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cornell university

cornell university Department Of Architecture

Master of Architecture Elective Seminar Work

EL

2013

department of architecture

spring 2013 _fall 2011


faculty name

cornell university Department Of Architecture

Master of Architecture Elective Seminars amber bartosh (spring 2013 ) Jordan Berta Allan Chhav Hong Yeol In Elizabeth Kang Siobhan Lee

amber bartosh (spring 2012 ) Xiao Xiao Li & Alison Nash mark cruvellier (spring 2012 ) Juan Carlos Artolozaga & Mia Kang Jordan Berta & Ning Fei Gao Jason Freedman & Elizabeth Saleh Greg Guylai & Simin Wang Feng Lin & Zhongtian Lin Mary Esther Palumbo & Dillon Pranger

nikole bouchard (spring 2013 ) Heriberto Rodriguez Valenzuela inaqui carnicero (spring 2013) Mia Miyoung Kang ivan perez-rossello (spring 2013) Bradley Kinsey Jr.

& leah white

kevin pratt (fall 2012) Charles Cupples Lucas Greco Hong Yeol In Apexa Patel Yifei Yang

(fall 2012 )

jenny sabin (spring 2012 ) James Blair & Mia Miyoung Kang Clifford Chan Runsheng Lin

aap

srdjan jovanovic weiss (fall 2012) James Blair, Jason Freedman & Heriberto Rodriguez Valenzuela Mia Miyoung Kang Feng Lin Alison Nash

spring 2013 _spring 2012

student name

matthew bannister James Blair Mia Miyoung Kang

alex mergold (spring 2012 ) Tiffany Arakaki Aditya Ghosh Eric Johnson Rachel Kaplan Tzara Peterson William Smith Julia Weiss


jordan berta

amber bartosh

left

01_Analysis of Eda Apartments by Ryue Nishizawa right

01_Surface model 2013

Constructed Drawing II


amber bartosh

2013

allan chhav

Constructed Drawing II


amber bartosh

Amber Bartosh Constructed Drawing II (Seminar)

elizabeth kang

critic:

left

01_Elizabeth Kang (SANAA Zollverein School of Management and Design Analysis) right

01_Hong Yeol In (Aqua Pavilion Constructed Drawing) 2013

Constructed Drawing II


amber bartosh

2013

hong yeol in

Constructed Drawing II


hong yeol in

amber bartosh

2013

Constructed Drawing II


amber bartosh

01

02

03

04

siobhan lee

left

2013

01_Aqua pavillion digital model right

01-04_Pavillion digital and physical models

Constructed Drawing II


siobhan lee

amber bartosh

left

01_Analysis of The Ducth Embassy by OMA 2013

Constructed Drawing II


amber bartosh

2013

siobhan lee

Constructed Drawing II


nikole bouchard

student: Heriberto Rodriguez Valenzuela

heriberto rodriguez valenzuela

critic:

Nikole Bouchard Cross Cuts: Cinematic Strategies of Representation (Visual Representation Elective Seminar)

01

02

03

left

01_Original image 02-03_Photoshop actions applied to original image right

01_Final mosaic of tiles from which an animation is made 2013

Cross Cuts: Cinematic Strategies of Representation


nikole bouchard

2013

heriberto rodriguez valenzuela

Cross Cuts: Cinematic Strategies of Representation


inaqui carnicero

student: Mia Miyoung Kang

mia miyoung kang

critic:

I単aqui Carnicero Concrete Sense (Building Technology Seminar)

INTRODUCTION: Subtractive Concrete

Subtractive concrete was investigation into creation of void space through removal of found object. In this scheme, paper was used as formwork, where concrete was poured over. Removal of formwork (paper) was also great interest in this investigation. Paper was set on fire in order to be removed. Because paper was densely packed in order to maintain its form as concrete was poured, various methods to remove paper was further investigated. Due to its lack of structural stabilty with moisture, material tend to cave in.

2013

Concrete Sense


inaqui carnicero

2013

mia miyoung kang

Concrete Sense


inaqui carnicero

01

02

03

04

REMOVAL OF MASS: Dense Brown Paper

mia miyoung kang

Subtractive concrete with dense brown paper mateiral was investigation into creation of void space through use of found material that was inserted and pulled from concrete after concrete has been poured. Rigidity of formwork was studied through density of packed material through folding and twisting. It was stronger form work than that of earlier iteration with paper. Void/ occupiable space was able to be created. However, due to its density, it was diffi cult to remove form work. It was also ignited, however, it had diffi culty in overall removal. REMOVAL OF MASS: Earth

In order to dive further into subtractive concrete through removal of mass, I’ve decided to look into materials that could be easily removed and readily available. Natural material, such as soil and trees were used as form work. Study of its natural resting state of material was observed first followed by accentuating form/ structure to create stablity. Four diff erent formwork was studied through density of packed material through packing and mix of material with clay. It resulted in structually stable inhabitable space and objects. left

01-04_Process of burning dense brown paper right

01_Resulting product of earth removal

2013

Concrete Sense

Natural material, soil was used as form work. Study of its natural resting state of material was observed fi rst followed by accentuating form/structure to create stablity. Four diff erent formwork was studied through density of packed material through packing and mix of material with clay. It resulted in structually stable inhabitable space and objects.


inaqui carnicero

2013

mia miyoung kang

Concrete Sense


inaqui carnicero

02

03

04

mia miyoung kang

01

left

01-02_Casting of inflatable material 03-04_Casting of dense brown paper right

Concrete Sense

2013

01_Casting of dense brown paper


inaqui carnicero

2013

mia miyoung kang

Concrete Sense


ivan perez-rossello

Design of Ecological Sensitive Products | Bradley Kinsey + Shuping Liu | bjk87 + ssl94

Assembly

1

2

3

4

6

5

ITEM NO. 1 2 3

A

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

B

PET DACRON SAILCLOTH

C

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

D

7

PART NUMBER connection v2 shaft v2 Bearing Ring Bearing Ring Outside2 Ball Bearing Bearing Ring Inside Motor cap bottom cap arm2 Wire Wire Hold Wire Hold Clip sail2 sail3 arm sail test sail3 arm2 tripod tripod base tripod base bottom piece tripod long arm tripod short arm HX-SHCS 0.2528x0.625x0.625-N Regular LW 0.25 MSHXNUT 0.250-28-SN footing teather tie off teather cord Stake

8

MATERIAL 6061 ALUMINUM PET PLASTIC 304 STAINLESS STEEL

QTY. 2 1 2

304 STAINLESS STEEL

1

304 STAINLESS STEEL 304 STAINLESS STEEL VARIOUS METALS PET PLASTIC 6061 ALUMINUM PET PLASTIC 304 STAINLESS STEEL 304 STAINLESS STEEL 304 STAINLESS STEEL PET DACRON (TM) PET DACRON (TM) PET DACRON (TM) PET PLASTIC 6061 ALUMINUM 6061 ALUMINUM

5 1 1 1 1 4 2 2 2 1 1 2 1 2 1 1

6061 ALUMINUM

1

6061 ALUMINUM 6061 ALUMINUM

3 3

A

B

C

12 12 12 3 1 3 3

6061 ALUMINUM 304 STAINLESS STEEL 304 STAINLESS STEEL 304 STAINLESS STEEL

D

UNFOLDED SAILCLOTH E

UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED: DIMENSIONS ARE IN MILLIMETERS SURFACE FINISH: TOLERANCES: LINEAR: ANGULAR: NAME

DEBUR AND BREAK SHARP EDGES

FINISH:

SIGNATURE

DATE

TITLE:

DRAWN

bradley james kinsey jr.

& shuping liu

F

CHK'D

SolidWorks Student Edition. For Academic Use Only. 1

2

APPV'D MFG Q.A

3

4

DO NOT SCALE DRAWING

MATERIAL:

WEIGHT:

N/A

8.83lbs

REVISION

WS - 00

DWG NO.

FULL ASSEMBLY

SCALE:1:32

A3

SHEET 1 OF 1

6

students: Bradley James Kinsey Jr. & Shuping Liu critics: Ivan Perez-Rossello

Digital Modeling and Fabrication for Industrial Design of Sustainable, Ecologically Sensitive/Informed Products (Visual Representation Seminar)

We looked at sail manufacturers to identify a viable waste or discarded material. Visiting Haarstick Sailmakers in Rochester, we were shown the manufacturing process for making a sail. The process involves: sail cloth testing, CNC cutting, and stitching. Through this process, the main waste product is offcuts of sailcloth from the initial cutting, however, the offcuts were often very small pieces—at largest 3 x 2 ft. As we were told, the manufacturers themselves try to make use of offcuts to make duffel bags, but this process proved to be too labor intensive and therefore, the majority of the material is thrown away and not recycled in any way.

Sails wear down through use and are generally considered obsolete when they lose a certain amount of rigidity. In the wind, the sails are exposed to constant distributed wind load, so the stretching and wear to the sail is likewise distributed. Tears and rip are repairable, but a sail which has loosened too much becomes less effective and thus thrown away. Discarded sails are worn but are still usable as a material considering their high performance qualities. Sailcloth is very durable, performs very well in tension, and is often very lightweight. Our initial invest gation into the sailcloth, promoted futher interested in Polyethylene terephthalate—otherwise known as PET. We were

Digital Modeling and Fabrication for Sustainable Industrial Design

2013

We were also shown the various types of sailcloth, each with specific performance qualities. The most common sailcloth is called Dacron (Polyethylene terephthalate), which is intended for casual and long term use, as it is relatively heavyweight and is resistant to UV. The higher-end sailcloths are intended for racing. These materials are super lightweight and are composed of multiple materials, in-

cluding kevlar and carbon fiber, in weave patterns. All the materials have given tensile strength properties, but vary in moisture resistance, and UV resistance. They also greatly vary in price, from $10/ yd to $30/yd or more.


ivan perez-rossello

Design of Ecological Sensitive Products | Bradley Kinsey + Shuping Liu | bjk87 + ssl94

Assembly

1

2

4

3

ITEM NO. 1 1.1 1.2

CAP

5

A

6

5

1.3 1.4

TRUE R1.50

1.5 1.6 1.7 1.8

4.3 TRUE R1.00 TRUE R1.09

B

4.2

.15 TRUE R1.25

2

BALL BEARING RING

2.1 2.2 3 4

4.1

4.1 4.2 4.3 5

.30

C

7

PART NUMBER Arm Connection connection v2 arm2 HX-SHCS 0.2528x0.75x0.75-N Regular LW 0.25 MSHXNUT 0.250-28-SN Wire Hold Clip Wire Hold Wire Rotating Casing and Motor Rotating Magnet shaft v2 Motor Bearing Ring Assembly Bearing Ring Outside2 Ball Bearing Bearing Ring Inside cap

8

DESCRIPTION

QTY. 1 1 2

A

4 4 4 2 2 2 1

B

1 1 1 1 1 6 1 1

C

1.1 TRUE R1.25

TRUE R1.00

D

D

.50 TRUE R1.15

3 COILED COPPER WIRES (FOR GENERATOR)

TRUE R1.40

E

2.1 MAGNET (FOR GENERATOR) UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED: DIMENSIONS ARE IN MILLIMETERS SURFACE FINISH: TOLERANCES: LINEAR: ANGULAR: NAME

TRUE R1.50 F

2.2 PET PLASTIC CASING

SolidWorks Student Edition. For Academic Use Only. 1

2

DEBUR AND BREAK SHARP EDGES

FINISH:

SIGNATURE

DATE

TITLE:

DRAWN CHK'D APPV'D MFG Q.A

3

4

DO NOT SCALE DRAWING

MATERIAL:

WEIGHT:

REVISION

WS - 01

DWG NO.

TOP ASSEMBLY

SCALE:1:8

A3

SHEET 1 OF 7

STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS: Connections & Parts

2013

Our design concept came from our initial interest in wasted sailcloth. We sought to take advantage of the high tensile strength and lightweight qualities of the material. In a similar use as the materials original design intention, we decided to use the cloth as a basis for designing a collapsible/transportable wind turbine with the thought that it could be easily shipped and set up as a means of providing power in post-disaster locations. Set up in key locations, a series of these turbines could provide power for a large amount of people for necessities such as charging phones or other helpful electronics that could be of aid.

Digital Modeling and Fabrication for Sustainable Industrial Design

& shuping liu

interested in PET because it is greatly recycled, and is noticeably much stronger than many other plastics. As bottles and other food containers are commonly made from PET, there is a large amount of post-consumer waste available. We wanted a material with the possibility of being somewhat flexible while retaining strength, largely available, and highly recycleable. The versitility of PET allows.

bradley james kinsey jr.

7


ivan perez-rossello

Design of Ecological Sensitive Products | Bradley Kinsey + Shuping Liu | bjk87 + ssl94

Assembly

1

2

4

3

6

5

ITEM NO. 1 2

A

3 4 5 6 7 8

3 DETAIL C SCALE 1 : 1

B

7

PART NUMBER connection v2 arm2 HX-SHCS 0.2528x0.75x0.75-N Regular LW 0.25 MSHXNUT 0.250-28-S-N Wire Hold Clip Wire Hold Wire

8

DESCRIPTION

QTY. 1 2

A

4 4 4 2 2 2

TRUE R12.49 7

C

B

8

4 B

6

20.00 5 C

C

1 2

13.65 D

D

CAST PET PLASTIC ARM, BEFORE STRESSED IN TENSION

E

UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED: DIMENSIONS ARE IN MILLIMETERS SURFACE FINISH: TOLERANCES: LINEAR: ANGULAR: NAME

DEBUR AND BREAK SHARP EDGES

FINISH:

SIGNATURE

DATE

DO NOT SCALE DRAWING

TITLE:

DRAWN CHK'D

SolidWorks Student Edition. DETAIL B For Academic Use Only. SCALE 1 : 1

F

1

2

APPV'D MFG MATERIAL:

Q.A

3

REVISION

WS - 03

DWG NO.

ARM CONNECTION DETAIL

4

WEIGHT:

SCALE:1:8

A3

SHEET 3 OF 7

bradley james kinsey jr.

& shuping liu

9

Design of Ecological Sensitive Products | Bradley Kinsey + Shuping Liu | bjk87 + ssl94

Assembly

1

2

4

3

6

5

7

8

A

A

B

B

M

C

DETAIL M SCALE 1 : 1

DETAIL P SCALE 1 : 1

C

D

D

N

P

DETAIL R SCALE 1 : 1

E

DETAIL N SCALE 1 : 1

R UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED: DIMENSIONS ARE IN MILLIMETERS SURFACE FINISH: TOLERANCES: LINEAR: ANGULAR: NAME

DEBUR AND BREAK SHARP EDGES

FINISH:

SIGNATURE

DATE

DRAWN

F

CHK'D

SolidWorks Student Edition. For Academic Use Only. 1

2

APPV'D MFG Q.A

3

4

DO NOT SCALE DRAWING

TITLE:

MATERIAL:

6061 ALUMINUM WEIGHT:

REVISION

WS - 06

DWG NO.

TRIPOD ASSEMBLY

SCALE:1:8

A3

SHEET 6 OF 7

Digital Modeling and Fabrication for Sustainable Industrial Design

2013

12


ivan perez-rossello

Design of Ecological Sensitive Products | Bradley Kinsey + Shuping Liu | bjk87 + ssl94

Assembly

1

2

4

3

6

5

7

8

A

A

STAINLESS STEEL STAKE

PET SHAFT

B

B

7.38

C

C

85.89

D

D

ALUMINUM POLE E

UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED: DIMENSIONS ARE IN MILLIMETERS SURFACE FINISH: TOLERANCES: LINEAR: ANGULAR: NAME

DEBUR AND BREAK SHARP EDGES

FINISH:

SIGNATURE

DATE

DO NOT SCALE DRAWING

F

WS - 05

CHK'D

SolidWorks Student Edition. For Academic Use Only. 1

2

APPV'D MFG MATERIAL:

Q.A

3

REVISION

TITLE:

DRAWN

4

DWG NO.

BOTTOM ASSEMBLY

WEIGHT:

SCALE:1:8

A3

SHEET 5 OF 7

11

bradley james kinsey jr.

Design of Ecological Sensitive Products | Bradley Kinsey + Shuping Liu | bjk87 + ssl94

Assembly

1

2

4

3

6

5

7

8

A

A

.25

23.50

.13

& shuping liu

B

B

TRUE R.13 .25

7.50 .13 C

C

3.00 D

D

.50

.50 E

UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED: DIMENSIONS ARE IN MILLIMETERS SURFACE FINISH: TOLERANCES: LINEAR: ANGULAR: NAME

DEBUR AND BREAK SHARP EDGES

FINISH:

SIGNATURE

DATE

DRAWN

F

CHK'D

SolidWorks Student 3.00 Edition. For Academic Use Only. 2

MFG MATERIAL:

WS - 07

DWG NO.

6061 ALUMINUM 3

4

WEIGHT:

REVISION

SCALE:1:8

TRIPOD PARTS

A3

SHEET 7 OF 7

13

2013

1

APPV'D

Q.A

DO NOT SCALE DRAWING

TITLE:

Digital Modeling and Fabrication for Sustainable Industrial Design


matthew bannister

01

& leah white

02

critic: Matthew Bannister & Leah White

james blair

Special Topics in Visual Representation

ASSIGNMENT 02: Sidewalk Shooting

ASSN 2A: set up a NYC composition and set up a tripod. shoot (at least) 40 images over (at least) 3 hours. changes in time and light should be evident in these shots, so choose a time such as sunrise or sunset to capture the most dynamic light changes. camera settings (focal length) and tripod location and height should be recorded. compose and present these images in a single image that shows time as a gradient. ASSN 2B: create a single image compositing your photos of the site that contains no people

ASSN 2C: create a single image with a narrative of people, time and light, taken from several of the images. consider the lighting in this image, and how and where shadows are falling, people are stepping, etc. ASSN 2D: using the information recorded about the camera settings and tripod height the images were shot with, create a 3D model with a matching camera in 3D studio max. in the space of this camera, render planes. in photoshop, create alpha channels for these planes. let each one of these channels become a masks for your photos, and layer these elements together into a visual collage. 2012

Time Frames: Exposures in Visual Thinking


matthew bannister

01

& leah white

02

2012

james blair

Time Frames: Exposures in Visual Thinking


matthew bannister

& leah white

01

mia miyoung kang

02

2012

Time Frames: Exposures in Visual Thinking


matthew bannister

& leah white

01

2012

mia miyoung kang

Time Frames: Exposures in Visual Thinking


matthew bannister

& leah white

critic: Matthew Bannister & Leah White

rachel kaplan

Special Topics in Visual Representation

ASSIGNMENT 03: Derivatives: Oliver Boberg + Philip-Lorca DiCorcia

ASSN 3A - compose and shoot photos that emulate the lighting and composition demonstrated in the work of Oliver Boberg and Philip Lorca DiCorcia. 12 total photos, 6 emulating the work of each artist. ASSN 3B: find a site, or revisit one from 3A, in order to create 2 images of the exact same composition, one in the style of PLD, one in the style of OB. ASSN 3C: material library on site, photograph all materials in the scene. take orthagonal shots of all surfaces, and create tiled, non repetitive square jpgs for each material. take contextual shots from within your scene so that you have visual information for reflections you create in 3D.

ASSN 3D: interventions in virtual space (3D max or other) match the camera from assignment 3B. create an intervention within your scene which changes the landscape of the site. use the material library (3C) to map scene materials onto the object(s) you create. render these objects and composite them into the scene for your OB derivative image. ASSN 3E: narrative sketch a narrative for your PLD shot that incorporates the intervention. make decisions about where people will be situated, and how they will be interacting with your intervention. carefully consider how light will be used to tell a story, how it will coincide/compliment/contrast the lighting of the scenes. capture images of choreographed people by shooting them in studio with orchestrated lighting, and begin to composite foreign elements into the scene, in the style of PLD. 2012

Time Frames: Exposures in Visual Thinking


matthew bannister

& leah white

01

02

2012

rachel kaplan

Time Frames: Exposures in Visual Thinking


kevin pratt

200’

180

160’

140’

120’

Vertical Scale: 1/16”=1’

charles cupples

100’

55

80’

42

60’

CONCRETE ASPHALT PAVEMENT SECTION OF BUILDING

40’

SOIL AND FOLIAGE ROCK WATER

20’

SOUND PRESSURE : DECIBEL (dB)

0’ 0’

20’

40’

60’

80’

100’

120’

140’

160’

180’

200’

220’

240’

260’

280’

Ho

2012

Site & Sustainability


kevin pratt

Site and Sustainability ARCH 5611

Transect Drawing: 2012.11. 14 Horizontal Scale: 3/64”=1’ Vertical Scale: 1/16”=1

MILSTEIN

Charles Cupples / crc238 Iroha Ito / ii48 Ning Fei Gao / ng358

73

68

300’

320’

340’

360’

380’

400’

420’

440’

460’

480’

500’

520’

540‘

560’

2012

orizontal Scale: 3/64”=1’

Site & Sustainability

580’

charles cupples

48

600’


kevin pratt

02

03

04

charles cupples

01

critic: Kevin Pratt

Site & Sustainability (Building Technology Seminar)

LAB 01: Climate Visualization

This lab is designed to teach you how to visualize climate data and how to access climatic data sets for use in both visualization and building and site analysis. We are going to do a comparative analysis of climate. Therefore we need to pick two locations to

look at. One will be a location you are familiar with – use your hometown. If you can’t find weather data for the exact location, pick somewhere nearby. The second location will be a different place that has a very different climate. 2012

Site & Sustainability


kevin pratt

02

03

04

charles cupples

01

left

01_Elmira (air use) 02_Dallas (heat use) 03_Elmira (humidity) 04_Dallas (humidity) right

2012

01_Elmira (temperature) 02_Dallas (temperature) 03_Elmira (wind) 04_Dallas (wind)

Site & Sustainability


kevin pratt

critic: Kevin Pratt

Site & Sustainability (Building Technology Seminar)

hong yeol in

ASSIGNMENT 02: Odum Diagram

Odum remarks that a good model deals with the following issues: 1) how the system is bounded 2) subsystems (components) 3) time scale Often, the boundaries of a system are chosen arbitrarily in order to produce a continuous “control volume� for a model. Define a control volume and the inputs (sources), outputs (sinks) and internal processes and subsystems, in the notation of Odum for one of the following: a. your person b. Milstein Hall c. the City of Ithaca d. Collegetown Bagels e. your dorm room f. a greenhouse that grows tomatoes

Site & Sustainability

2012


kevin pratt Apexa Patel (asp232) 9/17/12

Carbon Dioxide Nose (Sinuses)

Nitrogen

Air

Supraglottis

Lips

Glottis

Oxygen Trachea

Water vapour

Vocal chords/folds

Subglottis

Larynx

Argon

Carbon Dioxide

Diaphragm contracts and relaxes

Lungs

Chest

vocal tone

Conversation

Resonance

Bronchus

Sun

Skin

Mouth

Speech

Pyloric Sphincter

Esophagus

Saliva Lips

Water

Louie’s Truck

1

Drinks

GDP

ADP

2

Fatty acids & cholestral

Energy

Inorganic Phosphate

Food

Small intestine

Maltose

Glucose Colon

Bladder

Urethra

Hunger

5

9

Brain

Receptors in muscles

Thoughts & Ideas

Fats

soluble

Fiber

insoluble

NREM sleep

Vitamins

Axl3 Rose

Education

Fat soluble - A, E, K

Stress

D

Water soluble - B, C

Dreams Eyes

Retina

Optic Nerve Optic Chiasm

Optic Tract

Work

6

Fatigue REM sleep

Stupidity

Cognition

4

Image

Posterior Speech Area

Anxiety & Irratability

Art

Kidneys

Large intestine

Starch & Sugar

Carbohydrates

Amino acids

Diffusion Osmosis

Lymphatics

Protein

MilsteinHall (Cornell)

Pancreas

Stomach

Gallbladder

GTP

The Green Dragon

Ghrelin

Liver

ATP

Primary visual cortex

Rectum Anus

Lateral Geniculate Nucleus

Primary Motor cortex

Wernicke’s Area

Solid Waste

7

Broca’s Area

]

[

Liqiuid Waste1

8

apexa patel

left

01_Odum Diagram

2012

right

01_Odum Diagram

Site & Sustainability


kevin pratt

critic: Kevin Pratt

Site & Sustainability (Building Technology Seminar)

LAB 03: Solar Geometry 1 – The Gnomon

Lab 3 begins the process of understanding solar geometry, shadows and shading. The first part of the assignment is relatively straightforward. Your task is to build a Gnomon that we will be using to test shadowcasting and shading techniques described in class.

hong yeol in

The gnomon is the part of a sundial that casts the shadow. Gnomon is an ancient Greek word meaning “indicator”, “one who discerns,” or “that which reveals.” It has come to be used for a variety of purposes in mathematics and other fields.

2012

Site & Sustainability


kevin pratt

02

03

04

hong yeol in

01

left

01_Gnomon (top)

2012

right

01_Gnomon (perspective D) 02_Gnomon (perspective C) 03_Gnomon (elevation A) 04_Gnomon (elevation B)

Site & Sustainability


kevin pratt

critic: Kevin Pratt

Site & Sustainability (Building Technology Seminar)

yifei yang

LAB 02: Climate Data Visualization

Use one of the locations that you chose for your climate analysis. Your goal is to try and describe how the climate will change in this location over the next sixty or so years. 1. First use the IPCC AR4 data sets to take a look at what different models predict will happen to your particular location. You will have to choose how to look at the data, which scenarios to use, and which models to pull data from. Please look at least two variables (temperature and rainfall, for example). 2. Second, search the web for finer grain data for your area. See if you can find predictions of what will happen according to these data sets. Ask yourself – when were the forecasts made? Do they agree with the latest model runs contained in the relatively new 4th assessment report? Keep in mind that you may not find much specific data for some places. 2012

Site & Sustainability


kevin pratt

2012

yifei yang

Site & Sustainability


srdjan jovanovic weiss

students: James Blair

Jason Freedman Heriberto Rodriguez Valenzuela

critic:

Srdjan Jovanovic Weiss (Spcial Topics in the Theory of Architecture Architecture vis-a-vis Ideology: The Reappearing Acts of Spatial Practice

james blair, jason freedman

& heriberto rodriguez valenzuela

Monument to Cold War Victory Propaganda Projections : Manipulating the Consensus for Victory, NYC

As the competition description makes clear, the impact of half a century of sustained ideological conflict still reverberates through all forms of public and private experience. To explore the idea of a monument to Cold War victory, the project began with two important questions; where exactly is the ideological conflict occurring, and how can the experience of an ideological conflict be exploited to memorialize the Cold War? The answers to these questions are multifaceted and complex. This, in part, is due to the visual lexicon of Cold War imagery having been so widely absorbed into contemporary culture that it now reads as either an aesthetic misnomer, such as in advertising, or is attached to a Cold War iconography that is framed in terms of destruction and kitsch. On the contrary, a monument to the Cold War should be striking and thought-provoking, evocative of the strange cycle of history, and indicative of the fact that notions of victory are largely defined by the collective psychology of the populace. The objective of the scheme is to utilize the imagery of the Cold War, namely the visual propaganda that has become so prevalent, in order to reframe the conflict in contemporary terms and accomplish the reintroduction of ideological propaganda into the public consciousness. An important concept is the notion of public vs. private space (drawing on how the two opposing systems that fought conflict interpreted these notions) and how utilizing private space in a place like New York City influences the psychological power of ideological propaganda. Through this exploration and the introduction of Cold War signifiers into the architectural realm, unique notions of victory are evoked and induced in the minds of the viewers. The manifestation of the scheme visually articulates these ideas as photographs of iconic propaganda projected in light onto architectural surfaces, and into the urban architectural spaces of Manhattan. While contemporary propaganda is largely broadcast through new media such as the Internet and online social networks, the

iconographic nature of this project harkens back to the legacy of the Cold War in the complex material, social, and cultural forms of signification and indexicality that the traditional idea of a monument still clings to. On the other hand, the medium used challenges those notions. If a monument is not a permanent and grandeur gesture but rather a temporal and intimate one, it better reflects the true nature of the Cold War conflict and the effect upon the victims of the War. The projected images attempt to break down the traditional, formal structure of the monument in order to redefine the way one addresses the introduction of propaganda into everyday life. The link between Soviet propaganda and the city of New York is rooted in fascinating and little known history. The Soviet aesthetic, both in architecture and propaganda translated into print, was inspired directly by Stalin’s fascination with lower Manhattan in the early 1930’s. In particular, Stalin saw McKim, Mead and Whites’ Municipal Building, 1914, as an example of how the entirety of the Soviet Union could be rebuilt. Stalinist architecture refined these forms, originally the result of New York’s 1916 Zoning Resolution, and often placed a mark of Soviet propaganda such as an image or icon at the apex of such structures. Stalin would eventually commence his ambition to construct the ideal Soviet city through his commissioning of ‘The Seven Sisters’ skyscrapers of Moscow in the 1940’s and 1950’s. This project, a monument to Cold War victory, reintroduces and reinforces the tie between propaganda and the architecture of New York through the simple yet striking introjections of iconic imagery, projected onto the apex of ordinary buildings. Consequently, the outcome is arresting and provocative, reminiscent of the strange cycle of history, and indicative of the fact that indeed a retroactive commemoration utilizing propaganda has the power to alter collective psychology and the consensus for victory. 2012

Architecture vis-a-vis Ideology: The Reappearing of Spatial Practice


srdjan jovanovic weiss

james blair, jason freedman

2012

& heriberto rodriquez valenzuela

Architecture vis-a-vis Ideology: The Reappearing of Spatial Practice


james blair, jason freedman

& heriberto rodriguez valenzuela

srdjan jovanovic weiss

2012

Architecture vis-a-vis Ideology: The Reappearing of Spatial Practice


srdjan jovanovic weiss

james blair, jason freedman

2012

& heriberto rodriquez valenzuela

Architecture vis-a-vis Ideology: The Reappearing of Spatial Practice


james blair, jason freedman

& heriberto rodriguez valenzuela

srdjan jovanovic weiss

2012

Architecture vis-a-vis Ideology: The Reappearing of Spatial Practice


srdjan jovanovic weiss

james blair, jason freedman

2012

& heriberto rodriquez valenzuela

Architecture vis-a-vis Ideology: The Reappearing of Spatial Practice


srdjan jovanovic weiss

01 students: Mia Miyoung Kang critic:

Srdjan Jovanovic Weiss (Spcial Topics in the Theory of Architecture Architecture vis-a-vis Ideology: The Reappearing Acts of Spatial Practice

mia miyoung kang

Ink Ice

A visitor encounters an object. An object unlike any others he/she has seen before. As visitor approach the object, he/ she feels the coldness of its energy being exuded into the atmosphere. With curiosity, the visitor approaches the object and places his/her body near its dense charcoal black ice surface, where he could only sense the silent solitude. Within its silence, visitor drifts into deep thought… As the time pass, the object slowly melts away into its surrounding, where once foreign, becomes part of ‘whole’. Other visitors, similar to one before, join the object. As visitors emerge to observe this powerful silent object, they become part of the ‘whole’. Their meandering footsteps marked with residue from the object migrate near by leaving imprint on the ground… More time pass, the object has slowly transformed. As its original solid charcoal black ice form diminish, its liquid counterpart emerge leaving black imprint on the ground. The object has vanished, and a space for imagination is all that remains. A visitor encountered an object. An object unlike any other he/she has seen before. The Cold War and its events have left a significant legacy in the United States and Russia. With its ‘non-physical’ existence of the war, Monument of Cold War Victory is created as abstract form as an expression of hope for peace in the state of mind for those directly involved in The War and those who were greatly influenced. As the ice slowly transform from solid to liquid it will eventually leave imprint on the paper that lie underneath the ice. The abstract symbols vanished, and imprinted print for imagination is all that remains. The remaining imprinted print takes on new form of life and meaning as a form of existence of the event. Through this abstract symbol, visitors become ‘one’ with Cold War and simultaneously

find sense of peace and tranquility as the ice transform. Once thought as ‘War’ now is transformed into peace and victory in the minds of beholder. INSTALLATION Ink ice is to be installed at Union Square in NY and Red Square in Moscow both as an important intersection, a place of unity. It is allowed to melt under the sun and wind. As the ice fights for its survival, it surrenders to its warming surrounding. Sense of negotiation emerges through conflict. Depending on the atmospheric temperature, ice will melt at various rates, leaving different imprint on the paper that lie underneath the ice. As visitors interact with ice and surrounding liquid ice ink, they will also contribute to the outcome of the imprint. The abstract symbol of ice vanishes but the remaining imprinted paper is left for imagination, a symbol of peace and victory. INK ICE The ice block is in the form of plinth and tower, symbolizing the structure once dominated by Russia borrowed by rest of the world. Ice is made from smoke ink of various densities. As the temperature warm up, the staked ice plinth and tower melt into its context, dissolving into pools of still dark water. As days go by, the solid entity will disappear, the residue left behind are only ink imprint on the ground. The original trace to plinth and tower is still visible with overlay of unpredicted imprint of ink, surrounding, and atmosphere. The abstract symbols vanished, and a space for imagination is all that remains. A symbol of peace and victory remains. 2012

Architecture vis-a-vis Ideology: The Reappearing of Spatial Practice


srdjan jovanovic weiss

left

01_Ink Ice meltdown drawings right

01_Ink Ice meltdown rendering

2012

mia miyoung kang

Architecture vis-a-vis Ideology: The Reappearing of Spatial Practice


srdjan jovanovic weiss

left

01_Ink Ice meltdown rendering right

mia miyoung kang

01_Ink Ice prints

2012

Architecture vis-a-vis Ideology: The Reappearing of Spatial Practice


srdjan jovanovic weiss

2012

mia miyoung kang

Architecture vis-a-vis Ideology: The Reappearing of Spatial Practice


srdjan jovanovic weiss

student: Feng Lin

feng lin

critic:

Srdjan Jovanovic Weiss (Spcial Topics in the Theory of Architecture

Monument to Cold War Victory : Fictional Underground

The proposal for the Cold War Victory Monument locates the commemoration site at a fictional underground space which used to operate as be the cold war missile launch site. It is invisible, but powerful just like the hidden power of cold war.

War, that it was a hidden power in the past (1st image), then forgotten by during the development time (2nd image), and eventually, it may be revealed to the public in the future (3rd image).

Since Cold War was not an official war between the United States and the Soviet Union; therefore, the victory of the war remains uncertain and has never been clarified. A monument is always built to represent the victory or commemorate the victims; however, in terms of the Cold War, the result has never been known. The proposed monument is for neither the US nor the Soviet Union, but to represent the fact of the Cold

The first image represents the past of Cold War while both the above ground and underground are for military use; in the second image the above ground is the image of its economic development while the underground space is being forgotten by people just like Cold War. The third image shows the idea that Cold War may finally revealed to the public, just as the space can be claimed for public use like a station or an exhibition. 2012

Architecture vis-a-vis Ideology: The Reappearing of Spatial Practice


srdjan jovanovic weiss

left

01_Fictional Underground sectional perspective right

01_Fictional Underground sectional perspective

2012

feng lin

Architecture vis-a-vis Ideology: The Reappearing of Spatial Practice


srdjan jovanovic weiss

posse

/ power, activity / having power / what body and mind can do

telos

networked form

/ constructing a much more networked form of power, a network of control… a network that of course includes the United States, but also includes the other dominant nation states, the capitalist corporations, various multinational institutions, plus a variety of non-governmental organizations

/ end or purpose / goal

at io n

self-organization se lfor ga niz

biopolitical connection between the power of life and its political organization

lit ic

al

emergence

machine + technology hybridization of human and machine is no longer a process that takes place only on the margins of society experience general right to control its own movement is the multitude’s ultimate demand for global citizenship

m ult itu d

e

is

bio

po

/ idea of emergence of new contemporary reality

communication general right to control its own movement is the multitude’s ultimate demand for global citizenship

power

time + body

control

/ time is a collective experience that embodies and lives in the movements of the multitude

multitude

/ conceptualization as a new model of resistance against the global capitalist system mult itud e ha s to con trol mov eme nt / movements of the multitude designate new spaces, and its journey establish new residence

structure

endless paths

globalization

imperialism

movement

general right to control its own movement is the multitude’s ultimate demand for global citizenship

/ the power of a nation state to impose its sovereignty over foreign territory

no longer the ruling form of power / post 911 US. Imperialism / attempting to control foreign territory and potentially the whole globe / remake the Middle East, rule over the world, etc

mobile multitude

empire

US as imperial power

US

/ global multitude / global citizenship

/ de-centered / a new logic of global control or domination

autonomous movement / self - assembly

dominant nation states blurred “boundaries” a variety of non-governmental organizations

capitalist corporations passport / will become obsolete

multinational institutions

the general right to control its own movement is the multitude’s ultimate demand for global citizenship

global citizenship is the multitude’s power to reappropriate control over space and thus to design the new cartography

new geography / established new rivers and ports / locomotives for circulation / temporary residences and networks of the mass distribution of living humanity

uncontainable rhizomes / new path of destiny / constructed new freedoms

empire does not really know how to control these paths and can only try to criminalize those who travel them

mia miyoung kang

& alison nash

empire must restrict and isolate the spatial movements of the multitude to stop them from gaining political legitimacy

01_Elastic Ideology (class presentation)

Architecture vis-a-vis Ideology: The Reappearing of Spatial Practice

2012

left


srdjan jovanovic weiss

Multitude

singular power of a new city

Self-Organization

global order arise from local interaction

Emergence

complex system arise from multiplicity of simple interactions

Hard Line

Erosion

changes through time, streching landscape

wall, rifts

Shifitng Borders indeterminate

Coexistence

parallel regimes of identities and power, union opposites

Evolving Future

locked in present, anticipating shifts, fictions

mia miyoung kang

2012

& alison nash

right

01_Elastic Ideology (class presentation)

Architecture vis-a-vis Ideology: The Reappearing of Spatial Practice


srdjan jovanovic weiss

soc

iali

sm

’s s

tor

y

ele

na

kag

mia miyoung kang

& alison nash

new 190 yor 0 - k ci 193 ty 3 rift s per “en cepti o fut ding ns ure ”

of

ide

an,

198

1

olo

gy

01_Elastic Ideology (class presentation)

Architecture vis-a-vis Ideology: The Reappearing of Spatial Practice

2012

left


srdjan jovanovic weiss

protocol of peace

1915

the great divide

1925

2012

“lessons for american radicals�

right

01_Elastic Ideology (class presentation)

Architecture vis-a-vis Ideology: The Reappearing of Spatial Practice

& alison nash

1935

mia miyoung kang

1930

strike failure

1920

the new deal

1910

WW I

1905

new york city

a portrait of the NY SP

1900

dissension within the SP

what happened to socialism in america?


srdjan jovanovic weiss

1915

1920

1925

1930

1935

Ideology

1940

1945

1950

Red Urbanism

1955

utopia

SHE NZHE N CHI NA

1960

1965

1980

1919-1977

* CCP

1959 Fammine

1949-1956 l a nd reform

Zone1

1972+

American Dream

Capitalist M arket

Deng Xi a opi ng

1958 Soviet Union fall out

*crea te communes

1976-1979 Economic Zone

Antiurbanism

*Uni ty

Zones

Infrared 1957-1977

1934 Mao Zedong

Events

1975

1919-1957

De-Urbanism Actors

1970

1919.1978

1963 Middle man campaign 1970 decline of Red ideology

INDUSTRIALIZATION CITIES COUNTRYSIDE Cities reorganized around self industrial neighborhood communes countriside focus /autonomy form cities / city center of consumption not production CITY IS CENTER * s oci a l i s t ci ti es /i l l us i on of future: Expa ns i on- Overs ta tement - “a es thei ci s i m of numbers ” CITY IS COUNTRYSIDE factories of red / surreal ghost factories * i dea l communi s t ci ti es / hous i ng s ta nda rdi za ti on, control i i ng ci ty s i ze, pol i ti ca l /a dmi n centra l i ma ge

Revers a l of Ma o a nti -urba n s tra tegi es / us es metropi ol i s & ma rket

*"des tructi on for cons tructi on" / "i ndus tri a l i za ti on wi thout urba ni za ti on" *doubt a bout centra l pl a nni ng

1915

1920

1925

1930

1935

Ideology

1940

1945

Red Urbanism

1950

1955

utopia

SHE NZHE N CHI NA

1960

1965

1980

1919-1977

Zones

Infrared

Economic Zone

1959 Fammine

1949-1956 l a nd reform *crea te communes

1976-1979

1957-1977

Antiurbanism

* CCP *Uni ty

1975

1919-1957

1934 Mao Zedong

Events

1970

1919.1978

De-Urbanism Actors

*shift from factories to freeways and highrise

Zone1

1972+

American Dream

Capitalist M arket

Deng Xi a opi ng

1958 Soviet Union fall out 1963 Middle man campaign

1970 decline of Red ideology

INDUSTRIALIZATION CITIES COUNTRYSIDE Cities reorganized around self industrial neighborhood communes countriside focus /autonomy form cities / city center of consumption not production CITY IS CENTER CITY IS COUNTRYSIDE factories of red / surreal ghost factories PRESENT TIME LAPSE FUTURE obsession with future / refussal of present Cured of future INDIVIDUAL vs. MULTITUDE Loss of individual significance / freedom from individual and tradition Specialization pol i ti cs vs . profes s i ona l s / TECH & SCIENCE

Market vs. Class struggle

CONCEALMENT

representation vs. Perception

& alison nash

REPRESENTATION PERCEPTION

mia miyoung kang

Concea l ment of Communi s m

01_Elastic Ideology (class presentation)

Architecture vis-a-vis Ideology: The Reappearing of Spatial Practice

2012

left


srdjan jovanovic weiss

1915

1920

1925

1930

1935

Ideology

1940

1945

1950

Red Urbanism

1955

utopia

SHE NZHE N CHI NA

1960

1965

1980

1919-1977

1959 Fammine

1949-1956 l a nd reform

Zone1

1972+

American Dream

Capitalist M arket

Deng Xi a opi ng

1958 Soviet Union fall out

*crea te communes

1976-1979 Economic Zone

Antiurbanism

* CCP *Uni ty

Zones

Infrared 1957-1977

1934 Mao Zedong

Events

1975

1919-1957

De-Urbanism Actors

1970

1919.1978

1963 Middle man campaign 1970 decline of Red ideology

INDUSTRIALIZATION CITIES COUNTRYSIDE Cities reorganized around self industrial neighborhood communes countriside focus /autonomy form cities / city center of consumption not production CITY IS CENTER CITY IS COUNTRYSIDE factories of red / surreal ghost factories TIME LAPSE PRESENT FUTURE obsession with future / refussal of present Cured of future *forced to bury promise of the future

1915

1920

1925

1930

1935

Ideology

1940

1945

Red Urbanism

1950

1955

utopia

SHE NZHE N CHI NA

1960

1965

Zones

Infrared

Economic Zone

1959 Fammine

1949-1956 l a nd reform *crea te communes

1976-1979

1957-1977

Antiurbanism

* CCP *Uni ty

1980

1919-1977

1934 Mao Zedong

Events

1975

1919-1957

De-Urbanism Actors

1970

1919.1978

Zone1

1972+

American Dream

Capitalist M arket

Deng Xi a opi ng

1958 Soviet Union fall out 1963 Middle man campaign

1970 decline of Red ideology

INDUSTRIALIZATION CITIES COUNTRYSIDE Cities reorganized around self industrial neighborhood communes countriside focus /autonomy form cities / city center of consumption not production CITY IS CENTER CITY IS COUNTRYSIDE factories of red / surreal ghost factories PRESENT TIME LAPSE FUTURE obsession with future / refussal of present Cured of future INDIVIDUAL vs. MULTITUDE Loss of individual signiďŹ cance / freedom from individual and tradition Specialization pol i ti cs vs . profes s i ona l s / TECH & SCIENCE

Market vs. Class struggle

CONCEALMENT

representation vs. Perception PERCEPTION Concea l ment of Communi s m

mia miyoung kang

REPRESENTATION

2012

& alison nash

right

01_Elastic Ideology (class presentation)

Architecture vis-a-vis Ideology: The Reappearing of Spatial Practice


the introverted monument final review

srdjan jovanovic weiss

2012

Architecture vis-a-vis Ideology: The Reappearing of Spatial Practice


srdjan jovanovic weiss

2012

the introverted monument final review

Architecture vis-a-vis Ideology: The Reappearing of Spatial Practice


amber bartosh

left

01_Crumped image rendering right

xiao xiao li

& alison nash

01_Crumped image study

2012

Constructed Drawing II


amber bartosh

xiao xiao li

2012

& alison nash

Constructed Drawing II


mark cruvellier

left

juan carlos artolozaga

& mia miyoung kang

01-02_Blur Building (DSR) Model details

2012

Structures 3603 | 6603


mark cruvellier

juan carlos artolozaga

& mia miyoung kang

right

2012

01_Blur Building (DSR) Wood model

Structures 3603 | 6603


jordan berta

& ning fei gao

mark cruvellier

01

2012

Structures 3603 | 6603


mark cruvellier

jordan berta

& ning fei gao

left

2012

01_ White Forest Building (Junya Ishigami) soldered model right

01_White Forest Building (Junya Ishigami) soldered model

Structures 3603 | 6603


jason freedman

& elizabeth saleh

mark cruvellier

2012

Structures 3603 | 6603


mark cruvellier

left

01_German-Chinese House (Markus Heinsdorff) Model detail right

01_German-Chinese House (Markus Heinsdorff) Wood, metal and plexi model

jason freedman

2012

& elizabeth saleh

Structures 3603 | 6603


simin wang

& greg guylai

mark cruvellier

01_Metropol Parasol (J端rgen Mayer-Hermann)

Structures 3603 | 6603

2012

left


mark cruvellier

simin wang

2012

& greg guylai

right

01_Metropol Parasol (J端rgen Mayer-Hermann)

Structures 3603 | 6603


feng lin

& zhongtian lin

mark cruvellier

left

01_Cathedral of Christ the Light (SOM) model 01_Cathedral of Christ the Light (SOM) model detail

Structures 3603 | 6603

2012

right


mark cruvellier

feng lin

2012

& zhongtian lin

Structures 3603 | 6603


mary palumbo

& dillon pranger

mark cruvellier

2012

Structures 3603 | 6603


mark cruvellier left

01_Bird Watching Tower (GMP Architecture) Model interior detail right

01_Bird Watching Tower (GMP Architecture) Wood model

mary esther palumbo

2012

& dillon pranger

Structures 3603 | 6603


rachel kaplan

aleksandr mergold

2012

Making Prints


aleksandr mergold

2012

eric johnson

Making Prints


tzara peterson

aleksandr mergold

2012

Making Prints


aleksandr mergold

2012

julia weiss

Making Prints


aleksandr mergold

02

elective seminar

01

left

2012

01_Clay print stamp 02_Clay print

Making Prints


aleksandr mergold

01

02

elective seminar

2012

right

01_Clay print stamp 02_Clay print

Making Prints


elective seminar

aleksandr mergold

01

02

03

left

2012

01-03_Clay print stamps

Making Prints


aleksandr mergold

02

03

elective seminar

01

2012

right

01-03_Clay print stamps

Making Prints


elective seminar

aleksandr mergold

left

2012

01_Rubber print

Making Prints


aleksandr mergold

elective seminar

2012

right

01_Rubber print

Making Prints


james blair

& mia miyoung kang

jenny sabin

2012

Digital Ceramics


jenny sabin

james blair

& mia miyoung kang

left

01_Ceramic mold, components & wall configuration right

2012

01_Ceramic components

Digital Ceramics


james blair

& mia miyoung kang

jenny sabin

left

Digital Ceramics

2012

01_Ceramic component wall configuration


james blair

& mia miyoung kang

2012

jenny sabin

Digital Ceramics


jenny sabin

02

03

clifford chan

01

Digital Ceramics

FRONT ELEVATION

2012

04


jenny sabin

clifford chan

left

01_Pre-bloom (woven stage) 02_Mid-bloom (concentric stage) 03_Full-bloom (reductive Stage) 04_Front elevation right

2012

01_3D print prototype

Digital Ceramics


runsheng lin

02

03

2012

Digital Ceramics

04 6.00

5.00

4.50

4.00

4.25

4.00

3.75

3.50

6.00

5.00

4.50

4.00

2.75

3.00

2.75

2.50

6.00

5.00

4.50

4.00

jenny sabin

8.50 inch

01

05


jenny sabin

runsheng lin

left

01_Component catalogue 02-05_Elevations right

2012

01_Final prototype

Digital Ceramics


runsheng lin

jenny sabin

left

01_Final prototype right

01_Usage diagram 02-04_Vegetation growth phases

2012

Digital Ceramics


jenny sabin

runsheng lin

2012

01

02

03

04

Digital Ceramics


Cornell University: Master of Architecture Program