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Archery Magazine 800 Archery Lane Yankton, SD 57078

PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID RAVENNA MI PERMIT NO. 320


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FEATURES August / September 2008

MAKE YOUR HUNTING BOW TARGET-ACCURATE by John Dudley .........................................5 TOURNAMENT RESULTS Marked 3D Nationals ..............................15 FROM THE PRESIDENTS DESK by Bruce Cull ...........................................12 NFAA CALENDAR OF EVENTS ...............14 COACH’S CORNER The Mystery of Back Tension by Bernie Pellerite ...................................20

ON OUR COVER Friendly competitors (L to R) John Stone, Gary Renner, Robert Hatton and Jackie Wyatt, all of South Carolina, enjoy good times at the Southeastern Outdoor near Clemson. Photo by Paul Davison.

NEXT ISSUE... Results, photos and articles from the 2008 Unmarked 3D and Outdoor Nationals in Yankton, SD! 2 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August / September 2008

Vol. 28 • No. 4 © 2008 NFAA®

NFAA COACH: TOP GUN Featuring Tim Huff by Charles Land .......................................26

SECTIONAL NEWS ..................................33

WAY BACK WHEN Let’s Go to An Invitational! by Paul Davison .......................................28 MENTAL MANAGEMENT “Winning” with Lanny Bassham ................................30

Plus tournament registration forms AND MUCH MORE!

BECOME THE SHOT by Terry Wunderle ...................................32

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ARCHERY MAGAZINE

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ADVERTISERS INDEX Angus Brown Safaris. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42 Archery Focus Magazine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Brite Site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45 BCY Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3

The voice of field archery, the NFAA®, Ted Nugent United Sportsmen, the IFAA and bowhunting.

article and photos by JOHN DUDLEY

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Carter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Electronic Awards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44 Feather Vision . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44 Maple Leaf Press . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45 Mathews, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Mental Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 New Archery Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46 Robinhood Videos. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Shot Doctor, the . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32 Specialty Archery. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42 Stanislawski . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . outside back cover TrueFlight Feathers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 US & International Archer Magazine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46

EDITORIAL BOARD Bruce Cull Brian Sheffler Paul Davison Douglas Joyce EDITOR Marihelen Rogers NFAA Executive Secretary PUBLISHER Rogers Printing Inc. 3350 Main St. PO Box 215 Ravenna MI 49451-0215 LAYOUT P. A. Rogers SALES MANAGER Jim Stewart DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Scott Robbins

ADVERTISING SALES Martin J. Rogers NFAA Headquarters 800 Archery Lane, Yankton, SD 57078 (605) 260-9279 E-mail: nfaarchery@aol.com

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August / September 2008

MAKE YOUR HUNTING BOW TARGET-ACCURATE.

T

he one season I look forward to more than any other is the hunting season. I wouldn’t have gotten serious about competitive shooting had it not been for my desire to improve my hunting skills. When I look back to my beginning years as a bow hunter, I realize how lousy a shot I was. Maybe some of that wasn’t entirely my fault. Well, at least that’s what I think when I look at the equipment I shot back then. Fifteen years ago, archery gear could still be considered primitive. However, now I think the archery shooter’s gear is far from being considered primitive. As the equipment in our industry continues to get better and better, so does our ability to improve our accuracy as hunters. For the past several years I usually spend about a month getting my bow fine tuned for the hunting season ahead. That time for all of us NFAA shooters is right now! What I have found time and time again is that a hunting bow can be so impressive with the accuracy it

can produce. So much so that I have questioned whether I could still earn a place on a podium at a target event with some of the hunting bows I have had. Obviously if you are a year round archer and are active in 3D, field or target tournaments then you are going to be a better shot in the fall hunting season as well. What I would like to do is go through a few things that I do to make sure my hunting bow is shooting target bow accurate. The first change I make to my hunting bow is that I replace the launcher blade rest with a fall away rest. We all know from the past five years of advertisements that the fall away arrow rests are a good option for the bow hunter. What I believe to be the single most important selling point to the fall away design is that it allows you the freedom of vane or feather clearance. This is very important when the archer wants to shoot strong helical or longer fletching with today’s smaller diameter arrow shafts. When you have continued on pg. 6 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

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MAKE YOUR HUNTING BOW TARGET-ACCURATE. good clearance it makes such a difference in where the arrows impact, especially when using a broadhead. I will talk later about some fletching options and how they affect the broadheads, but first things first: have a rest that at least gives you the option to use whatever fletching you want. I personally use a Trophy Taker fall away because of its simplicity. There are several good models on the market but this one is my preference. I believe in using the K.I.S.S. technique that my dad taught me years ago: Keep It Simple Stupid! It sounds logical enough, and in archery I have found that anytime something changes, everything changes. Solid aluminum rests with strong sturdy parts are going to be reliable. Most of the fall away rests are also very quiet and that is important to us as hunters, as I am sure you know. I normally install my fall away and then craft some mole-

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skin or fleece around the arrow rest and also the inside of my riser shelf to keep and arrow noise to a minimum. Many of the arrow rests now are enclosed rests, so they are easy to silence with moleskin. On fall away rests, the cord can be attached in a number of ways. Many people prefer to attach it to the cable slide. There are different variations of slides that allow you to attach the cord. It is repeatable and works well. However, some of you that are not using a cable rod will need to just fasten it through the cable itself. Tying it into the cable is still what I personally do with my bows. I usually make a 1-2” serving on the cable first and then feed the cord through the cable underneath the serving. I do it with either a half hitch knot or simple over and under knots using a small thread like the BCY 3D. I don’t actually serve it onto the string, meaning I don’t make my serving over the cord itself permanently fixing it to the cable. I just make my

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MAKE YOUR HUNTING BOW TARGET-ACCURATE.

serving and then divide the cable in half and put the rest cord through. I prefer to feed it through the cable rather than serve it directly because it allows you to reposition the cord through the cable to come back directly to the arrow rest. The fall away cord should always come from the cable directly to the back of the rest. Feeding the cord through the cable allows you to make sure this happens regardless of any twisting you may do to the cable. It looks clean and works well. If it is permanently served into the cable, then you may have trouble when making a twist or two to the cable. Since changing to the fall away arrow rest, my arrows fly like darts regardless of the fletching I choose, even on the smaller diameter arrows shafts that are popular today. After I have changed the rest, I start to think about what arrow to use. Many people look past the importance of the arrow shaft and the quality of it. BAD CHOICE! The shaft you select definitely has a big effect on the accuracy of your hunting bow. How much effect the arrow choice has will depend on your particular hunting application. For example, if you are only hunting at a water hole or tree stand and making shots less than 20 yards, then you can get away with nearly any shaft on the market. That is if you are happy with shooting groups the size of a kill zone. But if you are a western hunter or a spot and stalk hunter that requires longer shots, angled shots with smaller kill zones or shots on bigger tougher animals, then you will need to pay more attention to the quality shaft you choose. Your shaft selection can determine whether you are shooting 6” groups or less than 3” groups. The hunting industry has made huge leaps over the years in the selection of hunting arrows. It’s nice to see that the shaft diameters are getting smaller without sacrificing the overall weight of the arrow. I believe this is critical to the accuracy and penetration of the arrow with broadheads. When selecting an arrow, pay attention first to the manufacturer’s advertised straightness of the shaft. Many companies provide the same type of arrow but in different grades of straightness. It is worth the money to get the straight-

est ones you can, especially with a broadhead on the front of it. I personally select arrows that have a straightness of at least +/- .002. Also make sure to ask if the arrow you are selecting has components that allow for a tight fit into the shaft. I have tried brands in the past that have a great arrow shaft, yet when I put in the components, the shaft straightness was irrelevant because the components fit so poorly. If the inserts or shaft have a poor tolerance, then the broadhead will not spin true when you screw it on, and ultimately it will not fly true. This will assure that once tipped with a broadhead, it will spin true and ultimately fly true as well. The next thing to make sure you do correctly when selecting an arrow is to make sure you select the correct spine arrow for your bow. The spine or stiffness of the arrow is critical to how well it will group and tune for you. The best way to assure you have the correct spine arrow is to use the manufacturer’s shaft selection charts. This will require you to know the length of your arrow, the point weight you will shoot, your draw length and your peak bow poundage. For my selection I personally use either the ST Axis with the N-Fused carbon or the ST Axis Full Metal Jacket arrows from Easton. The reason I shoot these series of shafts is to maximize penetration and minimize wind drift. I definitely prefer a smaller diameter shaft that still has a high overall mass weight for maximum penetracontinued on pg. 8 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

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MAKE YOUR HUNTING BOW TARGET-ACCURATE.

tion. All of us target shooters can appreciate this common law since we know the effects of large diameter lightweight shafts. In target, many of us competitive shooters prefer the larger shafts for scoring and hanging the lines. However, that isn’t a factor in the hunting field. In hunting durability is more important than scoring, and some of the lighter, thin-walled carbon shafts that are designed for target shooting aren’t going to be good enough for penetrating hide and bone without breaking. My hunting arrow weighs just over 500 grains with an outside diameter of only 9/32”. I have a long draw length and I am able to achieve speeds of about 280 fps with this heavy arrow. Many people may think this is overkill for the game animals in the U.S. However, my argument is that in bowhunting, the animals have time to react to an arrow. If a reaction occurs that causes my arrow to impact a dense bone, then I want to know that I will have the energy to still penetrate into the 8 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

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vital area. Furthermore, I am not a robot so I can’t make perfect shots all the time. Reality is that although my bow in practice can be target accurate, sometimes in the moment of glory the nerves and adrenaline will cause a misplaced arrow. A heavy arrow will go through bone or brisket and drive the broadhead into the boiler room. Also, don’t expect to have a target accurate hunting bow if you are going to have several different kinds of shafts in your quiver. Make sure you have matching arrows and make the investment in a good quality shaft and good quality components for hunting. I still see hunters with an assortment of arrows in the hunting quiver. Most of you that are reading this article are wise enough to know that you need to have matching arrows to have matching results on a target face. The same is true on an animal. Lastly, spend time making sure all your arrows are close to the same weight. Mark the ones that

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are closest in weight and they’ll be perfect for the hunting quiver. Picking a reputable brand for a hunting arrow will most likely give you consistency in weight, straightness and component fit tolerances. There are lots of arrows to choose from, but with the ease of the internet you can find the perfect choice for you and your application if you do a little research. Once you have selected your preferred shaft, you will need to consider to two more things with your arrow. First is selecting which broadhead you want to shoot and second is determining the fletching you will need to steer that broadhead. There are many of you using a mechanical broadhead, but I believe there are still equally as many using a fixed blade head. I personally have gone back to a fixed blade head several years ago for all my big game hunts. With the new compact designs in today’s fixed heads, you can have a fixed blade tune as well as an expandable head if your tune is good and speed stays under 280. Shooting the heaviest arrow you can that will allow speeds around the 280 mark will be the most stable and most accurate. I have done a lot of testing with a Hooter Shooter and broadheads with different speeds. The magic number for good groupings is 280 or less. Many of the bows today are very fast. Shooting a light arrow fast isn’t as effective as shooting a heavier and more stable arrow at a slower speed. With this in mind, I have also gone back to shooting a heavier broadhead that gives a better F.O.C. in the arrow and ultimately less wind drift on longer shots with maximum accuracy and penetration. With the speed of today���s bows combined with the technology of today’s arrows, you should have no problem shooting good speeds with at least a 125 grain broadhead. I have found that an extra 25 grains of point weight can have a huge impact or leftto-right drift when shooting in the wind. To be deadly accurate with your hunting bow, you need to treat it the same as your target bow. Practice with it and try out the broadheads you have selected. It is no different than anything else in life. There are products that make a lot

of hype and have very poor performance. But there are also products that are solid and perform extremely well. Do some research and see what fixed head is having good results. I have used a G5 striker and had unbelievable results. However, the Shuttle T and Slick Trick have also had awesome results during my field test at 100 yards with the Hooter Shooter. The bottom line is this: You need to try out any broadhead you think is good. You won’t know unless you try. After you decide on a broadhead, look into fletching options. There is a huge craze now on the smaller fletch with a high profile, like the Blazer Vanes, Quickspin ST or the Dura Vane Predator. They work well with the compact heads of today. Since I use a fall away rest, I have unlimited options on fletching selection. During my test, if I have a broadhead that isn’t flying well with the shorter vanes, then I have had good results by shooting a 4 fletch. I have found this to work really well when shooting at higher speeds or with a 4 blade broadhead. However, I will warn you that sometimes this configuration can cause more noise in the air. You will have to weigh all the pros and cons of your selection vs. your kind of hunting. One year my bow was shooting deadly accurate, but I noticed that the arrow and broadhead combination was noisy. This was a problem because I had set this bow up for antelope in a unit that I knew was notorious for being very open country continued on pg. 10

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MAKE YOUR HUNTING BOW TARGET-ACCURATE. and would demand long shots. It was a mistake taking that set up because the antelope were reacting to the arrow in mid-flight. An animal as fast as an antelope can be totally out of the way of an arrow that’s noisy if you are shooting over 40 yards. Some products are noisier than others so I would strongly encourage you to pay attention to that. Being deadly accurate will have no purpose if your game is dodging out of the way while your arrow is mid-flight. The other option is to shoot a longer vane or feather but with a very strong helical or off set. This is what I have been using for the past few years. I shoot a 4” vane with the strongest helical I can put on it. You want to have good rotation in the arrow after it leaves the bow to help stabilize it. Getting the back end of the arrow to steer is so important with a broadhead.

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The size and style of the broadhead will usually dictate what kind of helical you will need on the fletching. I have always just put on as much helical as my fletching jig will allow. Feathers are still popular and worthy of noting. A 4” feather will steer even better if you are having problems getting a broadhead to tune well. I really like the performance of a feather, but I don’t like the durability and care. You can’t get them wet and they are noisier than a vane, but they do work. If you choose the fall away arrow rest you will have so many options with vane or feather configurations. What I would recommend is to take 6 arrows and fletch 3 one way and 3 another way. Shoot some groups and see what configuration works best for you. Try a few different broadheads on those same configurations. Most of the archery shops in my area have some used broadheads from different makes lying around to try out. Spend time in the archery shop prior to the hunting season doing some trial and error tests. Now is the perfect time! If you are still having problems tuning a broadhead after using several combinations, then you may have to slow down the arrow. I have had no problem getting a hunting bow to shoot 4-5” groups at 100 yards on a calm day with broadheads. But again, you will only achieve that if you are willing to experiment. The last piece of equipment that you should look into is a sight that allows you to be accurate at longer distances. For all of you hunting out west, you will understand this more so than the eastern hunters. Are long range shots preferred? No! Are they sometimes required? Yes, whether they’re the first shot, or—worst case scenario— finishing shots. The reality is, if you are going to be the most ethical hunter you can be, you need to have the equipment that is designed for longer range shooting as well as close range. This will mean that you have long range adjustability and smaller pin sizes. Many of the sights have gone to a .18-.29 fiber option pin sizing and offer models with up to 6 pins. This will definitely make it easier to aim accurately on an animal at an extended range. I like a sight that has fixed

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pins as well as offers instant adjustability for the longer shots. My Sure Loc Max hunting sight is more or less a target sight with pins. I can put it on a yardage and that’s where the arrow will go if I make a good shot. To me it’s like real life field archery and it’s why I started shooting competitively in the first place. What is most important is that you spend time practicing and making sure you understand your bow and yourself. I once heard Chuck Adams say that a hunter’s effective range in the field is probably about half the distance that they are comfortable with shooting at home. I believe that statement to be accurate for the average bow hunter. Those of us who practice more at the distances we are accustomed to in field archery can improve on that. Surely those of you who are reading this magazine aren’t comfortable only being about to shoot a pie plate at 20 yards. We are used to seeing a kill zone half that size on the 80 yard walk up target. A person will greatly benefit from practicing at distances longer than they expect to shoot. Last month while I was hunting at my spot and stalk bear hunt up in British Columbia, I was faced with having to make a long distance shot. Was it my preference? No. But was I totally prepared for it? Absolutely! I had spent the entire spring shooting 90 meter targets and rugged field courses. I knew that my target form was at a maximum and my hunting bow felt no different. My arrow flew true and my practice had prepared me to take a nice animal at a very long distance. I couldn’t have done that if I didn’t have total confidence in myself, my equipment and myself with my equipment. I like to be able to dial in the exact number when shooting past 50 yards. If you know you will have to stretch out the distance while hunting, then make sure you aren’t just guessing on where to hold. Having a good sight that is designed for advanced hunting is a must. Also, make darn sure that you properly set the bubble on your hunting sight. It’s very critical —field shooters know this well. Make sure the sight you have has a bubble and it’s set correctly. Don’t even attempt an up or down hill shot without a

bubble because you’re only asking for trouble. If you want a target accurate hunting bow, then you need to set it up like your target bow. Get a sight designed for advanced level shooting. Most of us that are reading this Archery Magazine are dedicated to the sport of archery. Here in the states, I think the vast majority of us are also dedicated bow hunters. I am proud to see so many of us treat this sport as a year-long hobby instead of only a season sport for a few months. I spend a lot of time in countries where hunting is not allowed, nor is it understood. The rights of the hunters and firearm bearers have been taken away in many places. Be proud of what we have here in America and do what you can to make sure you are the best you can be at it. I get a lot of enjoyment from shooting my hunting bow and seeing how accurate it can be. Take note on these few equipment considerations so that you too can make your hunting bow target accurate. For those of you who are wondering the obvious, YES, I do change my 34” doinker for a 10” one during hunting season! All kidding aside, I wish you the best of luck in the woods this year and certainly hope you can take advantage of every chance you get at a trophy. Shoot well. —John Dudley www.dudleyarchery.info• www.ddbowhunting.com ■

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NFAA® Council & Board of Directors NFAA® Council

NFAA® Board of Directors

Officers President—Bruce Cull 2305 E. Hwy. 50 Yankton, SD 57078 605/665-8340 archery@iw.net

GREAT LAKES Judy McCutcheon Director - IL 23358 Virden Rd. Virden, IL 62690 217/652-5836 jlynnmac@royell.org

Vice President—Brian Sheffler 7006 Beargrass Ct. Indianapolis, IN 46241 317/244-7585 lbs@indy.net NFAA® Office 800 Archery Lane Yankton, SD 57078 605/260-9279 NFAArchery@aol.com

63rd Annual Outdoor An Historic Event! Greetings fellow archers: This July 19-25 has been an exciting time for everyone. Not only was the National Unmarked 3-D combined with the National Outdoor, but they were be held for the most part on our own NFAA property! The construction of the new headquarters, Easton Sports Development Foundation (ESDF) Training Center, museum, 5-28 target field courses and Olympic Field are nearing completion! Our new archery complex is soon to be a reality! I would like to invite everyone to come see the progress on the new complex and participate in the national tournaments. The new ranges are much more flat than the ranges used in 2005-6 and offer a great variety of challenging shots. Brian Sheffler, Ray Jones, Tim Austin and Mark Johnson-Engineer, City of Yankton employees and state and federal inmates have been designing and building the ranges. In addition, we have been designing a program for range layout with an engineering company that everyone will be able to see. This program uses the latest in satellite and computer software with X Y Z technology, enabling degree of change and 3-dimensional views in addition to safety zones and angles. I would like to give a big thank you to them for all their diligent efforts. The complex is located right in Yankton, SD and the address is 800 Archery Lane—this is directly behind the Best Western Kelly Inn and Super 8 Motels. If you Google the address—use 800 Bramble—this was the old address and is not updated yet. The tournament registration and tradeshow was held in the Best Western Kelly Inn-Minerva’s—this is walking distance to all the ranges and the Olympic Field-Practice Range. The Best Western Kelly Inn-Minerva’s also had a breakfast buffet every morning and was the caterer for the tournament. The format for the event was: July 19-20 National Unmarked 3-D Championship; July 21-25 National Outdoor Championship; Wednesday, July 23, opening ceremony and Pro Am Tournament. In addition, on Wednesday was a free BBQ picnic and a novelty to shoot for everyone in attendance—along with some great live music. This was the “Ford Shoot Down” and there were some very cool prizes, including one very, very valuable prize yet to be announced! This year the format for the National Outdoor was either a 3or 5-day. The entire Yankton community and the state of South Dakota was very excited about the tournament and rolled out the red carpet to “welcome the archers!” I hope all that attended had an enjoyable experience!

See You All in Yankton! Bruce Cull President 12 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

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Great Lakes Robert McCutcheon 23358 Virden Rd. Virden, IL 62690 217/965-5290 prairie1@royell.net Mid-Atlantic Mike LePera 34 Kentwood Road Succasunna, NJ 07876 973/584-0637 brtesite@optonline.net Midwest Ray Jones 704 West South Winterset, IA 50273 515/462-6788 IowaArchery@hotmail.com New England Kenneth Moore 730 Newman Avenue Seekonk, MA 02771 508/761-5415 kmoore15@comcast.net Northwest Dennis Lundine 19605 Pribilof Loop Eagle River, AK 99577 907/696-1910 lundine5@aol.com Southeast Tim Austin 1710 SW 76th Terrace Gainesville, FL 32607 352/332-1969 Flarchery@bellsouth.net Southern Lee Gregory 112 Ridge Oak Drive Georgetown, TX 78628-7613 512/863-8296 lee@dlprint.com Southwest Becky Pearson P.O. Box 308 St. David, AZ 85630 520/720-9532 beckysayre@hughes.net

Rocky Kline Director - IN 1108 N. Korby St. Kokomo, IN 46901 765/457-7086 rlkline@insightbb.com Bill Jones Director - MI 2049 Lake St. National City, MI 48748 989/469-3939 Dave Thewlis Director - OH 16423 Chamberlain Rd Grafton, OH 44044 440/926-2464 DThew69613@aol.com Mike Strassman Director - WI 2402 W. Camerson Eau Claire, WI 54703 715/834-9975 mstrassman9975@hotmail.com MID ATLANTIC Ron West Director - MD 802 Painter Pl. Capitol Hts., MD 20743 202/584-8015 WestArrowsWest@aol.com John Pawlowski Director - PA 360 Madison St. Coatesville, PA 19320 610/384-5483 bpjp@ccis.net Douglas Joyce Director - NJ 30 Willow Ave. Somerset, NJ 08873 732/247-3892 jdjarcher@aol.com Dave Hryn Director - NY PO Box 341 West Seneca, NY 14224 716/481-4699 Archery1@localnet.com Jim Quarles Director - VA 7911 Cherokee Rd Richmond, VA 23225 804/272-6512 jim.quarles@vfaa.org Ron Lauhon Director - WV P.O. Box 9331 Huntington, WV 25704 304/529-3509 R_lauhon@comcast.net MIDWEST Dean Conrad Director - IA 200 Mulberry St. Sumner, IA 50674 563/578-8534 abe_archery@yahoo.com John Doub Director - KS 1125 E. 59th St. Wichita, KS 67216 316/524-0963 archnutz@cox.net Bill Hakl Director - MN 5656 317th St. Stacy, MN 55079 651/462-1916 wehjkh@frontier.net

Earl Foster Director - MO 8709 Booth Kansas City, MO 64138 816/763-2699

Crystal Parker Director - WA 13328 317th Avenue NE Duvall, WA 98019 425/844-6125 crystalp2@verizon.net

Ed Christman Director - NE 3818 34th St. Columbus, NE 69601 402/563-3504 eChristman@neb.rr.com

Dan Kolb Director - WY 3571 Teton St. Casper, WY 82609 307/265-4418 bhfsldlk@hotmail.com

Marc Tebelius Director - ND 5292 8th Ave. North Grand Forks, ND 58203 701/792-3582 (home) 218/230-3258 (cell) tebelius@gra.midco.net

SOUTHEAST Howard Beeson Director - AL 111 Eagle Circle Enterprise, AL 30824 334/347-4990

Reginald “Shorty” Faber Director - SD P.O. Box 66 Carthage, SD 57349 605/772-4468 fabkat@alliancecom.net NEW ENGLAND Volker Pense Director - AAE Carl-Ulrich-Strasse 2B 64297 Darmstadt, Germany 0615-653085 nfaadirector@aae-archery.org Gary Marrier Director - VT 1525 Gibou Rd. Montgomery Ctr., VT 05471 802/326-4797 bowdoctor@pivot.net Jim Lamoin Director - CT 138 Albrecht Rd. Torrington, CT 06790 860/489-9452

Bruce Mulneix Director - RI 6101 Post Rd. Trlr 73, N. Kingstown, RI 02852 401-885-5684

SOUTHERN Wayne King Director - MS 107 Dana St. Brandon, MS 39042 601/825-9278

NORTHWEST Hubert Sims Director - ID PO Box 1713 Orofino, ID 83544 208/476-5377 hmsarchery@email.com

Dick Andrews Director - AR 11 Tuxford Circle Bellavista, AR 72714 479/855-6066 andr-ds@cox.net

LeRoy Dukes Director - OR P.O. Box 422 Fairview, OR 97024 503/201-4961

CHARTERED STATE ASSOCIATIONS AND OVER 1,000 AFFILIATED CLUBS IN THE UNITED STATES

John Thayer Director - NV 7215 W. Tara Ave. Las Vegas, NV 89117 702/222-9878 mdthayer@cox.net

AND ABROAD. THE SPORT OF ARCHERY IS A HEALTHY AND

Judd Wathen Director - UT 675 N. 460 E Ephraim, UT 84627 435/283-3129 Wathen_1@msn.com

EXCITING SPORT PROVIDING AN ACTIVITY IN WHICH

Professional Representatives Great Lakes Jeff Button 2889 Busston Rd. Cottage Grove, WI 53527 (608) 839-5137 Midwest Sharon Henneman 9 Aspen Belton, MO 64012 (816) 679-3250

THE ENTIRE FAMILY CAN PARTICIPATE.

WRITE US ON HOW TO OBTAIN INFORMATION ABOUT VARIOUS

Midatlantic Tom Coblentz 1 Ash Drive Knoxville, MD 21758 301/834-7154

Scott Bradford Director - LA 40340 Old Hickory Ave. Gonzales, LA 70737-6756 225/622-0838 NFAALADirector@aol.com Robert Wood Director - OK 75377 S. 280 Rd Wagoner, OK 74467 918/485-6552 robertw@osaa.us

THE NFAA® HAS 50

Robert Borges Director - NM 5332 River Ridge Ave NW Albuquerque, NM 87114 505/890-4665 Archermn@netscape.com

Mike Hindmarsh Director - NC 1687 Kildee Church Rd. Ramseur, NC 27316 919/742-5017 onebowtie@gmail.com

Michael Wright Director - NH PO box 237 Marlboro, NH 03455 603/876-4249 barebownh@aol.com

Scott Roadarmel Director - AK 4106 Harrison St. Anchorage, AK 99503 907/727-0483 sroadarmel@gci.net

George Kong, Jr. Director - HI 1255 14th Ave. Honolulu, HI 96816-3838 808/734-5402

Jerry Barr Director - KY 919 Manor Dr. Henderson, KY 42420 270/827-4570 jerrybarr@bellsouth.net

Clinton A. Berry, III Director - TN 1802 Porter Road Nashville, TN 37206 615/227-4211 caberry3@earthlink.net

Doug Tate Director - MT 3499 Blacktail Loop Rd. Butte, MT 5970d1 406/494-4393 DOUG.TATE@northwestern.com

Kenneth Buck Director - CO 1923 Shoshone Dr. Canon City, CO 81212 719/783-0767 KandSBuck@earthlink.net

Tom Boots Director - GA 6530 Robert Dr. Harlem, GA 30814-5360 706/556-3240 boots6530@charter.net

Paul Lewokowicz Director - MA 3 David Road Southborough, NH 01772

Pro Chairperson Diane Watson 11815 Lakewood Drive Hudson, FL 34669 727/856-6841 DianeN2Archery@aol.com

Tom Daley Director - CA 11271 Lakeshore South Auburn, CA 95602 650/722-2713 nfaadir@cbhsaa@org

Oliver Austin Director - FL 1620 Yearling Trail Tallahassee, FL 32317 850/309-1918 oaustin@admin.fsu.edu

S. Dale Smith Director - SC 149 Low Road Six Mile, SC 29682 864/868-9422 sdalesmith@yahoo.com

Committee Chairmen

SOUTHWEST Frank Pearson Director - AZ P.O. Box 308. St. David, AZ 85630 520/647-7847 frank@frankpearson.com

PROGRAMS OFFERED BY NFAA®. NATIONAL

Southern Troy Wesley 2306 57th St. Lubbock, TX 79412 (806) 797-0546

CHAMPIONSHIP TOURNAMENTS,

Southeast Diane Watson 11815 Lakewood Drive Hudson, FL 34669 (727) 856-6841 DianeN2Archery@aol.com Southwest Jonathan Pemberton 1652 N. 2100 W. Provo, UT 85604 (801) 323-3704

SECTIONAL/STATE TOURNAMENTS, INDOOR/OUTDOOR LEAGUES, JUNIOR BOWHUNTER PROGRAMS, WHICH INCLUDE THE ART

Monty Heishmann Director - TX 10149 Heritage Pkwy. West, TX 76691 254-826-5788 barebow@att.net

YOUNG SMALL / BIG GAME AWARDS, AND THE BOWFISHER PROGRAM.

ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August / September 2008 13


NFAA® CALENDAR

of events 2008

TOURNAMENT ............................................DATES......................................VENUE Big Sky Open ......................................................Nov 1-3 ...............................Mesquite, NV North American Field Archery Championships .. Dec 13-14............................Homestead, FL

TRADL-MA

FSL-FY-A

953

SYNHORST, STEVE

1160

834

PAPAC, GEORGE

FS-MY-A

820

BURNHAM, TOM

1499

TRADL-MMS 661

1143 CHANEY, SHELBY

DALLONS, BRIAN

BB-MMS 1292

LONSBERY, FRED

SEGARS, ANTHONY

1056

MILLER, JERRY

1490

SPENCER, LUKE

1042

ADAMS, RALPH

1480

THOMAS, DAVID

BB-MS-A

TRADR-MA

1459

DAYTON, ANDY

1399

DALEY, TOM

1264

1416

CARTER, BRAD

1232

WASHBURN, CHARLEY

TRADR-MS

1401

MORAN, AUSTIN

0

LARUE, PAUL

Western Classic Trail Shoot.............................. May 1-3 .............................. Redding, CA

582

1286

BERTSCH, CHASE

BH-FA-A

IFAA World Bowhunter Championships .......... June 9-12 ..............................Yankton, SD

FPW-SIGHT

1075

VAN ORDEN, ZANE

1390

SCIACCA, JAN

0

1071

FRIAS, ESTEVAN

1291

MCCAIN, SANDY

2009 The Vegas Shoot ............................................Feb 6-8 ...........................Las Vegas, NV NFAA Indoor Nationals ............................. March 14-15 ........................ Louisville, KY NFAA Marked 3D Championship .................. May 1-3 ............................. Redding, CA

NFAA Unmarked 3D Championship ........... June 13-14........................... Yankton, SD NFAA Outdoor National Championship ......July 22-26 ................ Mechanicsburg, PA

EDITORIAL POLICIES Archery is the official publication of National Field Archery Association and is published bi-monthly. Editorial deadlines are as follows: ISSUE Feb/March April/May

DEADLINE December 15 February 15

ISSUE June/July Aug/Sep

DEADLINE April 15 June 15

ISSUE Oct/Nov Dec/Jan

DEADLINE August 15 October 15

GAFFNEY, GLADE REDMOND, GREG PROSSER, VIC BEAUCHAMP, BODIE

MPW-NS

FS-MY-C

1420

1156

THOMAS, ALEX

BHFS-FA-A BARBER, CHRISTOPHER

1478

DAVIS, CHRISTINA

MPW-SIGHT

FS-FYA-B

1450

HAKL, JULENE

1500

1253

1445

HOLLAND, JOAN

PREIS, CORBIN

REICH, KATY

BB-FC-A

FSLR-FYA-A

1421

LARSON, ROSE

1034 CHANEY, LAUREN

1336

1404

FALGOUT, NEECIE

BB-FC-C

FS-MYA-A

1403

SHIELD, LYNN

1508

SCHAFF, KRIS

1374

NUNEZ, JESSICA

1506

ELZA, SEAN

1327

HOLT, JENNIFER

1498

PREIS, CODY

1184

UPERY, TONI

555

BARBER, MORGAN

FS-FC-A 1454

THOMAS, CATHERINE

MCGRATH, SHAELIE

All material should be sent by mail or e-mail. Mailed contributions should be submitted on diskette and typewritten. Microsoft Word is preferred. DO NOT include digital photos in your word document. No material will be returned. Submissions should be no more than 2,000 words. Previously published material will not be considered unless accompanied by a release or permission from the first publisher. Material appearing in this magazine does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the NFAA or its Board of Directors.

Correspondence concerning the NFAA’s policies and operations should be directed to the NFAA Headquarters, 800 Archery Lane, Yankton, SD 57078. Contributions and correspondence pertaining to this magazine should be directed to:

FS-MC-A

1481

MOVELAND, RAY

BHFS-FA-B

1532

DECOSTA, MICHAEL

1468

BRAZELL, GLEN

1244

Marihelen Rogers, Editor, 800 Archery Lane, Yankton, SD 57078 (605) 260-9279 • E-mail: nfaarchery@aol.com

1507

DELIO, GUNNAR

1447

NETTLES, TONY

BHFS-FA-C

The NFAA can not reimburse for cost incurred in the preparation of material submitted, nor compensate contributors for items which are published.

NFAA Section and State Association News should be directed to:

1505

MILLER, BAILEY

1406

WORTHAM, TYLER

1111

GUTIERREZ, KAREN

1494

PEARCE, KADEN

1276

HARDING, AARON

1070

BARBER, HEATHER

1492

NELSON, HUNTEE

1252

BERTSCH, CURTIS

564

HAM, KATHY

1482

SHEPPELHARTE, ANDREW

BB-FA-A

1403

DRISCOLL, GUS

1399

All material will be published at the discretion of the editorial board. Photos of animals harvested should be in good taste. Only animals taken under the rules of fair chase will be considered.

Paul Davison, Section and State News Editor 2787 Winston Way, Duluth, GA 30096 Fax (770) 476-7488 E-mail (preferred): stringwalker@att.net

Archery is published bimonthly by the National Field Archery Association, 800 Archery Lane, Yankton, SD 57078 (605) 260-9279. Advertising rate cards available for display and classified advertising. All feature and editorial requests should be made in writing to NFAA® at the address above. Editorial contributions must be submitted with self-addressed envelopes with sufficient return postage. All materials considered, but the publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts. Deadline for copy is eight weeks prior to the month of publication. All statements are those of the writers and do not necessarily conform to the magazine’s editorial policies. Copyright 1984 by the National Field Archery Association®. All rights reserved. Change of address – allow eight weeks for change to become effective. Contact NFAA® headquarters. 14 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August / September 2008

FS-FY-A

KEZYWICKI, LORRAINE

BHFS-FS-A MCMANUS, CAY

1301

MCELMURRY, SHARON

BB-MA-A

BHFS-FS-C 0

1517

PEARCE, PAIGE

1323

HOULE, MARK

1259

WIEBERT, SYDNIE

1292

BROWN, NATHAN

SEXTON, LINDA

continued on pg. 16 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August / September 2008 15


BHFSL-FA-A

1407

MARTIN, JOHN

0

1299

GILLELAND, LESLIE

1396

DAVIS, JEFF

1164

CHANEY, AMY

1382

BHFSL-MA-A 1440 1346

MURPHY, DANNY

1458

SOMMERS, JANE

1408

BRADLEY, DAVID

1527

HANSEN, CHRIS

BH-MS-A

1244

STONE, MELISSA

1407

SANDQUIST, DARREL

1525

RAGLIN, RANDY

WALKER, DAVID

1388

CHISOLM, ROCKY

FS-FA-C

1380

TADATSUGU, OTUKA

1523

PESTILLI, MIKE

1377

VANDERMOLEN, BARRY

1344

AVERY, JERRY

948

1334

CHAI, CLINTON

1522

NUNEZ, SENECCA

LAINCHBURY, MIKE

1375

FALGOUT, RONNIE

1309

FAUST, STEVEN

FS-FMS

FSL-MA-B

1520

ENGLISH, BEN

TITTLE, CHRIS

1218

HOUX. JASON

1223

HARVEY, JUREGUIX

1430

GARDNER, KAY

1312

1520

LOONEY, BOB

BHFSL-MS-A

0

WALKER, JOSHUA

0

MURPHY, GERALD

1231

MILLER, CONNIE

FSL-MMS

1520

PRUITT, TOM

1358

0

WILSON, BOB

BH-MS-B

FS-F-PRO

1388

ECKENBURG, DICK

1518

ROBISON, JASON

HENDRICKS, JIM

ROBERTS, LISA

WILSON, TERRY

BHFS-MA-A

BHFS-MA-C

1166

FINSTERBUSCH, JOHN

1517

LARSON, HOLLY

1361

NATION, BOB

1518

RUBIO, MARK

1523

DAVIS, TIM

1358

933

ALFREY, GARY

1517

VAN NATTA, JAMIE

1322

RAMSEY, LARRY

1517

EAVES. MARK

1522

WAGNER, STEVE

BHFS-MS-A

FS-FA-A

1513

ANSCHUTZ, ERIKA

1203

FARMER, KENNETH

1517

PIMENTAL, RYAN

1513

BATES, HARRY

1485

LONG, JIM

1507

BRADEN, GEORGIANNA

1511

MCHENRY, ALICIA

1199

KNOX, JOHN

1516

HUNTLEY, JEREMY

1509

SCHMITZ, MATT

1464

JOHNSTON, GARY

1502

LAINCHBURY, LINDA

1506

CALLOWAY, CONNIE

0

MILHISER, GLENN

1516

SPENCER, ROB

1505

KINORES, MICHAEL

1451

FORD, LEW

1497

PEARCE, STACY

1505

REEVES, TIFFANY

FSL-M-PRO

1515

GERARD, MIKE

1503

HUMAN. JEFF

1445

COPPOCK, DWIGHT

1486

SISSON, AMANDA

1501

WATSON, DIANE

1511

GENTRY, BOB

1514

AUDECH, MAURICE

1501

HAKL, BILL

1442

BENNETT, RON

1483

ENGLISH, MINDI

1488

SEVERTSON, PAM

1508

OWENS, CHARLIE

1514

WATTS, JEFF

1499

CURL, GARY

1438

GILLESPIE, DAN

1481

WEAVER, KRIS

1486

HOTT, SHERRY

1497

FABRY, JEFF

1513

ANDERSON, MATT

1497

METAXAS, ROBERT

1431

MOORE, DEL

1477

PAYNE, RUTH

1475

PARKER, CRYSTAL

1485

BRABEC, RANDY

1513

POORE, HARRY

1493

DAVIS, AARON

1427

HOLMES, KEN

1472

MILLER, LAURI

1466

RICHARDSON, JENNIE

1481

HUFFMAN, RODNEY

1512

POWERS, DUSTY

1493

FUNES, CARLOS

1423

HERRERA, FRANK

1458

MORGAN, SHAUNA

FS-FS-A

1474

BUDZINSKI, EMORY

1511

TIEFENTHALER, BILL

1489

HENDERSON, STEWART

1419

JULIEN, KEITH

1457

DOUGLAS, CANDACE

1476

DUDLEY, MYRA

1471

GOZA, LARRY

1509

MARTINEZ, JIM

1488

PEREIRA, CHARLES

1403

STANNELLE, MICHAEL

1453

PRESTON, CHAREE

1449

COMER, SANDI

1465

DENNY, DAVID

1509

ROOF, CHARLES

1487

FEVELLA, JASON

1376

SHIELD, BOB

1447

ANGEL FOSTER, HEATHER

1448

KOUNS, BEV

FSL-MS-A

1508

PRESTON, MARK

1481

BERRY, CHRIS

1362

MCELMURRY, RON

1446

HAMMONS, STEPHANIE

1373

ADAMS, LINDA

1399

FREGOSO, SCOTT

1507

TOMOKIYO, LESLIE

1480

POSSINGER, WILL

BHFS-MS-B

1443

BEAUCHAMP, AMANDA

FS-FS-B

1389

BACHO, JOHN

1506

POWERS, BUBBA

1479

AYERS, SHAUN

1392

SPRINGER, ROBERT

1425

PRESTON, LYNELL

1354

1269

GIBSON, JERRY

1506

SHELL, ROBERT

1470

MODAFF, FRED

1343

REICH, RON

1422

FRANCESE, LAURA

FSL-FA-A

FSL-MS-B

1506

VAUGHN, JOEY

1468

SOBOTA, JOE

1314

SWICKARD, KEN

1413

PREIS, DORI

1261

1322 MOSCARELLI, ANTHONY

1505

WOOD, SHAWN

1466

HOLT, TIM

BHFS-MS-C

1395

CHAPMAN, KAREN

FSL-FMS

FSLR-FA-A

1504

BOWMAN, MEL

1461

YOUNG, JON

925

1386

POWERS, YVETTE

1144

1168

1504

SWANSON, KEITH

1459

MILLER, SCOT

BH-MA-A

1374

CRINKLAW, JILL

FSL-FS-A

FSLR-MA-A

1503

THORNTON, DARREN

1458

MOORE, DOUG

1421

KOEHLER, BOYD

1372

JULIEN, KRISTEN

1293

ECKENBURG, JOEY

1448

HINES, TIMM

1502

JACKSON, MARK

1451

MILLER, MICHAEL

1417

BROMLEY, RICHARD

1352

TITTLE, MAGGIE

789

MUSSER, LINDA

1398

BERNAL, ROY

1501

KERNUTT, JON

1441

GRALIAN, MARK

1380

MCCAIN, GARY

1329

WORTHAM, NANCY LEE

FSL-MA-A

1356

BROWN, ROGER

1501

MCNAIL, JEFF

1439

UPERY, RICKY

1379

SCIACCA, CHUCK

1287

LEDBETTER, JANE

1454

PREIS, DON

FSLR-MMS

1501

PAGNELLA, PAT

1436

ENGLISH, RICHARD

1312

LANZENDORFER, RANDY

1254

HAMAR, SANDRA

1452

ECKENBERG, RICH

819

1500

DENTON, DUGIE

1432

PEERY, RON

1283

BUTTERFIELD, MIKE

1005

THOMAS, CINDY

1442

DRISCOLL, TIM

FS-MA-A

1500

THURMAN, BOB

1426

HAMMONS, T C

1133

STONE, MIKE

0

PYLE, PENNIE

1431

PAULING, DALE

1531

TAYLOR, DAVE

1499

HALL, AARON

1418

MOVELAND, RAY

1116

MCMANUS, JOE

FS-FA-B

1430

BABCOCK, RON

1530

HINKLEMAN, RANDY

16 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August / September 2008

BARBER, SHANE

HAM, JIM

LONSBERY, CONNIE CONINE, GEMMA CHRISTIANSEN, KARMA

ENRIGHT, TIMALYN

STURGILL, JAMES

continued on pg. 18 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August / September 2008 17


1499

PHILLIPS, DEREK

1438

MEADE, TOM

0

1498

LEDBETTER, GARY

1429

VAN WINKLE, JOHN

1498

MAXFIELD, JOEL

1423

1497

NEALY, TOM

1497

HUHN, BUTCH

1515

CARTER, FOREST

1443

WILLIAMS, RAY

1513

COBLENTZ, TOM

FS-M-PRO

1514

BEAUCHAMP, BRIAN

1428

HAMAR, SID

1513

SNODGRASS, DWIGHT

GIBSON, CRAIG

1534

MCCARTHY, DAN

1513

MCCONNELL, JEREMIAH

1423

PEETS, PIERRE

1512

RENNER, DAN

1422

JAMISON, CARL

1533

COUSINS, DAVE

1511

ANNON, NICHOLAS

1415

DAYTON, RICHARD

1510

WILDE, DEE

PENNER, JIM

1413

ANDERSON, BRADY

1532

BEAUBOUEF, CHANCE

1511

FREITAS, RICH

1409

SLOAN, BRENT

1507

PEARSON, FRANK

1496

MEYER, ROSS

1406

HALL, ERICK

1532

HOYLE, ROGER

1511

SHREWSBURY, MELVIN

1399

BAILEY, DARRYL

1504

BLANKENSHIP, CHARLES

1496

MOLL, SCOTT

1399

PETERSON, LYNN

1531

SCHAFF, JOSH

1509

JOHNSON, CABE

1372

DESTON, ROBERT

1504

WEST, RON

1495

MORGAN, RICK

1323

BOWMAR, JIM

1531

STEPP, DAVID

1508

NIELSEN, JUSTIN

1244

JONES, DON

1500

MCCOY, PHIL

1492

CHANEY, CHRIS

0

ENGLISH, BEN

1530

BRADEN, MICHAEL

1504

BARNDT, RONALD

0

RAGLIN, PHIL

1497

DENNING, KEN

1492

PRESTON, GARY

0

GREATHOUSE, SHAWN

1530

WILDE, REO

1504

MILLER, JIM

FS-MS-B

1497

JONES, RANDALL

1491

JOHNSON, WYATT

0

LONG, RANDY

1529

BROADWATER, JESSE

1500

HEYREND, LEITH

1428

BROWN, DOUGLAS

1495

BOYLAN, STEVE

1491

TYREE, CONRAD

0

PYLE, JASON

1529

BUTTS, JIMMY

1499

MILLER, CORY

1390

THOMPSON, FRED

1494

ROGERS, BEN

1490

HELLUMS, DAVID

0

RAGLIN, RANDY

1529

PAYNE, RUSSELL

1492

FRANCE, DON

FS-MS-PRO

1493

DIXON, GEORGE

1490

THOMAS, MIKE

0

SEABURY, ROB

1528

GILLINGHAM, TIM

1484

COOLEY, CHUCK

1527

RUDDOCK, ALLAN

1483

HALL, BURLEY

1489

CASTEEL, MIKE

FS-MA-B

1528

WILLS, SHANE

1478

CYPRET, TROY

1526

NEELEY, DENNIS

1472

CAMPBELL, GLENN

1489

GONZALES, VIRGILIO

1479

MURPHY, JAMES

1527

TRILLUS, DIETMAR

1437

SCHEER, ADRIEN

1520

CROWE, THOMAS

1488

MUNSELL, ANDREW

1435

BROWN, JASON

1526

WILDE, LOGAN

FS-MS-A

1519

BENGSTON, DAVE

1488

PELLICER, DAN

1412

ROBERTS, JASON

1525

JERVIS, STEVE

1511

MILLS, RUSTY

1482

ENRIGHT, MIKE

1383

BELLES, ROBERT

1525

STANSBURY, DUSTIN

1507

SEALY, GARY

1479

REINHARD, TYLER

1379

EVOLA, MICHAEL

1524

HOBBS, BEN

1505

TAYLOR, J.T.

1476

LARSON, VICTOR

1361

LENTZ, DAVID

1524

MORGAN, ROB

1500

DAY, DENNY

1474

DAVID, MILLER

FS-MMS

1524

QUINTANA, DAN

1497

BERFIELD, LARRY

1474

GRIMSLEY, CURTIS

1504

POWERS, DAVID

1524

WILLET, RODGER JR

1495

MUSSER, TEX

1470

HERNANDEZ, MIKE

1492

STELLA, JOSEPH

1524

WILSON, ANDREW

1493

RAGLIN, PHIL

1469

CHAPMAN, BOB

1491

MILLER, KEN

1522

TRAIL, KEITH

1491

TANNER, RANDY

1468

HITCHCOCK, GREG

1488

BAUERNFEIND, JOE

1522

TUCKER, RANDY

1490

ROBINSON, RICK

1468

ROADARMEL, SCOTT

1486

KOUNS, DON

1522

UPP, JEREMIAH D

1485

DUDLEY, JOHN

1468

STILES, WAYNE

1473

WASHBURN, PAUL

1521

DESTON, CHRIS

1483

BATH, JIM

1466

WEAVER, ROD

1467

CHRISTIANSEN, RED

1520

ANDERSON, MICHAEL

1478

HAMMONS, TOM

1462

WORTHAM, TOM

1464

THOMAS, ISAAC

1520

DALEY, TOMMY

1478

MORROW, BILL

1461

LUDWIG, ANDY

1454

KITE, LAYTON

1520

KURTZHALS, ZAK

1470

CARLSON, SID

1453

MARTIN, ROBERT

1441

DAVIS, JAMES

1520

NEALY, THOMAS

1468

COMER, AL

1446

DAMMARELL, VERN

1441

KUDLACEK, DON

1520

WILKEY, KEVIN

1468

KONG JR, GEORGE K

1446

KLENC, LARRY

1430

EBERSOLE, KENNETH

1519

STARK, STEVEN

1465

GIPSON, DON

1444

SCHAFF, MIKE

1425

HENSLEY, BILL

1518

POLING, MARK

1465

LUPO, TOM

1443

CRINKLAW, SCOTT

1421

PICKERING, JIM

1518

SCHULTZ, TODD

1463

KRESIN, WAYNE

1443

PERCIVAL, REESE

1420

GARDNER, KEN

1517

LOTZ, MARTIN

1455

SCHUSTER, AL

1442

RAMENTO, RICK

1383

VAN WINKLE, BOB

1516

POOLE, GREG

1452

LETER, SAM

1441

HARRIS, JOEL

1374

BRABEC, JERRY

1515

BURNETT, TIM

1445

TAYLOR, DALE

18 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August / September 2008

ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August / September 2008 19


Coach’s Corner

blades together which will contract the rhomboids and drive both elbows rearward. One of these techniques should help you to feel these muscles. But, just because you can feel the right muscles doesn’t mean you can use them properly.

by Bernie Pellerite ©2008

THE MYSTERY OF BACK TENSION veryone has heard by now that “if you want to win...you have to shoot with back tension.” Back tension seems to be a mysterious feeling that most archers never end up understanding or experiencing. I will try to relate in simple terms why, how and what to do, so you’ll be able to reap the benefits. WHY??? First, why do you want to shoot with back tension? The real reason is because nearly all of us anticipate the release if it’s not a surprise, and back tension is the easiest way to affect a consistent surprise release. The conscious mind can only think of one thing at a time...It’s either aiming or it’s “doing the release.” Pick one... It can’t do both! If you’re “doing the release”, you lose the pin. So, if you want to keep the “pin in,” you’d better develop a subconscious, surprise, unanticipatable release. This is pretty tough if you do it the way most shooters do. Since a finger or thumb are in contact with the trigger on the release aid, (or in the case of a finger shooter, directly on the string), it’s impossible for most of us not to anticipate the release, because of the thousands of tactile sensory receptors on the tips of our fingers. These receptors are so sensitive that they can tell us the difference between 1 and 2 sheets of paper in the dark. That’s .002 (2 thousandths) of an inch! So obviously they can feel when a trigger on a release moves, even slightly and sends a message to the conscious mind to “get ready!” (anticipation.) When that message, sent by what I call “the smart muscles” hits the brain, it alerts the senses and the entire body. It interrupts and overrides any concentration we might have had on aiming and “screws up” the shot. Of course, you’ve all been there, haven’t you? If somehow we had a way to set it off without any warning...well, that’s why most ev20 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

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eryone who wins does it with back tension. That’s because the back muscles have comparatively few tactile receptors. They can’t accurately calibrate exactly where the trigger is at any one given point in the execution part of the shot like the fingers can. These “stupid muscles” as I call them, help keep our conscious mind from “anticipating the explosion.” WHAT DOES BACK TENSION FEEL LIKE? The next question is usually how do I feel back tension? This is where almost everyone gets stumped. The best way to feel it is first to know where it is on your body, and what it is suppose to be doing. The muscles you are trying to feel are a group called the “rhomboids,” located between the spine and the scapulas (shoulder blades.) They are under some other major muscles (the trapezius) and work together with the levator scapuli muscles (which is not important in this example.) Recently a big issue has been made out of technically defining exactly which muscles are involved in back tension using useless medical techno-babble that only third-year medical students and doctors can understand or care about, but that won’t help the average shooter. So, suffice to say that the muscles (rhomboids) between your shoulder blades are what we’re trying to get you to feel. You can do that a few different ways; one way is to elevate your draw arm elbow to shoulder height and put the palm of your hand flat against your chest, with the tips of your fingers touching your breast bone (sternum). Keeping the finger tips in contact with your sternum, try to move your elbow, (which should remain shoulder height,) to a spot behind your head, WITHOUT moving your fingers away from the sternum (Fig. A). You should feel some muscles contracting between your spine and the tips of your shoulder blades...those would be the ones! There are other ways, such as grabbing each end of an arrow with both hands and

raising it above and behind your neck...now with both fists gripping opposing ends of the arrow, try to pull the arrow apart, trying to do it with only the muscles between your shoulder blades (Fig. B). The third way is to have someone put their

SETTING UP FOR BACK TENSION The rhomboids can’t help you unless you get the draw length short enough to elevate the bow arm elbow, at least as high as your nose. You see, the idea is for you to squeeze the bow arm side rhomboids only and cause the elbow to move very slightly without using the biceps (upper arm) or deltoid (upper arm-shoulder) muscles. If you can’t get the elbow to move when you contract your rhomboids, then you can’t proceed to the next step. Caution: Be aware that some people will tell you erroneously to squeeze the rhomboids on both sides of the spine and that’s back tension. you don’t need to squeeze the bow arm side...it doesn’t operate anything! Now that you can make your elbow move by squeezing your draw arm side rhomboids together, you are ready for the hard part. This would be getting the release hand, wrist, and forearm positioned correctly to make the shot go off without doing anything else, or moving anything else, but the back muscles.

finger on the draw arm side of your back between the spine and the tip of your shoulder blade and firmly press in while you try to squeeze their finger tip with your back muscles (Fig. C). You can also stand in a doorway and put both elbows, shoulder high, against the door jam and push yourself out of the doorway slowly, by squeezing your shoulder

Your hand positioned on your release or fingers on the string should be in a stretched out and relaxed position at full draw so the next 1⁄2 inch or so that the elbow moves behind your head will cause the shot to go off, without you having to move any fingers, wrists or any other body part! Caution: a lot of people think that the elbow should move 2 to 3 inches before the shot goes off...not true! If that happens, you’d be spraying shots left and right all day long! DIFFERENT APPLICATIONS OF BACK TENSION Triggerless Releases (Stanislawski, Zenith, etc.) These releases have to be pulled to anchor almost entirely with the index finger and thumb,

Fig. C

continued on pg. 30 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

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unless they are set up with a 3 or 4 finger grip and have a lot of travel in them, or have a “clicker” type groove machined into the half moon. Note: You need to practice any of the following techniques 3 feet away on an empty bale until you can safely execute the shot every time. Warning: Before you rush out to buy one of these releases, they normally require months for most people to master. These types of releases need to be set very light if you want to use back tension only to set it off. A lot of people shoot this type of release incorrectly (if you consider back tension the correct and only way to shoot.) These people may have built up some pressure in the rhomboids, but they really set the release off by rotating the handle with their fingers or wrist, because the release was set up with too much travel to be done with just the back muscles. Then they will swear to you they are using back tension. Jan and I have videoed hundreds of students at the Shooter’s School and close-ups replayed in slow motion reveal that most all squeeze their fingers or rotate the handle with the hand and/or wrist to get the shot off. This technique will only work for a few “Type B” personalities that are extremely focused and don’t anticipate or judge things, and trust their shot sequence to set the shot off. The rest of us control freaks, analyticals, and risk takers will find this is really just a “controlled punch” for us and it will not get us winning scores if we ever try to leave our local zip code. At full draw, most archers need to hook real deep on this type of release, (like you’re gripping brass knuckles) and make a relaxed fist, anchoring the knuckles behind the jaw bone. The fist should be a 45 degree angle to the ground. This angle matches the movement of the nose-high elbow 22 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

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Hook really deep on this type of release, (like brass knuckles) and make a relaxed fist. This keeps you from “cheating”!

tip when you squeeze the rhomboids on the draw side. The squeezing should move the elbow back and behind the head, just about 1⁄2 inch or so, and this very slight movement should be enough to move the lever off the half moon cam all by itself, if it’s set up properly. Note: Set up with the

elbow slightly outside the arrow alignment. As the back tension is applied, the elbow is drawn into perfect alignment with the arrow. If you start out “in line,” as your elbow rotates behind your head, it will end up “out of line” when the shot goes off, and you’ll get left and right arrows. Remember, people who squeeze the back muscles and rotate the handle with their fingers and/or wrist will eventually calibrate mentally where the end of the travel is...and then, they can, once again, anticipate the moment of release. They will then anticipate nearly every shot and then might have to resort to one of those bags to hang on your belt with 7 or 8 releases, all the same, but set up differently, so they can’t anticipate them. I only know of one guy who does that well.. and you “ain’t him!” So, try it the “idiot proof” way and discover what hundreds did in the Shooter’s School I conduct... a complete surprise. That is...if you can handle a surprise!

Thumb Releases The biggest mistake people make with a thumb release or index finger release is to set it up with a hair trigger! These releases set up like this CANNOT be set off with your back muscles. The trigger pressure needs to be 3 to 6 pounds, not 3 to 6 ounces! The heavy trigger pressure will allow you to put the tip of your thumb ahead of the trigger on the case of the release. Then, put firm pressure on the trigger with the middle section of the thumb. At this point, you need to have all the kinks and bends out of the wrist with everything in line from the tip of your elbow to the tip of your arrow. Because the trigger is firm, you now can “pre-load it” without fear it will prematurely fire. At this point, all you have to do is relax the rest of the hand :(still keeping the pre-load on the trigger) and activate the back muscles and/or push your elbow straight back into and imaginary wall. The movement will only be 1⁄2 inch or so, but if the hand is relaxed, this will cause it to hinge at the knuckles and force the middle section of the thumb in toward the middle of the hand naturally. Since you don’t have to think about the hand hinging, because it happens naturally, all you have to do is pre-set everything and preload the trigger and back tension will do the rest.

Pre-load the trigger by putting firm pressure on the trigger with the middle section of your thumb.

Trigger should be in the first crease, not on the pad of the finger. Hand should be relaxed.

continued on pg. 32

Index Finger Releases There are a few secrets to shooting this release. First of all, it must fit your hand properly and there are some things that you can and cannot do. 1. At full draw, the trigger should fit comARCHERY MAGAZINE

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fortably into the first joint of the index finger. You farther on the rest. Finger Shooters should not have to reach for the trigger and the fin- One of the keys to successfully shooting with back ger tip pad should not be what contacts the trigger. tension and fingers is to have the back of the hand 2. On the other hand, it should not be so short completely relaxed and flat, not cupped. The as to wrap too much of the three fingers should contact finger around the trigger, the string in the first joints or nor should the trigger be put deeper, not on the fingertips. in the second joint. 3. You This keeps the hand relaxed should pull the bow back and hooking the string in the with the wrist strap, not by first joints will also enable you grabbing on to the handle or to keep the back of the hand barrel of the release and pullflat and give you a cleaner reing. The only place you should feel any pressure is on lease. Most successful finger shooters pull the bow the wrist strap and in the first joint (or crease) of the with all three fingers, then “drop” or “drag” either index finger, where the trigger is. 4.) The tip of the the top or the bottom finger for releasing the string. index finger should be pointAt this point, as back tension ing straight down and the rest is activated and the elbow is of the finger should have sort pulled rearward, thoughts of of a flattened out arch to it. the release should be directEverything between the elbow ed to the conclusion, not the and the first joint should be reexplosion. A typical conclulaxed. 5.) The wrist should sion would be touching your be straight...no curve or “hump” in it. You should shoulder with the release hand. Commit to touch... be able to draw a straight imaginary line from the tip NOT commit to “let-go.” (This keeps any anticipaof the elbow to the index finger. 6.) Don’t put your tion on an action that takes place after the arrow thumb behind your neck. This puts a kink in the is gone and you can no longer effect it’s flight wrist. 7.) The trigger should path.) This allows your hand be set up with absolutely NO to “rip” back to your shoulslop or creep, and should be der, keeping the index finger on the firm side...around 3 in contact with your face all to 4 pounds. Having a hairy the way to the shoulder. “Lettrigger is one of the main reago” will just happen, without sons for target panic! A firm you making it happen, or antrigger with no creep is very ticipating it. Just think of pullimportant! At full draw, with ing rearward until you touch the hand, wrist, and forearm your draw shoulder. Chances relaxed, squeeze off about Your finger is like a fish hook on the trig- are, if you touch your shoulger with a tow line tied to your elbow. 1⁄2 of the trigger pull. At this der, you will have had to let point, the hand is completego somewhere before, but ly relaxed, and your finger is like a fish hook on without conscious thought. the trigger with a line tied to your elbow, and all These methods are illustrated in more detail in the slack must be out of the line. As you activate either “Volume 2” of the NFAA Shooter’s School back tension, it drives your elbow rearward, and Videos or “44 Form Flaws” of the Shooter’s School your release hand will relax, stretch out and col- Master Series. lapse slightly, and actually slip slightly through the If you can master one of these “back tension” wrist strap, which will cause the “hook” in your methods, you will completely eliminate anticipatindex finger to “tow” the trigger back, causing ing the explosion, and you will be free to (and be the release to go off, but only if you pre-loaded forced to!) really aim hard! the heavy trigger at least halfway and relax the And remember, aimers always beat shooters in hand. If you don’t, you’ll just draw the arrow back this game! ■ 24 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

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The School of Advanced Archery and Instructor Certification UPDATE The School of Advanced Archery & Instructor Certification, a.k.a. “A Weekend at Bernie’s,” is well into the 2008 season. So far, the ever-popular mobile Shooter’s School (formerly the NFAA Shooter’s School) has conducted 35 schools. 433 students have attended with 403 becoming Certified Instructors. Interested shooters should go after your pro shop owners or club presidents and book a Shooter’s School near you! Remember, the host shop or club receives 10% and the contact person attends for free. The Shooter’s School is offering NFAA Certification. To date, there are 88 new NFAA members and 134 new NFAA Level III Instructors. For more information about attending or hosting a school, go to www.robinhoodvideos.com. 2008 SCHEDULE November 14-16

Lakeside Archery, N. Yarmouth, ME. Contact: Ryan Penney 207-846-0413

PALMYRA SCHOOL

OLD TOWN SCHOOL

Graduates of school hosted by Palmyra Sportsman Association, Palmyra PA April 18-20, 2008 Listed alphabetically, ( ** denotes dual certification with NFAA) **Ed Davies, *Adam Dohner, **Andrew Dumbauld, **Leslie Hoffer, **Tim Hoffer, **Jason Kleinspehn, **Bob Smith, **Ryan Wagner, **Randy Watkins

Graduates of school hosted by Old Town Archery, Old Town, ME May 30-June 1, 2008 Listed alphabetically, ( ** denotes dual certification with NFAA) **Sharyn Ayotte, **J. Govan Baird, Bruce Bragg, **Chuck Civiello, **Matthew Clark, **James Connolly, Dan DeCondio, **Robert Dodge, Kevin Howard, **Chas LaVersa, **Craig Martel, **Sherrill Neese, **Scott Nickerson, **Stan Novak, **Bernie Smith, **Bob Wengrzynek

ROBINHOOD VIDEOS • 1600 Reynoldsburg-New Albany Rd. • Blacklick, Ohio 43004 614-322-1038 / fax 614-322-1039 • E-mail: Bernie@robinhoodvideos.com • www.robinhoodvideos.com

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NFAA Coach: Top Gun NAME: AGE: OCCUPATION:

Tim Huff 39 12 yrs. Homeland Security; law enforcement since 1988; Senior Officer TSO, Firearms Instructor, HazMat, U.S. Customs and Broder Protection MARITAL STATUS: Married to Syndi 13 years. Syndi is also a level 2 instructor YEARS IN ARCHERY: Started at age 5; NFAA Advanced Instructor Level article by Charles Land, NFAA Master Coach, Pro level 4 W H AT D O E S I T TA K E to become a champion? As most of us realize, champions are not born, they are developed through a demonstrated obstinacy for the achievement of their goals (long and short term). Failure and disappointment, fatigue and injury, mental cessation (like target panic) are all obstacles that these elite athletes overcome through a designed program of technical education, physical preparation and mental toughness. As long as it takes is as long as it takes. One of eighteen officers selected from the United States and Puerto Rico, Tim was invited to a three week course at the Advanced Training Center (FITP) Firearms Instructor Training Program at Harpers Ferry, West Virginia. One of the contributing factors in his selection was his background in archery. It is an honor in itself to be selected; to be there with the best of the best, all with the same goals. Weaponry, “target reading,” performance under pressure, imagery, visualiza26 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

tion, psychological stress and the perspiration of the fearlessly persistent officers was challenging for all. Part of their training involved the management of thought concepts and positive reinforcement fundamentals and, as Tim soon realized, were verbatim to those that he had formerly learned in archery. All of the subjects that were covered and the methodology used to deal with these subjects were the same as he had learned previously in our NFAA coaching seminars. I spend a great deal of time training athletes and coaches on the immense value of strong, positive mental preparation. You can have the best equipment that money can buy, but if you are not physically fit, mentally in tune and focused to your process, the game is over. The instructors were suitably impressed with the knowledge that Tim brought with him to the school. When asked about where he had learned about the psychological aspects of shooting, he replied “From my

August / September 2008

archery coach back in Washington State.” Tim has been one of my students, not only as an athlete, but also as his instructor for the NFAA Instructor levels of Certification. He has demonstrated the tenacity, dedication and ethical development that are required to achieve goals, not only that he sets for himself, but also for those of his students. These are the very traits that saw him awarded TOP GUN accolades at the completion of this course. He has since been invited back to the training center on a “Temporary Duty Assignment” for a 120 day period as a weapons instructor. Congratulations. It just goes to prove—guns, golf or arrows, it is all the same. Champions come to the table with an ordered mind ... a developed, consistent thought process that will duplicate a definitive set of movements in the shot making process, all immersed in a seamless flow. It’s all about the process, grasshopper. ARCHERY MAGAZINE

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by Paul Davison NFAA Historian

Way Back When L e t ’ s G o To A n I n v i t a t i o n a l ! wasn’t a post World War II Baby Boomer, but my kids were. In the mid1960’s, the younger of our two daughters, Jan, was a pre-adolescent tomboy, and she was always pestering me to go outside and play “catch.” She got tired of the tree house I had built, and we wouldn’t let her ride her bike on the narrow country road in front. Although we belonged to a swim club, she wasn’t too excited about swimming. Moreover, she needed and an activity to do with her dad. After about a year of head-scratching, we finally came up with an activity we could do together as well as do at home: Archery. We lived on a large (11⁄2 acres), partially wooded lot that bordered on a fairly steep earthen bank. It seemed to be an ideal, and quite safe, place to plunk a few arrows.

The 60’s and 70’s were good times for archery. The millions of Baby Boomers were at an age where they were most physically active. They desperately needed a weekend recreational outlet — but the swimming pools were too crowded, golf was too expensive (and crowded), tennis was a little too exhausting, fishing was a little too relaxing, hunting was too seasonal, and bowling wasn’t outdoors. Archery was a perfect outlet. You could shoot all year around, you could shoot outdoors or indoors, and you could bowhunt. The introduction of the compound bow made archery even more exciting. This was truly the Golden Age of Archery. We had given Jan a cheap Sears bow and arrow set for Christmas. She had fun with it, but I soon realized that we both needed better equipment

if we were going to pursue this sport together. I had no idea on what to buy, but I did know the manager of a local sporting goods store, who happened to be an archer, as well as a casual acquaintance for over twenty years. He gave me the best advice I’ve ever received in my forty-year archery career: “Join an archery club first.” “The Wyandotte Archers are holding an ‘invitational’ next Sunday, and you should go watch and ask a lot of questions.” I did just that. Not only did I learn that an “invitational” was nothing more than a small archery tournament, but that there were plenty of people in the club willing to help Jan and me select equipment and learn to shoot. After about two more weeks of watching and asking questions, I joined the club, and then bought a used Bear Polar recurve bow for myself and a

For more NFAA history, visit www.fieldarchery.com and click on 28 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

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new Bear Cub for Jan. We were on our way. We did the father and daughter thing for about two years, but then Jan, with guidance from a PAA pro, decided to pursue the NAA target archery route, while I stayed with the NFAA field archery route. Ohio, where we lived, was the hotbed for all three archery organizations, and there was some action to be found every weekend. The Ohio Archers, the NFAA affiliate, had more than sixty clubs in the early 1970’s. Some were indoor only, and some were bowhunting only, but most were field archery clubs. The Ohio Archers were divided into eight districts, and each district held roundrobin field archery tournaments (invitationals) from about April through early October. The invitational schedules in each district were well coordinated so that there were no conflicts. Most clubs also held one or two closed shoots per month. If that weren’t enough, we could always go to an invitational in another district. Ohio is a fairly small state, and from the center, where I lived, we could get to any invitational in two hours or less. Our favorite out-of-district shoot was the Black River Bow Benders’ “28 Field + 28 Animal Shoot and Steak Fry” near Elyria. It was a long day, but well

worth it, especially since the didn’t have these tools forty years T-bone steaks were included in ago when we were travelling to the entry fee. a remote “invitational” once or Because of the multitude of twice a month. places to shoot, the Ohio Archers published an annual Map Book ... first as a sixmaps-per-page pamphlet, as shown here, and later as a much thicker, one-pageper-club booklet, where each OA club could advertise its shoot schedule, as well as show where its range was located. With the possible exception of one or two states, map books are probably not published anymore. Today, most NFAA State 1971 Ohio Archers Map Book Associations and many NFAA clubs have their own websites, and It’s ironic that we now have it’s quite easy to show maps great tools for finding a place-toonline. Alternately, it’s easier shoot, but there’re no “shoots” to find point-to-point directions there once we find it. Yes, I know ® using MapQuestTM or Google , that urban sprawl and the cost for example, or your car’s of land have been the demise of GPS system. There’s even a the outdoor archery club, but website, www.archerysearch. it’s still nice to remember how com, dedicated to locating much fun we had going to all archery ranges (plus dealers and the club invitationals. ■ instructors). It’s too bad we

NFAA History, or visit the historian’s website at www.stringwalker.net ARCHERY MAGAZINE

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Mental Management® with Lanny Bassham

Lanny Bassham is an Olympic Coach and an Olympic Gold Medalist. He is a member of the Olympic Shooting Hall of Fame, ranks third among all shooters in total international medal count for the USA and one of the most respected mental trainers in the world. His book With Winning in Mind and his Mental Management® concepts are used and endorsed by Olympian and World Champion archers. You can reach him at 1-800-8795079 or at www.lannybassham.com WINNING... Over the past 30 years I have talked to a lot of winners about winning. Some were National, World and Olympic Champions. I thought you might find it interesting that titles of significance are rarely won by champions who were consciously trying to win them. You heard me right. They weren’t TRYING to win the competitions. Here is an example from the world of golf. Recently I had the pleasure of teaching the 2002 winner of the PGA Championship Rich Beem. He shared with me that the year he won this major golf championship he was not really trying to win the event. He had won a PGA tour event just two weeks earlier netting him over $800,000. He had already doubled his previous year’s winnings and he went into the PGA Championship with an attitude to just enjoy the experience of playing. He was not among the early favorites to win and was not worried about his score while playing. Relaxed and enjoying the moment proved to be the best thing Rich Beem could have done. He finished with a strong 68 on the last day for the win. Winning a major championship in golf can mean millions to a PGA tour player but thinking about winning while you are playing rarely yields a victory. I have interviewed hundreds of World and Olympic Champions and asked them what

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they were thinking about while performing at their best. Interestingly, most say that they were thinking about nothing or very little while winning their event. This makes sense when you consider that when the Conscious mind is quiet the Subconscious can do its best work. We need to perform subconsciously in big competitions. When we think about winning while performing, we become outcome-oriented instead of performance-oriented and normally overtrying is the result. Over-trying has caused more good shooters to lose competitions than any other form of mental error. It is difficult not to think about winning the competition when you are in position to win it. Archers have to score at each end in most competitions and you cannot hide from the score board if you are an elite shooter for if you are near the lead and are “score-sensitive” someone will certainly remind you of your place. Sometimes you want to win so badly that it becomes the most important thing in your life at the moment. Ask any National Team member in a World Championships about WANTING IT so much you can taste it. But the taste is bitter-sweet if wanting it too much keeps you from shooting well enough to attain it. Friends tell us to just go out and enjoy the competition. Yeah, right! It is easy to say but oh so hard to do. But, that is exactly what some of the people we have a difficult time beating ARE doing. They are working hard in training and working easy in the competition. This is an advantage some of our younger shooters have on us old guys. They still view this as a game. Veterans may see it as life or death and it’s neither one. What shooting is to each of us is a very individual thing. One thing is certain however, your worth as a person is not equal to your score this day. It is more than a game to the serious shooter but not worth the self destruction that many shooters do to them-

selves after a poor performance. Is there a proper time to think about winning? Well that depends on your definition of winning. First, there are many winners in a big competition. There are class winners, preliminary event winners, the kind of bow you are using winners, age winners and even whether you can beat your last score winners. But there is only one over-all winner of the competition or should be in my opinion. This is the position that every truly competitive shooter wishes they held. Secondly, there are many ways to win other than finishing first on the leader board. One could argue that we win whenever we advance down the road to achievement. We win when we learn and we learn more from our struggles up the mountain than by just standing on the summit. Winning and being a winner can be two different things as well. Did you hear about the USA Olympic rifle shooter in Athens that shot on the wrong target on his last shot in the final and lost the Gold Medal? What was not so widely broadcast was how the shooter handled his mistake. Once he fully understood what had happened 23 year old Matt Emmons was the first to congratulate the winner. He took the responsibility for his error and accepted the consequences with grace and honor. You do not have to win to be a winner. One could also argue that who you become is equally important to where you finish in the long run. So, should we be concerned at all about winning? Certainly! And the best focus, in my view, is on a winning performance not on finishing on top. I suggest that if you have paid the price and have developed the skill to win an event that you goal set to have a winning performance on the day of competition instead of goal setting to win the competition. What is the difference you ask? If you goal set to have a winning performance you will always be process-oriented and not outcome-oriented.

You will be much less likely to over-try in the competition because you will always focus on the process of shooting the shot and not on the effect of the shot on your position in the event. I’ll give you one more reason to focus on having a winning performance instead of winning the event. The shooter with the best performance in a shoot does not always win it. If you’ve been shooting any time at all you have seen this happen or had it happen to you. You can draw a late start time when the weather is brutal and be beaten by one point by someone on a calmer start time. Who really had the better day? If you had both been on the same line you just might have been the victor. This happens, no doubt about it! Don’t get me wrong. If you are first on the leader board I will be the first to say you’ve won the event. But, I also believe that maybe more than one person had a winning performance today and their names will not be recognized. If you are one of those shooters you can leave the field with your head held high and your self image enhanced for your work this day. There is a time to think about winning and that time is while training for the event. Your self image needs to believe that it is “like you” to win. One way to enhance this attitude is to picture that you are having a winning performance every time you train. Your self image imprints that it is “like you” to win and aids the likelihood that winning will fall within your comfort zone in the upcoming competition. So, think about winning in training and keep your conscious mind on performance in the big event. By the way, thinking about losing while competing works every time. ■ Mental Management is a registered term, owned by Lanny Bassham. It is a violation of federal law to use the term in any form without permission from the owner. All rights are reserved.

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SECTION & STATE ASSOCIATION NEWS

BECOMEtheSHOT by Terry Wunderle

While coaching a young man who was shooting fairly well, I noticed that he reacted each time an arrow was released. It appeared that he was responding to the “explosion” of the bow as if it were a foreign object in his hand. I explained to him that in order to develop into a great archer, you have to become the shot. The archer is the shot—not the bow. To make the transition in his form, we moved to five yards so he could shoot blank bale with his eyes closed. Practicing in this manner removed the visual stimuli of the target and the movement of the bow when the arrow was released. If you try this technique,

you will notice you increase your focus on the process and the muscles needed to execute and duplicate a perfect shot. At the same time, you are able to reach a higher level of relaxation. As you stand with your eyes closed at full draw, check the muscles in your shoulders, arms, and neck. Any muscles not needed to perform the shot should be relaxed so they do not affect the shot execution. The simpler you make the process, the easier it is to duplicate. Once this procedure is learned during blank bale shooting, you can transfer it to the target. Shoot one arrow at a dot on the practice butt and then the next at an open area on the butt. Continue doing this until both shots are executed identically. The bow is nothing more than an extension of the bow arm. The pressure from the bow should extend through the hand, arm and shoulder and be felt in the back muscles. When the arrow is released, you should feel your bow arm pushing the arrow into the tenring. The release or tabs attached to the string are only an extension of the release arm. When the back muscles create pressure on the string, pull the bow apart. Feel the whole process, as your mind and muscles become the shot. Becoming an active participant in the sequence heightens your focus and allows you to duplicate the execution. In essence, you are the shot. ■

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August / September 2008

Edited by Paul Davison • stringwalker@att.net GREAT LAKES SECTION Bob McCutcheon, Councilman prairie1@royell.net

Great Lakes Outdoor Sectionals Results June 14-15, 2008 Eau Claire, Wisconsin 28 Field + 14 Animal + 28 Hunter PL SHOOTER ST FLD Pro Male Freestyle C Rod Menzer WI 557 2 Josh Miller WI 549 3 Joe Kapp MI 551 Scott Turner MI 552 Grant Schleusner WI 547 Mark Ryan WI 537 David Pierce WI 537 Ken Robie MI 539 Joe Cox WI 536 Bob McCutcheon IL 518 Pro Female Freestyle C Sally Robie MI 543 Pro Male Freestyle Limited C Emory Budzinski WI 523 Senior Pro Male Freestyle C Bob Webb IN 540 2 Bruce Trimble WI 534 Senior Pro Male Freestyle Limited C Larry Smith WI 491 Senior Pro Female Freestyle Limited C Lori Draeving IN 476 Adult Female Freestyle C Julia Stover IL 536 2 Renee Powell WI 536 3 Debbie Brown WI 521 Adult Male Freestyle Championship Flight C Dave Ganschow WI 549 2 Kyle Sturz WI 550 3 Jason Winter WI 549 Steve Stover IL 542 Justin Jenson WI 539 Chad Nelson WI 543 Tom Hermann WI 539 Jon Powell WI 538 Marty Singletary WI 530 Steven Binger WI 527 Second Flight 1 Mike Darnell MI 522 2 Michael Sturz WI 523 3 Jim Apfelbeck WI 525 Jerry Fouts MI 507 Gene Esser WI 499 Matthew Travis WI 501 Matthew Hamilton WI 493 Gordie Severude WI 472

ANL

HTR

TOTAL

287 289 286 286 287 285 286 290 289 285

558 550 549 545 541 552 540 529 533 535

1402 1388 1386 1383 1375 1374 1363 1358 1358 1338

284

541

1368

281

523

1327

287 284

540 520

1367 1338

276

503

1270

274

484

1234

286 287 282

534 527 511

1356 1350 1314

288 287 286 288 286 286 281 283 282 281

552 546 545 548 547 543 544 543 528 526

1389 1383 1380 1378 1372 1372 1364 1364 1340 1334

280 282 277 278 278 279 284 280

529 519 516 511 511 507 497 517

1331 1324 1318 1296 1288 1287 1274 1269

Jeff Page WI 499 278 490 Dale Brock IL 504 266 491 Adult Male Freestyle Limited C Jeff Wyler IL 516 281 503 2 Rick Knorr IL 481 267 478 3 Mark Brown WI 491 273 204 Adult Male Bowhunter Freestyle C John Hamilton WI 544 282 529 2 Walter Erickson IL 525 284 531 3 Dave Hebert WI 509 285 510 Wade Erickson WI 499 276 508 Jeff Marek WI 496 273 508 Randy Schultz WI 462 273 444 Steve Cook WI 514 282 inc Adult Female Freestyle Limited C Erica Strassman WI 496 270 490 2 Judy McCutcheon IL 467 263 466 Senior Male Freestyle C Paul Domke WI 526 285 534 2 Bob Zimmerman WI 529 284 530 3 Doug Grade WI 526 277 533 John Kanter WI 522 283 527 John Smith MI 518 285 527 Jack Nichols WI 523 284 500 Mike Harelson WI 508 278 514 Senior Female Freestyle C Lora Smith MI 512 281 517 2 Janette Domke WI 500 278 516 Senior Male Bowhunter Freestle Limited C Ruben Wichinski WI 237 198 239 Master Senior Male Freestyle C Karl Nelson WI 516 285 515 2 Don Will IL 501 267 511 Master Senior Male Barebow C Richard Hanlon MI 437 250 458 Master Senior Male Freestyle Limited C Ron Moschetz WI 470 269 478 Cub Male Freestyle C Josh Ryan WI 553 289 547 Youth Male Freestyle C Kyle Dowe WI 514 274 488 2 Jason Marek WI 500 277 473 3 Jake Brown WI 476 262 462 Zach Hamilton WI 408 249 409 Youth Male Freestyle Limited C Steven Hebert WI 264 166 253 Young Adult Male Freestyle C Jake Brock IL 520 274 526 2 Josh Brown WI 527 279 513 3 Jordan Clamer WI 490 278 510 Young Adult Female Freestyle Limited Recurve/Longbow C Marcie Hebert WI 466 271 485

1267 1261 1300 1226 968 1355 1340 1304 1283 1277 1179 796 1256 1196 1345 1343 1336 1332 1330 1307 1300 1310 1294 674 1316 1279 1145 1217 1389 1276 1250 1200 1066 683 1320 1319 1278 1222

continued on page 34 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August / September 2008 33


MID-ATLANTIC SECTION Mike Le Pera, Councilman brtesite@optonline.net

The Mids – by Mike Le Pera The Mid-Atlantic Outdoor Sectional, consisting of 28 Field, 14 Animal and 28 Hunter, was held June 28 and 29 at Watkins Glen, NY. After being absent for four years, it was good to be back at the Glen. To this writer, however, it seems that the hills got a little steeper from the last events there. It must have been a geological upheaval. The attendance was better than expected. One hundred forty eight archers shot the tournament — good numbers considering the present-day economy. Guests Jim Brown (FL), Mike Hindmarsh (NC), and Jay and Susie Price (VT) shot because it was the Glen. Our shooter of the year, Randy Hinkelman, was top gun in the amateurs, as was Jimmy Butts for the pros. The weather threatened a few times, but cooperated. Thank the Man upstairs. Thanks, guys. Hopefully, there will be another Outdoor Nationals here. Thanks also go to the work force from NYFAB: Kym, George, Erin, and all the others for the hard work putting on the tournament. Without them, things don’t happen. Next year, the Mid Atlantic Outdoor Sectional will be at Cape May, NJ. Mid-Atlantic Outdoor Sectional Results June 21-22, 2008 New York Field Archers, Watkins Glen, NY 28 Field + 14 Animal + 28 Hunter PL SHOOTER CFBB C Catelyn Battelle CMBB C James West CMFS C Eric Facklam 1 Lucas Kenley 2 Jonathan Casaregola John Novak III CMFSL C Hunter Reynen AFBB C Cay McManus AFFS C Sue Weinstein 1 Heidi Snyder 2 Colleen McGowan Peg Callaghan AFFSL C Sue Blickenstaff AMBB C Jim Neborsky AMBH C Joe McManus 2 Jon Battelle AMBHFS C Jeff Human 2 Greg McBride 3 Christopher Moser Scott Rolfe Edward Wilson AMBHFSL C Myron Swarts 2 Don Brongo AMFS Championship Flight C Randy Hinkelman 2 Brad Baker Jr 3 Ken Raymond JC Bradway Jon Bach Robert Reedinger T.L. Williams Tracy Neal Second Flight 1 Nicholas Vickers 2 Dan Martinez 3 Terry Colin Mark Irlbacher

ST

FLD

ANL

HTR

TOTAL

NY

90

76

101

267

MD

293

205

280

778

NY VA NY NH

544 498 497 457

280 269 266 248

534 502 439 464

1358 1269 1202 1169

NY

196

174

282

652

VA

468

273

479

1220

MD NY VA PA

530 532 511 473

545 526 510 468

1075 1058 1021 941

MD

468

264

448

1180

NJ

443

264

419

1126

VA NY

379 349

259 242

349 378

987 969

NY PA NJ NY NJ

535 533 523 463 426

283 279 282 280 272

536 538 533 474 454

1354 1350 1338 1217 1152

NY NY

477 405

274 268

483 434

1234 1107

MD VA NY NJ NJ PA PA NY

555 547 546 544 542 543 544 542

290 288 287 290 290 288 284 278

549 553 554 548 547 540 528 525

1394 1388 1387 1382 1379 1371 1356 1345

NJ NY NY NY

540 537 537 539

292 289 285 286

548 548 539 534

1380 1374 1361 1359

34 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August / September 2008

Mark Myers Alan Avery Greg Bechtold Jr Russell Renner Brian Robertson Third Flight 1 Rodney Carley 2 Dale Grossl 3 Edward Bowen Robert Kenley Rick Cardarelli John Blaine Mike Lambertson John Leto Greg Benner Fourth Flight 1 Scott Beard 2 Sean Facklam 3 Jeremy Travis Nick Chernega Robert VanIngen Jr Brian Flaherty David Provost Mark W. Drozdek Fifth Flight 1 Donald Denight II 2 Christopher Jones 3 Gregg Wolff James Hundertmark Mark Green Donald Denight III Matthew Gambino AMFSL C Dave Hryn 2 Paul Donahoo 3 David Blickenstaff MSMBB C Roy Sturgill 2 Larrie Emerson 3 Ronald Thompson MSFFS C Vicki Clem 2 Eva Mazzella MSMFS Championship Flight C James Goins 2 Ray May 3 Sonny Foote Rich Paul Edward Albright Jim French Charlie Myers Andrew Roslewicz Second Flight 1 Joe Bauernfeind 2 David Tarry 3 Al Liguori OJ Avery Warren A Magee Sr. Lou Havel Jesse Williams Edward Happ MSMFSL C Larry Worrill 2 John Knox III AMTrad C Mike Orlic 2 Ronnie Emerson PFFS C Samantha Neal SPFFS C Jan Lockwood PMFS C James Butts 2 George Ryals SPMFS C Tom Coblentz 2 Ron West SMBB C Bill Vrabel 2 Cy Powenski

NY NY PA NJ NY

541 539 535 535 539

288 286 287 286 285

530 533 535 535 532

1359 1358 1357 1356 1356

NY WV MD VA NY NJ NY NJ PA

532 530 528 530 528 527 525 526 525

284 285 286 282 285 286 285 283 284

540 536 534 532 530 530 518 516 514

1356 1351 1348 1344 1343 1343 1328 1325 1323

NJ NY NY NY NJ NY NJ NJ

524 522 515 512 511 518 501 515

284 284 283 282 283 279 279 DNF

539 527 526 519 511 502 488 DNF

1347 1333 1324 1313 1305 1299 1268 515

NJ NY NY NY NY NJ WV

490 490 495 495 500 499 490

282 281 277 280 278 DNF DNF

511 497 495 491 477 DNF DNF

1283 1268 1267 1266 1255 499 490

NY PA MD

511 519 463

282 280 260

521 512 471

1314 1311 1194

DE VA MD

409 443 421

270 229 246

443 429 403

1122 1101 1070

MD NJ

511 431

20 16

507 446

1038 893

MD MD NJ PA DE VA NJ NJ

540 524 520 523 526 528 510 532

282 284 284 285 282 285 285 283

539 534 535 528 528 513 515 DNF

1361 1342 1339 1336 1336 1326 1310 815

NY NJ NJ NY NJ NY MD NY

504 503 502 487 481 483 449 438

277 279 280 276 279 278 269 258

548 514 511 505 500 496 473 464

1329 1296 1293 1268 1260 1257 1191 1160

MD MD

475 397

278 252

493 433

1246 1082

NJ VA

381 292

256 178

397 323

1034 793

NY

541

286

529

1356

NJ

486

274

478

1238

NY NY

556 547

291 288

556 545

1403 1380

MD MD

551 538

290 282

543 540

1384 1360

NY NY

429 350

242 219

420 355

1091 924

SMBH C Marvin Mahana 2 Richard Goodson Sr. 3 Sal Mistretta SMBHFS C Mike Collins 2 James King 3 Charles Bobrowski Don Armstrong SMBHFSL C David Reiss 2 Tony Didio SMFS Championship Flight C Larry Hix 2 Robert Wise 3 Doug Joyce David Townsend Michael Farren Bruce Smith Michael Barry Second Flight 1 Chuck Blake 2 John Hurley 3 Dave Benty Gene Grodzki Jeff Vickers Ronald Fulmer Ray Scroger SMFSL C Dennis Wallace 2 John Grossl 3 Jim Greager SMFSLR/L C Zip Harris 2 Lyn Duhrkopp SMTrad C Andrew Lakata YAFFS C Kaitlyn Deming YAMFS C Brandon Armstrong YFBB C Hope Wymer YFFS C Katie Williams 2 Shaylyn Novak YFFSL C Faith Wymer YMFS C Zachery Grossl 2 Zacharie Reynen Guests Mike Hindmarsh Jay Price Jim Brown Suzi Price

NJ NY NY

459 370 347

252 190 230

449 371 311

1160 931 888

NY NY NJ VA

492 503 477 456

280 272 276 260

514 504 486 452

1286 1279 1239 1168

NY NY

477 450

262 258

463 469

1202 1177

MD MD NJ NY PA PA NJ

550 541 537 533 524 528 518

285 289 284 286 286 285 281

543 546 542 535 535 529 528

1378 1376 1363 1354 1345 1342 1327

WV NY NY NJ NJ NY NY

516 516 516 516 495 487 496

279 283 275 285 281 281 273

533 522 524 509 499 498 496

1328 1321 1315 1310 1275 1266 1265

MD WV PA

488 427 428

273 272 256

497 481 479

1258 1180 1163

WV NJ

455 335

266 228

474 365

1195 928

NY

239

186

250

675

NJ

490

280

486

1256

VA

535

287

541

1363

VA

210

126

224

560

NY NJ

479 368

253 220

427 332

1159 920

VA

344

170

325

839

WV NY

484 261

273 211

478 265

1235 737

NC VT FL VT

535 500 488 507

DNF

544 508 491 DNF

1079 1008 979 507

MIDWESTERN SECTION Ray Jones, Councilman iowaarchery@hotmail.com

Midwestern Outdoor Sectional Results June 21-22, 2008 Independence Bowhunters, Blue Springs, MO & Rapids Archery Club, Coon Rapids, MN 28 Field + 14 Hunter + 14 Animal Ties broken by highest 14 Field PL SHOOTER ST AFBHFS C Julene Hakl 2 Marcia Jones AFFS C Tonyia Bartholomew 2 Andrea Lamke 3 Kathy Faber Serena Finley

FLD

HTR

ANL

TOTAL

MN IA

503 509

254 241

272 278

1029 1028

KS MN SD MN

526 521 515 506

263 260 257 255

280 280 282 276

1069 1061 1054 1037

Kathy Potter Collette Weiser AMBHFS C Steve Christian 2 Rob Reidel 3 Bill Hakl Tracy Jonas Dave Harms Rich Arpin Greg Rosa Mick McJunkin Jeff Stevens AMFS Championship Flight C Jody Pletan 2 Jeff Rollins 3 Randy Ballard Tom Hood Tim Sargent Steve Bridger Rick Rugroden Dave Hellums Dale Determan Josh Hawley 2nd Flight 1 Greg Robel 2 Curtis Grimsley 3 Tom Ward Matt Kasuske Andrew Jones Dan Tindell Roscoe Vanausdoll Mark Tebelius Joe Mixer AMFSLR/L C Jeff Read CMFS C Kyle McCollum MSMFS C Roger Dobias 2 Carl Thiessen 3 Tom Stelk Al Tuller Dennis Garrison John Doub D. Edward Will John Carlson Ron Carvens Gary Thorson Len Emmen MSMFSL C Jim Wyatt PMFS C Richard Potter 2 Darren Collins 3 Eric Lydeen Jeff Quinn Trent Kleeberger PMFSL C Jamie Jennings SFFS C Judy Doub SMBH C Tom Jurik SMBHFS C Bob Shipman 2 Shorty Faber 3 Jim Borg SMFS C Jim Bath 2 Ed Christman 3 Lynn Umbarger Mike McCarty Arnie Veen Larry Mincy Bill Martin SMFSLR/L C Jerry Commerford 2 Earl Lynse

MO MN

487 438

245 229

279 275

1011 942

MO MN MN MO IA KS MO MN MN

547 523 523 528 524 524 516 518 501

270 270 262 262 261 259 257 255 261

283 283 286 281 284 283 281 277 280

1100 1076 1071 1071 1069 1066 1054 1050 1042

SD MO IA MO IA MO MN MO MN MN

551 545 543 540 543 534 535 529 532 526

269 274 271 274 270 270 265 265 256 283

284 285 289 286 286 286 287 287 282 257

1104 1104 1103 1100 1099 1090 1087 1081 1070 1066

MO MO KS SD IA MN MO ND MN

524 522 521 513 521 507 512 506 497

264 267 266 260 254 255 252 253 247

288 287 287 287 283 283 279 283 281

1076 1076 1074 1060 1058 1045 1043 1042 1025

KS

414

231

259

904

MO

454

233

248

935

MO SD IA MO MO KS MO IA MO IA MN

533 534 528 529 506 503 497 492 485 480 429

273 268 262 254 264 255 251 248 249 230 215

290 285 284 282 282 281 285 279 276 271 246

1096 1087 1074 1065 1052 1039 1033 1019 1010 981 890

MO

451

224

263

938

MO MO MN MN MN

555 545 553 533 520

275 277 267 INC INC

288 289 289 INC INC

1118 1111 1109 533 520

MO

531

268

286

1085

KS

478

243

281

1002

IA

247

190

151

588

IA SD MN

519 495 482

254 251 254

280 271 272

1053 1017 1008

KS NE KS MN SD MO MN

538 537 524 521 515 510 489

269 268 266 252 253 256 220

286 286 285 283 283 281 278

1093 1091 1075 1056 1051 1047 987

KS MN

405 365

194 205

247 247

846 817

continued on page 36 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August / September 2008 35


SPFFS C Sharon Henneman YAMFS C Daniel Barker YFFS C Rachel Mixer YMFS C Brandon Hood 2 Joseph Vanausdoll 3 Ryan McCollum

MO

520

265

287

1072

IA

430

214

257

901

MN

467

236

274

977

MO MO MO

543 512 476

253 254 237

284 282 261

1080 1048 974

C 2 3

Nick Deangelo Jim Lamoin Richard Lavigne Peter C. Janos Tony Rega George C. Borrero II Donald Levesque Gabe Lamana Roger Hatfield

MA CT CT MA RI MA RI MA MA

523 516 517 463 477 445 437 260 209

280 283 281 275 258 255 250 DNS DNS

524 516 516 478 477 448 415 516 DNS

1327 1315 1314 1216 1212 1148 1102 776 209

MSMFSL C Bill Heinecke YMFS C Tate Morgan YMFSL C Cody Denton CMFSL C Dugan Denton

WY

475

534

473

1482

MT

492

545

519

1556

MT

390

470

424

1284

MT

490

540

464

1494

Other Tournaments

NEW ENGLAND SECTION

Host: Location: Directions:

Ken Moore, Councilman kmoore15@comcast.net

New England Outdoor Sectional Results June 21-22, 2008 Lunenburg Sportsman Club, Lunenburg, MA 28 Field + 14 Animal + 28 Hunter PL SHOOTER ST Pro Male Freestyle C Chris Deston CT Adult Male Freestyle C Mike Pestilli CT 1 Mike Lamar CT 2 Bill Simas RI Virgilio Gonzales CT Bill Laramie MA Tyler Prudden MA Charles Howard, Jr RI David Ferrie MA Michael Hulme MA Greg Gioiosi MA Al Terminiello MA Adult Male Freestyle Limited C Paul Lewkowicz MA 2 Ken Moore RI Adult Male Barebow C Mike Wright NH Adult Male Bowhunter Freestyle C Gary Marrier VT 2 Gary Carpenter MA 3 Chris Mizner ME Jerry Nissenbaum MA Adult Male Traditional C Steven Evitt MA Adult Female Freestyle C Kathie Ainsworth NH Young Adult Male Freestyle C Joey Hunt III ME 2 Nicholas Gioiosi MA 3 Tim Meeker CT Senior Male Freestyle C Frank Minuto CT 2 John Fornier RI 3 Paul Locke RI Jim Leclair VT James Dean RI Jay Price VT Ken Hatt NH Ken Vivenzio NH Fred Meeker CT Davd E. Chouinard MA Bob Deston CT Senior Male Freestyle Limited C Rex Parent, Sr NH Senior Male Bowhunter Freestyle C Duke Willard MA Senior Male Traditional C Mike Martin MA Senior Female Freestyle C Darlene Marrier VT 2 Suzi Price VT 3 Heather Dean RI Master Senior Male Freestyle

36 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

SOUTHERN SECTION

2008 NEW ENGLAND SHOOT August 30-31, 2008

Registration:

FLD

ANL

HTR

TOTAL

552

286

547

1385

553 550 540 538 525 520 520 517 519 509 398

289 289 287 275 284 287 286 283 280 278 202

555 554 550 545 540 531 515 513 509 494 459

1397 1393 1377 1358 1349 1338 1321 1313 1308 1281 1059

505 468

266 269

498 480

1269 1217

447

264

467

1178

527 523 518 533

280 282 283 283

538 533 534 514

1345 1338 1335 1330

283

160

239

682

494

274

495

1263

527 472 445

286 261 265

532 466 INC

1345 1199 710

524 526 524 520 514 508 486 443 496 485 485

283 281 285 279 282 283 276 251 276 278 273

532 529 526 520 517 506 502 451 INC DNS DNS

1339 1336 1335 1319 1313 1297 1264 1145 772 763 758

454

264

431

1149

509

278

500

1287

165

120

232

517

502 496 497

282 277 267

522 508 499

1306 1281 1263

August / September 2008

Lunenburg Sportsman Club Reservoir Rd, Lunenburg, MA From SR 2 in Massachusetts, take Exit 35 to SR 70 heading north (Lunenburg Rd). Then turn right onto Leominster-Shirley Rd, then left onto Reservoir Rd. Follow Reservoir Rd to club on left. Lori LePage, 5 Sunrise Dr, Bradford, MA 01835. Tel: 978-372-8459 Make checks payable to NESFAA, and please include your phone number. None None Saturday: 28 Field and 14 Animal by assigned course. Start from 8:00 am until noon. Shoot all 28 Field, then shoot 14 Animal beginning on target #1 of same course and with same group. Animal targets are to go up at 2:00 pm. Sunday: Pick up scorecards at 8:00 am, general assembly at 8:30am, and then shoot 28 Hunter by assigned target with shotgun start at 9:00 am. Awards at 4:00 pm. Super 8 Motel, 482 N Main, Leominster, MA, 978 5372800. Sheraton Four Points, 99 Erdman, Leominster, MA, 978-534-9000. Best Western, 150 Royal Plaza Dr, Fitchburg, MA, 978-342-7100 Camping available at club

Deadline: Late Registration: Schedule:

Accommodations:

Campgrounds:

NORTHWESTERN SECTION Dennis Lundine, Councilman lundine5@aol.com

Northwestern Outdoor Sectional Results June 21-22, 2008 Lost Arrow Archers, Casper, WY 28 Field + 28 Animal + 28 Hunter PL SHOOTER AMFS C Jeremy Terhune 2 Andy Turnquist 3 Dugie Denton PMFS C Josh Schaff 2 Rob Morgan AFFS C Lynell Preston SMBHFS C Dan Perry 2 Dennis Lundine AMBHFS C Ramie Haines 2 Chris Kegler 3 Michael Bennett AFBHFS C Michelle Perry SFFSL C Linda Parker MSMFS C Dan Kolb MSMBB C T.C. Parker AMBH C Mark Mitchell

ST

FLD

ANL

HTR

TOTAL

WY WY WY

542 537 524

576 573 561

552 534 535

1670 1644 1620

MT MT

554 557

576 578

556 551

1686 1686

WY

518

568

525

1611

WY AK

476 437

526 531

503 464

1505 1432

WY WY WY

513 511 492

560 555 543

529 505 502

1602 1571 1537

WY

493

539

495

1527

WA

467

563

458

1488

WY

527

569

531

1627

WA

357

466

336

1159

WY

339

459

404

1202

Lee Gregory, Councilman lee@dlprint.com

Southern 3-D Sectional April 12-13, 2008 Tangi Archery Club, Baton Rouge, LA 2 X 15-Marked 3-D Animals PL SHOOTER Day 1 SMFS C Charles Buhler 144 Don Dickenson 122 AMBHFS C Ricky St. Upery 138 2 Ronnie Falgout 131 3 Gary Duran 98 YMFS C Patrick O’Bryant 128 AMFS C Ralph Sibley 143 2 Rick Shuffield 147 3 William O’Bryant 102 PMFS C Johnny Kennedy 140 2 Jay James 129 AFBHFS C Neecie Falgout 117 2 Gail Wright 97 3 Shelly Duran 100 Toni St. Upery 102 SMBHFS C Jack Lawes 100 SMTrad C Walter McGovern 2 Terry Credeur 103

Day 2

TOTAL

150 146

294 268

126 127 109

264 258 207

131

259

154 146 121

297 293 223

146 152

286 281

124 123 84 76

241 220 184 178

125

225

130 102

120 205

250

Southern Outdoor Sectional Results June 14-15, 2008 Red River Bowmen, Shreveport, LA 28 Field + 14 Animal + 14 Hunter 28 FLD 14 HTR + 14 ANL PL SHOOTER AFBHFS C Falgout, Neecie 2 Wright, Gail 3 Window, Cathy St. Upery, Toni Credeur, Ada AFFS C Braden, Georgianna 2 Taylor, Jacki 3 Hannah, Jamie Hughes, Merissa AFFSL C Brown, Stephanie AMBB C Bowen, Bill 2 Koopman, Randy AMBH C Baxter, Dave AMBHFS C Bradford, Scott

ST

28 FLD

14 HTR + 14 ANL

LA LA LA LA LA

508 502 478 461 396

537 537 511 516 462

1045 1039 989 977 858

TX TX TX TX

546 529 524 489

561 544 544 522

1107 1073 1068 1011

TX

450

443

893

TX TX

485 468

523 498

1008 966

TX

426

457

883

LA

534

550

1084

TOTAL

2 3

St. Upery, Ricky Bailey, Cope McMillan, Mark Taylor, Nathan Gettys, Greg Ellis, Danny Falgout, Ronnie Laxson, David McGee, Troy AMBHFSL C Prescott, Rick 2 Miller, Jeff 3 Allen, David Courtney, Andrew AMFS C Hansen, Chris 2 Bucy, Doug 3 Alderson, Mark Ray, Joshua Hemphill, Chip Rush, David Riggs, Tony O’Bryant, William Isaacs, Scott Zunker, Vincent AMFSL C Whiteford, Scott 2 Bateman IV, E.W. “Bubba” AMFSLR/L C Welch, Clayton 2 Ringel, Ed 3 Welch, Steve AMTrad C Credeur, Terry CFFS C Rogas, Ashley 2 Riggs, Tori CMBB C Bowen, Hayden CMFS C Zunker, Rowdy 2 Evans, Trevin MSFFS C Johnson, Betty MSMBB C Heishman, Monty MSMFS C Toon, Carlos MSMFSL C Pedelahore, Andrew PMFS C Braden, Michael 2 Payne, Russell 3 James, Jay SFBB C Wall, Rhonda SFFS C Toon, Linda SMBB C Hughes, David 2 McCrary, Eddie 3 Gregory, Lee SMBH C Bateman III, Earle W. SMBHFS C Coleman, Steven 2 Avouris, George 3 Laws, Jack Rodgers, Stanley Davis, John SMFS C Whiteside, Michael SMFSL C Barnhart, Hank YAMFS C Cavazos, Travis YMFS C O’Bryant, Patrick

LA TX OK TX OK OK LA TX TX

536 526 529 517 515 512 494 481 446

546 551 539 546 541 539 530 519 490

1082 1077 1068 1063 1056 1051 1024 1000 936

TX TX TX TX

466 444 438 427

485 490 490 465

951 934 928 892

TX TX OK OK LA TX TX LA LA TX

547 543 543 534 537 525 520 521 507 498

563 554 552 554 549 550 546 540 537 538

1110 1097 1095 1088 1086 1075 1066 1061 1044 1036

TX

506

542

1048

TX

507

541

1048

MS TX MS

476 453 423

515 482 465

991 935 888

LA

322

375

697

TX TX

502 478

521 516

1023 994

TX

417

412

829

TX TX

539 393

558 451

1097 844

TX

509

530

1039

TX

414

460

874

TX

538

554

874

LA

485

515

1000

TX TX LA

558 554 549

567 570 563

1125 1124 1112

TX

384

449

833

TX

489

518

1007

TX TX TX

495 465 453

530 514 486

1025 979 939

TX

430

476

906

TX TX LA TX TX

534 526 474 477 447

553 529 501 494 512

1087 1055 975 971 959

TX

531

560

1091

LA

418

451

869

TX

526

542

1068

LA

514

547

1061

continued on page 38 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August / September 2008 37


2 Mason Smith 3 Raleigh Boots Young Adult Male Freetyle C Cody Glover

SOUTHEASTERN SECTION Tim Austin, Councilman flarchery@bellsouth.net

NC GA

496 389

282 244

495 381

1273 1014

544

286

546

1376

Southeastern Outdoor Sectional Results June 21-22, 2008 Keowee Bowmen, Clemson, SC 28 Field + 14 Animal + 28 Hunter PL SHOOTER ST FLD Senior Pro Male Freestyle C Dan Renner SC 546 Pro Male Freestyle C Eric Helfritz FL 532 Adult Male Freestyle Championship Flight C Michael Alexander NC 544 2 Jim Addis SC 540 3 Joe Rozmus NC 538 Jimmy Renner SC 540 Jamie Wilbanks SC 534 Bobby Flores SC 533 John Stone SC 544 John Roberson SC 532 2nd Flight 1 Garry Renner SC 528 2 Jackie Wyatt SC 523 2 David Chumley SC 515 James Caudill KY 506 Robert Hatton SC 511 Steve Smith NC 509 Laszlo Toser FL 496 Oliver Austin FL 445 Senior Male Freestyle C Frank Smith KY 523 2 Terry Pendley NC 520 3 Drew Slayton SC 524 Lonnie Goodrich KY 516 Randall Fincher GA 528 Steve Anschutz KY 500 David Curtis NC 464 Ralph Thomas KY INC Adult Male Bowhunter Freestyle C Tim Eaton NC 534 2 Hugh Johnson GA 514 3 Donnie Dill SC 509 Russell Cooper SC 500 Master Senior Male Freestyle C James Thurman TN 546 2 Lynnwood Bunn GA 536 3 Tedd Lynn SC 525 George Jacobs KY 504 Tim Austin FL 493 Clay Caudil KY 491 William Bishop FL 480 Senior Male Bowhunter Freestyle C Dale Smith SC 523 2 Tom Boots GA 507 Senior Male Freestyle Limited C Frank Mosser KY 498 2 Buddy Lowman NC 452 3 Roger Pizio SC 405 Senior Male Freestyle Limited Recurve/Longbow C Jake Veit GA 367 Adult Male Freestyle Limited C Kevin Bryant KY 514 Adult Male Barebow C Glenn Baxter KY 493 2 Phillip Baldowski GA 403 Adult Female Freestyle C Janice Smith NC 487 2 Laura Chumley SC 482 Pro Female Freestyle C Erika Anschutz KY 545 2 Diane Watson FL 540 Youth Male Freetyle C Hunter Grant SC 527

38 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

ANL

HTR

TOTAL

289

552

1387

285

541

1358

284 288 285 282 289 285 287 283

544 543 541 542 538 536 INC INC

1372 1371 1364 1364 1361 1354 831 815

282 286 285 275 281 279 281 258

532 527 534 523 506 510 505 423

1342 1336 1334 1304 1298 1298 1282 1126

283 279 282 283 280 278 268 277

526 524 514 517 506 520 435 INC

1332 1323 1320 1316 1314 1298 1167 277

287 274 283 280

525 514 507 493

1346 1302 1299 1273

280 283 285 283 281 276 278

540 532 526 502 483 483 481

1366 1351 1336 1289 1257 1250 1239

278 281

518 521

1319 1309

282 275 249

502 483 402

1282 1210 1056

234

349

950

282

506

1302

273 222

480 393

1246 1018

283 280

508 499

1278 1261

289 284

542 545

1376 1369

286

515

1328

August / September 2008

Master Senior Male Freestyle C Bill Rucker CO 2 Richard Orth AZ 3 Red Christiansen CA Delvin Hatley NM Wayne Davidson AZ Jim Hamilton AZ Steve Gasca AZ Master Senior Female Freestyle C Karma Christiansen CA Master Senior Male Freestyle Limited C Ken Buck CO 2 David Aprea AZ 3 John Heffelfinger AZ Senior Male Freestyle C Don Snipes NV 2 Robert Kortan AZ 3 Larry Berfield NV Garry Beck AZ Pat Peters AZ Frank Roof NV Senior Male Bowhunter Fresstyle C John Hufford CO 2 John Thayer NV

515 507 509 504 485 500 478

278 279 271 276 277 273 279

291

526 515 497 492 508 489 495

1319 1301 1277 1272 1270 1262 1252

423

714

471 450 405

274 268 269

479 434 420

1224 1152 1094

531 518 520 513 525 513

278 284 286 284 277 282

534 531 519 513 504 511

1343 1333 1325 1310 1306 1306

489 476

278 280

507 482

1274 1238

Senior Male Bowhunter C Bob Borges NM 390 240 Senior Male Barebow C David Twigg AZ 379 255 2 Richard Doria AZ 231 174 Senior Male Traditional C Johnnie Hoeft AZ 143 141 Adult Male Freestyle C David Teran NM 544 288 2 Charles Roof NV 546 286 3 Luis Gomez AZ 541 289 Bill Edwards NV 538 281 Andrew Simon AZ 533 284 Todd Hulm AZ 518 282 Larry Pabst NV 515 286 Rand Dobbins AZ 517 284 Bob Zahn AZ 438 268 Adult Male Bowhunter Freestyle Limited C Robert Arthur NM 478 265 Adult Male Bowhunter Freestyle C Brian Johnson NV 529 286 2 Tom Vickers AZ 517 282 3 Kirk Toth AZ 518 283 Adult Female Freestyle Limited Recurve/Longbow C Lynn Walters CO 446 261

398

1028

404 250

1038 655

165

449

548 547 540 534 528 533 520 511 473

1380 1379 1370 1353 1345 1334 1321 1312 1179

489

1232

530 526 515

1345 1325 1316

436

1143

NFAA Pros Erika Anschutz and Diane Watson shoot a 45-yard walkup at Clemson

Host Director Dale Smith and Georgia Director Tom Boots rest at the Southeast Outdoor

SOUTHWESTERN SECTION Becky Pearson, Councilwoman beckysayre@hughes.net

Southwestern Outdoor Sectional Results May 17-18, 2008 Black Canyon Archers, Carefree, Arizona 28 Field + 14 Animal + 28 Hunter PL SHOOTER ST Professional Senior Male Freestyle C Richard Smith CO 2 Frank Pearson AZ Professional Adult Female Freestyle C Becky Pearson AZ

FLD

ANL

HTR

TOTAL

542 533

289 284

532 534

1363 1351

526

284

523

1333

ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August / September 2008 39


MATHEWS TV TAKES VIEWERS ON A GLOBAL JOURNEY Mathews Solocam invites home viewers to tune in for their new television series, Mathews TV. Join host, Dave Watson on world-wide excit-

cam Sweepstakes with great prizes from show sponsors. Dave Watson, a world-renown outdoorsman

ing hunts and intense archery competition every

and musician, has traveled the world with his

Sunday at 7 p.m. Eastern on Outdoor Channel.

Mathews bow. His adventurous personality and

Viewers can also log on to www.mathewstv.

years of expertise make Mathews TV both enter-

com, an interactive Web site, to see featured

taining and educational. Watson and his crew

clips, learn tech tips from Mathews’ Pros and

will present this exciting show to television view-

sign up for a chance to win the monthly Solo-

ers 52 weeks a year. One of the goals of Mathews TV is to highlight the expanding appeal of archery, both bowhunting and competitive target shooting. continued on page 42

40 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August / September 2008

ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August / September 2008 41


HOMESTEAD, FLORIDA — December 13 and 14, 2008

MATHEWS TV continued from page 41 Upcoming episodes will feature an African safari,

latest news and events from the industry. Visitors

national archery tournaments, inspiring stories

to the site will also be able to enter the Solocam

from students competing in the National Ar-

Sweepstakes for the chance to win monthly

chery in the Schools Program, bear hunting in

giveaways such as Carbon Express arrow pack-

the deep woods of Canada and plenty of world

ages, Genesis bow kits and a Mathews DXT.

class whitetails.

“We want to do more than showcase big

“Archery is one of the few sports which is ap-

hunts and competitions.” Watson explains, “Our

preciated all over the world...everywhere from

mission is to engage the people at home, to

Asia to Africa to North America,” says Watson.

make them feel a part of the action and inspire

“It’s never boring! There’s the thrill of the hunt

them to get out and create their own adven-

of course, but there’s also a deep heritage and a

tures.”

family connection to archery that makes it appealing to all outdoors enthusiasts.” Mathews TV has also launched a Web site to

Tune in for Mathews TV Sundays 7 p.m. Eastern on Outdoor Channel or log on to www. mathewstv.com for more information.

access the TV episode schedule, as well as the

42 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August / September 2008

ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August / September 2008 43


44 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August / September 2008

ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August / September 2008 45


QuikSpin

TM

Shrink your Groups... Period!

VANES

For maximum stability and head-turning accuracy, nothing spins a broadheadtipped arrow faster than QuikSpin vanes from N.A.P. QuikSpin’s revolutionary patented “kicker” rotates arrows up to 300% faster than feather helicals. And Standard Vane faster spin means tighter groups and better accuracy. Durable, all-weather reliable and easy to apply with any standard fletching machine in straight, offset right or right helical fletch. QuikSpin Vane The unique combination of our patented kicker and micro-grooves stabilizes an arrow in less than half the distance of a conventional vane or feather.

4” 2.25”

Patented micro-grooves on one side of each vane channel air over vane for flatter trajectory compared to conventional vanes.

1.5”

2004 IBO World Champ Adam Gibson trusted QuikSpins to take the Gold!

Used proudly and responsibly by Ralph & Vicki Cianciarulo, America’s Favorite Bowhunting Couple on “The Archer’s Choice” weekly t.v. show on The Outdoor Channel.

New Archery Products TM 7500 Industrial Dr., Forest Park, IL 60130 708.488.2500 Toll Free: 800.323.1279 Fax: 708.488.2515 www.newarchery.com info@newarchery.com 46 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August / September 2008

ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August / September 2008 47


W E

FOR

N

‘08

SX2

Introducing the new STAN SX2 the most recent addition to the STAN family. The NEW and improved internal, heat treated sear components are hardened to a wear proof 62 Rockwell. The internal mechanism of the SX2 is pure genius, lightning fast and crisp as a fall morning. See your local dealer to check out the NEW SX2 or the rest of the STAN line-up.

www.stanislawski.com

www.ishootastan.com


Aug/Sept 08