February 2018 New Mexico Farm & Ranch

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THE OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE NEW MEXICO FARM AND LIVESTOCK BUREAU®

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New Mexico Farm & Ranch

Shop for the Ronald McDonald House

2018 AgFest

Trespassing Through Water Ways February 2018


NMF&LB President’s Column TRACTOR SEAT DAYDREAMING

BY CRAIG OGDEN

Building Strong, Prosperous, Agricultural Communities A new year is upon us and I feel like I haven’t finished 2017 yet. This year started out with the American Farm Bureau Federation Annual Convention, January 5-10. New Mexico Farm and Livestock Bureau had 13 members attending this year’s convention. The convention is a time to see old friends and make new ones as well as attend various workshops from leadership to public policy to niche agriculture, just to name a few. NMF&LB was recognized with a State Award of Excellence in the area of Advocacy. Some other awards given were the YF&R Excellence in Agriculture and the YF&R Discussion meet winner who was from Colorado. The trade show and general sessions were also very good.

cilities in rural America. Additionally, he signed a presidential memorandum to build towers on federal lands to assist getting better and faster coverage. It was special to have the President of the United States speak to all the membership and we feel that it instilled much needed optimism and a renewed sense of certainty to our industry.

The Annual Meeting of the voting delegates, where Larry Reagan and I represented New Mexico, concluded the conference. There had been discussion about the increase in dues which some considered to be controversial. This action required a by-law change that would require two-thirds vote to pass. The dollar “The dollar increase passed...” increase passed The highlight of the with slightly over 81 Annual Meeting was a visit and speech from the President percent of the vote. This increase was necessary in helping of the United States, Donald J Trump. This is first time America Farm Bureau remain strong not only financially in over 25 years that a standing president has addressed but in its effectiveness in lobbying and leader development. the AFBF. In his speech, President Trump spoke about the changes in the income tax system where taxes would We, the members of the New Mexico Farm and Livestock be lowered and the exemption for estate taxes would be Bureau, rely on the American Farm Bureau Federation for doubled. He noted that for every new regulation passed, 22 information, research and programs. The American Fam existing regulations were repealed to help reduce the burden Bureau is committed to working through our grassroots on businesses. organizations to enhance and strengthen the lives of rural Americans and to build strong, prosperous, agriculture The Trump administration has stopped further advancecommunities. Just remember the strength of that organizament of the Waters of the US regulations and is going to tion starts right here at home. renegotiate the NAFTA so that it is more fair to the United States. Also mentioned was creating a farm bill that would be finished on time. He signed an executive order which streamlines and expedites requests to locate broad band fa Cover photo by Francisco Hatay Page 2

New Mexico Farm & Ranch

February 2018


AFBF President’s Column BEYOND THE FENCEROWS

BY ZIPPY DUVALL

A Harvest of Rural Prosperity Begins with Sound Policy in 2018 Agriculture policy is off to a promising start in 2018. The American Farm Bureau Federation began the year at our 99th Annual Convention in Nashville with the theme “Transform,” because we’re committed to pushing the issues that will revitalize and transform our rural communities. We intend to keep agriculture on the cutting edge of innovation and ensure that our nation’s farmers and ranchers can continue to feed the world. We were honored to host President Trump at this year’s convention, the first time in 26 years that a sitting U.S. president spoke to Farm Bureau members on that stage. The president’s visit was a visible reminder that rural America is being heard and that this administration takes a real interest in the concerns of farmers and ranchers. We’ve already seen great strides to relieve the burden on farm and ranch families with the review of the flawed 2015 Waters of the U.S. rule and a new tax law that has brought farm families additional relief from the estate tax. We hope that this is only the beginning of a transformative time for policies that support agriculture and rural America.

have been hundreds or thousands of miles away. The president also pledged his full support of a robust farm bill, including risk management tools like crop insurance. Farm policy also was top-of-mind for Farm Bureau delegates as they met to vote on our policy agenda for 2018 at our annual business session following the convention. It’s time we ensure that the next farm bill works for all farmers and ranchers, so that the business of agriculture can remain sustainable for generations to come. We’ve heard from our friends in the dairy and cotton sectors, and we are committed to fixing the problems in those programs as well as improving the Agriculture Risk Coverage program to address disparities across counties.

“... the beginning of a transformative time...”

President Trump concluded his remarks to all of us gathered in Nashville by signing two executive orders to improve rural broadband access across the countryside. Rural America has been left behind when it comes to broadband access. But thanks to the president’s actions, rural Americans soon will be just one click away from medical services, educational resources and business tools that for too long Page 3

New Mexico Farm & Ranch

All Americans need a stable and predictable food supply. This year we are eager to work with Congress and the administration to produce a 2018 farm bill that ensures a continued supply of the safe, affordable and high-quality American-grown products we all enjoy. While the policy reforms we’ve been calling for won’t come overnight, we’re confident that the seeds planted at our annual convention to strengthen U.S. agriculture and our rural economy will bring a bountiful harvest.

February 2018


NM Organic Farming Conference By Kristie Garcia, Public Information Officer, NMDA

From hoop house construction to digital marketing, and from drip irrigation to classroom agriculture, there is much to learn about at this year’s New Mexico Organic Farming Conference Feb. 16-17 in Albuquerque. Held at the Marriott Albuquerque Pyramid North at 5151 San Francisco Road, the conference kicks off at 7 a.m. Friday, Feb. 16 and wraps up at 4 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 17. Other topics include water, soils, pollinators, livestock disease, root crops, seeds grains, natural resources, worker safety, hay, meat/specialty processing, enterprise analysis, pruning, water harvesting, carbon farming, organic importing, pastured poultry, greenhouse construction, tomato grafting, compost, farm diversification, berry/small fruit, cover crops, microscopes, Pueblo agriculture, American-grown slow flower movement and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) Produce Safety Rule. “There is so much to offer at this year’s conference, and we hope many people in the industry understand the value of the event and take advantage of this opportunity to learn and grow,” said conference facilitator Sage Faulkner. “We are also offering networking sessions to help facilitate learning opportunities and potential collaborations.” In addition to Faulkner, conference organizers include the New Mexico Department of Agriculture, New Mexico Farm & Livestock Bureau, New Mexico State University Cooperative Extension Service and Walking Trout Farm. Steve Ela is the keynote speaker during Saturday’s lunch. He is the manager of Ela Family Farms and Silver Spruce Orchards, which is a 100-acre, organic family fruit farm in Hotchkiss, Colorado. Ela began the transition to organic production in 1994, and the farm is currently 100 percent certified organic. He is a fourth-generation grower, and current crops include peaches, apples, pears, sweet cherries, plums and heirloom tomatoes. The farm currently processes jams, fruit butters, apple sauces, cider and dried fruit. Ela received a bachelor of science in both biology and environmental geology from Beloit College and a master of science in soil science with a minor in water resources from the University of Minnesota. He is part of numerous organizations, including the National Organic Standards Board and Valley Organic Growers Association. He was president of the Organic Farming Research Foundation for five years. He helped organize and coordinate the Rogers Mesa Area Wide Codling Moth Management Project, which was sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture. He also helped organize the Colorado Organic Crop Management Association to promote organic tree fruit research. The fee for both days with lunch (for the first 650 participants) is $110, and the fee for one day is $70. Special rates are offered to student groups. Registration is available at https://tinyurl.com/2018NMOFC. For more information about the conference, visit www.nmofc. org or contact Sage Faulkner at 505-490-2822 or sagefaulkner@yahoo. com Photo courtesy of Seve Ela, Ela Family Farms Page 4

New Mexico Farm & Ranch

February 2018


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February 2018 12/5/17 9:46 AM


AgFest - A Legislative Gathering

With over 1,200 people and 44 booths, AgFest was a great success. Held at the Santa Fe Convention Center on January 23, AgFest brought together food producers and legislators for an agricultural showcase. Most bills considered in the Roundhouse, whether about taxes or regulations, affect our state’s farmers and ranchers. The legislative meet and greet featured traditional New Mexican foods such as beef, lamb, chile and pecans. Above left, Lt. Governor John Sanchez and NMF&LB President Craig Ogden. Above right NMF&LB Regional Director Tanner Anderson and NMF&LB State Board Members John Jackson and Richard Ritter serve empañadas at the NMF&LB booth. Below right, NMF&LB’s Women’s Leadership Program Chair Anita Hand and State FFA President Chance Mitchell draw a winning ticket for the rug being raffled off by the WLP. Robert Wooley of Deming was the winner. Bottom left, Eva and Senator Pat Woods with NMF&LB State Board Member Troy Sauble.

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New Mexico Farm & Ranch

February 2018


and an Agricultural Reunion

Above left, Farm Bureau Financial Services was represented by Bailey Slater, Mike Gion and Shelby Seward. NMF&LB State Board Member Boe Lopez, Farm Credit of New Mexico Assistant Vice President Shacey Sullivan and U.S. Congressman Steve Pearce at the Legislative Breakfast. Bottom right, Senator Cliff Pirtle with Ty Kinman (left) and son Zeke. Bottom left, an Aggie signing ceremony with incoming freshman Emily Montoya. Left, Shelly Hathorn and Representative Jimmie Hall.

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New Mexico Farm & Ranch

February 2018


Trespassing Through WaterWays By Tanner Anderson, NMF&LB Regional Director

Trespassing is an issue that many farmers and ranchers deal with all too often. It’s never fun, in fact it can be downright scary, to find an unwanted guest on your property. The fact of the matter is trespassers can be a huge liability for landowners. And so, we put up fences. Fences to keep the livestock in, and unwanted visitors out. We put fences and other barriers through the property we own so that we don’t have to risk the potential liability of someone getting hurt on our land, or causing harm to us. However, are you aware that there is a way to get on and go through private property and not be considered trespassing? This is where water comes into play. Rivers, creeks, streams and other water ways are deemed as being owned by the public. Landowners own only the streambed beneath that water. So, what does this mean? It means that anyone (if it’s at all possible) can “float” through the property, and so long as they are not on the streambed, they’re in the clear! I imagine this thought can be somewhat unsettling to many, and someone “floating” through your property can be just as frightening as someone walking inside your property line. Regulated by the New Mexico Fish and Game Department, there is a new process landowners can go through to certify their waters as being non-navigable, meaning that they would be able to post signage informing potential trespassers that the waterway cannot be used to access private property, and that criminal charges can be brought against trespassers if the signs are ignored. However, this new process could prove to be a headache for many landowners. 19.31.22.8, sub-section B, number 4 of the ruling states, “substantial evidence which is probative of the waters, watercourse or river’s being non-navigable at the time of statehood, on a segment by segment basis. This may include any reports to the US department of Interior from the Territorial Governor(s) of New Mexico, any pre-statehood cases discussing the navigability or non-navigability of New Mexico’s watercourses or rivers, any title opinion or other expert opinion, and any other evidence that may be probative.” While finding documentation to prove the non-navigability status can prove to be difficult, overall this process will be beneficial to those wanting to keep individuals from coming onto their private property through streams. For more information contact the NM Game and Fish Department at (505) 476-8000. To read the rule in its entirety go to: http://newmexico.gov/uploads/FileLinks/1177feb630ea48b88ea9438773609980/Notice_of_Rule_Making_19.31.22_NMAC_Landowner_Certification_of_Non_Navigable_Water.pdf Page 8

New Mexico Farm & Ranch

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Neighbors Helping Neighbors

The Women’s Leadership Program Shops for the Ronald McDonald House by Dalene Hodnett, NMF&LB Director of Communications “This is a great opportunity for New Mexico’s food producers to help those in our state who are in need,” says Anita Hand, Chair of NMF&LB’s Women’s Leadership Program. “This is how neighbors help neighbors.” Members of the WLP teamed up with Smith’s Supermarket in Albuquerque in an effort to assist the Ronald McDonald House during challenging economic times. Agriculture producers from across the state spent $1,023.48 on panrty staples, meat and fresh fruits and vegetables. The Ronald McDonald House provides room and board for out-of-town families who have relatives in local hospitals.

Clockwise from top, KRQE Albuquerque Channel 13 interviewed Anita Hand, NMF&LB CEO Chad Smith and NMDA Secretary Jeff Witte, NMF&LB YF&R members Britney Lardner and Nicki Jaynes, Mayra and George Jackson, and Jim Ellett and Craig and Teresa Ogden. Thanks to all who came to shop!

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New Mexico Farm & Ranch

February 2018


A Different Picture

By Amanda Ball, Coordinator, New Mexico Ag Leadership It’s 7:00 am on a December morning in New Mexico. What do you see? Maybe it’s the blur of your alarm clock, the steam rising from a small herd in the field, the backs of children running out the door, a long shadow off the tractor as you open the barn door, or a news clip running across a tiny screen. What we see is a matter of where we stand. As agriculturalists, as advocates, as parents and children in this beautiful state we call home, we share a pride in our work and a resilience in our nature. Are you satisfied with what you see, or is something missing? Too often, that crucial element is a strong leader – but it doesn’t have to be. New Mexico has one of the most unique agricultural identities in the nation, with tremendous diversity in our culture, industries, partnerships, and natural resources. We need strong leaders who can leverage this uniqueness, while maintaining integrity and harnessing the traditions of our agricultural heritage. The New Mexico Agricultural Leadership (NMAL) program sets out to develop these types of leaders. This professional development program for individuals 25 years and older is a premier step in the agricultural leadership spectrum. Our mission focuses on creating knowledgeable, multicultural leaders in the state’s agriculture, food, and natural resource industries. We enroll a select group of participants for an intensive, 18-month program, which exposes them to a variety of businesses, social settings, political environments and government agencies. They embark on a simultaneous journey of personal leadership growth through focused goal setting and reflection, and industry awareness through site visits and networking opportunities. As a result, our participants return to their homes, communities, and companies with a renewed energy to create change. Fueled by new perspectives, new ideas, and a reinforced sense of their leadership capacity, they are ready to tackle the challenges faced by New Mexico agriculture. In May of this year, a new group of participants began their journey with NMAL. After visits to the Navajo Agricultural Products Industry in Farmington, USDA headquarters and historical sites in Washington, D.C., and facilities where livestock cross the U.S.-Mexico border, the class is challenging assumptions and broadening their views. Between visits and workshops, class members discover how their unique strengths correlate to success in their careers, and in their lives. We may see different scenes on those early December mornings, but one universal element illuminates them all: the sunrise. For those of us working for NMAL, we see the sunrise as an opportunity to make a difference, to learn, to grow, and to lead. Now the question is, will you put yourself in the picture? From left to right, NMAL Coordinator Amanda Ball, Denise Hayes, NAPI; Jeff Anderson, Doña Ana County Extension; Jeff Mayberry, Mayberry Farms; Eric Nez, NAPI; Sam Hagelstein, First American Bank - Artesia; Shannon Berry, Ag New Mexico Farm Credit - Clovis; Beverly Idsinga, Dairy Producers of NM; and Katie Kruthaupt, NMDA Soil and Water Conservation District Specialist. Page 10

New Mexico Farm & Ranch

February 2018


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New Mexico Farm & Ranch

February 2018


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NEW MEXICO FARM & LIVESTOCK BUREAU Since 1917 . . . a Leader in New Mexico

ISSN 0028-6192 2220 N. TELSHOR BLVD. • LAS CRUCES, NM 88011 575.532.4700 • FAX: 575.532.4710 PUBLISHER: New Mexico Farm and Livestock Bureau New Mexico Farm & Ranch is published monthly. Yearly subscription is $24.00. New Mexico Farm and Livestock Bureau members receive a complimentary subscription with yearly dues. U.S. Postage PAID, bulk rate, PERMIT #31, Las Cruces, NM 88001. FORWARDING/RETURN POSTAGE GUARANTEED, ADDRESS CORRECTION REQUESTED. OFFICERS Craig Ogden President, Loving Larry Reagan 1st Vice President, Ft. Sumner Boe Lopez 2nd Vice President, Springer

BOARD OF DIRECTORS Burl Brown, Des Moines Bud Deerman, La Mesa Jim Ellett, Hope Duane Frost, Claunch Gary Hathorn, Flora Vista Leon Hemann, McDonald Jay Hill, Mesilla Park George Jackson, Lordsburg John Jackson, Lake Arthur Deena Kinman, Elida Matt Lansford, Clovis Danielle Lowry, Albuquerque Donald Martinez, El Rito Tommy Ortiz, Las Vegas Richard T. Ritter, Socorro Troy Sauble, Maxwell Casey Spradley, Cuba John Sweetser, Deming Tom Wilton, Ft. Sumner Anita Hand, Chair Women’s Leadership Committee Andy Ellett, Chair Young Farmer & Rancher Committee

REGIONAL DIRECTORS Tanner Anderson, Portales Valerie Huerta, Santa Cruz Benjie Segovia, Las Cruces Matthew Gonzales Director of Government Affairs Traci Curry Southern Director, Ag in the Classroom Francisco Hatay Marketing Coordinator Dalene Hodnett Director of Communications and Media Relations Cecilia Diaz-Johnson Bookkeeper Theresa Widner Director of Membership Services

Chad Smith Chief Executive Officer Page 12

New Mexico Farm & Ranch

February 2018