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cornell university

cornell university Department Of Architecture

Master of Architecture Core Design Studio Work

IV

2013

department of architecture

spring 2013 _fall 2011


faculty name

cornell university Department Of Architecture

Master of Architecture Core Design Studio IV vincent mulcahy James Blair Mia Miyoung Kang Kwan Ho Felita Li Alison Nash

+ luben dimcheff (spring 2012)

aap

student name

spring 2012


vincent mulcahy

james blair

student: James Blair

& luben dimcheff

critics: Vincent Mulcahy & Luben Dimcheff

TRAILER PARK WINERY

The concept for the project was inspired by the extreme care and individualization vineyards use when dealing with a seemingly monoculture fi elds of grape vines. The project use USGS maps of the sites soil as well as topography to map and place each winery. The facility consists of six individual wineries which make up the overall vineyard. Each facility has the capability to produce wine independently, some shared processing would occur such as bottling trailer and grape crusher.

Core Design Studio IV

Landscapes in the greater Ithaca area are notoriously beautiful and this projects site is no exception. Th e site’s beauty lies in its views of Cayuga Lake. Th e gentle topography lends itself to the production of grapes. Th e circulation within the site is intentionally limited. Parking occurs along the perimeter. Each cabin winery has a small parking space located various distances from the winery. Visitors walk along the vines trellises from their vehicle to the cabins. The materials used for surfacing the roads would consist of gravel. Due to the limited vehicle use gravel allows an inexpensive low energy input material which fi ts the esthetics of the rustic vineyard.

2012

Taking advantage of gravity the vertical layout of each winery allow for minimal pumps. Gravity feed minimize the energy used at each step of the wine making process. By placing the wine fermentation and storage below grade the building

takes advantage to the thermal stability of the earth.


vincent mulcahy

& luben dimcheff

left

01_Elevation right

01_Exploded isometric in detail

2012

james blair

Core Design Studio IV


& luben dimcheff

james blair

vincent mulcahy

2012

Core Design Studio IV


vincent mulcahy

& luben dimcheff

2012

james blair

Core Design Studio IV


& luben dimcheff

james blair

vincent mulcahy

left

01_Interior perspective 2012

Core Design Studio IV


vincent mulcahy

& luben dimcheff

james blair

right

2012

01_Interior perspective

Core Design Studio IV


vincent mulcahy

& luben dimcheff

01

02

03

04

05

mia miyoung kang

student: Mia Miyoung Kang

06

07

08

09

critics: Vincent Mulcahy & Luben Dimcheff

TIME

Through the horizon, one encounters a wall that gradually descends into earth.

view of earth and elements Snow falls slowly and as time passes, his memory of time before fade away into new memories.

Darkness envelopes him as he descends into winery. Through this darkness, glimpse of soft light that washes through ceiling start to reveal open space where one could hear only his footsteps and draw of his every breath.

DESIGN NARRATIVE

As one continues, he comes to a narrow corridor where one could see penetrating light at the end, there is absolute silence, he is drawn. At the end of the corridor, he finds himself overwhelmed by the view of the landscape that he once left behind, which again reminded him through this experience. His footsteps slowly fade.

Core Design Studio IV

Winery is carved into earth where interstitial space between the structure and earth is an area of importance to the concept of the winery. This is the space where ever-changing ‘nature’ is captured, snow, leaves, grass, moss, insects, etc. Through this change, the atmosphere in which one experience in the interior space changes constantly, creating a space that is same but different throughout the day. No two moments are identical, but similar.

2012

He enters a room , a room where time is captured through the

Space between earth and form reside snow, leaves, and plants that changes the experience of the interior, creating new memories of space as time passes.


vincent mulcahy

& luben dimcheff

left

01_Interior perspective of the barrel room 02-09_Conceptual images right

01_Ground floor plan

WATER SYSTEM

Situated along shore line of Seneca lake with its grand view that stretch in north to south direction, the open farm land with its exceptional view and vegetation allow for an ideal location for a tranquil winery where visitors could be enveloped by nature that surrounds them.

Winery was focused on production of exclusive fine wine, production of small number of bottles per year, which go through extensive care and time. Winery is open to public by reservation only where tasting is available through tasting room. Special reserve room is opened via exclusive reservation.

Winery is situated in East to West axis with the entry to the winery situated at south. Due to its sun exposure at North side of the structure, it receives soft reflected light throughout the day with occasional burst of sunlight during dawn and dusk.

Winery carved into the earth will attract water from surrounding landscape. In order to make use of this moisture, entire perimeter of winery is equipped with grey water recycling system that will direct water from the surrounding and channel it toward drain system, meanwhile, keeping the surrounding from access water accumulation. Gray water recycling system is embedded below large boulders to be concealed. Through gaps of boulders and drain grill, debris will be collected before entry into recycling system. Once water is recycled, it will be used in the building as water for washing room and water for cleaning facility.

2012

Soil, bedrock, and its erosion is a characteristic that was important in the design concept. Earth is carved from the recessed winery where nature could accumulate.

Core Design Studio IV

mia miyung kang

SITE


& luben dimcheff

mia miyoung kang

vincent mulcahy

2012

Core Design Studio IV


vincent mulcahy

& luben dimcheff

2012

mia miyung kang

Core Design Studio IV


& luben dimcheff

mia miyoung kang

vincent mulcahy

BUILDING SECTION

As one descend down the ramp, one will come to an entrance to the winery. It immediately takes you to a tasting area where one could meander throughout the space with the view of the sky through a courtyard. To left one could venture down a long corridor where aged wine are stored in bottles, which glow with a back light. Down this corridor is a window that captures a grand view of the landscape beyond. From entrance/ tasting area to the production area, one crosses the open air exterior space where sky and nature is captured. The production consists of the largest square footage area of the winery, Crushing area, Fermentation room, and Barrel room (aging) are all adjacent to each other. Special reserve is located at the opposite end of the production where selected bottles of wine are kept and aged. 2012

Core Design Studio IV


vincent mulcahy

& luben dimcheff

2012

mia miyung kang

Core Design Studio IV


vincent mulcahy

& luben dimcheff

student: Kwan Ho Felita Li critics: Vincent Mulcahy & Luben Dimcheff

FRAGMENTED LANDSCAPE

tween nature and the man-made - the winery is the artefact - or more accurately the produced natural and the crop field the natural. The dichotomy of the two was translated into two design interventions to the roofing - pressing and lifting and was arranged as if the two are no longer dialectical but gradually resolving into the mass, fragmented, unnoticed.

DESIGN CONCEPT STATEMENT

PROJECT NARRATIVE

The project is a counter reaction to the vertical neighbouring landmark, Lamoreaux Landing , of which it seeks to relocate it roots to the ground. The site, was originally a corn field. The remains of the crop field was beautifully contained and its remains has caused one to question the relationship be-

While it serves as a subsidary vineyard to the existing well-established vineyards, the project is therefore a medium scale winery, which seeks to provide tasting and dining to small groups by appointment. The project transforms the ground through pressing and lifting the skin, creating slits and openings for the

kwan ho felita li

The silence of the cornfield whispers and yearns for its natural trace in the landscape, in hope that the new winery would further appreciate the ground. Nothing is extracted except for the line of horizon, reframed and truncated within the fragmented roofing. The undulating roof plays with light and space, creating moments of surprise that characterizes the movement within.

2012

Core Design Studio IV


vincent mulcahy

& luben dimcheff

kwan ho felita li

left

01_Exterior perspective right

2012

01_Site plan

Core Design Studio IV


vincent mulcahy

from the tasting room emphasizes on the fragmented landscape. The hidden core separates the production and the public premise, but allows possible interaction whenever needed. Another access to the productionarea is through the ramp that was designed as an intention to transport the crushed grape for further process treatment. The entrance is seasonally engaged and its access is dependable on the availability of manpower. Storage , Barrel storage and the fermentation room is 15 foot in average, allowing sufficient space for fermentation tanks and bottling tools thermally insulated and separated without causing much temperature change and variation.Size of Lot: 18994 GEOTHERMAL HEAT PUMP

The pumps are attached to the ground through a series of plastic pipes that is located beneath the parking lot and the landscaped areas. The winery makes use of one 1550 foot well (open looped system). Groundwater circulating from the wells are transformed into radiant floor heating in the winter and fed into an air

kwan ho felita li

viewers to appreciate the beauty of the horizon in relation to the ground. The dichotomy of the treatment - pressing and lifting creates experiential variations in terms of light, framing and scale.Public premise and production are separated, but is visually connected. The tasting room is the main feature of the project. Not only is it the only program that suspends above ground, public access is formulated through visual connection with the production area, located below ground, circulated access to outdoor patio area and restricted access to the production area. The production area in the lower basement supports the daily functioning of the winery and interacts with the skylights created by the pressing of the ground. One follows the meandering path lined up along with the trees, the unstarting appearance of the building camoauges itself within the landscape, as one seeps into the building without noticing. The slight inclinations of the roof direct views and frames one’s view as one enters into the shop through the lobby area. There is no separation between the shop and the tasting room, but the main view to the exterior

& luben dimcheff

2012

Core Design Studio IV


vincent mulcahy

& luben dimcheff

handling system for heating and cooling year round. The water absorbs heat from the ground during winter and transfers it into the heat pump inside the building. In the summer, the process is reversed as heat from the building is returned to the ground. The water to air heat pump unit is located in the lower basement and provides cooling and fresh air in the production area. Control valves are used to allow water source to circulate within two looping system, allowing one to cool certain parts of the building, and to heat up the tasting room in the winter. Although this is an expensive system to install, the installation costs can be balanced by energy saving.

Local materials are employed for the retaining wall and the bioretention basic of which slate rocks and water seeping rocks are used to drain water within. INSULATION & FOUNDATION

RETENTION POND

The roof is insulated at both sides in the production area to minimize heat loss. Batt insulation is installed within the steel structure and rigid insulation in the cooler side of the building. Different temperature is required in the barrel storage room and the fermentation tanks and thus, the temperature of these two rooms are individually controlled and managed. The fermentation tanks for the white wines are kept at an average of 44 Fahrenheit and the red barrel room at 59 Fahrenheit.

The parking area and the roof garden diverts ground water runoff to bioswales with gravel filters and reintroduce prehistoric grasses to cleanse the ground water of chemicals and pollutants. Water is then channeled onto the linear terraces, collected and diverted into the pool.

Drainage pits of gravel bottomed with a permeable pipe called a drainage tile can be situated by the footings of a foundaÂŹtion to make sure that any stray moisture falls through the pit and into the drainage tiles.

2012

kwan ho felita li

Core Design Studio IV


& luben dimcheff

kwan ho felita li

vincent mulcahy

2012

Core Design Studio IV


vincent mulcahy

& luben dimcheff

2012

kwan ho felita li

Core Design Studio IV


vincent mulcahy

& luben dimcheff

01

02

student: Alison Nash critics:

Vincent Mulcahy & Luben Dimcheff

alison nash

Rabbit Ridge Vineyards is an exclusively red wine making winery. Operating on a similar business model as Shale Stone Winery south of the proposed site, our vineyard offers an enhanced visitor experience in addition to world-class tasting and sale of Seneca Lake’s “Banana Belt” Vinifera red wines. Daily educational self-guided tours of the award-winning LEED platinum facility and grounds enrich the visitor’s understanding of how our earth-based certified organic wine-making practices integrate with modern technology and resilient, site-enhancing systems. These tours of the vineyards and our facility demonstrate how a building can integrate and enhance the local and wider ecosystem. Tour highlights include our on-site water treatment greenhouse, green roof tasting deck, composting toilets, solar hot water wall, and displays and a newspaper that explains material, energy, and construction strategies that lighten our footprint on the earth.

left

01_Aerial photograph of site 02_Ground temperature right

Visitors can also experience this spectacular, glacially formed landscape by tast-

Core Design Studio IV

2012

01_Site plan 02_Building section 03_Ground floor plan

Recalling ancient civilizations that valued birds and animals for their waste’s contribution to fertilization of the land, the farm will include habitat for rabbits, bats, and other animals who bring organic benefits to the land.


vincent mulcahy

& luben dimcheff

02

01

03

ing its fruits: our sophisticated wine is created using modern organic methods. Our day-lit tasting room is the heart of our winery and a comfortable place to enjoy the spectacular view of Seneca Lake.

Program adjacency was conceptualized around a circulation “hinge” that connects upper public areas and the vineyard offices with production areas on a lower level. Working with the slope and local topography the two “arms” of the winery were rotated to maximize passive solar, day-lighting, and the thermal benefits of a below ground wine cellar for ageing and production. Farm and other external inputs enter on the lower level, separate and distant from the public entrance and significant views of Seneca Lake. Two outbuildings contain service functions: a greenhouse encloses a constructed wetland for on-site water treatment, a garage houses farm equipment. Mechanical space for composting toilets, heating, cooling, and air handling related to production and public areas is located below the tasting room. Water heating and a storage cistern is located near the crush pad, the largest water consumer in the winery production process.

2012

Resource and energy considerations: electricity is primarily used for cooling, refrigeration, hot water, pumping, bottling line motors. By placing the areas that require cooler temperatures below ground, the thermal mass of the earth helps to reduce cooling loads necessary to the wine making process. Water is used for fermentation tanks, barrel washing/ soaking, humidifying cellars, cleaning the crush pad. Using extra water available on site and re-using all water in a closed loop treatment system reduces environmental impact.

Core Design Studio IV

alison nash

Rabbit Ridge Vineyards design was inspired by the site’s rocky soil, the glacial geology of the Finger Lakes region, and a desire to work with the sun as a source of light, heat, and energy.


& luben dimcheff

alison nash

vincent mulcahy

left

01_Exterior perspective (night) 2012

Core Design Studio IV


vincent mulcahy

& luben dimcheff

alison nash

right

2012

01_Exterior perspective (day)

Core Design Studio IV

Cornell University: Master or Architecture Program  

Core Design Studio IV Student Work Collection

Cornell University: Master or Architecture Program  

Core Design Studio IV Student Work Collection

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