Village of Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Master Plan

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MASTER PLAN DECEMBER 2021


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PINECREST PARKS AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN

S P E C I A L T H A N K S: We extend our sincere apprecia on and gra tude to the residents of Pinecrest, Village staff, elected officials, and stakeholders who assisted in the public surveys, mee ngs, and the en re planning process. This cri cal input guided the development of this master plan and in turn, will have a posi ve impact on the Village of Pinecrest

VILLAGE OF PINECREST VILLAGE COUNCIL

V I L L A G E S TA F F

Mayor Joesph M. Corradino

Yocelyn Galiano, ICMA-CM, Village Manager

Councilmember Ka e Abbo

Guido H. Inguanzo, Jr., CMC, Village Clerk

Councilmember Anna Hochkammer

Angela Gasca, Assistant Village Manager

Vice Mayor Doug Kra

Jason Cohen, Chief of Police

Councilmember Shannon del Prado

David Mendez, Public Works Director Stephen Olmsted, Planning Director Alana Perez, Director of Pinecrest Gardens

PA R K S A N D R E C R E AT I O N D E PA R T M E N T

Michelle Hammontree, Communica ons Manager

Robert Ma es, Director Andrilys Marte, Administra ve Assistant to Director Tony Lamazares, Parks Superintendent Janelle Marzouka, Fitness Center Manager Daniel Alberty, Program and Events Coordinator Gloria Zoghbi, Assistant Program and Events Coordinator Martha Nino, Adminstra ve Clerk

C O N S U LTA N T T E A M Kimley-Horn BerryDunn

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TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................................................................4

PART 1: NEEDS AND PRIORITY ASSESSMENT 1.1 GUIDING DOCUMENTS .............................................................................................................................................8 1.2 DEMOGRAPHICS ANALYSIS .................................................................................................................................... 20 1.3 PARK EVALAUTIONS ................................................................................................................................................ 22 1.4 LEVEL OF SERVICE ANALYSIS ................................................................................................................................. 26 1.5 PROGRAM ASSESSMENT ........................................................................................................................................ 37 1.6 PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT ........................................................................................................................................... 44 1.7 NEEDS ASSESSMENT SUMMARY ........................................................................................................................... 60

PART 2: VISION AND IMPLEMENTATION PLAN 2.1 LONG RANGE VISION ............................................................................................................................................ 64 2.2 IMPLEMENTATION PLAN ........................................................................................................................................ 68 2.3 ACTION PLAN........................................................................................................................................................... 75

APPENDIX RECREATION PROGRAM ASSESSMENT REPORT .......................................................................................................... A ORGANIZATIONAL ASSESSMENT ................................................................................................................................... B MEETING NOTES ............................................................................................................................................................. C STATISTICAL SURVEY RESULTS ....................................................................................................................................... D PRIORITY CAPITAL PROJECTS PROBABLE COST ESTIMATES ........................................................................................E

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INTRODUCTION


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PINECREST PARKS AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN

INTRODUCTION Pinecrest, located in Miami-Dade County within the Miami metropolitan area, is known for providing residents and visitors with plen ful opportuni es to explore the beauty and recrea on Southern Florida has to offer. 2021 marks the Village’s 25th anniversary of incorpora on and respects a con nua on by civic leaders and residents to plan for the future. The purpose of this Parks and Recrea on Master Plan (PRMP) is to provide appropriate recommenda ons by evalua ng exis ng facili es and ameni es, in addi on to analyzing current and projected needs in Pinecrest. Recommenda ons are provided as achievable and ac onable strategies that will serve as a roadmap for the Village over the next five (5) or more years. This is Pinecrest’s first village-wide Parks and Recrea on

Master Plan and signals a high mark for the community in planning. In order to project future parks and recrea on needs of residents and visitors, this Master Plan analyzed previous reports, plans, and relevant documents, current and projected demographics, exis ng parks, facili es and programs, benchmark analysis of peer communi es, opera ons and maintenance analysis, and presents an ac onable implementa on plan to guide the Village forward as it relates to community needs. Throughout the Plan, the theme of family-friendly recrea on balanced with celebra on and access to natural resources, as well as opportuni es for health and wellness are emphasized.

Image: Village Green, Pinecrest, Florida

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Diagram 1: Flow Chart of Master Plan Process

Needs and Priorities Assessment

DATA COLLECTION AND RESEARCH Project Coordination and Management

Vision and Action Plan

STRATEGY DEVELOPMENT Long-Range Vision Plan Development

Technical Reviews and Assessments

Implementation Plan and Action Items

Public Engagement

Master Plan Review and Approval

Throughout the planning process, public engagement has formed the cornerstone of iden fying community needs, desires and aspira ons. Public engagement for this plan consisted of a series of focus groups, stakeholder interviews, community-wide virtual and inperson mee ngs, an engagement website, and an online survey open to all interested in contribu ng to this effort. Combined, these engagement events balanced technical evalua ons of exis ng park and facili es condi ons, programming offerings, demographics and level of service to help iden fy the community needs and true priori es as part of a needs assessment planning exercise, iden fied as Step One (1) in Diagram 1 above. Once a solid base of informa on iden fying needs was gathered, the planning team developed a longrange vision plan that incorporates residents’ desires and aspira ons for the Pinecrest community into a series of guiding principles. An Implementa on Plan was developed in alignment with the long-range vision to assist the Village with implementa on of guiding principles. A corresponding Ac on Plan outlines steps

for Village staff and partners to implement over the next year and beyond. These ac ons include acquisi ons, capital improvements, programming, opera ons and maintenance, and policies categories. As the Village con nues to grow and diversify, an important recommenda on is for Village staff to regularly review, assess and update informa on and recommenda ons. Staff may incorporate performance measurements ed to progress and implementa on of specific ac ons. Staff should also regularly survey residents and visitors’ needs, sa sfac on and priori es. The effort to stay up-to-date with community needs is shared with residents who must con nue to par cipate in opportuni es to provide input to elected officials and Village staff. This shared approach will help ensure Pinecrest remains a premier community in the na on.

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NEEDS AND PRIORITIES ASSESSMENT


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PINECREST PARKS AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN

1.1 GUIDING DOCUMENTS The Village of Pinecrest has a long history of strategically planning the character and quality of the public realm throughout the Village. There has been con nuous progress made towards a comprehensive Parks and Recrea on vision through the development of consistent and annually reviewed Strategic Plans supported by specific project budge ng. A core ini a ve of this PRMP is to provide an addi onal guide to progress towards the vision of the Village of Pinecrest. In an effort to ensure alignment with current community and infrastructural goals, iden fied guiding documents adopted and published by the Village were reviewed. Iden fica on of current goals, ongoing projects, and investments by the Village helps to solidify alignment and poten al opportuni es to provide mul ple benefits while excerising efficency with tax dollars. This document is a brief summary of each of the significant guiding document and their specific relevance to the Master Plan.

KEY TAKEAWAYS: • Several objec ves of the Village’s Comprehensive Plan can be advanced through implementa on of this PRMP. • Each Strategic Priority iden fied in the Village’s updated Strategic Plan can be advanced through this PRMP. • Implementa on of pedestrian and bicycle improvements, as noted in Transporta on Master Plan, will reduce need for addi onal parking within parks, improve health and wellness, increase safety, and reduce two primary barriers residents have in visi ng parks more o en. • Coral Pine Park is an important node in the Village’s stormwater system. • Addi onal strategic opens spaces within the C-100A Canal corridor could help reduce storm event flooding. • There is consistency in long-term recrea on needs as iden fied by the County and this plan.

L I S T O F G U I D I N G D O C U M E N T S: • • • • • • • •

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Comprehensive Development Master Plan (2016) Strategic Plan (2013) (2020) Transporta on Master Plan (2018) Stormwater Master Plan (2015) Village of Pinecrest Annual Budget (2021) Parks and Recrea on Business Plan (2021) Parks and Recrea on Marke ng Plan (2017) Miami-Dade County, Parks, Recrea on and Open Spaces Community Leisure Interest Survey Report (2014)

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C O M P R E H E N S I V E D E V E LO P M E N T MASTER PLAN The Comprehensive Development Master Plan (Comp Plan) outlines overarching and large-scale goals for the image, quality, and experience of specific land use areas and their rela onship to each other across the Village. This document serves as a primary reference for projects such as the development of strategic plans, capital investment projects, master planning, and annual budgets. Map 1, below, iden fies proposed Future Land Use Map within the Comprehensive Development Master Plan for 2030. Relevance to PRMP: The Comprehensive Development Master Plan is a key reference for the PRMP in order to support the objec ves that the Village of Pinecrest has previously

established. Primary objec ves that the Master Plan will support include: • Objec ve 1-1.4: Accommodate Public and SumiPublic Services • Objec ve 1-1.5: Develop a Dis nc ve Village Character and Sense of Place • Objec ve 1-1.7: Promote Village Appearance, Natural Ameni es, and Urban Design Principles • Objec ve 1-2.5: Indicate Land For Public and Private Parks and Recrea on Facili es (PR) • Chapter 6: Recrea on and Open Space Element • Objec ve 6-1.1: System of Parks and Recrea on • Objec ve 6-1.4: Access to Facili es and Programming

Map 1:Future Land Use Map (Village of Pinecrest Comprehensive Development Master Plan - 2016) 9


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PINECREST PARKS AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN

S T R AT E G I C P L A N Beginning in 2010, the Village of Pinecrest established a five-year strategic plan that outlines community-wide Core Values and a short-term vision for the Village. In early 2020, the Village updated the Core Values to reflect a refinement in priori es by residents. The updated Core Values are: 1. Fiscal Responsibility 2. High quality services and ameni es 3. Suppor ng excellence in educa on in the public schools 4. Protec ng neighborhood character 5. Health, safety, and community well being 6. Sustainability

Council’s refinement of the Core Values and update of the Strategic Plan in 2020 was based upon review of results from a series of resident surveys, a Situa onal Analysis, an environmental scan, and a five-year forecast. This approach supports the Village’s datadriven decision-making process. A series of Strategic Priori es were iden fied during the 2020 update and include: Organiza onal Excellence and Financial Stability: Maintain efficient and responsive government, which embraces the highest standards of service and ci zen engagement and commits to the goals of the strategic plan. Security and Pedestrian Safety: Maintain the Village’s standard of police service and enhance safety for pedestrians and bicyclists. Residen al Character and Community Enhancement: Maintain the appearance of the Village and the quality of life for residen al living by preserving the streetscape, minimizing impacts from commercial

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development, protec ng the caliber of our educa onal ins tu ons, and planning for the future needs of our community. Recrea on and Infrastructure: Con nue to provide a high standard of parks and infrastructure to best serve the community and plan for future demand as Pinecrest’s needs change. Cultural Value: Improve the quality and variety of arts and culture in the Village to provide opportuni es for community interac on and enrichment. Environmental Sustainability: Minimize the Village’s impact on the environment with increased energy efficiency, growth management policies, and alternate transporta on ini a ves.

Relevance to PRMP: Though the term ‘recrea on’ is only men oned in one of the Strategic Priori es, parks and recrea on are cri cal elements of the Village in achieving all six (6) priori es. Through the parks window, the Village is able to realize fiscal stewardship, provide safe environments for pedestrians and cyclists, promote a rich residen al character marked with a feeling of being within a park, encourage community interac on and sustain the natural environment and incorporate resilient prac ces. Specific objec ves which have relevance to the PRMP include: • Con nue to update web-based communica ons efforts to include full ADA compliant capabili es. • Strive to decrease the financial gap in the Parks and Recrea on Department as well as Pinecrest Gardens.

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• Improve ADA accessibility at Veteran’s Wayside Park. • Con nue implemen ng pedestrian-oriented recommenda ons from the Transporta on Master Plan. • Develop a long-term financial implementa on plan for the Bicycle Lane Projects as iden fied in the Transporta on Master Plan. • Conduct a canopy survey of the Village every five years and/or a er a significant storm event. • Con nue to implement the Village-wide Street Tree Plan ng Program to replace lost canopy. • Update the Veterans Wayside Park Master Plan. • Inves gate water access opportuni es throughout the Village and evaluate the possibility of acquisi on. • Create addi onal recrea on opportuni es to con nue to provide a high standard of parks as the community’s needs change by ac vely pursuing the acquisi on of land for future parks. • Create a comprehensive Parks and Recrea on Master Plan. • Establish a 501c(3) corpora on in Pinecrest with a focus in the arts. • Maintain Tree City USA status. • Implement an educa onal campaign to increase community awareness regarding sustainable improvements that can be made by private property owners. • Create a policy on the installa on, maintenance and subsides of electric vehicle chargers at all Pinecrest facili es. Following the approval of this master plan, addi onal objec ves will likely be incorporated by the Village which expand the ac ons taken to realize Core Values.

TRANSPORTATION MASTER PLAN Within the ini al 2015 Transporta on Master Plan, three (3) Primary Improvement Areas were iden fied. These include: Pedestrian/Bicycle facility Improvements, Traffic Opera ons Improvements, and Traffic Calming Improvements. The improvement areas were developed in partnership with stakeholders, the Village’s Transporta on Advisory Commi ee (TAC) and Village residents. Each has an impact on how residents and visits access and experience parks and open spaces within the Village. Addi onal recommenda ons within the plan include study of the Village’s People Mover transit service and analysis of Village wide speed limit reduc ons. These addi onal areas have the poten al to improve the safety and universal access to parks and recrea on in the Village. Improvements to pedestrian and cyclist access to parks has been a highlight of prior public involvement and outlined in various vision and strategic plans for the Village. The Transporta on Master Plan further ar culates recommended projects to increase safety for pedestrians and cyclists, while having the added benefit of increasing access to parks and other Village facili es. The overall character of the Village is one which celebrates tree-lined residen al streets, many of which lack sidewalk infrastructure. In most cases, residen al streets within the Village are calm and can be accessed by residents to walk, cycle and generally enjoy the public realm. Several arterial streets, however, crisscross the Village and provide important inter-city connec vity are busy and do not offer a safe environment for pedestrians and cyclists with designated facili es such as sidewalks and/or on-road or off-road bicycle facili es or shareduse trails.

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PINECREST PARKS AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN

Relevance to PRMP: Building upon the comprehensive public input gathered during the development of the Transporta on Master Plan, the PRMP has the poten al to provide addi onal refinements to pedestrian, cyclist and/or traffic calming projects or provide addi onal priori za on of exis ng recommended projects. The Transporta on Master Plan recommends several bicycle lanes (5.1 miles), shared-use paths (13.2 miles), shared lane markings/sharrows (6.9 miles), and sidewalk (7.1 miles) projects, iden fied in Map 2 to the right. When fully implemented, the network will connect each park and Village facility to one-another. This interconnected network of pedestrian and cyclist facili es will have a tremendous impact on residents’ ability to safely access parks and par cipate in recrea on events and programming without having to drive. Full implementa on of the Transporta on Master Plan has the poten al to increase use of parks across the Village, promote a more healthy and well-being community, and decrease the need for addi onal or exis ng parking facili es within parks, therefore providing for be er use of exis ng parks and a poten al return of parkland to green space or recrea on facili es.

STORMWATER MASTER PLAN The 2015 Stormwater Mater Plan was established as the first and current comprehensive stormwater management plan for the Village. The plan iden fies current and projected issues and proposed conceptual design solu ons for a number of impacts from stormwater such as flooding events, groundwater rise, sea-level rise and saltwater intrusion. Projec ons used for this plan factor a 3-7 inch rise in sea levels by 2030 and 9-24 inches of rise by 2060. Though most of the Village’s park and recrea on assets do not have immediate exposure to coastal condi ons, impacts

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from sea-level and groundwater rise will have significant impacts on exis ng parks and the planning and design of new facili es. Impacts may include changes to habitats and vegeta on, higher finish floor eleva ons requirements, and requirements for be er resilient prac ces to reduce or mi gate hazards. Map 3 iden fies a projected 100-Year, 72-hour storm event flood impact across the Village. Only two (2) park sites; Coral Pine Park and Red Road Linear Park are within FEMA’s 100-Year Flood Zone and would vary from 12 inches or less in flooding impact. Most areas with the greatest level of flooding poten al, shown in red shading on map, are residen al areas. Future buy-outs could allow for strategic use of parcels which may suffer future repe ve losses, primarily along the C-100A Canal corridor. Based upon a ranking of factors including repe ve losses, documented home flooding, flood volume reduc on, and input from Village staff, 15 projects were iden fied with five (5) ranked as highest priority. Parks directly or indirectly impact three (3) of the five (5) high priority projects (ranking); (#1) C100DN-1E includes Coral Pine Park; (#3) C100D-N-1 includes future Hidden Pine Park and is adjacent to future Gary Matzner Park; and (#4) C2-S-9NE is adjacent to Red Road Linear Park). An important note highligh ng the mutual benefits of stormwater control and parks. Open space serves many purposes beyond aesthe cs and relief from the urban environment. Parks and open space, when designed with resiliency in mind, can easily incorporate best prac ces that increase stormwater storage capacity, improves water quality and helps to recharge the aquifer. One example is designing athle c fields to func on as temporary stormwater storage areas, typically for 2448 hrs. for large storm events, reducing peak runoff for adjacent areas.

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Map2: Bicycle/Pedestrian Network Improvement Plan - Villagewide (Village of Pinecrest Transporta on Master Plan (2018)

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PINECREST PARKS AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN Map: Model Valida on 100-Year, 72-Hour & Flood Complaints (Appendix 5F); Village of Pinecrest Stormwater Master Plan (2015)

Red Road Linear Park

Coral Pine Park

Veterans Wayside Park

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Relevance to PRMP: Two (2) primary areas are relevance to the PRMP; overlapping of projects and parks, and fiscal priori za on. For the first area of relevance, there is not a significant overlap in the total number of priority stormwater projects and park or recrea on facili es loca ons, however, several of the top five (5) priority stormwater projects do impact or overlap park sites. The three (3) high priority projects that overlap with parks represent over $10 million in costs (in 2015 dollars) to implement and should be planned with Dept. Staff involvement to ensure opportuni es to provide mul ple benefits to taxpayers is achieved. The second area of relevance to the PRMP is the fiscal priority of the stormwater projects. Facing the same challenges as the Transporta on Master Plan, the Village must priori ze mul ple types of infrastructure needs each requiring extensive funding to implement. The Stormwater Master Plan’s list of priority projects total over $40 million in implementa on costs while the Transporta on Master Plan includes over $8.65 million in project costs. These two plans are also not an exhaus ve list of the infrastructure costs the Village faces. Projects iden fied through the PRMP will need to show jus fica on of community need and priority in order to secure funding.

VILLAGE OF PINECREST ANNUAL BUDGET REPORT (2020-2021) The Annual Budget Report provides a variety of informa on including Budget Process, Long-Range Financial Plans, Financial Policies, Fund Structure, General Funding, and specific funding sec ons that include categories of Stormwater, Special Revenue, Capital Projects, and Debt Service. It is a significant effort to first determine the needs of a community, and an addi onal effort to implement improvements and changes to fit within short- and long-term fiscal possibili es. The structure of the Annual Budget

corresponds with the goals of the updated Strategic Plan and the adopted Transporta on and Stormwater Masterplans, amoung other reports, all working together to support the Comprehensive Development Master Plan.

Relevance to PRMP: The Capital Improvements Project sec on of the Annual Budget describes specific project goals and their financial obliga on for the 2021 fiscal year as well as how they align with the budgets over the next five (5) years. The Capital Fund designates the funds to the following during the 2021 fiscal year: • Design of a shared use path along Kendall Drive • Improvements to the Palme o Middle School basketball court • LED light installa on for baseball field #1 at Suniland Park • Flagler Grove Park Improvements to include a new playground, LED ligh ng, shade structures for bleachers and team benches, installa on of synthe c turf for soccer field, small restroom upgrades and parking lot resurfacing. • Comple on of improvements at Evelyn Greer Park including playground equipment replacement and outdoor wall sconces • Coral Pine Park Improvements including Master Plan Phase 2 Documents and Construc on

A June 2021 Capital Improvement Project Update provided more specific updates on projects as well. The update included details for Village entrance monument sign loca ons with general construc on es mated to begin in October 2021, Suniland Park LED lights and Flagler Grove Park turf installa on. The design process was updated to have started for the Kendall Drive shared-use path and Coral Pine Park Phase 2 design.

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PINECREST PARKS AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN

Chart 1: Importance/Unmet Needs Assessment Matrix for Leisure Ac vi es for the Central Coastal area of Miami-Dade County

Chart 2: 76:Importance/Unmet Importance/UnmetNeeds NeedsAssessment AssessmentMatrix Matrixfor forSports, Park and Recreation Sports, for Programs and Classes MiamiProgams and Classes the Central Coastalinarea of MiamiDade DadeCounty’s County Central Coastal Community.

Miami-Dade County Community Leisure Interest Survey

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MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, COMMUNITY LEISURE INTEREST SURVEY REPORT (2014) The purpose of the Miami-Dade County, Parks, Recrea on and Open Spaces Community Leisure Interest Survey Report is to iden fy unmet needs in the county, iden fying gaps between services and needs, and the sharing of this informa on throughout the County for park and recrea on planning purposes. Pinecrest Village is part of the ‘Central Coast’ community as shown in Map 4 below:

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Old Cutler Bike Path Ned Glenn Nature Preserve

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Debbie Curtin Park SW 232ND ST

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SW 127TH AVE

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SW 211TH ST

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Bill Sadowski Preserve

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Roberta Hunter Park

SW 216TH ST

SW 232ND ST

SW 173R

SW 186TH ST

Quail Roost Park

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SW 162ND AVE

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Southridge Park

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SW 167TH AVE

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Charles Deering Estate

SW 200TH ST

Pine Ridge B.M.X. Park

Castellow Hammock Preserve PLANT SW 157TH AVE

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PALMETTO BAY Charles Deering Estate SW 174TH ST

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Comparison of findings between the Miami-Dade County Leisure Interests Survey and the sta s cal survey completed for the PRMP iden fy a high level of consistency between leisure ac vi es, sports, programs and classes that have high unmet needs and are most important to households. This consistency establishes clear trends in needs from residents that have remained since 2014 and con nue to not be met through other providers.

Bill Baggs Cape SP

CORAL GABLES

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Eureka Park

Losner Park

Area 259

West Perrine Senior Center

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SW 184TH ST

Relevance to PRMP:

Crandon Park

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SW 96TH ST

R. Hardy Matheson Preserve

SW 168TH ST

SW 112TH AVE

Larry & Penny Thompson Park

SW 200TH ST

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Zoo Miami

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Gold Coast Railroad Museum Park

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SW 152ND ST

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Palmetto Golf Course

Colonial Drive Park

Chuck Pezoldt Park

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Walter A.White Park

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Matheson Hammock Park Matheson Hammock Park SW 104TH ST Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden Snapper Creek Lake Parkway

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Deerwood Bonita Lakes Park

Oak Creek Park

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Crandon Park

Biscayne Trail (East Side of Canal)

Black Creek Trail (Along C1 Canal) SW 240TH ST

SW 240TH ST

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Black Point Park and Marina

Legend County Parks

State and National Parks

Commission District

Highways

Rail

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County Heritage Parks

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Greenways

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Similar findings can be iden fied from Chart 2 which summarizes unmet needs and importance to households for recrea on sports, programs and classes. Consistency with the PRMP’s online sta s cal survey findings which indicate Zumba, Pilates, yoga, and learnto-swim programming as most important and of high unmet needs establishes a trend.

KEY BISCAYNE

PINECREST

SW 120TH ST

Area 318 Briar Bay Park

SW 128TH ST

SW 136TH ST SW

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Continental Park

Area 47 Three Lakes Park

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Banyan Drive Park

SW 77TH AVE

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Nixon Smiley Pineland Preserve

SW 88TH ST

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Camp Matecumbe

SW 85TH ST

Kendalwood Park

Cherry Grove Park SW 94TH ST Kendale Park

SW 112TH ST

SW 80TH ST

SW 72ND AVE

SW 95TH ST

SW 117TH AVE

SB

SW 112TH ST

SR 878

Devon Aire Park Ron Ehmann Park

Arvida Park

SW 78TH ST

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Sunset Park

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SW 64TH ST

K DR

SW 87TH AVE

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Miller Drive Park

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MAYNADA ST

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SW 42ND AVE

AP PE

SW 82ND AVE

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ST SW 96TH

Hammocks Community Park

CK MO

H ST

N SN

Kendall Indian Hammocks Park Kendall Soccer Park

Water Oaks Park

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SW 112T

Snapper Creek Trail

FLORIDA TPKE EXT SW 122ND AVE

Lago Mar Park

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SW 57TH AVE

ST ST SW 80TH

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SR 826 EXT

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SW 82ND AVE

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127TH AVE SW 1

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Park Westwood P Map 42: Central Coast Community

SW 62ND AVE

Tropical Park

Millers Pond Park

Eden Lakes Park

SW 37TH AVE

Map 4: Central Coast community area as iden fied in the MiamiDade County Community Leisure Interests Survey (2014)

completed as part of this master plan. In general, many of the cultural, water-ac vi es, and cycling ac vi es are consistent in level of importance to households and level of unmet need in 2021 in Pinecrest as they were in 2014. This iden fies a trends in need that has not been resolved.

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1.5

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Included in the leisure interest survey are a series of ‘Unmet and Importance’ matrices for each study area. To the le are two (2) matrices which summarize findings for the Central Coastal area that includes Pinecrest. Though the data used for these charts has aged, it can serve as a baseline to determine if there are consistent trends, confirma on or barometer of change occurring within the Village regarding leisure ac vi es. Chart 1 iden fies unmet need and importance to households for general leisure ac vi es. Of note, are similari es with findings that rank concerts/fairs/ fes vals as most important and of high unmet need consistent with results from the online sta s cal survey

SPORTS & FITNESS INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION: SPORTS, FITNESS, AND LEISURE ACTIVITIES TOPLINE PARTICIPATION REPORT Community needs cannot just be based on popula on. Trends in recrea on need to be taken into account when planning for the future. The data on these pages is from the Sport & Fitness Industry Associa on: Sports, Fitness, And Leisure Ac vi es Topline Par cipa on Report for 2020. The report provides insight into what ac vi es are most popular by age group and what ac vi es are growing in popularity. In general, ac vity rates are increasing, although total par cipa on rate (around 73% for Americans over

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PINECREST PARKS AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN

6 years old) remains the same, see Figure 2. Trends highlight a growth in par cipa on rates for fitness sports such as aqua c exercise, boot camp style training, kickboxing, dance, weights, running/jogging, swimming, Tai Chi, walking for fitness and yoga. Outdoor sports include backpacking, bicycling, canoe/kayaking, hiking, wakeboarding, stakeboarding, fishing, and stand-up paddling. Addi onal hightlights include: • Although par cipa on rates fluctuate slightly over the years, all ac vity categories have increased par cipa on since 2013. • Fitness and outdoor ac vi es remain the most popular categories and have the most increase in par cipa on. • Cardio equipment use and class exercises such as barre, yoga, and cross fit increased by at least 3.5%. • Outdoor ac vi es such as paddleboarding and hiking gained 7% in annual increases. • This survey does not include the effect of COVID-19, which has impacted the recrea ng and overall ac vity habits of many people. Qualita ve data indicates an increase in camping and other outdoor ac vi es but it is not yet clear if this is a sustained trend. 2020 and 2021 data should be taken into account when available. Current ac vity par cipa on rates only iden fy part of the need. The ac vi es that people desire to do are also important because crea ng be er access to these ac vi es greatly encourages people to be ac ve. Figure 1 iden fies ac vi es that non-par cipants are most interested in by age. • Outdoor ac vi es such as biking, camping, and fishing topped the lists of all ages. • Stand-up paddling was a new top interest for young adults. • Gym workouts with weights and machines were listed for all ages except the youngest.

18

Figure 1: Sport & Fitness Industry Associa on Non-Par cipa on Rate by Age Group AGES 6 12 • • • • • • • • • •

Soccer Fishing Swimming on a team Camping Mar al arts Basketball Skateboarding Bicycling Golf Football

• • • • • • • • • •

Camping Mar al arts Backpacking Snowboarding Climbing Kayaking Fishing Bicycling Volleyball Working out w/ weights

• • • • • • • • • •

Stand-up paddling Swimming for fitness Camping Bicycling Working out w/ weights Mar al arts Basketball Working out w/ machines Volleyball Running/jogging

AGES 13 17 • • • • • • • • • •

Camping Fishing Basketball Working out w/ weights Running/jogging Swimming for fitness Golf Volleyball Football Working out w/ machines

• • • • • • • • • •

Stand-up paddling Swimming for fitness Camping Bicycling Surfing Kayaking Working out w/weights Running/jogging Backpacking Wakeboarding

• • • • • • • • • •

Camping Working out w/ weights Stand-up paddling Bicycling Swimming for fitness Hiking Fishing Canoeing Working out w/ machines Bird/wildlife viewing

• • • • • • • • • •

Bird/wildlife viewing Fishing Working out w/ machines Swimming for fitness Hiking Fitness classes Bicycling Camping Working out w/ weights Shoo ng

AGES 18 24

AGES 25 34

AGES 35 44

AGES 45 54

AGES 55 64 • Bicycling • Bird/wildlife viewing • Working out using machines • Camping • Fishing • Hiking • Swimming for fitness • Stand-up paddling • Working out w/weights • Canoing

AGES 65+

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Figure 2: Sport & Fitness Industry Associa on Total Par cipa on Rate by Sport Category

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

Individual Sports Outdoor Sports

Fitness Sports

60.1% 61.3% 61.9% 63.9% 65.5% 66.0% 67.3% 43.9% 46.0% 48.8% 49.3% 49.6% 49.2% 50.7% 43.3% 45.0% 47.7% 46.8% 46.2% 45.3% 45.0%

Team Sports

22.0% 22.0% 22.6% 23.2% 22.6% 22.8% 23.4%

Water Sports

13.4% 14.0% 14.5% 14.3% 13.8% 13.7% 13.6% 12.4% 12.6% 13.1% 13.4% 13.3% 13.2% 13.0%

Racket Sports Winter Sports

2019

7.0% 6.8% 7.0% 7.1% 7.3% 7.5% 8.2%

CONCLUSION The Village of Pinecrest has a number of exis ng guiding documents that ar culate residents’ vision for the community. From the Village’s updated Strategic Plan to the recently adopted Transporta on Master Plan, there is an extensive number of community goals, objec ves and previously iden fied capital projects that will either have an impact on parks and recrea on within the Village or can be advanced through improvements of parks and recrea on facili es. Guiding documents also shed light on trends in recrea on and sports which can help inform gaps in current offerings. Cumula vely, the plans and reports reviewed will serve as guidance for the PRMP and help bring complimentary efforts to meet residents’ and visitors’ needs.

19


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PINECREST PARKS AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN

1.2 DEMOGRAPHICS ANALYSIS Parks and recrea on are essen al to the high quality of life celebrated in the Village of Pinecrest. Planning for these facili es, however, is not only about crea ng places, it’s about how to best serve residents and build strong neighborhoods. One of the first steps in park system planning is to be er understand the popula on, current demographic trends, and projec ons for the future. Evalua on of popula on and demographic sta s cs in this sec on are anecdotal. Though data is sta c in nature, the Village of Pinecrest can make be er informed decisions based on trends that may impact delivery of services over the next five (5) or more years. The Village of Pinecrest’s first official popula on count occurred during the 2000 US Census, a few years a er the Village was founded, with a popula on of 19,055. This figure, however, decreased in 2010 to 18,233 (-4.4%), before increasing in 2020 to 18,388 (+ 0.9%). The return to moderate growth is projected to con nue for the Village with the University of Florida es ma ng a Figure 3: Past and Projected Popula on for Village of Pinecrest (2000-2030)

KEY TAKEAWAYS: • Pinecreast is poised for a projected future growth rate of 13.4% by 2030; significantly higher than previous rates. • Growth is not guaranteed due to redevelopment needs. • Popula on growth would likely occur through higher densi es along Pinecrest Parkway (US 1) and would increase urban lifestyle needs such as access to open space. • Four exis ng parks along Pinecrest Parkway are within in 1/4 mile or 5 minutes walk of future bus rapid transit (BRT) sta ons. • Pinecrest has a higher than state average percent of residents age 45-64 and youth age 5-24, and a significantly lower than average number of residents age 25-44 and children under age 5. • The next ten (10) years will likely bring an increased need for senior programs

Figure 4: Age Group Growth Rates (2014-2019)

25,000

+ 3.3%

20,000

20,863 19,055

18,233

Ages 15-24

18,388

15,000

10,000

Year 20

Growth rate: (2014-2019) 2000

2010

2020

Ages 65+

Ages Under 5

-1.2 % - 3.4%

2030 December 2021


DRAFT

popula on of 18,619 in 2021 and Miami-Dade County projec ng a 2030 popula on of 20,863, which would represent an increase of 13.4% from the most recent 2020 Census, see Figure 3. Of most relevance to this master plan is where the future growth may occur. Based on exis ng and future land uses, as well as future transporta on and transit infrastructure, future popula on growth for Pinecrest will likely come from an increase in density in the western areas of the village, along Pinecrest Parkway (US 1). Growth is not guaranteed as redevelopment would be necessary. Higher density and mul -use development contributes a higher level of need for open space compared to single-family residences on one-acre lots, and may have an increased demand on exis ng park facili es and ameni es in the western area of the Village. Current County plans include bus rapid transit (BRT) sta ons within 1/4 mile or about a five (5) minute walk to four (4) Village parks; Suniland, Evelyn Greer, Veterans Wayside and Flagler Grove.

Age is another important demographic character when considering future needs for parks and recrea on. Figure 5 iden fies a breakdown by percentage of each age group as projected for 2021. Addi onally, State of Florida averages are included, illustra ng unique trends for Pinecrest. The Village has a higher than average percentage of residences age 45-65 and youth age 5-24. Seniors age 65+, children age 5 or less and young adults age 25-44 are all below state averages with significant devia ons for ages 25-34 and under age 5.

CONCLUSION Demographic trends for Pinecrest indicate a higher than previous growth rate over the next ten (10) years with a poten al concentra on of growth occurring in the far western areas of the Village along Pinecrest Parkway. Trends in age indicate a future increase in the number of seniors as a large por on of residents 45-64 years old will age over the next ten years, see Figure 4.

Figure 5: Percentage of Popula on by Age, Village of Pinecrest (2021) Esri 7.4%

75+

FL = 9.0%

10.7%

65-74

FL = 11.1%

17.2%

55-64

FL = 13.2%

15.5%

45-54

FL = 13.1%

10.4%

35-44

FL = 12.1%

9.2%

25-34

FL = 13.0%

12.9%

15-24

FL = 11.9%

13.0%

5-14

FL = 11.1%

Under 5

3.8% FL = 5.4%

21


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PINECREST PARKS AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN

1.3 PARK EVALUATIONS The Village of Pinecrest provides a park system with a variety of recrea on opportuni es and park spaces. From linear park spaces to large play and sport parks, the parks and open spaces in Pinecrest provide experiences that cater to a wide range of user groups. Within the Village’s seven (7) exis ng parks and one (1) community center there are: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Over 44 acres of public park land 5 playgrounds 6 mul purpose fields 5 baseball/youth fields 5 restrooms 6 tennis courts 2 basketball courts 4 ba ng cages 3 indoor rental spaces 1 dog park (Pawcrest Park) 1 freshwater lake 1 natural area A 22,000 SF community center 2.5 miles of shared-use trail Over 1 mile of paved walking paths

In addi onal to the above inventory of parks, residents can enjoy access to Pinecrest Gardens, owned and operated by the Village, two (2) private tennis clubs, and two (2) elementary schools and one (1) middle school with joint use agreements for public access. Furthermore, the Village is surrounded by addi onal municipal and county owned and operated parks. The Village is also in the process of developing two addi onal

22

KEY TAKEAWAYS: • Parks throughout Pinecrest are examples of successful public spaces for all of South Florida. • Successful a ributes of Pinecrest’s parks include high level of use, quality of maintenance, and promo on of healthy lifestyles while design of parks include connec ng visitors to primary des na ons and use of standards in branding and materials. • Opportuni es for improvements focus on further incorpora on of sustainable prac ces, primary with environmental elements such as energy, water and material resources. • Addi onal improvements to balancing ac ve and passive (at-will) recrea on opportuni es and providing ample comfortable sea ng op ons are primary design considera ons.

park sites; Gary Matzner Park and Hidden Pines Park, which will add 2.84 and 0.57 acres respec vely in parkland to the Village. Once completed, residents and visitors to Pinecrest will have public access to 66.06 acres of parkland with an addi onal 13.64 acres designated as private clubs. The highlight of the parks evalua on is a performance ra ng of each park site. Using a comprehensive set of criteria developed to objec vely observe parks both individually and as a system. Map 4 iden fies the Village’s public parks, private clubs, and surrounding public parks adjacent to the Village’s limits.

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DRAFT

Map 4: Village of Pinecrest Public and Private Parks and Clubs and Surrounding Public Parks (2021)

Neighborhood Neighborhood Parks Parks

6

sŝůůĂŐĞ ŽĨ WŝŶĞĐƌĞƐƚ Ͳ džŝƐƟŶŐ WĂƌŬƐ

1 Flager Grove Park 2 Red Road Linear Park 3 Veterans Wayside Park Village of Pinecrest - Future

7

4 Gary Matzner Park 5 Hidden Pines Park 8

KƚŚĞƌ EĞŝŐŚďŽƌŚŽŽĚ WĂƌŬƐ

6 William H. Kerdyk, Jr. & Family Park (Coral Gables) 7 Fuchs Park (S. Miami) 8 Dante Fascell Park (S. Miami) 9 Coral Bay Park (Coral Gables) 10 Briar Bay Park (County) 11 Briar Bay Linear Park (County) 12 Rockdale Park (County)

4 5 1 2

7 5

1

1

8 2

3

2

13

3

9

14 10

4

11

3

15

Community Parks sŝůůĂŐĞ ŽĨ WŝŶĞĐƌĞƐƚ Ͳ džŝƐƟŶŐ WĂƌŬƐ

12

0

1 mi

1/2 mi 1/4 mi

6

3/4 mi

Legend: Pinecrest Boundary

1 2 3 4

4 Pinecrest Parks

Community Facilities

Future Parks

Public Schools

Municipality Boundaries

Special Venue

Private Schools

Major Roads Streets

Golf Course Parks

Greenway Trail

County Parks

Bus Stops Bus Route

Planned Greenway Trail

Natural Area Preserve

Metro Rail Stops Metro Rail Route

Coral Pine Park Village Green Evelyn Greer Park Suniland Park

KƚŚĞƌ ŽŵŵƵŶŝƚLJ WĂƌŬƐ

Regional Parks 1 2 3 4

Matheson Hammock Park R. Hardy Preserve Chapman Field Park Charles Deering Estate

5 ŽŶƟŶĞŶƚĂů WĂƌŬ ;County) 6 Coral Reef Park (WĂůŵĞƩŽ ĂLJ)

Private

7 Royal Palm Tennis Club 8 Coral Oaks Tennis and Wellness Club

23


DRAFT

PINECREST PARKS AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN

The following sec on details the scoring range of evalua ons along with documenta on of key success and opportuni es for parks observed. The criteria used is based in part on guidelines developed by Project for Public Spaces (PPS), a non-profit organiza on dedicated to helping communi es create and sustain public spaces that build stronger communi es. Parks observed were assigned a score for each categorical ques on based on observa onal evalua on of how the park met the aforemen oned criteria at the me of observa on. Specific needs iden fied for each park noted during observa ons are addressed in the Implementa on Plan. Score are shown via a matrix, see Table 1, that allows trends to become visible across the en re system.

Exceeding Expecta ons Parks with scores in this range are defined as parks with new or recently enhanced facili es or features, readily accessible through mul ple modes of transporta on, exhibit mul ple features that enhance the comfort and experience of park users, and that exhibit a maintenance quality that meets or exceeds the standards of the Village. These parks score in the 75-100 range.

Mee ng Expecta ons Parks with scores in this range are defined as parks with serviceable facili es or features providing func onal recrea onal access for the public, accessed primarily by vehicle with some connec ons to adjacent neighborhoods. These parks exhibit few features that enhance the comfort and experience of park users beyond a minimal recrea onal access capacity, and that exhibit a maintenance level sufficient for the uses in the park but would benefit from addi onal maintenance. These types of parks score in the 50-74 range.

Not Mee ng Expecta ons Parks within this score range are generally defined as parks with facili es or features that have exceeded

24

their func onal life span and/or need enhancement or replacement to provide func onal recrea onal access for the public, accessed primarily by vehicle and are disconnected from adjacent neighborhoods. These parks exhibit few, if any, features that enhance the comfort and experience of park users, and that exhibit a maintenance level insufficient to con nue to provide the desired uses and recrea onal access. These types of parks score in the 0-49 range. Ra ngs are based on a scale of 1-5, with 1 represen ng the lowest and 5 represen ng the highest. A ra ng of n/a indicates that the criteria was not applicable and is not included in any totals. Final ra ngs are weighted to a scale of 0-100, with 100 being the highest possible. Ra ngs are based on observa ons made during a limited me period and are intended to provide informa on regarding trends for individual parks or across the park system only.

SUCCESSES The Village of Pinecrest’s park system enjoys a wide array of successes. Ranging from a high level of maintenance quality to access to parks from mul ple modes of transporta on, the Village’s parks are a showcase in quality for South Florida. Individually, Evelyn Greer Park was the best preforming park with Village Green a close second. The best rated category is condi on which reflects the quality of maintenance completed by Village staff as well as how residents and visitors care for their parks. Individual elements with the highest ra ngs are: • Evidence of use from visitors • Sites are free of li er • Connec ng users to primary des na ons within parks (paths, sidewalks, or vehicle) • Promo ng a healthy lifestyle and/or helping to reduce daily stress • U lizing standards for branding, materials, etc.

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DRAFT

Table 1: Village of Pinecrest Public Park Evalua on Ra ngs Legend:

• Enhancing environmental awareness or knowledge • Provide nodes within larger ecological corridors or habitats • Using energy, water and material resources efficiently • Balancing ac ve and passive (at-will) recrea on opportuni es • Providing ample convenient places to sit

Mee ng Expecta ons (74-50) Not Mee ng Expecta ons (49-0)

Is there evidence that the design and construc on of the site meet the needs of users served?

4

5

Is the site readily accessible to the users being served? (walking, biking, vehicle, etc.)

4

5

4

4

3

Does the site u lize durable materials or products?

4

4

n/a

3

4

Does the site include appropriate recrea on ameni es for intended users? (fields and courts for athle cs, etc.)

4

4

4

3

5

Has the site been developed or recently renovated?

4

4

5

3

Is there evidence that the site u lizes design standards for branding, materials, etc.

5

5

5

How many different types of ac vi es are available?

5 5 4

5 5 5

Are there choices in intensity of ac vi es? (passive/at-will or ac ve/programmed)

4

Is there a balance of ac ve recrea on (programmed spaces) and passive (at-will) opportuni es? Is there evidence that the site serves users’ current needs for recrea on, relaxing, or other ac vi es?

5

83

5

4

83

3

4

73

3

4

77

4

3

5

80

4

4

4

5

4

3

5

3

91

n/a n/a 4

4 3 3

5 5 5

3 3 3

5 5 4

81 90 87 80

5

4

3

4

3

4

77

4

4

4

3

3

3

4

71

4

5

4

3

4

3

5

80

How would you rate the site’s maintenance? (grass cu ng, working equipment, etc.)

5

5

n/a

4

4

4

5

90

What level of use is evident from visitors?

5

5

n/a

5

5

4

5

97

What level of pride is evident from staff regarding maintenance or customer service?

5

5

n/a

4

5

4

5

93

Does the site need improvements? (1=Very Much; 5=No/none)

4

5

n/a

3

4

3

4

Does the site make a good first impression?

5

5

n/a

4

5

4

3

77 84 87

Are there ample places to sit and are they conveniently located? Is the site clean and free of li er?

3 4

4 5

4 n/a

2 4

4 5

4 5

4 5

71 93

Does the site provide a feeling of safety or perceived safety? (CPTED standards, etc.)

4

5

n/a

5

5

4

5

93

Do vehicles dominate the site through access roads, parking and/ or maintenance?

4

5

4

2

4

3

4

74

4 5 4

4 5 4

3 3 4

5 3 5

4 4 4

4 4 4

4 3 3

83 80 77 80

Do paths and/or roads connect people to primary ameni es?

3 5

4 5

4 5

5 5

4 5

3 2

5 5

80 91

Are there transit stop(s) (within 1/4 mile) and/or parking and bike racks near of primary entrance points?

4

5

5

3

5

5

4

89

Does the site provide places for people to gather?

4

4

4

3

5

3

5

80 80

Does the site promote a healthy lifestyle and/or helps to reduce daily stress?

5

5

4

4

5

4

5

91

Is the site well connected with clear and safe access point(s)?

Does the site improve water quality?

4 3 5

5 3 3

3 4 3

5 4 4

4 4 3

4 4 4

4 4 3

83 74 71

Does the site enhance, preserve, promote or contribute to biological diversity?

4

3

n/a

4

2

4

4

70

Does the site incorporate resilient design features or prac ces?

Does the site enhance environmental awareness or knowledge?

5 2 2

3 n/a 3

4 n/a n/a

3 4 3

4 n/a 2

3 n/a 3

4 n/a 3

74 60 53

Does the site create public and/or private revenue-genera ng opportuni es?

4

3

n/a

5

4

n/a

5

84

Does the site help sustain or increase adjacent property values?

5

4

4

5

4

4

5

89

Does the site contribute to nearby property development or redevelopment poten als?

5

4

4

5

4

3

4

86

Does the site provide permanent jobs?

4

n/a

n/a

5

4

n/a

5

90

84

88

80

76

84

71

87

81

Effec veness Are people using the site or is it empty? Is there evidence that the site is used by people of different ages?

89

Condi on

Comfort & Image

Access & Linkages

Is there clear and useful wayfinding/signage within the site? Can people easily walk to the site from surrounding areas? Does the site func on for people with special needs?

Collec vely, the parks within Pinecrest are examples of highly successful public spaces that are heavily used and enjoyed by residents. High-quality maintenance, focus on community health, and use of standards are specific areas of success. Incorpora on of environmental sustainability, balancing ac ve and passive (at-will) recrea on and providing ample comfortable sea ng op ons are a few areas for improvements. Improvements range from strategic goals for the community to lowhanging ac ons that can be easily addressed.

81

Design & Construc on

Are there clear and open view lines into open spaces?

CONCLUSION

— C oral P in

Even the best park systems in the country have areas which can be iden fied as opportuni es for improvements. Diversifying needs, impacts from the South Florida climate, wear caused by use, etc. all contribute to a need for regular improvements. Individually, Veterans Wayside Park was the lowest performing park with Red Road Linear Park in second. Overall, environmental sustainability was the lowest rated category and individual elements, but could have the greatest level of improvements across the park system. The following individual elements have the greatest amount of opportunity for improvement:

e Par k — E velyn Gree n Par k — F lagler Grov e Par k — R ed Ro ad Lin ear P ar k — S unila nd Pa rk — V etera ns W aysid e Par k — V illage Comm Green / Pinec unity Cente rest r

Exceeding Expecta ons (100-75)

OPPORTUNITIES

Sustainable & Resiliency

Does the site use energy, water and material resources efficiently?

Is the site a node within a larger ecological corridor or habitat?

25


DRAFT

PINECREST PARKS AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN

1.4 LEVEL OF SERVICES ANALYSIS The purpose of a Level of Service (LOS) Analysis is to quan fy how well the exis ng parks system is mee ng the needs of residents. The Na onal Recrea on and Park Associa on’s defini on of LOS is “an alloca on mechanism for the delivery of park land and basic recrea on facili es throughout a community. By adop on of such a standard, a community in essence says that all ci zens, [...], will have an equal opportunity to share in the basic menu of services implicit in the standard and accompanying spa al distribu on and alloca on of policies.” For the Village of Pinecrest, the LOS analysis was measured based on three (3) concepts: amount of park land per 1,000 residents; number of facili es per 1,000 residents; and distance or travel me to a park. • Acreage (Amount of Park Land) – Every resident should have similar opportuni es to park land; • Facili es (Number of Facili es) - Every resident should have similar opportuni es to use recrea on facili es; and • Access (Distance or Travel Time) - Every resident should be able to access specific park facili es within similar walking, bicycling, public transit and/ or driving distances.

26

KEY TAKEAWAYS: • Three (3) different measurements were u lized to analyze exis ng level of service within the Village. • Combined, the results of the LOS analysis iden fy acquisi on, facility development and access improvement needs. • Pinecrest is currently deficient in acreage of public parkland un l undeveloped parks are completed. • When public access to private clubs and school sites (with JUAs) is considered, the Village has a surplus of acreage of parkland compared to the Village’s current standard. • The Village’s current standard and exis ng measurement of acreage per 1,000 residents is slightly lower than peers. • Facili es such as an outdoor swimming pool and canoe/ kayak launch are needed based on state standards. • As popula on of the Village increases, addi onal playgrounds, restrooms, and walking paths will be needed. • Residents have adequate access to community and regional parks. • Access to neighborhood park facili es is lacking in a large area of central Pinecrest from SW 88th Street to SW 136th Street along SW 67th and SW 62 Avenues. • Access to neighborhood park facili es could be limitedly improved through strategic improvements to pedestrian and bicycling facili es.

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DRAFT

Figure 6: Village of Pinecrest 2020 Acreage Level of Service

Addi onally, schools, through Joint Use Agreements (JUAs), and private tennis clubs provide recrea on acreage that contribute an addi onal 1.28 acres per 1,000 residents. When added to the acreage provided by the Village, residents in Pinecrest can enjoy 4.33 acres of parkland per 1,000 residents. These figures are only snap-shots in me though. As the Village grows, the need to add parkland acreage for public access will rise. With an es mated popula on of

Schools

(Private Tennis Clubs)

0.54 acres/1,000 (Public Schools)

0.19 acres/1,000

(Future Parks: Gary Matzner and Hidden Pines Park)

Pinecrest Gardens

(Village Acreage LOS Standard)

0.7 acres/1,000

Village (Public Parks)

The 2020 US Census popula on of Pinecrest was 18,388 and there is approximately 39.75 acres of public parks. By using the noted popula on es mate and acreage figures, an Acreage LOS calcula on can be obtained, see Figure 6. The current Acreage LOS is 2.16 acres per 1,000 residents for public parkland provided by the Village. There are, however, other facili es that include parks and open space in the Village. Pinecrest Gardens, a botanical gardens amenity owned and operated by the Village contributes another 0.70 acres of land per 1,000, while future parks, owned by the Village, will provide another 0.19 acres per 1,000 residents. Combined, these facili es contribute to the Village achieving an overall Acreage LOS of 3.05 per 1,000 residents, which is above the Village’s standard of 3.0 acres per 1,000.

0.74 acres/1,000

3.0 acres/1,000

2.86 acres/1,000

The most common way to measure Level of Service (LOS) for exis ng acreage is the number of park acres per 1,000 residents in a community. What does this measurement mean? A general lack of na onal standards in defini on of what should count as parkland results in difficultness in comparing figures with peer communi es or establishment of a na onal benchmark. Analysis, however, can iden fy local trends and result in standards that meet the needs and desires of residents for the long-term vision of the community. The best Acreage LOS standard for the Village of Pinecrest will ul mately be reached through public input and debate as to what the community desires.

4.33 acres/1,000 Surplus of 1.33 acres/1,000

Private

ACREAGE LEVEL OF SERVICES

2.16 acres/1,000

(Pinecrest Gardens)

Table 2: Village of Pinecrest 2020 Acreage LOS Comparison Acreage LOS

City/Village

Acres of Parks

2020 Pop.

(acres per 1,000 pop.)

Weston

251

68,107

3.68

South Miami

48

11,699

4.10

Pinecrest

76.3*

18,388

4.14

Palme o Bay

104

24,439

4.26

Coral Gables

260

49,248

5.28

Wellington

665

66,078

10.06

Palm Beach Gardens

678

59,182

11.45

Notes: * Excludes undeveloped parkland

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PINECREST PARKS AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN

20,863 (by Miami-Dade County), the Village will only have adequate park acreage to meet an Acreage LOS requirement of 62.59 acres if public access remains for schools sites. Without considera on of other providers such as schools and private clubs, the Village would need to add 6.53 acres of parkland by 2030. This figure also assumes development of parkland currently owned by the Village but not open to the public. In comparison to peer communi es, Pinecrest is below the median (4.26) with an Acreage LOS of 4.14 for 2020 excluding undeveloped parkland, see Table 2. The adjacent community of South Miami has a lower Acreage LOS, while Palme o Bay and Coral Gables have higher figures. Weston, a comparable community in Broward County has an Acreage LOS of 3.68, while the Village of Wellington and Palm Beach Gardens, both in Palm Beach County, have Acreage LOS measurements above 10.0 acres per 1,000 residents. All three (3) of these communi es have significantly higher popula ons and larger geographical areas. As a comparison to state standards, the State Comprehensive Outdoor Recrea on Plan (SCORP) for the State of Florida (2019) iden fies a LOS recommenda on of six (6) acres per 1,000 residents.

FACILITY LEVEL OF SERVICES A second way to measure exis ng parks and recrea on LOS is by the number of facili es per popula on. Like acreage, there are no strict standards for the number of facili es that a community may need. This sec on documents the evalua on and comparison of the number of facili es per popula on to averages in the Southeast Region of Florida found in the 2019 Florida SCORP. Demand for Outdoor Recrea on Facili es: Unlike Acreage LOS, the Village does not have an adopted standard for use in calcula ng Facility LOS. Instead, the State of Florida’s 2019 SCORP will serve as a benchmark for comparison. The SCORP contains results

28

from an online survey conducted in 2017 that included responses from 2,384 residents across the state of Florida regarding their par cipa on in 26 outdoor recrea on ac vi es during the previous 12 months. The survey iden fied the most popular outdoor recrea on ac vi es with responses from Florida residents. The most popular ac vity is outdoor fitness walking/jogging with 68% of residents and 58% of tourists indica ng par cipa on. Second highest is wildlife viewing (59% of residents); third is saltwater beach ac vi es (54% of residents); fourth is visi ng historical sites (46% of residents); and picnicking (44% of residents) is fi h most par cipated ac vity. Rounding out the top ten (10) are hiking (42%); swimming in outdoor pools (38%); bicycling (37%); saltwater fishing (36%); and freshwater fishing (34%). Survey respondents were asked which types of facili es were most desired with the top ten (10) consis ng of the following facili es:

1. Hiking/walking trails 2. Biking paths/trails 3. Nature/Interpre ve trails 4. Community parks 5. Wildlife viewing areas/overlooks 6. Paved walkways 7. Playgrounds 8. Beach access/parking 9. Off-leash dog areas 10. Camping These results are helpful in determining the kind of recrea onal ac vi es that ci zens wish to engage in and iden fying the types of facili es that can best serve these demands, however, the informa on is only specific to the Southeast Region for SCORP which consists of Palm Beach, Broward, Miami-Dade and Monroe Coun es. In order to be er understand the unique needs for recrea on and park facili es by residents, the number

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of Village recrea on facili es must be compared to SCORP averages. Supply of Recrea onal Facili es: The Florida SCORP uses the supply of recrea on services and compares to resident demand figures to establish a LOS for the supply of resources. While Acreage LOS is based on the en re resident popula on, SCORP considers the percentage of par cipa on in its LOS calcula ons for recrea on supply of facili es. This means that LOS is measured in the amount of resources and facili es that are available to support an ac vity, expressed in terms of units of supply per 1,000 par cipants. Each region’s level of service was calculated for

26 ac vi es and associated facili es to provide a geographically relevant standard to which coun es and municipali es can compare. The Southeast Region serves as the benchmark by which the Village is compared. In addi on to supplying par cipa on data for 26 ac vi es, the SCORP divides results into two (2) categories: resource-based facili es, and user-oriented facili es. Resource-based facili es are those that are dependent upon some element or combina on of elements in the natural or cultural environments that cannot be easily duplicated. Ac vi es supported by these facili es include beach access, fishing, hiking, biking, and nature study. The Village’s park system does not include an abundance of resource-based facili es

Table 3: Village of Pinecrest 2020 User-Oriented Facili es LOS and Es mated 2030 LOS Facility Type (excludes school parks)

Baseball/So ball Fields

Exis ng Units needed to LOS (2030) 2030 Units needed Southeast Region Number of LOS (2020) meet Southeast units/1000 to meet Current LOS units/ 1000 Facili es in units/1000 pop.* Village Parks Region LOS* pop. * Southeast LOS pop. * 0.65

5

1.09

2

0.96

2

Basketball Courts

0.83

2

0.44

2

0.39

2

Outdoor Swimming Pools

0.059

0

0.00

0

0.00

1

Tennis Courts

1.03

6

1.16

1

1.02

0

Soccer (mul purpose)

0.09

5

0.97

5

0.86

4

Football

0.27

1

0.20

0

0.18

1

Canoe / Kayak Launch

0.112

0

0.00

1

0.00

1

Walking Paths (miles)

0.024

1

0.27

1

0.24

1

Exis ng Units needed to LOS (2030) 2030 Units needed Southeast Region Number of LOS (2020) meet Southeast units/1000 to retain Current LOS units/ 1000 Facili es in units/1000 pop.* Village Parks Region LOS pop. * City LOS pop. * Restrooms

N/A

5

0.27

0.24

1

Gymnasium

N/A

0

0.00

0.00

0

Fitness Gym

N/A

1

0.05

0.05

0

Ba ng Cages

N/A

4

0.22

0.19

1

Shelters/Pavilions

N/A

2

0.11

0.10

0

Playgrounds

N/A

5

0.27

0.24

1

Dog Park

N/A

1

0.05

0.05

0

Notes: (x) = Surplus; * SCORP LOS represents supply per 1,000 par cipants, not residents. 29


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PINECREST PARKS AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN

and these can be extremely difficult to create where resources are not naturally found. User-oriented facili es are those that can be provided almost anywhere for the convenience of the user. These facili es support more specific ac vi es that include soccer, tennis, baseball, basketball, and outdoor pool swimming. The Village does include a number of user-oriented facili es which will be the primary elements analyzed for this method. Table 3 iden fies current Facility LOS for the Village of Pinecrest and the Southeast Region of Florida. This data is evaluated based on the percentage of resident par cipants each unit is serving, and is also separated into resource-based and user-oriented for recrea on ac vi es with relevance to the Village’s parks and recrea on system. The LOS for these facili es is compared to the Southeast Region LOS, and facility deficits in Pinecrest have been iden fied for 2020 popula on and es mated for 2030. Facili es that are not quan fied in the LOS calcula ons by SCORP are evaluated based on growth, with units needed to maintain current LOS figures provided. Key findings include a surplus in the number of soccer/ mul purpose fields and baseball fields and a deficit of basketball courts, football fields, outdoor swimming pools, canoe/kayak launches currently, while addi onal restrooms, ba ng cages and playgrounds may be needed in the future if the Village grows to a projected 2030 popula on noted earlier. The user-oriented facili es that are not quan fied in the SCORP LOS calcula ons are evaluated based on the units that will be needed to maintain the current Village Facility LOS figures. Similar to the facili es discussed previously, several facility types may be needed over the next ten (10) years in order to maintain current levels. As these es mates are not based on SCORP par cipa on levels, further input from the community is necessary to iden fy the facili es that have the greatest unmet needs and highest demand.

30

It should also be noted that this Facility LOS evalua on only includes facili es that are in the Village’s parks and recrea on inventory and excludes all school sites or other providers. Many school sites contain addi onal facili es that could poten ally supplement the deficits experienced in the user-oriented categories.

ACCESS LEVEL OF SERVICES A third approach explored to be er determine exis ng LOS is analyzing the level of access that residents have to parks. This is typically measured as a distance, either in miles or travel me. Similar to Facility LOS, the Village does not have adopted access standards for parks. Instead industry best prac ces are u lized to complete the analysis. Park types analyzed and distance include: • Neighborhood Parks – ½ mile • Community Parks - 2 miles and ½ mile as Neighborhood Parks • School Sites – ½ mile • Regional Parks (Miami-Dade County) - 5 miles Distances used are based on typical walking or biking ranges for neighborhood, community parks and school sites, while regional parks rely upon service areas more conducive to biking, driving or transit. A ½-mile range is used for neighborhood parks and school sites and is sourced from a 1995 study by the Federal Transit Administra on (FTA) which iden fies a 10-minute walking distance as a comfortable distance for most people. Using typical walking speeds, a 10-minute walk translates into a ½-mile distance. A er 10-minutes walking, less than 10% of par cipants were willing to walk longer than ½ mile to a des na on. The ½-mile distance also translates into an average 5-minute bike ride. For community parks, a two (2) mile distance is used and translates to a 40-minute walk or 20-minute bike ride. For regional parks, a five (5) mile service distance translates to a 50-minute bike ride, or 20-minute drive or transit ride.

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Map 5: Village of Pinecrest Exis ng Neighborhood Parks Access Level of Service 6

Neighborhood Parks sŝůůĂŐĞ ŽĨ WŝŶĞĐƌĞƐƚ Ͳ džŝƐƟŶŐ WĂƌŬƐ

1 Flager Grove Park 2 Red Road Linear Park 3 Veterans Wayside Park 7

Village of Pinecrest - Future

4 Gary Matzner Park 5 Hidden Pines Park

8

KƚŚĞƌ EĞŝŐŚďŽƌŚŽŽĚ WĂƌŬƐ

4

6 William H. Kerdyk, Jr. & Family Park (Coral Gables) 7 Fuchs Park (S. Miami) 8 Dante Fascell Park (S. Miami) 9 Coral Bay Park (Coral Gables) 10 Briar Bay Park (County) 11 Briar Bay Linear Park (County) 12 Rockdale Park (County)

5

2

1

Schools - with Joint Use Agreements

Public School Private School 13 WĂůŵĞƩŽ ůĞŵĞŶƚĂƌLJ ^ĐŚŽŽů 14 WĂůŵĞƩŽ DŝĚĚůĞ ^ĐŚŽŽů 15 Howard Drive ůĞŵĞŶƚĂƌLJ ^ĐŚŽŽů

3

13

9

14 10

11

15

12

0 1/4 mi

Legend:

1 mi

1/2 mi 3/4 mi

Service Areas: Pinecrest Boundary Municipality Boundaries

Planned Greenway Trail Pinecrest Parks

Major Roads Streets

Future Parks

Greenway Trail

Special Venue

Golf Course Parks

1/2 Mile

5 Mile

County Parks Natural Area Preserve

2 Mile

31


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PINECREST PARKS AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN Map 6: Village of Pinecrest Exis ng Community Parks Access Level of Service

Community Parks sŝůůĂŐĞ ŽĨ WŝŶĞĐƌĞƐƚ Ͳ džŝƐƟŶŐ WĂƌŬƐ

1 2 3 4

Coral Pine Park Village Green ǀĞůLJŶ 'ƌĞĞƌ WĂƌŬ Suniland Park

KƚŚĞƌ ŽŵŵƵŶŝƚLJ WĂƌŬƐ

5 ŽŶƟŶĞŶƚĂů WĂƌŬ ;County) 6 Coral Reef Park (WĂůŵĞƩŽ ĂLJ) Private

7 Royal Palm Tennis Club 8 Coral Oaks Tennis and Wellness Club 7 5 1

8

2

3

4

0

1 mi

1/2 mi 1/4 mi

3/4 mi

6

Legend:

Service Area: Pinecrest Boundary Municipality Boundaries

Planned Greenway Trail Pinecrest Parks

Major Roads Streets

Future Parks

Greenway Trail

Special Venue

Golf Course Parks

1/2 Mile

County Parks Natural Area Preserve

5 Mile

2 Mile 5 Mile

32

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Map 7: Village of Pinecrest Exis ng Regional Parks Access Level of Service

Regional Parks 1 2 3 4

Matheson Hammock Park R. Hardy Preserve Chapman Field Park ŚĂƌůĞƐ ĞĞƌŝŶŐ ƐƚĂƚĞ

1

2

3

0

1 mi

1/2 mi 1/4 mi

3/4 mi

4 Legend:

Service Area: Pinecrest Boundary Municipality Boundaries

Planned Greenway Trail Pinecrest Parks

Major Roads Streets

Future Parks

Greenway Trail

Special Venue

Golf Course Parks

1/2 Mile

County Parks Natural Area Preserve

5 Mile

2 Mile 5 Mile

33


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PINECREST PARKS AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN Map 8: Village of Pinecrest All Exis ng Neihborhood Access Level of Service Coverage

Neighborhood Parks

6

sŝůůĂŐĞ ŽĨ WŝŶĞĐƌĞƐƚ Ͳ džŝƐƟŶŐ WĂƌŬƐ

1 Flager Grove Park 2 Red Road Linear Park 3 Veterans Wayside Park Village of Pinecrest - Future

7

4 Gary Matzner Park 5 Hidden Pines Park

8

KƚŚĞƌ EĞŝŐŚďŽƌŚŽŽĚ WĂƌŬƐ

6 William H. Kerdyk, Jr. & Family Park (Coral Gables) 7 Fuchs Park (S. Miami) 8 Dante Fascell Park (S. Miami) 9 Coral Bay Park (Coral Gables) 10 Briar Bay Park (County) 11 Briar Bay Linear Park (County) 12 Rockdale Park (County)

4 5

5

Schools - with Joint Use Agreements

Public School Private School 13 WĂůŵĞƩŽ ůĞŵĞŶƚĂƌLJ ^ĐŚŽŽů 14 WĂůŵĞƩŽ DŝĚĚůĞ ^ĐŚŽŽů 15 Howard Drive ůĞŵĞŶƚĂƌLJ ^ĐŚŽŽů

2

7

1

1

8 2

3

13

3

9

14 10

4

11

15

Community Parks sŝůůĂŐĞ ŽĨ WŝŶĞĐƌĞƐƚ Ͳ džŝƐƟŶŐ WĂƌŬƐ

1 2 3 4

12

0

1 mi

1/2 mi 1/4 mi

6

KƚŚĞƌ ŽŵŵƵŶŝƚLJ WĂƌŬƐ

3/4 mi

Legend:

Service Areas: Pinecrest Boundary Municipality Boundaries

Planned Greenway Trail Pinecrest Parks

Major Roads Streets

Future Parks

Greenway Trail

Special Venue

Golf Course Parks

1/2 Mile

County Parks Natural Area Preserve

2 Mile 5 Mile

34

Coral Pine Park Village Green ǀĞůLJŶ 'ƌĞĞƌ WĂƌŬ Suniland Park

5 ŽŶƟŶĞŶƚĂů WĂƌŬ ;County) 6 Coral Reef Park (WĂůŵĞƩŽ ĂLJ)

Private

7 Royal Palm Tennis Club 8 Coral Oaks Tennis and Wellness Club

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Map 9: Village of Pinecrest All Exis ng Neihborhood Access Level of Service Coverage with Improvements

Neighborhood Parks

6

sŝůůĂŐĞ ŽĨ WŝŶĞĐƌĞƐƚ Ͳ džŝƐƟŶŐ WĂƌŬƐ

1 Flager Grove Park 2 Red Road Linear Park 3 Veterans Wayside Park Village of Pinecrest - Future

7

4 Gary Matzner Park 5 Hidden Pines Park

8

KƚŚĞƌ EĞŝŐŚďŽƌŚŽŽĚ WĂƌŬƐ

6 William H. Kerdyk, Jr. & Family Park (Coral Gables) 7 Fuchs Park (S. Miami) 8 Dante Fascell Park (S. Miami) 9 Coral Bay Park (Coral Gables) 10 Briar Bay Park (County) 11 Briar Bay Linear Park (County) 12 Rockdale Park (County) Schools

4 5

2

7

1

1

5

Public School Private School 13 WĂůŵĞƩŽ ůĞŵĞŶƚĂƌLJ ^ĐŚŽŽů 14 WĂůŵĞƩŽ DŝĚĚůĞ ^ĐŚŽŽů 15 Howard Drive ůĞŵĞŶƚĂƌLJ ^ĐŚŽŽů

8 2

3

13

3

9

14 10

4

11

15

Community Parks sŝůůĂŐĞ ŽĨ WŝŶĞĐƌĞƐƚ Ͳ džŝƐƟŶŐ WĂƌŬƐ

1 2 3 4

12

0

1 mi

1/2 mi 1/4 mi

6

KƚŚĞƌ ŽŵŵƵŶŝƚLJ WĂƌŬƐ

5 ŽŶƟŶĞŶƚĂů WĂƌŬ ;County) 6 Coral Reef Park (WĂůŵĞƩŽ ĂLJ)

3/4 mi

Legend: Pinecrest Boundary

Service Area: Future Parks

Municipality Boundaries

Special Venue

Major Roads Streets

Golf Course Parks

Greenway Trail

County Parks

Planned Greenway Trail

Natural Area Preserve

Coral Pine Park Village Green ǀĞůLJŶ 'ƌĞĞƌ WĂƌŬ Suniland Park

Private

1/2 Mile 2 Mile 5 Mile

additional 1/2 mile service area with improvements

7 Royal Palm Tennis Club 8 Coral Oaks Tennis and Wellness Club

Pinecrest Parks

35


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PINECREST PARKS AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN

Service areas are determined by using ArcGIS Network Analyst which u lizes points of access to a park and calculates a services area. The tool u lizes the Village’s street network which includes streets with sidewalks and crosswalks as well as quite neighborhood streets. Each service area or walkshed represents an area that is walkable and bikeable or can be accessed by driving or taking a transit ride. Overall, the Access LOS analysis indicates that park distribu on and facility access vary across the Village with por ons requiring long distances to access a pubic park. Individual park service areas are areas which have access to the park via walking, biking, vehicle or transit within the previously listed distances. Neighborhood Parks (Map 5) were found to have several gaps in service areas from SW 88th Street to SW 136th Street along the SW 67th and 62nd Avenue corridors. Most of the current and future land uses within this area are one (1) acre single-family residen al. In addi on to Village owned parks, school facili es with JUAs, private clubs and adjacent municipal or county neighborhood parks were included in the analysis. Community parks were also shown as serving as neighborhood parks to surrounding residences. Community Parks (Map 6) are shown to have extensive coverage with a two (2) mile access standard. Only a small area in the extreme southeast area of the Village does not have exis ng access to a community park within two (2) miles or a 40-minute walk/20-minute bike ride. Surrounding municipal and county owned community parks were included in the analysis. For many community parks, visitors can be expected to drive, bike or take transit unless within a 1/2 mile or 10-minute walking distance. Regional Parks (Map 7) are strictly owned and operated by Miami-Dade County in the area of Pinecrest. Regional parks are frequently resource focused and typically include unique natural resources and/or large recrea on facili es that serve a large area. Visitors can

36

be expected to drive or take transit to such des na ons. Several regional parks are located adjacent to Pinecrest and serve the en re community within a five (5) mile access distance. Many regional parks are connected via greenway trails for regional access, including the exis ng parks adjacent to Pinecrest. Map 8 combines different park types and analyzes access at a walking and biking range of ½ mile. Park types include neighborhood parks; community parks (serving neighborhood park func ons); school sites with public access agreements in-place, and adjacent municipal parks that contain open space. Facili es that contain no open space, such as libraries, as well as open spaces that are primarily entranceways or greenways are excluded from this analysis. The analysis iden fies gaps in access to neighborhood park space within the central area of the Village. Map 9 adds poten al connec vity improvements to exis ng parks and addi onal school sites that are recommended for JUAs (Palme o Senior High School and Pinecrest Elementary School). The improved pedestrian connec ons through new sidewalks, crosswalks, trails and/or access points, would provide an increase to the service areas of parks and help to fill access gaps in areas of the Village.

CONCLUSION By u lizing a three-level approach to analyze exis ng level of service (LOS) for park and recrea on facili es, key findings were iden fied that help inform recommenda ons for parkland acquisi on and facility development. Though independent in approach and findings, when all three (3) LOS techniques are combined, a more accurate snapshot of the Village’s needs and priori es becomes clearer. Primary needs include con nued public parkland acquisi on, increased public access to school sites through JUAs, and con nued development of select recrea on facili es to maintain level of service as the Village grows in popula on.

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DRAFT

1.5 PROGRAM ASSESSMENT The Department’s recrea on programs and services were evaluated through a series of data analysis, conversa ons with staff, a staff survey, and the results from the community needs survey. In support of the Department’s efforts in developing high quality programs, the recrea on assessment is intended to provide best prac ces to recrea on program development and delivery of services. The goal of the assessment is to help develop a strategic vision for program delivery, iden fy any gaps, and pursue opportuni es to strengthen programming for the community. The following key tasks where completed: • • • • • • •

Inventory of programs Age segmenta on of programs Distribu on of the types of programs Life cycle analysis Review of similar providers and duplica ve services Staff and community engagement User fee analysis

Various resources were u lized during the program assessment and inventory review. This included data provided by the Department on program par cipa on, community survey results, staff survey results, 2020 Parks and Recrea on Highlights Report, special marke ng materials such as program flyers, par cipant surveys, Pinecrest Parks and Recrea on Business Plan 2021, New Program Request Form, the Village’s website, social media, and the Mindbody fitness registra on pla orm.

KEY TAKEAWAYS: • The Village currently provides a high concentra on of programming for the 6-12 years age group. • Increasing programs for teens and all age groups should be considered and is aligned with focus group input. • Extending the enrollment-based programs to age segments that have the highest spread between offerings and popula on is more likely to result in a higher poten al of market capture, i.e. adults and all ages. • Aqua cs, golf, and pickleball are specific programs types that are not offered formally by the Village but have a high demand from residents. • Community events consist of 2% of all programming offered by the Village, however, 53% of residents indicate a need not being met or only par ally met. • Fitness programs accounted for 9% of all programs, however, residents indicated a need for water exercise (27.5%) and Pilates (29%) as unmet or only par ally met. • With 82.3% of programs in introduc on and growth stages, the Department has demonstrated heightened responsiveness to community needs. • There is not a significant amount of duplica on of services between the Village and other providers, though there is a heavy concentra on in fitness and dance. • A partnership with Miami-Dade County and/or adjacent municipali es may be best suited to explore mee ng local needs for aqua cs or other higher cost programs. • Con nued work to strengthen the rela onship with the Miami-Dade School Board is recommended.

37


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PINECREST PARKS AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN

Some of the assessment components reviewed mul ple years of data. It should be noted that performance trends in these instances were all impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020. Addi onally, the singleyear assessment components used data from 2019 in lieu of the most recent fiscal data.

Figure 7: Village of Pinecrest Recrea on Program Age Segmenta on

All Ages 8.4 %

Ages 0-5 8.4 %

Ages 65+ 21.7 %

CORE PROGRAMS One of the Department’s key service areas is the delivery of recrea on programs. Categorizing those programs into core program areas helps the Department staff organize the administra on of like-services and also helps the community understand the leisure opportuni es in an organized fashion. The following sec on provides specific detail about the core program areas and services offered by the Department. Department staff have defined core program areas as camps; community events; cultural arts; educa onal; fitness; life skills; seniors; sports; and science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM).

Ages 6-12 42.2 % Ages 18-64 10.8 % Ages 13-17 8.4 %

Figure 7 illustrates a fairly widespread offering of programs for different age groups, with most programming (42.2%) for ages 6 - 12 years. A large percentage of programming for this age group is common in the parks and recrea on industry as youth and families look to their local recrea on providers for safe, healthy, and fun ac vi es.

AGE SEGMENTATION Age segment analysis reviews the distribu on of the program offerings according to the age segments serviced. For the purposes of this assessment, age categories were delineated according to the following age structure: • • • • •

Early Childhood, ages 0 – 5 years Youth, ages 6 – 12 years Teen, ages 13 – 17 years Adult, ages 18 – 64 years Senior, ages 65+ years

If a program spanned clearly across two age categories (e.g., ages 8–14 years), it was counted once in each age group. Special events typically serve all ages, and therefore were included in the all-ages category.

38

The teen category was observed to be a “spillover” recrea on category rather than one that was specifically programmed. Although teens are able to a end the all ages programs and a end fitness classes, there were no programs designed for this target audience. This is consistent with input received during focus group interviews regarding a lack of teen focused programming. Similarly, two of the seven early childhood classes were for the specific age group; the other programs were designed for all ages. The same scenario was observed for adults; two of nine programs were designed for the adult age group. The caveat to this observa on is the total number of fitness classes offered through Mindbody was not added to the total adult program category’s offerings. In summary, most of the enrollment-based courses in the program menu targeted youth ages 6 to 12 and seniors.

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DRAFT

The age segmenta on analysis is one helpful method to review the Village’s programming related to the community demographics. Demographic data can be helpful to consider how programming efforts are aligned with the makeup of the community. The sideby-side comparison of the community’s popula on and enrollment-based program offerings in Figure 8 demonstrates three key age segments’ rela onship between the popula on percentage and percentage of programs offered. Figure 8: Village of Pinecrest Popula on and Enrollment-Based Program Opportuni es

Youth 24.7 % of Popula on 59.0 % of Programs

Adults 57.3 % of Popula on 10.8 % of Programs

Seniors 18.1 % of Popula on 21.7 % of Programs

The segmenta on review can be used to assess the extent to which each age group is being served. The segmenta on does not necessarily need to mirror the community’s age demographic segmenta on in an exact

manner; however, an ongoing goal can be to balance the menu toward a reflec on of the community makeup. As the Department considers opportuni es for program expansion, Figure 6 can help iden fy target age segments for enhancements, addi ons, and/or innova ons. Extending the enrollment-based programma c reach to those age segments that have the highest spread between offerings and popula on is more likely to result in a higher poten al of market capture (e.g., the adult category displays a current 46.5 percentage-point difference). While this is only one way to analyze programming, it is a very helpful tool to iden fy who the Department is serving. Other considera ons need to be reviewed such as programming being provided by other local providers as well as community demand. Addi onally, public engagement can be conducted on a regular basis by Department staff to gauge community interests in programming. During focus group mee ngs conducted as part of the parks and recrea on master plan, programming specifically focused for young professionals was iden fied as a need. The age segmenta on clusters all adults between the ages 1864 as a single group but as future programming for adults is developed, specific sub-groups needs may be considered. An important considera on by Department staff is to avoid oversatura ng the market with high quality products and services that are already supplied by other providers.

PROGRAM INVENTORY For comparison purposes, the consul ng team reviewed the program category percentages against its database of park and recrea on agencies na onwide. The comparison agencies’ average percentage of program categories was 64.5%, which is higher than the Department’s 59.1%.

39


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PINECREST PARKS AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN

When the program inventory is compared to public input, such as the input gathered from the community survey, gaps between the two can be iden fied. The following three examples are of note: • Aqua c programs are not currently offered by the Department. Conversely, 27.5% of the community survey respondents indicate that their water exercise needs are not being met or only par ally being met, 23.8% indicate that their compe ve swimming needs are not being met, 26% indicate that swimming opportuni es in a pool are not being met, and 15.8% indicate that their needs for water safety and swim lessons are not being met. These ra ngs indicate some of the higher needs for services across all surveyed areas. An important note is the difference in results between iden fied need and importance to households. Though aqua c-based ac vi es are iden fied consistently as having higher needs by respondents, none of the water ac vi es are in the top five choices of ac vi es most important to households. Instead, Village residents iden fy pickleball, soccer, baseball, tennis and senior/ ac ve adult programming as most important to their household. • Golf programs are not currently offered by the Department, while 29% of the community survey respondents indicate that their golf program needs are not being met or only par ally met. What is important to note about this finding is that the gap does not necessarily mean that the Department should be the en ty to fill the need. Instead, the Department can look for crea ve ways to partner with exis ng golf courses, for example, in order to help provide the service without facilita ng the service internally. Similar to aqua c-based ac vi es, golf has a higher iden fied need by respondents, but is a lower importance to households, therefore a lower priority. • Pickleball programs are not being directly

40

organized by the Department; however, pickleball leagues and facili es are provided. Of all community survey respondents, 34.4% indicate that their pickleball program needs are not being met or only par ally met. Like other communi es across the country, pickleball demand is higher than supply. The trend has remained strong, and therefore con nued efforts to meet the demand are recommended. Unlike aqua cs and golf, Village residents iden fied pickleball as the most important sport to their household (15.5%), signally a high priority for the sport among residents.

Program Distribu on: Figure 9 captures the quan ty of total registra onbased programming offered by the Department during the year examined and depicts how the programming was distributed across core program area categories. Figure 9: Village of Pinecrest Recrea on Program Distribu on

STEM 6 %

Seniors 4 % Community Events 2 %

Life Skills 6% Camps 32 % Fitness 9% Sports 11 % Educa onal 15 %

Cultural Arts 15 %

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The program distribu on is another very helpful method to review the Department’s program menu. Nearly a third (32%) of the Department’s programs focus on camp related ac vi es with the next largest quan ty in cultural arts (15%) and educa onal (15%) programs. This assessment is a valuable tool when comparing to public input, such as the community survey for this master plan. Through this type of analysis, following findings have been iden fied: • Community Events currently represent 2% of program offerings. Based upon the community survey conducted for the master plan, approximately 80% of survey par cipants responded that they are very suppor ve or somewhat suppor ve of the Department hos ng more community-wide events. The Department should consider increasing the number of community events offered based on this analysis. Part of that considera on should also include the staff and fiscal resources needed to support the poten al expansion. Addi onally, over 53% of respondents iden fied their needs for a ending a concert, fair or fes val is not being met or only par ally being met. This is the single highest ranked need for a leisure ac vity iden fied for the Village. • Fitness programs accounted for 9% of program offerings. Based upon community survey results, programs like water exercise (27.5%) and Pilates (29%) are the programs with the some of the highest response of survey par cipants indica ng that their needs are not being met or only par ally met. Fitness programming efforts by park and recrea on agencies across the na on have grown significantly in recent years. The community survey did not address all fitness programming needs for the community and the Department should review if more fitness programs are needed.

LIFE CYCLE ANALYSIS A life cycle analysis reviews the status of all program offerings across the Department based upon the stages of Introduc on, growth, mature, and decline. This type of assessment helps to determine if Department staff need to develop new and more innova ve programs, reposi on programs that are in the decline stage, or con nue with the current balance of life cycle stages. Staff were asked to categorize their core programs according to the life cycle stages; Table 3 outlines the descrip on of those life cycle stages and the Department’s percentage of programs within each stage: Table 3: Village of Pinecrest Program Life Cycle Stages Life Cycle State

Descrip on

Village %

Introduc on

Ge ng a program off the ground, heavy marke ng

23.5 %

Growth

Moderate and interested customer base, high demand, not as intense marke ng

58.8 %

Mature

Steady and reliable performer, but increased compe on

14.7 %

Decline

Decreased registra on

2.9%

The majority (82.3%) of programs in introduc on and growth stages directly correlates with the exponen al program growth that the Department has demonstrated over the past few years. It also indicates a vibrant and dynamic parks and recrea on organiza on being responsive to community needs. Mature programs are important program offerings as they provide stable and established services for the community. A limited number of programs are iden fied as mature (14.7%). Typically agencies try to balance the

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PINECREST PARKS AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN

number of programs in the growth and mature stages. The Department should simultaneously try to grow the number of mature programs to provide stability, while closely monitoring exis ng mature programs to make sure they do not move into the decline stage. A very low number or programs are in the decline stage at 2.9%, which represents great work by the Department to keep programs in the decline cycle at a very low level. All programs iden fied in decline are within the senior program area. It is common for senior programs to be in the decline cycle as more and more seniors are pursuing programs associated with ac ve adult program areas. The Department should seek to con nue to keep declining programs under 3%.

OTHER PROVIDERS The Village of Pinecrest is not the provider of recrea on ameni es and programming. A list of other providers is included in the Appendix of this report that includes other public, private and nonprofit leisure providers in the surrounding area. With more than 11 fitness provers in the immediate area, it is recommended that the Department con nue to meet the unmet fitness needs of the community, while taking care to not compete any further in the exis ng fitness center market. Some par cipants prefer a community-based fitness center, and for that reason the Department should con nue providing a fitness center and classes. Addi onally, group fitness classes such as yoga and Pilates were iden fied unmet needs and therefore represent programs that the Department should expand. For the similar reasons, addi onal dance programs should only be considered if there is more demand for a specific dance mode than what is being provided by the private sector. Similar providers can be seen as partners in service provision; therefore, brining providers

42

together to discuss how the Department can strengthen total service offerings in a par cular area can be a huge community benefit. For example, if the theatre companies are struggling with access to performance space, perhaps the Department could help iden fy possible solu ons for that group of recreators. Partnership Opportuni es: An enhanced partnership with Miami-Dade County Parks, Recrea on and Open Spaces could provide enhanced therapeu c recrea on services to the Village residents, The County’s completed Disability Services Master Plan iden fies A.D. Barnes Park, located approximately seven (7) miles or 20-30-minute drive, as a primary loca on for County Disability Services Programs. Kendall Indian Hammocks Park, located approximately six (6) miles or 20-25-minute drive from the Village is also iden fied by the County as a future recommended Disability Services Program loca on. Addi onally, County owned and managed aqua c facili es are also located at A.D. Barnes Park and proposed for Kendall Indian Hammocks Park. Currently students and other residents must travel a great distance, typically more than 30-minute drive me to exis ng aqua c facili es. A partnership with MiamiDade County and/or adjacent municipali es may be best suited to explore mee ng local needs for aqua cs. Con nued work to strengthen the rela onship with the Miami-Dade School Board is recommended. Joint Use Agreement (JUAs) have tradi onally allowed for public access to school sites within the Village, however, two JUAs recently lapsed at Miami Palme o Senior High School and Palme o Elementary School which reduces the open spaces and recrea on facili es generally available to the public in the Village. A renewed effort to secure new JUAs with the School Board for these sites and to include access to indoor gym and mee ng space is recommended.

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Shared use of community spaces are typically wellsupported by residents. As the Department con nues to grow, addi onal partners can be found in local nonprofit groups, churches, and private leisure service providers. Collabora ve and partner-based rela onships have been seen to strengthen communi es across the country genera ng in-kind support and fiscal sponsorship. Duplica on of Services: In general, there is not a significant amount of duplica on of services between the Village and other providers. Though there is a heavy concentra on in fitness and dance, there are s ll areas of the market not being served and regular review of program performance helps to assure the Department assess and modifies programming to meet market needs. The duplica on of service that stands out the most is between the Parks and Recrea on Department and Pinecrest Gardens. The Village-run en es are both offering a number of similar programs and events. The Village staff need to con nue to find synergies and work collabora vely to avoid any poten al compe on with each other. Internal efficiencies can be achieved, and subsequent diversifica on and expansion of program variety a ained, if the teams work together to provide leisure services to the community.

CONCLUSION Key findings for three (3) focus areas; Programs Menu; Administra on; and Marke ng and Communica ons have been iden fied as: Program Menu • Review the program menu’s distribu on on an annual basis and refine offerings as needed • Develop programs to reach underserved groups, including teens, young adults, and seniors • Consider offering courses instructed in languages

other than English • Establish short-, mid-, and long-term goals that respond to the key community needs iden fied in Sec on 9 • Review the success factors that contributed to gym membership growth in 2019 to iden fy repeatable growth strategies Administra on • Con nue to measure key performance indicators regularly and review internally to iden fy needed adjustments or trends. • Develop enrollment tracking based on core program area • Consider adjus ng monthly gym membership fees to account for the administra ve costs incurred • Consider adjus ng fitness class package pricing to a consistent discount percentage across all class types • Account for addi onal staff resources to support new program growth • Consider modifying the GL structure to allow for focused tracking of program area and contractor-led performance Marke ng and Communica on • Consider developing a seasonal program catalogue/ guide or an alterna ve means for residents to understand all of what the Department offers • Communicate more core details of what is involved in a program on its adver sement • Conduct a website audit, answering the “who, what, when, where, why, and how” for each service The above findings warrant detailed conversa ons and considera ons by the Department and Village. Some changes will be easy and straigh orward; others may involve extensive thought regarding the Department’s and Villages’ service delivery philosophy.

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PINECREST PARKS AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN

1.6 PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT Public engagement is a primary qualita ve research method for the PRMP. A primary goal of the plan’s public engagement was to provide opportuni es for geographical, topic-specific, and policy-related input. The public engagement phase of the project included conduc ng a series of five (5) focus groups mee ngs, ten (10) stakeholder interviews, one (1) virtual public workshop, and one (1) in-person workshop. Addi onally, a sta s cally-valid online survey was administered and interac ve tools u lized through a public engagement website. The Village’s exis ng social media accounts and email lists were u lized to adver se public engagement opportuni es. Figure 10 illustrates the outreach par cipa on levels achieved during the development of this plan: Figure 10: Village of Pinecrest PRMP Public Engagement Par cipa on Figures

34

396

Community Mee ng Par cipants

17

Focus Group Par cipants

Sta s cal Survey Responses

3,470+

1,170+ Unique Online

Online Views

Par cipants

10

Stakeholder Interviews

44

KEY TAKEAWAYS: • The PRMP planning process u lized robust public engagement to gathering input on community needs and priori es for parks and recrea on. • Par cipants in the Community Mee ngs and Focus Groups were consistent in iden fying needs for pickleball courts, access to Biscayne Bay, and aqua cs. • Online engagement iden fied a need and loca on opportuni es for designated pickleball court(s); aqua cs, and adventure recrea on such as pump track, rock climbing. etc. • Sta s cal survey results indicated a need and importance for more special events, fitness classes such as yoga and Pilates, and aqua cs. • Addi onal resources are needed to enhance digital outreach to residents and be er inform visitors of programming offerings. • Connec vity improvements to parks is a top priority for residents and elected officials. • Residents and elected officials iden fied a need for addi onal teen programming op ons. • Park designs need to enhance comfort for visitors and be er balance passive and ac ve recrea on opportuni es. • Village residents desire maintenance of exis ng parks and greenway trails, but are most suppor ve of funding acquisi on of parkland, development of athle c fields, and access to Biscayne Bay.

53

Online Map Ideas December 2021


DRAFT

COMMUNITY MEETINGS

boa ng, visi ng wildlife and biking were also iden fied needs.

Three (3) community mee ngs were held during the development of the PRMP. The first two (2) mee ngs were focused on iden fying community needs and priori es while the last mee ng focused on public review of the dra PRMP report. The first two (2) mee ngs were designed to inform the public of the planning process, schedule, and ask for input on community needs and priori es for parks and recrea on. The first mee ng was held on Sept. 14, 2021 and consisted of a virtual project overview presenta on, followed by a general ques ons and answers session. Twenty people par cipated during the virtual presenta on.

An addi onal exercise had par cipants iden fy any elements they would like to ‘add’ or ‘keep’ within exis ng parks. The following lists summarize results: ADD ( mes men oned): 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Dedicated Pickleball Courts (5) Grass/Natural Space (2) Passive Pocket Parks Indoor Children’s Play Area Community Lap Pool

KEEP: A second community mee ngs was held on Sept. 29, 2021 and consisted of an in-person presenta on and virtual presenta on. The mee ng was held at Leslie Bowe Hall in Evelyn Greer Park and 14 people in a endance. The mee ng included a presenta on, a general ques ons and answer session, and an interac ve open house with display boards and handouts. Table 4 highlights the top uses and needs for recrea on ac vi es and facili es as iden fied by par cipants. Pickleball was ranked the most used and highest need by par cipants while other ac vi es such as kayak/ Table 4: Community Workshops Top Uses and Needs Rank

Top Uses (votes)

Top Needs (votes)

1

Pickleball (12)

Pickleball (10)

2

Special Events (6)

Kayak/Boa ng (3)

3

Exercising Outdoors (6)

Visi ng Wildlife (2)

4

Walking (5)

Biking (2)

5

Visi ng Historic Places (4)

Visi ng Historic Places (2)

6

Adult Fitness (3)

Golf (2)

7

Kayak/Boa ng (3)

Swim for Fun (1)

8

Biking (3)

Walking (1)

9

Hiking (3)

Fishing (1)

10

Ac ve Seniors (2)

Hiking (1)

1.

Improve Security at Parks

FOCUS GROUPS A series of five (5) focus groups where held on Sept. 14th, 15th and Sept. 29, 2021. In total, 17 people par cipated in the focus groups and contributed input for iden fying community needs and priori es. The following lists iden fy needs par cipants noted in descending over and priori es for recrea on ac vi es or facili es. Park and Recrea on Needs ( mes men oned): 1. Pickleball Courts (6) 2. Kayak Launch (3) 3. Tennis (3) 4. More Athle c Fields (2) 5. Basketball Courts (2) 6. Outdoor Pool (2) 7. Fitness (yoga, Pilates) (2) 8. Dog Park 9. Running Track 10. Team Pickup Sports Park and Recrea on Priori es (in no ordering):

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PINECREST PARKS AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20.

More lighted athle c fields More/be er public access agreements with MiamiDade County Schools Help promote sports leagues more Be er maintained athle c fields Provide unique offerings with ameni es and programming and more than one offering at each park U lize more social media adver sements and outreach Provide more year-round sports and keep sports seasonal Promote life-long sports Improve park security Provide more benches and tables in parks Designate electric vehicle (EV) parking spaces in parks Host bike/ebike demonstra on days in parks with partners for bike shop community Provide courts that are always open for pick-up sports Host more special events such as Zombie runs, movie nights, summer in January, etc. Consider using ar ficial turf for more athle c fields Provide outdoor weight/exercise classes Provide spaces for teens to hangout Provide more sports for women and girls Promote short bike rides for older adults Offer more classes online

STAKEHOLDER INTERVIEWS During September 2021, a series of ten (10) stakeholder interviews were conducted. Interviewees included elected officials and senior Village staff. The purpose of the interviews was to confirm public input on needs and priori es and ensure that Village staff have the needed resources to achieve what the community’s needs and priori es include. The following list iden fies key themes from the interviews for items men oned mul ple mes.

46

Park Ameni es: • Keep the high-quality ameni es and programming to fit the community • Meet today’s needs. Lacrosse, basketball courts, pickleball, passive. • Need more fields but do not have room currently • Aqua cs has been a need discussed for some me in the Village. Need to drill down on what type. • Poten al Pinecrest soccer tournament • There is heavy use of park fields by clubs and leagues • Having facili es for all ages and all abili es is important • Village may have too few tennis courts • Opportunity to provide water access has been around a long me. • Lack of athle c fields and aqua cs at public schools is likely leading to needs within the Pinecrest community • Do not see public schools developing the types of athle c facili es that are needed and typically have the expecta on that the Village will build the facility • Matzner Park will be an important development for Parks

Connec vity to Parks/Safe Access: • Be er entrances and gateways to parks are needed • Link all parks with a paved path (8-10 ) • Having ADA accessibility is cri cal as many children in the community are on the au sm spectrum and have challenges • Be er access to water and mee ng the needs of addi onal parks and open space • Would like to have more sidewalk accessibility to parks throughout the Village. • All parks need to have mul -modal access with safe crossings, entrances and routes to each park.

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Balance of Passive and Ac ve Uses: • Balance ac ve and passive uses at parks. • Ther are opportuni es to add pocket parks where needed and larger athle c facili es teamed with schools and poten ally the County. • Veterans [Wayside] Park is underu lized and needs improvements to be er meet neighborhood’s needs • Some concerned that the Village is ‘under parked’ • Concerned that there is not enough passive park space • Concerned that too much of exis ng parks are used for revenue genera on and programming uses • Would like to see a diversity of park types throughout the Village. Not just athle cs, but also spaces for quiet and relaxing uses • As popula on increases, public comments tend to focus on agricultural land and open space. Village has to preserve open space, parkland.

Programming: • Need more teen programming op ons • Programming for seniors seems to be oriented to low-func oning seniors. • Have more cultural programming at parks other than Pinecrest Gardens. • Providing programming and ameni es geared towards teens is needed, but difficult.

• Provide communica ons materials in Spanish • Need more staff with communica ons skills • Would like to see poten al be er use of fields with schools in general and poten al use of Palme o High School’s indoor gym.

Security in Parks: • • • •

Great internal communica ons with P&R Dept. Consider more cameras and ligh ng in parks Improve park communica ons systems for safety Consider expanding panic alarm system to all facili es

ONLINE ENGAGEMENT The Village launched a public engagement project website in August that provided access to project details, schedule and presenta on materials for download. The project website had over 3,700 visits by over 1,100 unique individuals contribu ng over 50 comments and nearly 400 responses to a sta s cal survey. Image: Project Public Engagement Website

Improvements to Internal Func ons: • There is some overlap in maintaining public spaces in the Village and there may be room for consolida on of efforts • Consistency with standard can be challenging • Would like to coordinate with P&R to fold inspec on and maintenance of drain inlets in parks into the same contract • Do not have me to communicate to the public of all the offerings in the me needed

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PINECREST PARKS AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN PRMP Public Engagement Timeline

PROJECT KICKOFF JUNE 23, 2021 The planning team met virtually with Village Staff to kickoff the project and review project goals and schedule.

COMMUNITY WORKSHOP

SEPTEMBER 14, 2021 The first community workshop was held virtually in August

The first community mee ng was held vritually

STATISTICAL SURVEY LAUNCH AUGUST 16 OCTOBER 1, 2021

ONLINE SURVEY ACTIVE

WEBSITE LAUNCH

JULY 23, 2021 A project public engagement website was launched with interac ve tools such as maps, comment walls and a survey.

48

STAKEHOLDER INTERVIEWS & FOCUS GROUPS SEPTEMBER 14 15, 2021 A series of stakeholder interviews and focus groups were kicked off virtually. Par cipants answered introductory ques ons about how they use the parks today and their goals for the future.

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STATISTICAL SURVEY COMPLETED OCTOBER 1, 2021 The sta s cal survey was closed to responses with 396 total par cipants, of which 292 were residents of the Village.

APPROVAL

JANUARY, 2022

Village Council approval of the PRMP

IN PERSON COMMUNITY WORKHSOP

SEPTEMBER 29, 2021

The second community workshop was held in-peson at at Leslie Bowe Hall in Evelyn Greer Park.

COMMUNITY PRESENTATION

DECEMBER 21, 2021 A viritual presenta on of the dra master plan was completed to gather public input on the document.

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PINECREST PARKS AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN

The public engagement website included several interac ve tools intended to assist in gathering input and ideas from par cipants. The image below is a snap-shot of an interac ve map tool which provided par cipants with an opportunity to submit ideas or comments by placing a ‘push pin’ on the map for a specific loca on. Other par cipants could either like or dislike previous comments. Table 5 shows the most ‘liked’ and ‘disliked’ comments or ideas from the map tool. Image: Project Project Engagement Website Map Tool

Par cipants could also contribute ideas to a ‘comment wall’ where others could like or dislike the comment or idea. A total of 19 comments were posted and 34 likes. The following list iden fies comments with the most likes in descending order: Most Liked Comments (number of likes): • • • • • • •

Pickleball (24) Inclusive Programming and Play (4) Dog Park (3) Acquisi on of More Parkland (3) Community Gardens (2) More Green Space/Open Space (2) More Baseball Fields

Image: Project Project Engagement Website Comment Wall

Table 5: Public Engagement Website Map Tool - Most Likes/Dislikes

50

Rank

Most Like Votes (votes)

Most Dislike Votes (votes)

1

Pickleball (69)

Pickleball (23)

2

Access to Playgrounds (22)

3

Secure Playgrounds (17)

Field Ligh ng (5)

4

Tennis (16)

Lacrosse Field (4)

Compe

on Pool (12)

5

Compe

6

Bike Pump Track (5)

Pickleball/Tennis (2)

7

Gateways/Signs (4)

Bike Pump Track (2)

on Pool (5)

Dog Friendly Parks (3)

8

Water Quality (3)

Secure Playgrounds (2)

9

Kayak/Canoe Launch (2)

Outdoor Workout Space (1)

10

Outdoor Workout Space (2) December 2021


DRAFT

Image: Project Online Survey

ONLINE STATISTICAL SURVEY Commenced on August 16, 2021, and concluded on October 1, 2021, Pinecrest residents and anyone with an interest had an opportunity to par cipate in an online public opinion survey via SurveyMonkey. The Online Public Opinion Survey was accessible by two means: a link was provided through social media posts by the Village and a link emailed to individuals. In addi on, at public events staff provided business cards to a endees with a domain address and QR Code to access the public engagement website and encouraged a endees to complete the survey. In total, 396 responses were collected, providing a sta s cal rate of return with a 5.7%+/- margin of error with a 95% confidence level. The inten on of the survey was to reach as many Pinecrest residents and interested par es as possible. A series of basic demographic ques ons were asked to be er understand respondents at the beginning of the survey. 292 responses were from Village of Pinecrest residents out of the 396 total responses. Results for each ques on were compared between total responses and responses from residents only. Comparisons are only included in this summary when the difference is greater than the margin of error. Parks and Recrea on Ques ons A series of ques ons specific to park and recrea on issues was asked to each respondent. Ques ons are organized into five (5) categories: • • • • •

Park and Facili es Recrea on Programs Ac vi es and Hobbies Sa sfac on and Communica on Priori es and Ac ons

The following are selected responses from the online survey:

1. Which one of the following op ons best describes you? A majority of responses were Village of Pinecrest residents (73.74%). Approximately 26% of responses were from par cipants that were not residents of the Village. Figure 11: Residents versus Nonresident Responses 80.00%

73.74%

70.00% 60.00% 50.00% 40.00% 30.00%

26.01%

20.00% 10.00% 0.25% 0.00% Village of NOT a resident of Pinecrest resident the Village of Pinecrest

Not sure

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PINECREST PARKS AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN Figure 12: Most visited parks in Village of Pinecrest

60.00% 50.00%

60.19% 51.25%

60.50% 56.67%

70.00%

Village of Pinecrest Residents Only 59.25% 65.42%

Responses

39.50% 44.58%

2. Which Village of Pinecrest parks and recrea on facili es have you or members of your household visited in the last twelve (12) months?

15.99% 15.42% 0.63% 0.83%

4.39% 5.42%

10.00%

0.94% 0.83%

7.52% 8.75%

20.00%

10.34% 12.08%

30.00%

8.15% 9.58%

19.75% 23.75%

40.00%

Evelyn Green Park is the most visited park by all respondents, however, more Village residents visit the Pinecrest Community Center. Suniland is the second most visited park, however, approximately 9% fewer Village residents visit the park.

0.00%

Figure 13: Quality of Parks in Pinecrest (percentage of households)

52

National Average

53%

49.85%

60.00% 50.00%

4.26%

0.30%

1.52%

10.00%

3%

20.00%

14%

30.00%

29%

40.00%

9.12%

Respondents rate the quality of parks in Pinecrest be er than the na onal average with 34.95% ra ng parks as excellent versus 29% na onally.

Village of Pinecrest

34.95%

3. How would you rate the overall quality of Pinecrest parks and recrea on ameni es you have visited in the last 12 months?

0.00% Excellent

Good

Fair

Poor

Not sure

I have not visited a Pinecrest park in the last 12 months

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Figure 14: Visits to Other Park Providers

40.00%

4. Which other providers do you visit parks or par cipate in recrea on programming?

36.58%

38.26%

45.00%

25.17%

5.00%

1.34%

10.00%

4.36%

6.71%

10.40%

13.42%

14.43%

15.00%

11.74%

10.40%

11.07%

17.45%

25.00% 20.00%

23.83%

22.15%

30.00%

25.84%

35.00%

0.00%

Figure 15: Most Common Times of Week for Visi ng Parks 35.00% 30.00%

5. What days and mes do you most frequently par cipate in programs or visit parks?

32.45% 28.15%

25.00% 20.00% 15.00%

12.25%

11.26%

Respondents are ac ve throughout South Florida in visi ng parks. The most common other providers visited include; Village of Palme o Bay (38.26%); Miami-Dade County (36.58%); and City of Coral Gables (25.84%). Respondents are also ac ve in visi ng State and Federal parks.

12.91%

10.00% 5.00%

2.98%

The majority of park users visit parks either weekday mornings or evenings. Weekends are typically the least u lized mes for visi ng parks.

0.00% Weekday morning

Weekday daytime

Weekday evening

Weekend morning

Weekend daytime

Weekend evening

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PINECREST PARKS AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN

16.23%

13.49% 1.32%

1.64%

10.00%

2%

9.87%

30.00%

33%

25.88%

30.59%

40.00%

10.53%

20.00%

50.00%

10%

Respondents and Village residents rated the quality of programming or events lower than na onal averages with a high percentage of respondents ‘Not Sure’ of the quality.

46.05%

60.00% 44.41%

6. Overall, how would you rate the quality of the program(s) or event(s) that you and/or members of your household par cipated in over the last 12 months?

55%

Figure 16: Quality of Programs or Events (percentage of households

0.00% Excellent

Good

Fair

Poor

Not sure

Village of Pinecrest Village of Pinecrest Residents Only National Average Village of Pinecrest Residents Only

7. Rate your level of sa sfac on with the following program services provided by the Village of Pinecrest Parks and Recrea on Department. Respondents are most sa sfied with the loca on of programs, mes offered, and quality of instructors. Ease of naviga ng the Village’s website has the highest level of dissa sfac on followed by availability of informa on on the Village’s website. Figure 17: Sa sfac on with Programs and Services

61.87%

63.71%

31.13% 3.86%

5.06% 1.95%

13.51%

8.02% 3.44%

7.60% 2.66%

1.12%

Quality of instructors

8.21%

3.61% 1.20%

Location of programs

8.63% 2.75%

4.06% 1.11%

10.00%

1.85%

20.00%

9.26%

30.00%

18.92%

22.90%

30.22%

32.32%

57.41%

65.65%

Very Dissatisfied

60.45%

Dissatisfied

55.29% 33.33%

40.00%

29.63%

50.00%

36.95%

60.00%

43.54% 51.29%

59.26%

70.00%

Satisfied

58.23%

Very Satisfied

Ease of navigation through Village's website

Quality of customer service

0.00% Times programs are offered

54

Fees charged Quality of the Ease of Availability of for value facility where registration information on received program/event Village's is offered website

December 2021


DRAFT

Figure 18: Defining Walking Distance (percentage of households)

8. How would you define ‘walking distance?’

35.00% 29.15%

30.00% 25.00% 20.00% 16.27%

17.29% 15.25%

15.00% 9.49%

10.00% 5.00%

8.47%

4.07%

The majority of respondents define walking distance as between 1/4 mile (5 minute walk) and 3/4 mile (15 minute) walk. Results are consistent with a suburban development pa ern.

0.00% 1/8 mile or 2-3 1/4 mile or 5 1/2 mile or 10 3/4 mile or 15 1 mile or 20 1-1/2 miles or Greater than minutes minutes minutes minutes minutes 30 minutes 1-1/2 miles or walking walking walking walking walking walking 30+ minutes walking

Figure 19: Sufficient Park Space (percentage of households)

9. Do you feel there are sufficient parks and green space areas within walking distance of your residence?

60.00% 51.97% 52.74% 50.00% 40.46% 41.35% 40.00% 30.00% 20.00% 7.57% 5.91%

10.00% 0.00% Yes Responses

No Village of Pinecrest Residents ONLY

Not sure

A slight majority of Village residents feel there is sufficient parks and green space areas within walking distance of their residence, however, a significant por on of the Village’s popula on does not feel there is sufficient parks within walking distance.

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PINECREST PARKS AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN

Figure 20: Barriers to Visi ng Parks or Par cipa ng in Programs National Average 50.21%

60.00%

50.00%

3.40%

2.13% 3%

9.36% 9%

11.49% 14%

15.74% 7%

10.21% 14%

21.70% 1.70% 3%

2.55%

0.85% 3%

12.77%

16.60% 14%

11.06%

5%

10.00%

6.81% 9%

10%

14%

20.00%

19.15% 18%

30.00%

16.60%

35%

40.00%

4.26%

Respondents indicated that heat outdoors in the biggest barrier to visi ng parks more o en. Lack of programs offered and access by sidewalks or bike are the next largest barriers. The Village has successfully communicated offerings and loca ons for programs, common barriers na on-wide.

Village of Pinecrest

2.98%

10. Select ALL the reasons that prevent you or other members of your household from visi ng parks or par cipa ng in recrea on programs and events in the Village of Pinecrest more o en.

0.00%

Figure 21: Learning About Offerings

56

46.08%

24.23% 22%

24.91%

43.00% 48%

14% 2.05%

10.00%

10.24% 16%

20.00%

16%

30.00%

National Average

25%

40.00%

39%

50.00%

44.03%

50.51%

60.00%

21.84%

Respondents u lize digital tools such as the Village’s website, emails and social media most to learn about offerings, however, tradi onal word of mouth is a significant method as well.

Village of Pinecrest

36%

11. Select ALL ways in which you learn about recrea on programs, events or classes provided by the Village of Pinecrest.

0.00%

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DRAFT

Figure 22: Recrea on Programs, Sports or Classes with the Greatest Level of Unmet Need (percentage of all households) (top 10) I have a need and its PARTLY met

I have a need and its NOT met

24.00%

11.02%

11.44%

21.21% 12.95%

11.56%

2.60%

5.00%

3.56%

4.64%

7.02%

10.00%

11.16%

14.22%

16.24% 12.82%

14.34%

15.00%

13.97%

20.00%

14.75%

17.47%

25.00%

21.93%

24.47%

30.00%

0.00% Yoga

Golf

Pickleball

Senior / Active Adult

Pilates

Water Exercise Arts and Crafts (ceramics, painting, etc.)

Aerobics / Spinning

Competitive Swim

Tennis

12. Indicate if you or members of your household have a need for the following recrea on PROGRAM, CLASSES and SPORTS and how much of your need is currently being met either by the Village of Pinecrest or other park and recrea on providers. Shown in descending order from le to right, respondents have iden fied the top ten (10) programs, sports or classes with the greatest amount of need either fully unmet or par ally unmet. Figure 23: Recrea on Programs, Sports or Classes Most Important to Households (percentage of all households) (top 5)

8.54%

11.06%

6.95%

10.00%

8.49%

13.07%

10.81%

15.58%

12.56%

20.00%

15.00%

13. Which THREE sports, programs or classes listed are most important to you or members of your household?

Village of Pinecrest Residents Only Top Choice

19.69%

25.00%

20.46%

Top Choice

5.00%

Listed in descending order from le to right, the top five (5) most important programs, sports or classes to respondents and Village residents.

0.00% Baseball (Youth or Adult)

Pickleball

Soccer

Tennis

Senior / Active Adult

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PINECREST PARKS AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN

Figure 24: Leisure Ac vi es with the Greatest Level of Unmet Need (percentage of all households) (top 10)

8.56%

11.16%

12.79%

16.28%

16.44%

22.43%

23.87%

13.57%

13.10%

15.00%

15.91%

19.55%

21.72%

23.29% 18.72%

19.46%

20.00%

20.96%

30.00%

25.00%

I have a need and it is NOT met

27.95%

30.32%

35.00%

32.31%

I have a need and it is PARTLY met

5.61%

10.00%

5.00%

0.00% Attending a Kayaking, Going to Theater Concert, Fair or canoeing or Festival Paddle Boarding

Dinning Out

Cycling (street or mountain)

Going to the Beach, Swimming in Ocean

Boating (sail or Going to Movies Adventure motor) Recreating (rock climbing, cable ski, etc.)

Gardening

14. Indicate if you or members of your household have a need for the following LEISURE ACTIVITIES and how much of your need is currently being met either by the Village of Pinecrest or other park and recrea on providers. Shown in descending order from le to right, respondents have iden fied the top ten (10) leisure ac vi es with the greatest amount of need either fully unmet or par ally unmet. Figure 25: Leisure Ac vi es Most Important to Households (percentage of all households) (top 5)

10.37%

6.71%

7.93%

7.08%

8.00%

7.55%

9.76%

10.00%

9.43%

12.00%

12.20%

14.00%

Village of Pinecrest Residents Only Top Choice

8.02%

Listed in descending order from le to right, the top five (5) most important leisure ac vi es to respondents and Village residents.

Top Choice

10.85%

15. Which THREE leisure ac vi es listed are most important to you or members of your household?

6.00% 4.00% 2.00% 0.00% Cycling (street or mountain)

58

Attending a Concert, Fair or Festival

Reading

Attending a Farmer's Market

Dinning Out

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DRAFT

Figure 26: Support for Ac ons by Village (top 5) Somewhat Supportive

Not sure

Not Supportive

83.54%

Very Supportive 90.00%

58.05%

60.34%

70.00%

65.00%

66.09%

80.00%

60.00% 50.00%

6.78%

11.44%

5.49%

23.73%

24.89% 9.28%

5.00%

9.58%

4.29%

10.00%

1.23%

3.29%

20.00%

6.01%

11.93%

30.00%

20.42%

23.61%

40.00%

0.00% Maintain existing parks, recreation facilities and fields

Maintain existing greenway trails

Increase tree canopy in parks Develop new greenways and connect existing trails

Make existing parks more sustainable and resilient

16. The following are ac ons that the Village of Pinecrest could take to improve the Parks and Recrea on system. Indicate your level of support for each ac on. Respondents are most suppor ve of maintaining exis ng parks and recrea on facili es, followed by maintenance of greenway trails. Increasing the tree canopy is the third most supported ac on followed by developing new greenway trails and making exis ng parks more sustainable.

Figure 27: Tax Dollar Support for Ac ons by Village (percentage of households) (top 6)

17. Which THREE ac ons would you be most willing to fund with your tax dollars?

17.02%

Village of Pinecrest Residents Only Most Willing 15.35%

16.18%

14.36%

16.00%

15.43%

18.00%

17.01%

Most Willing

8.00%

8.51%

7.47%

6.38%

10.00%

8.30%

9.96%

12.00%

9.57%

14.00%

6.00%

Listed in descending order from le to right, the top six (6) supported ac ons the Village could make with tax dollars.

4.00% 2.00% 0.00% Maintain existing parks, recreation facilities and fields

Purchase land to Purchase land to develop sports fields, provide access to courts and facilities water / Biscayne Bay

Develop additional athletic fields or courts

Purchase land to provide more parks

Develop an aquatic facility

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DRAFT

PINECREST PARKS AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN

1.7 NEEDS ASSESSMENT SUMMARY Through the compila on of findings from various research techniques, a number of parks and recrea on needs and priori es emerged. Table 6 provides a summary overview of the findings from each analysis technique, which were further refined based on addi onal public input and analysis. Three (3) types of research were u lized in a mixedmethods, triangulated approach to a needs assessment process: observa onal; qualita ve; and quan ta ve. Together, these research methods provided eight (8) opportuni es to cross-check results and be er determine an accurate understanding of Pinecrest’s needs and priori es for parks, recrea on facili es and programming. Table 6 summarizes the synthesized findings of all methods which included observa onal evalua ons, community and stakeholder input, a sta s cal survey, program assessment, and exis ng LOS analysis. The top ten (10) facili es and programs needs are iden fied in Table 6 as a means to concisely present findings. These facili es and ac vi es are ones iden fied through these mul ple techniques to have the highest level of importance and most unmet need by the community. In addi on to the iden fica on of the top communitywide needs from public par cipa on and survey techniques, overall priori es have emerged and are listed in descending order to the right.

60

KEY TAKEAWAYS: • Trends in public engagement input and research findings has iden fied a series of needs and priori es for the park and recrea on system in Pinecrest. • Programming for seniors, teens and all -ages (familyoriented) are top needs. • Facili es for accessing Biscayne Bay, swimming, pickleball and mul purpose sports are highest needs. • Needs may be met through partnerships with nearby communi es, the county, schools or non-profits.

Top 5 Priorities 1. 2.

3. 4.

5.

Develop programming opportuni es targeted for all ages, seniors and teens. Iden fy strategic opportuni es to provide parks within the central area of the Village from SW 88th Street to SW 136th Street along SW 67th and SW 62 Avenues. Design parks to enhance comfort of users in the extreme South Florida climate. Improve connec vity to parks through implementa on of planned pedestrian and bicycle improvements. Incorporate sustainable and resilient prac ces to reduce needs for resources and seek ways to reduce storm event flooding through strategic acquisi ons and incorpora on of best prac ces.

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DRAFT

Addi onal Priori es • Addi onal resources are needed to enhance digital outreach to residents and be er inform visitors of programming offerings. • A partnership with Miami-Dade County and/ or adjacent municipali es may be best suited to explore mee ng local needs for aqua cs. • Aqua cs, golf, and pickleball are specific programs types that are not offered formally by the Village but have a high demand from residents. • Facili es such as an outdoor swimming pool,

pickleball, and canoe/kayak launch have the highest need in the Village. • As popula on of the Village increases, addi onal playgrounds, restrooms, and basketball courts will be needed. • Addi onal improvements to balancing ac ve and passive (at-will) recrea on opportuni es and providing ample comfortable sea ng op ons should be primary park design considera ons. • Iden fying strategic opens spaces within the C-100A Canal corridor could help reduce storm event flooding

Table 6: Needs Assessment Summary

Level of Service Analysis

Sta s cal Survey

Online Engagement

Program Assessment

Stakeholder Interviews

Focus Groups

= Indicates Need

Community Mee ngs

= Indicates Highest Need

Park Evalua ons

Needs Assessment Techniques

Kayak and Canoe Launch Pickleball Courts

Facilities

Outdoor Swimming Pool (lap and leisure) Tennis Courts Mul purpose Fields Basketball Courts Passive Parks Outdoor Events Space Walking Paths Picnicking Shelters/Pavilions

Programs and Activities

Aqua cs/Water Fitness Adult Fitness and Wellness Community Events Senior/Ac ve Adults Teen Programming Pickleball Golf Performance Arts/Theatre Nature Enjoyment Adventure Recrea on (rock climbing, etc.)

61



VISION AND IMPLEMENTATION PLAN


DRAFT

PINECREST PARKS AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN

2.1 LONG RANGE VISION The vision for the Village of Pinecrest parks and recrea on facili es and programs is linked to the vision of the Village as a whole. The community’s system of parks, open spaces, recrea on facili es, and natural areas, all elements of the public realm, are woven into the fabric of what makes Pinecrest a great place to live, work and play. This vision integrates components of previous city-wide efforts to achieve the overall vision for the Village defined in previous planning efforts (see Sec on 1.2). The Vision ul mately is built upon a framework dis lled from input and analysis conducted during the Needs and Priori es Assessment.

VISION COMPONENTS Previous efforts have provided a vision framework dis lled from public input and comprehensive analysis. This input has allowed iden fica on of a set of components that will help guide the development of the parks and facili es, and the management of a diverse system. Each component was developed through community input and an analysis of the exis ng physical system. Guiding principles iden fied for each component describes the community’s aspira ons for the overall park and open space system and its physical a ributes. Accomplishment of this Vision will be dependent upon Village staff, exis ng and future partners, and the support of residents.

64

KEY TAKEAWAYS: • Pinecrest’s vision for parks and recrea on builds upon the vision established by the community’s Comprehensive Plan and Strategic Plan. • Comprehensive Vision consists of five (5) components: Parks and Open Spaces; Fitness and Athle cs; Community Cultural Arts; Sustainability and Resiliency; and Connec vity. • Working as an interconnected system, the five components iden fy clear ini a ves that can be championed by advocates and progressed by staff. • Specific ac ons will allow for assessment of progress toward achieving overall vision.

Village of Pinecrest Mission To sustain a vibrant Village that builds a sense of community spirit and pride with fiscally responsible government, the highest quality municipal services and infrastructure, a responsive and efficient staff, and innova ve leaders who engage our residents.

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DRAFT

Diagram 2: Vision Principles

Parks & Open Space Balance of passive and ac ve recrea on opportuni es; Maintain high-quality parks and facili es; Design for comfort in South Florida climate

Fitness and Athle cs Provide for a diversity of op ons; Encourage lifelong health and wellness; Maximize high-quality sports facili es for mul ple uses and extra capacity

Community Culture Arts Celebrate community through special events; Increase diversity of cultural offerings; Promote art within the public realm

Sustainability & Resiliency Con nue to incorporate sustainable and resilient prac ces; enhance educa on and awareness; expand access to natural areas and resources

Connec vity Implement inter/intra mul -modal connec vity op ons, Provide water access; Connect des na ons through pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure

Parks & Open Space Guiding principles for parks and open space in the Village of Pinecrest focuses on three (3) primary areas: • Balancing passive and ac ve recrea on opportuni es: Ensuring a balance of park space designated for ac ve or programmed uses as well

as ample natural or open space. Priori za on of acquisi on of parkland, open space or natural areas, or securing public access to school sites should be made by the Village. • Maintain high-quality parks and facili es: Residents have high expecta ons for the quality of parks and facili es in Pinecrest. A con nua on of providing high-quality ameni es and park spaces means

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PINECREST PARKS AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN

flexibility to changing needs, reinvestment in higher lifecycle costs, use of durable materials. • Design for comfort in South Florida climate: As the primary barrier for many residents and visitors, the South Florida climate can be highly uncomfortable and dangerous without ample shade, access to water, areas for rest, awareness to the risks. Designing parks to educate and reduce risks for users will encourage extended use of facili es and parks and promote a health community.

Fitness and Athle cs Guiding principles for fitness and athle cs includes the following: • Provide for a diversity of op ons: Residents of Pinecrest share a wide-range of experiences and bring to parks and recrea on an expecta on for innova ve classes, programs and high-quality facili es to accommodate. Regular assessment of evolving needs should be completed by the Village as well as development of flexible facili es that can accommodate different uses. Investment in singleuse facili es should be limited. • Encourage life-long health and wellness: In an area known for transient popula ons, Pinecrest residents are encouraged to age-in-place and to accommodate this goal, ac vi es that can be enjoyed by any age group should be a focus, including mul genera onal ac vi es. Ac vi es and programs such as tennis, pickleball, bike riding, walking and special events should be considered core programs that promote ac vity well into one’s advanced age. • Maximize high-quality sports facili es for mul ple uses and extra capacity: Pinecrest has a shortage of land for poten al development for parks. As a builtout community, growth will likely come through an increase in density in select areas. With increased density comes a different lifestyle, urban dweller

66

which also brings a set of different needs and priori es for open space and recrea on ac vi es. U lizing the limited space within exis ng parks be er can bring added capacity through extended hours and more days of play- me. Use of efficient LED field or court ligh ng and ar ficial turf can help extend the hours in a given day that courts or fields are available. Addi onally, ar ficial turf can reduce the down me required a er rain events, therefore, providing a more consistent schedule for sports. The Village is currently construc ng an ar ficial turf sports field at Flagler Grove Park which should serve as a test before considering replacement of natural grass at other parks. Indoor recrea on space is also an important part of providing a well-round athle c experience. Currently the Village has limited indoor gymnasium access to provide basketball, indoor pickleball, and general pickup sports mes. Adding capacity through addi onal indoor mul -purpose space is an important balance to exis ng outdoor sports offerings.

Community Culture Arts Guiding principles for community culture arts includes the following: • Celebrate community through special events: A ending concerts, fairs and fes vals was the single highest need and second most important ac vity for Village residents based on results from the sta s cal survey. Given the success and high praises provided from residents to the Village for current events, expanding to include more year-round events can easily be achieved. Specific focus should be given to events that celebrate the cultural diversity of the Village and South Florida, while providing for the interests of all age groups with a family-friendly environment.

December 2021


DRAFT

• Increase diversity of cultural offerings: Pinecrest has an unique poten al to expand integra on of nearby cultural ins tu ons into program offerings. Many residents par cipant in cultural ins tu ons or clubs and have expressed a desire to have more opportuni es available near their homes. Expansion of indoor space to accommodate addi onal offerings as well as a formal Village square or open space would allow for a designated space to host cultural and special events. • Promote art within the public realm: Each capital improvement should include a percentage for art as an effort to promote public art in a meaningful way. Public art does not have to just consist of sculptures, but can be a celebra on of the rich culture of the Village or the history of South Florida. Whether the art is a bench or light, such prac cal infrastructure turned art can bring character and vibrancy to public spaces.

Sustainability & Resiliency Guiding principles for sustainability and resiliency includes the following: • Con nue to incorporate sustainable and resilient prac ces: Expanding upon the Village’s recent efforts to incorporate sustainable and resilient prac ces can focus on individual parks, however, by developing standards, a culture of resource efficiency can be established and contribute to the success of the park system and the natural environment throughout the Village. As exis ng parks are improved or new parks developed, the Village can expand to include energy management planning, expanded use of na ve plants, and variable maintenance prac ces to allow for more naturalized areas. • Enhance educa on and awareness: Parks and facili es in Pinecrest have the poten al to func on not just as places for outdoor recrea on but

serve as major centers for the enhancement of environmental educa on. Through physical design interven ons and collabora ve programs and partnerships, the parks and facili es can be used as mediums of educa on. • Expand access to natural areas and resources: Natural areas require natural resources. Though Pinecrest consists of mostly developed or disturbed lands, the Village can work to expand access to nearby natural areas, mostly owned by Miami-Dade County. Though significant natural resources are limited in their undisturbed se ngs, many of the parks and open spaces within the Village can s ll incorporate resources such as wetlands, hammocks and water.

Connec vity Guiding principles for connec vity includes the following: • Implement inter/intra mul -modal connec vity op ons: Pinecrest has a unique opportunity to capitalize on its proximity to mass transit while maintaining its character. Promo ng safe and convenient connec ons for transit, regional shareduse trails, and sidewalk will encourage a culture that reduces dependency on vehicles. • Provide water access: Opportuni es for freshwater and saltwater access exists within Pinecrest. Development of a premier water access point to the C-2 Canal would serve as a hub for access to saltwater bodies. • Connect des na ons through pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure: Development of a interconnected network of pedestrian and bicycle shared-use trails and sidewalks would connect residents to all parks and civic facili es throughout the Village. Implementa on of the Village’s Transporta on Master Plan would promote connec ons with the Village and regionally.

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PINECREST PARKS AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN

2.2 IMPLEMENTATION PLAN In order to advance the Long-Range Vision established for Pinecrest, implementa on strategies must be defined and priori es established. The Implementa on Plan plays a cri cal role in making the vision realis c and is intended to provide guidance in bringing the master plan vision to reality through four cri cal elements: funding analysis; probable cost es mate; planning strategies; and ac on items. Priority of individual ac on items are ed to public and staff input gathered and documented throughout the needs and priori es assessment. Together, these components will allow the Village to review and efficiently revise the implementa on plan, as needed in the future, to reflect changing condi ons, demographics or priori es. The Long-Range Vision iden fied five (5) components, each defined through a series of guiding principles. Defining each component allows Village staff to be er understand how to address the needs and priori es that were iden fied throughout the planning process, as well as the individual park needs that resulted from the park evalua ons and public input. U lizing this informa on, recommenda ons intended to sa sfy system-wide objec ves have been developed at an individual park level. These recommenda ons form a por on of the probable cost es mate. In addi on to costs associated with vision-based recommenda ons, cost es mates also incorporate projects that have been previously iden fied by the Village, including projects iden fied in the Capital Improvement Plan (CIP).

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KEY TAKEAWAYS: • The Parks and Recrea on Dept. has experienced a significant increase in funding over the prior three budget years. • The Dept.’s combined cost recovery rate is 47%, down from a high of 68% in 2019, just before the pandemic. • The Pinecrest Community Center operated with a posi ve cash flow for 2019, prior to a lower cost recovery rate of 74% while Parks Dept. is 22% • There are over $21.5 million in grant opportuni es available to the Village. • Short-term needs have a probable cost es mate of $11.9 million and will require an addi onal $162,875 in O&M costs annually. • Capital projects and land acquisi on have been grouped into one of three (3) phasing meframes: Short-Term (1-5 Years); Medium-Term (6-10 Years) and Long-Term (10+ Years).

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DRAFT

FUNDING ANALYSIS Revenues and expenditures over the last three (3) buget years have seen some of the widest swings from posi ve to nega ve and back to posi ve. Many communi es were quick to pull back expenditures as uncertain es arrived in early 2020, only to find out in some cases that revenues where not as impacted or were impacted in ways that balanced incoming Federal and State subsides. Revenues over the last few years have been trending up for the Village, see Table 7. For the Parks and Recrea on Department, the last three (3) years have seen a 32%

increase in revenues while the Community Center has received a 13% decrease. All divisions saw substan al increases between 2020 and 2021 budget years. As a peer Department, Pinecrest Gardens has seen a 19% decrease in the last two years, but last years recieved a 17% increase, lower than Parks and Recrea on. Expenditures have mostly mirrored revenues, but to a lesser degree of growth, see Table 8. Parks and Recrea on has seen a 12% increase, while the Community Center has experienced a 23% increase and Pinecrest Gardens a 4% increase. Cost recovery for Parks and Recrea on for 2021 stands at an es mated 22%,

Table 7: Village of Pinecrest 2019-2021 Revenues 2019

2020

Percentage Change

2021

Percentage Change

2019-2021 Trend

$500,347

$198,520

-60%

$337,500

+70%

+32%

$1,165,980

$804,875

-31%

$1,013,610

+26%

-13%

Impact Fees

$44,647

$83,410

+86%

$71,500

-14%

+60%

Sidewalk Fee

$190,189

$137,390

-27%

$95,000

-30%

-50%

Private Dona ons

$36,096

$10,350

-71%

$10,000

-3%

-72%

$3,483,266

$1,264,525

-63%

$8,665,000

+585%

+148%

$753,211

$520,000

-31%

$609,000

+17%

-19%

$5,680,978

$6,874,480

+21%

$8,486,487

+252%

+49%

Revenues Parks and Recrea on Community Center

Capital Projects Fund Pinecrest Gardens General Fund Balance

Table 8: Village of Pinecrest 2019-2021 Expenditures 2019

2020

Percentage Change

2021

Percentage Change

2019-2021 Trend

Parks and Recrea on

$1,350,680

$1,329,313

-1.5%

$1,517,270

+14%

+12%

Community Center

$1,089,395

$1,180,857

+8%

$1,343,590

+14%

+23%

Capital Outlay

$5,106,820

$6,345,091

+24%

$11,600,915

+82%

+127%

Pinecrest Gardens

$2,474,715

$2,617,273

+6%

$2,579,965

-1.4%

+4%

Village’s Total Expenditures

$20,991,824

$22,193,307

+6%

$22,885,000

+3%

+9%

Expenditures

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PINECREST PARKS AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN

while the Community Center will have an es mated 74% cost recovery. Combined the two divisions are projected to have a 47% cost recovery, down from a high of 68% in 2019 before the pandemic. 2020 marked the lowest year for cost recovery, bo oming out at 40%. At the current pace of improvement, it may take another three (3) years of increases before the two divisions return to pre-pandemic cost recovery levels. In 2019, the Community Center actually turned a 7% return to the Village which is a significant milestone and shows the strong place in the market the Center enjoys. This is s ll a marked improvement for Pinecrest Gardens which prior to the pandemic had a 30% cost recovery that dropped to 19.8% in 2020 and is projected to increase slightly to 23.6% for 2021. It is important to note that expenditures for Pinecrest Gardens also include debt repayment for the purchase and improvements at the facility. This debt is schedule for full payment in 2021, a year ahead of schedule. Village Council has established a desired ac on to increase cost recovery for Parks and Recrea on, including the Community Center, to a goal of 80%. Based on 2021 budget year es mates, the addi onal revenues need to reach the goal cost recovery would total nearly $1 million. Three (3) poten al addi onal funding sources within the Village for park and recrea on capital projects include the Impact Fee Fund, Sidewalk Fee Fund, and private dona ons. All three have seen revenues decrease in 2021 es mates over the prior year and only the Impact Fee Fund has experienced an increase over the last three budget years. Moving forward, all three funds could par ally fund park and recrea on projects. Addi onally, Pinecrest Gardens has targeted alterna ve funding sources such as naming rights for planned capital projects, projec ng to raise $1 million for an inspira on center and pe ng zoo.

Development Assistance Program for installa on of ar ficial turf at Flagler Grove Park. The grant represented nearly 1/3 of the total capital funding needed for the project. Table 9, provide a comprehensive list of grant opportuni es, represen ng over $21.5 million in grants. U lizing mul ple funding sources has become the most effec ve way of maximizing the amount of funding a community can obtain. “Grant Stacking” allows a project to draw funding from several sources. The idea of “Grant Stacking” refers to grouping grants of varying levels (federal, state and local) to support one project. Careful selec on of grants can result in one grant providing the matching funds requirement for another grant and the reciprocal as well. This process can address acquisi on and development in phases to best meet a project’s intent and me schedule. The Village also has a long history of u lizing borrowing to fund capital improvements and acquisi ons. Following payoff of the Pinecrest Gardens acquisi on and improvements bond, the Village will have four (4) remaining bonds or loans in ac ve repayment, represen ng annual costs of slightly over $1.1 million. All four remaining debts are scheduled to be paid off by 2030. A por on of the 2015 bonds are being u lized to fund Phase 2 of planned capital improvements at Coral Pine Park. In the last two years, Pinecrest has decreased per capita debt from $834 to $540, represen ng a drop of 35%. The Village enjoys an extremely low debt percentage to assessed value of 0.195% compared to a na onal median of over 2% or roughly ten mes currently levels enjoyed by Pinecrest.

Other alterna ve funding sources include recent success in obtaining a grant from the Florida Recrea on

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Table 9: Grant Funding Opportuni es and Eligible Elements Funding Program

Grant Amount

Match Requirement

Types of Eligible Elements

Great Urban Parks

$575,000

0%

Land and Water Conserva on Grant

$200,000

100%

Ballfields, courts, trails, fishing facili es, playgrounds, restrooms, shade structures, ligh ng and landscaping

March

Florida Recrea on Development Assistance Program (FRDAP)

$200,000

100%

Ballfields, courts, trails, fishing facili es, playgrounds, restrooms, shade structures, ligh ng and landscaping

September

Cultural Facili es Grant Program

$500,000

200%

Ac ve and passive facili es, stormwater, environmental

Educa onal, amphitheater, nature, art elements Any outdoor recrea on elements that enhance opportuni es for disabled or person with unique abili es

An cipated Deadline April

June

FRDAP (Disabled & Unique Abili es)

$500,000

0%

Outdoor Recrea on Legacy Partnership Program (ORLPP)

$750,000

100%

Ballfields, courts, trails, fishing facili es, playgrounds, restrooms, shade structures, ligh ng and landscaping

May

Recrea onal Trails Program (RTP)

$200,000

25%

Trails, trailside, trailhead facili es

April

Florida Communi es Trust (FCT)

$5,000,000

25%

Land acquisi on of passive and ac ve recrea onal facili es including those for unique and disabled persons

$50,000

80%

Renova on and/or construc on of public tennis fac.

Rollling October, February, June

USTA Public Facili es Grant U.S. Soccer Founda on Grants

$50,000

100%

Field turf, ligh ng, irriga on and program equipment

MLB Tomorrow Fund

$40,000

100%

Renova on and development of ballfield related elements

American Academy of Dermatology

$8,000

0%

$500,000

200%

Cultural Facili es Grant Program Public Art Challenge

Shade structures Educa onal, amphitheater, nature, art elements

$1,000,000

25%

Art in Public Places

Our Town Grant

$200,000

100%

Innova ve public projects including heritage trails

Florida Small Matching Grant Program

$50,000

100%

Restora on of historic structures, educa on facili es

Florida Special Category Grant Program

$350,000

100%

Acquisi on and development of historic structures

Urban Forestry Grant Program (UFC)

$10,000

100%

Tree plans/programs and plan ng

25%

Educa onal elements, signage, nature trails, internet applica ons

Environmental Educa on Grants

$91,000

Urban Waters Grant

$60,000

5%

Signage, public educa on, innova ve water quality projects

Sec on 319(h) Grants

$750,000

40%

Stormwater, water quality, educa on projects

Coast Partnership Ini a ve (CPI)

$30,000

100%

Educa on facili es, signage, water access

100%

Nature centers, museums, botanical gardens, children museums

Na onal Leadership Grants for Museums

$500,000

March

Rolling September June December October June December March April November March October December

Pre-Disaster Mi ga on

$3,000,000

25%

Stormwater including open space, hardening

May

Water Project Funding

$3,000,000

100%

Stormwater, water quality, alterna ve water

November

Complete Streets and Local Ini a ves

$1,500,000

0%

Pedestrian and bicycle trails and greenways

January

$200,000

20%

Construc on of trails and support facili es

April

Any outdoor trail and greenway elements that enhance opportuni es for disabled or person with unique abili es

July

Kayak/canoe facili es, blueway facili es

April

Recrea on Trails Programs (RTP) FRDAP (Disabled & Unique Abili es)

$500,000

0%

Waterway Assistance Program (FIND)

$200,000

100%

Urban Waters Grant

$60,000

5%

Preserve America

$200,000

100%

$1,000,000

0%

Acquisi on of trails/greenways that enhance the state system

October

Land and Water Conserva on Grant (LWCF)

$200,000

100%

Boa ng facili es, kayak/canoe, trails, fishing facili es, outdoor classroom, restrooms, shade structures, ligh ng and landscaping

March

Coast Partnership Ini a ve (CPI)

$30,000

100%

Kayak/canoe facili es, vegeta on removal, signage

OGT Land Acquisi on Program

Signage, innova ve water quality projects Signage, wayfinding

November TBD

October

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PROBABLE COST ESTIMATES Table 10: Probable Cost Categories

Based on cost es mates derived from parks and open space assessments and projects iden fied in previous Capital Improvement Program (CIP), and recommenda ons associated with the Master Plan Vision, the es mated probable cost is approximately $45.5 million in 2021 dollars for complete implementa on of all component of the Vision (Table 10). The Vision includes system improvements an cipated to occur to establish and maintain parks delivery within the next five (5) to ten (10) years consistent with the growth an cipated in the Village. The probable cost es mate is organized into exis ng park and facili es, undeveloped parks, acquisi on, and proposed future parks. Es mated costs can be further aligned with the park components (Table 11), The full list of projects and es mated costs used to derive the total es mate includes over 200 items. This includes addi onal projects that will help achieve the goals and objec ves of the Long-Range Vision.

PHASING PLAN The Phasing Plan for capital improvement projects is comprised of three (3) different phases based on community needs and priori es and input from Village staff. These phases, summarized in Table 12, provide a framework for the implementa on of over $45 million in capital improvement projects. Approximately 26% of projects are included in the short-term phase which are targeted for comple on or substan al progress in the next 1-5 years. Another 41% of project costs are shown in the medium-term phase which are to be completed in the next 6-10 years. Finally, the long-term phase includes projects that have lower priority or take longer periods of me to iden fy funding or partners. These projects are likely not to be completed within the next ten (10) years unless priori es change.

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Es mate of Probable Cost

Category

(2021 Dollars)

Exis ng Parks and Facili es

$8,102,500

Undeveloped Parks

$1,725,000

Acquisi on

$11,500,000

Proposed Future Parks

$24,255,000

Total

$45,582,500

Table 11: Probable Costs by Vision Component Es mate of Probable Cost

Vision Components

(2021 Dollars)

Parks and Facili es

$18,950,000

Fitness and Athle cs

$23,737,500

Community Cultural Arts

$355,355

Sustainability and Resiliency

$1,975,000

Connec vity

$670,000*

Total

$45,582,500

Notes: * Excludes Pedestrian and Bicycle Projects included in the Transporta on Master Plan

Table 12: Probable Costs by Phase Phase

Es mate of Probable Cost (2021 Dollars)

Percentage of Total

Short-Term (1-5 Years)

$11,927,500

26%

Medium-Term (6-10 Years)

$18,572,500

41%

Long-Term (10+ Years)

$15,082,500

33%

Total

$45,582,500

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Map 10: PRMP Vision Priority Project Loca ons

Neighborhood Neighborhood Parks Parks

6

sŝůůĂŐĞ ŽĨ WŝŶĞĐƌĞƐƚ Ͳ džŝƐƟŶŐ WĂƌŬƐ

1 Flager Grove Park 2 Red Road Linear Park 3 Veterans Wayside Park

Gary Matzner Park Hidden Pine Park

Village of Pinecrest - Future

Cost: $155,000 Phase(s): Short-Term

4 Gary Matzner Park 5 Hidden Pines Park

7

Cost: $1,570,000 Phase(s): Short, MediumTerm

8

KƚŚĞƌ EĞŝŐŚďŽƌŚŽŽĚ WĂƌŬƐ

6 William H. Kerdyk, Jr. & Family Park (Coral Gables) 7 Fuchs Park (S. Miami) 8 Dante Fascell Park (S. Miami) Coral Pine Park 9 Coral Bay Park (Coral Gables) Cost: $140,000 Phase(s): Short-Term 10 Briar Bay Park (County) 11 Briar Bay Linear Park (County) 12 Rockdale Park (County) 5 1

Red Road Linear

4

Cost: $485,000 Phase(s): Short, MediumTerm

5

1 2

7

1

Flagler Grove Park

8

Cost: $70,000 Phase(s): Medium-Term

Village Green Cost: $1,842,500 Phase(s): Short, Medium, and Long-Term

2 3

2

Veterans Wayside

Water Access

Cost: $450,000 Phase(s): Short and Medium-Term

Cost: $2,105,000 Phase(s): Short-Term

Evelyn Greer Park Cost: $3,102,500 Phase(s): Short, Medium, and Long-Term

13

3

9

Pocket Parks (4)

14

10

Cost: $7,000,000 Phase(s): Long-Term

4

11

3

15

Suniland Park Community Park

Cost: $1,992,500 Phase(s): Short and Medium-Term

Cost: $26,450,000 Phase(s): Short, Medium and Long-Term

12

0

1 mi

1/2 mi 1/4 mi

6

3/4 mi

Legend: Pinecrest Boundary

4 Pinecrest Parks

Community Facilities

Future Parks

Public Schools

Municipality Boundaries

Special Venue

Private Schools

Major Roads Streets

Golf Course Parks

Greenway Trail

County Parks

Bus Stops Bus Route

Planned Greenway Trail

Natural Area Preserve

Metro Rail Stops Metro Rail Route

Community Parks sŝůůĂŐĞ ŽĨ WŝŶĞĐƌĞƐƚ Ͳ džŝƐƟŶŐ WĂƌŬƐ

1 2 3 4

Coral Pine Park Village Green Evelyn Greer Park Suniland Park

KƚŚĞƌ ŽŵŵƵŶŝƚLJ WĂƌŬƐ

Regional Parks 1 2 3 4

Matheson Hammock Park R. Hardy Preserve Chapman Field Park Charles Deering Estate

5 ŽŶƟŶĞŶƚĂů WĂƌŬ ;County) 6 Coral Reef Park (WĂůŵĞƩŽ ĂLJ)

Private

7 Royal Palm Tennis Club 8 Coral Oaks Tennis and Wellness Club

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OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE COSTS With the addi on of new facili es and park acreage, opera ng and maintenance (O&M) costs can be expected to increase. This plan is conserva ve in the assump on that replacement of exis ng park ameni es or facili es will result in a minimal cost adjustment for O&M. Improving exis ng parks or adding new parks and facili es will commonly result in addi onal O&M costs. With full implementa on of the Vision, between 5.5 and eight (8) acres of new parkland will be added to the Village. With this comes the need to secure sites, mow grass, pick up li er, and other basic needs. Upon development of each new park site, addi onal O&M costs are provided to staff new centers and maintain new park ameni es. Table 13 iden fies the es mated phased annual increase in O&M costs for new or improved facili es. Full implementa on of the Long-Range Vision is es mated to increase O&M by approximately $962,475 annually, or 3% of capital improvements. This equates to an es mated $30,000 in O&M costs for each $1,000,000 million in capital investment.

Table 13: Addi onal O&M Cost for 5-Year, 6-10 Years, and 10+ Year CIP Time-Frames Addi onal O&M Costs within 5-Year Time-Frame Exis ng Park Improvements

$53,175 Addi onal O&M costs

New Park Development

$109,650 Addi onal O&M costs

Totals

Addi onal O&M Costs within 6-10 Year Time-Frame Exis ng Park Improvements

$99,675 Addi onal O&M costs

New Park Development

$457,500 Addi onal O&M costs

Totals

$557,175 annually

Addi onal O&M Costs beyond 10 Years Time-Frame Exis ng Park Improvements

$90,225 Addi onal O&M costs

New Park Development

$152,250 Addi onal O&M costs

Totals

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$162,825 annually

$242,475 annually

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2.3 ACTION PLAN The funding analysis, phasing plan, and priority projects sec ons outline an approach to implemen ng various improvements and ac ons needed to address the vision. Table 14 iden fies ac on items that can help implement priority projects iden fied in the previous sec on. Each ac on item advances objec ves of the vision, as well as the priori es iden fied by parks and recrea on staff. Two (2) categories of me have been iden fied: “priority” represents priority ac on items to be completed in the next 1-3 years; “con nued emphasis” represents ac on items that may take up to five (5) years to complete.

KEY TAKEAWAYS: • Defini on of Ac on Items is intended to assist Village staff with implementa on priori za on. • Two (2) cateogies of me are used to priori ze the Ac on items; priority (1-3 Years) and con nued emphasis (within 5 Years). • Ac on Items are grouped into four (4) themes; capital, acquisi on, policy and ini a ves. • Ac on items should be reviewed regularly and updated as priori es change or they are completed.

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PINECREST PARKS AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN Table 14: PRMP Ac on Items Item

Priority Ac on Items (Comple on in 1-3 Years)

Capital A

Implement a focused approach for capital improvements reinvestments in facility and park projects to secure and improve condi ons of exis ng assets.

B

Evaluate cost recovery target in rela ons to peer Departments and impacts associated with the pandemic.

C

Secure addi onal grants by leveraging dedicated funding sources for targeted capital improvement or need-based grants from State, Federal, private, or non-profit sources.

Acquisi ons D

Strategic land acquisi on program to target and secure land acquisi on opportuni es, par cularly opportuni es larger than three (3) acres in size and/or located within the central area of the Village.

E

Secure targeted surplus or other Village-owned proper es and strategically acquire adjacent lands or trade with other proper es to amalgamate con guous land holdings that can be used for future parks.

Policy F

Integrate Master Plan recommenda ons into the Village’s Comprehensive Plan and future Strategic Plan updates.

G

Work in conjunc on with other Village departments to develop a parks-oriented set of sustainability design guidelines.

Ini a ves Communica on

H

Increase marke ng and communica on resources with a dedicated posi on focused on development and coordina on of communica ons for Parks and Recrea on and Pinecrest Gardens.

I

Development Spanish translated materials.

J

Enhance website descrip ons of each park, facility and program with more robust details, videos, and images. Planning Efforts

K

Complete a master plan for Gary Matzner Park that includes public engagement

L

Develop a set of design and sustainability guidelines to aid the planning and design of parks and recrea on facili es. Organiza onal

76

M

Develop a set of key performance indicators (KPIs) to measure organiza onal performance

N

Develop a strategic plan, as required by CAPRA, that includes annual goals and objec ves and covering a three to five year period

O

Revise the 2017 Marke ng Plan to reflect the exis ng marke ng environment, determine priori es for strengthening the Department’s brand and image, and to build community awareness of programs and services.

P

Incoproate recomenda ons from Recrea on Program Plan for program offerings, administra on and marke ng/communica ons. Review annually and update based on progress and changing needs.

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Item

Con nued Emphasis (Comple on within 5 Years)

A

Develop department-wide resiliency plan to counter impacts of climate change and sea level rise to park and recrea on facili es.

B

Enhance water and energy conserva on through an evalua on of recommended plants species, design and materials standards, and educa onal programming.

C

Con nue to establish tree canopies through all parks, Village-wide.

D

Coordinate with other Village departments in the development of a ‘Safe Routes to Parks/Play’ or similar ini a ve.

E

Establish a dedicated, capital funding source to address deferred maintenance, upgrade of exis ng facili es, land acquisi on, and the development of new park facili es.

F

Develop a new park level of service (LOS) standard to include walkability measure to promote development of park and recrea on facili es in a more walkable pa ern and promote a more healthy community through easier access to parks

Image: Suniland Park, Pinecrest, Florida

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APPENDIX RECREATION PROGRAM ASSESSMENT REPORT .......................................................................................................... A ORGANIZATIONAL ASSESSMENT ................................................................................................................................... B MEETING NOTES ............................................................................................................................................................. C STATISTICAL SURVEY RESULTS ....................................................................................................................................... D PRIORITY CAPITAL PROJECTS PROBABLE COST ESTIMATES ........................................................................................E

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APPENDIX

A

Village of Pinecrest, FL Recreation Assessment V2

Submitted by: BerryDunn 2211 Congress Street Portland, ME 04102-1955 207.541.2200 Chad Snow, Principal csnow@berrydunn.com Dannielle Wilson, Project Manager dwilson@berrydunn.com Submitted On: 16 December 2021

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Table of Contents Section

Page

Table of Contents ........................................................................................................................... i 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Core Programs ........................................................................................................................ 2 Camps ....................................................................................................................................... 2 Community Events .................................................................................................................... 2 Cultural Arts ............................................................................................................................... 3 Educational ................................................................................................................................ 3 Fitness ....................................................................................................................................... 4 Life Skills ................................................................................................................................... 5 Seniors ...................................................................................................................................... 5 Sports ........................................................................................................................................ 6 STEM ........................................................................................................................................ 8 3.0 Age Segmentation .................................................................................................................. 8 4.0 Program Menu ...................................................................................................................... 11 Program Inventory ................................................................................................................... 11 Program Distribution ................................................................................................................ 12 5.0 Life Cycle Analysis ................................................................................................................ 14 6.0 Program Administration and Performance ............................................................................ 17 Program Development Processes ........................................................................................... 17 Participation ............................................................................................................................. 17 Fiscal Performance ................................................................................................................. 18 Performance Tracking ............................................................................................................. 21 Marketing and Communications .............................................................................................. 22 7.0 Similar Providers ................................................................................................................... 24 Partnership Opportunities ........................................................................................................ 29

Recreation Assessment | 2 December 2021

Table of Contents | i

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Duplication of Services ............................................................................................................ 29 8.0 User Fee Analysis ................................................................................................................. 31 Tennis ...................................................................................................................................... 31 Gym Memberships .................................................................................................................. 31 Fitness Classes ....................................................................................................................... 32 9.0 Community Needs ................................................................................................................ 34 10.0 Recommendations .............................................................................................................. 36 Program Menu ......................................................................................................................... 36 Administration .......................................................................................................................... 36 Marketing and Communication ................................................................................................ 36

Recreation Assessment | 2 December 2021

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1.0 Introduction BerryDunn completed a recreation programming assessment in support of the Village of Pinecrest (Village), Florida’s Parks and Recreation Department’s (Department’s) master planning efforts. The Department’s recreation programs and services were evaluated through a series of data analysis, conversations with staff, a staff survey, and the results from the community needs survey. In support of the Department’s efforts in developing high quality programs, the recreation assessment is intended to provide best practices to recreation program development and delivery of services. The goal from this assessment is to help the Department develop a strategic vision for program delivery, identify any gaps, and pursue opportunities to strengthen programming for the community. BerryDunn completed the recreation programming assessment through the following key tasks: x

Inventory of programs

x

Age segmentation of programs

x

Distribution of the types of programs

x

Life cycle analysis

x

Review of similar providers and duplicative services

x

Staff and community engagement

x

User fee analysis

BerryDunn utilized various resources to include in the program assessment and inventory review. This includes data provided by the Department on program participation, community survey results, staff survey results, 2020 Parks and Recreation Highlights Report, special marketing materials such as program flyers, participant surveys, Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Business Plan 2021, New Program Request Form, the Village’s website, social media, and the Mindbody fitness registration platform. Some of the assessment components reviewed multiple years of data. It should be noted that performance trends in these instances were all impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020. Additionally, the single-year assessment components used data from 2019 in lieu of the most recent fiscal data.

Recreation Assessment | 2 December 2021

1.0 Introduction | 1

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2.0 Core Programs One of the Department’s key service areas is the delivery of recreation programs. Categorizing those programs into core program areas helps the Department staff organize the administration of like-services and also helps the community understand the leisure opportunities in an organized fashion. The following section provides specific detail about the core program areas and services offered by the Department. Department staff have defined core program areas as camps; community events; cultural arts; educational; fitness; life skills; seniors; sports; and science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM).

Camps Camps are offered for participants ages four to twelve. Several camp programs provide diverse activities including athletic, artistic, creative, educational, and other experiences. Camps take place throughout the year – typically during days off from school – and include participation options ranging from half-day to full-day programs. Some of the camps offered include Camp Unbeatables Winter Camp, FunCamps, David Ensignia Tennis Camps, and Mad Science Camps. Fees vary depending on the time duration of the camp. Camps typically operate on weekdays from Monday through Friday. Staff reported that camp programs produce significant revenue, which is an important contribution to the Department’s cost recovery efforts. As part of the Village Council’s 2020 Strategic Plan, the Parks and Recreation Department has a five-year goal of regularly recovering at least 80% of expenses through revenue produced from programs, services, and special events. Staff recently tripled the number of camp offerings (over two years) with diverse types of camps in an effort to meet this goal. Based on data provided from the community survey, 21% of survey participants responded that they have a need for camp programs like summer camp that is not being met or only is partially met while 67% of survey participants responded that they do not have a need for this activity. The survey is a helpful snapshot of community needs and further research should be conducted regarding camp program needs. It is common in the field of parks and recreation for organizations to provide camps as safe and enjoyable activities while children are out of school.

Community Events The Department organizes and hosts community events that serve all ages of the population. Based upon the 2020 Parks and Recreation Highlights Report, seven community events were facilitated by the Department in 2020. At the time of this report, seven community events are scheduled for the 2021-2022 season with additional events to possibly be added. Community events take place throughout the year and are designed to focus on holidays as well as special activities. Some of the community events include Track or Treat, Veterans Day Picnic, Camp Out Night, and Pinecrest Car Show. Staff indicated that the events have been quite popular, and that they see a significant amount of nonresident participation in them. Recreation Assessment | 2 December 2021

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In the field of parks and recreation, it is common for event organizers to be challenged with accurate attendance numbers as many events are drop-in and may not require tickets or registration. As popularity in community events grow, many organizations are using new tools, like LiveGauge, or similar technologies to track event attendance, which the Department may consider. It is also common in the field of parks and recreation for community events to be fully or partially subsidized as events reach a broad and community-wide audience and typically promote community pride while supporting positive interactions with all types of government employees and community members. Based upon the community survey, approximately 80% of survey participants responded that they are very supportive or somewhat supportive of the Village hosting more community-wide events. Furthermore, approximately 53% of respondents indicated a need for attending a concert, fair or festival that is either partially met or not met at all. Respondents also identified attending concerts, fairs or festivals as the second most important leisure activity to their household. It is very common for communities to be supportive for increasing community-wide event programming. Cultural arts programming, including community-wide or special events, is experiencing significant growth in interest and offerings across the nation.

Cultural Arts The Department offers cultural arts programs for participants of all ages, including music, dance, and art. At the time of this report, over 50 different cultural arts programs are being provided that take place throughout the year. An analysis indicates that cultural arts programming features the highest number of programs of all core program areas provided by the Department. Based on data provided from the community survey, 21% of survey participants responded that they have a need for performing art programs that is not being met or only partially met while 66% of survey participants responded that they do not have a need for this activity. In the same survey, almost 25% of participants responded that they have a need for arts and crafts programs that is not being met or only partially met while 68% of survey participants responded that they do not have a need for this activity. Approximately 16% of respondents identified painting, 7% writing, nearly 11% for reading, 16% for photography, 29% for going to movies, and over 42% for going to theaters as not being met or only partially met. Overall, respondents have a high need for cultural arts activities that are typically in group settings such as theater or watching movies.

Educational As a community-based recreation provider, it is important to include educational programming as part of a well-rounded menu of opportunities. The Department provides educational programs for all ages of the population with programs that take place throughout the year. Some of the types of programs include APEM French Program, Medicare Monday, Power to the Pencil, and Lectures and Workshops. Recreation Assessment | 2 December 2021

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The community survey asked whether the community’s computer education needs were being met. Sixteen percent of survey participants responded that they have a need for this type of educational program that is not being met or only partially met, while 79% of survey participants responded that they do not have a need for this activity. Over 22% of respondents identified learning about history as a need that is not being met or only partially met, while 67% indicated not having a need for the activity.

Fitness The Department helps to meet the community’s fitness needs by providing fitness classes and fitness center membership services. Examples of fitness classes include Goat Yoga, Walking Club, and Chair Yoga. The most popular fitness classes include spinning, TRX, and Zumba. The Department also offers access to fitness activities through various fitness center membership opportunities. Fitness center membership types include individual adult, individual senior, and family, and vary for periods of time such as annual or 90-day memberships. As indicated in the Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Business Plan 2021, over the past few years, fitness class and membership revenue has increased as a direct result of the new gym facilities as well as an increase in the number and variety of group fitness classes offered. The COVID-19 pandemic had a negative effect on participation in these two areas during FY 20192020; however, both areas are now seeing a rebound in participation. One reason for the rebound was the team’s concerted effort to offer fitness programs outside, in its parks. The following charts were provided in the Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Business Plan 2021: Figure 1: Membership and Group Fitness Program Revenue

The Department tracks fitness programming data through a variety of tools (e.g., gym participant reports, Mindbody reports, program registration). The average number of gym members moved from 402 per month in FY 2017-2018 to 919 in FY 2018-2019 and then down to 340 in FY 2019-2020. This fluctuation between years showed tremendous growth starting in June of 2018, a peak of 1,199 members in July of 2019, and then a steady decline until the pandemic closed the facility in March of 2020. Membership averages have somewhat recovered since then, with 534 members in June of 2021. To continue the growth trajectory, the staff should review 2019’s success factors for repeatable growth strategies. Recreation Assessment | 2 December 2021

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The Village asked residents about specific fitness classes, including yoga, aerobics, Zumba, water exercise, and Pilates. Of the options available to respondents, yoga was ranked highest in overall community need with 31.4% of respondent indicating a need not met or partially met, while Pilates (28.9%) was ranked fifth, water exercise (27.5%) ranked sixth and aerobics/spinning (24%) ranked eight highest in need. The same participants also responded that they do not have a need for the activities of water exercise (71%) and Pilates (67%). Noteworthy, the response for water exercise (24%) represents the highest response of survey participants throughout all programs assessed (only equal to golf at 24%), indicating that needs are not being met at any level for this activity. This also represents a significantly higher level of need than the national average of 15%.

Life Skills As a community-based recreation provider, it is important to include life skills programming as part of a well-rounded menu of opportunities. The Department provides life skills programming for all ages of the population with programs that take place throughout the year. Examples of the programs offered by the Department in this program area include Grow With Us Experience, AARP Safe Driver Course, and Bake It On Wheels. Life skills related programs were not a significant area of study in the community survey for this Master Plan. A specific area of survey consideration was reading and writing. Approximately 4% of survey participants responded that they have a need for these types of programs that is not being met.

Seniors The Department provides senior programs for adults ages 65 and over throughout the year. Some of the program offerings include Game Day, Bingo, Senior Trips, and Social Hour. Seniors also participate in other Department offerings that are provided for their age group such as Senior Fitness Memberships. Based upon the community survey, approximately 29% of survey participants responded that they have senior/active program needs that are not being met or only partially met. Approximately, 62% of participants in the same survey responded that they do not have a need for senior programs. Senior or active adult programming was also the fifth most important program type for resident households and the most important non-sport program ranked, with 8.5% of residents indicating it as the most important program to their household. Recreation service providers throughout the nation are evolving to reduce focus on senior identified programs in response to interest and usage trends to both active adult and senior age groups. Active adult programming is increasingly being pursued by adults ages 45-65 for their programming needs due to the belief that senior programs are for “old people.” While senior specialized programming continues to be a regular offering throughout the field of parks and recreation, more attention is being placed expanding programmatic emphasis to accommodate active adult preferences. The Department should continue to monitor national trends and local Recreation Assessment | 2 December 2021

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interests in senior versus active adult programming and consider more intentionally separating the two programmatically.

Sports The Department provides sports programming for all ages throughout the year. Some programs include David Ensignia Tennis, WE Martial Arts, Super Soccer Stars, and pickleball. Sports are programmed through a variety of service delivery methods such as leagues, classes, and camps. Staff report that drop-in and non-programmed sport activities are popular with participants. The Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Business Plan 2021 described Suniland Park as the Village’s most active park. Survey responses indicate that all four of the most visited parks in the Village offer a majority of their activities and/or space to accommodate active recreation or sports. Analyzing total responses versus Village of Pinecrest residents indicates that more residents visit Pinecrest Community Center and the Village Green than Suniland and Evelyn Greer Parks, likely due to the later two parks’ location in the far southwestern area of the community. Village Green does not provide for lighted athletic fields. Sport related activities at the park include basketball courts, multipurpose fields, and batting cages. There is also lighting for nighttime sports activities at several park locations including Suniland, Evelyn Greer, Coral Pine and Flagler Grove parks. The Department facilitates many sport related activities and programs by renting its fields to outside sports organizations. The Department generates revenue from these rentals as reported in this chart from the Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Business Plan 2021: Figure 2: Facility Rental Revenue

Many different considerations related to the future of sport-related programming were researched as part of the community survey. Residents are also supportive of more tax dollars being spent for acquisition of land and development of sports-related facilities. Approximately 77% of survey participants responded in Recreation Assessment | 2 December 2021

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favor (e.g., very or somewhat supportive) of the Village to purchase land to develop sports fields, courts, and facilities. Approximately 78% of survey participants responded in favor of the Village developing additional athletic fields or courts. Village residents also indicated a strong willingness to prioritize additional tax dollars for acquisition for sports facilities (14.3% of all respondents that are Village residents) and development of sports facilities (9.5% of all respondents that are Village residents). This represents nearly 25% of Village residents indicating acquisition of land and development of sports facilities at the most important actions for the Village to undertake with their tax dollars to improve parks and recreation in the community. This is closely followed by 17% of Village residents indicating their top priority as access to water or Biscayne Bay (for kayaking or other water-related recreation) and 8.5% that support aquatic facilities as a top priority in terms of actions the Village to take to improve parks and recreation in the community. Several specific sport programs were researched as part of the Community Survey. Of these programs, the survey respondents indicated the greatest need for golf (29%), competitive swimming (23.8%), and pickleball (29%), basketball (21.5%), martial arts (17.8%), and soccer (16.5%), either with no needs met or only partially met. Sports programming has gained more attention across the country in recent years in areas of health, wellness, and equity, with many national movements currently underway to increase participation across all age groups and levels of ability. Further, certain sports, like golf and pickleball, have experienced significant growth in participation during the past three years, especially during the pandemic. Equally important is to note that several sport activities have a high portion of respondents with needs indicating that none of their need is being met. Table 1 identifies the top ten activities with the highest percent of need not being met at any level and an estimated number of residents in the Village with a need. Eight of the top ten are sports related activities. Table 1: Activities with Highest Percentage of Need Not Met Activity

Total Percent of Respondents with Need

Percent of Need Not Met

Estimated Number of Residents with Needs Not Met

Cricket

5.75%

92.35%

976

Competitive Swimming

24.68%

85.94%

3,900

Water Exercise

28.00%

85.71%

4,413

Volleyball

15.04%

85.31%

2,359

Water Safety/ Learn to Swim

16.23%

78.37%

2,339

Golf

32.49%

75.32%

4,499

Softball (Adult or Youth)

17.36%

73.68%

2,352

Gymnastics/Tumbling

12.22%

71.44%

1,605

Pilates

32.02%

68.49%

4,032

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Martial Arts

20.45%

63.03%

2,370

STEM The Department provides STEM programs for ages six to twelve throughout the year. Program examples include Bricks 4 Kidz, Mad Science of Miami, and CodeHER. STEM programs were not specifically researched in the community survey; however, some closely related programs that are commonly affiliated with life skills and educational programs were considered and analyzed in those core program areas.

3.0 Age Segmentation Age segment analysis reviews the distribution of the program offerings according to the age segments serviced. For the purposes of this assessment, age categories were delineated according to the following age structure: x

Early Childhood, ages 0 – 5 years

x

Youth, ages 6 – 12 years

x

Teen, ages 13 – 17 years

x

Adult, ages 18 – 64 years

x

Senior, ages 65+ years

The consultant team reviewed the Department’s registration-based program opportunities geared toward particular age groups. If a program spanned clearly across two age categories (e.g., ages 8 – 14 years), BerryDunn counted that section once in the youth category and once in the teen category. Special events typically service participants of all ages, and therefore were included in the all-ages category. The age distribution within program offerings is as follows:

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Figure 3: Pinecrest Age Segmentation

Pinecrest Age Segmentation

8.4%

8.4% 0-5 years 6-12 years

21.7%

13-17 years 18-64 years 42.2%

65+ years All ages

10.8% 8.4%

Figure 3 represents a fairly widespread offering of programs for different age groups, with most programming (42.2%) for ages 6 - 12 years. A large percentage of programming for this age group is common in the parks and recreation industry as youth and families look to their local recreation providers for safe, healthy, and fun activities. The teen category was observed to be a “spillover” recreation category rather than one that was specifically programmed. Although teens are able to attend the all ages programs and attend fitness classes, there were no programs designed for this target audience. This is consistent with input received during focus group interviews regarding a lack of teen focused programming. Similarly, two of the seven early childhood classes were for the specific age group; the other programs were designed for all ages. The same scenario was observed for adults; two of nine programs were designed for the adult age group. The caveat to this observation is the total number of fitness classes offered through Mindbody was not added to the total adult program category’s offerings. In summary, most of the enrollment-based courses in the program menu targeted youth ages 6 to 12 and seniors. The age segmentation analysis is one helpful method to review the Village’s programming related to the community demographics. Demographic data can be helpful to consider how programming efforts are aligned with the makeup of the community. The side-by-side comparison of the community’s population and enrollment-based program offerings in Figure 4 demonstrates three key age segments’ relationship between the population percentage and percentage of programs offered.

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Figure 4: Community Population and Enrollment-Based Program Offerings

Youth

Adult

Senior

24.7% of population

57.3% of population

18.1% of population

59.0% of programs

10.8% of programs

21.7% of programs

The segmentation review can be used to assess the extent to which each age group is being served. The segmentation does not necessarily need to mirror the community’s age demographic segmentation in an exact manner; however, an ongoing goal can be to balance the menu toward a reflection of the community makeup. As the Department considers opportunities for program expansion, Figure 4 can help identify target age segments for enhancements, additions, and/or innovations. Extending the enrollment-based programmatic reach to those age segments that have the highest spread between offerings and population is more likely to result in a higher potential of market capture (e.g., the adult category displays a current 46.5 percentage-point difference). While this is only one way to analyze programming, it is a very helpful tool to identify who the Department is serving. Other considerations need to be reviewed such as programming being provided by other local providers as well as community demand. Additionally, public engagement can be conducted on a regular basis by Department staff to gauge community interests in programming. During focus group meetings conducted as part of the parks and recreation master plan, programming specifically focused for young professionals was identified as a need. The age segmentation clusters all adults between the ages 18-64 as a single group but as future programming for adults is developed, specific sub-groups needs may be considered. An important consideration by Department staff is to avoid oversaturating the market with high quality products and services that are already supplied by other providers.

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4.0 Program Menu Program Inventory The following is a list of major program categories that park and recreation agencies throughout the country commonly provide. This list helps to identify if there are any common program areas not offered by an agency. Most agencies offer a majority of programs. In matching the Department’s inventory of programs against this list, a majority of the program areas, 62.2% are represented. (Red text represents programs not offered.) Active Adult Aquatics Arts Before/After School Biking Birthday Party Services Child Care Cooking Dance Day/School Break Camps E-Sports Early Childhood Environmental/Nature Extreme Sports Fitness

General Interest Golf Gymnastics/Tumbling Historical Programs Homeschool Horseback Riding Ice Skating/Hockey Language Arts Lifelong Learning Martial arts Music Open Gym Outdoor Adventure Pets Pickleball

Preschool Running/Walking Seniors Special/Community Events Specialty Camps Sports STEM/STEAM Summer Camp (day-long) Sustainability/Green Teen Tennis Theatre/Acting Therapeutic Recreation Trips Wellness

For comparison purposes, the consulting team reviewed the program category percentages against its database of park and recreation agencies nationwide. The comparison agencies’ average percentage of program categories was 64.5%, which is slightly higher than the Department’s 62.2%. The program categories depicted with red text represent opportunities for program menu expansion where aligned with community needs. When the program inventory is compared to public input, such as the input gathered from the community survey, gaps between the two can be identified. The following three examples are of note: x

Aquatic programs are not currently offered by the Department. Conversely, 27.5% of the community survey respondents indicate that their water exercise needs are not being met or only partially being met, 23.8% indicate that their competitive swimming needs are not being met, 26% indicate that swimming opportunities in a pool are not being met, and 15.8% indicate that their needs for water safety and swim lessons are not being met. These ratings indicate some of the higher needs for services across all surveyed areas. An important note is the difference in results between identified need and importance to households. Though aquatic-based activities are identified consistently as

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having higher needs by respondents, none of the water activities are in the top five choices of activities most important to households. Instead, Village residents identify pickleball, soccer, baseball, tennis and senior/active adult programming as most important to their household. x

Golf programs are not currently offered by the Department, while 29% of the community survey respondents indicate that their golf program needs are not being met or only partially met. What is important to note about this finding is that the gap does not necessarily mean that the Department should be the entity to fill the need. Instead, the Department can look for creative ways to partner with existing golf courses, for example, in order to help provide the service without facilitating the service internally. Similar to aquatic-based activities, golf has a higher identified need by respondents, but is a lower importance to households, therefore a lower priority.

x

Pickleball programs are not being directly organized by the Department; however, pickleball leagues and facilities are provided. Of all community survey respondents, 34.4% indicate that their pickleball program needs are not being met or only partially met. Like other communities across the country, pickleball demand is higher than supply. The trend has remained strong, and therefore continued efforts to meet the demand are recommended. Unlike aquatics and golf, Village residents identified pickleball as the most important sport to their household (15.5%), signally a high priority for the sport among residents.

Program Distribution Figure 5 captures the quantity of total registration-based programming offered by the Department during the year examined and depicts how the programming was distributed across core program area categories.

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Figure 5: Program Distribution

Program Distribution STEM 6%

Senior 4%

Life Skills 6%

Community Events 2%

Camps 32%

Fitness 9% Sports 11% Educational 15%

Cultural Arts 15%

The program distribution is another very helpful method to review the Department’s program menu. Nearly a third (32%) of the Department’s programs focus on camp related activities with the next largest quantity in cultural arts (15%) and educational (15%) programs. This assessment is a valuable tool when comparing to public input, such as the community survey for this master plan. Through this type of analysis, following findings have been identified: x

Community Events currently represent 2% of program offerings. Based upon the community survey conducted for the master plan, approximately 80% of survey participants responded that they are very supportive or somewhat supportive of the Department hosting more community-wide events. The Department should consider increasing the number of community events offered based on this analysis. Part of that consideration should also include the staff and fiscal resources needed to support the potential expansion. Additionally, over 53% of respondents identified their needs for attending a concert, fair or festival is not being met or only partially being met. This is the single highest ranked need for a leisure activity identified for the Village.

Fitness programs accounted for 9% of program offerings. Based upon community survey results, programs like water exercise (27.5%) and Pilates (29%) are the programs with the some of the highest response of survey participants indicating that their needs are not being met or only partially met. Fitness programming efforts by park and recreation agencies across the nation have grown significantly in recent years. The community survey did not address all fitness programming needs for the community and the Department should review if more fitness programs are needed. Recreation Assessment | 2 December 2021

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5.0 Life Cycle Analysis The life cycle analysis reviews the status of all program offerings across the Department based upon the stages of Introduction, growth, mature, and decline. This type of assessment helps to determine if Department staff need to develop new and more innovative programs, reposition programs that are in the decline stage, or continue with the current balance of life cycle stages. BerryDunn asked staff to categorize their core programs according to the life cycle stages; Table 2 outlines the description of those life cycle stages and the Department’s percentage of programs within each stage: Table 2: Life Cycle Stages Life Cycle Stage

Department Percentage

Description

Introduction

Getting a program off the ground, heavy marketing

23.5%

Growth

Moderate and interested customer base, high demand, not as intense marketing

58.8%

Mature

Steady and reliable performer, but increased competition

14.7%

Decline

Decreased registration

2.9%

Figure 6 depicts the percentage of programs in each life cycle stage. A healthy balance between the stages is optimal, with a majority of programs in the growth and mature stages. As a normal part of the planning cycle, there should always be programs in the introduction stage, which bring new and innovative programming to the menu. There will typically also be programs in the decline stage; those programs should be either repositioned or decommissioned. Figure 6: Life Cycle of Pinecrest Programs

Life Cycle of Pinecrest Programs 2.9% 14.7%

23.5%

58.8%

Introduction

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Growth

Mature

Decline

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The majority (82.3%) of programs in introduction and growth stages directly correlates with the exponential program growth that the Department has demonstrated over the past few years. It also indicates a vibrant and dynamic parks and recreation organization being responsive to community needs. Mature programs are important program offerings as they provide stable and established services for the community. A limited number of programs are identified as mature (14.7%). Typically agencies try to balance the number of programs in the growth and mature stages. The Department should simultaneously try to grow the number of mature programs to provide stability, while closely monitoring existing mature programs to make sure they do not move into the decline stage. A very low number or programs are in the decline stage at 2.9%, which represents great work by the Department to keep programs in the decline cycle at a very low level. All programs identified in decline are within the senior program area. It is common for senior programs to be in the decline cycle as more and more seniors are pursuing programs associated with active adult program areas. The Department should seek to continue to keep declining programs under 3%. Figure 7 provides a visual representation of all major program categories and their respective spread across life cycle stages for each program planning area. Figure 7: Life Cycle by Program Area

Life Cycle by Program Area Camps Community Event Cultural Arts Educational Fitness Life Skills Seniors Sports STEM

16

1 1

3

1

5

2

1 1 1

4

3

2

1 1

0%

20% Introduction

2

2 1

40% Growth

60% Mature

80%

100%

Decline

Individual program planning areas and/or program categories should strive to have programming that falls into all four life cycle stages, with the majority in the growth and mature stages (green and blue in Figure 7, for example). The program area demonstrating the most balance between the stages is seniors, with programs in all four stages. Cultural arts has a very stable base of mature, while infusing new programs into the introduction stage. The point-inRecreation Assessment | 2 December 2021

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time assessment should be reviewed annually as stages can shift; therefore, a recommendation for ongoing conversations by the Department regarding life cycle analysis is provided.

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6.0 Program Administration and Performance An organization can measure the extent to which its programs perform well by reviewing the program development process, participation, and finances. This section reviews these program performance areas as well as the current status of program performance tracking.

Program Development Processes Nearly all the Department’s programs are led by independent contractors. To provide structure and control of new program requests, a Program Request Form requires the applicant to outline the program’s planning details, such as program name, description, time/day details, materials, audience, and facility-based needs. The Director reviews each contractor’s request; if applicants are accepted, a contract outlining the scope of services is required. Some programs are led internally, such as Tech for Seniors and art classes, but these are an anomaly to the independent contractor standard. The Department’s staff expressed cautious interest in the idea of facilitating its own programming with Village employees, which was largely due to the inherent need for a larger quantity of employees for that model to work. The benefits of employee-led programming can be increased control over the service delivery and increased revenue; conversely, drawbacks can include the cost of a larger employee base. The small size of the recreation programming staff has been able to triple their offerings in a short amount of time because of the independent contractor model. The current independent contractor model is working for the Department. Future expansion could include a hybrid of these two delivery models, but would not be necessary for the Department’s continued success. Staff have intentionally tried to activate their parks more. They also feel they are seen as programming leaders in the region. When asked about their program planning efforts, staff indicated that they try to thoroughly assess one program area each season, and more often than not they comprehensively review participation, financial, and evaluation results prior to the development of the next season’s program plan. When asked what programming roadblocks they faced, staff unanimously indicated the lack of indoor and outdoor facility space was a barrier.

Participation The ultimate goal of any parks and recreation programming team is to increase the number of people it is reaching through its services. That programmatic reach can be measured through participation. Participation in Department programming increased between fiscal years (FY) 2017-2018 and 2018-2019 by 9.5%. The master plan survey identified that approximately 60% of Village residents have participated or a member of their household has participated in a Village lead program, class or sport in the last prior 12 months (2020-21). This is significant in two ways; first the national average is 33%

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for participation rates, and secondly, the 12-month period include a time when programming was highly impacted by pandemic restrictions. Figure 8: Participant Reach

Participant Reach 35,000 30,000 25,000 20,000 15,000 10,000 5,000 0 FY 2017-2018

FY 2018-2019

Program Participants

FY 2019-2020*

Gym Memberships

*FY 2019-2020 performance impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic

The total of 28,545 participants in FY2018-2019 surpassed the previous year by 2,726 participants – which represents significant growth. In that same year, the three program areas with the most participants were cultural arts (3,673), sports (431), and educational (200). The Pinecrest Dance Project is a primary reason the cultural arts participation was so high, averaging 263 participants each month it was offered. Similar growth was seen with gym memberships between the two years as well. Average member counts were 402 in FY2017-2018, 919 in FY2018-2019, and 340 in FY2019-2020. The majority of gym members (85.2%) were Village residents. Program participant residency did not appear to be tracked by staff.

Fiscal Performance A review of a six-year revenue history shows that recreation programs and memberships are the top-earning revenue categories. The Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Business Plan 2021 depicted the revenue by key revenue category, as shown in Figure 9.

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Figure 9: Revenue by Category

While Figure 9 allows the reader to track revenue by category over a span of six years, Figure 10 provides visualization of the total revenue breakdown, by each revenue category’s percentage of the whole in a single year, FY 2018-2019.

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Figure 10: FY 2018-2019 Total Revenue, by Category

FY 2018-2019 Total Revenue, by Category Field Rentals User League 1.9% Fees Personal 1.9% Trainer 2.5% Tennis Court Fees 6.9% Building Rentals 10.1%

Other Services 1.0%

Recreation Programs 37.5%

Camps 14.0%

Memberships 24.1%

Three primary categories; Recreation programs, memberships, and camps accounted for 75.6% of all the Department’s revenue. In addition to celebrating revenue, it is important to also consider the corresponding expenses. For example, the top revenue generator is recreation programs. As mentioned earlier in this report, most of the recreation programs are led by independent contractors who receive an agreed-upon percentage of the program fee. The net result is much more indicative of true fiscal performance. As a Department, the overall FY 2018-2019 fiscal performance was solid. The budget requested a 45.6% subsidy, and in actually only needed 31.5%. This alludes to the fact that expenses were controlled and revenue was higher than predicted. When focusing on developing revenue in the future, one concept to consider is the “ten more” concept. The idea breaks down growth in a seemingly small number—10—and challenges the staff to add just 10 more participants. To demonstrate, using a dollar-per-participant average of current pricing and participation, if the Department secured 10 more recreation program, membership, and camp participants, the potential increase in revenue could be $10,030. The master plan survey asked respondents to identify the number of events or programs facilitated by the Village that members of their household have participated in over the prior 12 months. Approximately 34% identified participation in only one program, while nearly 33% of Recreation Assessment | 2 December 2021

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households participated in 2-3 programs and 5% participated in 4-5 programs or events. These results show a high level of return participants to Village programs and events. From an accounting perspective, it may help to initiate a general ledger (GL) coding sequence that will allow for the tracking of independent contractor-led programs’ revenue and expenses separately from internally led. Additionally, the Budget Performance Report does not currently allow the recreation team to monitor program revenue and expenses by core program area. If the Department staff start leading more programs with employees as instructors, a shift in financial reporting will help the staff monitor the revenue and expenses (and subsequently the cost recovery) for those programs.

Performance Tracking The Department should be commended for its efforts to continuously track key performance indicators. The following are regularly reported through monthly reports: x

Program participation in enrollment-based recreation programs, fitness classes, and athletic partner teams

x

Total programs offered, monthly and in comparison to previous fiscal years

x

Fiscal performance, specific to Community Center revenue and expenses and athletic rentals

x

Program and events achievements

With such a good pulse on program performance, the Department staff easily provided the consulting team with inventory, participation, and financial data. Additionally, the data helped feed into the Department’s Annual Parks and Recreation Highlights 2020 Report, which featured park improvement accomplishments, anticipated capital improvements for the next FY, and key data, as depicted in Figure 11 below:

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Figure 11: Key Performance Indicators, 2020

These performance tracking and communication efforts are representative of industry best practices and should be continued into the future. The Department maintains a meticulous record of the number of participants in each program on a monthly basis. As the Department grows, and the quantity of programming increases, it will be helpful to develop enrollment tracking based on core program area. Internal trending can then be monitored according to those programming areas, which in turn helps with future program development and decisionmaking. Additional measurements to consider for future tracking include the number of unique program enrollees and the tenure of fitness members.

Marketing and Communications Upon reviewing the communication about its programs and assessing the programs’ marketing strategies, the consulting team identified opportunities for strengthening. The Department needs a comprehensive way for the residents to understand how the programs “work.” Specifically, how does a potential participant gain a clear understanding of the types of services that are offered, when they are offered, and how to participate? These answers are often provided through a printed program catalogue or guide. If the Department does not desire to create a guide, then the website content should be developed to help provide more detailed information. Agencies are starting to move away from the printed guides, and yet are developing alternative means for residents to understand all of what they have to offer. One example is the creation of “mini-guides” that provide highlights and teasers directing readers to the website for more information. Recreation Assessment | 2 December 2021

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The Department uses high-color and quality imagery to advertise its upcoming programs in a flyer format. Although visually appealing, there were details missing from these advertisements. The reader should understand what the program is about, when it will occur, who can participate, how to register based on the information on the flyer, and how to contact the Village regarding any special needs. The advertisement should communicate the core details of what is involved. If it is not possible to answer all the questions on the flyer, the provided link/website page should provide the detailed information in a clear and concise manner. Linking advertisements straight to the registration location generally does not provide the potential participant enough information to make an informed decision. To help ensure that the Department is communicating enough essential information, staff could conduct a website audit. Core questions to answer on every page of the website: x

Who can participate?

x

What is involved/will be taught?

x

When (e.g., date, time, length) is the activity?

x

Where is the activity (e.g., building, directions, signs)?

x

How to register and/or get more info? (i.e., who is teaching, identification of the contractor to clearly identify the partnership)

Participants and their family members depend on this type of information to make their participation and purchasing decisions. The Pinecrest community is highly-educated and therefore information-oriented; a website audit can help ensure that desire for information is satisfied. The master plan survey asked respondent to identify reasons or barriers that prevent the respondent or members of their household from participating in Village programs and events or visiting parks more often. Nationally one of the highest rated barriers is typically not knowing what is offered (35%) and not knowing locations (14%). For the Village of Pinecrest results indicated only 16.6% of respondents did not know what was offered and only 3% did not know locations of facilities, much lower than the national averages and an indication that the Village has done a good job in communicating information to residents. The programming outputs have increased so quickly, that the size of the marketing team has not had a chance to catch up. Additional support is needed to help build awareness and drive participation.

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7.0 Similar Providers The following section provides insight into providers of similar services in the area. The list examines a cross-section of the key leisure categories to provide a snapshot of the competitive landscape; therefore, it is not an exhaustive list of every public, private, and nonprofit leisure provider in the surrounding area. Table 3 is categorized by agency type and key service focus. Table 3: Similar Providers Agency Type

Name

Address

Public

Kings Creek Village Recreation Center

8333 SW 81st Ave, Miami, FL 33143

https://kcvamiami.org/

Recreation Center

Public

Continental Park

1000 SW 82 Avenue, Miami, FL 33156

miamidade.gov

Recreation Center

Public

Village of Palmetto Bay

9705 East Hibiscus Street, Palmetto Bay, FL 33157

https://www.palmettobay-fl.gov/

Recreation Rooms

Public

City of South Miami

5800 SW 66th St, South Miami, FL 33143

https://www.southmiamifl.gov/

Community Center

Public

Miami-Dade County Parks, Recreation and Open Spaces

275 NW 2nd Street, Miami, FL 33128

https://www.miamidade.gov/

Zoo Miami, Deering Estate, marinas, golf, beaches

Nonprofit

Banyan Street Community Center

17400 SW 97th Ave STE 110, Miami, FL 33157

www.banyanstreetcommunitycenter.co m/

Group, family, and individual programs and activities in the areas of vocational enrichment; mental health services; and positive/hea

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Service Focus

Website

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Agency Type

Name

Address

Service Focus

Website

lthy social activities YMCA

South Dade YMCA Family Center

YMCA

9355 SW 134th St, Miami, FL 33176

https://ymcasouthflorida.org/location/s outh-dade-ymca-family-center/

Community Center

Alper JCC Miami

11155 SW 112th Ave, Miami, FL 33176

https://www.alperjcc.org/pages/healthfi tness/

Community Center

Nonprofit

Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden

10901 Old Cutler Rd, Coral Gables, FL 33156

fairchildgarden.org

Botanical Garden

Nonprofit

Montgomery Botanical Center

11901 Old Cutler Rd, Coral Gables, FL 33156

montgomerybotanical.org

Botanical Garden

Public

Deering Estate

deeringestate.org

Botanical Garden

Public

Pinecrest Gardens

11000 Red Road Pinecrest, Florida 33156

https://www.pinecrestgardens.org/

Botanical Garden

Private

Miami Strength and Fitness Club 24/7

8855 SW 131st St, Miami, FL 33176

http://miamistrengthandfitnessclub.co m/

Fitness

Private

SoMi Fitness

6855 SW 81st St, Miami, FL 33143

http://www.somifitness.com/

Fitness

Private

Antidote Wellness Labs

11423 S Dixie Hwy, Pinecrest, FL 33156

https://www.antidotewellnesslabs.com/

Fitness

Private

Thump Gym and Fitness

Greenery Mall, 7740 N Kendall Dr, Miami, FL 33156

https://www.thumpgym.com/

Fitness

Private

Peak 360 CrossFit

6802 SW 81st St, Miami, FL 33143

http://www.peak360fitness.com/

Fitness

Private

GRIT Miami

6895 SW 81st St, Miami, FL 33143

http://gritmiami.com/

Fitness

16701 SW 72nd Ave, Miami, FL 33157

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Agency Type

Name

Address

Private

Paradise Gym

12900 SW 89th Ct, Miami, FL 33176

https://paradisegymmiami.com/

Fitness

Private

Omni Athletic Performance + Recovery Center

13111 SW 85th Avenue Rd, Miami, FL 33156

https://omniathletecenter.com/

Fitness

Private

Orangetheor y Fitness

8511 SW 136th St, Miami, FL 33156

https://www.orangetheory.com

Fitness

Private

Body20 Pinecrest

12511 S Dixie Hwy, Pinecrest, FL 33156

http://www.body20.com/pinecrest

Fitness

Private

The Athletic Compound

8100 SW 81st Dr Suite 135, Miami, FL 33143

http://theathleticcompound.com/

Fitness

Private

K Martial Arts taekwondo

15365 S Dixie Hwy #7, Palmetto Bay, FL 33157

http://www.kculturecenter.com/

Martial Arts

Private

Abrakadoodl e Inc

11300 SW 81st Rd, Pinecrest, FL 33156

http://abrakadoodle.com/

Private

School of Rock

5701 SW 72nd St, Miami, FL 33143

https://locations.schoolofrock.com/cora lgables

Music

Private

Superior Academy of Music

7734 N Kendall Dr, Miami, FL 33156

http://www.superioracademyofmusic.c om/

Music

Private

Lessons In Your Home

10205 SW 77th Ct, Miami, FL 33156

http://www.lessonsinyourhome.net/

Music

Private

Avesani Voice Studio

8101 SW 136th St, Miami, FL 33156

http://avesanivoicestudio.com/

Music

Private

All Star Party World

8770 SW 131st St, Miami, FL 33176

http://www.allstarpartyworld.com/

Parties

Private

The Slime Factory Powered by Maddie Rae

8888 SW 136th St STE 407A, Miami, FL 33176

https://www.theslimefactory.com/

Children's amusement center

Private

Just 4 Fun

5701 Sunset Dr #355, South Miami, FL 33143

http://www.just4funparks.com/

Children's amusement center

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Service Focus

Website

Art

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Agency Type

Name

Address

Service Focus

Website

Private

Miami Acting Company

16201 SW 95th Ave, Miami, FL 33157

http://miamiactingco.org/index.html

Theatre/acti ng

Private

Miami Children's Theater

11155 SW 112th Ave, Miami, FL 33176

https://miamichildrenstheater.com/

Theatre/acti ng

Private

AV Kids Miami

8770 SW 131st St, Miami, FL 33176

http://www.avkidsmiami.com/

Theatre/acti ng

Private

Area Stage Company

5701 Sunset Dr Suite 286, South Miami, FL 33143

https://www.areastage.org/

Theatre/acti ng

Private

Dance Empire of Miami

8853 SW 132nd St, Miami, FL 33176

http://www.danceempire.com/

Dance

Private

Miami Dance Collective

9549 S Dixie Hwy, Pinecrest, FL 33156

9549 S Dixie Hwy, Pinecrest, FL 33156

Dance

Private

Miami Dance Project

8619 S Dixie Hwy, Pinecrest, FL 33156

http://www.miamidanceproject.com/

Dance

Private

Jill Mallory Studio of Dance

13270 SW 87th Ave, Miami, FL 33176

http://www.jillmallorydance.com/

Dance

Private

True Movement Dance Studio

8854 SW 129th Terrace Suite B, Miami, FL 33176

http://www.tmdancestudio.com/

Dance

Private

Pinecrest Dance Project

5855 SW 111th St, Miami, FL 33156

http://www.pinecrestdanceproject.com/

Dance

Private

Scarlett's Center Stage

8929 SW 129th St, Miami, FL 33176

http://www.scarlettscenterstage.com/

Dance

Private

Fred Astaire Dance Studios Pinecrest

14109 S Dixie Hwy, Palmetto Bay, FL 33176

https://www.fredastaire.com/pinecrest/

Dance

Private

MC Dance Miami

http://www.mcdancemiami.com/

Dance

14850 SW 67th Ave, Miami, FL 33158

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Agency Type

Name

Address

Service Focus

Website

Private

DanzartEcole

13821 S Dixie Hwy, Palmetto Bay, FL 33158

http://www.danzart-ecole.com/

Dance

Private

Maria Verdeja School of the Arts

8871 SW 132nd St, Miami, FL 33176

https://www.mvsastudios.com/

Dance

Private

AquaKids Inc

6855 SW 152nd St, Palmetto Bay, FL 33157

http://aquakidsswim.com/

Swim

Private

British Swim School of South Miami LA Fitness

5701 Sunset Dr #134, South Miami, FL 33143

https://britishswimschool.com/greatermiami/south-miami-lafitness/

Swim

Private

Gulliver Prep Swim Club and Swim School

12595 Red Rd, Coral Gables, FL 33156

https://www.gulliverprep.org/athletics/c ommunity-programs/

Swim

Private

Ocaquatics Swim School Tropical

4950 SW 75th Ave, Miami, FL 33155

https://www.ocaquatics.com/

Swim

Private

Ocaquatics Swim School Kendall

13408 SW 131st St, Miami, FL 33186

https://www.ocaquatics.com/

Swim

With more than 11 fitness provers in the immediate area, it is recommended that the Department continue to meet the unmet fitness needs of the community, while taking care to not compete any further in the existing fitness center market. Some participants prefer a community-based fitness center, and for that reason the Department should continue providing a fitness center and classes. Additionally, group fitness classes such as yoga and Pilates were identified unmet needs and therefore represent programs that the Department should expand. For the similar reasons, additional dance programs should only be considered if there is more demand for a specific dance mode than what is being provided by the private sector. Similar providers can be seen as partners in service provision; therefore, brining providers together to discuss how the Department can strengthen total service offerings in a particular area can be a huge community benefit. For example, if the theatre companies are struggling with access to performance space, perhaps the Department could help identify possible solutions for that group of recreators.

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Partnership Opportunities An enhanced partnership with Miami-Dade County Parks, Recreation and Open Spaces could provide enhanced therapeutic recreation services to the Village residents, The County’s completed Disability Services Master Plan identifies A.D. Barnes Park, located approximately seven miles or 20-30-minute drive, as a primary location for County Disability Services Programs. Kendall Indian Hammocks Park, located approximately six miles or 20-25-minute drive from the Village is also identified by the County as a future recommended Disability Services Program location. Additionally, County owned and managed aquatic facilities are also located at A.D. Barnes Park and proposed for Kendall Indian Hammocks Park. Currently students and other residents must travel a great distance, typically more than 30-minute drive time to existing aquatic facilities. A partnership with Miami-Dade County and/or adjacent municipalities may be best suited to explore meeting local needs for aquatics. Continued work to strengthen the relationship with the Miami-Dade School Board is recommended. Joint Use Agreement (JUAs) have traditionally allowed for public access to school sites within the Village, however, two JUAs recently lapsed at Miami Palmetto Senior High School and Palmetto Elementary School which reduces the open spaces and recreation facilities generally available to the public in the Village. A renewed effort to secure new JUAs with the School Board for these sites and to include access to indoor gym and meeting space is recommended. Shared use of community spaces are typically well-supported by residents. As the Department continues to grow, additional partners can be found in local nonprofit groups, churches, and private leisure service providers. Collaborative and partner-based relationships have been seen to strengthen communities across the country – sometimes generating in-kind support and fiscal sponsorship.

Duplication of Services In general, the consultant team did not identify a significant amount of duplication of services between the Village and other providers. Though there is a heavy concentration in fitness and dance, there are still areas of the market not being served and regular review of program performance helps to assure the Department assess and modifies programming to meet market needs. The duplication of service that stands out the most to the consulting team is between the Department and Pinecrest Gardens. The Village-run entities are both offering a number of similar programs and events. The Village staff need to continue to find synergies and work collaboratively to avoid any potential competition with each other. Internal efficiencies can be achieved, and subsequent diversification and expansion of program variety attained, if the teams work together to provide leisure services to the community. One key efficiency

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opportunity is to merge the teams together under the leader of one director-level position. The unified team would be stronger and set up for more collaborative success.

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8.0 User Fee Analysis Per the request of the Department staff, the user fee analysis in this study was specific to three key areas: tennis, gym memberships, and fitness classes.

Tennis The Department offers tennis out of a facility called Coral Pine Park Tennis Center. Open from 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. daily, the lighted facility has six courts and has a staff person present during all open hours. Due to demand and the additional expense to operate lights, pricing increases for night reservations. Eight pre-approved tennis professionals pay a yearly permit fee to be an instructor and pay a higher court rental rate than community members. The amount the pros pay covers the cost for both their entrance and their adult or youth student. If every court was rented each hour the facility was open, at the basic hourly rate, the daily income would be $366. The cost to pay a staff person to monitor the desk during that duration, assuming $15 per hour, is $210 (not including taxes or any benefits). This does not include costs for senior administrative staff, supplies, utilities, facility cleaning and maintenance, ongoing maintenance, and reserves for repair and replacement. It is unrealistic to think the facility could be booked to capacity on a daily basis; it is also prudent to recognize that some of the timeslots will be used by a pro, and will therefore command a higher hourly rate. According to MyTennisHQ.com, the average public tennis court one-hour admission fee is zero to $10 per hour. Local research resulted in an average of about $3.50 per hour for youth and $5.89 for adults per hour. The important factor to remember about memberships to a court-based facility is the question of equity and access. Residents who pay a membership fee will likely have expectations or priority reservations and/or perks for their membership commitment. At the same time, a membership structure deters from a sense of community and access to recreation for all residents.

Gym Memberships Gym memberships are sold as a means to use strength and conditioning equipment in a fitness center setting. Because of the way they are named, gym memberships may get confused with gymnasium memberships. Staff should monitor residents’ understanding of the term, to help ensure it is clear for potential buyers. Terminology is often regional in nature, and therefore this may not be a problem at all for the local community. The average annual gym membership in the United States is $507 for the first year and $479 succeeding years. Rates are often higher the first year due to enrollment fees. Publicly managed gyms often serve the community as a lower-cost option than private gyms. The Department’s annual resident gym membership rate is $428 for an individual adult. The monthly resident fee is $37.45, or $449.40 for 12 months. It is typical for fee structures to promote Recreation Assessment | 2 December 2021

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payment in full for annual memberships, due to the decreased administrative costs to manage the membership on an annual basis. When comparing pricing, it is important to account for the amenities included in the membership. For example, a Life Time Fitness membership will include access to services such as lap swim and child care. BerryDunn suggests the Department staff maintain a list of pricing at all similar-sized and similar-equipped gyms within a 10-minute drive. On an annual basis, the staff should review that list and determine where it would like to land on that pricing spectrum. We generally find that public providers prefer to be lower on the spectrum. Regardless of overall price point, there is an opportunity to adjust the rate charged to members who wish to pay on a monthly basis. From an administrative perspective, the increased fee to pay monthly should account for the additional administrative costs to manage the payment plans as well as the ACH fees incurred. Currently the Department charges an increase of 5% for monthly processing. Benchmarked against three other public gym membership structures range anywhere from 9.09% in an Illinois example, 10.57% in Ohio, and 20% in Florida. The Department should consider this opportunity to better-align its monthly gym membership fees to account for the administrative costs incurred.

Fitness Classes The fitness class prices are structured on a per-class basis, with a discount if participants commit to a 10-class package. Zumba classes are $16 for a single class, $150 for 10; yoga $25 and $215; and, all other fitness classes $20 and $175. The discount structure is a bit curious, as the Zumba package is a 6.25% discount, yoga 14%, and other fitness classes 12.5%. The consulting team suggests that fitness class pricing be consistently packaged, using a straight discount percentage across class types. Fitness providers across the nation have differing opinions regarding whether fitness classes should be included with gym membership pricing or if the gym membership price should remain separate from the fitness class price. In addition to these two pricing structures, some fitness providers offer a hybrid package, where a menu of fitness classes are included with the gym membership and other (sometimes more specialized) fitness classes are offered separately. In this option, some providers offer the additional classes at a discounted rate for members. It is the consulting team’s opinion that the two services often have two separate markets and therefore should have separate pricing models. The caveat to this opinion is that the Department should offer a structure that differentiates itself from the surrounding providers, so that the needs of a variety of fitness users are met through both public and private entities. The Department uses a third-party service called Mindbody to help administer the fitness classes. While the Mindbody website has the Pinecrest Parks and Recreation logo, name, and address at the top, additional attention should be given to the informational content on the site. The home page should have an introductory paragraph that describes the services and the relationship between Mindbody and the Department. Additionally, there should be list of all fitness class choices available with corresponding descriptions. A calendar would also help the Recreation Assessment | 2 December 2021

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prospective buyer; providing a visual look at when the classes are offered throughout a given week or month helps the buyer plan their workouts. The sales side of the website appears to be clear and efficient.

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9.0 Community Needs While some of the community needs survey findings are woven throughout this assessment, the following key programmatic findings highlight specific observations and opportunities for the Department’s consideration: x

Pilates and Yoga were two fitness class categories that respondents indicated they had an unmet need (need not met and only partially met) for (29% and 31.4% respectively) and both were identified as fairly high in importance to households by respondents. This response is something the Department can address fairly quickly and easily by examining its current fitness class offerings and the methods of communicating those offerings. Unlike other unmet needs, the fitness class structure is already established and space to hold the classes already exists.

x

When combined, water-based programs had a high percentage of respondents that indicated their needs were not met. Water exercise (27.5%), competitive swim (23.8%), and water safety/learn to swim (15.8%), and swimming in pools (26.1%) are programs with unmet needs that all center on the availability of pools. Some recreation agencies enter into cooperative agreements with public schools, their county, YMCA’s, and sometimes private swim clubs to provide water access to the community. Joint ventures could include shared use and/or shared cost to build. Currently Gulliver Upper Prep provides a 10-lane 50 meter competition lap pool while Gulliver Prep Marian Krutulis Pre-K -8th Campus provides a 6-lane 25 yard lap pool.

x

Village residents indicated that pickleball was the most important program, selected as a first choice for 15.5% of all residents with an estimated 2,712 residents identifying a need that is not met or only partially met.

x

Baseball was rated as a first choice on the importance rating scale for 20.5% of all survey respondents, however, when viewing only Village of Pinecrest residents’ responses, the rating drops to 12.5% and third place of most important sports or programs, behind pickleball (15.5%) and soccer (13%).

x

Senior and active adult programs were consistently identified as a top five most important program by all survey respondents with a slightly greater importance rating by Village of Pinecrest residents’ respondents only. An estimated 2,986 residents have a need for senior or active adult programming that is not being met or only partially being met. Staff indicated that while their reach to this demographic is growing, they would like to encourage more participation for the age group.

x

Of the 34% of respondents who had a need for golf, a high percentage (32.5%) indicated their need was not met or only partially met, representing approximately 4,499 residents. While it is not realistic for the Department to consider entering the golf business, there could be potential partnerships established to help meet those residents’ needs.

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x

Several sports and programs have a high proportion of need that is not being met on any level. Cricket, competitive swimming, water exercise and volleyball all have over 80% of identify need not being met in any level. For an example, of the 5.8% of residents that did have a need for cricket, 5.3% indicated their need was not met. This translates to approximately 967 residents who have a need for cricket. While the amount of green space required for a cricket pitch is rather high, and space is at a premium in Pinecrest, it would be prudent to account for this amenity in future park development plans.

x

Concerts, fairs, and festivals were identified as the second most important leisure activity to survey respondents with a slight increase to 10.4% of all Village resident respondents indicating it as the most important activity to their household. Approximately 53.5% of all respondents identified a need for activity that is not being met or only partially met. Additionally, going to the movies was indicated a partly met or not met need by 29.2% of respondents. The Department should explore the current special events in tandem with Pinecrest Gardens to identify additional event possibilities for the community. Different music genres, cultural celebrations, and movies in the park are suggested.

x

Kayaking, canoeing, and paddle boarding were identified as a partly met or unmet need by nearly 50% of survey respondents. With such proximity to water, additional ways to help provide access to water should be explored. For example, local launches, beach events, or organized trips to beaches could be considered. This initiative would be supported by the survey results showing that 17% of Village residents were willing to fund access to water / Biscayne Bay with tax dollars. An estimated 5,575 Village residents have a need for kayaking, canoeing, etc. that is not being met on any level.

x

Additional leisure activities that could be added or expanded with current special event offerings include: going to theater with a not met or partially met need of 42%; and dining out (41%). Dinning out was also identified as a top five most important activity by respondents.

x

Skateboarding and adventure recreation (rock climbing, cable ski, etc.) are activities that have a high proportion of need that is not being met at any level. For skateboarding 85% of the need is concentrated as not being met while 80% of adventure recreation. This represents a need by approximately 2,526 and 4,124 Village residents, respectively.

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10.0 Recommendations Recommendations were woven throughout the report and are also summarized in this section.

Program Menu x

Review the program menu’s distribution on an annual basis and refine offerings as needed

x

Develop programs to reach underserved groups, including teens, young adults, and seniors

x

Consider offering courses instructed in languages other than English

x

Establish short-, mid-, and long-term goals that respond to the key community needs identified in Section 9

x

Review the success factors that contributed to gym membership growth in 2019 to identify repeatable growth strategies

Administration x

Continue to measure key performance indicators regularly and review internally to identify needed adjustments or trends.

x

Develop enrollment tracking based on core program area

x

Consider adjusting monthly gym membership fees to account for the administrative costs incurred

x

Consider adjusting fitness class package pricing to a consistent discount percentage across all class types

x

Account for additional staff resources to support new program growth

x

Consider modifying the GL structure to allow for focused tracking of program area and contractor-led performance

Marketing and Communication x

Consider developing a seasonal program catalogue/guide or an alternative means for residents to understand all of what the Department offers

x

Communicate more core details of what is involved in a program on its advertisement

x

Conduct a website audit, answering the “who, what, when, where, why, and how” for each service

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The information discovered through these analyses and subsequent recommendations warrant detailed conversations and considerations by the Department and Village. Some changes will be easy and straight forward; others may involve extensive thought regarding the Department’s and Villages’ service delivery philosophy. Without question, the Village’s concierge-based service approach should guide all program-related decisions.

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APPENDIX

B

Village of Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Master Plan Operational Assessment Overview The Parks and Recreation Master Plan process included an assessment of operations and maintenance practices for the Department. The process encompassed a review of Department documents such as the organization chart, budget documents, review of the Village’s Strategic Plan, website review, monthly reports, policy and practices review, meetings with the Director and Parks Superintendent, and a series of employee focus groups. The Assessment included the following elements: x x x x x x

Mission and Vision review and development of Organizational Values Alignment with the Village’s Strategic Plan Summary of employee meetings Ideas for strengthening operations Connection of operations to CAPRA standards Recommendations for the future

Mission, Vision, and Values Before the development of the Parks and Recreation Master Plan, the Department reviewed its mission and vision statements, as follows: Mission: Pinecrest Parks and Recreation strives to provide exceptional facilities, services and programs that enhance the quality of life for all residents through dedicated customer service, community engagement and enriching experiences. Vision: Be the leader in providing parks and recreation opportunities creating a better life for all. The mission describes the Department’s purpose while the vision describes the Department’s aspiration. Being the leader in providing parks and recreation opportunities requires a commitment to continuously strengthening operations. The goal of the Operational Assessment is to provide recommendations for the Department’s aspiration as a leader in providing parks and recreation opportunities. Values: As part of the Operational Assessment, staff members completed an exercise to determine which values are most important to the employees. Values describe the organizational culture, or the way things are done. The values that received the most votes include: x

Team oriented: We are committed to working together collaboratively and in coordination with one another in a respectful way.

x

Helping others: We shall be mindful of keeping others’ needs in mind and endeavor to assist others when needed.

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x

Integrity: We will act honestly and demonstrate a consistent adherence to strong moral and ethical principles and values. In ethics, integrity is regarded as the honesty and truthfulness of one's actions.

x

Communication: We will be responsive to one another through openness and transparency, and we will do our best to keep fellow staff members informed when our decisions impact others.

x

Community: We work to connect and engage the Pinecrest community with enriching and healthy opportunities and experiences, with an overall goal of improving the quality of life of our residents.

The values can become a dynamic part of organizational life. Various organizational processes such as recruitment and hiring processes, orientation programs, reward and recognition, and performance feedback should all align with the Department’s values. The values play an important part in the development of a wellͲdefined organizational culture.

Alignment with the Village’s Strategic Plan The Village adopted a 2021Ͳ2022 Strategic Plan in June of 2021. The future direction of Pinecrest Parks and Recreation should align with the Village’s future direction. The Strategic Plan includes seven key outcome areas; an assessment of the Department’s alignment in each outcome area is as follows:

x

Organizational Excellence and Financial Stability: The Department works toward continuously strengthening operations, which is the emphasis of this Operational Assessment. The Department already performs at a high level, but aspires to even greater organizational excellence through its efforts to achieve national accreditation through the CAPRA process. As for Financial Stability, the Department emphasizes continued growth of earned revenues and has a goal for the Community Center to operate on a breakͲeven basis.

x

Secure and Safe Community: Park activation and facility use contribute to a safe community. In addition, the Department plays an integral role in following COVIDͲ19 protocols.

x

Residential Character and Community Enhancement: The Community Center and vibrant parks contribute to Residential Character and Community Enhancement.

x

Recreation and Infrastructure: One of the tenets of the Recreation and Infrastructure outcome includes the continuation of providing high standards of park development, as well as planning for future, growing demands for services.

x

Cultural Value: The services offered by Parks and Recreation play a significant role in the Village’s ability to improve the amount and variety of culture through programs and events, which results in enhanced community interaction and enrichment.

x

Environmental Sustainability: Parks and recreation departments can have a significant impact on a community’s commitment to sustainable practices. This includes ongoing use of vehicles and equipment, water and utility use, use of chemicals, and many others. Pinecrest Parks and Recreation understands the importance of sustainable practices and the Department’s impact on the environment.

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x

Transportation and Pedestrian Mobility: Parks and recreation facilities are located throughout the Village. The Department can play an important role in promoting walking and biking through the development of safe connections among the many park sites.

Employee Meeting Summary Several meetings were held to gain employees’ perspectives of operational areas such as internal support, organizational structure, challenges, process improvements, and staff training opportunities. Individual meetings included the Director and Parks Superintendent. In addition, six focus group meetings were facilitated with Community Center, Parks, and Administrative staff. The following provides a summary of employee comments. Overall The employees are a highly spirited group that work well together, collaborate, and support each other. The demand for services continues to grow, which creates a strain on the system — particularly related to staffing numbers and the ability to offer programs with limited space. The staff have a significant amount of respect for the Director. The staff greatly appreciate his leadership, openͲmindedness, and welcoming approach. Employees feel they have a voice. Employees are very positive, passionate, and committed. According to one staff member, the Department “just seems to always hire nice people.” The Department has become more professional in its operational and service delivery approach. In addition, the Department’s leadership encourages employees to seek certifications, attend conferences, and develop skills. The Department is committed to working toward its vision of creating a better life for all. Organizational Culture The employees do not have an understanding of organizational culture. While no wellͲdefined culture exists, the working environment appears to be very good, based on employee comments. However, the employees had a difficult time describing the culture. Some words mentioned include: teamͲoriented (most frequently mentioned word), tight nit, feels like a family, professional, and flexible. Also noted was responsiveness to community needs. From the Parks team perspective, employees appreciate being able to leave their jobs at work, not taking their work home, and not feeling stressed. On the other hand, there is some level of pressure felt among Community Center staff, partly as a result of revenue goals.

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Challenges The most frequently mentioned challenge was having sufficient space for programming and storage. Demand for program and services continue to grow, as does the community. Staffing was the next most frequently mentioned challenge in two areas: x x

Recruiting and retaining partͲtime staff. Having sufficient number of staff throughout the Department. Several staff in all divisions mentioned this as a concern, particularly as a result for continued growth in the demand for services.

Challenges also included having sufficient financial resources, particularly in light of the impact of COVIDͲ19, as well as the increase in the minimum wage. In addition to these areas, CAPRA was mentioned as another challenge, as a result of the extensive amount of time required to successfully show evidence of meeting the accreditation standards. Additional or New Positions As for new positions, many employees mentioned the need for a Community Center facility manager, and/or a deputy director position. Another suggestion was the creation of a position between the Park Superintendent and Park Specialists. Some staff members mentioned that it is difficult for the Parks Superintendent to take care of everything and oversee the work of two Park Specialists and 20 Park Service Aids. In addition, there were many comments about the need for marketing support. Internal Communication Internal communication was mentioned as needing improvement. The consulting team hears about the need to improve internal communication in every organization it works with, so those comments are not unusual. Some employees suggested the need to improve communication and teamwork between that the Community Center and Parks Division staff, or in other words, reduce the silos. CAPRA includes a standard for internal communications, requiring agencies to have a documented internal communication system. Resources Resources, including technology, office and program supplies, equipment, and vehicles were deemed to be satisfactory, although the Community Center staff mentioned the need for a vehicle to use for daily travel. The Park Specialists mentioned the need for equipment and power tools, such as a fork lift to help lift/load heavy equipment for special events. As mentioned previously, labor resources were mentioned as a Departmental need.

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Financially, a feeling exists that hourly wages for partͲtime staff are too low; as a result, some staff hired for partͲtime jobs leave for better paying fullͲtime positions. In addition, some fullͲtime employees believe their pay is too low as compared to other agencies. One employee mentioned a suggestion of adhering to CDC information related to COVIDͲ19 cleanliness standards. According to the employee, the CDC states that there is a 1 in 10,000 chance of contracting COVID from surfaces. Yet employees are tasked with regularly cleaning surfaces. Process Improvements Processing membership refunds was mentioned as an onerous process as it includes too many steps. Also mentioned were difficult purchasing policies; for example, staff do not have access to a credit card. Another process improvement to note includes doubleͲbookings for rentals and programs. However, this occurs on an infrequent basis. Marketing and brand awareness also needs improvement, according to employees. One of the key outcomes associated with the Village’s strategic plan includes environmental sustainability practices. This appears to be an area that can be operationalized throughout the Department. One recommendation for creating a systematic approach to sustainable practices is to complete a sustainable practice audit of the Department. Relationships with other Departments Relationships with other departments such as public works, finance, human resources, police, and fire seem to work fairly well. Employees generally feel as though they receive good support, though one focus group mentioned limitations with the support they receive from other Village Departments. Additionally, one employee group mentioned a disconnect between the Department and Village Manager’s office. Training and Development Employees mentioned that they are financially responsible for attending conferences, while other agencies compensate their employees. While training opportunities exist, sufficient financial resources are not allocated for training, certifications, or licenses. Staff members at the Aide level feel as though they know what they are supposed to be doing. The Daily Duties document was mentioned as being an effective tool. Most employees feel their job orientation was effective. Supervisors take the time to provide onͲtheͲjob training to their employees. Most learned from longer tenured employees who did a good job explaining job functions. Job training could be more formalized. Given the Department’s size, employees recognize the lack of promotional opportunities, which is an additional challenge for the Department.

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One employee mentioned it would be helpful to have a training program about child supervision as this staff person was in a situation of having to oversee children and was not quite sure how to handle the responsibility.

Strengthening Operations Staffing As mentioned previously in the report, many staff mentioned the need for a position to oversee the Community Center. Having one position supervising the entire operation of a community center is a typical form of structure. Currently, four key community center positions report to the Department Director. Having one person in charge creates a better opportunity for the Director to spend more time on strategic, rather than tactical tasks. One of the most significant areas of growth in the park and recreation industry centers on developing inͲ house marketing expertise. Currently, the Parks and Recreation Department relies on Village staff to assist with marketing, communication, and promotional activities. Most agencies the size and scale of Pinecrest Parks and Recreation have a dedicated marketing staff person. Allocating resources toward the development of marketing could start as a partͲtime position, evolving to fullͲtime as responsibilities and demands for marketing continue to grow. Marketing interns can also add support. During the employee interviews, several employees commented about the large scope of the Park Superintendent’s job and how difficult it is to manage two fullͲtime Park Specialists and approximately 20 partͲtime Aides. It may be helpful to have the two Park Specialists take on additional supervisory responsibilities to allow the Superintendent to focus on strategic direction. Currently, the Department has 14 fullͲtime employees. Using the NRPA Park Metrics database of cities, towns and villages that have a population of 15,000 to 25,000, 56 agencies from around the country have included their data in the database. The following metrics pertain to staffing levels:

Low 25% quartile

Median

Upper 75% quartile

Number of fullͲtime employees

9.5

14

18.5

Number of nonͲfull time employees

18

37

100

Pinecrest’s fullͲtime staffing number matches the median number of 14. However, when adding in the number of nonͲfull time employees, Pinecrest has 25 nonͲfull time employees, which is closer to the lower 25% quartile of reporting agencies. For an agency at the median, the total number of fullͲtime and nonͲfull time employees is 51. Pinecrest has 39. However, it is important to note that these numbers do not indicate agency’s level of responsibility related to number of programs, facilities, and park acreage. In addition, the number of hours for nonͲfull time employees is not quantified in this category. Therefore, it is difficult to compare these numbers as some of this employee may work 10 hours a week and others 30 hours a week.

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Currently, mowing in all of the parks is a contracted service. Staff members are currently reviewing this possibility to research the costs and benefits of contract versus inͲhouse maintenance. The maintenance of athletic fields is one of the most critical job responsibilities of the Parks Division. Creating methods to measure athletic users’ satisfaction toward the quality of maintenance would be a best practice. Recreation program instruction is also a contracted service. As programs continue to grow, consider complementing contractual instructors with inͲhouse partͲtime staff instructors for key program areas, in order to provide the Department with additional quality control. This will also necessitate the need for an additional fullͲtime programming position at some point in the future.

Reporting The Department completes a monthly report process to document progress of Department performance as well as the divisions of the Department, including fitness, parks, and programs and events. This represents a good practice, keeping the Village and Department employees informed of organizational results. The Department’s monthly report focuses on participant numbers and financials. The Divisional reports include financial results, registrant/membership numbers, challenges, projects, employee success stories, and other categories. It may be useful to have comparison information included in the reports, in order to provide some level of context to the results and demonstrate yearͲtoͲyear performance. This information can be integrated into the Highlights report, which serves as the Department’s annual report. A comprehensive Staff Manual was developed in April, 2021. The manual includes detailed information from a variety of topics, from work schedules and time off to staff evaluations and employee recognition. Recreation and Park Service Aides commented that they have awareness of the responsibilities expected of them. This is accomplished, in part, with tools such as the Daily Work Sheet and Daily Duties, and the Monthly Maintenance Calendars for both Parks and the Community Center. Documentation of processes is a key factor in developing a best practice organization. A good complement to these documents is the development of park and facility maintenance standards. The standards outline the recommended level of care for physical assets, such as athletic field maintenance, and custodial care for the Community Center. Along with the development of standards, the Department can also consider developing a performance audit process, in which parks and facilities are visited on a monthly visit to determine how well the various physical assets are meeting established standards. A Marketing Plan, developed in 2017, has a robust number of marketing recommendations. The Plan currently is four years old, and the Department has significantly changed since the time of the Plan’s

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completion. The results of the Recreation Program Assessment and other facets of the Master Plan can help to inform a revised marketing plan.

Key Performance Indicators Currently, the Department has a small number of performance metrics, included in the Village’s Budget Document. The metrics include: x x x

Number of park facility rentals Number of special events Number of programs offered inͲhouse

The limitation of these measures are that they are all output measures. Additional measures that track outcomes, effectiveness, and efficiency should also be included. Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) can be developed at an organizational and divisional level. Starting out, consider having approximately 12Ͳ 20 Departmental KPIs and approximately 6Ͳ10 Divisional measures. For example, in response to the Village’s major outcome of Environmental Sustainability, including a few metrics related to sustainable practices would be important. The recommendation section includes a list of common industry measures.

CAPRA The Department is currently pursuing CAPRA certification. Several required standards relate to operations. A selected number of these include: 1.4 Mission: The Department does comply with this standard 1.4.1 Agency Goals and Objectives requires staff involvement in the creation of goals and objectives: Goals and objectives do not exist. A recommendation for the agency includes developing a strategic plan, along with annual goals and objectives. 1.5 Vision: The Department does have a vision statement 2.5 Strategic Plan: The recommendation section lists this as an important goal 3.1 Organizational Structure: The Department does have a documented structure. Recommendations include additional positions to change the Director’s span of control. 3.3 Internal Communication: Employees mentioned this as a needed improvement. The recommendation section includes information about developing guidelines and techniques for improved communication. 7.5 Management and Operations Standards: The Department does utilize standards throughout the Department. However, additional standards such as park operations/athletic field standards, customer service standards, and programming standards can be added.

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Recommendations 1. Develop a set of key performance indicators (KPIs) to measure organizational performance. Measures used throughout the industry include metrics such as: x x x x x x x x x x x x

Employee satisfaction Turnover rate of partͲtime and fullͲtime staff Number of program registrants Gross and net revenues, DepartmentͲwide and for key program areas Amount of earned revenue generated Percent of revenue from nonͲtax sources Cancellation rate of recreation programs Overall customer satisfaction rate of program participants and athletic field users Park scorecard (develop a checklist and scoring sheet for the quality of park maintenance) Master plan implementation; percent of recommendations completed Safety indicators such as number of public and staff accidents/lost work time Sustainable practice indicators such as water usage and utility use

2. Develop a strategic plan, as required by CAPRA, that includes annual goals and objectives. The plan can be a brief document that outlines the strategic direction of the Department, covering a three to five year period. A strategic plan is different from a master plan. The master plan focuses more on tangible assets such as parks and facilities as well as services. A strategic plan focuses on the future vision of the agency such as marketing strategies, identifying and better serving underserved segments of the Village, organizational learning and growth, and improving operational internal support, as a few examples. 3. Create ways to operationalize the newly created values, along with the mission and vision. Identify ways to keep the values top of mind. This includes having them posted prominently throughout office areas and internal documents. Align systems such as reward and recognition and recruiting and hiring to reinforce the values. This will result in the creation of a wellͲdefined organizational culture. 4. Create new positions including a Community Center Manager position and a partͲtime marketing position that can evolve into a fullͲtime position. Additional programming staff will be needed in the future as a result of continued population growth and increased demand for services. As mentioned previously in the report, add partͲtime instructional staff as Town employees for key program areas. Rather than add a position supervising the Park Specialists and reporting to the Parks Superintendent, delegate responsibility to the Park Specialists in order to relieve the Superintendent of Park Service Aide oversight. 5. Add operating standards that include: x x x

Programs/memberships Facilities Rentals

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x x x

Customer service Safety Athletic field maintenance

6. Complete a sustainability audit and determine priorities. 7. Revise the 2017 Marketing Plan to reflect the existing marketing environment, determine priorities for strengthening the Department’s brand and image, and to build community awareness of programs and services. 8. Develop individual development plans for employees to guide them through career progress. 9. Develop a documented internal communication process and work on improving the connection between Community Center operations and Parks.

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APPENDIX

D

Village of Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Master Plan

Question 1

Community Survey

Village of Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Master Plan Community Survey Which one of the following options best describes you? Answer Choices Village of Pinecrest resident NOT a resident of the Village of Pinecrest Not sure

Responses 73.74% 26.01% 0.25% Answered Skipped

292 103 1 396 0

Which one of the following options best describes you? 80.00%

73.74%

70.00% 60.00% 50.00% 40.00% 30.00%

26.01%

20.00% 10.00%

0.25%

0.00% Village of Pinecrest resident NOT a resident of the Village of Pinecrest

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Village of Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Master Plan

Question 2

Community Survey

Village of Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Master Plan Community Survey What is your gender? Answer Choices Female Male Other

Responses 64.14% 35.61% 0.25% Answered Skipped

254 141 1 396 0

What is your gender? 70.00%

64.14%

60.00% 50.00% 40.00%

35.61%

30.00% 20.00% 10.00% 0.25% 0.00% Female

Male

Other

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PINECREST PARKS AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN Village of Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Master Plan

Question 3

Community Survey

Village of Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Master Plan Community Survey Which ONE of the following best describes your ethnicity? Answer Choices Hispanic or Latino Not Hispanic or Latino

Responses 37.63% 62.37% Answered Skipped

149 247 396 0

Which ONE of the following best describes your ethnicity? 70.00%

62.37%

60.00% 50.00% 40.00%

37.63%

30.00% 20.00% 10.00% 0.00% Hispanic or Latino

Not Hispanic or Latino

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Question 4

Community Survey

Village of Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Master Plan Community Survey Which of the following best describes you? (check all that apply) Answer Choices American Indian or Alaska Native Asian Black or African American Native Hawaiian of Other Pacific Islander White Haitian Other

Responses 1.01% 4.04% 0.76% 0.00% 91.92% 0.00% 3.79% Answered Skipped

4 16 3 0 364 0 15 396 0

Which of the following best describes you? (check all that apply) 100.00% 90.00% 80.00% 70.00% 60.00% 50.00% 40.00% 30.00% 20.00% 10.00% 0.00%

91.92%

1.01%

4.04%

American Indian or Alaska Native

Asian

0.76%

0.00%

Black or Native African Hawaiian of American Other Pacific Islander

White

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0.00%

3.79%

Haitian

Other

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PINECREST PARKS AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN Village of Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Master Plan

Question 5

Community Survey

Village of Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Master Plan Community Survey Counting yourself, how many people in your household are... Answer Choices Under age 5 Ages 5-9 Ages 10-14 Ages 15-18 Ages 19-24 Ages 25-34 Ages 35-44 Ages 45-54 Ages 55-64 Age 65+

Average Number 1.024390244 1.125925926 1.206896552 1.053763441 0.959459459 0.766666667 2.379746835 1.676829268 1.283185841 3.285714286

Total Number 84 152 175 98 71 46 376 275 145 414

Responses 20.71% 34.09% 36.62% 23.48% 18.69% 15.15% 39.90% 41.41% 28.54% 31.82% Answered Skipped

82 135 145 93 74 60 158 164 113 126 396 0

Counting yourself, how many people in your household are in each age group

20.00%

31.82%

28.54%

41.41%

15.15%

25.00%

18.69%

30.00%

20.71%

35.00%

23.48%

40.00%

36.62%

34.09%

45.00%

39.90%

(percentage of responses with someone in age group)

15.00% 10.00% 5.00% 0.00% Under Ages 5Ͳ9 Ages 10Ͳ Ages 15Ͳ Ages 19Ͳ Ages 25Ͳ Ages 35Ͳ Ages 45Ͳ Ages 55Ͳ Age 65+ age 5 14 18 24 34 44 54 64

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Question 6

Community Survey

Village of Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Master Plan Community Survey Are any members of your household disabled as a consequence of an impairment that may be physical, cognitive, mental, sensory, emotional,developmental, or some combination of these? Answer Choices Yes No

Responses 6.82% 93.18% Answered Skipped

27 369 396 0

Are any members of your household disabled as a consequence of animpairment that may be physical, cognitive, mental, sensory, emotional,developmental, or some combination of these? 93.18%

100.00% 80.00% 60.00% 40.00% 20.00%

6.82%

0.00% Yes

No

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PINECREST PARKS AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN Village of Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Master Plan

Question 7

Community Survey

Village of Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Master Plan Community Survey Referencing the map above, which Village Council Area do you or your family live in? Answer Choices Council Seat 1 - Northern Area Council Seat 2 - Central Area Council Seat 3 - Southern Area Not sure I am not a resident of the Village of Pinecrest

Responses 22.47% 27.27% 24.49% 0.76% 25.00% Answered Skipped

89 108 97 3 99 396 0

Referencing the map above, which Village Council Area do you or your family live in? 30.00% 25.00%

27.27% 25.00%

24.49% 22.47%

20.00% 15.00% 10.00% 5.00% 0.76% 0.00% Council Seat 1 Ͳ Northern Area

Council Seat 2 Ͳ Central Area

Council Seat 3 Ͳ Southern Area

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I am not a resident of the Village of Pinecrest

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Village of Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Master Plan

Question 8

Community Survey

Village of Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Master Plan Community Survey Which Village of Pinecrest parks and recreation facilities have you or members of your household visited in the last twelve (12) months? (Select all that apply) Responses

Answer Choices Coral Pine Park Evelyn Greer Park Flagler Grove Park (closed) Red Road Linear Park Pinecrest Community Center Suniland Park Gary Matzner Park (undeveloped) Veterans Wayside Park Village Green I have not visited… I visit other parks Not sure

39.50% 60.50% 7.52% 19.75% 59.25% 60.19% 0.94% 8.15% 10.34% 4.39% 15.99% 0.63% Answered Skipped

126 193 24 63 189 192 3 26 33 14 51 2 319 77

Village of Pinecrest Residents 44.58% 56.67% 8.75% 23.75% 65.42% 51.25% 0.83% 9.58% 12.08% 5.42% 15.42% 0.83%

Which Village of Pinecrest parks and recreation facilities have you or members of your household visited in the last twelve (12) months? (Select all that apply)

0.63% 0.83%

15.99% 15.42%

10.34% 12.08%

4.39% 5.42%

10.00%

8.15% 9.58%

20.00%

7.52% 8.75%

30.00%

0.94% 0.83%

40.00%

19.75% 23.75%

50.00%

39.50% 44.58%

60.00%

60.19% 51.25%

60.50% 56.67%

70.00%

Village of Pinecrest Residents Only 59.25% 65.42%

Responses

0.00%

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Question 9

Community Survey

Village of Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Master Plan Community Survey How would you rate the overall quality of Pinecrest parks and recreation amenities you have visited in the last 12 months? Village of Pinecrest

Answer Choices

Excellent 34.95% Good 49.85% Fair 9.12% Poor 1.52% Not sure 0.30% 4.26% I have not visited a Pinecrest park in the last 12 month Answered Skipped

115 164 30 5 1 14 329 67

National Average 29% 53% 14% 3%

How would you rate the overall quality of Pinecrest parks and recreation amenities you have visited in the last 12 months?

4.26%

0.30%

3%

10.00%

1.52%

20.00%

14%

30.00%

9.12%

40.00%

29%

50.00%

34.95%

60.00%

National Average

53%

49.85%

Village of Pinecrest

0.00% Excellent

Good

Fair

Poor

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Not sure

I have not visited a Pinecrest park in the last 12 months

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Question 10

Community Survey

Village of Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Master Plan Community Survey Do you visit parks or participate in recreation programs offered by providers other than the Village of Pinecrest?

Yes No Not sure

Village of Pinecrest Residents Only 67.87% 30.52% 1.61%

Responses

Answer Choices

72.26% 26.22% 1.52% Answered Skipped

237 86 5 328 68

Do you visit parks or participate in recreation programs offered by providers other than the Village of Pinecrest? Responses 80.00% 70.00%

72.26%

Village of Pinecrest Residents Only

67.87%

60.00% 50.00% 40.00% 26.22%

30.00%

30.52%

20.00% 10.00%

1.52%

1.61%

0.00% Yes

No

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PINECREST PARKS AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN Village of Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Master Plan

Question 11

Community Survey

Village of Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Master Plan Community Survey Which other providers do you visit parks or participate in recreation programming? (Select all that apply) Responses 25.84% 38.26% 10.40% 17.45% 11.07% 11.74% 14.43% 6.71% 13.42% 22.15% 36.58% 23.83% 25.17% 4.36% 1.34% 10.40% Answered Skipped

Answer Choices City of Coral Gables Village of Palmetto Bay Town of Cutler Bay City of South Miami City of Miami Other municipal parks or programs Miami-Dade County Public Schools Other school sites University of Miami campus Private Gym or Recreation Provider Miami-Dade County Parks State of Florida State Parks National Park or other Federal lands Not sure I do not visit parks or recreate I only visit Village of Pinecrest parks or programs

77 114 31 52 33 35 43 20 40 66 109 71 75 13 4 31 298 98

Which other providers do you visit parks or participate in recreation programming? (Select all that apply)

25.17%

23.83%

22.15%

1.34%

10.40%

13.42%

5.00%

4.36%

10.00%

6.71%

15.00%

10.40%

20.00%

14.43%

17.45%

25.00%

11.74%

30.00%

11.07%

35.00%

25.84%

40.00%

36.58%

38.26%

45.00%

0.00%

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Question 12

Community Survey

Village of Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Master Plan Community Survey Have you or other members of your household participated in any recreation program or event offered by the Village of Pinecrest during the last 12 months? Village of Pinecrest

Answer Choices Yes No

66.46% 33.54% Answered Skipped

218 110 328 68

National Average

Village of Pinecrest Residents Only

33% 67%

60% 40%

Have you or other members of your household participated in any recreation program or event offered by the Village of Pinecrest during the last 12 months? Village of Pinecrest 80.00% 60.00%

66.46%

Village of Pinecrest Residents Only

National Average 67%

60% 33%

40.00%

33.54%

40%

20.00% 0.00% Yes

No

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PINECREST PARKS AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN Village of Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Master Plan

Question 13

Community Survey

Village of Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Master Plan Community Survey Approximately how many different recreation programs or events offered by the Village of Pinecrest have you or members of your household participated in over the past 12 months? Answer Choices 1 program 2-3 programs 4-6 programs 7-10 programs 11 or more programs I do not participate….

Responses 34.19% 32.91% 5.11% 1.28% 1.60% 24.92% Answered Skipped

107 103 16 4 5 78 313 83

Approximately how many different recreation programs or events offered by the Village of Pinecrest have you or members of your household participated in over the past 12 months? 40.00% 35.00%

34.19%

32.91%

30.00%

24.92%

25.00% 20.00% 15.00% 10.00% 5.00%

5.11% 1.28%

1.60%

0.00%

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Question 14

Community Survey

Village of PinecrestParks and Recreation Master PlanCommunity Survey What days and times do you most frequently participate in programs or visit parks? Answer Choices Weekday morning Weekday daytime Weekday evening Weekend morning Weekend daytime Weekend evening

Responses 28.15% 12.25% 32.45% 11.26% 12.91% 2.98% Answered Skipped

85 37 98 34 39 9 302 94

What days and times do you most frequently participate in programs or visit parks? 35.00% 30.00%

32.45% 28.15%

25.00% 20.00% 15.00%

12.25%

11.26%

12.91%

10.00% 5.00%

2.98%

0.00% Weekday morning

Weekday daytime

Weekday evening

Weekend morning

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Weekend daytime

Weekend evening

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Question 15

Community Survey

Village of Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Master Plan Community Survey Overall, how would you rate the quality of the program(s) or event(s) that you and/or members of your household participated in over the last 12 months? Village of Pinecrest

Answer Choices Excellent Good Fair Poor Not sure

30.59% 44.41% 9.87% 1.64% 13.49% Answered Skipped

93 135 30 5 41 304 92

Village of National Pinecrest Average Residents Only 33% 25.88% 55% 46.05% 10% 10.53% 2% 1.32% 16.23%

16.23%

13.49% 2%

1.64%

10.00%

1.32%

9.87%

10.53%

33%

20.00%

10%

30.00%

30.59%

40.00%

25.88%

50.00%

55%

44.41%

60.00%

46.05%

Overall, how would you rate the quality of the program(s) or event(s) that you and/or members of your household participated in over the last 12 months?

0.00% Excellent

Good

Fair

Poor

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Question 16

0.00%

10.00%

20.00%

30.00%

40.00%

50.00%

60.00%

70.00%

29.63%

59.26%

25 11 9 22 22 20 21 35 13

1.11%

4.06%

43.54%

51.29%

Location of programs

Very Satisfied

1.20%

3.61%

36.95%

58.23%

Quality of instructors

2.75%

8.63%

33.33%

55.29%

Fees charged for value received

32.32%

57.41%

Page 16 of 27

Ease of registration

7.60%

8.21%

60.45%

13.51%

18.92%

63.71% 3.44%

8.02%

22.90%

65.65%

30.22%

10/5/2021

Community Survey

Total Very Dissatisfied 1.85% 5 270 1.11% 3 271 1.20% 3 249 2.75% 7 255 1.12% 3 268 2.66% 7 263 3.44% 9 262 3.86% 10 259 1.95% 5 257 Answered 277 Skipped 119

Availability of Ease of Quality of information on navigation customer service Village's website through Village's website

Very Dissatisfied

2.66%

Dissatisfied

1.12%

Quality of the facility where program/event is offered

Satisfied

3.86%

Rate your level of satisfaction with the following program services provided by the Village of Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Department.

1.85%

Times programs are offered

9.26%

Dissatisfied 9.26% 4.06% 3.61% 8.63% 8.21% 7.60% 8.02% 13.51% 5.06%

61.87%

160 139 145 141 162 151 172 165 159

31.13%

Satisfied 59.26% 51.29% 58.23% 55.29% 60.45% 57.41% 65.65% 63.71% 61.87%

5.06%

Very Satisfied 29.63% 80 43.54% 118 36.95% 92 33.33% 85 30.22% 81 32.32% 85 22.90% 60 18.92% 49 31.13% 80

1.95%

Services Times programs are offered Location of programs Quality of instructors Fees charged for value received Quality of the facility where program/event is offered Ease of registration Availability of information on Village's website Ease of navigation through Village's website Quality of customer service

Rate your level of satisfaction with the following program services provided by the Village of Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Department.

Village of PinecrestParks and Recreation Master PlanCommunity Survey

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PINECREST PARKS AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN Village of Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Master Plan

Question 17

Community Survey

Village of Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Master Plan Community Survey Select ALL of the ways you or members of your household travel to the park or to participate in a recreation program or event. Answer Choices Walk Bike Drive (vehicle or carpool) Public Transportation (bus, Metro, etc.) Personal electric motor vehicle (scooter, cart) None

Responses 37.17% 43.42% 95.07% 0.33% 4.28% 1.64% Answered Skipped

113 132 289 1 13 5 304 92

Select ALL of the ways you or members of your household travel to the park or to participate in a recreation program or event. 100.00% 90.00% 80.00% 70.00% 60.00% 50.00% 40.00% 30.00% 20.00% 10.00% 0.00%

95.07%

37.17%

43.42%

0.33%

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146

4.28%

1.64%

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Village of Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Master Plan

Question 18

Community Survey

Village of Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Master Plan Community Survey How would you define 'walking distance?' Answer Choices 1/8 mile or 2-3 minutes walking 1/4 mile or 5 minutes walking 1/2 mile or 10 minutes walking 3/4 mile or 15 minutes walking 1 mile or 20 minutes walking 1-1/2 miles or 30 minutes walking Greater than 1-1/2 miles or 30+ minutes walking

Responses 4.07% 16.27% 29.15% 15.25% 17.29% 9.49% 8.47% Answered Skipped

12 48 86 45 51 28 25 295 101

How would you define 'walking distance?' 35.00% 29.15%

30.00% 25.00% 20.00%

16.27%

15.25%

17.29%

15.00% 9.49%

10.00% 5.00%

8.47%

4.07%

0.00% 1/8 mile or 2Ͳ 1/4 mile or 5 1/2 mile or 3 minutes minutes 10 minutes walking walking walking

3/4 mile or 1 mile or 20 1Ͳ1/2 miles Greater than 15 minutes minutes or 30 minutes 1Ͳ1/2 miles walking walking walking or 30+ minutes walking

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Question 19

Community Survey

Village of Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Master Plan Community Survey Do you feel there are sufficient parks and green space areas within walking distance of your residence? Answer Choices Yes No Not sure

Responses 51.97% 40.46% 7.57% Answered Skipped

158 123 23 304 92

Do you feel there are sufficient parks and green space areas within walking distance of your residence? 60.00%

51.97%

50.00% 40.46% 40.00% 30.00% 20.00% 7.57%

10.00% 0.00% Yes

No

Not sure

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Village of Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Master Plan

Question 20

Community Survey

Village of Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Master Plan Community Survey Select ALL the reasons that prevent you or other members of your household from visiting parks or participating in recreation programs and events in the Village of Pinecrest more often. National Average

Village of Pinecrest

Answer Choices I do not know locations of parks/facilities Parks/facilities are not well maintained Program or facility not offered Security is insufficient/loitering Lack of trail access Parks/facilities too far from residence Parks/facilities are too crowded Lack of accessibility for people with disability Physical health limitations Poor customer service by staff Lack of sidewalks or bike lane access I do not know what is offered Use private or other community's parks/facilities Lack of parking Park operating hours not convenient Lack of transportation/public transit Too hot outdoors Fees are too high COVID Other (please specify)

2.98% 4.26% 19.15% 6.81% 11.06% 16.60% 12.77% 0.85% 2.55% 1.70% 21.70% 16.60% 10.21% 15.74% 9.36% 2.13% 50.21% 11.49% 3.40%

7 10 45 16 26 39 30 2 6 4 51 39 24 37 22 5 118 27 8 39 235 161

Answered Skipped

14% 10% 18% 9% 14% 5% 3% 3% 35% 14% 7% 9% 3% 14%

Select ALL the reasons that prevent you or other members of your household from visiting parks or participating in recreation programs and events in the Village of Pinecrest more often. Village of Pinecrest

National Average 50.21%

60.00%

3.40%

11.49% 14% 2.13% 3%

15.74%

9.36% 9%

7%

16.60%

21.70% 2.55%

1.70% 3%

5%

0.85% 3%

16.60% 14%

12.77%

19.15% 18% 6.81% 9%

4.26% 10%

10.00%

2.98%

20.00%

14%

30.00%

11.06%

40.00%

10.21% 14%

35%

50.00%

0.00%

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Question 21

Community Survey

Village of Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Master Plan Community Survey Select ALL ways in which you learn about recreation programs, events or classes provided by the Village of Pinecrest. National Average

Village of Pinecrest

Answer Choices Website (Village of Pinecrest) Printed brochure(s) Social media (Facebook, Twitter, Nextdoor, etc.) Email blasts Newspaper Family or Friend Mailer(s) Radio/Television Flyers or posters at parks/facilities Other (please specify)

50.51% 21.84% 44.03% 46.08% 10.24% 43.00% 24.91% 2.05% 24.23%

148 64 129 135 30 126 73 6 71 11 293 103

Answered Skipped

36% 39% 25% 16% 16% 48% 14% 22%

Select ALL ways in which you learn about recreation programs, events or classes provided by the Village of Pinecrest.

14% 2.05%

10.24% 16%

10.00%

24.23% 22%

24.91%

43.00% 48%

44.03%

46.08% 16%

20.00%

21.84%

30.00%

36%

40.00%

39%

50.00%

National Average

25%

60.00%

50.51%

Village of Pinecrest

0.00%

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Question 22

0.00%

10.00%

20.00%

30.00%

40.00%

50.00%

58.05% 8.90% 10.59% 11.44% 11.02%

60.00%

Page 22 of 27

66.09% 4.35% 7.83% 13.04% 8.70%

66.96% 3.04% 8.70% 11.30% 10.00%

61.48% 4.10% 5.33% 14.34% 14.75%

70.00%

61.54% 3.85% 5.56% 12.82% 16.24%

80.09% 2.21% 1.77% 7.52% 8.41%

86.03% 1.75% 1.31% 2.18% 8.73%

93.78%

1.78% 0.89% 1.78% 1.78%

94.25%

0.00% 0.00% 0.44% 5.31%

87.67% 2.64% 0.88% 3.08% 5.73%

71.93%

2.19% 4.39% 7.02% 14.47%

I have a need and its NOT met

Total National Average 230 228 228 227 226 226 225 9% 229 13% 237 16% 236 14% 244 226 16% 230 234 26% 225 15% 228 34% 231 230 21% 225 20% 225 13% 229 21% 224 229 21% 228 21% 228 21% 227 219 274 122

I do not have a need for this activity

78.22% 1.33% 2.67% 4.89% 12.89%

I have a need and its PARTLY met

81.66% 0.87% 1.31% 6.11% 10.04%

I have a need and its MOSTLY met

70.54%

I have a need and its FULLY met

67.56% 1.78% 4.89% 11.56% 14.22%

80.00%

I have a need and its I do not have a need for this NOT met activity 7.39% 17 69.13% 159 5.26% 12 89.04% 203 14.47% 33 71.93% 164 5.73% 13 87.67% 199 5.31% 12 94.25% 213 12.83% 29 84.51% 191 1.78% 4 93.78% 211 8.73% 20 86.03% 197 24.47% 58 66.24% 157 11.02% 26 58.05% 137 14.75% 36 61.48% 150 8.41% 19 80.09% 181 10.00% 23 66.96% 154 16.24% 38 61.54% 144 24.00% 54 71.11% 160 12.72% 29 82.46% 188 21.21% 49 74.46% 172 8.70% 20 66.09% 152 14.22% 32 67.56% 152 12.89% 29 78.22% 176 10.04% 23 81.66% 187 11.16% 25 70.54% 158 17.47% 40 57.64% 132 21.93% 50 67.11% 153 11.40% 26 78.51% 179 6.61% 15 64.76% 147 12.79% 28 81.28% 178 Answere Skipped

2.23% 3.13%

12.95% 11.16%

90.00%

I have a need and its PARTLY met 9.13% 21 2.19% 5 7.02% 16 3.08% 7 0.44% 1 1.33% 3 1.78% 4 2.18% 5 4.64% 11 11.44% 27 14.34% 35 7.52% 17 11.30% 26 12.82% 30 3.56% 8 3.07% 7 2.60% 6 13.04% 30 11.56% 26 4.89% 11 6.11% 14 12.95% 29 13.97% 32 7.02% 16 6.14% 14 7.49% 17 4.11% 9

57.64% 3.06% 7.86% 13.97% 17.47%

100.00%

69.13%

7.39% 6.96% 9.13% 7.39%

16 3 10 2 0 2 2 3 8 25 13 4 20 13 1 1 2 18 11 6 3 7 18 7 8 25 1

0.44% 3.51% 6.14% 11.40%

Indicate if you or members of your household have a need for the following recreation PROGRAM, CLASSES and SPORTS and how much of your need is currently being met either by the Village of Pinecrest or other park and recreation providers.

89.04%

2.19% 1.32% 2.19% 5.26%

I have a need and its MOSTLY met 6.96% 1.32% 4.39% 0.88% 0.00% 0.88% 0.89% 1.31% 3.38% 10.59% 5.33% 1.77% 8.70% 5.56% 0.44% 0.44% 0.87% 7.83% 4.89% 2.67% 1.31% 3.13% 7.86% 3.07% 3.51% 11.01% 0.46%

78.51%

I have a need and its FULLY met 7.39% 17 2.19% 5 2.19% 5 2.64% 6 0.00% 0 0.44% 1 1.78% 4 1.75% 4 1.27% 3 8.90% 21 4.10% 10 2.21% 5 3.04% 7 3.85% 9 0.89% 2 1.32% 3 0.87% 2 4.35% 10 1.78% 4 1.33% 3 0.87% 2 2.23% 5 3.06% 7 0.88% 2 0.44% 1 10.13% 23 1.37% 3

64.76% 10.13% 11.01% 7.49% 6.61%

Program, Classes and Sports

1.37% 0.46% 4.11% 12.79%

Soccer Football Basketball Lacrosse Cricket Volleyball Cheerleading Gymnastics/Tumbling Golf Tennis Pickleball After-School Summer Camp Senior / Active Adult Water Exercise Water Safety / Learn to Swim Competitive Swim Performing Arts (music, dance, etc.) Arts and Crafts (ceramics, painting, etc.) Martial Arts Zumba Aerobics / Spinning Yoga Pilates Computer Education Baseball (Youth or Adult) Softball (Youth or Adult

66.24% 24.47% 1.27% 3.38% 4.64%

71.11% 24.00% 0.89% 0.44% 3.56%

84.51% 12.83% 0.44% 0.88% 1.33%

82.46% 12.72% 1.32% 0.44% 3.07%

74.46% 21.21% 0.87% 0.87% 2.60%

67.11% 21.93% 0.88% 3.07% 7.02%

81.28%

Indicate if you or members of your household have a need for the following recreation PROGRAM, CLASSES and SPORTS and how much of your need is currently being met either by the Village of Pinecrest or other park and recreation providers.

Village of PinecrestParks and Recreation Master PlanCommunity Survey

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Question 23

0.39% 0.42% 0.00%

3.35% 1.83%

0.39% 1.67% 3.20%

2nd Choice

1.16% 2.93% 3.20%

6.95% 5.44% 6.39%

3rd Choice

1.54% 1.26% 1.83%

3.09% 3.77% 3.20%

Top Choice

Most Important Programs, Classes and Sports

8.49% 9.21% 9.13%

Village of Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Master Plan Community Survey

25.00%

20.46% 1.93% 2.09% 1.37%

Community Survey

4.18% 1.83%

19.69% 9.62% 5.48%

20.00%

6.39%

3.47% 2.93%

9.13% 3.09% 5.02%

15.00%

10.00%

5.00%

0.00%

0.77%

Village of Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Master Plan

Top Choice 2nd Choice 3rd Choice 10.81% 5.44% 3.20% 0.00% 2.51% 5.02% 3.09% 5.02% 9.13% 1.16% 2.09% 1.83% 1.93% 2.09% 1.37% 0.00% 0.42% 0.91% 0.77% 3.35% 1.83% 0.39% 0.42% 0.00% 1.16% 2.09% 1.37% 1.93% 5.86% 5.48% 8.49% 9.21% 9.13% 19.69% 9.62% 5.48% 0.39% 1.67% 3.20% 1.16% 2.93% 3.20% 6.95% 5.44% 6.39% 3.09% 3.77% 3.20% 1.54% 1.26% 1.83% 0.77% 3.77% 4.11% 3.09% 3.35% 3.20% 1.54% 4.60% 6.39% 3.09% 2.09% 1.37% 0.00% 1.26% 2.74% 1.16% 2.93% 3.20% 3.47% 2.93% 6.39% 2.70% 5.44% 4.11% 0.39% 2.93% 1.83% 20.46% 4.18% 1.83% 0.77% 3.35% 2.28% 1.16% 2.09% 1.83%

Which THREE sports, programs or classes listed are most important to you or members of your household? Programs, Classes and Sports Soccer Football Basketball Softball Lacrosse Cricket Volleyball Cheerleading Gymnastics / Tumbling Golf Tennis Pickleball AfterͲSchool Summer Camp Senior / Active Adult Water Exercise Water Safety / Learn to Swim Competitive Swim Performing Arts (music, dance, etc.) Arts and Crafts (ceramics, painting, etc.) Martial Arts Zumba Aerobics / Spinning Yoga Pilates Computer Education Baseball (Youth or Adult) Softball (Youth or Adult) 0.00% 0.42% 0.91%

Page 23 of 27

4.60% 6.39% 1.54%

5.86% 5.48% 1.93%

10.81% 5.44% 3.20%

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December 2021

152

3.35% 2.28%

0.77%

3.77% 4.11% 0.77%

5.02% 2.51% 0.00%

1.16% 2.09% 1.37%

3.09% 3.35% 3.20%

3.09% 2.09% 1.37%

0.00% 1.26% 2.74%

1.16% 2.93% 3.20%

2.70%

5.44% 4.11%

0.39%

2.93% 1.83%


DRAFT

Village of Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Master Plan

Question 24

Village of Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Master Plan Community Survey Indicate if you or members of your household have a need for the following LEISURE ACTIVITIES and how much of your need is currently being met either by the Village of Pinecrest or other park and recreation providers. I have a need and it is FULLY met 24.53% 52 7.18% 15 22.79% 49 5.16% 11 14.69% 31 12.33% 27 3.65% 8 7.73% 17 8.37% 18 2.37% 5 6.99% 16 13.02% 28 33.33% 78 16.44% 36 2.37% 5 15.28% 35 7.14% 15 32.00% 72 12.14% 25 3.27% 7 15.84% 35 18.35% 40 3.62% 8 0.47% 1 0.93% 2 11.27% 24 3.29% 7 6.10% 13 8.02% 17 2.40% 5 6.76% 15

Reading Writing Watching Television Playing Video Games / eGaming Surfing Internet or Social Media Going to Movies Going to Theater Cycling (street or mountain) Gardening Dance Attending a Concert, Fair or Festival Socializing Attending a Farmer's Market Shopping Photography Dinning Out People Watching Walking Playing Catch Pickup Sports (basketball, 5x5, etc.) Going to the Beach, Swimming in Ocean Swimming in pool Kayaking, canoeing or Paddle Boarding Skateboarding Adventure Recreating (rock climbing, cable ski, etc.) Traveling or Sightseeing Learning about History Fishing Picnicking Painting Boating (sail or motor) Other (please specify)

I have a need and it is MOSTLY meet 14.62% 31 1.91% 4 4.19% 9 2.35% 5 3.32% 7 6.39% 14 7.31% 16 11.82% 26 8.84% 19 1.42% 3 17.47% 40 13.49% 29 22.65% 53 13.24% 29 7.11% 15 19.21% 44 7.14% 15 21.78% 49 8.25% 17 3.27% 7 9.05% 20 3.67% 8 6.79% 15 0.47% 1 1.40% 3 10.80% 23 7.04% 15 3.76% 8 12.74% 27 4.33% 9 3.15% 7

I have a need and it is I have a need and it is I do not have a need PARTLY met NOT met for this 6.60% 14 4.25% 9 50.00% 106 3.83% 8 3.83% 8 83.25% 174 1.40% 3 0.47% 1 71.16% 153 1.88% 4 3.76% 8 86.85% 185 3.32% 7 1.42% 3 77.25% 163 16.44% 36 12.79% 28 52.05% 114 18.72% 41 23.29% 51 47.03% 103 19.55% 43 15.91% 35 45.00% 99 16.28% 35 11.16% 24 55.35% 119 8.06% 17 9.95% 21 78.20% 165 32.31% 74 20.96% 48 22.27% 51 15.81% 34 11.16% 24 46.51% 100 21.37% 50 5.13% 12 17.52% 41 14.61% 32 3.65% 8 52.05% 114 5.69% 12 10.43% 22 74.41% 157 27.95% 64 13.10% 30 24.45% 56 5.71% 12 5.24% 11 74.76% 157 16.89% 38 7.56% 17 21.78% 49 6.80% 14 4.37% 9 68.45% 141 10.75% 23 11.21% 24 71.50% 153 13.57% 30 21.72% 48 39.82% 88 7.34% 16 18.81% 41 51.83% 113 19.46% 43 30.32% 67 39.82% 88 2.37% 5 13.74% 29 82.94% 175 5.61% 12 22.43% 48 69.63% 149 14.08% 30 10.80% 23 53.05% 113 9.86% 21 12.68% 27 67.14% 143 8.92% 19 17.37% 37 63.85% 136 16.04% 34 11.32% 24 51.89% 110 7.69% 16 9.13% 19 76.44% 159 8.56% 19 23.87% 53 57.66% 128

Total 212 209 215 213 211 219 219 220 215 211 229 215 234 219 211 229 210 225 206 214 221 218 221 211 214 213 213 213 212 208 222 20 246 150

Answe Skippe

Indicate if you or members of your household have a need for the following LEISURE ACTIVITIES and how much of your need is currently being met either by the Village of Pinecrest or other park and recreation providers.

23.87% 6.76% 3.15% 8.56%

2.40% 4.33% 7.69% 9.13%

8.02% 12.74% 16.04% 11.32%

51.89%

57.66%

63.85%

67.14% 53.05% 3.29% 7.04% 9.86% 12.68%

6.10% 3.76% 8.92% 17.37%

69.63% 22.43%

76.44%

82.94% 0.93% 1.40% 5.61%

0.47% 0.47% 2.37%

13.74%

51.83% 19.46% 30.32% 39.82% 3.62% 6.79%

39.82%

18.81%

18.35%

3.67% 7.34%

11.27% 10.80% 14.08% 10.80%

68.45%

I do not have a need for this

71.50% 15.84% 9.05% 13.57% 21.72%

3.27% 3.27% 10.75% 11.21%

12.14% 8.25% 6.80% 4.37%

32.00% 21.78% 16.89% 7.56% 21.78%

7.14% 7.14% 5.71% 5.24%

15.28% 19.21% 27.95% 13.10% 24.45%

2.37% 7.11% 5.69% 10.43%

3.65%

16.44% 13.24% 14.61%

46.51% 33.33% 22.65% 21.37%

17.52%

5.13%

13.02% 13.49% 15.81% 11.16%

32.31% 20.96% 22.27%

17.47% 6.99%

I have a need and it is NOT met

52.05%

74.41%

74.76%

I have a need and it is PARTLY met

78.20% 55.35% 2.37% 1.42% 8.06% 9.95%

18.72% 23.29% 3.65% 7.31%

12.33% 6.39% 16.44% 12.79%

22.79%

14.69% 3.32% 3.32% 1.42%

10.00%

5.16% 2.35% 1.88% 3.76%

20.00%

4.19% 1.40% 0.47%

30.00%

7.18% 1.91% 3.83% 3.83%

40.00%

24.53% 14.62% 6.60% 4.25%

50.00%

45.00%

47.03%

50.00%

60.00%

52.05%

70.00%

8.37% 8.84% 16.28% 11.16%

80.00%

7.73% 11.82% 19.55% 15.91%

71.16%

90.00%

I have a need and it is MOSTLY meet

77.25%

83.25%

86.85%

I have a need and it is FULLY met 100.00%

0.00%

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Village of Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Master Plan

Village of Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Master Plan Community Survey Top Choice 2nd Choice 3rd Choice 8.02% 1.98% 3.09% 0.94% 1.49% 1.03% 2.36% 0.99% 1.03% 0.00% 0.99% 1.55% 0.00% 0.50% 0.52% 2.36% 3.47% 2.06% 3.77% 2.48% 4.12% 10.85% 8.91% 3.09% 4.72% 3.96% 3.09% 2.83% 0.50% 3.09% 9.43% 12.87% 6.19% 3.30% 2.97% 7.22% 7.55% 7.92% 5.67% 0.47% 0.00% 6.19% 0.00% 1.49% 1.03% 7.08% 14.85% 6.70% 0.00% 0.50% 1.03% 0.00% 0.00% 1.03% 6.60% 3.47% 9.79% 1.89% 1.49% 1.55% 3.77% 3.47% 0.52% 3.30% 4.46% 5.67% 4.72% 2.97% 4.12% 3.30% 5.45% 5.15% 0.00% 0.00% 0.52% 0.94% 0.50% 2.58% 3.77% 5.45% 3.09% 0.00% 0.50% 0.52% 1.42% 2.48% 2.58% 0.47% 0.50% 1.03% 0.94% 0.50% 1.03%

Top Choice

2nd Choice

3rd Choice

Most Important Leisure Activities

Which THREE leisure activities listed are most important to you or members of your household? Leisure Activities Reading Writing Watching Television Playing Video Games / eGaming Surfing Interview / Social Media Going the Movies Going to the Theater Cycling (street or mountain) Gardening Dance Attending a Concert, Fair or Festival Socializing Attending a Farmer's Market Shopping Photography Dinning Out Cooking People Watching Walking Playing Catch Pickup Sports (basketball, 5x5, etc.) Going to the Beach / Ocean Swimming Swimming in a Pool Kayaking, canoeing or Paddle Boarding Skateboarding Adventure Recreating (rock climbing, cable ski, etc.) Traveling / Sightseeing Fishing Picnicking Painting Boating (sail or motor)

16.00% 14.00% 12.00%

8.00%

10.00%

6.00% 4.00% 2.00% 0.00%

Question 25

December 2021

154


Village of Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Master Plan Community Survey

0.00%

10.00%

20.00%

30.00%

40.00%

50.00%

60.00%

70.00%

80.00%

90.00%

55.60%

7.98%

10.50%

25.63%

55.88%

133 134 130 131 203 154 137 131 143 137 88 88 66 54 133 156 117

Somewhat Supportive 25.63% 61 21.16% 51 27.85% 66 14.47% 34 11.93% 29 23.61% 55 23.73% 56 25.52% 61 24.89% 59 21.07% 51 29.79% 70 17.09% 40 25.00% 58 29.91% 70 17.72% 42 20.42% 49 30.54% 73

Not sure 10.50% 9.13% 10.55% 16.17% 3.29% 6.01% 11.44% 13.81% 9.28% 9.09% 19.15% 19.23% 21.12% 17.52% 15.19% 9.58% 13.81% 25 22 25 38 8 14 27 33 22 22 45 45 49 41 36 23 33

19 34 16 32 3 10 16 14 13 32 32 61 59 69 26 12 16

Answered Skipped

Not Supportive 7.98% 14.11% 6.75% 13.62% 1.23% 4.29% 6.78% 5.86% 5.49% 13.22% 13.62% 26.07% 25.43% 29.49% 10.97% 5.00% 6.69%

Total 238 241 237 235 243 233 236 239 237 242 235 234 232 234 237 240 239 32 257 139

Very Supportive

6.78%

11.44%

23.73%

58.05%

Make existing parks more sustainable and resilient

Somewhat Supportive

5.86%

13.81%

25.52%

54.81%

Develop new parks

Not sure

Not Supportive

17.09%

19.23%

26.07%

37.61% 13.62%

19.15%

29.79% 13.22%

37.45% 9.09%

21.07%

56.61% 5.49%

9.28%

24.89%

60.34%

Develop an Develop new Develop additional Develop additional aquatic facility greenways and athletic fields or new recreation centers connect existing courts trails

17.72%

29.49%

56.12% 17.52%

23.08%

29.91% 21.12%

25.00%

25.43%

28.45%

Develop a splash Develop additional Develop access pad / spray park dog parks points to water / Biscayne Bay

15.19%

6.01%

23.61%

66.09% 1.23%

3.29%

11.93%

83.54% 13.62%

14.47%

16.17%

55.74% 6.75%

10.55%

27.85%

14.11%

54.85%

9.13%

The following are actions that the Village of Pinecrest could take to improve the Parks and Recreation system. Indicate your level of support for each action.

Very Supportive 55.88% 55.60% 54.85% 55.74% 83.54% 66.09% 58.05% 54.81% 60.34% 56.61% 37.45% 37.61% 28.45% 23.08% 56.12% 65.00% 48.95%

4.29%

Purchase land to Purchase land to Purchase land to Purchase land to Maintain existing Maintain existing provide more develop sports preserve open provide access to parks, recreation greenway trails parks fields, courts and space water / Biscayne facilities and fields facilities Bay

21.16%

Purchase land to provide more parks Purchase land to develop sports fields, courts and facilities Purchase land to preserve open space Purchase land to provide access to water / Biscayne Bay Maintain existing parks, recreation facilities and fields Maintain existing greenway trails Make existing parks more sustainable and resilient Develop new parks Develop new greenways and connect existing trails Develop additional athletic fields or courts Develop additional new recreation centers Develop an aquatic facility Develop a splash pad / spray park Develop additional dog parks Develop access points to water / Biscayne Bay Increase tree canopy in parks Host more community-wide events Other (please specify)

The following are actions that the Village of Pinecrest could take to improve the Parks and Recreation system. Indicate your level of support for each action.

Question 26

10.97%

Village of Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Master Plan

5.00%

9.58%

20.42%

65.00%

Increase tree canopy in parks

6.69%

13.81%

30.54%

48.95%

Host more communityͲwide events

DRAFT

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PINECREST PARKS AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN

Village of Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Master Plan

Village of Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Master Plan Community Survey

Most Willing

Village of Pinecrest 2nd Most Residents Only Most Willing Willing 8.56% 13.06% 7.21% 9.46% 8.11% 6.76% 2.70% 0.90% 6.76% 8.11% 1.80% 6.31% 1.35% 1.80% 5.41% 7.66% 3.15% 0.90%

3rd Most Willing 4.74% 3.79% 9.00% 5.69% 11.37% 5.69% 4.27% 6.64% 4.74% 8.53% 4.74% 6.64% 3.32% 2.84% 6.64% 5.69% 4.27% 1.42%

Question 27

Village of Pinecrest Residents Only Most Willing

2nd Most Willing

Actions Most Willing to Support with Your Tax Dollars 3rd Most Willing

Make existing Develop new parks Develop new Develop additional Develop additional Develop an aquatic Develop a splash Develop additional Develop access new recreation facility pad / spray park dog parks points to water / parks more greenways and athletic fields or courts centers Biscayne Bay sustainable and connect existing resilient trails

Most Willing

6.38% 14.36% 4.79% 17.02% 15.43% 1.60% 2.66% 1.06% 2.13% 9.57% 1.06% 8.51% 1.60% 3.72% 4.26% 3.19% 2.13% 0.53%

Purchase land to Maintain existing Maintain existing provide access to parks, recreation greenway trails water / Biscayne facilities and fields Bay

8.30% 16.18% 4.15% 15.35% 17.01% 1.24% 2.49% 1.24% 2.07% 9.96% 0.83% 7.47% 1.66% 2.90% 3.32% 3.32% 2.07% 0.41%

Which THREE actions would you be most willing to fund with your tax dollars?

Actions

Purchase land to preserve open space

Purchase land to provide more parks Purchase land to develop sports fields, courts and facilities Purchase land to preserve open space Purchase land to provide access to water / Biscayne Bay Maintain existing parks, recreation facilities and fields Maintain existing greenway trails Make existing parks more sustainable and resilient Develop new parks Develop new greenways and connect existing trails Develop additional athletic fields or courts Develop additional new recreation centers Develop an aquatic facility Develop a splash pad / spray park Develop additional dog parks Develop access points to water / Biscayne Bay Increase tree canopy in parks Host more communityͲwide events I do not support any additional or new actions

18.00% 16.00% 14.00% 12.00%

8.00%

10.00%

6.00% 4.00% 2.00% 0.00% Purchase land to Purchase land to provide more parks develop sports fields, courts and facilities

Page 27 of 27

Increase tree canopy in parks

Host more communityͲwide events

Community Survey

I do not support any additional or new actions

10/5/2021

December 2021

156


DRAFT

APPENDIX

E

Village of Pinecrest Parks and Recreation Master Plan Vision Ͳ Probable Cost Estimate (2021) Ͳ Priority Capital Projects Phasing Legend ST ShortͲTerm Ͳ 1Ͳ5 Years MT MediumͲTerm Ͳ 6Ͳ10 Years LT LongͲTerm Ͳ 10+ Years

PRIORITY CAPITAL PROJECTS A. Existing Parks and Facilities CP Phase Coral Pine Park Phase 2 Implementation CP Implementation of Phase 2 of the Coral Pines Master Plan CP ST CP Subtotal: Park Improvements CP Two (2) additional shelters CP ST Additional unpaved hiking trails CP ST Interpretative Signage CP ST Solar Panels for shelters CP ST CP Subtotal: CP CP EV EV EV EV EV EV EV EV EV EV EV EV EV EV EV EV

Phase Evelyn Greer Park Athletics Artifical Turf field replacement; organic fill, grading lowered 1Ͳ2 LT feet for stormwater retention; subgrade drainage LED Lighting Fixtures for Fields LT Subtotal: Park Improvements Two (2) shelters ST Splash Pad ST Parking Lot Repairs ST Interpretative Signage ST Solar Panels for Park Building MT Solar Panels for Maint. Building MT Design and permitting MT Subtotal:

Unit

Quantity

Unit Cost

Is

1

$2,433,000

Is Is Is Is

2 1 1 2

$35,000 $25,000 $25,000 $10,000

Subtotal

$2,433,000 $2,433,000 $70,000 $25,000 $25,000 $20,000 $140,000

$2,573,000

SF

195000

$10

$1,950,000

Is

7

$22,500

$157,500 $2,107,500

Is Is Is Is Is Is Is

2 1 1 1 1 1 1

$35,000 $500,000 $25,000 $25,000 $100,000 $25,000 $250,000

$70,000 $500,000 $25,000 $25,000 $100,000 $25,000 $250,000 $995,000

$3,102,500

FG FG FG FG FG FG

Phase Flagler Grove Park Park Improvements One (1) shelter MT

RR RR RR RR RR RR RR RR RR RR RR RR RR

Phase Red Road Linear Park Connectivity Crosswalks and Traffic Calming ST Bike Repair stations ST

Is

2

$35,000

Subtotal:

$70,000 $70,000

$70,000

Is Is

3 2

$50,000 $10,000

$150,000 $20,000 $170,000

Is Is Is Is

4 4 1 1

$35,000 $25,000 $25,000 $50,000

$140,000 $100,000 $25,000 $50,000 $315,000

Subtotal: MT MT MT MT

Park Improvements Four (4) shelters Seating Areas Interpretative Signage Design and Permitting Subtotal:

$485,000

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DRAFT

PINECREST PARKS AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN SU SU SU SU SU SU SU SU SU SU SU SU SU VG VG VG VG VG

Phase Suniland Park Athletics Artifical Turf field replacement; organic fill, grading lowered 1Ͳ2 MT feet for stormwater retention; subgrade drainage LED Lighting Fixtures for Fields MT LED Lighting for Basketball Courts MT Subtotal: Park Improvements Three (3) shelters ST Interpretative Signage ST Solar Panels for Park Building MT Design and permitting MT Subtotal:

126500

$10

$1,265,000

Is Is

7 4

$22,500 $35,000

$157,500 $140,000 $1,562,500

Is Is Is Is

3 1 1 1

$35,000 $25,000 $100,000 $200,000

$105,000 $25,000 $100,000 $200,000 $430,000

$1,992,500 Phase Village Green / Pinecrest Community Center Athletics Basketball Court (1) MT Pickleball Courts (4) MT 5x5 Soccer Fields; artifical turf MT

VG ST VG ST

Covered Outdoor Fitness Area; asphalt surface; shade sail canopy Replacement Vita Course Stations Replace Multipurpose field Sod; redesign drainage to handle parking lot drainage; Subtotal: Park Improvements Two (2) shelters Interpretative Signage Solar Panels for Community Center Install drainage tiles under courts for stormwater capacity Design and permitting Subtotal:

VG VG VG VG VG VG VG VG VG VG VG

LT

VW VW VW VW VW VW VW VW VW VW VW

Phase Veterans Wayside Park Park Improvements Two (2) shelters ST Tot Lot; turf surface ST Walking Paths MT Enhanced Memorial and plaza MT Enhanced Landscape; new canopy trees, shrubs MT Design and Permitting ST

ST ST MT MT ST

ls Is SF

1 4 5000

$50,000 $25,000 $10

$50,000 $100,000 $50,000

SF ls

2500

$55

$137,500

6

$10,000

$60,000

SF

90000

$10

$900,000 $1,297,500

Is Is Is Is Is

2 1 1 1 1

$35,000 $25,000 $100,000 $150,000 $200,000

$70,000 $25,000 $100,000 $150,000 $200,000 $545,000

$1,842,500

Is Is Is Is Is Is

2 1 1 1 1 1

$35,000 $100,000 $100,000 $100,000 $50,000 $50,000

Subtotal:

$70,000 $100,000 $100,000 $100,000 $50,000 $50,000 $470,000

$470,000

A. Existing Parks and Facilities

158

SF

Subtotal Funded Unfunded

$10,535,500 $2,433,000 23.1% $8,102,500 76.9%

By Phasing

ShortͲTerm MediumͲTerm LongͲTerm

$1,772,500 21.9% $3,322,500 41.0% $3,007,500 37.1%

By System Components

Parks and Facilities Fitness and Athletics Community Cultural Arts Sustainability and Resiliency Connectivity

$2,320,000 $3,612,500 $105,355.00 $1,975,000 $195,000

28.6% 44.6% 1.3% 24.4% 2.4%

December 2021


DRAFT

B. New Parks and Facilities GM Phase Gary Matzner Park Athletics GM Half Basketball Court (1) GM MT Pickleball Courts (2) GM MT GM Park Improvements GM Three (3) shelters GM ST Accessible Playground; covered, turf surface GM ST Open Lawn and Landscaping GM ST Community Garden Space GM ST Perimeter walking path GM ST Water Fountain GM ST Site furnishings GM ST Wayfinding and Signage GM ST Site Prep and Utilities GM ST Master Plan, design and permitting GM ST

ls Is

1 2

$30,000 $25,000

$30,000 $50,000 $80,000

Is Is Is Is Is Is Is Is Is Is

3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

$35,000 $650,000 $100,000 $100,000 $75,000 $50,000 $50,000 $35,000 $125,000 $200,000

$105,000 $650,000 $100,000 $100,000 $75,000 $50,000 $50,000 $35,000 $125,000 $200,000 $1,490,000

Subtotal:

Subtotal:

$1,570,000 HP HP HP HP HP

Phase Hidden Pines Park Park Improvements Two (2) shelters ST ADA walking path ST Wayfinding and Signage ST

Is Is Is

2 1 1

$35,000 $50,000 $35,000

Subtotal:

$70,000 $50,000 $35,000 $155,000

$155,000 WA WA WA WA WA WA WA WA WA WA WA WA WA WA

Phase Future Water Access Park Connectivity Accessible Kayak Launch ST SharedͲUse Trailhead ST

ls Is

1 1

$150,000 $150,000

$150,000 $150,000 $300,000

Is Is Is Is

3 1 1 1

$35,000 $25,000 $125,000 $50,000

$105,000 $25,000 $125,000 $50,000 $305,000

ls

1

$1,500,000

Subtotal: ST ST ST ST

Park Improvements One (1) shelter Wayfinding and Signage Site Prep and Utilities Planning, Design and Permitting

ST

Acquistion 0.5Ͳ1 acre land acq.

Subtotal:

Subtotal:

$1,500,000 $1,500,000

$2,105,000

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DRAFT

PINECREST PARKS AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN CO Phase Future Community Park Athletics CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO

MT MT LT

ST ST ST ST ST ST ST ST ST

ST

Competition Pool; Lap pool; diving well; pool house; lockerooms; shared parking Two (2) Tennis Courts; lighted Indoor Gym and meeting rooms Subtotal: Park Improvements Two (2) shelters Accessible Playground; covered, turf surface Event Lawn; utility hookups Community Garden Space Perimeter walking path Water Fountain Site furnishings Wayfinding and Signage Site Prep and Utilities Subtotal: Acquistion 3Ͳ5 acre land acq. Subtotal:

ls

1

$15,000,000

$15,000,000

Is SF

2 15000

$85,000 $325

$170,000 $4,875,000 $20,045,000

Is Is Is Is Is Is Is Is Is

2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

$35,000 $650,000 $150,000 $100,000 $100,000 $50,000 $50,000 $35,000 $200,000

$70,000 $650,000 $150,000 $100,000 $100,000 $50,000 $50,000 $35,000 $200,000 $1,405,000

ls

1

$5,000,000

$5,000,000 $5,000,000

$26,450,000 PP PP PP PP PP PP PP PP PP PP PP PP PP PP PP

Phase Future Pocket Parks Park Improvements Picnic shelter LT Tot Lot LT Fence/Wall LT Landscape LT Sidewalk Access LT Site furnishings LT Wayfinding and Signage LT Site Prep and Utilities LT Planning, Design and Permitting LT

Is Is Is Is Is Is Is Is Is

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4

$35,000 $150,000 $100,000 $50,000 $25,000 $25,000 $15,000 $100,000 $50,000

$140,000 $600,000 $400,000 $200,000 $100,000 $100,000 $60,000 $400,000 $200,000 $2,200,000

ls

4

$1,250,000

$5,000,000 $5,000,000

Subtotal: LT

Acquistion 1/3Ͳ1/2 acre lots Ͳ 4 sites Subtotal:

$7,200,000 B. New Parks and Facilities

Subtotal ShortͲTerm MediumͲTerm LongͲTerm

$37,480,000 $10,155,000 27.1% $15,250,000 40.7% $12,075,000 32.2%

By Type of Project

Undeveloped Acquisitions Proposed

$1,725,000 4.6% $11,500,000 30.7% $24,255,000

By System Components

Parks and Facilities Fitness and Athletics Community Cultural Arts Sustainability and Resiliency Connectivity

$16,630,000 44.4% $20,125,000 53.7% $250,000 0.7%

By Phasing

160

$475,000

1.3%

December 2021


DRAFT

PRIORITY CAPITAL PROJECTS TOTAL

TOTAL

$45,582,500

Note: Unfunded projects only By Phasing

ShortͲTerm MediumͲTerm LongͲTerm

By System Components

Parks and Facilities Fitness and Athletics Community Cultural Arts Sustainability and Resiliency Connectivity

$11,927,500 26.2% $18,572,500 40.7% $15,082,500 33.1% $18,950,000 $23,737,500 $355,355 $1,975,000 $670,000

41.6% 52.1% 0.8% 4.3% 1.5%

161


MASTER PLAN