day.

Wednesday is Dagmar Cake Day, and we can hardly function without it!

In Memory Edith Kilgren Dear Edith passed away peacefully in April, almost a year after fully retiring from her regular Thursday morning Gift Shop shift. Edith was one of the earliest members of the Museum’s Danish community, and helped to start the tradition of making aebleskiver at Viking Days and Yulefest, which we continue to do. She lived a full and happy and inspirational life. She was a beloved mother, grandmother, wife and sister, and a beloved member of the Museum’s volunteer corps. She is dearly missed and fondly remembered.

Hera Owen Hera Ware Owen, a dedicated museum volunteer and member of the Finnish community in Seattle, passed away on May 22, at the age of 98. She had lived at the Norse Home since 2009. Born to Finnish immigrant parents, Hera lived in Hobart, Washington as a small child, and later in Seattle, where she graduated from Franklin High School. She attended the University of Washington, then spent five years in New York City, working in a book store and studying dance with Martha Graham.

After her marriage, Hera moved to Micronesia with her husband, Bob Owen, an entomologist, and fell in love with Palauan culture and art. She started the Palau National Museum and served as its director for 25 years, mentored and promoted local artists, and wrote a Mel Hollister cookbook – all the while raising two Mel, an children and helping Bob with his work. active The family returned to Seattle in 1979 member of after Bob’s retirement. Hera discovered the Danish the Nordic Heritage Museum and community, promptly volunteered. passed away Hera was instrumental in the design and in May, creation of the Suomi-Finland Room at joining his the Museum. She brought her wife of 62 experience in museum work, a deep year, Anne. appreciation of immigrant history, and Mel was a her artistic spirit to the project. She long-time volunteer and a designed exhibits, raised funds, mainstay of Viking Days and Yulefest, splitting his time between collected artifacts and oral histories. She cajoled her friends and charmed the beer garden and the acquaintances into helping out – it was aebleskiver hearth up until last hard to say no to Hera! She never year. Our prayers are with his stopped thinking about the Suomifamily and community. Finland Room; in the weeks before she died she was still coming up with ideas Inga-Märtha Åhman Inga passed away on Monday, June for improving the exhibits. 10, 2013. She was an active in ~Liisa Mannery Our Redeemers Lutheran Church in Ballard, founding the annual Lucia festivals. She was also an excellent cook and her meatballs and breads were legendary in the Ballard

community and beyond. Her love, guidance and energetic grace influenced meaningful values and numerous lives. Our thoughts and prayers are with her family.


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Special Recognition `tÜztÜxà _|wuxÜz? iÉÄâÇàxxÜ Éy à{x lxtÜ

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Under the leadership of the following volunteer committee members, we had another recordbreaking Auktion, with $265,000 in Volunteer of the Year is an honor awarded to someone gross revenue! who has made outstanding contributions to the Museum in the Berit Sjong, Linda Christensen, Sig last calendar year. In this case, Margaret has played an Eriksen, Jon Hanson, Sandy Haug, essential role for many years. She can be found in the kitchen Paul Jacobson, Judith Mallory, Arlene during every food event, making sure that we are running an Oberg, Barbara Paquette, Donna efficient, cost-effective, and tight ship. She also volunteers Pedersen, Ashley Russell, Sonja Sorvik every Friday morning at the Admissions Desk, and helps at and a special THANKS to Carina numerous events throughout the year. Halgren for donating time while Thank you, Margaret, and congratulations! Co-Chairs Linda visiting from Sweden. We truly appreciate all you do! Christensen and Berit Sjong

And a big thank you to all of our Auktion volunteers. JoAnne Rudo Stephanie Maurer Mary Junttila Joanne Foster Jill Wasberg Marit Thomson Kirsten Chalfen Abby Alling Jake Lamb Edla Deppman Louise Torseth Malina Hubler Markus Rook Marilyn Sheldon Margaret Lidberg Mary Lindholm Priscilla Featherstone Kathy MaCaulay Julie Coulter

Rich Johnson Karrin Daniels Elaine Carpenter Gina Moorhead Brittany Bryant Aaron Kitson Dagmar O'Brien Marianne Olson Brenda Bard Molly Andrus Jessica Rubenacker Doug Skove Kelley Staab Don Meyers Dylan High Dan Brown Carleen See Erin Sterling Jacob Tice

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Margaret in her modeling days.

At this year’s Spring Tea.

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Each year we recognize handful of people who have made noteworthy contributions to the Museum in several major areas: Visitor Services, Special Events, Collections, Education, and Facilities. It’s never an easy decision, but these volunteers have earned our praise and gratitude for their incredible dedication to the Museum and community. Thank you, for all that you do!

This Spring, the Museum received two awards associated with the NAV project and the publication of Voices of Ballard and Beyond: an award for ”exemplary historical publication” awarded by Association of King County Historical Organizations, and a Project of Excellence Award, granted by the Washington Museum Association. Thank you to all the NAV volunteers. We are very proud of this achievement!

Paul Jacobson Mina Larsen

Edla Deppman

Representatives of Nordic American Voices receiving the AKCHO award at MOHAI this Spring.

Dylan High

Mari-Ann Kind Jackson Emily McDade

Ron Hornung


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Volunteer Appreciation Mostly Nordic Volunteers

Spring Programs and Events Soup and Cinema Debi Covert-Bowlds Janet Backman Barbara Jeniker Niki McClure Lecture Ann Durant Abby Alling Julie Coulter Brittany Bryant

Mostly Nordic volunteers enjoying a well-deserved meal after cleanup.

Thank you to all of the volunteers who helped with our Mostly Nordic Concert and Smörgåsbord this season. We had a great team of regulars, and those willing to jump in at the last minute to set up, take tickets, tend bar, serve, bus tables, and clean up! Mostly Nordic has the distinction of being both a successful program and a wonderful experience to produce as well. Thank you! Kris Ewing Vincent Jolivet Mary Mohler Ellen Juhl Aaron Kitson Rich Johnson Debi Covert-Bowlds Chris Covert-Bowlds Joanne Foster Christine Cummings Markus Rook Sue Gregor Jenna Gregor Malina Hubler Brittany Bryant Karl Bloomberg Randi Parker Natasha Parker Abby Alling Jane Kern Gina Moorhead Michelle Eastman Tyler Robbins-Linford Natalie Stone Geoff Stone Toni Eaton Alan Lundeen Nan Bentley

Ballard Jazz Pancake Breakfast Pat Charlson Kate Wiebe Margaret Lidberg Mary Lindholm Ellen Duernberger Marilyn Sheldon Edla Deppman Christine Cummings Louise Torseth Rich Johnson Harriet Kemp Jane Kern Barbara Paquette Cari Brown Slow Art Day Don Meyers Syttende Mai Sandy Haug Margaret Lidberg Mary Lindholm Marilyn Sheldon Barbara Paquette Michelle Eastman Elena Manenti Greta Haagensen-Roseberg Pirkko Borland Rich Johnson Louise Torseth Dan Kaylor Mina Larsen & Family Einar Pedersen & Family Mari-Ann Kind Jackson & Family Scandinavian Heritage Day Gordon Strand Sami Book Launch Erik Sundholm Rebecca Butler Maritime Lectures Erik Sundholm Rebecca Butler Hallie Stegelvik Aaron Kitson

Film: Through Hell and High Water Andrea Bonnicksen Rich Johnson Haugaard and Blum Concert Markus Rook Ellen Juhl Meera Parmar Smith Ørnulf Opdahl Member Previews Arlene Amundsen Markus Rook Julie Coulter Hallie Stegelvik Rich Johnson Abby Alling Harriet Kemp Special thanks to ladies who labored in the kitchen to prepare the delicious reception spread! Skandia Midsommerfest Rich Johnson Mari-Ann Kind Jackson Gordon Strand Teen Council Program Volunteers Hallie Stegelvik Pat Charlson Greta Haagensen Roseberg Louise Torseth Everyone who supported us by attending the events!

Interns and Ongoing Assistance Robin Kaufman Kate Marchewka Meera Parmar Isobel Grad Rebecca Bolin Marilyn Whitted Steve Harvey Marianne Kolden Anne Willott Valerie Vega Kathi Erickson Alison Goetz Emily McDade Jean Wirch Dorothy Trenor Ashley Russell Jonathan Wintrip Kristina Mannes Astor Rask Chris Hardy Kirsten Chalfen

I apologize for any inadvertent omissions from this list! Please let me know!

Special Thanks Monday and Thursday Crew Visitor Services Volunteers Members of the Ethnic Galleries for caring for the rooms, and dressing them up for the holidays.


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Volunteer Opportunities CALL FOR CLOTHING!

Call for folk costumes from and related to the Nordic countries! Folk Costume Fashion Show Wednesday September 25 7PM

This fall the Museum will be hosting the exhibition, Dressing Swedish: From Hazelius to Salander (September 13, 2013 – November 10, 2013), co-curated by our own Lizette Gradén, and originally produced for the House of Sweden in Washington D.C. The exhibition includes Swedish folk costumes as well as contemporary clothing, and asks the questions, what does it mean to “dress Swedish”–and how has this Swedish-ness developed over time?

To supplement the travelling exhibition, the Museum is adding objects to enhance the In conjunction with the upcoming connection to the Nordic community in the clothing exhibit Dressing Pacific Northwest, including folk costumes Swedish, the Museum will host from the Museum’s permanent collection. an evening with a folk costume We would also like to include contemporary fashion show, folk music and clothing that has been chosen–at least in dancing, food and no-host bar. part–to express the wearer’s national identity. An Oleana sweater worn by a Do you have a folk costume Norwegian-American, or a Marimekko dress that you would like to see (or worn by a Finnish-American, are just a few wear!) on the “runway”? We examples. wish to share the rich variety folk costumes related to all the If you have a contemporary garment that you feel is on some level an expression of Nordic countries for the show. your national heritage or identity, and that If we have an overwhelming you would be willing to lend for the run of response, we will select a the exhibition, we would love to hear from representative sample of you. We hope to include examples from costumes to highlight. each of the five Nordic countries. Contact Stina Contact Kirsten or Lizette before August before August 26 if you 16 if you would like to contribute! would like to participate! Kirsten Olsen, kirsteno@nordicmuseum.org, Stina Cowan 206-789-5707x34 stinac@nordicmuseum.org, Lizette Gradén, Lizette@nordicmuseum.org, 206-789 5707x21 206-789-5707x35

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Soup & Cinema The popular program Soup & Cinema returns on Tuesday October 8, for its 4th season. Join us on the second Tuesday of the month from October through April at Noon to enjoy Nordic films and wholesome, nourishing soup at the Museum. All movies are in the original language with English subtitles. We are looking for delicious soup recipes, as well as volunteer soup cooks and servers! If you have a favorite recipe, or want to help out at the event, let us know! Do you have a favorite soup recipe? Please let us know! Contact Stina Cowan

stinac@nordicmuseum.org, 206-789 5707x21 with soup recipes or for more information.

Seeking Museum Docents! Are you looking for a way to share your love of the Nordic Heritage Museum with others? The Education Department would be happy to train you to lead tours of the Dream of America exhibit! Docents are needed for both school and adult tours, generally during the day from Tuesday through Friday. Training can be done on a one-to-one basis or as a group, if enough interest is indicated.

One of the most beloved and memorable aspects of Yulefest is the popular, If you are interested in and fully volunteer-coordinated, bake-sale Goodies to Go. It also brings in becoming a docent or would considerable revenue for the Museum. We are always looking for volunteers to bake for Goodies to Go. This year we are also looking for a few energetic like more information you can contact Alison Church, volunteers to take an active role in the process, and become Goodies to Go Children’s Education apprentices (and eventually coordinators). Duties include soliciting baked donations, as well as packaging, pricing and selling the goodies at Yulefest, with expert guidance, of course. Please contact Michael if you are interested in this rewarding opportunity: 206 -789-5707x12 michaeli@nordicmuseum.org

Coordinator, at or alisonc@nordicmuseum.org 206- 789-5707 x19


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Summer Calendar ]âÄç Tues

9

7pm

Lecture: Icelandic Migration to and from Utah

Weds

10

1-2pm

Viking Days Meeting: Overview

Thurs-Fri

11-12

10am-4pm

Viking Days Mailing Party

Fri-Sun

12-14

9am-3:30pm

Craft School: Rosemaling

Sat-Sun

13-14

11am-6pm

Seafood Fest in Ballard

Sun

14

All Day

Free Admission!

Weds

17

1-2pm

Viking Days Meeting: Food

Sat

27

10am-4pm

Lefse Fest in Issaquah

Tues

30

10am and Noon

Landscape Workshop for Kids

Thurs

1

10-11am

Nordic Stories: Brave Charlotte and the Wolves (Fin)

Thurs

1

10:30-11am

Viking Days Meeting: Set Up

Tues

6

7pm

Book Talk: Four Thousand Hooks

Thurs

8

10:30-11am

Viking Days Meeting: Set Up

Fri

9

7:10pm

Nordic Heritage Night at Safeco Field

Sat-Sun

17-18

10am-5pm

Viking Days

Sat

24

TBA

Finn Fest in Bellevue

Thurs

5

10-11am

Nordic Stories: A Home for Naughty Puppy (Ice)

Thurs

5

7pm

Film Program: Popcorn and Pickled Herring

Sat

7

10-12:30

American Girl Doll Immigration Experience

Sat

7

11am-6pm

Fall Fisherman Festival

Mon

9

10:30-11:30am

Volunteer Council Meeting

Mon

9

Noon

Volunteer Potluck

Thurs

12

6-8pm

Member Preview: Dressing Swedish

Sat

21

1:30-4pm

Craft School: Care for Your Costume

Weds

25

7pm

Folk Costume Fashion Show

Thurs

26

6-8 PM

Member Preview: Eino Romppanen

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Sign Up for Viking Days August 17 & 18 • • •

Use the form attached to the paper edition of this newsletter Sign up on-line: https://www.nordicmuseum.org/volunteer.aspx Contact me directly michaeli@nordicmuseum.org (206) 789-5707x12

SAVE THE DATE

Yulefest November 23-24

Viking Bugle-Summer 2013  

Newsletter for the volunteers of the Nordic Heritage Museum

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