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ᑲᖏᖅᖠᓂᕐᒥ ᐅᓇᑕᖅᑐᒃᓴᙳᐊᖏᑦ ᐊᐅᓪᓚᖅᐳᑦ ᐊᕕᒃᑐᖅᓯᒪᓂᐅᔪᓄᑦ ᓵᓚᖃᕋᓱᐊᕐᓂᐅᔪᓄᑦ

Cadets ready for regionals Wednesday, April 11, 2018

Vol 24 No 16

$1.00

Nunavut's Award-Winning Voice of Kivalliq

ᐅᖅᑰᓂᐅᔪᑦ ᑭᕙᓪᓕᕐᒥ ᖁᕕᐊᓲᑕᐅᓂᐅᔪᓂ Hot times in Rankin photo courtesy of RIFD

News ᓈᒻᒪᓈᖅᓯᑦᑎᐊᖅᑐᑦ ᓇᐅᔮᒥᐅᑦ

Lady Luck steps up for Naujaat

Photos Sports ᕿᑲᕐᓇᐅᔪᒥ ᖁᕕᐊᓲᑎᒋᔭᐅᓂᐅᔪᓄᑦ ᓄᑲᖅᖠᑦ ᑲᓇᒃᔅ ᐱᓕᕆᐊᖓ ᐱᕈᐃᕙᓪᓕᐊᕗᖅ ᑐᙵᕕᖃᑦᑎᐊᕐᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᐃᖅᑲᐅᒪᓂᐅᔪᓂ ᑲᖏᖅᖠᓂᕐᒥ Holiday memories in Rankin

Jr. Canucks program building solid foundation

"We got really lucky this time around, because it could have been a lot worse." – Naujaat SAO Rob Hedley after the community's water trucks were knocked out of service, page 2.

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Naujaat dodges a bullet 2 KIVALLIQ NEWS, Wednesday, April 11, 2018

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ᓄᓇᒃᑰᔪᖅ ᓴᓂᐊᒎᖅᑐᖅ ᓄᑕᕋᑯᓗᐃᑦ ᓯᓚᒥ ᐱᖑᐊᖅᑎᓪᓗᒋᑦ ᐳᖅᑐᔪᐊᓗᖕᓂ ᐊᐳᑎᓂ ᐊᖅᑯᑎᐅᑉ ᓴᓂᕋᖓᓂ ᑲᖏᖅᖠᓂᕐᒥ ᒥᑦᑕᕐᕕᓕᐊᖅᑐᒥ ᐱᖅᓯᖅᑐᐊᓘᓚᐅᖅᑎᓪᓗᒍ ᒫᔨ 15-ᒥᑦ 17-ᒧᑦ, 2015ᒥ. ᑕᒪᑐᒪᓂᓕ ᐅᑭᐅᑦᑎᓐᓂ 2018-ᒥ ᓇᐅᔮᒥᐅᑦ ᖃᒪᓂ’ᑐᐊᒥᐅᓪᓗ ᐊᐱᓂᖅᐹᖑᔪᑦ ᑭᕙᓪᓕᕐᒥᐅᓂ.

NNSL file photo

A truck passes below a group of kids playing on mammoth snowbanks leading to the Rankin Inlet airport following a record-breaking blizzard that rocked Rankin from March 15 to 17, 2015. So far Naujaat and Baker Lake have been leading the way for 2018 snowfall in the Kivalliq.

Stars align to get hamlet's downed water trucks back on the road after mechanical problems what blizzard it was now, except for the fact it was the worst one in a string of Naujaat them, and it got really bad for us with up "We got lucky. Very lucky." to 90-kilometre winds," said Hedley. That's how Naujaat SAO Rob Hedley The blizzard forced the garage to described the community's brush with close so hamlet staff did not realize there disaster when a brief power outage com- had been a brief power outage. bined with blizzard conditions to knock "Normally our maintainers and I both the hamlet's water check that kind of stuff, trucks out of service. but the storm was so bad Hedley said the that none of us went outside to check things out," weather in Naujaat, like said Hedley. most of the Kivalliq, has As the storm subsided been poor for the past six and hamlet crews began weeks. clearing roads, they realThe poor weather ized that the garage's furhad been preventing the nace had shut down on hamlet from supplying March 29 and that the citizens with water and Naujaat SAO Rob Hedley community's water trucks sewer services. were frozen solid. "The Hamlet Office "Once we got them and Municipal Services are being suspended because of the poor thawed out we discovered all the pumps visibility and lowering temperatures – all were cracked and needed to be repaired," hamlet activities are suspended until the said Hedley. "We were worried that we'd weather improves –  for those who need be down for a significant period of time water and sewage services please be because, with such lousy weather, we patient and as soon as the weather clears hadn't been able to get any freight in." The hamlet's foreman quickly got to we will run a full schedule to catch up as quickly as we can," stated the hamlet in work on the water trucks. "We all know you need water and we a March 15 news release. Hedley said the blizzard slamming will get to you as soon as possible," said the hamlet caused brief power problems the hamlet in a March 30 news release. at the garage holding the two trucks on "Please be patient and be assured we March 27 and 28 and almost created a will get to you as much as equipment and conditions allow." dire situation. Hedley said they were extremely for"I probably couldn't have told you by Darrell Greer

Northern News Services

"Everyone was either needing water or had already run out."

tunate in that they were able to make quick repairs to the pumps using salvaged equipment from old, out-of-service vehicles. He said with the old pumps providing a fortunate stopgap, the water trucks were only out of service for about seven hours and were back on the road that evening. But by that time, the community was in dire need of water. "What made the problem worse was that we were just coming out of a series of blizzards, so everyone was either needing water or had already run out," said Hedley. "If it wasn't unbelievable enough that we were able to get two trucks back out on the road so fast, the weather cleared enough for a plane to get in the very next day and it had the truck parts that we had ordered quite awhile previously." "We got lucky. We got very lucky," added Hedley. "We got caught up fairly quickly, have been able to keep it going, and have stayed caught up ever since." Hedley said it's been a challenging winter. "We're going to be clearing snow from now until doomsday," he said. "I know it's not just us – Baker Lake has just been buried – but right now I'd conservatively estimate that we have eight times the amount of snow down that we had this past year." "We got really lucky this time around, because it could have been a lot worse."


ELLESMERE ISLAND

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Kivalliq News is committed to getting facts andGrisenames right. Fiord With that goes a commitment to acknowledge mistakes and run Sachs Harbour corrections. If you spot an error in Kivalliq News, call (867) 645Tuktoyaktuk 3223 and ask to speak to the editor, or emailResolute kivalliqnews@nnsl. Inuvik com. We'll get a correction or clarification in as soon as wePond can. Arctic Bay Inlet ME LVILLE ISLAND

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r?9o3u iWK5, WzJx8i, wSD 11, 2018 3

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photo courtesy of Dorothy Tootoo

photo courtesy of Wanda Joy

The Rankin Rock squad claiming gold in the Bantam Division of the Toonik Tyme minor hockey championships are, back row from left. Joeffrey Kaludjak (coach), Maximus Amaq, Adam Taipana, Simon Wiseman, Brady Tucktoo, Nolan Tattuinee, Luke Kusugak, Leo Kaludjak, Israel Maktar, A.J. Alogut and Dave Wiseman (coach), and middle row from left, Justin Towtongie, Xavier Kubluitok, Wayne Pilakapsi, Koby Connelly and Tugak Netser, and front row left Cole Kaludjak and Qaumak Eccles in Iqaluit on April 2.

Rock strike gold Rankin Inlet The Rankin Rock bantam team defeated the host squad to strike gold in the Bantam Division of the Toonik Tyme minor hockey championships in Iqaluit on April 2. The event was a great tuneup for the Rock bantams as they prepare to head to Winnipeg, Man., to compete in an Indigenous hockey tournament being hosted by the Manitoba Aboriginal Sports and Recreation Council on the weekend of April 24. The Rankin Rock midgets also put in a fine showing at the Toonik Tyme event. The Rock struck bronze in the tournament's Midget Division.

Out in three Yellowknife/Rankin Inlet The Rankin entry into the annual senior men's hockey tournament in Yellowknife just couldn't keep it going at this year's event from March 29 to April 2. Rankin took the first game of their round robin by a 6-1 count, before dropping their next two games 6-3 and 7-0 to be bounced from the tournament. The Rock squads are all near the end of their season as the Rankin Inlet Arena will cease operations for this hockey season on April 13.

Rankin Inlet cadets, from left, cadet Logan Siksik, Sgt. Pilakapsi Tatty, Sgt. Marikah Sanguin, Cpl. Eden Sammurtok-Kolola and Master Cpl. Sakkataaq Zawadski were all set to compete for a regional marksmanship title in Gimli, Man., on April 13.

Rankin cadets zero in on national championship by Darrell Greer

Northern News Services

Rankin Inlet

Five members of the 3019 Royal Canadian Army Cadet Corps (RCACC) Rankin Inlet are off to Gimli, Man., to participate in the cadet regional marksmanship competition from April 13 to 15. They will be accompanied by Lt. Dorothy Tootoo from their corps. The 3019 marksmanship team qualified for the regional competition last month. The Rankin cadets will be trying to advance to the National Cadet Marksmanship Championship for a second consecutive year. Tootoo said the Rankin corps took care of its own in-house competition. The five-person team fired Daisy 853C air rifles at paper targets, and then sent the mail-in targets to be scored in order to qualify for the regional event. She said the members of the team – Sgt. Marikah Sanguin, cadet Logan Siksik, Sgt. Pilakapsi Tatty, Master Cpl.

Sakkataaq Zawadski and Cpl. Eden Sammurtok-Kolola – were as ready as they could be to challenge for the regional title. "Basically we competed against Nunavut cadets with the mail-in targets, which represented stage two behind our own in-house competitions," said Tootoo. While cadets taking part in the tournament will able to show off their sharpshooting skills, they'll also be expanding their safety skills. There are three senior and two junior cadets on this year's team, including Siksik, who is a brand-new cadet to the program. Their other junior cadet is Sammurtok-Kolola. The National Cadet Marksmanship Championship is being held in Victoria, B.C., the first weekend of May. Tootoo does not expect the team will be in medal contention, even if they advance to nationals, but said the Rankin cadets had a fighting chance. "Some of these kids, though, all of a sudden get spurred on by the com-

petition and, the next thing you know, they're setting a personal best at the competition, so you really never know," she said. The team is in rebuilding mode after their three senior cadets – Chief Warrant Officer Obadiah Sanguin, Chief Warrant Officer Tatonya (Nin) Autut and Master Warrant Officer Qilak Everard – aged out of the program, said Tootoo. But at the end of the day, these kids just really like shooting, she said. Whether it's a brand new or senior cadet, given the opportunity to pick their own activity, about 90 per cent of them would want to go and shoot, she added. "We put so much time into shooting that the military is having to send me more and more pellets every year," said Tootoo. "We're training consistently on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays, so that's an awful lot of shooting." bf l A ᑕᐅᑐᖕᓂᐅᔪᖅ m4WZz 4

ᓄᓇᓕᖕᒥᐅᓄᑦ ᐃᑲᔪᖅᑕᐅᔪᑦ

ᐃᓐᓇᐃᑦ ᐋᒐᑕ ᐃᒃᑯᐊᓚᖅ, ᕕᕉᓂᑲ ᒪᒃᑖᖅ ᐊᒻᒪᓗ ᐃᓕᓴᐱ ᖃᓪᓗᓈᖅ, ᓴᐅᒥᐊᓂ, ᐃᑲᔪᖅᓴᓚᐅᕐᒪᑕ ᑮᓇᐅᔭᓂᒃ ᑲᑎᖅᓱᐃᔪᓂᒃ ᑎᑭᕋᕐᔪᐊᒥ ᒫᔨ 29-ᒥ.

Hamlet Day Baker Lake The community of Baker Lake is expected to be out in droves when the hamlet hosts its annual Hamlet Day celebration on May 7.

Volunteers to meet Rankin Inlet There will be a volunteer/community-groups meeting for Pakallak Tyme at the hamlet office in Rankin Inlet on April 12, beginning at 7 p.m. A strong turnout is encouraged for group members and volunteers to discuss their plans and ideas for the 2018 Pakallak Tyme Spring Festival in Rankin.

COMMUNITY SUPPORT

photo courtesy of Noel Kaludjak

Elders Agatha Ekwalak, Veronica Maktar and Elizabeth Kabloona, from left, lend their support to a fundraising event in Whale Cove on March 29.


4 KIVALLIQ NEWS, Wednesday, April 11, 2018

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ᑕᐅᑐᖕᓂᐅᔪᖅ ᑕᐃᒪᐃᒃᑲᓐᓂᕐᓂᖏᓐᓄᑦ ᑲᖏᖅᖠᓂᕐᒥ ᐅᓇᑕᖅᑐᒃᓴᙳᐊᑦ ᑐᕌᖅᐳᑦ ᑲᓇᑕᒥ ᓵᓚᖃᕋᓱᐊᕐᓂᐅᔪᒧᑦ

ᑕᓪᓕᒪᓂ ᐃᓚᒋᔭᐅᔪᓂ 3019ᒥ ᑯᐃᓐᒧᑦ ᑲᓇᑕᒥ ᐅᓇᑕᖅᑐᒃᓴᓄᑦ ᐅᓇᑕᖅᑐᒃᓴᙳᐊᑦ ᑲᑎᙵᓂᐅᔪᓄᑦ (RCACC) ᑲᖏᖅᖠᓂᕐᒥ ᐊᐅᓪᓚᕆᐊᖅᑐᓚᐅᖅᐳᑦ ᒋᒻᓕ, ᒫᓂᑑᐸᒧᑦ, ᐃᓚᐅᖃᑕᐅᓂᕐᒧᑦ ᐅᓇᑕᖅᑐᒃᓴᙳᐊᑦ ᐊᕕᒃᑐᖅᓯᒪᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᖁᑭᖅᓴᑦᑎᐊᕋᓱᐊᕐᓂᕐᒧᑦ ᓵᓚᖃᕋᓱᐊᕐᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᐊᐃᑉᕆᓕ 6-8-ᒧᑦ. ᐃᓚᒋᔭᐅᓚᐅᖅᐳᑦ ᓗᑕᓇᓐᑦ ᑐᐊᑎ ᑑᑑᒧᑦ ᑲᑎᙵᓂᕆᔭᖓᓐᓂ. 3019 ᖁᑭᖅᓴᑦᑎᐊᕋᓱᐊᕐᓂᕐᒧᑦ ᑲᑎᙵᓂᐅᔪᑦ ᐱᔪᓐᓇᖅᓯᓚᐅᖅᐳᑦ ᐊᕕᒃᑐᖅᓯᒪᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᓵᓚᖃᕋᓱᐊᕐᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᑕᖅᑭᐅᓚᐅᖅᑐᒥ. ᑲᖏᖅᖠᓂᕐᒥ ᐅᓇᑕᖅᑐᒃᓴᙳᐊᑦ ᓯᕗᒻᒧᐊᕋᓱᓚᐅᖅᐳᑦ ᑲᓇᑕᒧᑦ ᐅᓇᑕᖅᑐᒃᓴᙳᐊᓄᑦ ᖁᑭᖅᓴᑦᑎᐊᕋᓱᐊᕐᓂᕐᒧᑦ ᓵᓚᖃᕋᓱᐊᕐᓂᐅᔪᓄᑦ ᒪᕐᕈᖓᓂ ᒪᓕᒃᑐᓄᑦ ᐊᕐᕌᒍᖓᓄᑦ. ᑑᑑ ᐅᖃᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᑲᖏᖅᖠᓂᕐᒥ ᑲᑎᙵᓂᐅᔪᑦ ᑲᒪᒋᔭᖃᓚᐅᖅᐳᑦ ᓇᖕᒥᓂᖅ ᐃᒻᒥᒍᑦ ᓵᓚᖃᕋᓱᐊᕐᓂᐅᔪᒥ, ᐊᒻᒪᓗ ᐊᓱᐃᓛᒃ ᐊᐅᓪᓚᖅᑎᑦᑎᓪᓗᑎᒃ ᑎᑎᖅᑲᒃᑯᕕᑎᒍᑦ ᖁᑭᖅᓴᕐᓂᑯᖏᓐᓂᑦ ᑐᕌᕐᓂᖏᓐᓂ ᓇᐃᓴᐅᓯᖅᑕᐅᓂᕐᓄᑦ ᐱᔪᓐᓇᖅᓯᑎᑕᐅᓂᖏᓐᓄᑦ ᐊᕕᒃᑐᖅᓯᒪᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᖃᓄᐃᓐᓂᐅᔪᒧᑦ. ᐅᖃᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᑕᓪᓕᒪᐅᔪᓂ ᐃᓚᒋᔭᐅᔪᓂ ᑲᑎᙵᓂᐅᔪᓂ – ᓵᔾᔭᓐᑦ ᒪᕆᑲ ᓵᙳᐃᓐ, ᐅᓇᑕᖅᑐᒃᓴᙳᐊᑦ ᓘᒐᓐ ᓯᒃᓯᒃ, ᓵᔭᓐᑦ ᐱᓚᑲᑉᓯ ᑕᑎ, ᒫᔅᑐᕐ ᑯᐊᐳᕈᓪ ᓴᒃᑲᑖᖅ ᓴᕙᑕᔅᑭ ᐊᒻᒪᓗ ᑯᐊᐳᕈᓪ ᐄᑕᓐ ᓴᒻᒧᖅᑐᖅ-ᑯᓗᓛ – ᐸᕐᓇᒃᓯᒪᑦᑎᐊᓚᐅᖅᐳᑦ ᐱᔪᓐᓇᕐᓂᓕᒫᒥᓂᑦ ᐊᑭᑦᑐᕋᕐᓂᕐᒧᑦ ᐊᕕᒃᑐᖅᓯᒪᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᑕᐃᒎᓯᖓᓐᓂ ᐊᐅᓪᓚᖅᑎᓪᓗᑎᒃ ᑲᖏᖅᖠᓂᕐᒥ. "ᐊᑭᑦᑐᕋᐅᑎᑲᓚᐅᖅᐳᒍᑦ ᓄᓇᕗᒻᒥ ᐅᓇᑕᖅᑐᒃᓴᙳᐊᓂᑦ ᑎᑎᖅᑲᒃᑯᕕᑎᒍᑦ

ᐊᐅᓪᓚᖅᑎᑕᐅᔭᕆᐊᓕᖕᓂ ᑐᕌᒐᕆᔭᐅᔪᕕᓂᕐᓂ, ᑭᒡᒐᖅᑐᐃᓚᐅᖅᑐᓂ ᐱᓕᕆᑦᑕᕐᓂᖓᓂ ᒪᕐᕈᖓᓂ ᓇᖕᒥᓂᖅ ᓵᓚᖃᕋᓱᐊᕐᓂᐅᔪᓄᑦ," ᐅᖃᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᑑᑑ. ᐱᖓᓱᓂ ᐃᓐᓇᐅᓂᖅᓴᓂ ᐊᒻᒪ ᒪᕐᕉᖕᓂ ᓄᑲᖅᖠᓂᑦ ᐅᓇᑕᖅᑐᒃᓴᙳᐊᓂᑦ ᑕᒪᑐᒪᓂ ᐊᕐᕌᒎᔪᒥ ᑲᑎᙵᓂᐅᔪᓄᑦ, ᐃᓚᖃᖅᖢᑎᒃ ᓯᒃᓯᒃ ᓗᑖᑦᑎᐊᖑᓪᓗᓂ ᐅᓇᑕᖅᑐᒃᓴᙳᐊᖑᔪᒥᑦ ᐱᓕᕆᐊᖑᔪᒧᑦ. ᐊᓯᖏᑦ ᓄᑲᖅᖠᐅᔪᑦ ᐅᓇᑕᖅᑐᒃᓴᙳᐊᔪᖅ ᓴᒻᒧᖅᑐᖅᑯᓗᓛᖑᕗᖅ. ᑲᓇᑕᒥ ᐅᓇᑕᖅᑐᒃᓴᙳᐊᑦ ᖁᑭᖅᓴᑦᑎᐊᕋᓱᐊᕐᓂᕐᒧᑦ ᓵᓚᖃᕋᓱᐊᕐᓂᐅᔪᑦ ᐱᓕᕆᐊᖑᓂᐊᖅᐳᑦ ᕕᒃᑐᐊᕆᐊ, ᐳᕆᑎᔅ ᑲᓚᒻᐱᐊᒥ, ᓯᕗᓪᓕᖅᐹᒥ ᐱᓇᓱᐊᕈᓯᐅᑉ ᓄᙳᐊᓂ ᒪᐃᒥ. ᑑᑑ ᓂᕆᐅᙱᓚᖅ ᑲᑎᙵᓂᐅᔪᑦ ᐅᔭᒥᒃᑕᐅᓂᕐᓄᑦ ᐃᓚᐅᖃᑕᐅᓂᐊᕐᓂᖏᓐᓂ, ᓯᕗᒻᒧᐊᕋᓗᐊᕈᑎᒃ ᑲᓇᑕᒧᑦ ᓵᓚᖃᕋᓱᐊᕐᓂᐅᔪᓄᑦ ᑭᓯᐊᓂ ᐅᖃᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᑲᖏᖅᖠᓂᕐᒥ ᐅᓇᑕᖅᑐᒃᓴᙳᐊᖏᑦ ᐱᕕᒃᓴᖃᑐᐃᓐᓇᕆᐊᓖᑦ. "ᐃᓚᖏᑦ ᓱᕈᓯᐅᔪᑦ, ᑭᓯᐊᓂ, ᐊᔭᐅᖅᑕᐅᓯᑳᓪᓚᓲᖑᕗᑦ ᓵᓚᖃᕋᓱᐊᕐᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᐊᒻᒪᓗ, ᒪᓕᒃᑐᒥ ᖃᐅᔨᓗᑎᑦ, ᓇᖕᒥᓂᖅ ᐱᓕᕆᑦᑎᐊᓛᕆᔭᖓᓃᓕᓲᑦ ᓵᓚᖃᕋᓱᐊᕐᓂᐅᔪᒥ, ᑕᐃᒪᓐᓇ ᖃᐅᔨᒪᓪᓚᕆᒍᓐᓇᙱᓚᒍᑦ," ᐅᖃᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ. ᑲᑎᙵᓂᐅᔪᑦ ᐱᕈᐃᒃᑲᓐᓂᕐᓂᕐᒥᑦ ᐋᖅᑭᒃᓯᒪᕗᑦ ᐊᓯᐅᔨᓚᐅᖅᑎᓪᓗᒋᑦ ᐱᖓ)ᓂ ᐊᖓᔪᖅᖠᓄᑦ ᐅᓇᑕᖅᑐᒃᓴᙳᐊᖏᓐᓂᑦ – ᐊᓐᓄᕌᓕᕆᔨᒻᒪᕆᒃ ᐅᐸᑕᐃᔭ ᓵᙳᐊᓐ, ᐊᓐᓄᕌᓕᕆᔨᒻᒪᕆᒃ ᑕᑖᓐᔭ (ᓂᓐ) ᐊᐅᓱᑦ ᐊᒻᒪ ᒫᔅᑐᕐ ᐊᓐᓄᕌᓕᕆᔨᕐᔪᐊᖅ ᐅᐃᓚᒃ ᐃᕗᕋᐅᑦ – ᐅᑭᐅᖅᑯᖅᑐᓗᐊᓕᓚᐅᖅᑐᓂᑦ

ᑲᖏᖅᖠᓂᕐᒥ 3019 ᐅᓇᑕᖅᑐᒃᓴᙳᐊᑦ, ᓴᐅᒥᖓᓐᓂ, ᓵᔭᓐᑦ ᒪᕆᑲ ᓵᙳᐃᓐ, ᐅᓇᑕᖅᑐᒃᓴᙳᐊᖅ ᓘᒐᓐ ᓯᒃᓯᒃ, ᓵᔾᔭᓐᑦ ᐱᓚᑲᑉᓯ ᑕᑎ, ᒫᔅᑐ ᑯᐊᐳᕈᓪ ᓴᒃᑲᑕᖅ ᓴᕙᑕᔅᑭ ᐊᒻᒪ ᑯᐊᐳᕈᓪ ᐄᑕᓐ ᓴᒻᒧᖅᑐᖅ-ᑯᓗᓛ ᒋᒻᓕᓕᐊᖅᐸᓪᓕᐊᕗᑦ, ᒫᓂᑑᐸᒥ, ᐊᐃᑉᕆᓕ 13-ᖑᑎᓪᓗᒍ ᐱᔪᓐᓇᖅᓯᓚᐅᖅᑎᓪᓗᒋᑦ ᐊᕕᒃᑐᖅᓯᒪᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᓵᓚᖃᕋᓱᐊᕐᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᑕᖅᑭᐅᓚᐅᖅᑐᒥ. 3019 RCACC-ᖑᔪᑦ ᓯᕗᒻᒧᓚᐅᖅᐳᑦ ᑕᐃᑯᖓᓗᒃᑕᖅ ᑲᓇᑕᒧᑦ ᐅᓇᑕᖅᑐᒃᓴᙳᐊᑦ ᖁᑭᖅᓴᑦᑎᐊᕈᓐᓇᕐᓂᐅᔪᒧᑦ ᓵᓚᖃᕋᓱᐊᕐᓂᐅᔪᒥ 2017-ᒥ.

photo courtesy of Dorothy Tootoo

Rankin Inlet 3019 cadets, from left, Sgt. Marikah Sanguin, cadet Logan Siksik, Sgt. Pilakapsi Tatty, Master Cpl. Sakkataaq Zawadski and Cpl. Eden Sammurtok-Kolola were off to Gimli, Man., on April 13 after qualifying for the regional marksmanship competition this past month. The 3019 RCACC advanced all the way to the National Cadet Marksmanship Championship in 2017. ᐱᓕᕆᐊᖑᔪᒧᑦ, ᐅᖃᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᑑᑑ. ᑭᓯᐊᓂ ᐅᓪᓘᑉ ᓄᙳᐊᓂ, ᐅᑯᐊ ᓱᕈᓯᐅᔪᑦ ᖁᑭᖅᓴᕐᓂᕐᒥ ᐊᓕᐊᓇᐃᒋᔭᖃᑦᑎᐊᖅᑐᑦ, ᐅᖃᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ. ᓄᑖᖑᒐᓗᐊᖅᐸᑕ ᐊᖓᔪᒃᖠᐅᒍᑎᒡᓘᓐᓃᑦ

ᐅᓇᑕᖅᑐᒃᓴᙳᐊᖑᓗᑎᒃ; ᐱᕕᒃᓴᖃᖅᑎᑕᐅᒍᑎᒃ ᓂᕈᐊᖅᓯᓂᖏᓐᓄᑦ ᓇᖕᒥᓂᖅ ᖃᓄᐃᓕᐅᕐᓂᐅᔪᒥ, 90 ᐳᓴᓐᑎᖏᑦ ᖁᑭᖅᓴᕆᐊᕈᒪᓇᔭᖅᐳᑦ, ᐃᓚᒋᐊᖅᓯᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ. "ᖁᑭᖅᓴᕐᓂᕐᒧᑦ

ᐊᔪᕈᓐᓃᖅᓴᖃᑦᑕᓗᐊᒧᑦ ᐅᓇᑕᖅᑐᒃᓴᐃᑦ ᓇᒃᓯᐅᔾᔨᑲᑕᒋᐊᖃᒃᑲᓐᓂᖅᐳᑦ ᓱᓇᒐᙳᐊᓂ ᐊᕐᕌᒍᑕᒫᒥ," ᐅᖃᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᑑᑑ. "ᐱᓕᒻᒪᒃᓴᐃᓐᓇᐅᔭᖅᐳᒍᑦ ᐊᐃᑉᐹᓂ, ᕿᑎᖅᑰᒥ ᐊᒻᒪ ᓯᕙᑖᕐᕕᖕᒥ, ᑕᐃᒫᒃ ᖁᑭᖅᓴᕐᔪᐊᕐᓂᐅᕗᑦ."


KIVALLIQ NEWS, Wednesday, April 11, 2018

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opinions ᓄwhmK5

r?9o3u iWK5, WzJx8i, wSD 11, 2018 5

Mary Jane at the door Northern News Services

Despite the growing evidence debunking the long-held stance (by some) that marijuana is a gateway drug leading to the use of much heavier drugs, those who bought into the flawed theory decades ago stubbornly hang onto a time-proven weapon to perpetuate belief in the myth – fearmongering! And they're not doing anyone any favours, especially you and your family. Precious few topics today can be as polarizing among family members as marijuana's justified place in the world, or lack thereof, especially as its legalization creeps ever nearer. One of the biggest problems over the marijuana "debate" is that it is most often being carried out on both sides by fanatics. War on drugs – all drugs – good! Marijuana legalization bad! And, of course, conversely, marijuana is good for everyone and cures everything that ails you. End of story. Well, how can you argue with that? It's a rule as ironclad as 'you can't start a sentence with a conjunction'. And we all know there's plenty of folks out there who treat that rule as if it came down the mount with Moses. The problem is, it's a "rule" with with no historical or grammatical foundation. It simply doesn't exist. Yet, literally hundreds of millions of people would argue the opposite with you tomorrow. For any discussion to have validity, it must also have truth and honesty, and that's where the wheels start to fall off with many discussions on the pros and cons of having Mary Jane come

ed that 83 per cent of illicit drug users for a visit. The fanatics themselves are often did not start out smoking pot. Most people will now concede the biggest contributors to the problem because, as with all fanaticism, (unless you live in a cave or are a neither side will give an inch, nor will fanatic) that there is mounting evithey stop at anything to prove their dence that factors such as poverty and poor social environment are point. a greater predictor of hard And, of course, both sides drug use than early exposwill use any weapon at their ure to soft drugs. disposal to strike fear into On the other side of the the other or cloud the issue. equation, little companThat's important, because ies that dream of one day we all know its medicinal becoming "weed" megastar value is at the heart of the corporations have long been marijuana debate. betting that law enforceHowever, if you want little ment has become someBobby's parents to fiercely DARRELL what disinterested in mariwant no part of the drug cul- GREER juana with its legalization ture, than what better way so close. than to have them believe They have been filling e-mail boxes today's weed is tomorrow's heroin? Not only is fear-mongering success- across North America with informaful in its direct approach, it also enjoys tion on every form of marijuana conceivable, including various oils and great peripheral success. The stories have already begun to the back-in-vogue-again edibles buffet be told how, when faced with the section. A bold move? Yes. Getting a little legalization of marijuana – a day they never thought would come – those on ahead of themselves? Perhaps. Getthe end-justifies-the-means side of the ting a big jump on a voluminous marequation were not above introducing ket that has yet to be clearly identiFentanyl into an already out-of-control fied? Most definitely. Success? Only time will tell. opioid crisis. What does legalized marijuana That is scary stuff, indeed, to even mean to you? Your family? try to comprehend. There is a ton of information out As far back as 1999, the U.S.'s Institute of Medicine of the National there. Don't kid yourself. The "weed" will Academy of Sciences declared that there is no conclusive evidence that be legalized soon. The more (credible) information you the drug effects of marijuana are causally linked to the subsequent abuse of absorb, the better equipped you are to decide what role, if any, the legalizaother illicit drugs. And a 2010 study in Japan conclud- tion of marijuana will play in your life.

ᒪᒪᖅᑐᖅ ᓂᕆᔭᕋ ᐊᑭᐅᕈᓐᓃᓕᖅᑐᖅ

ᐊᖅᑲᖃᖅ ᑕᓄᔭᖅ, ᓴᐅᒥᐊᓂᑦ, ᑭᓕ-ᐋᓐ ᑲᑕᒑᓯᐊᖅ, ᑖᓂ ᑕᓄᔭᒃ, ᖃᔮᓛᖅ ᓖᓯᒪᓐ-ᐳᕌᑯᓪᐹᖕᒃ ᐊᒻᒪᓗ ᐃᕙᓗ ᓖᔅᒪᓐ-ᐳᕌᑯᓪᐹᖕᒃ ᒪᒪᑕᒃᑐᑦ ᓵᑦᑐᔮᓕᐊᒥᒃ ᐅᓪᓛᕈᒻᒥᑕᖅᑎᓪᓗᒋᑦ ᑕᒪᑐᒪᓂ ᕕᒃᑐ ᓴᒻᒧᖅᑐ ᐃᓕᓴᕕᐊᓂ ᐃᒡᓗᓕᒑᕐᔪᒃᒥ.

Contents copyright. Printed in the North by Canarctic Graphics Limited. No photos, stories, advertisements or graphics may be reproduced in any form, in whole or in part, without the written approval of the publisher.www. albertapresscouncil.ca Member of the Alberta Press Council, an independent, voluntary body that serves to protect the public's right to full, fair and accurate news reporting. As a non-judicial, non-government review board, the Press Council considers complaints from the public about the conduct and performances of weekly and daily newspapers in Alberta and the NWT. The press council encourages the highest ethical and professional standards of journalism. It serves to preserve the freedom of the press and provide a forum for greater understanding. Complaints should go to: Alberta Press Council, P.O. Box 21067, Edmonton, AB., T6R 2V4 Email: abpress@telus.net Fax: 1-780-435-0441 www.albertapresscouncil.ca Subscriptions One year mail $65 Online (entire content) $50/year SEND US YOUR COMMENTS

You can email us at kivalliqnews@nnsl.com; mail to Box 2820, Yellowknife X1A 2R1; or drop your letter off at our office at 5108-50th Street. All letters submitted must be signed with a return address and daytime telephone number so that we can confirm it came from you. Not all letters will necessarily be published. Preference is given to short letters of broad interest or concern. We particularly encourage new contributors as we attempt to publish a cross-section of public opinion. Letters of more than 200 words, open letters and those published elsewhere are seldom used. We reserve the right to edit for length or taste and to eliminate inaccurate or libelous statements. We may also choose to use a letter as the basis for a story. We acknowledge the financial support of the Government of Canada.

Nous reconnaissons l'appui financier du gouvernement du Canada.

YUMMY IN THE TUMMY

photo courtesy of Glen Brocklebank

Aqaaqaq Tanuyak, clockwise from left, Kailey-Anne Kategatsiak, Dawny Tanuyak, Kayalaaq Leishman-Brocklebank and Ivalu Leishman-Brocklebank enjoy a tasty pancake breakfast earlier this semester at Victor Sammurtok School in Chesterfield Inlet.


6 KIVALLIQ NEWS, Wednesday, April 11, 2018

news ᓄá·∆¿ÖÀî

r?9o3u iWK5, WzJx8i, wSD 11, 2018

Hundreds awed at Easter festival Fire department hosts second annual Eggstravaganza

by Darrell Greer

Northern News Services

ᓄᑕᕋᑯᓗᐃᑦ ᐅᐸᖃᑦᑕᓚᐅᕐᒪᑕ ᒪᑭᕝᕕᐊᓂ ᐅᑲᓕᖑᐊᒧᑦ ᐅᓐᓄᒃᓴᓕᖅᑎᓪᓗᒍ ᑕᒪᑐᒪᓂ ᓄᖅᑲᖓᓇᕐᓂᖓᓂ.

Rankin Inlet

When all was said and done, the second annual Easter Eggstravaganza outdid the hype and delivered a memorable day for the community of Rankin Inlet on March 31. Somewhere between 300 and 400 kids enjoyed the egg hunt and an early afternoon of hot dogs, hot chocolate and toasted marshmallows. The festivities came to an end with a bang at 10 p.m. with a fireworks display that sent everyone home with a smile on their faces and a little extra warmth in their hearts. Building on his experience conducting a fireworks display at Christmas, Rankin Inlet Fire Chief Mark Wyatt impressed the crowd with a dazzling pyrotechnics display. "Every show we do we're going to make it a little bit better, so the next one we do is going to be better than this one and we'll just continue from there." Rather than lighting every individual firework, members tied each set of fireworks together so lighting one fuse set off 10 shells, he said. "That made everything a lot smoother and a little bit safer, as well, for the people who were firing them," said Wyatt. The department spent about $5,000 on the second annual Easter Eggstravaganza, said Wyatt. He said the money spent on the celebration is an investment of goodwill between the community and the department. "We do an awful lot in terms of raising money within the community, and our community is very supportive when we're doing fundraising events like our bingo games, galas and raffles," said Wyatt. "We raised a fair amount of money in Rankin Inlet for things we needed within the department. We bought a side-by-side this year, which we're road-fitting for rescue and tundra fires. We also bought a Jaws of Life this year, and we're looking at an extension to the fire hall, as well as building the garage out front." Wyatt said every purchase and improve-

Children were drawn to the Easter Bunny all afternoon during the holiday event. ment is being paid for by money the department raises in the community. He said department members putting on events for the community is a way of showing appreciation for what people do for them. "Sometimes, for us to just volunteer our time and do things that puts smiles on kids faces – and things that otherwise wouldn't hap-

pen in this community – is, I would have to say, a win-win situation for everyone, especially the kids," said Wyatt. "We have, probably, the largest group of volunteers in town and we have the ability sometimes to be able to do stuff for the community and that's why we do it." Wyatt said he estimates that somewhere in the neighbourhood of 400 kids came out for the

photos courtesy of Mark Wyatt

Eggstravaganza. He said the department also gave away at least 400 hot dogs during the event. "The hot dogs were really popular, and one of the things that worked out really well was having the bonfire and giving kids the opportunity to roast their own hot dog and marshmallow," he said. "That was quite popular, as well."

ᐊᑭᓕᖅᓱᖅᑕᐅᓇᑎᒃ ᐃᑲᔪᖅᑎ ᓇᑖᓂᐊᓪ ᕼᐊᑦᓯᓴᓐ ᐊᒻᒪᓗ ᑲᑕᕆᓇ ᑖᑎ ᐆᓇᖅᑐᒥᒃ ᑯᑯᑐᖅᑎᑦᑎᔪᑦ ᓄᑕᕋᑯᓗᖕᓂᒃ ᑕᒪᑐᒪᓂ ᒪᑭᕝᕕᐊᓂ ᖁᕕᐊᓱᒃᑎᓪᓗᒋᑦ ᒪᓐᓂᓂᒃ ᐃᔨᖅᑕᐅᓯᒪᔪᓂᒃ ᕿᓂᖅᑎᑕᐅᓪᓗᑎᒃ ᕗᐅᓕᐊᒻ ᑕᓯᖓᓂ ᑲᖏᖅᖠᓂᕐᒥ ᒫᔨ 31-ᒥ.

Volunteers Nathaniel Hutchinson and Catherine Tatty serve hot chocolate to an eager line of kids at the Easter Eggstravaganza on Williamson Lake in Rankin Inlet on March 31.


KIVALLIQ NEWS, Wednesday, April 11, 2018

photo story

r?9o3u iWK5, WzJx8i, wSD 11, 2018 7

ᓄphoto stories

Easter brings out the smiles Northern News Services

The second annual Easter Eggstravaganza was a wondrous success on Williamson Lake in Rankin Inlet on March 31. Hundreds of children were left smiling by a day of festivities and a dazzling fireworks display that evening, which brought the event to an official close.

EASTER Feature

ᖃᑦᑎᕆᔨᒃᑯᑦ ᐊᖓᔪᖅᑳᖓ ᑕᐅᑐᒋᐊᖅᑐᖅᓯᒪᓪᓗᑎᒃ.

ᒫᒃ

ᕗᐊᐃᐊᑦ

ᐱᖃᑎᐊᓗ

ᐃᐊᓪᐳᑦ

ᖃᕝᕕᐅᖅ

ᐊᓐᓄᕌᖅᑐᖅᓯᒪᑦᑎᐊᖅᑐᑦ

ᖁᕕᐊᓱᒃᑐᓂᒃ

by Mark Wyatt Rankin Inlet

ᑕᑯᔭᒃᓴᐃᑦ

ᐅᓐᓄᒃᑯᑦ ᓯᓚᒥ ᖃᐅᒻᒪᓪᓛᔪᓂᒃ ᑕᐅᑐᒃᑎᑕᐅᓚᐅᖅᑐᑦ ᒪᑭᕝᕕᐊᓂ ᖁᕕᐊᓱᒃᑐᑦ ᐃᓱᓕᓕᖅᑎᓪᓗᒍ ᑐᖓᓕᖓᓂ ᒪᓐᓂᓂᒃ ᐃᔨᖅᑕᐅᓯᒪᔪᓂᒃ ᓯᓚᒥ ᕿᓂᓚᐅᖅᑎᓪᓗᒋᑦ ᖁᕕᐊᓲᑎᖃᓚᐅᕐᒪᑕ ᕗᐃᓕᐊᒻ ᑕᓯᖓᓂ ᑲᖏᖅᓕᓂᕐᒥ ᒫᔨ 31-ᒥ.

A sparkling fireworks display was the perfect way to officially close the second annual Easter Eggstravaganza and holiday celebration on Williamson Fire Chief Mark Wyatt and young Albert Kabvitok are well protected from the elements. Lake in Rankin Inlet on March 31. ᓄᑕᕋᑯᓗᐃᑦ ᑕᒪᐃᑕᓕᒫᖅ ᐃᓚᐅᓕᓚᐅᖅᑐᑦ ᒪᒪᖅᑐᓂᒃ ᐃᒐᔪᓂ ᑕᒪᑐᒪᓂ ᒪᓐᓂᓂᒃ ᓯᓚᒥ ᕿᓂᓚᐅᖅᑎᓪᓗᒋᑦ. ᖁᕕᐊᓱᒃᑐᑦ ᐊᒥᓱᑦ ᑮᓇᐃᑦ ᑕᑯᒃᓴᐅᓕᓚᐅᖅᑐᑦ ᒪᐃᒃ ᓯᑯᓯᑎᑐᑦ ᑕᒪᑐᒪᓂ ᐅᖅᑰᔪᑕᐅᓚᐅᖅᑐᑦ ᐃᒃᑮᕌᓗᖕᒥ ᓯᓚᒥ ᒪᑭᕝᕕᐊᓂ ᓄᓇᓕᖕᒥᐅᑦ ᐊᓃᕋᔭᒃᖢᑎᒃ ᖁᕕᐊᓱᒃᑎᓪᓗᒋᑦ.

Kids of all ages were trying their hands at toasting marshmallows during the Eggstravaganza.

Happy faces like Mick Skuce's were the order of the day at the holiday celebration.


8 KIVALLIQ NEWS, Wednesday, April 11, 2018

sports & recreation

Îé¯≤ú & ÄÎÖ∏ÙÄÕÍ≤Ò

r?9o3u iWK5, WzJx8i, wSD 11, 2018

Kivalliq performs well in Winnipeg Jr. Canucks squad has strong showing at Indigenous Minor Hockey Tournament by Darrell Greer

Northern News Services

Winnipeg

The atom and peewee Kivalliq Jr. Canucks squads put in strong showings at the 31st annual Indigenous Minor Hockey Tournament hosted by the Manitoba Indigenous Cultural Education Centre (MICEC) in Winnipeg, Man., from March 23 to 25. The atoms went 1-2 in their double-knockout play, losing their final game 3-2 with the winning goal being scored in the final minute of play, while the peewee team went through the tournament undefeated until they ran up against Pinaymootang, losing the tourney final 6-5 in overtime. Kivalliq's David Clark of Rankin Inlet was named the peewee division's top coach, while the Jr. Canucks' Russell Matoo was named the division's top defenceman. Team general manager Gleason Uppahuak of Arviat said the Kivalliq Jr. Canucks use regional tournaments such as the Powerful Peewee and Arctic Atoms to select most of their players. He said head coach Clark handles the player selections, while he takes care of all the administrative tasks. "I let (Clark) work his magic when it comes to selecting the players," said Uppahuak. "He and his dad (Donald) are, in my opinion, the top of the line for Nunavut hockey coaches, so I let them do what they do best." Uppahuak said they decided this past fall to move all the minor hockey tournaments up a little bit in Rankin Inlet this year. The tournaments now run in January and February, which gives them more time to prepare their teams for the southern tournaments they compete in during March and April, he said. "We're proud of the effort our atoms and peewees put in, and I have high hopes for our bantam team this month," said Uppahuak.

ᐊᐃᑦᑖᕈᓱᒃᑐᓂ ᑲᑎᙵᓂᐅᔪᓂ ᑭᕙᓪᓕᕐᒥ ᓄᑲᖅᖠᑦ ᑲᓇᒃᔅ ᐲᕖ ᐱᙳᐊᖅᑏᑦ ᑲᑎᙵᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᐊᔾᔨᓕᐅᖅᑕᐅᓇᓱᒃᐳᑦ ᐅᒡᒍᓇᖅᑐᒥ 6-5 ᖄᖏᐅᑎᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᓵᓚᒋᔭᐅᓚᐅᖅᑎᓪᓗᒋᑦ MICEC-ᑯᑦ 31-ᖓᓂ ᐊᕐᕌᒍᑕᒫᒥ ᓄᓇᖃᖅᑳᖅᓯᒪᔪᓄᑦ ᕼᐋᑭᖅᑎᕋᓛᓂᑦ ᓵᓚᖃᕋᓱᐊᕐᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᑭᖑᓪᓕᖅᐹᖓᓂ. ᑐᓄᐊᓂ ᓴᐅᒥᖕᒥ, ᐃᑲᔪᖅᑎᐅᔪᑦ ᐊᔪᕆᖅᓱᐃᕙᒃᑐᓂ ᑳᓄᕐ ᕚᓪᒃᓄᕐ, ᓯᑦᓂ ᓂᑰᓪ ᐊᒻᒪ ᑮᓇᓐ ᐃᑦᑐᖅ, ᐊᒻᒪ ᐊᐅᓚᑦᑎᔨᖓᑦ ᒋᓖᓴᓐ ᐅᑉᐸᕼᐅᐊᒃ, ᐊᒻᒪ, ᕿᑎᐊᓂ ᓴᐅᒥᖓᓐᓂ, ᑕᐃᕕᑦ ᑲᓛᒃ (ᐊᔪᕆᖅᓱᐃᔨᒻᒪᕆᖓ), ᒪᑲᓐᓯ ᐳᑐᒥᕋᖅᑐᖅ, ᐳᕋᐃᒻ ᐸᓂᔪᒃ, ᒍᕋᒍᕆ ᐅᐊᔅᒪᓐ, ᐄᑕᓐ ᖁᒃᓱᒃ, ᔭᔅᑎᓐ ᐃᑦᑐᖅ, ᐆᕙᓐ ᑳᓇᓕ-ᑲᓛᒃ, ᓵᓐᑎ ᑕᑦᑐᐃᓂ, ᕋᓱᓪ ᒪᑐ, ᐱᐊᓐ ᑯᓱᒐᖅ, ᑲᐃᑎᓐ ᐃᑦᑐᖅ ᐊᒻᒪ ᐅᐃᓕᐊᒻ ᐅᑉᐸᕼᐅᐊᒃ, ᐊᒻᒪ, ᓯᕗᓂᐊᓂ ᓴᐅᒥᖕᒥ, ᒫᒃ ᑲᓪᓗᐊᒃ, ᐱᐊᓐ ᑐᓗᒐᖅ, ᔨᒥ ᐆᓕ, ᑎᐊᕆᓐᔅ ᐱᓚᑲᑉᓯ, ᕌᒻᓯ ᐃᑦᑐᖅ, ᕌᑦᓂ ᓇᑯᓛᖅ ᐊᒻᒪ ᑕᐃᔪᕐ ᑯᒪᒃᔪᐊᖅ ᐅᐃᓂᐸᐃᒡ, ᒫᓂᑑᐸᒥ, ᒫᔾᔨ 24-ᖑᑎᓪᓗᒍ.

photo courtesy of David Clark

A distraught group of Kivalliq Jr. Canucks peewee players try to pose for a team photo after a heartbreaking 6-5 overtime loss in the MICEC's 31st annual Indigenous Minor Hockey Tournament final. Back row from left, assistant coaches Connor Faulkner, Sidney Nichol and Keenan Eetuk, and general manager Gleason Uppahuak, and, middle row from left, David Clark (head coach), Mackenzie Putumiraqtuq, Prime Paniyuk, Gregory Wiseman, Ethan Kuksuk, Justin Eetuk, Owen Connelly-Clark, Sandy Tattuinee, Russell Matoo, Ben Kusugak, Kadin Eetuk and William Uppahuak, and, front from left, Mark Kalluak, Ben Tulugak, Jimmy Ollie, Terence Pilakapsi, Ramsey Eetuk, Rodney Nakoolak and Thayer Komakjuak in Winnipeg, Man., on March 24. "The Kivalliq is hockey, and we're already excited about our Jr. Canucks peewee squad for next year because about 80 per cent of the players who made the team this year will be returning for the 2018-19 season." Because of a scheduling conflict with the Arctic Winter Games, the Jr. Canucks couldn't send the bantams to the Indigenous Minor Hockey Tournament, so Uppahuak will have them playing in another Indigenous

hockey tournament being hosted by the Manitoba Aboriginal Sports and Recreation Council later this month. Clark said the minor tourneys Rankin hosts are imperative to selecting the Canucks squads. He and his assistants put every player in a given tournament up on a board in the coach's room before play begins and during the course of the weekend the names are whittled down to the selected team, he said. "I coach, ref or watch every game

in the tournament," said Clark. "We take advice from the local coaches and, as the weekend goes on, we start narrowing our list down and start watching the players a little bit more closely, taking note of their attitudes and the way they act around the rink both on and off the ice." Clark said that while some teams at the MICEC tournament would struggle in Kivalliq tournaments, most are equal to or a bit ahead of where the Kivalliq is at in terms

of player development. Most of the MICEC teams would do very well at the Kivalliq tournaments, he added. "It's a good mix and it's good for our kids to see we're right there with the better teams and we're doing well when we get to these tournaments," he said. "I had compliments all weekend on how our peewees play a team game, and the boys stick to their positions and play hockey the right way, so that made me quite happy to hear."


KIVALLIQ NEWS, Wednesday, April 11, 2018

amazing on-the-land stories

ᔪᐊᓇ ᓇᐹᖅᑐᓛᖅ ᓂᖏᐅᑦᓯᐊᖅ

ᓴᓪᓕᕐᒥᐅᖅ

ᐋᓐᑐᕉ-ᔮᓐ ᓂᖏᐅᑦᓯᐊᖅ, 2014-ᒥ.

JOANNA NAPAQTULAAQ NINGEOCHEAK Coral Harbour

Andrew-John Ningeocheak, 2014.

ᑲᔾᔮᕐᓇᖅᑐᓂᒃ ᓄᓇᒥ ᐅᓂᒃᑳᑦ

ᑕᐃᓯ ᑲᑕᓗᒃ

ᖃᒪᓂ’ᑐᐊᒥᐅᖅ

ᐅᕙᓂ ᐱᓚᒃᑐᐃᕌᓂᕋᑖᖅᑎᓪᓗᑕ ᐃᕐᓂᒪ ᐊᑕᔪᑉ ᑐᒃᑐᑕᖓᓂᒃ. ᐸᕐᓇᓕᖅᑎᓪᓗᑕ ᐅᑎᒧᑦ ᐊᓯᕙᖅᓯᒪᓚᐅᖅᖢᑕ ᒪᑭᕝᕕᐊᓂ ᓄᖅᑲᖓᓐᓇᖅᑎᓪᓗᒍ. ᐃᕐᓂᕋ 16-ᓂᒃ ᑕᖅᑭᖃᓕᖅᑎᓪᓗᒍ.

DAISY KATALUK Baker Lake

Just finished my son Elliot Kataluk's tuktu atayuq. Getting ready to head out camping Easter weekend. He is 16 months old.

ᐊᑭᓯᔪᖅ: ᐃᓖᓴ ᓇᔪᒥ ᐃᑦᑐᓗᒃ

ᐱᑕ ᐊᕈᓛᖅ ᒋᐱᓐᔅ

ᑕᓗᕐᔪᐊᕐᒥᐅᖅ

ᑲᓄᕙᒃ ᐃᑦᑐᓗᒃ ᐱᖑᐊᕈᓯᖃᖅᑎᓪᓗᒍ ᓂᕿᒥᓂᒃ ᐱᑦᓯᒥᒃ ᑕᓗᕐᔪᐊᑉ ᓯᓚᑖᓂ ᑕᖕᒪᖅᓯᒪᑎᓪᓗᒋᑦ 2012/13-ᒥ.

r?9o3u iWK5, WzJx8i, wSD 11, 2018 9

ᐃᓚᐅᔪᒪᒍᕕᑦ ᐱᓇᓱᐊᕈᓯᐅᓂᐊᖅᑐᒥ ᓇᓚᐅᑦᑖᖅᑐᓂ, ᐅᖃᕆᐊᖃᕐᓂᐊᖅᑐᑎᑦ ᐃᓯᕈᓐᓇᐅᑎᒥᒃ ᖃᐅᔨᒪᔭᕐᓂᒃ.

ᓴᓪᓕᒥᐅᖅ

ᒫᔨ 6, 2018-ᒥ ᓴᓪᓕᒦᑎᓪᓗᑕ ᓇᓅᑉ ᑐᒥᖏᓐᓂᒃ ᒪᓕᒃᖢᑕ ᐱᖃᑎᒋᓪᓗᒍ ᓄᐊ ᑲᓪᓚᒃ.

ᑕᒪᑐᒪᓂ ᐱᓇᓱᐊᕈᓯᑦᑎᓐᓂ ᐃᓯᕈᓐᓇᐅᑎ ᑕᐃᓗᒍ ᐊᒪᐅᑎ.

Born to hunt Northern News Services

Do you have an amazing story from your adventures on the land? Tell us your story and show us your photos for a chance to win $100. Each week, we will pick one story from those submitted to editor@nunavutnews.com, or by mail to Nunavut News, PO Box 28, Iqaluit, NU, X0A 0H0. Entries will be placed on our Facebook page. The story and photo with the most combined Likes and Shares at the end of the week wins. This week's winner is Eliza Naomi Eetoolook. Congratulations!

WINNER: ELIZA NAOMI EETOOLOOK Taloyoak

Kanovak Eetoolook playing with Arctic char dry fish outside of Taloyoak, 2012/13.

To enter next week's contest, you'll need to tell us the secret word.

THIS WEEK'S SECRET WORD IS AMAUTI.

PETER ARULAAQ GIBBONS Coral Harbour

March 6, 2018 when I was in Coral Harbour we were following the polar bear with Noah Kadlak.


sports & recreation Îé¯≤ú & ÄÎÖ∏ÙÄÕÍ≤Ò

ᐱᓕᕆᐊᖑᔪᒥ ᐱᕈᖅᓴᐃᓂᖅ 10 KIVALLIQ NEWS, Wednesday, April 11, 2018

r?9o3u iWK5, WzJx8i, wSD 11, 2018

ᑭᕙᓪᓕᕐᒥ ᓄᑲᖅᖠᑦ ᑲᓇᒃᔅ ᐱᙳᐊᖅᑎᖏᑦ ᐱᓕᕆᑦᑎᐊᖅᐳᑦ ᐱᕙᓪᓕᐊᑎᑕᐅᖏᓐᓇᖅᑎᓪᓗᒍ

ᐋᑕᒻ ᐊᒻᒪ ᐲᕖ ᑭᕙᓪᓕᕐᒥ ᐊᓪᓚᕕᓕᕆᓂᕐᒧᑦ ᐱᓕᕆᐊᒃᓴᐅᔪᓂᑦ. ᐊᐃᑦᑖᕈᓱᒃᑐᓂ ᑲᑎᙵᓂᐅᔪᓂ ᑭᕙᓪᓕᕐᒥ ᓄᑲᖅᖠᑦ ᑲᓇᒃᔅ ᐲᕖ ᐱᙳᐊᖅᑏᑦ ᑲᑎᙵᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᐊᔾᔨᓕᐅᖅᑕᐅᓇᓱᒃᐳᑦ ᓄᑲᖅᖠᑦ ᑲᓇᒃᔅ ᐱᙳᐊᖅᑎᐅᔪᑦ "(ᑲᓛᒃ) ᐱᓕᕆᑎᑉᐸᒃᐸᕋ ᐅᒡᒍᓇᖅᑐᒥ 6-5 ᖄᖏᐅᑎᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᓵᓚᒋᔭᐅᓚᐅᖅᑎᓪᓗᒋᑦ MICEC-ᑯᑦ 31-ᖓᓂ ᐊᕐᕌᒍᑕᒫᒥ ᓄᓇᖃᖅᑳᖅᓯᒪᔪᓄᑦ ᓴᙱᔪᒥ ᑕᑯᒃᓴᐅᑎᑦᑎᓂᖃᓚᐅᖅᐳᑦ ᐱᓕᕆᑦᑎᐊᕐᓂᕆᒋᕙᒃᑕᖓᓂ ᕼᐋᑭᖅᑎᕋᓛᓂᑦ ᓵᓚᖃᕋᓱᐊᕐᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᑭᖑᓪᓕᖅᐹᖓᓂ. ᑐᓄᐊᓂ ᓴᐅᒥᖕᒥ, ᐃᑲᔪᖅᑎᐅᔪᑦ ᐊᔪᕆᖅᓱᐃᕙᒃᑐᓂ ᑳᓄᕐ 31-ᖓᓂ ᐊᕐᕌᒍᑕᒫᒥ ᓂᕈᐊᖅᓯᔭᕆᐊᖃᓕᕌᖓᑕ ᕚᓪᒃᓄᕐ, ᓯᑦᓂ ᓂᑰᓪ ᐊᒻᒪ ᑮᓇᓐ ᐃᑦᑐᖅ, ᐊᒻᒪ ᐊᐅᓚᑦᑎᔨᖓᑦ ᒋᓖᓴᓐ ᐅᑉᐸᕼᐅᐊᒃ, ᐊᒻᒪ, ᕿᑎᐊᓂ ᓴᐅᒥᖓᓐᓂ, ᓄᓇᖃᖅᑳᖅᓯᒪᔪᓄᑦ ᕼᐋᑭᖅᑎᕋᓛᓂᑦ ᐱᙳᐊᖅᑎᓂᑦ," ᐅᖃᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᑕᐃᕕᑦ ᑲᓛᒃ (ᐊᔪᕆᖅᓱᐃᔨᒻᒪᕆᖓ), ᒪᑲᓐᓯ ᐳᑐᒥᕋᖅᑐᖅ, ᐳᕋᐃᒻ ᐸᓂᔪᒃ, ᒍᕋᒍᕆ ᐅᐊᔅᒪᓐ, ᐄᑕᓐ ᖁᒃᓱᒃ, ᔭᔅᑎᓐ ᓵᓚᖃᕋᓱᐊᕐᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᑲᒪᒋᔭᐅᔪᒥ ᐅᑉᐸᕼᐅᐊᒃ. "ᐊᑖᑕᒌᒃ (ᑕᓄᑦ) ᐃᑦᑐᖅ, ᐆᕙᓐ ᑳᓇᓕ-ᑲᓛᒃ, ᓵᓐᑎ ᑕᑦᑐᐃᓂ, ᕋᓱᓪ ᒪᑐ, ᐱᐊᓐ ᑯᓱᒐᖅ, ᑲᐃᑎᓐ ᐃᑦᑐᖅ ᐊᒻᒪ ᐅᐃᓕᐊᒻ ᐅᑉᐸᕼᐅᐊᒃ, ᐊᒻᒪ, ᒫᓂᑑᐸᒥ ᓄᓇᖃᖅᑳᖅᓯᒪᔪᓄᑦ ᐃᓱᒪᒋᔭᓐᓂᑦ, ᖁᑦᑎᓛᖑᕗᑦ ᓄᓇᕗᒻᒥ ᓯᕗᓂᐊᓂ ᓴᐅᒥᖕᒥ, ᒫᒃ ᑲᓪᓗᐊᒃ, ᐱᐊᓐ ᑐᓗᒐᖅ, ᔨᒥ ᐆᓕ, ᑎᐊᕆᓐᔅ ᐱᓚᑲᑉᓯ, ᕌᒻᓯ ᐃᑦᑐᖅ, ᕌᑦᓂ ᓇᑯᓛᖅ ᐊᒻᒪ ᐃᓕᖅᑯᓯᓕᕆᔨᒃᑯᓐᓄᑦ (MICEC) ᕼᐋᑭᒧᑦ ᐊᔪᕆᖅᓱᐃᕙᖕᓂᖏᓐᓄᑦ." ᐅᐃᓂᐸᐃᒡ, ᒫᓂᑑᐸᒥ, ᒫᔾᔨ 23-25-ᒧᑦ. "ᐅᐱᒍᓱᒃᐳᖓ ᐊᒃᓱᕈᓚᐅᕐᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᑕᐃᔪᕐ ᑯᒪᒃᔪᐊᖅ ᐅᐃᓂᐸᐃᒡ, ᒫᓂᑑᐸᒥ, ᒫᔾᔨ 24-ᖑᑎᓪᓗᒍ. ᐋᑕᒻᔅ ᐱᙳᐊᓚᐅᖅᐳᑦ 1-2 ᐋᑕᒻᔅᕗᑦ ᐊᒻᒪ ᐲᕖᓄᑦ ᒪᕐᕈᐃᖅᑐᒥ-ᓵᓚᖃᕋᓱᐊᕐᓂᐅᔪᒥ, ᐃᓕᓯᓚᐅᕐᓂᖏᓐᓂ, ᖁᑦᑎᒃᑐᒥ ᓵᓚᐅᓪᓗᑎᒃ ᑭᖑᓪᓕᖅᐹᖓᓂ ᓂᕆᐅᖕᓂᖃᖅᐳᖓ ᐹᓐᑕᒻ-ᖁᑎᑦᑎᓐᓄᑦ ᐱᙳᐊᕐᓂᖏᓐᓂ 3-2-ᒥ ᑕᒪᑐᒪᓂ ᑕᖅᑭᐅᔪᒥ," ᐅᖃᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᓵᓚᖃᖅᑐᒥ ᐃᓯᖅᓯᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᐅᑉᐸᕼᐅᐊᒃ. "ᑭᕙᓪᓕᖅ ᕼᐋᑭᐅᕗᖅ, ᑭᖑᓪᓕᖅᐹᖑᔪᓂ ᒥᓂᑦ-ᖑᔪᒥ ᐊᒻᒪᓗ ᖁᕕᐊᑉᐳᒍᑦ ᓄᑲᖅᖠᑦ ᑲᓇᒃᔅ ᐱᙳᐊᕐᓂᐅᔪᒧᑦ, ᐲᕖ ᐱᙳᐊᖅᑏᑦ ᐲᕖ ᐱᙳᐊᖅᑎᐅᔪᓂ ᐊᕐᕌᒎᓂᐊᖅᑐᒧᑦ ᓵᓚᖃᕋᓱᐊᕐᓂᐅᔪᒃᑰᓚᐅᖅᐳᑦ 80 ᐳᓴᓐᑎᐸᓗᖕᓂ ᐱᙳᐊᖅᑎᓂᑦ ᓵᓚᒋᔭᐅᙱᓐᓇᖅᖢᑎᒃ ᑭᓯᐊᓂ ᑲᑎᙵᓂᐅᓄᐊᓚᐅᖅᑐᓄᑦ ᑕᒪᑐᒪᓂ ᐱᙳᐊᓕᕐᒪᑕ ᐱᓇᐃᒧᑖᖕ-ᑯᓐᓂ, ᐊᕐᕌᒍᒥ ᐅᑎᕐᓂᐊᕐᒪᑕ 2018-19 ᓵᓚᒋᔭᐅᓪᓗᑎᒃ ᓴᓚᖃᕋᓱᐊᕐᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᐱᙳᐊᕐᓂᖓᓐᓂ." 6-5-ᒥ ᖄᖏᐅᑎᓂᐅᔪᒥ. ᑲᓛᒃ ᐅᖃᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᑭᕙᓪᓕᐅᑉ ᑕᐃᕕᑦ ᑲᓛᒃ ᕼᐋᑭᖅᑎᕋᓛᖑᔪᓄᑦ ᓵᓚᖃᕋᓱᐊᕐᓂᐅᔪᑦ ᑲᖏᖅᖠᓂᕐᒥᐅᑕᖅ ᐊᑦᑎᖅᑕᐅᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᑲᖏᖅᖠᓂᕐᒥ ᑲᒪᒋᕙᒃᑕᖏᓐᓂ ᐲᕖᓄᑦ ᐊᕕᒃᓯᒪᓂᐅᔪᒥ ᖁᑦᑎᓛᖑᓪᓗᓂ ᐱᒻᒪᕆᐅᕗᑦ ᓂᕈᐊᖅᓯᓂᕐᒧᑦ ᑲᓇᒃᔅᓄᑦ ᐊᔪᕆᖅᓱᐃᔨᐅᓂᖓᓂ, ᓄᑲᖅᖠᑦ ᑲᓇᒃᔅ ᐱᙳᐊᖅᑎᓂᑦ. ᐃᒻᒥᓂᒃ ᐊᒻᒪ ᕋᓱᓪ ᒪᑐ ᐊᑦᑎᖅᑕᐅᓪᓗᓂ ᐊᕕᒃᓯᒪᓂᐅᑉ ᐃᑲᔪᖅᑎᖏᑦ ᐃᓕᓯᓲᖑᕗᑦ ᐊᑐᓂ Grise Fiord ᖁᑦᑎᓛᖑᓪᓗᓂ ᓴᐳᔾᔨᓯᒪᓂᐅᓂᖓᓂ. ᐱᙳᐊᖅᑎᐅᔪᒥ ᓇᓕᐊᑐᐃᓐᓇᓂ ᑲᑎᙵᓂᐅᔫᑉ ᓵᓚᖃᕋᓱᐊᕐᓂᐅᔪᓂ ᓂᕕᙵᑕᐅᔪᒥ Sachs Harbour ᐊᐅᓚᑦᑎᔨᖓ Tuktoyaktuk ᒋᓖᓴᓐ ᐅᑉᐸᕼᐅᐊᒃ ᐊᕐᕕᐊᕐᒥᐅᑕᖅ ᐊᔪᕆᖅᓱᐃᕙᒃᑐᓄᑦ ᐃᒡᓗᕈᓯᖓᓐᓂ Resolute photo courtesy of David Clark Inuvik ᐅᖃᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ ᑭᕙᓪᓕᕐᒥ ᓄᑲᖅᖠᑦ ᐱᙳᐊᓚᐅᙱᓐᓂᖓᓐᓂ. A distraught group of Kivalliq Jr. Canucks peewee players try to pose for a team photo after a Arctic Bay Pond Inlet Tsiigehtchic ᑲᓇᒃᔅ ᐊᑐᓲᖑᕗᑦ ᐊᕕᒃᑐᖅᓯᒪᓂᐅᔪᓂ ᐱᓇᓱᐊᕈᓯᐅᑉ ᓄᙳᐊᓂ, ᐊᑎᐅᔪᑦ Nanisivik Ulukhaktok heartbreaking 6-5 overtime loss in the MICEC's 31st annual Indigenous Minor Hockey TournaPaulatuk ᓵᓚᖃᕋᓱᐊᕐᓂᐅᔪᓂ ᓲᕐᓗ ᓴᙱᔪᓄᑦ ᐅᓄᕈᓐᓃᖅᐸᓪᓕᐊᓲᖑᕗᑦ Clyde River ment final. Back row from left, assistant coaches Connor Faulkner, Sidney Nichol and Keenan ᐲᕖᓄᑦ ᐊᒻᒪ ᐅᑭᐅᖅᑕᖅᑐᒥ ᐋᑕᒻᔅᓂ ᓂᕈᐊᖅᑕᐅᔪᓄᑦ ᐱᙳᐊᖅᑎᓄᑦ, e Colville Lake Eetuk, and general manager Gleason Uppahuak, and, middle row from left, David Clark (head ᓂᕈᐊᖅᓯᓂᖏᓐᓄᑦ ᑕᒪᕐᒥᒐᓚᖕᓂ ᐅᖃᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ Cambridge Bay ls Kugluktuk Taloyoak Qikiqtarjuaq coach), Mackenzie Putumiraqtuq, Prime Paniyuk, Gregory Wiseman, Ethan Kuksuk, Justin ᐱᙳᐊᖅᑎᖏᓐᓂᑦ. "ᐊᔪᕆᖅᓱᐃᓲᖑᕗᖑ, ᐱᙳᐊᖅᑐᓄᑦ Igloolik Deline lita Gjoa Haven Hall Beach ᐅᖃᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ Umingmaktok ᑲᒪᔨᐅᕙᒃᖢᖓ ᖁᙱᐊᑐᐃᓐᓇᖅᖢᖓᓗ Eetuk, Owen Connelly-Clark, Sandy Tattuinee, Russell Matoo, Ben Kusugak, Kadin Eetuk and Kugaaruk Pangnirtung ᐊᔪᕆᖅᓱᐃᔨᓪᓚᕆᒋᔭᐅᔪᖅBathurst ᑲᓛᒃInlet ᐊᑐᓂ ᐱᙳᐊᕐᓂᐅᔪᒥ William Uppahuak, and, front from left, Mark Kalluak, Ben Tulugak, Jimmy Ollie, Terence PilakaW rigley ᑲᒪᒋᔭᖃᓲᖑᕗᖅ ᐱᙳᐊᖅᑎᓄᑦ ᓵᓚᖃᕋᓱᐊᕐᓂᐅᔪᒥ," ᐅᖃᓚᐅᖅᐳᖅ psi, Ramsey Eetuk, Rodney Nakoolak and Thayer Komakjuak in Winnipeg, Man., on March 24. Repulse Bay Gameti W ekweti ᑲᒪᒋᔭᖃᖅᑎᓪᓗᒍ ᓂᕈᐊᖅᓯᓂᖓᓂ, ᑲᓛᒃ. ELLESMERE ISLAND

AXEL HEIBERG ISLAND

Magnetic North Pole

PRINCE PATRICK ISLAND

Beaufort Sea

ME LVILLE ISLAND

BANKS ISLAND

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DEVON ISLAND

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BATHURST ISLAND

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Great Bear Lake

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Queen Maud Gulf

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Cumberland Sound

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Edzo Rae Fort Providence

Jean Marie River Kakisa Enterprise

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AROUND Kivalliq Baker Lake

Yellowknife

Lutselk'e Fort Resolution

Great Slave Lake

Hay River

Davis Strait

Iqaluit

Fort Chipewyan

Lake Athabasca

SOUTHAMPTON ISLAND

Kimmirut

PLAYER OF THE WEEK

Coral Harbour

Rankin Inlet

Whale Cove

Fort Smith

Cape Dorset

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Hudson Strait

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Îé∏≤Ò ÖÀ∏Ú≤ÒåÒ á∂ªÖÊπÍ´

Ungava Bay

with Darrell Greer

Arviat

Rangers shoot Hudson Bay

Rankin Inlet A total of 20 Canadian Jr. Rangers from across the Kivalliq were in Rankin Inlet this past weekend, from April 7 to 8, to compete in the annual Kivalliq region marksmanship selection competition. A winning team will be selected from the competition to represent Nunavut at a national competition in St. Catherine's, Ont., from May 4 to 6. James Bay

ᒫᔅᑐᕐ ᑯᐊᐳᕈᓪ ᐳᕆᔾᔨᑦ ᒪᓕᑭ, ᓯᕗᓂᐊᓂ, ᑐᕌᖅᑎᑦᑎᕗᖅ ᖁᑭᕆᐊᕐᓂᐊᖅᑕᖓᓄᑦ ᑎᐊᕆᓐᔅ ᒪᑉᓴᓚᒃ ᖃᐅᔨᓴᖅᑎᓪᓗᒍ ᐊᒻᒪ ᔭᐃᒥᓯ ᐊᓚᕋᓚᒃ ᖁᑭᕆᐊᖅᑎᓪᓗᒍ ᑐᕌᒐᕆᔭᖓᓄᑦ ᑐᓄᐊᓂ ᖁᑭᕆᐊᑦᑎᐊᕋᓱᐊᕐᓂᕐᒥ ᐱᔪᓐᓇᕋᓱᐊᕐᓂᖓᓄᑦ ᖁᑭᖅᓯᓂᐅᔪᓄᑦ ᓇᐅᔮᓂᑦ ᕕᕈᐊᕆ 17-ᖑᑎᓪᓗᒍ.

RYLEY KOMAKJUAK Nunavut's Award-Winning Voice of Kivalliq

Community: Arviat Sport: Hockey photo courtesy of Lloyd Francis

Master Cpl. Bridgette Malliki, front, takes aim at her target as Terance Mapsalak spots and James Alaralak fires at his target behind her during their marksmanship qualifying shots in Naujaat on Feb. 17.

Ryley is this edition's player of the week for an outstanding season with the Arctic Wolves, including being Top Forward at the Arctic Atoms tourney. Keep lighting the lamp, Ryley!!


KIVALLIQ NEWS, Wednesday, April 11, 2018

STREET talk with Darrell Greer

alternatives

ᐊᔾᔩᑦ

kivalliqnews@nnsl.com

r?9o3u iWK5, WzJx8i, wSD 11, 2018 11

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Other than Rankin Inlet, what is your favourite Nunavut community?

Horoscopes April 12 to April 18 ARIES – Mar 21/Apr 20 A solid week is ahead for you, Aries. However, some surprises can pop up on a day when you need a little extra sunshine in the routine. Embrace the unexpected. TAURUS – Apr 21/May 21 Taurus, your relations with authority figures are very good right now. Do your best to maintain this both in the short- and long-term. You will benefit from having done so. GEMINI – May 22/Jun 21 Gemini, a surprise invitation may come your way this week. You aren't sure if you have the time or the gumption to accept at this point. But give ample thought to accepting. CANCER – Jun 22/Jul 22 Cancer, even though you may want to spend time at home Ñ and maybe make a cocoon under the covers Ñ there are some things you need to face if you are going to move forward. LEO – Jul 23/Aug 23 Leo, you are full of clever ideas that you are eager to share with coworkers and people at home. Pace yourself so you don't overwhelm others with information.

Gavin Gee: “Coral Harbour. We have lots of friends and family there.”

Stan Anderson: “Whale Cove. The people are really friendly and it's close to Rankin.”

Nelson Kolit: “Whale Cove. The people are really friendly and it's close to Rankin.”

VIRGO – Aug 24/Sept 22 Virgo, an opportunity to earn more money will catch your eye this week. Even if it seems a little risky, it could be well worth pursuing. LIBRA – Sept 23/Oct 23 This can be a fun-loving week for you, Libra, if you embrace the opportunities for letting loose. You may feel impulsive, and that's okay in moderation. SCORPIO – Oct 24/Nov 22 Scorpio, home repairs and renovations are on the brain. You are ready to pour your energy into changing your home spaces for the better. Start making an idea board. SAGITTARIUS – Nov 23/Dec 21 Sagittarius, a very fast-paced week is ahead. The good news is that any related unpleasantness will move by quickly, and you can focus on enjoying the fun parts. CAPRICORN – Dec 22/Jan 20 Capricorn, work relationships can be unpredictable, which means you may need to reevaluate your approach. A change in tone or direction may be all that's needed.

Brian Sigurdson: “Whale Cove. It's my hometown.”

Heather Kolit-Carter: “Coral Harbour. I know where to hunt and fish on Southampton Island.”

ᓄᒡᓗᒃᑕᖅᑐᓂ ᓄᒡᓗᓚᐅᖅᑐᖅ

ᔩᒥᓯ ᓵᑦᑎᐊᓇ, ᑕᓕᖅᐱᐊᓂ, ᑐᓂᓯᔪᖅ ᓅᓪ ᖃᓗᔾᔭᒧᑦ ᐱᐅᔪᐊᐱᖕᒥᒃ ᐊᒡᒐᒧᑦ ᓴᓇᓯᒪᔪᒥᒃ ᐃᖅᓯᕕᑯᓗᖕᒥᒃ ᒥᖅᑯᑎᒃᑯᕕᖕᒥᒃ ᐊᑭᐅᓯᐊᖅᖢᓂ ᐊᑭᖃᖏᑦᑐᒥᒃ ᖃᕆᑕᐅᔭᑎᒍᑦ ᓄᒡᓗᒃᑕᖅᑎᓪᓗᒋᑦ ᓴᑦᑎᐊᓇᐅᑉ ᑐᕌᕐᕕᐊᓂ ᕖᔅᐳᒃᑯᑎᒍᑦ ᑕᒪᑐᒪᓂ ᑕᖅᑭᖅᑎᓐᓂ ᑲᖏᖅᖠᓂᕐᒥ.

John Taipana: “I've been to every Nunavut community except one, and I've really liked them all.”

AQUARIUS – Jan 21/Feb 18 Aquarius, travel plans can change on a dime, but you are adaptable. It's not the destination, but the journey. Take someone along for the ride. PISCES – Feb 19/Mar 20 Pay close attention to your bank account, Pisces. Financial surprises might be something to look out for in the near future.

Øúòúê≤ ÖÀ∏Ú≤ÒãÇÀÒ á∂ªÖÊπÍ´ SHANE MAPSALAK

Community: Naujaat Grade: Nine School: Tuugaalik High School Shane is this edition's youth of the week for working very hard and always having a positive attitude during the We Matter campaign's visit to Naujaat this past month.

CONTEST WINNER

photo courtesy of Jason Tologanak

James Sateana, right, presents Noel Kaludjak with a charming homemade sewing box that was the prize in a free online contest that Sateana hosted on Facebook earlier this month in Rankin Inlet.

Youth of the week


12 Kivalliq news, Wednesday, April 11, 2018

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Marketplace

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WANTED: OLD Tube Audio Equipment. 40 years or older. Amplifiers, Stereo, Recording and Theatre Sound Equipment. Hammond Organs, any condition. CALL Toll – Free 1-800-9470393 WANTED: REWARD paid on info leading to purchase of 426 Hemi motor from 1970 Road Ru n n e r s e r i a l # N - R M 2 7 R0G15756 also 1970 Road Runner/GTX/Satellite/Charger complete or parts car. Also old advertising / dealership signs. antique gas pumps, etc. Call 306-221-5908 or 306-369-2810.

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EMPLOYMENT, Legal notices & tenders

FIREARMS AUCTION April 21st, - Three Sessions Live And Online. Bidding Opens April 6th. www.switzerauction.com . Toll-Free 1-800-694-2609, Email: paul@switzersauction.com. Estates And Collections Wanted. Switzer’s – Canada’s #1 Firearms Auction. REAL ESTATE 3 bedroom house and 40’x70’ heated shop on 9.17 acres; 2.5 miles north of Somerset, MB on Hwy. 242. Ideal for trucker. (431) 773-0351 or (204) 744-2766. STEEL BUILDING Sale...”Big Blow Out Sale – All Buildings Priced To Clear!” 20X21 $5,560. 23x23 $5,523. 25x25 $6,896. 32X33 $9,629. 33X33 $9,332. One End Wall Included. Pioneer Steel 1-855-212-7036.

Ç∂ ª∂Ç∂ª´›Çú?

Whatsit?

ᑭᓲᕙ ᑭᐅᔾᔪᑎᖓ: ᒪᐃᐳᓪ ᐅᕕᓗᖓ ᓵᓚᒃᓴᖅᑐᖃᙱᑦᑐᖅ There is no winner for the March 21st Kivalliq Whatsit. It was a maple leaf.

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Ĭ¿Úî ÄœÀÖÒíÇùÖÔÚîêî

∂ƒÇîìÊíÇÀî áÕÇπØÕ‰ÖÔÒâî ØÍÁú á∂ªÖÊ∫ú Ö≤üƒÇ∏Úé∆¬ùú á·∆¿ÖÀ≤ ééËÒπØ≤ˆ≤î. Entries must be received within 2 weeks following publication. Fax, mail or drop off your answer to: Whatsit, Kivalliq News, Box 657, Rankin Inlet, NU X0C 0G0. Email: kivalliqnews@nnsl.com ÇòÖ ííéÒíÇùÖÔÒâî: The following information is required: sNsNhQ/C xtC

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____________________________________________ 04/11/18

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