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Archery Magazine 31407 Outer I-10 Redlands, CA 92373

PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID RAVENNA MI PERMIT NO. 320

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2 Archery Magazine August/September 2006

Archery Magazine August/September 2006 3

&ARTICLES

FEATURES August/September 2006 FROM THE PRESIDENTS DESK by Bruce Cull ...........................................10 WESTERN CLASSIC TRAIL SHOOT by Tim Atwood........................................12 BOWHUNTING FEATURE OF THE MONTH Who Was Ishi? by Tim Atwood........................................20 BOWHUNTING SHORT STORY CBH Tilapia Jamboree by Tim Atwood........................................22

Vol. 26 • No. 4 © 2006 NFAA®

RAGSDALE’S STRAIGHT SHOTS Fast Is Nice by Robert Ragsdale .................................26

NOSTALGIA CORNER National Tournament Memorabilia by Paul Davision ......................................43

SHOOTING IN ADVERSE CONDITIONS, PART I Shooting in the Wind by Bernie Pellerite ...................................30

NFAA FOUNDATION 2006 SCHOLARSHIP WINNERS & APPLICATION .....................48

THE SHOT DOCTOR Don’t Be a Bad Shot by Terry Wunderle ...................................34

MY BOWHUNTING Eldorado Getaway by Ted Nungent .......................................51 ASK THE NUGE Q&A with Ted Nugent.............................54

NFAA CALENDAR OF EVENTS ...............35 BOWHUNTING PLUS by Tim Atwood........................................23

ON OUR COVER:

SECTIONAL NEWS ..................................36

AND MORE!

Outdoor Sectional participants. Photo courtesy of Paul Davison. EDITORIAL POLICIES

Archery is the official publication of National Field Archery Association and is published bimonthly. Editorial deadlines are as follows: ISSUE Feb/March April/May June/July

DEADLINE December 15 February 15 April 15

All material should be sent by mail or e-mail. Mailed contributions should be submitted on diskette and typewritten. Microsoft Word is preferred. DO NOT include digital photos in your word document. No material will be returned. Submissions should be no more than 2,000 words. Previously published material will not be considered unless accompanied by a release or permission from the first publisher. Material appearing in this magazine does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the NFAA or its Board of Directors. The NFAA can not reimburse for cost incurred in the preparation of material submitted, nor compensate contributors for items which are published. All material will be published at the discretion of the editorial board. Photos of animals harvested should be in good taste. Only animals taken under the rules

ISSUE Aug/Sep Oct/Nov Dec/Jan

DEADLINE June 15 August 15 October 15

of fair chase will be considered. Correspondence concerning the NFAA’s policies and operations should be directed to the NFAA Headquarters, 31407 Outer I-10, Redlands, CA 92373. Contributions and correspondence pertaining to this magazine should be directed to: Marihelen Rogers, Editor, 31407 Outer I-10, Redlands, CA 92373 (909) 794-2133 • (909) 794-8512 FAX E-mail: nfaarchery@aol.com NFAA Section and State Association News should be directed to: Paul Davison, Section and State News Editor 2787 Winston Way, Duluth, GA 30096 Fax (770) 476-7488 E-mail (preferred): stringwalker@att.net

Archery is published bimonthly by the National Field Archery Association, 31407 Outer I-10, Redlands, CA 92373, 909/794-2133. Advertising rate cards available for display and classified advertising. All feature and editorial requests should be made in writing to NFAA® at the address above. Editorial contributions must be submitted with selfaddressed envelopes with sufficient return postage. All materials considered, but the publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts. Deadline for copy is eight weeks prior to the month of publication. All statements are those of the writers and do not necessarily conform to the magazine’s editorial policies. Copyright 1984 by the National Field Archery Association®. All rights reserved. Change of address – allow eight weeks for change to become effective. Contact NFAA® headquarters. 4 Archery Magazine August/September 2006

Archery Magazine August/September 2006 5

S RELEASE PRESS RELEASE PRESS RELEASE PRESS RELEASE PRESS RELEASE PRESS RELEASE

Axis Full Metal Jacket ™

Paying You To Improve Your Score

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Easton’s Axis Full Metal Jacket™� Turns Bowhunting Inside Out Salt Lake City, Utah, November 2005 � Easton introduces the next technological advancement in carbon arrows—the all-new Axis Full Metal JacketTM�with Hidden Insert Technology—HIT®. The new and revolutionary Carbon Core™�Axis Full Metal Jacket™�is so new, so different it will turn the bowhunting world inside out. Easton engineers have taken A/C technology—the most advanced arrows ever made—and turned them inside out, by pushing the envelope of innovation to create patent-pending Carbon Core™�construction. Axis FMJ features a small diameter, thick-wall carbon arrow armed in a bonepiercing full metal jacket, giving serious bowhunters just what they need—magnum big game stopping power. The new Axis FMJ provides even more durability and awesome penetration, yet delivers tight broadhead groups due to the accurate design of HIT®. The unique, patent-pending metal jacket helps Axis FMJ pull easier from high-density 3D targets, and fully encapsulates the carbon arrow to prevent carbon splinters when shot into game animals. Easton Bowhunting TV host Fred Eichler has been hunting with Axis FMJ™�prototype arrows the entire 2006 hunting season with fantastic results. “Just when I thought my Axis arrows couldn’t be improved, Easton engineers design the ‘Full Metal Jacket.’ It’s like an Axis arrow on steroids, and it performs like one!” said Eichler. “From Alaskan brown bear, to mountain caribou, to big whitetail bucks, the kinetic energy and penetration I’ve experienced with the FMJ’s are absolutely incredible. FMJ’s knockdown power turns marginal hits into devastating, lethal shots.” Fellow Easton Prostaff hunter, Phil Phillips had this to say about the revolutionary FMJ. “My reoccurring shoulder problems made it difficult to shoot because of the pain in pulling my Axis carbon arrows out of 3D targets. But the ‘Easy Out’ target removal feature of the Axis Full Metal 6 Archery Magazine August/September 2006

Jacket makes shooting painless and fun again.” Axis Full Metal Jacket™�is the best of all worlds— the straightness and consistency of an aerospace metal jacket, the durability and speed of carbon, and the ultra-small diameter benefits of Hidden Insert Technology. Check out the Axis Full Metal Jacket™� carbon arrow revolution today at your local archery pro shop, and feel the difference of a metal-jacketed Axis carbon arrow. You may also call or write Easton Technical Products at 5040 Harold Gatty Drive, Salt Lake City, Utah 84116, 801-539-1400 for a FREE Easton product guide. Or, visit Easton Technical Products at http:// www.easton.com. Beman 9.3—The Affordable, All-Carbon Line-Cutter Salt Lake City, Utah, November 2005— Beman, first in carbon arrows, expands their target line with the addition of the new, large-diameter Beman 9.3™�. Beman 9.3 is the affordable, big-bore target arrow designed to catch the 10-ring and pick up a few extra points on the 3D and target range. So you better check it out before the competition does—it’s stronger, more accurate and a great value. The Beman 9.3 has a large, 9.3-millimeter diameter that is FITA legal and provides target & 3D shooters the advantage of a fast, carbon line-cutter equipped with the accurate Super UNI Nock System to protect the nock of the shaft. Whether you are a serious target archer, or just like spending time shooting 3D targets at your local archery range, the Beman 9.3 can improve your score without breaking the bank. Beman 9.3—Big diameter, big performance and only from Beman. For more information on Beman’s 2006 line-up of carbon arrows, check out your local archery pro shop. You may also call or write Beman at 5040 Harold Gatty Drive, Salt Lake City, Utah 84116. Or visit the Beman online at http://www.beman.com.

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It Pays To Shoot The Best Up to $100,000 In 2006 ASA Pro/Am and Championship (7 Events)

Pro Contingency - $2100

Amateur Contingency - $2800

IBO National Triple Crown and IBO World Championship (4 Events)

Pro Contingency - $2100

Amateur Contingency - $3675

World Archery Festival—Vegas

Championship Divisions - $3675

Flight Divisions - $700

World Archery Festival—Archery Classic

Championship Divisions - $3150

Flight Divisions - $700

NFAA Indoor Nationals

Pro Contingency - $2100

Amateur Contingency - $1225

NFAA Marked 3D—Redding

Pro Contingency - $1575

Amateur Contingency - $1225

NFAA Outdoor Nationals

Pro Contingency - $2100

Amateur Contingency - $1225

NAA Field Nationals/Trials

Amateur Contingency - $1800

NAA Target Nationals

Amateur Contingency - $1800

Nimes Indoor Championships

Amateur Contingency - $1800

European Indoor Championships

Amateur Contingency - $1800

European Outdoor Championships

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FITA World Championships—Field

Amateur Contingency - $3600

Visit The Easton Booth To Get In On The Cash www.easton.com

Archery Magazine August/September 2006 7

NFAA® Council & Board of Directors NFAA® Council

NFAA® Board of Directors

Officers President—Bruce Cull 2305 E. Hwy. 50 Yankton, SD 57078 605/665-8340 archery@iw.net

GREAT LAKES Judy McCutcheon Director - IL 23358 Virden Rd. Virden, IL 62690 217/965-5290 jlynnmac@royell.net

Vice President—Brian Sheffler 7006 Beargrass Ct. Indianapolis, IN 46241 317/244-7585 lbs@indy.net NFAA® Office 31407 Outer I-10 Redlands, CA 92373 909/794-2133 800/811-2331 NFAArchery@aol.com Great Lakes Robert McCutcheon 23358 Virden Rd. Virden, IL 62690 217/965-5290 prairie1@royell.net Mid-Atlantic Mike LePera 34 Kentwood Road Succasunna, NJ 07876 973/584-0637 brtesite@optonline.net Midwest Ray Jones 704 West South Winterset, IA 50273 515/462-6788 IowaArchery@hotmail.com

Frank Tolivar took his 16 lb. turkey on 12/24/05. Frank has been a long time member of the NFAA. Frank holds many records in his home state of Missouri.

Harold Anglin took his farrow hog at 20 yards while bowhunting Montgomery County in Texas. Harold shot his hog with one arrow from a tree stand; it traveled only 30 yards.

Eari Rider of Riverside, California, took his record book class antelope while bowhunting in WY.

New England Kenneth Moore 730 Newman Avenue Seekonk, MA 02771 508/761-5415 kmoore15@comcast.net Northwest Bill Tiddy 3355 Pinecrest Drive Helena, MT 5960-2 tiddyw@aol.com 406/475-3569 Southeast Tim Austin 1710 SW 76th Terrace Gainesville, FL 32607 Flarchery@earthlink.net 352/332-1969

Pat McCabe of Alaska took his black bear using his Black Widow Recurve Bow and carbon Gold Tip arrows while bowhuting Prince William Sound, AK.

Southern Lee Gregory 112 Ridge Oak Drive Georgetown, TX 78628-7613 lee@dlprint.com 512/863-8296 Southwest Jerry Miller P.O. Box 613 Whittier, CA 90608 562/692-6105 swcman1@verizon.net

Rocky Kline Director - IN 1108 N. Korby St. Kokomo, IN 46901 rlkline@insightbb.com 765/457-7086 Bill Jones Director - MI 2049 Lake St. National City, MI 48748 989/469-3939 Dave Thewlis Director - OH 16423 Chamberlain Rd Grafton, OH 44044 440/926-2464 DThew69613@aol.com Bruce Timble Director - WI 650 17th St. N Wisconsin Rapids, WI 54494 715/421-9277 bruce@stringworks.net MID ATLANTIC Ron West Director - MD 190 54th Street SE Washington, DC 20019 WestArrowsWest@aol.com 202/584-8015 John Pawlowski Director - PA 360 Madison St. Coatesville, PA 19320 610/384-5483 bpjp@ccis.net Douglas Joyce Director - NJ 30 Willow Ave. Somerset, NJ 08873 732/247-3892 jdjarcher@aol.com Dave Hryn Director - NY PO Box 341 West Seneca, NY 14224 716/481-4699 Archery1@localnet.com Jim Quarles Director - VA 7911 Cherokee Rd Richmond, VA 23225 804/272-6512 jim.quarles@excite.com Steve Cox Director - WV WV Archery Assn. P.O. Box 142 Waverly, WV 26184 304/464-5646 MIDWEST Rodney “Zeke” Ogden Director - IA 718 N. 8th St. Osage, IA 50461 641/732-5797 ogdpeep@osage.net John Doub Director - KS 1125 E. 59th St. Wichita, KS 67216 316/524-0963 archnutz@cox.net

8 Archery Magazine August/September 2006

Mike Ray of Texas took his 115 lb. wild boar using a Bowtech Allegiance set at 70# and Gold Tip big game arrows with 100 gr. Magnus Buzz cut broadheads.

Bill Hakl Director - MN 5656 317th St. Stacy, MN 55079 wehjkh@concentric.net 612/462-1916

Earl Foster Director - MO 8709 Booth Kansas City, MO 64138 816/763-2699 Ed Christman Director - NE 3818 34th St. Columbus, NE 69601 402/563-3504 eChristman@neb.rr.com Marc Tebelius Director - ND 5292 8th Ave. North Grand Forks, ND 58203 701/792-3582 (home) 218/230-3258 (cell) marct@uffdaonline.net Ron Lewon Director - SD 11 Front St. Bronson, IA 51007 NEW ENGLAND Volker Pense Director - AAE Carl-Ulrich-Strasse 2B 64297 Darmstadt, Germany 0615-653085 nfaadirector@aae-archery.org Gary Marrier Director - VT 1525 Gibou Rd. Montgomery Ctr., VT 05471 802/326-4797 bowdoctor@pivot.net Tom Schaub Director - CT 35 Benson Rd. Ridgegfield, CT 06877 203/748-3771

LeRoy Dukes Director - OR P.O. Box 422 Fairview, OR 97024 503/201-4961 T.C. Parker Director - WA P.O. Box 613 Hoquiam, WA 98550 360/533-4698 wa_nfaa@olynet.com Dan Kolb Director - WY 3571 Teton St. Casper, WY 82609 307/265-4418 bhfsldlk@hotmail.com SOUTHEAST Howard Beeson Director - AL 111 Eagle Circle Enterprise, AL 30824 334/347-4990 Oliver Austin Director - FL 1620 Yearling Trail Tallahassee, FL 32317 850/309-1918 oaustin@admin.fsu.edu Earl Watts Director - GA 3672 Larkin Road SE Dearing, GA 30808 706/556-6145 ewatts@standardtextile.com Jerry Barr Director - KY 919 Manor Dr. Henderson, KY 42420 270/827-4570 barebow@henderson.net

Dave Cousins Director - ME 354 River Rd. Standish, ME 04084 207/642-4530

Mike Hindmarsh Director - NC 1687 Kildee Church Rd. Ramseur, NC 27316 bowtie01@centernet.net 919/742-5017

Alvie Carpenter Director - MA 7 Central Peterborough, NH 03458 603/924-3941 alviec@earthlink.net

S. Dale Smith Director - SC 149 Low Road Six Mile, SC 29682 864/868-9422 sdalesmith@yahoo.com

Michael Wright Director - NH PO box 237 Marlboro, NH 03455 603/876-4249 barebownh@aol.com

Gordon Oland Director - TN 8851 Highland View Lane Knoxville, TN 37938 865/925-0138 goland@staffingtech.com

Bruce Mulneix, Director - RI 6101 Post Rd. Trlr 73, N. Kingstown, RI 02852 401-885-5684

SOUTHERN Wayne King Director - MS 107 Dana St. Brandon, MS 39042 601/825-9278

NORTHWEST Hubert Sims Director - ID PO Box 1713 Orofino, ID 83544 hmsarchery@email.com 208/476-5377

Dick Andrews Director - AR 11 Tuxford Circle Bellavista, AR 72714 479/855-6066 andr-ds@cox.net

Doug Tate Director - MT 3499 Blacktail Loop Rd. Butte, MT 5970d1 406/494-4393 DOUG.TATE@northwestern.com

Scott Bradford Director - LA 40340 Old Hickory Ave. Gonzales, LA 70737-6756 225/622-0838 NFAALADirector@aol.com Robert Wood Director - OK 75377 S. 280 Rd Wagoner, OK 74467 robertw@osaa.us 918/485-6552 Monty Heishmann Director - TX 10149 Heritage Pkwy. West, TX 76691 254-826-5788 barebow@att.net

SOUTHWEST Frank Pearson Director - AZ P.O. Box 308. St. David, AZ 85630 520/647-7847 frank@frankpearson.com Tom Daley Director - CA 11 Colton Ct. Redwood City, CA 94062 650/364-6730 lestom@sbcglobal.net Kenneth Buck Director - CO 1923 Shoshone Dr. Canon City, CO 81212 719/382-8919 KandSBuck@earthlink.net George Kong, Jr. Director - HI 1255 14th Ave. Honolulu, HI 96816-3838 808/734-5402 Robert Borges Director - NM 5332 River Ridge Ave NW Albuquerque, NM 87114 505/890-4665 Archermn@netscape.com Jim Marshall Director - NV 195 Ridge Crossing Henderson, NV 89015 702/566-0819 marshalls01@earthlink.net Ray Shephard Director - UT P.O. Box 610 Santaquin, UT 84655 801/754-1340 RKS1155@msn.com

Professional Representatives Great Lakes Jeff Button 2889 Busston Rd. Cottage Grove, WI 53527 (608) 839-5137 Midwest Sharon Henneman 3818 34th St. Columbus, NE 68601-4447 (402) 563-3504 Midatlantic Doug Williams 31 Gaylord St. Apt. A Auburn, NY 13021 (315) 258-9269 dwilliams @copperjohn.com Northwest Carolyn Elder 2319 Pe Ell McDonald Rd. Chehalis, WA 98532 (360) 245-3261 Southern Troy Wesley 2306 57th St. Lubbock, TX 79412 (806) 797-0546 Southeast Jim Pruitte 6717 Green Plantation Rd. Harlem, GA 30814 (706) 556-0738 JPruitte@mcg.edu Southwest Jonathan Pemberton 1652 N. 2100 W. Provo, UT 85604 (801) 323-3704

Committee Chairmen Pro Chairman Michael Braden 723 Carmel Dr. Keller, TX 76248 817/753-6563 prorookie1@aol.com Bowhunting and Conservation Administrative Chairman Tim Atwood 3175 Racine Riverside, CA 92503 909/354-9968 Atwoodhome@aol.com Celebrity Chairman Ted Nugent Promotion Chairman Fred Eichler

THE NFAA® HAS 50 CHARTERED STATE ASSOCIATIONS AND OVER 1,000 AFFILIATED CLUBS IN THE UNITED STATES AND ABROAD. THE SPORT OF ARCHERY IS A HEALTHY AND EXCITING SPORT PROVIDING AN ACTIVITY IN WHICH THE ENTIRE FAMILY CAN PARTICIPATE.

WRITE US ON HOW TO OBTAIN INFORMATION ABOUT VARIOUS PROGRAMS OFFERED BY NFAA®. NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP TOURNAMENTS, SECTIONAL/STATE TOURNAMENTS, INDOOR/OUTDOOR LEAGUES, JUNIOR BOWHUNTER PROGRAMS, WHICH INCLUDE THE ART YOUNG SMALL / BIG GAME AWARDS, AND THE BOWFISHER PROGRAM.

Archery Magazine August/September 2006 9

NFAA® Museum Tour The voice of field archery, the NFAA®, Ted Nugent United Sportsmen, the IFAA and bowhunting.

Visit our Web site www.fieldarchery.com or call us toll-free at 1-800-811-2331

Greetings fellow archers: new article here

EDITORIAL BOARD: Bruce Cull, Brian Sheffler, Paul Davison, Dick Andrews EDITOR: Marihelen Rogers, NFAA Executive Secretary PUBLISHER: Rogers Printing Inc., 3350 Main St. PO Box 215, Ravenna MI 49451-0215 LAYOUT: Patricia A. Rogers SALES MANAGER: Jim Stewart DISTRIBUTION MANAGER: Scott Robbins

ADVERTISING SALES Martin J. Rogers NFAA Headquarters 31407 Outer I-10, Redlands, CA 92373 (909) 794-2133 (909) 794-8512 FAX E-mail: nfaarchery@aol.com

ADVERTISERS INDEX American Log Homes ................................................2 Angus Brown Safaris................................................58 Archery Focus Magazine.........................................21 BCY Inc.........................................................................4 Brite Site ....................................................................55 Carter Enterprises.......................................................3 Easton...........................................................................7 Electronic Awards.....................................................59 Evelyn Bay Coffee Co...............................................53 Gold Tip .....................................................................60 Kwikee Kwiver .........................................................52 Limbsaver ..................................................................63 Maple Leaf Press .....................................................21 Mathews, Inc. .............................................................5 Mental Management ..............................................59 New Archery Products ............................................62 Ragsdale & Associates .............................................26

T

by Tim Atwood

his month’s pictorial tour shows a painting of the late Fred Bear carrying out a bobcat on his back, and to

his right a bear recurve with the famous compass handle. To the far right a quiver and arrows made by the late Art Young. When in California, stop by and enjoy our archery museum, located in the NFAA

Shot Doctor, the .......................................................34 Specialty Archery........................................................8 Spirit of the Wild, Ted Nugent...............................61 Stanislawski ..................................outside back cover Stringwalker/Paul Davison .....................................43 Sunrize Acres.............................................................58 Sure-Loc .....................................................................59

headquarters building. Bring your bow and use the archery range behind the museum.

Tru-Flight Feathers ...................................................52 US & International Archer Magazine ...................32 Walkers Game Ear ....................................................15 10 Archery Magazine August/September 2006

Archery Magazine August/September 2006 11

3D Tournaments a Success by Tim Atwood

The 23rd Annual Redding two-day Western Classic Trail Shoot, and the 12th annual NFAA Marked 3-D National Championship was held May 6th and 7th in conjunction with the Redding Western Classic Trail Shoot. The shoot has been very successful in the past and was again this year. This year, unlike the past two year,s no rain was in sight. The temperature was in the 80s. Shooters and trade show reps were delighted, not to say the Redding Club itself was overjoyed. Seventy life size 3-D critter factory animal targets were shot in a two-day format. The action began Friday with the team money shoot and the manufacturers products display booths. Saturday morning opening ceremonies were held in the cool morning temperatures—ideal shooting conditions! After getting their instructions from the tournament director, the shooters headed out to their targets for a fun day of shooting. Registration was down just a bit, but gas costs

The shooters gather for opening ceremonies, and Saturdays instructions. 12 Archery Magazine August/September 2006

were up this year. The 2 percent attrition seems quite normal, taking into account gas costs this year. All of the 2006 3-D marked participants and their families had a great time and vow to be back next year. The NFAA final results are listed below and at www.fieldarchery.com. The NFAA officers, Directors, and Staff wait to shoot their first target.

The Idaho wild bunch ready o fire away.

M.J. Rogers, Brain Sheffier, and Ray Jones take aim on the 80-yarder line.

Redding’s cooks take a much-needed brake.

National champion many times over, Louie Rangel, center of the photo, takes aim.

Top Hoyt Pro Staff shooters Dan Quintana and Carl Hicks, always top competitors.

Shooters gather at the practice range.

Tom Daley NFAA’s Ca. State Director, has a few minutes to enjoy himself and old friends.

Archery Magazine August/September 2006 13

Game Ear Works For Me!

Shooters adding it up.

Tim Atwood and Alex Atwood at NFAA’s booth.

Easton and Hoyt booth.

The #1 selling Sound Amplification with Hearing Protection device for more than 13 years. The Pro’s Choice Worn and endorsed by more professional hunters than all other amplifying with hearing protection devices combined! • Wayne Carlton • Paul Butski • Ray Eye • Harold Knight

GAME EAR . . . . . . . . . . . $172.95 GAME EAR II w/AFT. . . . $227.95 GAME EAR III w-c . . . . . $324.95

(with wireless voice communication)

Digital GAME EAR . . . . . $489.95

Add $10.95 S&H • PA residents add 6% sales tax

Scoring the Rams.

The Doinker Boys and booth.

P.S.E truck and work shop and booth.

Walkerʼs GAME EAR II & III features Adjustable Frequency Tuning (AFT) allowing hunters to tune in specific sound frequencies to meet their individual needs, while protecting them from muzzle blasts.

MUFF-STYLE HEARING ENHANCEMENT AND PROTECTION POWER MUFFS . . . . . . . . $209.95 POWER MUFFS QUAD . . $259.95 Walker’s Game Ear, Inc. PO Box 1069 • Media, PA 19063 (800) 424-1069 • (610) 565-8952 www.walkersgameear.com

Shooter looking up at the 14 foot tall Big Foot target. 14 Archery Magazine August/September 2006

Mike Le Pera Brite-Site Booth

NFAA member Cassie Breuer of Port Orford, Oregon shot a Robin Hood on the 50 yard Caribou. Cassie is 14 years old.

Archery Magazine August/September 2006 15

Bowhunting Legislature

News

by Tim Atwood, Bowhunting and Conservation Chairman

Sportsmen Should Remain Alert for Threats at Local Level A city ordinance that recently would have banned bowhunting in an eastern Texas town was defeated by sportsmen’s vigilance. The City of Marshall proposed to ban all bowhunting after a citizen complained that a hunting blind was placed too close to his residence. He believed that bowhunting in the city was dangerous. Marshall’s city commissioners tabled a proposal that would have banned bowhunting until November 4. Bowhunters attending the meeting helped convince city commissioners that bowhunting is safe and essential in controlling the deer population. On November 4, the council decided to reinforce current Texas law, allowing bowhunting on personal property or with the landowner’s permission. No additional restrictions were imposed Bowhunters, along with all sportsmen, should stay alert for these issues. Hunting bans at the local level can spring up quickly if a complaint is registered. These bans stem from complaints that bowhunting or some other form of legal hunting, is unsafe and dangerous to the community. Local officials, many uneducated about such issues, often pass hunting bans just to quell protestors. In reality, a person is 20 times more likely to die from an insect bite than to be injured by a hunter (www. bowsite.com). Bowhunters and all sportsmen need to remain aware of local issues and should continue to educate local officials on the safety and efficiency of hunting as a means of controlling wildlife populations. Sportsmen Fortify Defense Against Antl’s With Launch of Bowhunter Rights Coalition Columbus—A coalition of the nation’s leading national bowhunting organizations and communications firms have joined to combat the newly elevated threat to bowhunting posed by the merger of two national animal rights groups. the groups are uniting behind an initial U.S. Sportsmen’s Alliance plan to mobilize bow hunters in defense of their sport. “Bowhunters have proven their resolve in the past and must again demonstrate their might to stave off promised attacks by anti-hunters,” said Rick Story, senior vice president of the U.S. Sportsmen’s Alliance. At a January meeting, the Bowhunter Rights Coali16 Archery Magazine August/September 2006

tion (BRC) was launched in response to the January 1 merger of the Humane Society of the United States and the Fund for Animals. The new mega-animal rights group boasts of a multi-million dollar budget and has vowed to target bow hunting in 2005. State and local bowhunting organizations, as well as individual bowhunters and other sportsmen are being recruited to unite under the BRC flag. Bowhunter Magazine, The Bowsite, The International Bowhunting Organization and Pope & Young Club have already joined the coalition. . “The BRC will build a grassroots network capable of defending against attacks in the courts, in legislatures or on the ballot,” said Story. “These allies will help to distribute issue alerts, urge sportsmen to contact lawmakers regarding hunting related legislation and dilute the burden of legal fees in defense of bowhunting.” The coalition’s main thrust will be the ability to effectively communicate and to have a rapid response capability. The U.S. Sportsmen’s Alliance is preparing a BRC website on which it will post the latest news about the assault against bowhunting for sportsmen and bowhunting publications. It will provide educational materials about bow hunter safety and more. A chat room will also be available to discuss issues and for occasional live chats with leaders of the bowhunting community. “The Alliance’s successes over the years have been attributed to our ability to organize,” said Story. “That was evident in the formation of the Bowhunter Defense Coalition in 1988 in response to increasing attacks on bowhunting. This effectiveness will be recreated with the BRC.” A report from the Humane Society of the United States released on January 31 lays out the group’s plans to ban hunting in 2005. Aside from previous plans to target bowhunting, HSUS is preparing a ballot campaign to ban Michigan’s dove season for which sportsmen arduously fought. For more information about how to join the Bowhunter Rights Coalition, call the U.S. Sportsmen’s Alliance, (614) 888-4868 or e-mail info@ussportsmen.org.

continued on page 18 Archery Magazine August/September 2006 17

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 16 Texas Animal Cruelty Bill Spells Big Trouble for Sportsmen Texas sportsmen should urge lawmakers to oppose legislation that will turn common hunting practices into criminal acts of animal cruelty. New York Considers Lowering Age Requirement for Bowhunters A bill in the New York Senate would allow the next generation of bowhunters to take to the woods at a younger age. Future of New Jersey Hunting. Wildlife Management Depends on Sportsmen’s Campaign The U.S. Sportsmen’s Alliance is working with New

jersey sportsmen and lawmakers to overturn a dangerous Supreme Court ruling that jeopardizes the future of hunting, fishing, trapping and conservation in the Garden State.

The U.S. Sportsmen’s Alliance will honor the lifetime support of the NFAA

It is a tremendous tribute to the deep and abiding commitment the NFAA has for the right of American Outdoorsmen. The National Field Archery Association name will appear on the U.S. Sportsmen’s alliances lifetime living wall, to commemorate its support to the U.S Sportsmen’s Alliances work. The wall is a living recognition of all those who have provided the financial support to ensure that the rights hunters will endure.

Bowhunting Feature of the Month

by Tim Atwood NFAA Bowhunting and Conservation Chairman

WHO WAS ISHI?

This is the story of a captured wild Indian that made headlines in California’s newspapers in August of 1911. Closely related to the discovery and capture of this Indian, is the tremendous impact that his existence made on the life of Saxton Pope, the father of bowhunting. This story began in Oroville, California, on August 2nd, 1911. Barking dogs aroused the operators of a slaughter house and they went outside to investigate the cause of the disturbance, but they were not prepared for what they saw outside, because it was so incredible and shocking. There, they saw, a frightened, emaciated and almost naked Indian, huddling against a corral fence. They immediately notified the local authorities and the “savage” was taken to the city precincts without any resistance on his part. The daily San Francisco newspapers published the event, with much sensationalism, and caught the attention of two anthropologists from the University of California, Professors Kroebel and Waterman. Once Professor Kroebel verified the veracity of those reports, he headed for Oroville. Witnessing this event was especially important, since it confirmed a prior report of an incident that happened three years earlier. In 1908, a group of surveyors came across a small company of Indians, a few miles north of Oroville. At that time, Waterman had spent several weeks trying to locate the tribe with no success, and now, he thought it must be a relation between the Indians from the earlier group and this newly discovered Indian, sensing they belong to the same tribe. Waterman visited the Indian at the sheriffs office and tried to communicate with him using a phonetically transcribed list of words from Northern and Central Yana. As he got close to 20 Archery Magazine August/September 2006

the end of the list, he said the word “swini” which means yellow pine, and as he said it, the Indian’s face radiated, indicating recognition of the word and he repeated the word. After this initial recognizable, sound others followed and it confirmed that he was indeed, a member of the lost tribe, Yahi. The two professors sought and obtained permission to have him to travel with them to the University Museum, whose staff would assume responsibility for the welfare of the Indian. This Indian was, indeed, the last wild Indian left in America! The first man from the Stone Age ever subjected to civilization in the 20th Century. His age was calculated to be past the middle age. At his arrival at the Museum, the Indian met with two other patrons, and although he was friendly to them, he never revealed his own Yahi name. Professor Kroeber nicknamed him “Ishi.” In the autumn of 1912 Ishi was introduced to Dr. Saxton Pope, who had recently been appointed to the University Staff. The two of them got acquainted as Dr. Saxton examined and treated Ishi at the University Hospital, and this patient-doctor relationship might never evolved, had not Dr. Saxton seen Ishi outside the Museum assiduously fashioning a bow. Dr. Saxton joined him and Ishi demonstrated for him his shooting stance, hold and method of release. Saxton became fascinated and filled with a strong desire to learn from this man that grew practicing this skill, not as a hobby but rather as a way of life and so it began the initiation of the mastery of Saxton in the art of the bow. Archery and big game hunting were Saxton’s passions in life and his ambition was to perfect his skills at pursuing these two disciplines. Having a true wild Indian as his teacher was beyond his fondest ambition. They shot Ishi’s bows and English bows and they even borrowed bows

from the Museum whenever possible. As years went by, these two spent many hours together pursuing this teaching. Week after week and month after month, spending their time together, they became close friends and developed their own language; a type of pigeon English-Yana idiom. They lived in a happy communion in their world and in the world of the swift and soundless bow. In May 1914, a Yahi expedition was formed. Part of the group was composed of Dr. Saxton Pope, his son Saxton Pope Jr., Ishi and the two professors, Waterman and Kroeber. They lived the life of Indians. Ishi and Pope provided meat and fish for their meals, thanks to the use of their bows. Ishi’s response surpassed everyone’s expectations. Each new day they visited new places and experienced new insights into Ishi’s way of life. In December of the same year, Ishi became sick with a cough. Later on, it was discovered that that cough was the beginning of tuberculosis. He went through his illness in the tradition of a true Indian; stoically and never complaining. He finally died on March 25, 1916, with

his friend Pope at his side. Ishi’s last words to Pope were: “you stay. I go.” Although Ishi’s new life lasted only five years, everything indicates that this new life was happier than his previous one. He lived happy and content with his good friends from the Museum. This great friendship was certainly a ‘ tremendous influence in Dr. Pope’s life. In 1962, the National Field Archery Association Club introduced the idea of a Special bowhunting award be named after Ishi, to honor and recognize the fact that Ishi instilled and taught to Dr. Pope. This idea was embraced with great enthusiasm and unanimous approval. What could be more appropriate than honor and recognize the man who inspired the fathers of modem bowhunting? Ishi’s Award is the highest award given for any recording period, and is only awarded to truly outstanding North American trophy animal, that is judged to be worthy of this recognition. So far, there have been fourteen presentations of the Ishi Award during the history of the Pope and Young Club record program.

Archery Magazine August/September 2006 21

Bowhunting Short Story by Tim Atwood

CBH TILAPIA JAMBOREE This is a short report on the Tilapia Jamboree held at Colorado River, near Palo Verde, CA and AZ border. Good preparation and scouting once again pay off. The beautiful, sunny and warm weather brought the fish to their spawning run in the slow-moving tule lined drains of the Imperial Water District at Palo Verde. Once again Gilbert Olivas had made cast tilapia out of plastic and brass replicas of Tilapia on plaques. The plaques were truly works of art, it was apparent that all the bow fisher participants would seriously vie to win one of

these works of art. Carp was again a side cash jackpot. Everyone had a chance at the big ones, as the event lasted all day Saturday and Sunday. A special award is given for every Tilapia over four pounds. (A brass Tilapia) This year fish were there on their spawning runs as the hot sun bore down. They were in the right place at the right time, this made for lots of shooting and fast shooting fun. This is a sportsman’s paradise and the Colorado River is really something for the bow fishermen to enjoy.

CBH TILAPIA JAMBOREE PHOTOS

1

3. Gilbert Ollivas shows his work of art, the Tilapia plaques

4

4. Tilapia participants start to gather for the weigh-in

1. From L to R Chandler Anglin and Trais Schwartz (Tilapia Youth Winners) 2. Sunday’s weigh-in

3

2

6

5. Gorden Eno fishing the tule lined drains takes his first Tilapia. 6. Bow hunter Chairman Tim Atwood takes a Tilapia out of his secret Tilapia Hole.

5 22 Archery Magazine August/September 2006

Bowhunting Plus

T

by Tim Atwood NFAA Bowhunting and Conservation Chairman

I once spoke at a seminar of bowhunters and offered some general, rather superficial reasons for why men hunt. They do so for many reasons, any one of which may be enough. A common one, of course, is the meat reason. The woods are full of people who claim to be hunting for prime meat. Then, of course, there’s the trophy reason. In its most shallow context, it is simply an exhibitionist effort to display prowess and status. In deeper context, it goes beyond that. Aldo Leopold once observed that: “Poets sing and hunters scale the mountains primarily for one and the same reason - the thrill of beauty. Critics write and hunters outwit their game for one and the same reason - to reduce that beauty to possession.” Those trophy antlers on the wall may not only be a hunter’s effort to possess beauty, but also to keep something important to him from slipping away and being forgotten. And if the trophy testifies that here is a strong and skillful hunter, well, what’s the use of denying it? Ten thousand years ago the hunter might have stood by a fire and recounted the great deed to his clan, while the old men nodded their approval and stripling boys back in the shadows listened in wonder. It hasn’t changed much. The trophy hunter - the ethical killer of the great stag or bare or ram - still commands attention by the fire as he recites his deeds. His peers still salute him, the old men still nod and remember, and the boys still dream of tomorrow’s hunts. Most of us will never kill the great stag, yet we have all taken deer that held special trophy value for us. Such value is not always a measure of time and beam. It may be just a measure of hard, solid hunting in which both man and deer conducted themselves well, so that neither was shamed. Trophy hunting has been bitterly condemned for an alleged deterioration of a game stock by killing off the best males, yet neither the math-

ematics of genetics nor the observed facts of breeding within wild life population add support to that contention. A five-by-five mule deer buck is nearing the end of his days and has already done his share of genetics work. Companionship can be a strong element in hunting and sometimes the companionship and the ritual become more important than the hunt itself. Sometimes the greatest pleasure is in the anticipation and recollection with the hunt only serving to bond the two. Our critics are fond of pointing out that wildlife has scarcely a chance against our highly efficient technology. But the fact is, wildlife has an edge of its own and is likely to be enhanced by our increasing dependence on gadgets and less reliance and our diminishing reliance on our legs, eyes, ears, patience and the savvy that accrues from years of experience. A good working definition of a game species is one that is fitted with survival equipment enabling it to take advantage, while a genuine sport hunter is one constrained by ethics and respect to give advantage. But as much as anything else, one of the greatest urges impelling such a hunter is his search for freedom and for the genuine personal adventure inherent in such freedom. Just as game species may be the truest indicators of quality natural environments, so hunting can be an indicator of quality natural freedom. The genuine hunter is probably as free as it is possible to be in this technology-laden earth of ours. Free not because he sheds civilized codes and restraints when he goes into the woods, but because he can project himself out of and beyond the ordinary, to be wholly absorbed in a quieter, deeper and older world. You know how it is. When you go into the woods, your presence makes a splash, and the ripples of your arrival spread like circles in water. Long after you have stopped moving, your prescontinued on page 24 Archery Magazine August/September 2006 23

Bowhunting Plus

CONTINUED

ence widens in rings through the woods. But after a while this fades, and the pool of silence is tranquil again, and you are either forgotten or accepted; you are never sure which. Your presence has been absorbed into the pattern of things you have begun to be a part of, and this is when the hunting really begins. You can always feel it when those circles stop widening; you can feel it on the back of your neck and in your gut, and in the awareness of other presences. This is the real start of the hunt, and you’ll always know when it happens and when you are beginning to hunt well. There were those times when I was a kid, hunting and spending several days and nights alone in the woods, when I’d have a flash of insight that was often gone as swiftly as it came. A vague sense of what aboriginal hunters must

feel, and what real hunting - the pure quill, honest-to-God real hunting -is all about. One strong flash of this to a boy, one swift, heady taste of an utter wild freedom and perception is enough to keep him hunting all his days. Not just for meat or horns, but for that flash of insight again, trying to close the magic circle of man, wilderness and animal. Why do men hunt? I’ll use a quote I heard Bob Del Ray recite at the NWF Annual Meeting. Sitting Bull, the legendary Sioux leader, is said to have said: “When there are no buffalo we will hunt mice for we are hunters and want our freedom.” As hunters, perhaps we understand all too well what Sitting Bull meant and maybe, what he felt. •**

RELEASE NEWS RELEASE NEWS RELEASE NEWS RELEASE NEWS RELEASE NEWS RELEASE GROWTH OF THE NATIONAL ARCHERY IN THE SCHOOLS PROGRAMTM REQUIRES AN EVER-EXPANDING TEAM OF COORDINATORS Sparta, WI—The National Archery in the Schools Program continues to grow at a remarkable rate. Introduced in 2002 to just 22 schools in one state (Kentucky), the NASP program has gained tremendous momentum and has now exploded onto the scene with approximately 2,000 schools in 37 states! By June 12th, Kansas and Nevada will be added to the program. More than 500,000 children have participated in the NASP program in their schools thus far. The plan is to have NASP implemented in all 50 states by 2007. NASP has also successfully expanded into Australia and Mexico. A successful program such as NASP requires good talent to make it grow. The following people have recently been named state NASP coordinators: Arizona Game & Fish has hired NASP Coordinator, Denise Raum. Denise was formerly the Penn24 Archery Magazine August/September 2006

sylvania NASP coordinator. Michigan DNR has recently hired NASP Coordinator, Mary Emmons. Iowa: Departing NASP Coordinator, Laverne Woock, will be replaced with new volunteer coordinator, John Carlson. Minnesota DNR has added Kraig Kriger as NASP Coordinator in that state. Maine DNR made its state the 37th, joining the NASP family on May 20, 2006. Emily Jones is the Maine NASP Coordinator. Kansas Department of Wildlife & Parks has hired Tracy Jonas to be the coordinator of its NASP program which launches June 5, 2006. For more information regarding the National Archery in the Schools Program, contact Jon Gauthier at 608-269-0832 ext. 205 or jgauthier@genesisbow.com The National Website can be viewed at www.archeryintheschools.org

New Jersey GO By Al Tilton

ARCHERY

ON JULY 7TH AND 8TH THE

sible. It uses a series of “drills” each archer can New Jerpractice at home, and a series of “skills” using sey Go Archery program got its start with the lightweight training equipment. The NJ Go Arfirst round of NFAA instructors being certified chery! TM Course includes a student guidebook through NADA, the National Alliance for the Defor each arvelopment of cher, and Archery . The the essenclass was held tial trainat the Black ing from Knight bow a certified benders club instructor. in Jackson, The NJ New Jersey. Go Archery The Black program is Knights, an designed SFAA club, specifically opened its to provide gates to ala great low the class degree of to be held positive by State Go reinforcearchery coorment to dinator and youth in a United Bow safe manHunter eduner. A goal cation and [Bottom]: Sandy Schulman, Phil Nuttall, Pat Gallagher, Joe Mills, of the NJ safety chairTom Robenhymer, Jack Spoto Go Archery man Al Tilprogram ton. coach is The goal to get every kid shooting (safely) within only of the NJ Go Archery program for 2006 is to a few minutes of first picking up a bow, and to certify roughly 75 new NFAA instructors for its provide constant POSITIVE encouragement as program. This first class had 19 students which the archer progresses through the achievement included Jack Spoto UBNJ president, Paul Wilevels. nan Black Knight president and many other For more information on beginning a procouncil members from both organizations. The gram at your club our organization, contact the class was held for the central region instructors. National Alliance for the Development of ArNorthern and southern region class will be held chery, NADA at www.teacharchery.org. in August and September. NJ Go Archery! TM was developed by NADA Al Tilton to encourage young children to enjoy the sport www.lhwoodsandwater.com of archery. The program was developed by top www.UBNJ.org coaches to help teach proper form to begin(609) 242-1812 ning archers as quickly and correctly as pos(732) 282-1812 Archery Magazine August/September 2006 25

FAST IS NICE. B E C A U S E H I G H E R S C O R E S A R E A U T O M AT I C , R I G H T ? A fast arrow is comforting, it might even be called “the American way” but what about “fast at any price?” Many of the inquiries I deal with concern what’s involved with increasing arrow velocity and what it’s true value really is. We were all doing just fine simply setting our sights on 50 and hitting at 50 and never knowing or caring what our arrow velocity was, until the 3D tournaments began to catch on. Then, with some decent money becoming more and more available plus the fact that you only get to shoot one arrow at a very few targets

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to win, the pursuit of scores much nearer to perfect quickly became a obsession, often regardless of what it “really” cost. The “unknown” distances of 3D target games have become the overwhelming cause. Everyone in archery knows that the #1 excuse in archery is, and will always be: “I didn’t know the distance to the target.” Of course the fact that my 40 yard setting was actually 38 and the arrow I used always hits low-right and that I was moving when I shot the arrow and all that other trivial basic stuff is never the reason I missed. The real truth is that if I had just been using a faster arrow it would have made up for all those things and touched the line enough to reap the higher value. Sure it would. LOWER TRAJECTORIES FROM INCREASED VELOCITIES. Just because a faster arrow doesn’t rise quite as high or drop quite as far as a slower one enroute the target, understand there is no guarantee it will thereafter continually improve your hit location by enough to be of any tangible scoring help. Understand also that only when you are using the actual perfect sight setting needed for that specific target, can you expect to at least “nip the line” when standing precisely at either end of the up-down impact tolerance range for that arrow speed. That is, if you can stand as much as 80.5 inches farther away and still barely nip the bottom of the 5 ring you can still miss low if you either used a sight setting that was too short for that particular targets needs or if you are actually standing 81 inches too far from the target. Yes, it’s still the EXACT SAME situation you face at every target, regardless of your arrow velocity. That is, if you are standing beyond the tolerance range for your

specific arrow velocity it will always impact low, period. And if the perfect sight setting needed for that specific target is longer than the one you set your sight on then you are actually too far away so you will still impact low. Terrible isn’t it? Nothing has changed. The only benefit of having a faster arrow is that the plus-or-minus tolerance range does increases very slightly as your arrow speed rises so you can gain an extra few INCHES that you can stand closer or farther from the target and still nip the bottom or top of the higher scoring ring. But just how often can you expect that to really make a difference. What keeps us thinking along these lines is that every time we have one of our arrows miss a scoring area by a couple thousandths of an inch at either 6 or 12 o’clock the first thing we think is “if I had a faster arrow it would have caught the line.” Wrong. Sorry, but generally that’s exactly where you caused it to go, the others shots were okay weren’t they? JUST HOW MUCH HELP IS AVAILABLE? Understand that with a perfectly executed shot, if you have set your sight on exactly what that particular target requires from your sight settings you can still nip the top or bottom of the 5 ring if you are within the tolerance range for that arrows velocity. However, if, for example, your sight is set longer that what the target actually requires of you, you will of course impact too HIGH if standing at the closer end of the tolerance range, not because the tolerance range was incorrect but because you used a sight setting that was longer than required. As you noted on my YARDAGE MARGIN OF ERROR CHART in the Dec-Jan06 issue, if you have absolutely perfect sight settings with a 225 fps arrow, with perfect execution you can still nip the top or bottom of the 5 ring on a 65cm Field or Hunter face while standing precisely at 60 yards using any setting from 58.8 or 61.2 yards. Or conversely, using a perfect 60 yards setting while standing at anywhere from 58.8 to 61.2 yards. Depending on your point of view, this TOLERANCE RANGE listing can be confusing since there are these 2 ways to look at it. The theory is and the mathematics reveals that in a perfect situation if you are too close by 1.2 yards at 58.8 the arrow will not have enough fall time enroute so it has the 2 1/2 inches above the center of the 5 inch diameter 5 ring as a safety margin to still barely reach it at 12 o’clock.

If you are standing farther away at 61.2 yards the arrow will have too much fall time on the trip so it has the 2 1/2 inches below the center of the 5 ring as a cushion so it will can still catch at 6 o’clock. Again, only when everything is as perfect as it should be. Also remember that when this happens, you are again right back where you started having to decide if you should shoot another arrow and chance missing or increase the yardage setting and risk overcorrecting and cause a miss up at 12 o’clock. Again, nothing has changed with a faster arrow “when you don’t know the acceptable sight setting required for that particular shot.” Understand that the figures given on the chart in the Dec-Jan06 issue can be off slightly since the radius of your arrow shaft has to be allowed for as well. That is, the figures cannot possibly be identical for 2 arrows of the same speed if one shaft is a quarter inch wide and the other is a half inch wide since the measurements are based on the absolute center of the shaft with the radius added since the wall is what will actually touch the scoring ring. Darn, things were a lot simpler and much more fun when I wasn’t so serious about “winning.” If I’m not going to gain 25 fps or more I’m just not going to bother changing and here is the reason I believe that velocity gains of only a couple of feet per second are always more trouble than they are worth. Even with a 25 fps velocity gain to increase your 225 fps arrow up to 250 fps, for that same perfect-distance, perfect sight setting, 60 yard target you will now be able to nip the top or bottom of the 5 ring with any sight setting from slightly greater erroneous distances of 58.6 to 61.4. Or, as I said, with a perfect 60 setting on a perfect 60 distance target you can also stand anywhere from 58.6 to 61.4 yards and still nip the 5 ring. Let me see now, with 225 fps I can still squeak out a hit when I misjudge the distance by plus-orminus 1.2 yards, but with 250 fps it becomes a whopping 1.4 yards. WOW! With that extra 25 fps I can now misjudge the distance long or short by an another 7.2 inches (.2 of a yard) so take a guess at what another mere 2 feet per second would be worth. Since our 60 yard 5 ring is just barely over 5 inches in diameter this is a clear indication that the 225 fps arrow actually falls 5 inches in the last 86.4 inches (2.4 yards) it travels. But, with the “much” faster 250 fps arrow it now travels 100.8 inches (2.8 yards) before it drops that same 5 inches on the target face. Ka-ching, money in the Archery Magazine August/September 2006 27

bank. Know what that extra 25 fps is worth at 30 yards on that smaller 5 ring? When it actually requires your 30 yard setting, at 225 fps you can be standing anywhere between 28.6 and 31.3 yards with that correct 30 yard setting and still nip the 5 ring, with perfect windage. After bringing your arrow up to 250 fps you can now be standing anywhere between 28.2 and 31.6 which means the extra 25 fps will allow you to stand another 14.4 inches (.4 yards) too close or another 10.8 inches (.3 yards) farther away and still touch the 5 on that smaller face. But once again, nothing has really changed, You see, on that 30 yard target at 250 fps if it really needed your 31 yard sight setting from your bow but you used your 30, because of that extra yard you didn’t know you needed you will miss LOW if you stand back at the 1.6 (31.6) yard greater distance listed. That is, the 1.6 yard tolerance is correct, but only when based on THE SIGHT SETTING YOU SHOULD BE USING and not the one you are using in error. Think about it, anytime you change to a faster arrow the only scoring increases you can “even hope to expect” would be from those few, if any, targets you previously missed by whatever small amount you actually gained, which may only be a few thousandths of an inch. Again, ONLY when you are using the perfect, absolute sight setting that specific target requires of you does the “tolerance range” for your arrow speed apply to allow you to still nip the maximum scoring area at the top or bottom. Again, all with perfect windage and perfect shooting form. I’d hate to have to prove that I actually “gained XX points” simply because I added another “XX” feet per second and not because of something else I had accomplished. “SOUPING UP” YOUR EXISTING BOW FOR MORE VELOCITY When you have a specific bow and you want more velocity out of it, there are only 2 games in town, more peak weight or a lighter arrow. Or both. Forget those ideas about re-cabling with some new name eccentrics or trying to conjure up some magic setup you think the factory hasn’t thought of yet or trying to make your old bow become the same as that new model they just released. Invariably pursuing such things means you might end up spending more than a new 28 Archery Magazine August/September 2006

bow would cost or at least waste a lot of time and effort only to end up totally disappointed and disillusioned. Keep in mind that I suggest that if your change will not guarantee you of an increase of 25 fps or more it is probably will not be worth the effort. Sadly, people often go out and spend hundreds for a new bow based on rumor or some confusing velocity figure in the ad they saw only to end up with no more than 1 or 2 fps or even less than they had simply because they didn’t understand the complete picture. In a great number of situations significant velocity increases of up to 40 FPS or more are actually possible from their present bow from using more peak weight, and a lighter arrow. As I reflect so often, rather than spend a ton just for another 1 or 2 feet per second, instead, just reach up and add a quarter turn or so to each limb bolt and it won’t cost you a dime. WHEN HEAVIER SPINES ARE NEEDED When your arrow is underspined you can effectively “stiffen the spine” of the arrows you have by making them shorter or lightening their point, or both. That is, for every inch you can shorten them it increases the spine enough to handle about another 4 or 5 pounds and for every 25 grains you can remove from the point it does it again for about another few pounds of peak weight. But, if you are already dramatically underspined like so many people are these days from trying to use lighter arrows in higher velocity rated bows, these still may not stiffen them enough so don’t forget you can also help the situation by lowering the peak weight of your bow. Additionally, if you “set your arrowrest back” into an “overdraw” configuration you can even cut your original underspined arrows off up to another 4 inches shorter to really stiffen their original spine rating. An “overdraw” is nothing more than a method of utilizing the same shorter arrow used by “the other guy who has a shorter draw length.” Plenty of speed crazed folks have been found to be 20 or 25 pounds underspined so carrying it this far to prevent buying more arrow shafts is not that unusual. SAFETY NOTE: If you add an overdraw arrowrest, be certain there is a safety shelf above your bow hand as in Figure 1, particularly if you will be shooting broadheads. If you have exhausted your shorter length and lighter point options and are still underspined, it may finally call for a completely different shaft

with a stiffer spine If you have to buy stiffer shafts for example you may also be able to kill 2 stones with 1 bird and both find a better spine that also happens to be lighter in mass weight. THE LAWS OF PHYSICS RULE Despite what you might think the ads suggest. Compound bows are like automobiles in the sense that after you settle on all of your components it can “run only as fast as all its features will allow” and there is virtually nothing you can do about it. The point is that once all the mechanical advantage features are assigned to your particular bowmodel it can only possesses the total capabilities of those features and no more. From that point, the only way you can get more velocity out of it is with peak weight increases and lighter arrows or both. No magic, just circumstance. It’ not unheard of for someone to go out and buy one of the average-velocity-rated models and then do nothing more than these 2 things to it and manage to end up with the fastest arrow at the tournament. Others shop and shop for whatever new model is hyped to be the fastest in town and then they unwittingly load it down with a heavier, slower arrow only to possibly end up with the slowest arrow in town. So you can see how academic it all really is. But then, when you realize that the tournament was won by the guy with the slowest arrow in town it begins to dawn on you that there must be a little more to winning than just launching a faster arrow than the other guy.

phased in and have become socially acceptable and are now even all the rage. That, 1 or 2 or 3 fps comes from the extra weight each archer now has to pull as the peak arrives quicker and stays longer for the archer to pull and feel because of continual eccentric design touchups. So much for bows that are comfortable to draw anymore. To me there is one bright side, with bows such as this if you have to “throw the bow into the sky” in order to rip it open it is a dead giveaway that you are trying to use much more peak weight than you actually need. Which brings me to also suggest that before making any change, anywhere on your setup, to always ask yourself or your mentor; “if I make this change and accomplish a little more arrow speed, how much do you guarantee my accuracy will improve instantly with the same amount of effort on my part?” Instead, consider for example that working for a more precise aiming technique by being more comfortable or keeping a very close check on how consistent each of your numbered arrows impact with the others or that even converting to a release aid might serve to increase your score 50 or 100 points or more. I profess that an arrow speed of 225 fps or so is all anyone really needs and that adding another 10 or 20 or 30 FPS may not result in any tangible accuracy improvement at all. Yes, even in 3D events.

ENJOY And why do we shoot arrows in the first place? TO HIT WHAT WE ARE AIMING AT of course, so it THE LIMIT IS NOT “THE SKY” is no disgrace to shoot well if you want. After all, As you can imagine, there has to be a limit to this is a recreational sport and we can seek any the mechanical advantages that can be incorporat- level we wish and enjoy it in the process. ed into a compound bow. Actually, the compound bow industry has been at this point for several years now, at the point of puttering and tinkering for virtual insignificant velocity gains. For many years now we have been more into the tweaking of public tolerance mode than anything else. In earlier times, if someone had offered you a compound bow that climbed in weight so fast that it had to be thrown into the air simply to draw back the same peak weight you had been drawing for years, or one with its low-weight-valley so Figure 1. This 31 inch bow with the arrowrest set back steep that if you lost only a very little bit of tension about 4 inches in an overdraw configuration allows the owner to use essentially the same 27 inch arrow that his buddy the bowstring would be ripped out of your hand uses with the same model and weight in a 27 inch draw. you would have told them you wouldn’t shoot it Shorter usually means lighter and therefore faster out if it was free with a $50 bill taped to the handle. of this bow than a 31 inch cut arrow. Note the safety shelf. But now, bows such as this have very slowly been Archery Magazine August/September 2006 29

Editor’s note: The following is an excerpt from Bernie’s book, “IDIOT PROOF ARCHERY”. This “tell-it-like-it-is, no-holdsbarred” approach is what makes Bernie so popular with his students. This 300+ page book, now in its 3rd printing, is illustrated with over 350 photos and diagrams and has already proven to be the best and most comprehensive ever written for the competitive archer! For those of you interested in more personal instruction, or wish to become an advanced level archery instructor, you can attend one of Bernie’s shooter’s schools (see schedule on page 21) or call 614-322-1038 or go to www.robinhoodvideos.com for more information.

Shooting In Adverse Conditions, Part I Shooting in the Wind Some of the toughest things to do with a bow and arrow include shooting while the wind is blowing, while it’s raining, or while you’re shooting uphill, downhill or on side hills. Because I have produced over three dozen archery videos with over a dozen world and national champions, I have been able to “pick their brains” and discover their techniques for shooting in these conditions. Also, because my wife and I spent six years shooting competitively in Hawaii where the wind blows almost constantly, we got a lot of experience practicing these “do’s and don’ts of playing the wind.” And since then, I have picked up some additional tips that make up a fairly comprehensive “arsenal” against wind, rain, and on hills that I now teach. Due to the length, and since the conditions are so different, we’ll look at each separately. In this issue, we’ll discuss shooting in the wind. In the next issue, we’ll cover shooting in the rain and on hills. The following should better prepare you to make the best of a bad situation. DON’T PRACTICE IN THE WIND If you shoot a compound bow with a release, you cannot 30 Archery Magazine August/September 2006

effectively practice while the wind is blowing you all over the target. It will also cause most people to start punching the trigger of the release (or worse!). If you shoot fingers (without a clicker), you can end up plucking the string or snapshooting. Rule #1: The wind never blows consistently. Rule #2: Practice is, by definition, a controlled environment in which we try to duplicate excellent archery shots.

Aiming Off We do this to ultimately absorb those techniques and/or feelings into our “muscle memory” (subconscious program). Rule #3: You can’t (effectively) practice shooting a stationary target if you’re in a rowboat during a storm, or while riding a bucking horse, or shooting in an unpredictable wind . . . without causing more problems than you solve. Consistency is the key. But by all

by Bernie Pellerite ©2006 means, go out on a windy day and try out or test the following “wind systems” once you’ve practiced learning them under controlled conditions. This will give you a feel for what or how shooting in the wind affects your head and your system . . . but don’t try to learn your system in the wind! Practice on a calm day and log your results. Finger shooters with clickers (which dictate “let-go”) may be able to get some benefits practicing in the wind. But for the majority of us, especially those with, or on the verge of, target panic . . . it’s a major no-no!

mind is always trying to put your sight in the middle of the target . . . naturally! You have a natural self-centering subconscious. You are now trying to contradict that natural tendency, and very few people can do it effectively. Some shooters who focus or concentrate on their apertures rather than on the center of the target can do this more effectively. But, most of them don’t hold as long at full draw and/or they aren’t using telescopic sights (scopes) that magnify movement. These archers are usually ex-rifle or pistol shooters that are more comfortable with focusing on the sight; not the target. These individuals may find it more effective and

tips

I have picked up some that make a fairly comprehensive ARSENAL against wind, and on hills.

rain

easier to aim off (see diagram), than to cant the bow.

AIMING IN THE WIND There are only two ways to aim in the wind . . . bad and worse! Just kidding! You can aim off to one side of the bullseye and let the wind blow the arrow into the center (pray it will) . . . or cant your bow to one side . . . and aim in the center. Whichever method you choose, don’t expect to hold rock steady or get perfect results . . . it won’t happen! AIMING OFF Aiming off is not recommended for most personality types. This is because your subconscious

CANTING THE BOW I have found that this is the method that works best for most people. Simply tilt the top limb of your bow into the wind . . . 3, 4, or 5 inches (or 5, 10, or 15 degrees, etc.) off normal (or plumb), and aim in the center of the target. The cant (or tilt) automatically casts the arrow away from the point of aim in the direction of the cant. For example, you might ultimately find that, if you cant the top limb 5” (or X degrees) to the right into a 10 MPH crosswind (right to left) from 30 yards . . . then your arrows will end up Record all of your results in a logbook. close to the middle. You can practice this method on a calm are being consistently executed, you can trust the results! Then, take all of this information to the range on a windy day. Try out what you have discovered against the wind, and record your day by aiming in the middle and results. This logbook could save canting the top limb different you at the next tournament. amounts, to find out how far left or right your bow shoots the ar- DON’T OVER-HOLD rows at different distances. If you Shoot in the wind with the have a level mounted on your same timing as you do on a calm bow or sight, practice using the day. Let down and start again, if bubble in the level. For example, you can’t get the shot off with at 45 yards with all of the bub- your normal timing. ble to the left of center (top limb One of the most common canted to the right), your arrows mistakes is to try and hold lonmight hit 6 inches to the right. ger (and therefore better). This Record this information in your is wrong! If your natural shot selogbook. At 50 yards, you may quence is 8 seconds and you try be 8 inches to the right. Record to hold an extra 3 to 4 seconds . this also. Next, practice at dif- . . you’ll probably stay in trouble ferent yardages with 3⁄4 of the because of the wind. bubble off center, then 1⁄2 of a Over-holding causes severbubble, etc. and record your re- al bad things to happen. Your sults. muscles (and therefore your Get as much information as sight picture) will start to shake you can. If you practice on a calm continued on page 32 day when you know your shots

Canting the bow to the right (from the archer’s perspective) casts the arrows to the right.

Archery Magazine August/September 2006 31

Shooting In Adverse Conditions continued from page 19 from oxygen deprivation and fatigue, if you try to hold past your physical comfort zone. Because the wind is blowing your sight around anyway, this is aggravated by the shaking from muscle fatigue. Even worse, over-holding causes your mind to leave the target . . . and go to the release (where it should not be), in an effort to time the shot, causing all kinds of fear, anxiety and panic to build. This situation can cause you to start punching the trigger or plucking the string, causing bad shots and bad habits to form. Also, the longer you tend to hold, the greater your tendency will be to push excessively with your bow arm because you start to feel it collapsing, or in an effort to “help the shot.” In righthanded archers, this will cause left arrows. DON’T OVER-CONTROL If you try to “muscle the bow” into holding steady, that will only make it worse. Again, recruiting muscles causes movement! Relax, and let the sight move around . . . it’s going to, anyway! Also, focus on the spot you are aiming at . . . not the sight, and shoot the best shot you can. Shoot through it . . . don’t alter

the shot sequence or timing! ADD YARDAGE (MAYBE) You will probably find you have to add yardage to the shot because the crosswind will “kill” some of the arrow velocity, causing it to drop low . . . even if you canted or held off correctly! CONSIDER ADDING MASS TO YOUR BOW You will find it much easier to hold steady in the wind if you add mass weight to your bow. You might add a heavier stabilizer or a set of Vbars or a back weight. Any of these can make a big difference on a windy day. It will also make you steadier when the wind isn’t blowing! Caution: Make sure to keep the added weight close to and preferably, below your hand. And, don’t just add the weight when the wind blows! The extra mass weight changes your shot dynamics and your physical comfort zone, so work up to the heavier weight slowly in practice (so you don’t injure yourself) and record the results in your logbook, so you know what to expect when you shoot on tournament day. SET REALISTIC GOALS As with normal shooting, it is important not to set your expectations past a point that you can reasonably expect to reach. Don’t expect miracles!

Remember, all these methods will vary from shooter to shooter, bow to bow, and arrow to arrow, depending on the speed of the wind. It is not an exact sciConsider adding mass to your bow with a ence! What they will do is give back weight or v-bars. Either could make you that few extra points that your bow steadier in the wind. 32 Archery Magazine August/September 2006

your opponent won’t get! You’ll have a plan and are much less nervous and afraid . . . because you are more aware of and prepared for what is probably going to happen when the wind does blow. In the next issue, we’ll cover Part 2 of Shooting in Adverse Conditions: Shooting in the Rain and On Hills.

&

The School of Advanced Archery Instructor Certification

SCHEDULE UPDATE

The School of Advanced Archery & Instructor Certification, a.k.a. “A Weekend at Bernie’s,” is well into its third year. So far in 2006, the ever-popular mobile Shooter’s School (formerly the NFAA Shooter’s School) has conducted 27 schools. Over 330 students have attended with 313 becoming Certified Instructors. Interested shooters should contact your pro shop owners or club presidents and book a Shooter’s School near you! Remember, the host shop or club receives 10% and the contact person attends for free. Through a mutual agreement in early February between the NFAA Council and Bernie, his Shooter’s School has begun offering NFAA Level III Certification. To date, there are 52 new NFAA members and 62 new NFAA Level III Instructors. The following picture of lists Shooter’s School graduates alphabetically (* denotes new NFAA member; # denotes NFAA Level III Instructor). Graduates of school hosted by Petawawa Archery Club, Petawawa, Ontario May 5-7, 2006 #Norman Beland, #Andy Bourgeois, #Renee Brouillette, *Roch Brouillette, #Don Crawford, *Dwayne Deevey, *Sam Genge, *Brenda Henderson, *Kyla Johnson, *Scott Johnson, *Maurice LaFramboise, *Richard Mongeon, #Nikolay Rassolkov, #Peter Ray, #Paul Revenboer, *Dale Sigsworth

SHOOTER’S SCHOOL SCHEDULE June 23-25

Blue Ridge Backwoods, Monticello, IL (25 miles SW of Champaign). Contact: Scott or Debbie 217-762-3123 July 7-9 Southern Hunter, Kaufman, TX. (45 miles SE of Dallas). Contact: Trace 972-9327100 cell 214-608-4405 August 18-20 Pin Oak Archery, Purdy, MO (SW Missouri) Contact: Clay Brown 417-632-4767 or 417-860-2289 September 8-10 C & B Archery, Hicksville, NY. (L.I.) Contact: Danny or Ralph 516-933-2697 Robinhood Videos 1600 Reynoldsburg-New Albany Rd. Blacklick, Ohio 43004 614-322-1038 • fax 614-322-1039 E-mail AskBernie@aol.com • www.robinhoodvideos.com For more information about attending or hosting a school, go to www.robinhoodvideos.com. Archery Magazine August/September 2006 33

H

ow many times have you said, “ I shouldn’t have shot that arrow?” Is your answer frequently, occasionally, seldom, or never? Your answer to the question probably reflects the level at which you shoot.

It is a breakdown or deviation from the form you normally shoot in practice. This breakdown in form is frequently caused by a different thinking process than normally used in practice to execute the shot. The concentration and focus Archery is a sport of concentration and disci- become misdirected towards score, winning, or pline. The lack of either of these two mental pro- some other distraction. When this happens, you By Terry Wunderle

Don’t Shoot a Bad Shot cesses hinders an archer from having a consistent performance. To understand a bad shot, we need to look at what causes it. The main reason is bad form. It seldom comes from the pin not being on or near the desired mark. What causes bad form?

34 Archery Magazine August/September 2006

become tense and extra muscles tighten, causing excess pin movement. To compensate for the pin movement, more muscles are tightened in an attempt to reduce pin movement. This causes several seconds to be added to the normal shot sequence and by this time, the shot process breaks down. The shot should be let down. This isn’t the only thing that causes a bad shot, but it is by far the most common cause. Many things can distract and breakdown the concentration of an archer. Maybe it is the pressure of a big tournament, something a friend or opponent said to you, or perhaps you just daydreamed about something other than shot execution. You need to train your mind to think the same thoughts in practice as you do in a tournament. When you do that, you should shoot the same shot. Occasionally, you will draw on a target and your mind will say, “Something is wrong.” You don’t have a clue what is wrong, so you go ahead and shoot. Too often you find out that your mind was correct. Something was wrong. Listen to your mind. You wouldn’t have thought something was wrong if it was not. Your deviating from your normal shot set-up in some way triggered the thought.

There are numerous things that can cause a breakdown in concentration. The more you work at raising your level of concentration, the more consistent you will be in your performance. In order not to shoot a bad shot, you have to first recognize that it is going to be a bad shot. Then comes the discipline. Don’t shoot it! Let it down and start over. When you shoot a shot that you think is going to be of poor quality, you will probably only hit the mark less than 50% of the time. Those are poor odds. Discipline is learned during practice. If you shoot bad shots during practice, chances are you will shoot them in a tournament. Implement the discipline in practice and then it will become more automatic in tournaments. When you read the title “Don’t Shoot a Bad Shot,” you probably thought, “Why would anyone shoot a bad shot?” After looking at the situation objectively, maybe you do shoot an occasional bad shot. Eliminate those from tournaments and your performance will rise. If you do not shoot bad shots, I would classify you a disciplined, high-level archer.

2006-2007 NFAA® CALENDAR OF EVENTS 2006 BIG SKY OPEN NEVADA ........................................................NOV 3-5...........................................................MESQUITE, NV NORTH AMERICAN FIELD ARCHERY CHAMP ...................... DEC 9-10 ....................................................... HOMESTEAD, FL

2007 SOUTHWEST INDOOR SECTIONALS.................................... JAN 13-28 ...............................................VARIOUS LOCATIONS WORLD ARCHERY FESTIVAL VEGAS SHOOT ........................FEB 9-11 ........................................................ LAS VEGAS, NV MIDWEST INDOOR SECTIONALS .........................................FEB 23-24 ................................. KANSAS CITY & SIOUX FALLS MID ATLANTIC INDOOR SECTIONALS ............................... MARCH 3-4 .............................................VARIOUS LOCATIONS NORTHWEST INDOOR SECTIONALS ................................ MARCH 10-11 ...........................................VARIOUS LOCATIONS SOUTHEAST INDOOR SECTIONALS .................................. MARCH 17-18 .............................................SHEPARDSVILLE, KY NFAA INDOOR NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP ................MARCH 31-APRIL 1 ................................................ LOUISVILLE, KY SOUTHEAST 3-D SECTIONAL .............................................APRIL 28-29 ............................................... FORT GORDON, GA WORLD ARCHERY FESTIVAL STANISLAWSKI OPEN ..........APRIL 21-22 ................................................... PITTSBURGH, PA MID ATLANTIC OUTDOOR SECTIONALS.............................JUNE 16-17 ...................................................JACOBSTOWN, NJ SOUTHEAST OUTDOOR SECTIONALS .................................JUNE 16-17 ...........................................DURHAM COUNTY, NC MIDWEST OUTDOOR SECTIONALS.....................................JUNE 23-24 .................................................COON RAPIDS, MN SOUTHWEST OUTDOOR SECTIONALS ................................JUNE 23-24 ............................................................. PROVO, UT NFAA OUTDOOR NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP....................JULY 23-27.................................................. DARRINGTON, WA Archery Magazine August/September 2006 35

SECTION & STATE ASSOCIATION NEWS GREAT LAKES SECTION Bob McCutcheon, Councilman prairie1@royell.net

Section Directors Meeting, June 10, 2006 The annual Directors meeting was held after Saturday’s shooting at the Outdoor Sectional. All states within the Section were represented. Sectional tournament dates and locations were set for the 2007 season. Proposed agenda items were discussed along with reports from individual states on their NASP programs.

ILLINOIS

Judy McCutcheon, Director jlynnmac@royell.net

2006 Great Lakes Outdoor Illinois’ Panther Creek Bowhunters again had the privilege of hosting the Great Lakes Outdoor Sectionals. Sunday morning was a little soggy, but the weather cleared by mid-day, and the mosquitoes didn’t carry anyone off! Thank you to all who participated, and to the members of Panther Creek Bowhunters for yet another quality tournament. The range was in wonderful shape. For all of you who were unable to attend this year, you missed a good one! Hope to see you next year!

Great Lakes Outdoor Sectional Results June 10-11, 2006 Panther Creek Bowhunters, Chatham, IL 28 Field + 14 Animal + 28 Hunter

PL SHOOTER AFBHFS C RHONDA COX AFFS C JULIA STOVER 2 KATHY PINDELL 3 RENEE POWELL LORA SMITH LAURIE SCHUH AFTrad C DAWN SMITH AMBHFS Championship Flight C STEVE STOVER 2 MIKE FLIER 3 JOHN POWELL MARTY SINGLETARY JOHN KANTER BILL MOHN STEVEN BINGER STEVE HICKMAN Flight 2 1 KEVIN CRAMBERG 2 DUSTIN HEEG 3 GERRIT DUMOND TIM BUSH

ST

FLD

ANL

HTR

TOTAL

IL

472

262

467

1201

IL IL WI MI IL

537 521 516 503 513

288 283 283 279 284

531 530 527 498 INC

1356 1334 1326 1280 797

IN

280

178

296

754

IL IL WI WI WI IL WI IL

546 544 533 536 537 533 528 534

289 285 283 284 282 279 284 283

543 539 533 524 525 531 527 517

1378 1368 1349 1344 1344 1343 1339 1334

IL WI MI IL

523 526 514 504

283 283 283 279

540 527 519 509

1346 1336 1316 1292

36 Archery Magazine August/September 2006

GAIL KILLION IL BRIAN SHEFFLER IN AMFSL C RICK KNORR IL PMFS C SCOTT TURNER MI 2 BOB WOLFRAM IL 3 BILL SCHUH IL JEFF HEEG WI RICK HOTCHKISS MI MSMFS C KARL NELSON WI 2 RAY L. JONES WI 3 CLAYTON VENNE WI DON WILL IL VICTOR DAVIDSON IL SFBHFS C PAT WHITLOCK IL SFFS C LILY VANWORMER MI SMBHFS C RON WHITLOCK IL SMBHFSL C JEFF WYLER IL SMFS C GARY SANDERS MI 2 JOHN SMITH MI 3 DOUG GRADE WI VINCENT BAKER IL EDDIE FLIER IL AL CHICKERNO WI ROCKY KLINE IN SMFSL C JOHN BRONSON WI SPMFS C STEVE BOYLAN IL 2 BOB WEBB IN 3 MICHAEL STRASSMAN WI LYLE VANWORMER MI SPMFSL C LARRY SMITH WI YAFFS C JESSICA HEEG WI

492 446

273 265

INC INC

765 711

490

274

494

1258

549 547 541 538 539

288 284 289 284 283

546 541 538 538 533

1383 1372 1368 1360 1355

529 532 525 513 451

283 286 278 280 265

531 516 519 503 461

1343 1334 1322 1296 1177

505

280

510

1295

465

282

459

1206

528

284

523

1335

495

270

500

1265

534 528 530 520 512 513 509

281 281 276 284 281 278 285

526 531 532 534 503 494 INC

1341 1340 1338 1338 1296 1285 794

476

282

479

1237

552 547 535 530

291 282 283 287

556 545 545 527

1399 1374 1363 1344

497

279

498

1274

511

283

485

1279

MID-ATLANTIC SECTION Mike LePera, Councilman brtesite@optonline.net

The 2006 “Mids” and Annual Directors Meeting A little rain did not hamper the 2006 Mid-Atlantic Outdoor Sectional Championship held June 3 and 4 at Cape May County Archery Association in Villas, New Jersey. Over 100 archers enjoyed shooting on ranges not far from the famous south Jersey seaside resort of Wildwood Crest. The Cape May area is a great place for a vacation. The ocean, boating, fishing, great sea food restaurants, beautiful Victorian homes, and lots of New Jersey history. Those NFAA members who did not attend this Sectional, missed a great tournament. I can not say enough about the Cape May range. There are two 28-target ranges in beautiful condition. This comes from dedicated and hard work by caring members. Kudos to Don Denight and family, Keith Pew, Jim and Sherill Mitchell, Pete and other members of the Cape May Archers. Thanks to Claire and Peg, too. Thank you for doing such a great job and making my job easier.

Following Saturday’s shooting, the annual meeting of the Mid-Atlantic Section State Directors was held in the clubhouse. Attending Directors were Jim Quarles, Virginia; Dave Hryn, New York; Ron West, Maryland; Doug Joyce, New Jersey; and John Pawlowski, Pennsylvania. Representing West Virginia was John Grossl. The following important tournament dates and rounds were discussed and approved for 2007: Ten locations in the Section were selected to host a leg of the 2007 Indoor Sectional, scheduled for March 3 and 4. The blue and white target face will be used. One 300 round will be the official score per archer. However, archers have the option of shooting one round for an official score, or shooting two rounds and selecting the better of the two rounds for an official score. Archers choosing to shoot two rounds can do so in one day or over a two-day period. When possible, archers should notify the respective ranges how many rounds they will be shootingm as well as their intended shooting times. The sectional host locations in New Jersey are Wa-Xo-Be Archers, South Brunswick; Wo-PeNa Archers, Clifton; and Cape May County Archery Association, Villas. In Virginia, Prince William Archers, Brentsville, and A & A Supply, Amherst. In Pennsylvania, York & Adams County Game & Fish Association, Abbottstown. In Maryland, Tuscarora Archers. In New York, Neil’s Archery, Endicott; Smith’s Point Archery, Patchogue and Gander Mountain, Tonawanda. Open practice on days of the indoor tournament is not restricted. The 2007 Outdoor Sectional will be held Saturday and Sunday June 16 and 17 at Garden State Archers, Jacobstown, New Jersey. On Saturday a 28-target Field round and a 14-target Animal round will be shot. Then on Sunday a 28-target Hunter round will be shot.

Mid-Atlantic Outdoor Sectional Results June 3-4, 2006 Cape May Archers, Cape May, NJ 28 Field + 14 Animal + 28 Hunter PL SHOOTER FLD AFBB C CAY McMANUS 440 AFBHFS C DEBORAH TILTON 439 AFFS C SUSAN WEINSTEIN 532 2 COLLEEN McGOWAN 517 3 DIANE GALLAGHER 506 AMBB C JOHN MASON 443 AMBH C NICKOLAS GIANNETTI 432 2 JOE McMANUS 414 AMBHFS C NELSON MENGEL 530 2 CHRISTOPHER MOSER 532 3 PHIL MENTZER 528 GREGORY KULP 514 AL TILTON 495 MIKE BURON 472 AMBHFSL C MARK WILLIAMS 451 2 JAMES GALVIN 413 AMFS Championship Flight C CHRIS JOHNSON 555 2 JAY BRADWAY 546 3 NICK VICKERS 546 RANDY HINKELMAN 546 MATTHEW LASHLEY 544 TRENT ARLEDGE 541 MIKE GERRISH 539 AL SODEN 536 Flight 2 1 GEORGE WONDER 530 2 GREGORY BENNER 532 3 BRIAN TOWNSEND 530 CASEY PARKELL 524 MICHAEL BARRY 515 MARK LASHLEY 513 BRANDON GIBSON 512 PATRICK KELLY 512 Flight 3 1 WILLIAM HAYMAKER 519 2 DALE GROSSL 487 3 BRIAN SHRIMP 500 JOE ALLEN 501 ROBERT FLEMING, JR. 484 ELMER McKISHEN 484 BASAN ABUSCHINOW 510 MICHAEL YOTSKO INC DANIEL COLLINS INC AMFSL C DAVE HRYN 515

ANL

HTR TOTAL

265

471

1176

260

450

1149

286 282 273

539 508 524

1357 1307 1303

263

482

1188

258 244

412 414

1102 1072

285 284 283 275 271 258

534 530 525 515 496 INC

1349 1346 1336 1304 1262 730

268 259

466 410

1185 1082

286 290 287 284 287 288 285 286

552 553 551 551 547 545 541 531

1393 1389 1384 1381 1378 1374 1365 1353

284 283 282 285 283 283 285 284

531 528 525 528 528 526 524 523

1345 1343 1337 1337 1326 1322 1321 1319

267 277 269 280 278 278 283 INC INC

503 518 512 493 504 494 INC 503 501

1289 1282 1281 1274 1266 1256 793 503 501

285

517

1317

AMTrad C MIKE ORLIC 400 CMFS C ZACK GROSSL 472 SPFFS C JAN LOCKWOOD 492 SPMFS C TOM COBLENTZ 545 2 RON WEST 539 SFFS C GWEN McMURRAY 510 SMBB C BILL VRABEL 413 SMBH C RONALD THOMPSON 393 SMBHFS C MIKE COLLINS 517 2 RAY MAY 520 3 VERNON VANDEVENDER505 CHARLES BOBROWSKI 502 SMFS Championship Flight C LARRY HIX 546 2 DAVID TOWNSEND 544 3 BILL LOFTEN 541 DOUG JOYCE 526 SONNY FOOTE 519 CHARLIE MYERS 519 ED ALBRIGHT 526 LOUIS HAVEL 516 Flight 2 1 GENE GRODZSKI 517 2 JEFFREY VICKERS 516 3 PATRICK GALLAGHER 505 MIKE FARREN 509 LEW BARBERA 508 STEVE TINCHER 486 JESS WILLIAMS 472 SMFSL C JIM GREAGER 236 2 JOHN GROSSL 222 MSMBB C ROY STURGILL 413 MSMFS Championship Flight C JOW BAUERNFEIND 533 2 JIM FRENCH 524 3 ERNIE MEDINA 523 O.J. AVERY, JR. 509 WILLIAM MASTERS 517 Flight 2 1 DAVID M. TARRY 506 2 MIKE LePERA 503 3 WARREN MAGEE, SR. 504 WOODY HURLEY 480 JOHN KNOX III 471 CARL HAINES INC MSMFSL C LARRY WORRILL 472 2 AL TOWLER 405 YAMFS C BLAKE LOPER 529 2 JOHN PETERS, JR. 459 3 DONALD DENIGHT III 428 YFFSL C DEVON GOTTMAN 394 GUEST - SMFS 1 ALAN HINES 535 2 TOM SAUNDERS 479

250

402

1052

260

426

1158

279

518

1289

286 284

547 537

1378 1360

284

505

1299

259

434

1106

206

364

963

285 284 271 279

537 527 530 503

1339 1331 1306 1284

284 283 285 284 283 286 281 285

547 542 534 537 540 527 519 514

1377 1369 1360 1347 1342 1332 1326 1315

279 284 278 273 283 278 273

520 508 523 517 504 497 481

1316 1308 1306 1299 1295 1261 1226

INC INC

242 INC

478 222

256

423

1092

283 283 279 281 282

525 528 524 529 513

1341 1335 1326 1319 1312

282 281 281 280 279 INC

526 512 490 483 491 514

1314 1296 1275 1243 1241 514

271 242

474 398

1217 1045

278 245 263

511 494 466

1318 1198 1157

256

373

1023

283 271

526 483

1344 1233

PENNSYLVANIA

John Pawlowski, Director bpjp@ccis.net

Pennsylvania Field and Target Archers’ NFAA State Indoor Championship Growing The first PFATA indoor state championship saw 28 archers participating. The second annual tournament had 48 participants, and the third annual tournament had 56 shooters. The 2006 indoor championship was held Saturday April 1st at the Farm Show Complex in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. A 300 NFAA round was shot using the blue and white targets. Twelve perfect 300’s were posted and X’s broke all ties. No shoot-offs were needed. Regular NFAA awards were presented to the winners. Here’s the list of medalists: Archery Magazine August/September 2006 37

PL SHOOTER PMFS C Dan Williams 2 Joe Kapp YAMFS C Dallas Fuhrman 2 Brian Hill 3 Dylan Rutherford YMBHFS C Daniel Cosgrove YAFFS C Donyelle Haymaker AFFS C Brandi McRoberts 2 Pauline Imbro-Allen 3 Ruth Gronchick SFFS C Stella Devore AFBHFS C Kristi Peterson AMFS Championship Flight C Dave Gilbert 2 Gary Schuler Jr. 3 Scott Patterson 2nd Flight 1 William Jenkins 2 Glen Thomas 3 Scott Kearny AMCXB C Odrun Stevens SMCXB C Terry Butler SMFS C George Pazel 2 Richard Alexander 3 Raymond Caba AMBHFS C Gregory Kulp 2 Greg McBride 3 Bob Showers AMFSL C Paul Donahoo SMFSL C Rick Hunsinger SMTrad C Jack Thorpe MSMFSL C Alfred Towler MSMFS C Darrel Gehman

SCORE

X’s

300 300

59 58

300 276 216

48 20 4

230

4

284

24

297 295 285

29 30 19

299

46

270

21

300 300 300

58 55 54

298 298 297

44 34 41

298

30

298

27

300 299 299

38 47 44

299 298 293

31 47 40

287

23

237

5

237 246

9

300

53

MIDWESTERN SECTION Ray Jones, Councilman intrudersx2@msn.com

Midwestern Outdoor Sectional Results June 24-25, 2006 Waverly Archers, Waverly, IA 28 Field + 14 Hunter + 14 Animal PL SHOOTER ST AFFS C Kathy Faber SD SFFS C Judy Doub KS AFBHFS C Julene Hakl MN 2 Marcia Jones IA AMFS Championship Flight C Joe Determan MN 2 Jim Hutchinson IL 3 Tom Hood MO Joey Sutcliffe IA Jody Pletan SD Rick Peters MO Donald Robinson MO Jim Hunt IA Flight 2 1 Matt Graesch IA 2 Todd Furguson MO 3 Ron Sykora IA

FLD

HTR

ANL TOTAL

497

258

282

1037

481

247

272

1000

517 492

264 252

273 284

1054 1028

551 548 549 549 541 540 537 538

278 271 267 270 275 274 272 271

291 291 290 286 284 284 284 283

1120 1110 1106 1105 1100 1098 1093 1092

530 530 526

265 265 268

287 283 285

1082 1079 1079

38 Archery Magazine August/September 2006

Allen Robinson IA Forrest Goodman IA Bryan Corley IA Larry Mestad IA Carl Johnson IL Flight 3 1 Arnie Veen SD 2 Alex Kingery IA 3 Scott Wymore Sr IA John Heying IA Mark Tebelius ND Keith Hofer SD Dwight Pesehong SD John Shappell IA Bob Manifold IA AMBHFS C Bill Hakl MN 2 Steve Christian MO 3 Bob Shipman IA Dave Harms IA Dale Determan MN Tim Sargert IA Scott Dahle MN AMBHFSL C Dean Conrad IA AMBB C Roland Noel IA AMFSL C Ron Lewon IA 2 Jeff Stevens MN 3 Steve Plein IA CMBB C Samuel Reiher IA YMFS C Brandon Hood MO YMBB C Michael Reiher IA YAMFS C Michael West IA MSMFS C Al Tuller MO 2 Tom Stelk IA 3 Gary Thorson IA Edward Will MO Ron Cravens MO Wally Miller Sr. IA Bob Bridge IA SMBH C Tom Jurik IA SMBHFS C Earl Goodman IA 2 Shorty Faber SD 3 Jim Borg MN Ray Jones IA SMBHFSL C Finley Manifold IA SMFSL C Dick Stream IA 2 Don Iverson SD SMFSL(R/L) C Earl Lysne MN 2 Ray Kramer IA SMFS Championship Flight C Ed Christman NE 2 Carl Thiessen TX 3 Roger Bakken MN Dave Barnhart IA Denny Amberg SD Flight 2 1 Lynn Umbarger KS 2 Terry Diefenderfer SD 3 Mike McCarty MN John Doub KS Don Chipman IA SPMFSL C Ken Yeater IA PMFS C Richard Potter MO 2 Jackie White MO 3 Randy Ballard IA SPMFS C John Carlson IA 2 Roger Wilson IA PFFS C Erika Anschutz NE

522 525 526 526 527

268 264 259 259 255

288 287 286 285 285

1078 1076 1071 1070 1067

518 517 520 519 516 518 514 500 430

267 270 261 263 262 258 252 242 215

287 284 286 285 285 283 279 276 220

1072 1071 1067 1067 1063 1059 1043 1018 865

544 535 534 527 532 517 496

272 269 262 280 257 286 272

289 287 287 261 276 250 243

1105 1091 1083 1068 1065 1053 1017

496

246

271

1013

266

154

122

542

507 498 471

253 241 236

277 258 267

1037 997 974

303

157

218

678

528

258

283

1069

133

76

105

314

476

248

278

1002

532 527 510 511 503 437 421

272 267 262 253 259 228 213

281 287 278 285 276 268 262

1085 1081 1050 1047 1038 937 896

320

243

148

711

522 497 478 493

258 249 258 249

282 278 279 269

1063 1024 1015 1011

438

220

266

924

468 426

265 256

232 208

965 890

419 363

271 260

210 202

900 825

534 529 528 524 522

271 270 263 284 258

285 285 280 261 285

1090 1084 1071 1069 1065

521 506 501 499 481

268 251 258 283 278

285 278 281 249 250

1074 1041 1040 1031 1009

482

239

272

993

543 557 533

270 278 270

291 289 287

1104 1124 1090

506 525

257 263

276 284

1039 1072

545

276

286

1107

NEW ENGLAND SECTION Ken Moore, Councilman kmoore15@comcast.net

Former New England Councilman George Ossola awarded NFAA Medal of Merit George Ossola was awarded the NFAA Medal of Merit on April 1, 2006. The award was presented during the New England Sectional meeting, and during the Indoor Sectional Tournament. George has been a driving force for NFAA archery in New England. He served as a State Director, President, Secretary and Treasurer for the Connecticut State Association for a number of years. George also served as the New England Councilman in excess of 20 years. He only stepped down from his position as Councilman for health reasons. George is both a NFAA and NBEF Certified Instructor. During his archery career George has won many awards and championships, as well as setting records in Adult Male Barebow at the state and section level.

ADULT MALE BOWHUNTER FREESTYLE C CRIS MIZNER ME 524 282 2 GARY MARRIER VT 520 285 3 KEN HATT NH 466 261 ADULT MALE FREESTYLE LIMITED R/L C MATT HOPKINS RI 432 258 ADULT FEMALE FREESTYLE C DARLENE MARRIER VT 497 280 2 KATHY AINSWORTH NH 464 262 YOUNG ADULT MALE FREESTYLE C CORY MONAHAN MA 543 286 SENIOR MALE FREESTYLE C FRANK MINUTO CT 530 280 2 DAN WHITEHOUSE VT 523 288 3 JOHN FORNIER RI 516 282 PAT PETTENGILL MA 509 281 HARRY SWOYER VT 499 279 DANA WHITE NH 486 262 SENIOR MALE BOWHUNTER FREESTYLE C DUKE WILLARD MA 517 280 SENIOR MALE TRADITIONAL C ROB RANDALL MA 351 233 MASTER SENIOR MALE FREESTYLE C JACK E TRIPP NH 453 268 2 KEN VIVENZIO NH 450 253

531 528 459

1337 1333 1186

472

1162

506 476

1283 1202

552

1381

526 524 526 522 517 486

1336 1335 1324 1312 1295 1234

517

1314

352

936

480 460

1201 1163

NORTHWESTERN SECTION Bill Tiddy, Councilman tiddyw@aol.com

Northwestern Outdoor Sectional Results June 17-18, 2006 Cascadian Bowmen of Eugene, Noti, OR 28 Hunter + 28 Animal + 28 Field Ken Moore presents Medal of Merit to George Ossola

New England Tournament Info 2006 NEW ENGLAND SHOOT September 2-3, 2006 Host: Location: Directions:

Registration: Deadline: Late Registration: Schedule:

Accommodations:

Campgrounds:

Lunenburg Sportsman Club Reservoir Rd, Lunenburg, MA From SR 2 in Massachusetts, take Exit 35 to SR 70 heading north (Lunenburg Rd). Then turn right onto Leominster-Shirley Rd, then left onto Reservoir Rd. Follow Reservoir Rd to club on left. Lori LePage, 5 Sunrise Dr, Bradford, MA 01835. Tel: 978-372-8459 Make checks payable to NESFAA None None Saturday Schedule: 28 Field targets, by assigned course. Start from 8:00 am until noon. Steak fry at 4:00 pm. Sunday Schedule: Pick up scorecards at 8:00 am, general assembly at 8:30am, then shoot 28 Hunter by assigned target with shotgun start at 9:00am. Awards approximately 3:00pm. Super 8 Motel, 482 N Main, Leominster, MA, 978 537-2800 Sheraton Four Points, 99 Erdman, Leominster, MA, 978-534-9000 Best Western, 150 Royal Plaza Dr, Fitchburg, MA, 978-342-7100 Camping available at club.

New England Outdoor Sectional Results June 24-25, 2006 Lunenburg Sportsman Club, Lunenburg, MA 28 Field + 14 Animal + 28 Hunter PL SHOOTER ST FLD ADULT MALE FREESTYLE C MIKE LAMAR CT 553 2 CASEY GALLAGHER CT 538 3 JIM LECLAIR CT 513 CHRIS SOUSA MA 488 ADULT MALE FREESTYLE LIMITED C REX PARENT SR NH 474 2 PAUL LEWKOWICZ MA 477 3 KEN MOORE NH 451 ADULT MALE BAREBOW C MIKE WRIGHT NH 429

ANL

HTR TOTAL

290 285 275 273

552 540 519 498

1395 1363 1307 1259

280 246 249

477 466 447

1231 1189 1147

254

433

1116

PL SHOOTER ST HTR ANL PRO MALE FREESTYLE C Thomas Nealy OR 543 578 PRO FEMALE FREESTYLE C Crystal Parker WA 523 567 MASTER SENIOR FEMALE FREESTYLE C Liane Hickman WA 525 571 SENIOR FEMALE FREESTYLE C Donna Rogers OR 526 561 MASTER SENIOR FREESTYLE C Gene Lueck OR 523 558 2 Don Kudlacek WA 519 562 3 LeRoy Dukes OR 511 558 SENIOR MALE FREESTYLE C Karl Okita OR 528 565 2 Barney Mowery ID 514 565 ADULT MALE FREESTYLE C Ron Barndt MT 545 574 2 Rick Morgan WA 538 577 3 Mark Eaves OR 537 570 Larry Thurmond WA 531 520 Matt Anderson WA 525 567 Tom Nealy OR 524 521 Jim Moss OR 513 514 Dan Rennelk WA 500 562 SENIOR MALE BOW HUNTER FREESTYLE C Rich Newton OR 503 567 2 Wayne Rogers OR 508 555 3 Frank Acher OR 480 540 Gerald Hickman WA 494 537 SENIOR FEMALE BOW HUNTER FREESTYLE C Beverly Archer OR 462 536 ADULT MALE BOW HUNTER FREESTYLE C Dave Nelson OR 535 573 2 Tim Davis WA 531 269 3 Jerrod Vaughn ID 529 565 Chris Richards OR 524 567 Ben English OR 516 566 Jason Hartl OR 513 565 Jim Bevers OR 514 563 Mack Moen OR 509 571 Steve Phillips OR 501 556 James Archer OR 491 551 Bob Brown WA 478 551 John Mattson OR 442 522 ADULT FEMALE BOWHUNTER FREESTYLE C Michelle Vaughn ID 473 549 2 Mindi English OR 478 531 3 Cherylann Mattson OR 462 532

FLD

TOTAL

539

1660

509

1599

516

1612

499

1586

517 516 479

1598 1597 1548

534 530

1627 1609

545 541 529 563 521 567 573 513

1664 1656 1636 1614 1613 1612 1600 1575

505 493 499 486

1575 1556 1519 1517

452

1450

534 535 527 525 519 513 514 514 504 493 484 375

1642 1635 1621 1616 1601 1591 1591 1594 1561 1535 1513 1339

493 453 427

1516 1462 1421

Archery Magazine August/September 2006 39

SENIOR MALE BOWHUNTER FREESTYLE LIMITED C Jim Hendricks OR 469 560 476 SENIOR MALE FREESTYLE LIMITED C John Bacho OR 488 557 485 2 Jack Hendricks OR 490 554 470 ADULT MALE FREESTYLE LIMITED C Ed Forslof WA 468 549 473 SENIOR MALE BOWHUNTER C Bill Parker OR 459 531 473 ADULT MALE BOWHUNTER C Frank McCubbins WA 483 547 476 SENIOR MALE BAREBOW C Johnny Hale OR 339 480 247 ADULT MALE BAREBOW C Wayne Woedich OR 437 491 420 YOUNG ADULT MALE FREESTYLE C Josiah Brown WA 524 558 526 YOUNG ADULT FEMALE FREESTYLE LIMITED C Alyssa Bowen WA 380 474 401 YOUTH FEMALE FREESTYLE C Ashley Hartl OR 493 569 498 CUB MALE FREESTYLE C Hunter Nelson OR 562 479 524 2 Drew Vaughn ID 492 338 329

1505 1530 1514 1490 1463 1506 1066 1348 1608 1255 1560 1565 1159

SOUTHEASTERN SECTION Tim Austin, Councilman flarchery@earthlink.net

2006 Southeastern Outdoor Sectional A very warm range, in the 90’s, and a drought region (0.5 inch in May), and two weeks since any rain ... but at least we had shade throughout the facility. The combined State and Sectional Championship had 92 archers on the range with 76 Southeast Tournament shooters and 72 Florida State Field shooters. The new 28-target range, designed in two loops, each starting and ending at tournament registration, had five water barrels and three cold drink coolers to provide fluid for all. More than two dozen State and Sectional records were tied and broken in several divisions. Shooting started on time at 8:30 am each day, and it was a fun weekend. The Southeastern Section Directors meeting was held the evening before the tournament. Principal action was the selection of sites and dates for the 2007 SE Sectionals; namely: • Indoor Sectional: March 17-18, Shepardsville, KY • 3-D Sectional April 28-29, Ft. Gordon, GA • Outdoor Sectional: June 16-17, Durham County, NC

Southeastern Outdoor Sectional Results May 27-28, 2006 Gator Bowmen, Gainesville, FL 28 Field + 14 Animal + 28 Hunter PL SHOOTER ST FLD ANL HTR TOTAL CFBB C Breggin Eddy FL 370 203 329 902 2 Danielle Wilson FL 203 148 250 601 CMFS C Raleigh Boots GA 475 275 473 1223 YMFSL(R/L) C Kiley Larrick FL 459 267 447* 1173 YMFS C Keenan Adams FL 490 276 502 1268 YAMBB C Phillip Baldowski GA 139 172 160 471 YAFFSL(R/L) C Sara Sandlak FL 351 229 316 896 YAFFS C Samantha Pruitte GA 524 280 527 1331 AFFSL(R/L) C Shelly Mascaro FL 410 247 453 1110 AFBHFSL C Sandy Thater FL 436 257 412 1105 AFBHFS C Cathy Cook FL 496 281 507 1284 SFFS C Joan Hines FL 491 267 492 1250 AFFS C Debra Sieloff FL 504 271 526 1301 PFFS C Diane Watson FL 541 288 540 1369 SMTrad C Tim Van Voorhis FL 357 245 364 966 2 John Lackey FL 364 169 391 924 40 Archery Magazine August/September 2006

3

William Cisek Bob Wartenberg AMTrad C Erik Steinbring 2 Craig White MSMBB C Marty Shelton 2 George Denilen 3 Bob Worrell 2 Ben Brown SMBB C Jerry Barr AMBB C Glen Baxter 2 Lenny Schwade SMBHFSL C Hermit Gann SMBHFS C Tom Boots 2 Roy Peters 3 Pete Murphy Ken Dees AMBHFS C James Pettitt 2 Rick Dorey 3 Hugh Johnson SMFSL(R/L) C Larry Michael 2 Jake Veit 3 Ralph Galatz AMFSL(R/L) C Guy Learn AMFSL C Jim Brown 2 Ron Lucas MSMFS C Frank Gandy 2 Wayne Carr 3 Teddy Lynn Fred Stahl Tim Austin Alex Toser Oly Oland Bill McLendon SMFS C Kevin Bergenroth 2 Alan Hines 3 Tom Borkowski Thom Smiley Joe Raleigh Gerald Keller Fran Way AMFS Championship Flight C Richy Burke 2 Stephen Schwade 3 Mitch Wright Mike Hindmarsh David DiMascio Joe Rozmus Johnny Leonard Chris Wilson 2nd Flight 1 Shawn Hughes 2 Sean Cahill 3 Erik Helfritz Harley Napier Dave Palmer Brad Weinischke Don Kitchen Eddie James Oliver Austin SPMFS C Myers Parrish PMFS C Tim Rogers 2 Jim Pruitte

FL FL

298 277

203 226

320 271

821 774

FL FL

354 259

183 196

356 270

893 725

FL FL FL FL

434 380 339 327

246 211 168 196

441 365 349 318

1121 956 856 841

KY

298

232

296

826

KY SC

446 388

263 219

460 391

1169 998

FL

433

268

426

1127

GA FL FL FL

493 482 464 404

281 278 251 252

515 484 450 421

1289 1244 1165 1077

FL FL GA

511 515 519

280 284 283

530 521 509

1321 1320 1311

FL GA FL

454 432 421

260 258 248

454 411 399

1168 1101 1068

FL

444

270

479

1193

FL FL

475 458

272 268

493 466

1240 1192

FL FL GA FL FL FL TN FL

535 529 514 519 490 441 495 268

283 283 280 282 277 265 276 266

539 524 528 520 478 464 xxx 223

1357 1336 1322 1321 1245 1170 771 757

FL FL FL FL FL FL FL

540 531 514 518 490 496 452

287 286 283 282 271 252 226

531 529 541 529 496 477 438

1358 1346 1338 1329 1257 1225 1116

KY SC FL NC FL NC FL NC

552 544 539 533 532 531 524 520

283 287 286 284 287 286 283 277

554 546 533 537 530 528 529 529

1389 1371 1358 1354 1349 1345 1336 1326

FL FL FL FL NC FL FL FL FL

518 515 512 512 508 492 496 483 448

281 281 285 281 276 285 281 260 247

528 529 522 523 504 511 497 475 442

1327 1325 1319 1316 1288 1288 1274 1218 1137

FL

535

287

532

1354

FL GA

546 546

290 289

555 548

1391 1383

2006 Southeastern 3-D Sectional The 2006 Southeast Sectional 3-D was completed on Sunday, June 25th, with a light drizzle of rain on a beautifully set course at Smoky Mountain Archers in Tennessee. Oly Oland, Tennessee Director, and the working members of the Knoxville club provided an unmarked course on Saturday and a marked course on Sunday, utilizing offset 12 rings and challanging uphill and downhill shots on a heavily wooded hillside. Although the turnout was small, the facility was inviting and the host organization simply outstanding. Archers traveled from as far away as 800 miles to shoot on the truly exceptional facility. Once again we had a longbow (traditional longbow with wood ar-

rows) shooter register in the Freestyle Limited (Recurve/Longbow) division not realizing that the division is a sighted shooting division following shooting equipment rules identical to those for NAA recurve. Unfortunately, not enough of our NFAA State Directors realize the confusion for the growing number of truly primitive equipment shooters — they see “longbow” and assume that it is the Internationally recognized unsighted longbow with wooden arrows. Here are the results of our 2006 Southeast Sectional 3-D event:

Southeastern 3-D Sectional Results June 24-25, 2006 Smoky Mountain Archers, Maryville, TN 30 Unmarked + 30 Marked PL SHOOTER YAMFS C Joseph Newton AMBB C Glen Baxter

ST Unmrkd Mrkd

TOTAL

KY

199

227

426

KY

204

185

389

162

183

345

248

239

487

203

236

439

251 212

270 233

521 445

209 193

199 203

408 396

148

143

291

155

177

332

SMBB C Jim Bowerman TN AMBHFS C Tim Newton KY AFFS C Debra Sieloff FL AMFS C Jason Ayers TN 2 Dale Smith SC MSMFS C Donald Huddleston TN 2 Tim Austin FL AMTrad C Roger Pallitt FL SMTrad C Lauren VanCleave FL

FLORIDA

Oliver Austin, Director oaustin@admin.fsu.edu

FAA State Field Championship Results May 27-28, 2006 Gator Bowmen, Gainesville, FL 28 Field + 14 Animal + 28 Hunter Medalists only PL SHOOTER CLUB SCORE CUB FEMALE BAREBOW C Breggin Eddy Xterminators 902 2 Danielle Wilson Xterminators 601 CUB FEMALE FREESTYLE LIMITED C Kimberly McCoy Brevard 719 YOUTH FEMALE FREESTYLE LIMITED (R/L) C Kiley Larrick Xterminators 1173 YOUTH MALE FREESTYLE C Keenan Adams Tri-State 1268 YOUNG ADULT FEMALE FREESTYLE LIMITED (R/L) C Sara Sandlak Xterminators 896 ADULT FEMALE FREESTYLE LIMITED (R/L) C Shelly Mascaro Everglades 1110 ADULT FEMALE BOWHUNTER FREESTYLE LIMITED C Jennifer Davies Zephyrhills 1236 2 Sandy Thater Aripeka 1105 ADULT FEMALE BOWHUNTER FREESTYLE C Cathy Cook Loxahatchee 1284 ADULT FEMALE FREESTYLE C Debra Sieloff Indian River 1301 PRO FEMALE FREESTYLE C Diane Watson Aripeka 1369 SENIOR MALE LONGBOW C Tim Van Voorhis Lee County 966 2 Bob Wartenberg Ft Lauderdale 774 ADULT MALE LONGBOW C Roger Pallitt Lee County 945 2 Dana Chatoo Everglades 839 SENIOR MALE TRADITIONAL C John Lackey Lee County 924 2 William Cisek Citrus 821 ADULT MALE TRADITIONAL C Erik Steinbring Everglades 893 2 Craig White Gator 725

MASTER SENIOR MALE BAREBOW C Marty Shelton Choctaw 1121 2 George Denilen Citrus 956 3 Bob Worrell Citrus 856 SENIOR MALE BOWHUNTER FREESTYLE LIMITED C Hermit Gann Gator 1127 SENIOR MALE BOWHUNTER FREESTYLE C Joe Melchiore Citrus 1298 2 Roy Peters Sarasota 1244 3 Pete Murphy Gator 1165 ADULT MALE BOWHUNTER FREESTYLE C Scott Davies Zephyrhills 1351 2 Jason Dorey Gold Coast 1322 3 James Pettitt Aripeka 1321 SENIOR MALE FREESTYLE LIMITED (R/L) C Larry Michael Sarasota 1168 2 Ralph Galatz Lee County 1068 ADULT MALE FREESTYLE LIMITED (R/L) C Guy Learn Gasparilla 1193 ADULT MALE FREESTYLE LIMITED C Jim Brown Daytona 1240 2 Ron Lucas Xterminators 1192 3 Andie Anderson Gator 1181 EXECUTIVE SENIOR MALE FREESTYLE C Bill McLendon Ft Caroline 757 MASTER SENIOR MALE FREESTYLE C Frank Gandy Ridge 1357 2 Wayne Carr Indian River 1336 3 Fred Stahl Lee County 1321 SENIOR MALE FREESTYLE C Kevin Bergenroth Gator 1358 2 Tom Borkowski Pro Flight 1338 3 Bob Stoorza Citrus 1336 ADULT MALE FREESTLE C Mitch Wright Gasparilla 1358 2 Scott McClure Central Fla BH 1356 3 David DiMascio Sebastian 1349 ADULT MALE FREESTLE - A1 1 Harley Napier Everglades 1316 ADULT MALE FREESTLE - A2 1 Eddie James Pro Flight 1218 ADULT MALE FREESTLE - B2 1 Oliver Austin Tri-State 1137 SENIOR PRO MALE FREESTYLE C Myers Parrish Ridge 1354 PRO MALE FREESTYLE C Tim Rogers Sarasota 1391

SOUTHERN SECTION Lee Gregory, Councilman lee@dlprint.com

Southern Section Directors Meeting At the Directors meeting held in conjunction with the Outdoor Sectional, Lee Gregory was re-elected to a second term as Councilman. It was also decided that we will have multiple sites for the 2007 Indoor Sectional. Next year’s Outdoor Sectional will be in Longview, Texas.

Southern Outdoor Sectional Results June 10-11, 2006 Trosper Archery Club, Oklahoma City, OK 28 Field + 14 Animal + 14 Hunter PL SHOOTER ST PMFS C Troy Wesley TX SPMFS C Rick Gilley OK 2 Thomas “Wayne” King AMFS C Mike Atwell OK 2 Steve Wingo OK 3 Ken Benjamin TX Robert Wood OK Ray Manfull KS SMFS C Lee Gregory TX 2 Freddy Hockett OK 3 Keith Ballard TX MSMFS C Dean Pridgen OK

FLD

ANL

HTR

TOTAL

550

288

279

1117

535

287

271

1093

509

277

255

1041

537 531 525 530 517

274 288 283 282 284

274 264 268 262 257

1085 1083 1076 1074 1058

516 509 486

283 283 267

254 252 242

1053 1044 995

529

284

271

1084

Archery Magazine August/September 2006 41

2 Hollis Lankford TX 3 Earl Johnson TX AFFS C Jacki Taylor TX SFFS C Betty Johnson TX CMFS C Justin Morrison TX YFFS C Coral McMinn TX AMBB C Bill Bowen TX AMFSL C Bubba Bateman TX SMFSL C Ed McCorkle TX CMFSL C Montana Sanders PFFSL C Jennifer Gilley OK AMFSL(R/L) C Dale Cooley OK AFFSL(R/L) C Liz Adams TX YAMFSL(R/L) C Neil Cooley OK AMBHFS C Scott Bradford LA 2 Ricky St.Upery LA 3 Nathan Taylor TX Mark McMillan OK Ronnie Falgout LA Greg Gettys OK Mike Ewing OK SMBHFS C Lloyd Putter OK AFBHFS C Anaise Falgout LA 2 Ada Credeur LA 3 Gail Ewing LA Toni St. Upery LA SMBHFSL C Tim Coyle TX AMBHFSL C Scott Whiteford TX 2 Lorn Adams TX SMBB C Eddie McCrary TX

409

284

265 231

958 880

503

284

265

1052

501

278

256

1035

547

287

269

1103

495

283

259

1037

463

241

207

911

495

284

250

1029

411

256

217

884

OK

348

234

181 763

481

277

252

1010

383

238

205

826

313

244

192

749

394

268

200

852

534 533 517 510 491 483 471

285 288 284 281 276 280 INC

267 258 257 261 244 244 INC

1086 1079 1058 1052 1011 1007 471

477

268

239

984

507 488 484 467

276 280 276 240

250 252 239 225

1033 1020 999 932

493

248

235

976

454 397

274 229

235 219

963 845

465

242

216

923

SOUTHWESTERN SECTION Jerry Miller, Councilman swcman1@verizon.net

Southwestern Outdoor Sectional Results June 24-25, 2006 Las Vegas Archers, Las Vegas, NV 28 Field + 14 Animal + 28 Hunter PL SHOOTER FLD ANL HTR TOTAL PMFS C Steve Wagner 541 285 545 1371 PFFS C Becky Pearson 530 284 535 1349 2 Sue Berfield 504 281 508 1293 SPMFS C Ben Rodgers 533 285 533 1351 2 Frank Pearson 534 284 532 1350 3 Rodger Weaton 528 286 523 1337 AMFS C Charles Roof 541 286 535 1362 2 Chris Fesmile 531 283 527 1341 3 Brian Marchello 530 281 522 1333 Stan LaPointe III 527 284 518 1329 Gary Sheldon 529 281 514 1324 Jerry Marley 481 282 500 1263 Ryan Johnson 485 279 491 1255 AFFS C Beckie Shepherd 503 280 495 1278 SMFS C Don Snipes 535 287 535 1357 2 Carl Hix 529 285 531 1345 3 Pat Peters 512 285 520 1317 Richard Orth 517 281 510 1308 42 Archery Magazine August/September 2006

Gary Beck 505 Frank Roof 501 Stanley LaPointe Jr. 495 Fred Kober 493 MSMFS C Paul Washburn 513 2 Frank Gamble 473 3 Keith Flint 459 AMFSL C K.D. Buck 480 2 Leonard Anderson 468 SMFSL C Ken Buck 448 AMBHFS C Tom Wagner 521 2 Ray Shepherd 527 3 Kirk Toth 519 Brian Johnson 506 Scott Walter 456 Bruce Bean 435 Michael Claborn 289 AFBHFS C Julie Wagner 492 2 Kimberly Terry 455 3 Jessica Johnson 442 SMBHFS C David Antonovich 505 2 John Thayer 516 3 Ronnie Yurong 468 Kenneth Koshimizu 472 AMBHFSL C Robert Arthur 457 2 Gary Buck 450 AMBB C Tom Daley 477 2 Ron St.Clair 456 3 Bob Borges 384 SMBB C Johnnie Hoeft 372 BB Master Sr. Male C Fred Lonsbery 442 AFFSL(R/L) C Lynn Walter 409 SMFSL(R/L) C Dave Aprea 435

284 282 275 269

518 510 507 496

1307 1293 1277 1258

281 274 264

518 502 485

1312 1249 1208

274 276

493 472

1247 1216

271

467

1186

283 284 282 277 263 225 202

537 529 529 515 Inc. Inc. Inc.

1341 1340 1330 1298 719 660 491

278 268 272

500 477 477

1270 1200 1191

281 285 278 278

519 502 495 483

1305 1303 1271 1233

272 269

469 463

1198 1182

266 270 256

477 467 383

1220 1193 1023

251

364

987

250

440

1132

272

436

1117

258

433

1126

by Paul Davison

N a t i o n a l To u r n a m e n t M e m o r a b i l i a

L

ong before the price of gasoline dictated where and how we took our annual family vacation, first priority for us dedicated field shooters was to attend the weeklong Outdoor Nationals. This was especially true in 1976. It was America’s Bicentennial, and after the big July 4th celebrations, we were in a good mood to “See the USA.” The Auroraland Archers certainly did everything possible to make us want to attend the 1976 Outdoor — two “pre-tournament” tournaments, several planned day-trips for the non-shooters, World Pro Team Championships, and catered picnics and barbeques. This sales job paid off. With 1266 shooters, the 1976 Outdoor was the second biggest ever. In those days, it was also the tradition for the tournament host to give each registered shooter a goodies pack full of visitor propaganda,

Del Huberty’s jacket with first 25 National Outdoor patches is now in the NFAA Museum

discount coupons, and tournament paraphernalia ... most cherished of which was the tournament commemorative shoulder patch. This practice is no longer observed, but it was really a big deal ever since the first National Outdoor in 1946. Tears were shed in 1970 at the 25th National Outdoor, also at Aurora, when Del Huberty of Wisconsin donated his prized “patch jacket” to the NFAA. This jacket (see photo) not only had several of Visit Del’s club and association �������������������� patches sewn on, but every single Official adjunct to NFAA’s commemorative �������������������� patch from the � NFAA History and historyfirst 25 National related articles published in ������� magazine O u t d o o r � Recent NFAA/WAF tournament tournaments. write-ups and photo galleries � Lists of all National Outdoor Thirty-six years (from 1946) and National later, Del’s jacket Indoor (from 1980) Champions � NFAA Barebow Fraternity news remains in the and membership roster NFAA Museum. � Field and 3-D Range Design I’ve attended Guidelines � Every ��������� ������ 23 Outdoor article published in ������� Nationals since � Recently-published general interest articles by Paul 1969, but Davison in ������� patches were issued at only “NFAA and WAF news for all archers” 17 of these.

Paul Davison’s

Archery Magazine August/September 2006 43

Nostalgia Corner CONTINUED Possibly it’s because shoulder patches are no longer fashionable, but it’s more likely a matter of economics. Another National Outdoor perk no longer given away is the post-tournament Tournament Summary Booklet. The booklet contained the complete tally of tournament scores, as well as a list of all record holders for the Field, Hunter and Animal rounds, plus 5-day Aggregate scoring records. It was produced by the NFAA and mailed to each attendee (one per family) a few weeks after the tournament. The cover of the 1976 booklet is shown herein. Note the embedded image of the tournament patch. This booklet was 48 pages thick, and, no doubt, a significant expense item for the NFAA. Today, the complete results are inserted in this magazine, as well as on NFAA’s website. I miss the commemorative tournament patch

Cover of 1976 Tournament Booklet, showing image of commemorative patch

and summary booklet; but, alas, they’re only memories now.

Start ‘em

keep it

FUN.

In the beginning, kids have to have fun; don’t make archery out too be too much work! I have seen the interest of some kids squelched completely by folks

Annual Y.O. Ted Nugent Birthday HuntBash 2006 Ted Nugent’s personal favorite and #1 hunting adventure for his family! December 13-17

who pushed kids as hard as they pushed themselves, it doesn’t work very well. Exposure to the sport should be designed to be fun. You can have a great

Join the Nugent Tribe for Ted’s private birthday celebration at the amazing Y.O. ranch this December! Magical historic facilities and game species galore at special Nuge pricing! Includes all meals, lodging, one animal & guides. Kids at even greater savings. Call Paul now to get all the details.

time showing kids the dos and don’ts of archery while teaching in the backyard.

Whether you choose a family vacation, a romantic get away, father & son hunt, or good times with your hunting buddies, this is the perfect hunt adventure for all. The Y.O. Ranch accommodates the hunting experience of your choice. 800-343-HUNT www.tednugent.com 44 Archery Magazine August/September 2006

Make it family fun, kids love to win things, kids love to shoot fun targets, and most of all, kids love to pop balloons. Backyard balloon fun with friends, [L to R] Alexis Mattie, Averie Hurtig, Brianna Ortega.

continued on page 50 Archery Magazine August/September 2006 45

Kids Corner

CONTINUED

YMCA winners in the 8-to-10-year-old class. [L to R] Walter Mills, Brendan Lopez, Alfred Mills, and behind, Coach Tim Atwood.

Be a goodwill ambassador for the sport of archery and keep it fun while they’re young. Take a kid shooting! If you have a photo. Contact Tim Atwood at: atwoodhome@aol.com or 3175 Racine Dr. Riverside CA. 92503/ phone: 951-354-9968

1. ATWOOD’S ABILITY LAW The ability of an archer to shoot a great score is inversely proportional to the number of archery pins and knickknacks he or she has on their hat. 2. ATWOOD’S LAW OF ARCHERY BUREAUCRACY Every archery club’s by-laws has an allotted number of positions to be filled by idiots. 3. ATWOOD’S RULE OF OPTIMISM There’s a 50% chance of a bulls eye; either you make one or you don’t. 4. ATWOOD’S LAW OF TRAD BOW MAKING • Measure with a micrometer. • Mark with Chalk. • Cut with an ax.

Chandler J. Anglin, 8 years old, with First Harvest (Marino Ram). Candler went bowhunting with grandpa Anglin who is an NFAA grandmaster. 46 Archery Magazine August/September 2006

Archery Magazine August/September 2006 47

The NFAA Foundation committee is delighted to be able to provide scholarships in the amount of $500.00 each. The committee wishes each of these scholarship award winners the very best in the pursuit of their educational dreams. You also can apply for a scholarship to help with your education. 2007 applications must be

submitted December 31, 2006 to be reviewed by next year’s committee at the NFAA annual meeting. Applications will be in the upcoming issues of Archery Magazine. Also you can get applications online at www.fieldarchery.com or call NFAA Headquarter at 800-811-2331 to have one mailed to you.

National Field Archery Foundation 2006 Scholarship Winners

Katie Deyerle, East Helena, MT- Katie will be attending Carroll College in Fall 2006. She will be majoring in Political Science/International Relations.

Tiffany Reeves, Helena, Mt- Tiffany will be attending Helena College of Technology Fall of 2006. She will be majoring in Biology/Genetics.

Julie Petty, Clio, IA Julies will be attending Iowa State University in Fall 2006. She will major in Interior Design.

Alden G Harris, Auburn, CA. Alden is currently attending Texas A & M. He is in the Physics program with honors.

Dustin Heeg, Marshfield, WI- Dustin will be attending the University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire. His major is Computer Science.

Anthony Schmidt, LaCrosse, WI- Anthony will be attending Fox Valley Technical College with a major in Natural Resources.

48 Archery Magazine August/September 2006

Archery Magazine August/September 2006 49

A T E D I T O R I A L b y Te d N u g e n t

Eldorado Getaway I

50 Archery Magazine August/September 2006

often wonder if the depth of my outdoor passion and sincerity is tangibly projected in my writings to an actual level anywhere near matching the outrageous intensity of my own feelings. A s I sit with my BloodBrothers in various SpiritCamps around the world, hammering away on my poor, abused laptop computer, the sheer joy, energy and giddiness of my hunting Toby, Ted & lifestyle verily flames from my soul onto the keypad. From primal campfires in the untamed wilds of Africa, glowing snow capped peaks of Alaska, the pungent, earthy aromas of my sacred Michigan swampgrounds to the mysticism of a beautiful prickly-pear-scaped South Texas adobe hacienda, my thirst for freedom, rugged individualism and true independence in nature powerfully drives my very being. God tells me to be myself, and I am a hunter. To function thoughtfully in His perfect tooth, fang and claw creation as the rea-

soning predator that He designed me to be is as soulfully satisfying as anything in life can be. I am drunk on His perfection. Pouring a cup of hot coffee and hanging with my two sons Toby and Rocco is always a supremely happy thing for me, no matter the circumstances or geography. But this morning, words cannot describe

Rocco

the incredible fulfilling electricity in the air as the Sims family fishing trawler rocks gently on the placid cove in the Prince of Wales archipelago. The 58-foot Eldorado will be our home for approximately a week again this spring to celebrate nature at her best and pure BloodBrother camaraderie at its fin-

est. I do believe heaven on earth is attainable if one pays attention to priorities and details. We happen to be sitting smack dab in the middle of it. On this fine day, the Nugent boys glow and we thank God with all our hearts and souls. I love my sons with everything I have. Toby is a scrapping, athletic, 29-year-old handsome young man. He has always been there with me when the call of the wild beckons us into the rituals of our sacred fall predatorship. Rocco is fifteen now, and almost a spitting image of his older brother. Both of my sons are hard workers and polite young men. From as early as three years of age they showed a genuine fascination with all things wild and shooting. Of course being my sons, they were surrounded with stunning wild ground and constant wildlife from birth as I made it a primary quality of life

continued on page 53 Archery Magazine August/September 2006 51

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decision to be sure we lived in great wildlife habitat. Not only does such a peaceful setting save their old man’s rock-nroll soul, but there is no doubt it is the best environment to raise children in, and like their sisters Sasha and Starr, their overall social, human and spirit radars are at optimum working order because of it. Rocco and Toby are both expert marksmen with firearms and archery tackle. They always try their best at everything they do, and from the age of four on, they could put BBs into bulls-eyes quite handily. This cultivated and dedicated hand-eye coordination also makes them killer basketball players and shooters as well, something they both like to abuse their rather inept, non-athletic father at whenever possible. They have both bagged an impressive array of big game around the world with me, but most importantly, have always been a beneficial asset to camp life and made me proud no matter where we go or how harsh the conditions may be. They are real men. Spring in Alaska can be either beautiful, or a sheer, cold snotfest. On this trip we were getting mostly the latter. But no matter, for we were eating the best fresh crab and shrimp on God’s good green earth daily and were surrounded by soul cleansing beauty

everyday. And of course on a working fishing boat in Alaskan waters, good Captain Mike Sims had assembled a crew of absolute ass kickers to keep things smooth, safe, interesting and always fun. We all chipped in to hold our own and carry our share of the workload, and my boys were showing their mettle in grand Michiganiac style. We made a good crew. Protected from the fickle winds of the Pacific Ocean by our barrier of scattered islands, we were moored on a relatively calm body of water with a view to die for. Eternal landscapes of towering cedars and fir trees blanketed every piece of ground in sight. Graphic, twisted driftwood and jambles of rock artwork highlighted the winding, jagged shoreline. Eagles and assorted birds were always in sight and the occa-

sional killer whale put on a show that mesmerized us all. A trio of Canadian geese and some seals became our companions right up next to the boat. This is the life I was meant to live. In this stimulating environment, sipping coffee or juice and just simply doing various chores together put us at ultimate ease, which really opens up a family to communicate better and dig a little deeper than usual in every day life. Plus, if the Nugents have anything going for us, it is surely a wonderful and often unruly sense of humor, and the gungho laughter seemed to never end. Rocco couldn’t get away from school the year before, so Toby and I came here and both bowkilled terrific trophy black bears. Being Rocco’s first boat bearhunt, we guided him to continued on page 62

Archery Magazine August/September 2006 53

BY TED NUGENT

The Beast Lives

If I were any more alive, I’d

surely implode. The sneak attack of that mesmerizing magiclight of predawn glowage crystallized my entire wild world with a sparkling shimmer and shine. Just behind us, huge wild turkeys began to flap out of the tall oaks, winging to ground for their morning ritual. The shrill “eek, eek, eeking”� of mile-high snowgeese ricocheted off the stratosphere of high cloud cover to the north as honking Canada’s traded over the deep, dark blue lake to my south. I heard faint whistling as wood ducks maneuvered the winding rivercourse nearby. Harsh, throaty, resonate croaking of migrating sandhill cranes punched the gentle morning air, just as a loud, double cackle from a raucous ringneck pheasant blasted the swampland haze. A woodpecker hammered wood nearby and a big, fluffed up fox squirrel scampered beneath us in the deep blanket of fallen leaves, sounding like a muffled popcorn maker.

I could see the hint of fiery orange sunrays behind me to

the east through the eternal forest maze. And then the welcome pitter patter of a deer moved in and my heart kicked into a nerve wracking overdrive. The small yearling stepped briskly along the lower ridge out of the marshgrass, pausing every few yards for a nibble here and a groom there. Crows scolded something. The large flock of turkeys now yelped and purred and putted and gobbled like a Mardi Gras of feathered partiers just behind me. A hoot owl cut loose yonder and the little deer strolled on directly under my ladderstand. I’m telling you, it was moving. How anybody could not want to be a part of and intentionally pursue this sensual, soulful erector set of the wild I will never know.

54 Archery Magazine August/September 2006

My goosebumps had goosebumps. I wanted to chime in with celebratory crowing of my own, but I instead simply sat perfectly still and soaked it all in. I was on fire. This is bowhunting. This is life.

Amidst this cacophony of the SpiritWild rush-hour jam session, I

able hands-on, of that I am certain. And even though we bowhunters rarely actually kill game on most of our hunts, it is indeed the mental and spiritual commitment to try to take a precious life for all the right reasons that ignite the inner primal scream like no other force known to man. Fatherhood is an enormously power-

self for the 56th season of my American Dream, overlooking a Michigan swamp ridgeline, allthings alive, ultra alive in me. Vidcam Ace, Jenny Olsen, shared this sacred earthly upheaval with me, and we were as tuned in as a being could be tuned in. We ate it up. This parade of natural wonder just kept on keeping on all morning long. It was beautiful.

Then I saw a quicker than usual spurt of activity way off to the southwest.

PHOTO HERE counted my blessings. Only in America can ”we the people” own the land and harvest our own renewable resources from the Good Mother Earth. Ya gotta crave freedom and liberty. With my sensual radar redlining out of control, I could only wonder what my fellow humans, the nonhunters, could possibly do in order to experience this astounding high.

Some say they feel the Great Spirit on fire when they go on

nature hikes or climb a mountain. I don’t think so. It’s not the same thing. The powerful and deep spiritual and psychological connection as an actual participant in this dynamo of tooth, fang and claw is not available as a spectator. It is only avail-

ful sense of belonging to our children, of that I’m sure. And even though we take our paternal role with all we have, mind, body and soul, there is no way we can ever know motherhood. Conceiving, carrying, nurturing in the womb, delivering and breastfeeding of our beloved children is a force known only to mothers. It is a unique oneness that is the ultimate “hands-on”. Spectators will never know. Believe it.

And so it was, during that

photosynthesis explosion of November that is thicker than an Ozzy accent, when the planets align and the spirit begins to throb, that I found my-

Through my forest I could see a distant patch of green foodplot above the dark timberline, as tawny hoofed projectiles darted in and out of visibility. My binoculars revealed three whitetail does scampering amongst the big trees, with a fourth deer bringing up the rear. Number four has white bone on his head and I turned to Jenny with headlight eyes and intensely whispered, “BUCK!”� Showtime!

The three big does were

running right to us on one of the main trails, closing the

distance fast. As they paused nearly beneath us, the handsome buck appeared in the blanket of rusty fall leaves on a trail slightly above. The does looked back then took off due east at a trot, keeping the buck’s attention right where it oughtta be. My predator spirit worked in unison with this tooth, fang and claw ballet, and as he sauntered into the 20 yard zone, my bowstring found the corner of my mouth, and the arrow zipped across no-man’s land, disappearing square into the golden triangle of his shoulder with a welcome THWACK! He cut hard left and ran hellbent for backstraps into the tangle down below, vanishing into the thicket of autumn olive and stunted pines which I had planted over the years.

Jenny’s camera smoothly swung to my smiling face as I sighed the sigh of a very happy bowhunter. Leaning against the gnarly oakbark, I verily glowed with joy and satisfaction of a job well done. My dedication to hardcore yearcontinued on page 56

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The Beast Lives

continued

long practice with my bow had once again paid off with the ultimate prize. Our celebration and recovery of the magnificent beast on tape was of souls and spirit on fire. He was a dandy seven point Michigan butterball backstrapper buck with a perfect X clean through his vitals for the quickest death possible in the wild. The Stinger tipped 500 grain GoldTip projectile had done its job

again, and the morning was the essence of life itself. The chores of gutting, dragging, cleaning, photographing and hanging were labors of love, and the ultimate party ritual of the Nugent family deercamp.

More geese and cranes sang the soundtrack songs of

our stirring fall harvest music all around us throughout the day, and plans were already in motion for another chapter for the afternoon hunt. Our

Thanksgiving party never ends when we are so directly connected to the grand celebration of hands-on conservation, and I felt some songs coming on strong, deep inside myself. Maybe the wildlife would let me join their band. For more Nugent hunting stories, order the reissue of Ted’s original book, Bloodtrails IIThe Truth About Hunting at www.tednugent.com or 800343-4868.

by Ted Nugent

Turkey Hunters Spend Millions on Conservation Wild turkeys hit a multi-million dollar jackpot —more than $200 million—and didn’t even have to buy a lottery ticket. Thanks to volunteers and partners across North America, the National Wild Turkey Federation has hit another milestone: $202 million NWTF and cooperator dollars raised and spent on habitat and outreach projects benefiting the wild turkey. “Because of the blood, sweat and tears of our volunteers and partners, we were able to reach this landmark number,” said Rob Keck, CEO of the NWTF. “Without the help of wildlife agencies, volunteers and sponsors, none of this would be possible and we will continue to work for our hunting tradition, and the conservation of the wild turkey.” The Hunting Heritage Super Fund supports the NWTF’s conservation and education programs. Established in 1983, the Super Fund pools money raised at banquets, donated by corporate sponsors and is given to benefit wildlife conservation. The restoration of the wild turkey is a perfect example of Super Fund dollars at work. In cooperation with state agencies, the NWTF was able to help accelerate the restoration of the wild turkey. When the NWTF was founded in 1973, there were an estimated 1.3 million wild turkeys and 1.5 million turkey hunters. Today, there are nearly 7 million wild turkeys and almost 3 million turkey hunters. Since 1985, more than $202 million has been spent on over 31,000 projects including: • • • • • •

Habitat management Hunter safety Habitat restoration Land acquisition Enforcement Research

56 Archery Magazine August/September 2006

• Equipment • Outdoor education for women • Education for youth in the outdoors through events • More than $1.4 million given in scholarships to graduating high school seniors • More than 2 million youth reached in the classroom through Wild About Turkey education boxes introducing—or reintroducing—people with disabilities to the outdoors With a membership base of 525,000, the NWTF is one of the largest single-species hunting and conservation organizations in the nation. Chapters are found in 50 states and 12 foreign countries. For more information, call (800) THE-NWTF or visit www.nwtf.org. About the NWTF: In 1973 when the National Wild Turkey Federation was founded, there were an estimated 1.3 million wild turkeys and 1.5 million turkey hunters. Thanks to the work of wildlife agencies and the NWTF’s many volunteers and partners, today there are 7 million wild turkeys and almost 3 million turkey hunters. Since 1985, more than $202 million NWTF and cooperator dollars have been spent on over 31,000 projects benefiting wild turkeys throughout North America. The NWTF is a nonprofit organization with nearly 525,000 members in 50 states and 12 foreign countries. It supports scientific wildlife management on public, private and corporate lands as well as wild turkey hunting as a traditional North American sport. For more information on the National Wild Turkey Federation, call (803) 637-3106, check out our Web site at www.nwtf.org or e-mail questions to nwtf@nwtf. net

Q:

Uncle Ted, I hunt a fifty acre piece of land near Nacogdoches, Texas that’s surrounded by thousands of acres that are completely unhunted. Because of this, I consistently have big bucks (150+) on my trail camera every year. But they always pass through my property around two or three in the morning. Is there anything I can do to possibly change these bucks patterns? You are a fine American, and I thank you for everything you do for sportsmen across the country. —James Vardeman, Texas

A:

Well James, the first thing we need to do is get ol Uncle Ted down there ASAP to ascertain the potential for your sacred deergrounds! Sounds like you have a dream piece of deer paradise there, sir. Fifty acres will not allow you any meaningful control over the deer movement to speak of, but the potential on such a low pressured area is unlimited in my humble venison-addicted opinion. The trick is to maximize your hunting time during the rut and get very aggressive with calling, rattling and the use of scents. Do not underestimate the potential of automatic corn feeders, my friend. After all, we are hardcore Texans, are we not? With all the killer attractants and supplements on the market these days, you could turn the tide down there. I’d immediately set up a Texas Hunter Product auto feeder with 50-50 corn and Record Rack protein pellets to

go off every day of the year at sunrise and two hours before sunset. I would also keep a few Record Rack deerblocks going all year and put out a bucket of granulated Lucky Buck as well. Use your head to be sure to set up and approach your stand without allowing the deer to know you are around. Then hang on and wait for the buck of your dreams. Let me know how it goes. Good luck, BloodBrothers. —Ted & family

Q:

Ted, I have a question about your string set up. I noticed on a couple of your TV shows that the serving below your nock point appears to have some additional material built up on it. It also looks like you attach your release well below the nocking point of the arrow on the string. I assume that this is done to accommodate your style of instinctive shooting with a compound and release. My question is this...what are the set up measurements on your string? I am curious because I am an instinctive shooter myself. I currently shoot both longbows and recurves, but I also enjoy shooting compounds. If you could give me the run down on how to set up with your style and maybe some tips, I’d appreciate it. Thanks. —Bryon Miller

A:

I am more than pleased to share my adventurous archery style with as many people as I possibly can Byron, as I am quite sure many others will get an increased kick out of this natural hand-eye shooting Archery Magazine August/September 2006 57

CONTINUED

What Every Archer Should Know First About The Mental Game

old stickbow. Try it, you’ll love it! Good luck. —Ted

What Every Archer Should Know First About The Mental Game is the first of a series of Mental Management products designed for the competitive Archer. This CD explains the top three mental mistakes most Archers make and teaches how to overcome them. Instructors find that this CD makes learning technical skill easier and faster by helping to eliminate mental error common to archery. Cost: $25.00 (USD)

Q: A:

Hey Nuge, I’m getting into Bow Hunting and I’m looking into a Reflex Super Slam bow. I’m an avid firearm deerhunter but I’m wanting to get into something that is more sporting. What do you think and what else should I be looking for? Thanks —Erik Lawther

Mastering The Mental Game of Archery VOL 1

Now you’re talking, Erik. Bowhunting surely elevates the reasoning predator spirit and radar to new heights. You can’t go wrong with any bow designed by Master Bowhunter Hall of Famer Chuck Adams. His Reflex line by Hoyt are state of the art pieces of archery art, for sure. As I am sure Chuck would agree, be sure you try every model and variation you can as archery, especially bowhunting, has everything to do with feel. The mystical flight of the arrow is hardcore heart and soul personal touch, my friend. There is no shortage of sport in firearms marksmanship, but bowhunting does kick it up a few notches, and I am confident you will revel in its spirit. Go slow, practice smart and diligently, keep it simple and say many prayers for the wildthings, and I assure you that you will fall in love with bowhunting. Goodluck, BloodBrothers. —Ted

Volume ONE, Building the Triad, teaches Archers how the Conscious, Subconscious, and Self Image work to generate performance. This is the first volume of a series that teaches competitive archers how to generate a consistent mental performance under pressure. This CD explains how to create balance within all three areas to form a proper Triad State, which increases good performance. You will learn Principles of Mental Management that are applicable to archery. Cost: $30.00 (USD)

Mastering The Mental Game of Archery VOL 2

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Volume TWO, Improving the Conscious Mind, is a discussion of pre-shot preparation and how it relates to the Pre-Shot Routine, the Preload and the Mental Program. This audio CD addresses pressure and how champions use this phenomenon to their advantage. Archers will also learn how to develop a proper mental program and increase their ability to perform well under stress. Cost: $30.00 (USD)

T

touch that has served me so well for so long. Being raised in the wonderful world of the rebirth of the mystical flight of the arrow as brought to us by Ishi, Saxton Pope, Art Young, Chief Compton, Fred Bear, Howard Hill, Ben Pearson, Roy Case and so many other great men, my early youth with the longbow taught me the purity of instinctive shooting. As I discovered the new fangled compound bow in the 1970’s, I found that this new mechanical contraption had its pluses and its minuses. Through much diligent and oft times painful trial and error over the years, I got my mojo back when I improvised, adapted and overcame the raised arrow shelf dilemma by adding a series of small rubber eliminator buttons on the serving below my nocking point, thereby bringing the relationship with the arrow departure back closer to my gaze alI had with my three finger under Apache drawing style. Like most longbows and recurves, all compounds are a little differently designed and I experiment with varying numbers of eliminatory buttons based on the flight of the arrow from each bow. When you find the right elevation you will be amazed at how natural you can point and shoot, just like a perfectly fitted

6/12/06 2:40:19 PM

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Archery Magazine August/September 2006 59

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Archery Magazine August/September 2006 61

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Eldorado Getaway the hottest spot and with much patience, stealth and dedication, he was able to kill a monster old boar with his Excalibur crossbow. Encountering a majestic black bear of any size is always an enormous thrill. But Rocco’s first bear kill happened to be a famous old cantankerous beast of lore known as Old Moe by the locals. With a perfectly executed crossbow bolt, he had bagged a monster seven-foot boar with worn teeth and a giant 21‰ skull. Weighing over 500 pounds in early spring would make this bear a bona fide 600+ pounder in the fall, full of pre-hibernation fish and berries. Grand celebration erupted that night on the mighty Eldorado, and visions of our hero BloodBrothers, the great Fred Bear and Ed Bilderback on the famous Valiant Maid, came pouring forth. It was wonderful. Toby and I both put in some hardcore bearhunting time, but with cold, wet winter weather hanging on and the bears mostly staying put in their cozy dens, neither of us got a shot. But the beauty of it all was that we could not have cared less. This father and his two sons had the time of our lives in the Alaskan wilderness with good friends in the lap of God, and we came away with powerful memories that we will all cherish and celebrate forever. Calendars are already circled for next spring and spirits run high. To find out more about great Nuge-approved adventures around the world for the whole family, visit tednugent.com or call SUNRIZE SAFARIS at 517750-9060. Archery Magazine August/September 2006 63


Aug/ Sept 06