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No. 15 Vol. 2

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www.thechathamnewsnj.com

February 2017

Madison Senior Center Hosts ‘Hug For Your Head’ Event

By Ainsley Layland olunteers from the local community gathered at the Madison Senior Center to cut, sew, and decorate caps for cancer patients as part of the ‘Hug For Your Head’ project. The caps are made

from t-shirts and are donated to the Carol G Simon Cancer Center in Morristown. While volunteering at the center, local community member Paula Moccia saw a need that began this campaign.

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“I noticed that there was a need for comfortable head coverings for cancer patients who had lost their hair due to chemo treatments,” said Moccia. “I wanted to find a solution and came upon the idea of using recycled t-shirts. The fabric was soft, washable, stretchable and came in many colors. I made a pattern, cut and sewed a hat from a t-shirt, decorated it and brought it in for the patients’ opinions. They loved it.” Moccia formed a committee in the spring of 2012 and officially started the Hug for Your Head, T-Cap project. Since then they have received countless donations to help make the caps.

Volunteers interested in participating are asked to bring washed t-shirts, a sewing machine, and items to decorate the hats with including jewelry, pins, earrings and ribbons. “Many people are interested in helping us and so we do workshops to teach them how to make and decorate the hats,” Moccia said. “We have held two very successful workshops at the Madison Civic Center. The last workshop there on January 19 was attended by about 15 women who helped produce approximately 100 t-caps of all different colors and each one decorated with a pin, flower or scarf.” The caps are included as part of the ‘comfort cart’

which also holds pillows, blankets and candy available for patients to take. According to Moccia, the comfort cart is brought up to the infusion rooms by volunteers and the patients are able to pick whatever they need from it. “We had the first event back in November and then just recently hosted another project day January 19 with plans to host a third event in April,” said Edna lerley-Byrne, Director at Madison Senior Center. “This most recent day in January was actually recorded and will be on cable on February 19.” Community members can tune in to the feature to see first-hand how the project operates and join in for

the next event in April. “Since the spring of 2012, we have donated approximately 1,000 t-caps to our patients every year,” Moccia said. “They are extremely happy and appreciative to receive a t-cap and are very moved knowing that someone cared enough about their condition. We will be celebrating our fifth anniversary of our project this spring with a total of 5,000 donated ‘Hug for Your Head, T-Caps’,” Moccia said. “Our goal is to spread the word about our project so perhaps other cancer centers will start their own program that will provide much needed comfort to their cancer patients. I hope you will be able help us.”


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Gannon Leads Productive Role As New Morris County Sheriff

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By Cheryl Conway nto the second month of his newly elected position, Morris County Sheriff Jim Gannon is off to a strong start in his mission to establish new partnerships, better services and improved technologies. Gannon of the Township of Boonton began Jan. 2 as the 77th sheriff of Morris County, taking the reins from Edward Rochford who served for 24 years since 1993. After November’s election win, Gannon met with Rochford to help with the transition and visited the Morris County Correctional Facility to prepare for its return of operations to the sheriff’s department. Having been in law enforcement for 33 years, Gannon was ready to step into his next challenge.

“It’s been great,” says Gannon. “I love the role. Morris County Sheriff’s Office is a very proud agency,” with the “finest officers, support staff second to none. That’s a great start. We also have people that are hungry for improvements,” from “senior people” with great ideas, to innovative “young folks.” “Good things are happening,” he continues. “The agency is changing before our eyes. I want to improve on all that they’ve [previous sheriffs] done. They’ve done a phenomenal job.” Before Gannon came on board, the Morris County Freeholders had been managing the county jail for 16 months, since 2015 after taking it away from the sheriff due to issues such

as officers’ salary hikes and overtime costs. That same board voted unanimously, 7-0, in Dec. 2016, to return the day-day management of the county jail back to the sheriff’s department. The sheriff’s office had run the county jail for 277 years, since 1739, says Gannon, who spent 100 hours reviewing the matter before presenting to freeholders the benefits of one agency. “The jail had always been the responsibility of the sheriff,” he says. To have it returned, made the most sense for better operations and partnerships. “Bottom line is we will work together. It’s more suitable that I take over.” As one agency- the Bureau of Law Enforcement and the Bureau of Cor-

rections- the new Morris County Sheriff’s Office employs 330 employees, which include 160 officers at the correctional facility, 90 officers in law enforcement, and additional support staff. There is “a lot going on” with the two bureaus, says Gannon, with a unique situation and a lot to offer, such as a jail population of 245 inmates; a crime scene unit that is a shared service, assisting towns with 1,262 crimes last year; its own bomb squad; Sheriff Emergency Response Team (SERT); a new and improved Morris County Sheriff’s Trends & Analysis Team (STAT); Canine Unit that went out 500 times last year in search of missing persons like elderly and children, narcotics,

explosives detention; and a warrant squad to pick up individuals with violations. “We really play into the role of all that’s going on in Morris County Law Enforcement,” says Gannon. The sheriff is also proud that “We are triple accredited,” in law enforcement, correctional side and healthcare side. “These inmates are in our vicinity; we make sure they get proper care,” from dental care to mental abuse treatment. During his first 100 day transition, or phase one, Gannon spent time interviewing all personnel “seeing how we can do better.” In phase two, he wants to develop partnerships and establish a new organization. One plan is to have an

assessment of the Morris County Courthouse complex to strengthen its infrastructure. The county has authorized an architect for $370,000 to come evaluate the complex, from floor plan to security, “to look at it holistically to see if it can be changed to accommodate the user.” The old courthouse building dates back to 1827 and is protected by the Nacontinued on next page

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Gannon Leads Productive Role... continued from previous page tional Registry of Historic Places. In order to provide better security for judges, crime victims and defendants, the building needs some redesigning, says Gannon. “It’s very difficult” to get around the facility for persons in wheelchairs or disabilities, he says. “You can’t do it by yourself.” Gannon says “I’m very pleased freeholders are taking the initiative to further these efforts. There will be great opportunity for improvements.” Gannon says his “number one responsibility is the protection of the people.” He wants to ensure that people who come to the courthouse can come in to speak to the judge without intimidation. He also needs

to safeguard crime victims, family members and visitors to the courthouse to prevent conflicted contact with the opposing party. Using correctional officers to help protect the courthouse is being considered for additional safety measures, he says. “I’m here to protect all the people,” stresses Gannon. “It’s serious business; I like to have fun but I’m a real serious guy when it comes down to it.” Another issue is opiate addiction in the county and the state, says Gannon. His plan is to have a housing unit at the county jail as well as a partnership with Morris County Vo-tech so inmates, once released, can continue their services while going for their GED and eventually a job.

“Last year, 62 people died in Morris County [from opium abuse], 21 to 71 years of age, all socio-economics, all races, all age groups, all levels of education,” says Gannon. “They are addicted maybe through oxycodone, or wisdom tooth pulled or a broken arm.” Gannon says “We are developing a system to assist with interventions to bring hope to the user. These users are our family, they’re our friends, they’re our neighbors. If people are distributing, they need to be cut off; to cut the head off the snake. We are going to make a difference.” Also on Gannon’s radar is to introduce a voluntary domestic abuse program “to discontinue that cycle of violence,” he says.

In March, he plans to start a bracelet program as an alternative to incarceration, an in-home detention program for inmates not charged with violent crimes. This way those involved in minor crimes will be given an opportunity to stay home and not be incarcerated in order to continue working and care for their families. Gannon has made some personnel changes, placing an undersheriff at the correctional facility, hiring an undersheriff at the Bureau

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of Law Enforcement, a new administrator and senior analyst. “In four weeks we made a lot of improvements.” He also has started some new programs such as senior fraud presentations in the Bureau Law Enforcement to help seniors who are victims of fraud, has been speaking to groups on counter terrorism and opium abuse and has taken “a very serious approach” to modernizing technologies and sharing information. With all that he has

planned, Gannon says, “I think we have a very bright future. I came in here to make a difference. It’s been exciting for me to steer the ship. It’s a seven day week job. I have high expectations. “I report to the people of Morris County,” he concludes. “The concerns of the people are my concerns. I have to listen to the people; I take that very seriously. That’s my table of organization.”

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Chatham’s Madame Bey: The Legend Behind Legends Written In Recent Book

By: J.L. Shively Someday someone will write a magazine serial or a movie around the life of Madame Bey, but I question its success. Because the public would consider it too farfetched, too imaginative. I mean things that have happened in the life of Madame Bey challenge credibility. They are not supposed to happen—except in the case of Madame Bey,” quoted from United Press, “Brooklyn Daily Eagle,” from Fri., Dec. 10, 1937. New Providence resident, Gene Pantalone, has challenged this prophetic quote by doing just that, writing a book around the life of the fantastic and incredible life of Madame Bey and the boxing camp in Chatham which she ran at her home from 1923 until her death in 1942. Pantalone’s book titled, “Madame Bey’s: Home to Boxing Legends,” published by Archway Publishing in Sept. of 2016 is rigorously researched and paints the life of a woman who immersed herself around the lives of legends and became a bit of a leg-

end herself. Hranoush Bey, better known as Madame Bey began her life in America at the age of 16, when she emigrated with her future husband from Turkey. They came to this country with the simple goal of marriage. “Madame Bey was Christian and Sidky Bey was Muslim; their families in Turkey forbade marriage. They wed in New York soon after their arrival,” Pantalone explains. The marriage to her husband would not be the only way Bey would defy convention in her life, she “was well-educated, sang opera as a soprano in Carnegie Hall, spoke seven languages and quickly became a favorite in the social scene in Washington, DC,” states Pantalone. Bey’s husband had become a diplomate at the Turkish embassy in Washington, D.C. and New York and it was from mixing in that circle that they befriended President William McKinley and his wife. McKinley even invited Bey to sing the National Anthem on his ill-fated trip to the World’s Fair in Buffalo,

N.Y. Pantalone goes on to explain how Bey actually “stood a few feet from President McKinley when he was assassinated [in Buffalo] and she appears in the last posed picture of President McKinley.” Bey and her husband purchased land in Chatham Township which neighbored the property of lightweight boxing champion, Freddie Welsh, who had purchased a mansion a mile away after losing his title to Benny Leonard. Welsh had transformed his property into what he dreamed would be a retreat where “businessmen could exercise and experience what he called ‘right living,’” Pantalone states and goes on to explain how Welsh’s dream hemorrhaged money and only became successful after he left and joined the army and left the camp to be run by his friend, Madame Bey. “She started making it successful by concentrating on boxers,” Pantalone explains. “Where Welsh failed, Bey made a success of it very quickly.” When in 1923 Welsh

Madame Bey in her gym with British heavyweight champion, Tommy Farr.

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camp and moved business to her own home, where all eleven boxers followed her and they built “Bey’s Train-

ing Camp.” “I had no intent of writing a book,” Pantalone excontinued on page 5

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Chatham’s Madame Bey...

cont. from previous page plains but remembers visiting the camp when he was about seven years old. By that time, the mid-60s, it was called Ehsan’s Training Camp, since it had been sold after Madame Bey’s death. “Although the camp has been mostly forgotten, during its time it was the most famous boxing camp in the world,” Pantalone states and it was right in Chatham. Thousands of

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people used to come to the camp to see the boxers train. “Imagine, limousines and cars lining River Road in Chatham Township, N.J, for the purpose of watching the world’s best boxers train. They arrived by the thousands when the town’s population numbered fewer than one thousand,” sums up Pantalone. Bey’s house and training facility no longer stand, all that is left in the camps memory is a historic mark-

er which was erected by the Chatham Historical Society and the memory of those who knew Bey and the legacy she left behind. Pantalone’s book is 504 pages, available in paperback for $33.99 or eBook for $9.99 on Amazon and can also be ordered from any bookstore. “Madame Bey’s” has even been selected to be featured in the Indie segment of the Kirkus Reviews magazine.

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Chatham Art Teacher Celebrates 50 Years of Service

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By Maryanne Christiano-Mistretta .L. Kraemer recently celebrated 50 years working as an art teacher at Lafayette School, Chatham. She was honored at a meeting of the School District of the Chathams Board of Education last month. “I didn’t mean to go there for 50 years,” Kraemer said. “The years just piled up.” Initially she was just filling in for a teacher who was out on maternity leave. What’s interesting is that Kraemer still exchanges Christmas cards with that teacher, who now lives in Florida. And the “baby” she had is now 50. As an art teacher, Kraemer teachers 693 fourth and fifth grade students at Lafayette who take art classes once a week. She also puts together the school yearbook and keeps the school decorated with student artwork throughout the year. The North Plainfield resident became interested in creating at an early age, around third grade. “It was fun to me,” she said. “I was always busy at crafts and making things; doing things with my hands, using my dad’s tools – wood, saws, hammers. He taught me to use them. I’d build doll beds for my sisters, even a wooden wheel chair when I was older, fifth or sixth grade. It wasn’t terrific, but it was one you could manage.” Coming from a family that appreciated doing things with their own hands, Kraemer always liked to do stuff. “I sewed a lot,” she said. “I’ve enjoyed crafts mostly. All kinds of weaving. And

ceramics. I’ve done some painting.” She always took art electives at school and realized, by the time she graduated, it was a lot of fun and was something she’d like to do all the time. During her years of service, Kraemer taught elementary art for fourth and fifth grade. Throughout the school year, she’d have the classes work on different types of art – painting, stencil prints and papier-mâché. She wrote the play “The Head Show” in which students wear huge heads made with papier mache, portraying non-speaking characters. Prior to her time spent teaching at Lafayette, Kraemer worked as an art teacher in Bernard’s Township while working for a master’s degree at Montclair University. “I lived in West Orange and traveled to Bernard’s Township every day,” she

said. “I had a heavy schedule.” When she saw two openings on the bulletin board at Montclair University – one for an art teacher in East Orange, and one in Chatham – she applied for both. “The Chatham school responded to me and asked me to bring in samples of things I was doing with kids,” she said. “First the principal, and then the superintendent got excited about my folder [portfolio].” Kraemer, who is now 73, has no intentions of retiring. “Not right away,” she said. “I don’t feel old enough yet.” In addition to art, other interests include gardening and biking. “I love to go biking by myself, leisurely,” she said. “I take my lunch. I have a nice time. I’ll take my bike down the shore.” Kraemer is married to Ira Kraemer, a violin maker and a symphony conductor.


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Chatham Senior Center Offers March Activities ree Tax Aid is set for Thur., 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. until April 13.

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Donate To Restore Madison Community House

he Thursday Morning Club, which runs the Madison Community House, added a donation page to its website to receive donations from the community to help with restoring the iconic building. Donations to the new fund will be used for restoration costs of the historic building after Madison Community House suffered a fire.

Got to https://www.thursdaymorningclub.org/fire/ for more information and to donate. In 1924, the Thursday Morning Club built the Madison Community House, which is home to TMC sponsored programs and activities including a nursery school, Before And After School Child Care (BASCC) and after

can be scheduled online at https://freetaxesmorrisnj. wordpress.com/chatham or by calling the Senior Center at 973-635-4565. A Golf Clinic is set for Thur., Mar. 9-30 from 12:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Series of four 90-minute lessons. Instruction includes improving swing, understanding the short game and hitting off the tee. Emphasis on drills. Cost is $75 for series or $25 for individual class. Must sign up. Limited class size. Instructor is Lou Ruina. A Book Club meeting is set to be held on Tues., Mar. 21, at noon to discuss “Summer Before the War”

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Donna Sue Dowton. Senior Men’s Basketball is set to hold practice on Mon., Wed. and Fri. from 10 a.m. until noon. Practice held in the Chatham Twp. Municipal Building gym. New members welcome. Kati’s Yoga is set to be held on Tues. from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Exercises and stretches with attention to effective breathing, for all levels of ability. $45/6week session; $9/class. Instructor: Kati Walker. For more information on these events, call the Senior Center at 973-635-4565 or visit www.chathamseniorcenter.org.

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Madison Police Department To Receive Body Cameras

By Henry M. Holden n recent years, the American public has been fed almost nightly scenes of public demonstrations ranging from peaceful to full-scale rioting and even anarchy, often caught on cell phone cameras. Many of the demonstrations involve protests about improper and alleged illegal behavior of law enforcement officers. Recently, law enforcement agencies have begun giving their officers body worn cameras. These cameras offer another point of view, the civilian’s behavior, and the law enforcement officer’s in a confrontation situation. These cameras are designed to “promote transparency, mutual accountability, and trust between police and

the community,” according to the state Attorney General Christopher S. Porrino. Madison Chief of Police Darren Dachisen said his department “plans to introduce the cameras in the next few months. In the meantime, he said the department is working to put together a policy on using the cameras.” There are privacy issues if officers enter schools, medical facilities, or private homes, wearing a camera. There also are issues on when and where the officers can use the cameras. The Madison Police Department can use up to $500 in grant funds for each camera or camera package, including camera and related equipment. “We’re happy to receive the grant,” Dachisen said,

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adding that he expects all the patrol officers to be wearing them. The decision regarding whether to acquire bodyworn cameras still is up to individual police departments and municipalities. However, the strong support of the Attorney General’s Office for use of body cameras, led the office to issue a statewide policy in 2015 establishing guidelines for deploying the cameras. “This new round of funding for body cameras will keep New Jersey in the vanguard nationally in using this technology, which promotes transparency in policing while protecting officers in their difficult and dangerous jobs,” Porrino said. “We’re rapidly reach-

ing the tipping point where most the police departments in New Jersey will have body cameras, and the remaining departments are likely to follow suit,” said Elie Honig, director of the state Division of Criminal Justice. The grants will use funds from the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant (“JAG”) Program. JAG funds are appropriated by Congress to the U.S. Department of Justice to aid states and local units of government in carrying out programs to prevent and control crime, and to improve the functioning of the criminal justice system. In July 2015, Gov. Chris Christie, and the Attorney General’s Office announced a total of $4 million in fund-

ing for body cameras using criminal forfeiture funds. They announced $1.5 million in funding to fully equip the New Jersey State Police with body cameras for every officer conducting patrol duties. They also announced $2.5 million in grant funding awarded to 176 police departments for the purchase of more than

5,000 cameras. “We’ve made positive police-community relations a top priority in New Jersey through policies and programs that have been embraced by law enforcement and communities, including our efforts to promote the use of body cameras by police,” said Porrino.

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Letter To The Editor Rotarian Chair Voices Concerns On Hunger Dear Editor: While there is no shortage of financial, social and health related problems in New Jersey, the one issue that receives little attention, is the rising rate of malnutrition and food insecurity. Food insecurity, simply defined, is the condition in which an individual or family is not sure of where their

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next meal is coming from. It is a condition, in which it is estimated that over one million NJ residents are living in. The condition is not restricted or isolated to urban centers. There are tens of thousands of residents in every county in NJ, living under those circumstances. There are more than sixty thousand in Morris, Sussex and Warren Counties. It is

not just the stereotypical poor in this condition; there are middle class families, veterans, senior citizens, and single parent households who worry about having enough food. I’ve had people say to me that most people go “hungry” every now and then. Considering the fact that obesity in NJ is on the rise, missing a meal does not appear to be common-

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place. Being “hungry,” not having adequate food, or knowing that you may not have a next meal, are not the same! The impact of food insecurity is not just a short-term condition. Food insecurity and the resulting malnutrition, have a critical impact on individuals, families and the community. Expecting a child to perform in school when their last meal may have been the day before is not realistic. Expecting a child to grow and develop both physically and mentally, up to their potential, is not realistic, when they have been malnourished. Yet, the government expects comparable performance in school for everyone. The other aspect of food insecurity is malnutrition.

Malnutrition can take many forms, and in fact, many individuals with obesity also have malnutrition. The combination of food insecurity and malnutrition has a direct long-term impact on the individual and society. Malnutrition directly effects an individual’s health and on related health costs. For example, when a malnourished senior requires hospitalization, they usually have anemia. Studies have shown that the person who is both malnourished and has anemia, will require more medical services, and the cost of their care will be significantly higher! The prevalence of anemia in children, women and particularly senior, has become a public health issue, rising over the last decade becoming a

contributing factor to rising healthcare costs. While New Jersey prides itself on being one of the wealthiest states in America, it seems paradoxical that we tolerate a condition that allows residents to wonder about their next meal. We can never be the state we aspire to be, until we address this fundamental need. Rotarians throughout northern New Jersey are helping to address this crisis, as are many private organizations. To begin to solve this multi-faceted problem, we will need greater recognition, as well as action, on the part of all levels of government. Ellsworth Havens, Chair EndHunger 3.6 www.madisonrotarynj.org.

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Area Nonprofit Seeks Applicants For Preschool Tuition Scholarships

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reschool Advantage is accepting applications for scholarships to its partner preschools located in areas such as Madison, Mendham, Morristown, Morris Plains, and Mt. Olive for the school year beginning in September. Local families can apply to Preschool Advantage for funding for a half-day of preschool for three or four year old children up to five days a week. Preschool Advantage has provided families in Morris Counties with financial assistance for high quality preschool education since 1995. In 2016, 71 children were funded by Preschool Advantage with more than 1,300 tuitions paid throughout the organi-

zation’s history. Children must be three or four years old by Oct. 1, to be considered for funding for the school year beginning in September 2017. The deadline for applications is Feb. 28. Families demonstrating commitment to education and financial need can access the application at preschooladvantage.org or by calling (973) 532-2501. Preschool Advantage is a non-profit organization that believes all children should have access to high quality early education. Preschool Advantage is dedicated to assisting families who fall into circumstances that make paying tuition for quality pre-

school out of reach. “While there are federally funded programs to cover the cost of preschool for families living below the poverty line, working families making over that level have limited options,” said Molly Dunn, executive director for Preschool Advantage. “There are thousands of families in New Jersey who cannot access a quality education for their child. We are committed to addressing this need one child at a time.” To apply for funding for preschool tuition or learn more about Preschool Advantage, visit www.preschooladvantage.org.

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Madison Rotary Club Seeks Donations To Feed Hungry

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otary Club of Madison is seeking monetary donations to purchase specific food supplies for this year’s End Hunger 3.6 packaging event scheduled for March

25 at the Drew Forum in Madison from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. This year’s goal is to package 150,000 meals at 25 cents per meal. Last year’s event resulted in packaging 52,000 meals

in two hours. Volunteers are needed for the event. For further information on donating or volunteering, please visit www.MadisonRotaryNJ.org.


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unshine Striders Fun Run was held Sat., Feb. 4, from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m., at the Equinox Gym in Summit. Team Pedaling Sunshine, the parent team to the Sunshine Striders, participated in the Cycle for Survival with more than 50 riders from the Chatham area. Cycle for Survival is the national movement to beat rare cancers. The relay-style spinning events take place in Equinox Gyms across the country. Participants raise money for rare cancer research at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Of every dollar raised, 100 percent goes directly to research within six months of the events. This is Cycle for Survival’s 11th year, and the organization has raised more than

Local Riders Pedal To Support Cancer Research $119 million - funding that is making a real difference to cancer patients and their families everywhere. The top fundraising team, Pedaling Sunshine was launched just last year by Chatham resident, Kelly Leach, a rare cancer survivor and mother to two young boys. The name Pedaling Sunshine was inspired by the fact that she sings the bedtime song “You Are My Sunshine” to her kids every night. Following her treatment at MSKCC, she launched Team Pedaling Sunshine, in the hopes that she could one day live in a world without cancer - or at least a world with sufficient and successful treatment options for cancer. In the 2016 Cycle for Survival season, Team Pedaling Sunshine had 190

riders in 10 different cities across the country, and raised more than $250,000. Leach reports that this year, the team has already raised

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