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THE OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE NEW MEXICO FARM AND LIVESTOCK BUREAU®

Brad Houston - Farm Family of the Year 2018 Legislative Preview YF&R AgTrue Tour Page 1

New Mexico Farm & Ranch

December / January 2018


NMF&LB President’s Column TRACTOR SEAT DAYDREAMING

BY CRAIG OGDEN

A Year in Review Yo It has been quite a year, and as I said at the annuand enjoy. Our “Tonight Show” guests at the Farm and al meeting, “WOO HOO, what a ride!” I would like to Ranch Heritage Museum made the celebration even more formally thank all the staff and volunteers who made it so remarkable. We missed past president Bill McIlhaney, and successful. If you didn’t make it to the annual meeting, I pray for his continued recovery. The museum nicely showwould like to give a brief overview of some of the topics and cased NMF&LB exhibiting precious photos and facts. That activities that occurred during last year, in no particular was just a snap shot of last year and I left out a lot. order. I hope that your Christmas and New Year was filled with NMF&LB supported the Women’s Agriculture Leadership joyous festivities and you were able to visit friends and famConference, Ranch Camp, and various youth organizations. ily. I feel it is the prime opportunity to reminisce about the The AgTrue Tour which was hosted by our YF&R was once past and start making plans for the future. again captivating and informative. Summer Conference was As we settle into the new year, we are just returning from one to be remembered with the theme being Past, Presthe AFBF conference in Nashville, Tennessee. Nipping ent, and Future. The at our heals is Ag “...we can make a positive difference...” Women’s Leadership Fest in Santa Fe, on Program gave $1000 in January 23, starting groceries to the Ronald McDonald House. The hot topics at 6:00pm. during last year were the Mexican Gray Wolf, Lesser Prairie A lot was done last year but as the saying goes, “many Chicken, Workman’s Compensation, WOTUS, the monuhands make light work.” We need to put our differences ments and many more. aside and look at the big picture. I believe that if we work Hats off to each county for their Centennial Celebration together, we can make a positive difference in the future, BBQ’s and activities. I met so many terrific Farm Bureau not only for us, but for the generations to follow. It has been people and hope to make the annual meetings next year for an honor to serve you this past year and with your help we the ones I missed. can begin to make the next 100 years even better. After resolutions, we gave AFBF President, Zippy Duval, a quick look at some of our state before he headed off to ArDo Justly, Love Mercy, Walk Humbly izona. Larry Reagan will represent us on the National level by serving on the Animal Care Issues Advisory Committee. The celebration for our Centennial, at our Annual Meeting was most memorable. The Centennial book that Dalene Hodnett compiled is beautiful. We still have some copies left, so I encourage you to consider buying one to cherish Page 2

New Mexico Farm & Ranch

December / January 2018


AFBF President’s Column BEYOND THE FENCEROWS

BY ZIPPY DUVALL

Greatest Hardships Bring Out the Greatest Resolve in Rural America The New Year is a time for new beginnings, when we resolve to do better, try harder, and make more of a difference in the lives around us. It’s a chance to renew the commitments we’ve made to help our neighbors and make our communities stronger. This resolve is what led the American Farm Bureau Federation and National Farmers Union to team up to increase awareness of a heartbreaking crisis in our nation’s rural communities—opioid abuse. According to a new survey we jointly commissioned with the firm Morning Consult, nearly half of rural Americans say they’ve been affected by opioid abuse, and 74 percent of farmers and farm workers echo that sentiment. Too many of us have seen people we know struggle with addiction personally or with the pain of addiction in their families. Our nation is facing an opioid epidemic. Rural Americans cannot ignore this crisis. According to the Centers for Disease Control, 91 Americans die every day from an opioid overdose. While we may want to think drug addiction is a big city problem, this crisis is hitting rural America especially hard. The CDC reported this fall that the rate of drug overdose deaths is actually higher in rural areas. It’s time to talk about it, and that is what this AFBF – NFU partnership is about. These tragic stories often begin with folks accidentally developing an addiction to what they believe are safe painkillers. Even without a prescription, opioids have become too easy to come by. According to our Morning Consult survey, three in four farmers say it would be easy for someone in

their community to access a large amount of prescription opioids or painkillers without a prescription. Opioid addiction is a disease, not a moral weakness. We must help our neighbors struggling with addiction fight this battle, rather than pointing fingers and placing blame. AFBF and NFU are committed to raising awareness and empowering rural communities to access the resources they need to overcome this crisis. And while opioid abuse is a disease, recovery is possible. It may not be quick or easy, but support of the community will be the key to success. One in three rural adults say there is a great deal of stigma associated with opioid abuse in their local community, and shame only fuels the crisis. It’s our hope the awareness campaign we’re launching with NFU will empower friends and family to have tough, honest conversations—the kind we need to have to bring people out of the shadows and into the treatment they need. We have to start talking with friends, family—anyone we know who may need help. Folks need to know that they are not alone in this battle. The Apostle John reminded us to love our neighbors, not just with our words but also with our actions. He asked, if anyone “sees a brother in need yet closes his heart against him, how does God’s love abide in him?” The opioid epidemic presents a real need to support to our rural communities. We must resolve to fight this disease by bringing the problem out into the open and helping our neighbors find the hope and healing they so desperately need.

“Our nation is facing an opioid epidemic.”

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New Mexico Farm & Ranch

December / January 2018


Still Growing Strong - NMF&LB’s “Building on the past to ensure a successful future” was the theme of this year’s 100th Annual Meeting of the New Mexico Farm & Livestock Bureau. Throughout the meeting we celebrated our past while turning our eyes to the future of agriculture in New Mexico. “This meeting was a wonderful mix of old and new,” said Chad Smith, NMF&LB CEO. “Past employees reminisced about their time with the organization while young ag educators and 4-H agents shared their vision of what’s to come.” Keeping with the “looking ahead” theme, Matthew Gonzales, NMF&LB’s Director of Government Affairs gave a preview of the 2018 legislative session (see page 8 for a recap) and Dr. Jennie Hodgen, who specializes in food safety and meat science for Merck Animal Health, talked about what millennials want at the meat counter. Other sessions included Sid Gordon, Otero County extension agent discussing the growth of New Mexico State University’s Youth Ranch Management Camp, while Amber Montaño, a past participant, explained how her YRMC experience convinced her to major in Ag Business at NMSU’s College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences. Lea County 4-H agent Kayla Hinrichs Silver City High School ag educator Klayton Bearup

Collegiate Discussion Meet winner Stacy Swope The Young Farmer & Rancher Program hosted a discussion meet for FFA students which was won by Abby Wilton representing Ft. Sumner FFA. She was awarded a mini iPad. YF&R also hosted a Collegiate Discussion Meet and Stacy Swope, a YF&R Committee members Andy Ellett and Danielle Lowry, far left and right, are shown freshman at NMSU won $500 and a trip to Reno to compete with the FFA Discussion Meet winner Abby in the national AFBF YF&R Discussion Meet. Congratulations Wilton, and NMF&LB President Craig Ogden. to all who participated. Page 4

New Mexico Farm & Ranch

December / January 2018


Centennial Annual Meeting At the Awards Banquet Matt Martinez won the Media Person of the Year. For over 20 years, Matt Martinez has been filling the airwaves of Las Vegas and the surrounding area. He recently added Albuquerque to his stable of stations for a total of five AM and FM spots on the radio dial. He has provided an outlet for regional farm bureau updates, runs public service announcements for Ag in the Classroom, and has ran political advertising to share information about proposed legislation that would be detrimental to ag. Thank you Matt for advocating for agriculture. Our Volunteer of the Year was Crestina Trujillo Armstrong. Crestina has served as the Taos County President for over 15 years. She also served as Chair of the Women’s Leadership Committee for four years. She helps at local county fairs and often sells her lambs and goats below market price to help beginning showmen. She calls area presidents to see if they need help and shows up at special events to help out. She attends all state meetings, and goes to every national meeting she can. Thank you Crestina for being a great volunteer. Matt Martinez, Media Person of the Year

To the right, Chad Smith, AITC Southern Director Traci Curry, Julie Janecka, AITC Teacher of the Year winner, Cheryl Butterfield, Northern AITC Director and Craig Ogden.

Above, NMF&LB CEO Chad Smith, Volunteer of the Year Crestina Trujillo Armstrong, and Craig Ogden To the right, Brad Houston, Farm Family of the Year winner. From left to right - Bobbie Doyle, Dorothy Kiser, Ron Doyle, Debbie and Rocky Langley, Brad Houston, Janet Sobien, Kristy, Glenn, Caden and Hunter Mason and Craig Ogden. Page 5

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New Mexico Farm & Ranch

December / January 2018


Annual meeting continued..... Julie Janecka, a fifth-grade teacher from East Picacho Elementary in Las Cruces was named the AG in the Classroom Teacher of the year. For the past three years her students have experienced a nine-week project focusing on chile. Students learn about soil nutrients, water, temperature of planting, and timeline of growth. They study the effects of weather, and disease from insects and soil borne pathogens. They also look at technology such as drones and drip irrigation systems. Thank you Ms. Janecka for teaching your students about the agricultural world around them. Our final award of the night went to long-time NMF&LB member and advocate, Brad Houston. John Bradley Houston graduated from Fort Sumner High School in 1946. He chose agriculture as a career and in 1951 received a Bachelor’s of Science Degree in Agriculture from New Mexico College of Agriculture & Mechanic Arts. After graduation, Brad served in the United States Army for two years, including serving for six months in Korea. In the summer of 1953 Brad married Elaine Black. She was from a dairy family in Arrey and the two had met in college. They moved to Roswell where Brad started a Vocational Agriculture program at Roswell High School. He remained the ag instructor for 14 years before moving to Las Cruces where Brad accepted a position as the instructor of Agriculture Engineering classes at New Mexico State University. In 1970, he and Elaine moved to Arrey to run the family dairy. At the time, Price-Black Farms was home of the largest Guernsey herd in the U.S., milking over 1700 cows. It was during this time when Brad became active in New Mexico Farm & Livestock Bureau, serving as president for Sierra County Farm & Livestock Bureau. He was also president of the Sandoval County Farm & Livestock Bureau when he and Elaine moved to Bernalillo in 1977. In 1982, Brad and Elaine returned to Roswell where he was the Vice President and General Manager of Price’s Roswell Farms. There they milked 2,400 cows, raised replacement heifers and bulls, and sold herd sires to other dairies. Brad was instrumental in improving cow genetics to make the dairy one of the best in the southwest. Brad of course joined the Chaves County Farm & Livestock Bureau Board and remains an “We were honored to recognize Brad for active member and supporter of agricultural eduhis long and storied agricultural career” cation outreach efforts. He also served on the New Mexico Farm & Livestock Bureau State Board from 2005 to 2015. Brad is the Ag representative to the Chaves County Chamber of Commerce, and helps sponsor and coordinate the Rise with Roswell Agriculture Business Breakfast. “We were honored to recognize Brad for his long and storied agricultural career,” said Craig Ogden, NMF&LB President. “But more importantly, we thank him for the time he has devoted sharing agricultural awareness with people across the state.” As part of our Centennial celebration, the New Mexico Farm and Ranch Heritage Museum in Las Cruces created an exhibit commemorating NMF&LB’s 100 years of advocating for agriculture. A reception was held at the museum so that members could view the exhibit which will be on display through September 2018. The reception was like a family reunion with an opportunity for past employees and legacy members to retell their favorite farm bureau memories. To the left, Duane Frost, Lincoln County, Archie Payne, Hidalgo County and Dennis Harris, Socorro County. Below NMF&LB past employees Smokey Blanton and Dave Kimble.

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New Mexico Farm & Ranch

December / January 2018


Above, Smokey Blanton, past NMF&LB Regional Director, Evelyn Colson, past Administrative Assistant, and Bob Porter, past Executive Secretary share stories of their time together. Right, Evelyn is presented with a copy of “Moon Shadows” by Cliff Donaldson as a thank you for her exhaustive work on the centennial book. Right below, the meeting attracted long-time members such as Joy and Hoyt Pattison of Curry County. The meeting concluded with a dance featuring the Delk Band.

Thank you to our Anual Meeting Sponsors - We Appreciate You Titanium $5,000 and above Silver $500 and above * Farm Credit of New Mexico * Doña Ana County Farm & Gold $1,000 and above Livestock Bureau * New Mexico Beef Council * Larry Marshall Farm Bureau * Tri-State Generation and Financial Services Transmission Bronze $250 and above * BNSF Railway * Ambitions Consulting Group * Monsanto * George and Mayra Jackson * Dow Agro Sciences Page 7

New Mexico Farm & Ranch

December / January 2018


Looking Ahead to the 2018 Legislative Session

By Matthew Gonzales, NMF&LB Director of Government Affairs In less than two months New Mexico’s 112 Legislators will head to Santa Fe for the state’s 2018 Regular Legislative Session. By law, the New Mexico Legislature convenes in regular sessions in Santa Fe at 12:00 noon on the third Tuesday in January each year. In odd-numbered years the legislature meets for 60 days and in even-numbered years for 30 days. This year’s session will last 30 days and the only matters that may be considered in the session are those relating to the budget (i.e. tax reform, bills containing an appropriation) or items listed in the Governor’s proclamation. This year’s session is scheduled to run from January 16 through February 15. Budget sessions tend to be less hectic given the narrow scope of what’s allowed to be introduced. This year is also unique because it will be Governor Martinez’ last legislative session. Legislators and lobbyist alike believe this upcoming session will be fairly low key given the Governor’s “lame duck” status but many of the business/ agriculture organizations remain on high alert. All 70 members of the House of Representatives will be up for reelection this next year as well; many of which are only in their first or second term. This is important because while many people feel that this will be a “do nothing” session, there are already rumblings in the “environmental” community to ramp up their agenda this session in anticipation of a new administration next session. What does that look like? More red tape for the business and agricultural industries, higher taxes, less access to public lands for agriculture, etc…. you get the point. The environmental lobby will not be doing us any favors. That’s why advocacy will be more important than ever as we prepare for a new political landscape with new leadership in 2019.

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New Mexico Farm & Ranch

December / January 2018


Tax Reform: Tax reform is not a new concept. It’s been in talks for several years now, but recent drops in commodity pricing for oil has left legislators looking for other options to increase revenues. All legislators and tax experts agree, our Gross Receipts Tax system is a mess. Thirty years ago our GRT was broad based and it taxed lots of services. Unfortunately, over the past few decades we have seen carve out after carve out for special interests (not necessarily needing an exemption) which has resulted in a very narrow tax base that can’t sustain New Mexico going forward. Rep. Jason Harper of Rio Rancho has taken this reform measure on. He is a good legislator that I believe has the state’s best interests in mind. We’ve discussed his reform effort with him and he is committed working with our organization to ensure our industry is not impacted. However, he has no control over amendments that get introduced or even if they’re adopted. Even the best-intentioned pieces of legislations can be hijacked and made into more job killing regulations. Therefore, we will have Tax Reform at the top of our list this session. “Seed” Preemption: Seed preemption is not something that would be germane in a budget session, however, Governor Martinez is considering putting it on the call. If a measure like this were to pass, it would allow our members to continue their current agricultural practices. Yes, you read that right. It allows you to keep doing business as usual. So why do we need this? There have been efforts in the past by the environmental community to regulate what kind of seeds can be used, what kind of pesticides can be used, and they’ve even gone to the extent of trying to tell us what crops we can and can’t grow. They’ve tried this at a state level but what’s more worrisome is that they’ve even tried passing these measures at the county and municipal levels. Often, the locally elected officials don’t have the knowledge or resources to even make these kinds of determinations, but the enviros use scare tactics to make these officials feel like they have no choice and MUST ACT! It’s gotten so bad in other places that 29 other states have passed similar measures to ensure this madness doesn’t happen at a local level. New Property Tax “Conservation” Schedule: In the state we have two tax schedules for property tax. You have the commercial rate and the agricultural rate. The “commercial” schedule is applied to any properties that do not have agricultural production on them. This new schedule would create a third option that would allow landowners to invest in restoration of previously designated agricultural lands rather than feeling obligated to commercially develop those lands. On the surface it sounds good. There are always instances where landowners must take a part of their property out or ag production for whatever reason. This sounds like it could be a great tool to retain “ag” lands before they’re lost to development for good. But as they say, the devil is in the details. The Taxation and Revenue Department said that current lands are valued at $15 billion. If enacted, this measure would be a property tax loss of over $100 million for our counties and the services they provide. These are just some of the bigger issues we expect to be debated this upcoming session, but this certainly does not cover all of them. As always, NMFL&B will be heavily engaged during the session to ensure our members’ interests are represented and advocated for. I’m sure you’re tired of hearing me beat this drum but I NEED YOU TO BE ENGAGED! Our industry, our livelihood will depend on your willingness to be active and engaged in the political process. We can never have too many office visits, phone calls or emails to our legislators. Our time to act is now! Page 9

New Mexico Farm & Ranch

December / January 2018


Ag Day 2017, A Day to Remember By Dalene Hodnett, Direcotr of Communications, NMF&LB Ag Day, the event coordinated by the New Mexico Department of Agriculture and sponsored by the New Mexico Farm & Livestock Bureau, was a success by any measure. From families enjoying free food, to kids playing

games, to producers telling their story, the entire day was an agricultural homerun. For three hours prior to the NMSU Aggie Homecoming football game, attendees enjoyed “live animals, educational exhibits, games, and New Mexico foods” provided by organizations manning over 50 booths. “New Mexico Farm and Livestock Bureau was proud to partner with NMDA to sponsor Ag Day,” says Chad Smith, NMF&LB CEO. “It was a fun way to connect food lovers with food producers as we celebrate the agricultural traditions of NMSU.” NMF&LB sponsored a booth where children who were able to toss a football through a hole were given an Aggies jersey and were taken on a tour of the football stadium while New Mexico Ag in the Classroom sponsored a scavenger hunt with questions about local agriculture. We hope you’ll join us next year for this fun event! At half-time Jeff Witte, Director of NMDA, and Chad Smith were recognized as game sponsors.

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New Mexico Farm & Ranch

December / January 2018


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New Mexico Farm & Ranch

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December / January 2018 12/5/17 9:46 AM


A Field Trip to the Pecan Orchard By Maddie Haggard, NMSU Ag Education Graduate

As a NMSU Graduate Student, I was looking for a creative component project and New Mexico Ag in the Classroom had expressed a need for educational materials pertaining to pecans, one of our state’s top commodities. Working closely with Traci Curry, I developed a pecan unit of three lesson plans for 3rd – 5th graders. I had the privilege to work with the 4th grade teachers at East Picacho Elementary School, who graciously field tested my lessons. Each teacher incorporated the lessons into their Project Based Learning and helped develop the them by providing feedback to make the lessons more usable in today’s classroom. The lessons were designed to help students understand pecans from a farm to table. Over the course of three weeks the students learned of the history, production, and nutritional value of pecans. Once the lessons were taught, the teachers and I were able to make the lessons even more meaningful by taking the kids on a field trip to Tom Salopek Farms to see the pecan harvest. With help from pecan experts and Dickie Salopek, the students saw presentations on grafting, soil sampling, tree Dr. Richard Heerema explains pecan cultivation. health, pollination, and of course the harvest. “The Pecan Unit and Field Trip was an engaging unit for our 4th graders,” said Ashley Cartwright, a teacher at East Picacho Elementary in Las Cruces. “As a 4th grade team, we integrated it into our Project Based Learning for the second quarter. Students learned about the history and production of pecans and the nutrition they provide. The field trip to Dickie Salopek’s orchard was a culmination of what the students learned throughout the unit. The “ahhh’s” from students when they saw the pecans fall from the trees was amazing! They were able to take what they had learned in the classroom and see it in ‘real life.’ When we returned to school from the field trip, the pecan harvest was beginning in the orchard behind our playground. The students were so excited to see the harvest equipment and relate what they had learned in the classroom and on the field trip. The entire experience was engaging for students and related to the agriculture that surrounds our school.” Once the field trip concluded, Dickie Salopek offered to make this an annual event, understanding that kids need to have on-site demonstrations to get excited about agriculture. “This helps kids understand the world around them,” said Salopek. “There is a pecan orchard across the fence from their school playground, now they understand the cycle of growing and harvesting pecans.”

Thank you to the following presenters and sponors:

Doña Ana County Farm & Livestock Bureau New Mexico Pecan Growers Association East Picacho Elementary School Dickie Salopek and 4-MP Farms Traci Curry, NM Ag in the Classrroom Benjie Segovia, New Mexico Farm & Livestock Bureau I hope to take this project further past Jeff Anderson, Doña Ana County Extension graduation and see it develop throughout the years. I would like to make these lesson Tiffany Johnson, NMSU Department of Entomology, plans available for teachers nationwide, Plant Pathology and Weed Science using the National Ag in the Classroom Dr. Richard Heerema, NMSU Extension Pecan Specialist Matrix. Page 12

New Mexico Farm & Ranch

December / January 2018


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New Mexico Farm & Ranch

December / January 2018


New Mexico Ag Coalition visits D.C. By Chad Smith, NMF&LB CEO

The New Mexico Ag Group led by Secretary Jeff Witte gathered in Washington D.C. to lobby on behalf of New Mexico Agriculture. New Mexico Farm and Livestock Bureau, Dairy Producers of NM, NM Association of Soil and Water Conservation Districts, New Mexico Cattle Growers and the New Mexico Wool Growers spent 3 days showing a united front and lobbying for our NM food producers. We met with our entire delegation and various agencies to discuss topics such as farm bill, national monument designations, ESA, regulatory reform, tax reform and many other issues. It was clear there are short term goals to get a tax reform package deal done but also on the minds of our delegation was the dire need for a new farm bill. It was evident that money is going to be an issue but we and our delegation are hopeful to at minimum maintain current funding levels for the new farm bill. While we would like to see increase caps on programs I think we will all be grateful to maintain what we have. Following New Mexico’s experience from Storm Goliath, advocating for increased caps on the Livestock Indemnity program and disaster relief title is important. It was also important that we press the issue of the recent monument designations in New Mexico and the fact that Utah saw some relief while our state was not afforded the same relief. As we always knew but our trip confirmed, because our New Mexico delegation was not in favor of a reduction in size the administration elected to not make any changes. We were assured that multi-use management would continue and that agriculture would not be harmed. We expressed our desire to be a part of the planning process and emphasized the fact that while our voices were not heard in the designations we hope that they are heard through the management planning process.

Left to Right, NMF&LB CEO Chad Smith, NMF&LB Director of Governmental Affairs Matthew Gonzales, Dairy Producers of NM Executive Director Beverly Idsinga, New Mexico Association of Conservation Districts Executive Director Debbie Hughes, Farm Credit of New Mexico Assistant Vice President Shacey Sullivan, New Mexico Department of Agriculture Director of Government & Legislative Relations Tiffany Rivera, NMDA Director Jeff Witte, New Mexico Cattle Growers Association Executive Director Caren Cowan, and NMF&LB President Craig Ogden.

I think at the end of the day this is a great example of where and why we absolutely must vote the right politicians into office. The group also had the pleasure of meeting with the Ag Advisor to President Trump where we reiterated our needs and wants in New Mexico. He laid out his top 4 priorities and we were very pleased with what we heard. The President’s advisor asked what was holding agriculture back from economic growth and it was concluded that trade, labor, regulatory reform and infrastructure, all which help set his priorities. It was a great trip and a great way to show our delegation how united the agriculture industry is in New Mexico. I think we should all be optimistic as I do believe we will see some positive changes in the next few years. A special thanks to Secretary Witte and Tiffany (Tiffy) Rivera for all their work in arranging our meetings. Page 14

New Mexico Farm & Ranch

December / January 2018


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New Mexico Farm & Ranch

December / January 2018


Non-profit Organization U.S. POSTAGE PAID Las Cruces, N.M. Permit No.2093

2220 N. Telshor Las Cruces, NM 88011

RETURN SERVICE REQUESTED

NEW MEXICO FARM & LIVESTOCK BUREAU Since 1917 . . . a Leader in New Mexico

ISSN 0028-6192 2220 N. TELSHOR BLVD. • LAS CRUCES, NM 88011 575.532.4700 • FAX: 575.532.4710 PUBLISHER: New Mexico Farm and Livestock Bureau New Mexico Farm & Ranch is published monthly. Yearly subscription is $24.00. New Mexico Farm and Livestock Bureau members receive a complimentary subscription with yearly dues. U.S. Postage PAID, bulk rate, PERMIT #31, Las Cruces, NM 88001. FORWARDING/RETURN POSTAGE GUARANTEED, ADDRESS CORRECTION REQUESTED. OFFICERS Craig Ogden President, Loving Larry Reagan 1st Vice President, Ft. Sumner Boe Lopez 2nd Vice President, Springer

BOARD OF DIRECTORS Burl Brown, Des Moines Bud Deerman, La Mesa Jim Ellett, Hope Duane Frost, Claunch Gary Hathorn, Flora Vista Leon Hemann, McDonald Jay Hill, Mesilla Park George Jackson, Lordsburg John Jackson, Lake Arthur Deena Kinman, Elida Matt Lansford, Clovis Danielle Lowry, Albuquerque Donald Martinez, El Rito Tommy Ortiz, Las Vegas Richard T. Ritter, Socorro Troy Sauble, Maxwell Casey Spradley, Cuba John Sweetser, Deming Tom Wilton, Ft. Sumner Anita Hand, Chair Women’s Leadership Committee Andy Ellett, Chair Young Farmer & Rancher Committee

REGIONAL DIRECTORS Tanner Anderson, Portales Valerie Huerta, Santa Cruz Benjie Segovia, Las Cruces Matthew Gonzales Director of Government Affairs Traci Curry Southern Director, Ag in the Classroom Francisco Hatay Marketing Coordinator Dalene Hodnett Director of Communications and Media Relations Cecilia Diaz-Johnson Bookkeeper Theresa Widner Director of Membership Services

Chad Smith Chief Executive Officer Page 16

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December / January 2018

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