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THE NEW SCHOOL FOR PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT

THE NEW SCHOOL Continuing Education Summer 2014 Term Begins June 2

Register online at www.newschool.edu/register


HOW TO REGISTER

HOW TO USE THIS CATALOG

This catalog lists course offerings for the Summer 2013 term. Early registration online or by fax, telephone, or mail is strongly encouraged, as courses may fill or be canceled because of insufficient enrollment. See pages 51–52 for more information about procedures and deadlines, or call 212.229.5690. The registrar is located at 72 Fifth Avenue, 4th floor (corner of 13th Street), for in-person registration.

The catalog includes several features designed to help you use it effectively.

Note: In person registration is closed May 26, July 4, and all Saturdays and Sundays. Register online or by fax when the office is closed; registrations will be processed the next working day. Online You can register through a secure online connection with payment by credit card. Go to www.newschool.edu/register and follow the instructions. Register at least three days before your course begins. You will receive an email confirming that your registration has been received. Your official Statement/Schedule will be mailed to you after payment has cleared.

Finding a Subject General subjects are listed in the Table of Contents on page 3. For more information about any course, contact the department or program; telephone numbers are found on the first page of each general subject area. Interpreting the Course Description A chart on page 50 breaks down the format of the course descriptions and explains the different elements.

USEFUL CONTACT INFORMATION General Information ...................... nspeinfo@newschool.edu 212.229.5615 Registration Office ...................................... 212.229.5690

By Fax

Box Office ................................................... 212.229.5488

You can register by fax with payment by credit card using the appropriate registration form in the back of this bulletin. Fax to 212.229.5648 at least three days before your course begins. No confirmation will be faxed; your Statement/Schedule will be mailed to you.

Student Financial Services........................... 212.229.8930

By Mail Use the appropriate registration form in the back of this bulletin. Mail registration must be postmarked at least two weeks before your course begins. Your Statement/Schedule will be mailed to you. By Phone You can register as a noncredit student by telephone, with payment by credit card. Call 212.229.5690, Monday–Friday. Call at least three days before your course begins. Your Statement/Schedule will be mailed to you. In Person You can register in person at 72 Fifth Avenue, 4th floor (corner of 13th Street). A schedule for in-person registration is published on page 51 of this catalog.

Admission Office (bachelor’s and graduate programs) ......... 212.229.5150 Alumni Office .............................................. 212.229.5662 Press Contact ............................................. 212.229.5151 New School Dean’s Office ............................ 212.229.5615 New School Switchboard ............................. 212.229.5600


THE NEW SCHOOL FOR PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT

SUMMER 2014 COURSE BULLETIN In this catalog, discover hundreds of courses available to you at The New School. The New School, a leading private university in New York City, also offers more than 135 degree and certificate programs in art and design, liberal arts and social sciences, management and urban policy, and the performing arts. We invite you to learn about the university’s undergraduate and graduate degree programs at www.newschool.edu/degreeprograms.


ACADEMIC TERM CALENDAR Summer 2014 Classroom/studio courses usually meet twice a week for 12–15 sessions beginning the week of June 2. Online courses run nine weeks, from June 2 to August 2.

Holidays New School facilities will be closed. Memorial Day Observed, May 26 Independence Day, July 4

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CONTENTS SUMMER 2014 COURSES Social Sciences, 6 For course advising, call 212.229.5124. History, 6 Politics, Economics, and the Law, 6 Anthropology, 7 Psychology, 7 Humanities, 8 For course advising, call 212.229.5961. Art and Music, 8 Literature, 9 Philosophy, 10 Media Studies and Film, 11 For course advising, call 212.229.8903. Media Studies, 11 Film Studies and Production, 12 Screenwriting, 14 The Writing Program, 15 For course advising, call 212.229.5611. Summer Writers Colony, 15 Fundamentals, 17 Poetry, 18 Fiction, 18 Nonfiction and Journalism, 19 Special Topics, 19 Foreign Languages, 20 For course advising, call 212.229.5676. Arabic, 20 Chinese (Mandarin), 21 French, 21 German, 21 Italian, 22 Spanish, 23 Turkish, 23 English Language Studies, 24 For course advising, call 212.229.5372. Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages, 24 English as a Second Language, 26 ESL + Design Certificate, 28

Visual and Performing Arts, 29 For course advising, call 212.229.5961. Drawing and Painting, 29 Printmaking, 30 Photography, 30 Music Performance, 31 Creative Arts and Health Certificate, 32 Management and Entrepreneurship, 33 For course advising, call 212.229.5124. Food Studies, 34 For course advising, call 212.229.5124. Institute for Retired Professionals, 36

ABOUT THE NEW SCHOOL THE NEW SCHOOL FOR PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT, 38 Educational Programs and Services, 38 Study Options, 38 Study Online, 39 Libraries and Computing Facilities, 39 International Student Services, 40 Services for Students with Disabilities, 40 The New School for Public Engagement Undergraduate Program, 40 THE UNIVERSITY, 41 University Administrative Policies, 42 Student Accounts and Records, 42 Tuition and Fees, 43 Cancellations, Refunds, Add/Drop, 43 Admission to Class, 44 Other University Policies, 45 Records and Grades, 46 Academic Transcripts, 46 Noncredit Record of Attendance, 46 Grades, 46 Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, 47

REGISTRATION PROCEDURES Understanding the Course Description, 48 Before Registering, 49 Register and Pay, 49 Student ID, 50 Find Your Class, 50 Withdrawal/Refund Policy, 50 NEIGHBORHOOD MAP, 51 REGISTRATION FORMS


SUMMER 2014 COURSES


SOCIAL SCIENCES

SOCIAL SCIENCES History Politics, Economics, and the Law

HISTORY NEW Black Nationalism: Rhetoric and Reality  NHIS3682 A 9 weeks, June 2 thru Aug. 1. Noncredit tuition $650.

ONLINE

Anthropology

Glenn Reynolds

Psychology

Black nationalism has proved to be a powerful organizing concept uniting much of the global Black diaspora. This course examines the multiple rhetorical strands of black nationalism, from religious, cultural, and political organizing themes to more tangible manifestations, such as experiments in Black resettlement and other forms of social activism. Key topics include the Black Atlantic, the “Back to Africa” movements of the 19th-century Caribbean and the United States, and the intersection of Black nationalism and Black Power. Key figures discussed include Olaudah Equiano, Paul Cuffe, John Russwurm, Martin Delany, Henry McNeal Turner, W.E.B. Du Bois, Alexander Crummell, Marcus Garvey, Wallace Fard Muhammad, Kwame Nkrumah, and Malcolm X.  (3 credits)

FOR COURSE ADVISING, CALL 212.229.5124. w w w. n e w s c h o o l . e d u / c e / s o c i a l s c i e n c e s

The Department of Social Sciences draws on The New School’s tradition of free inquiry and its commitment to making profound ideas accessible. At a time of fierce and competing ideologies, nationally and globally, we prepare students to take their place as thoughtful citizens of the world. Our faculty of talented people from diverse backgrounds and perspectives provides rigorous training that integrates analysis with the latest research. Students build the foundations for more advanced study in a variety of fields.

POLITICS, ECONOMICS, AND THE LAW NEW Women and the Law  NPOL3232 A 15 sessions. Mon. & Wed., 4:00–5:50 p.m., beg. June 2. Noncredit tuition $650. Jennifer Francone

Feminist legal history is driven by a commitment to understanding women’s legal agency and the ways women have used the law for individual and societal benefit. In this course, we examine how the legal system has shaped the evolution of women’s rights through case law, statutes, and policies. We look at landmark cases establishing women’s legal rights: accounts of the litigants involved, the historical context that shaped them, the strategies used, and theoretical implications. We also study issues of broad concern to women— reproductive freedom, the workplace, the family, domestic violence, rape— through the lens of history and constitutional law.  (3 credits) Issues in International Policy  NPOL3222 A 9 weeks, June 2 thru Aug. 1. Noncredit tuition $650.

ONLINE

Glynn Torres-Spelliscy

HOW TO REGISTER ONLINE Register online with payment by American Express, MasterCard, Discover, or Visa. Visit www.newschool.edu/register. BY FAX Register by fax with payment by American Express, MasterCard, Discover, or Visa. Fax 212.229.5648. Use the ­appropriate registration form in the back of this catalog. BY PHONE Noncredit students can register by telephone with payment by American Express, MasterCard, Discover, or Visa. Call 212.229.5690, Monday–Thursday, 8:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m., Friday, 9:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m. BY MAIL Use the appropriate registration form in the back of this catalog. Mail registration will be accepted if postmarked no later than two weeks before your class begins. IN PERSON Register in person at 72 Fifth Avenue, 4th floor. See page 49 for the schedule. For details of registration procedures and deadlines, see pages 49–50 or call 212.229.5690.

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This course is an overview of contemporary international issues that shape society on a daily basis. As the world becomes more and more fully integrated, communities become global in scope and we, as both observers and participants, are faced with the challenge of grasping complex issues of international politics and law. Understanding these issues has never been more important, but headlines and news bulletins often do not provide enough background information to enable readers and viewers to comprehend and analyze factors underlying the latest crises or to imagine ways to address them. Students learn to engage in close examination of these issues and to discuss them in a constructive manner. After a unit on conducting foreign policy analysis, we focus on major global issues, divided into three broad categories: conflict, security, and terrorism; globalization and the international economy; and international human rights and justice. The class attempts not only to understand these problems but also to develop solutions, which are then presented in a peer group setting. Through lectures and visual presentations, students learn about important geographical and geostrategic factors contributing to the political crises to be examined.  (3 credits)


SOCIAL SCIENCES

ANTHROPOLOGY

PSYCHOLOGY

Media, Health, and Culture   NANT3520 A 9 weeks, June 2 thru Aug. 1. Noncredit tuition $650.

Theories of Personality  NPSY2401 ONLINE

A 9 weeks, June 2 thru Aug. 1. Noncredit tuition $650.

ONLINE

Sheena Nahm

Instructor to be announced

What happens when media, in all their diverse forms, take on the issues of health and social change? We examine the way health and media are both constructed from and interpreted within cultural settings. Focusing on examples from television, film, and new media, we discuss a range of illness narratives, including ones involving eating disorders, cancer, depression, and AIDS. We explore questions central to medical anthropology and the anthropology of media, such as: How is medical knowledge produced and understood? What is the relationship between the real and the virtual when online communities spill off-line and vice versa? How does social context influence conceptions of risk, crisis, and hope? Do different media cultures produce different articulations of disease? Students learn to consider biological phenomena from a cultural perspective, with special attention given to the way they are reinforced or countered by media. The class also looks at the use of public space to discuss medical views of illness. In the process, we explore social, historical, and cultural views of media as an avenue for social change.  (3 credits)

This class introduces theories of personality through readings of primary texts by major theorists. We begin by examining the groundbreaking research of Sigmund Freud and his theory of personality development and the unconscious. We then read modern Freudians, from John Bowlby and Margaret Mahler to Erik Erikson and Heinz Kohut. We look at Melanie Klein and the British Middle Group, particularly Donald Winnicott. We consider interpersonal and relational theories that stress not only the inner mind but the interactional self. We conclude with current research from feminism, sociology, and genetics. Throughout, we discuss personality as an intersection of factors including subjectivity, biological inheritance, personal history, and culture. We question the idea of a “normal” personality and study the way each theorist defines the abnormal or pathological. We also draw on cultural and clinical texts to illuminate these theories and the relevance of psychoanalysis to art and other cultural practices.  (3 credits) Cross-Cultural Psychology  NPSY3345 A 9 weeks, June 2 thru Aug. 1. Noncredit tuition $650.

ONLINE

Instructor to be announced

Traditional theories of psychology, developed primarily by Western Europeans and North Americans, are based on the unexamined assumption that all human behavior can be explained through a single worldview. However, recent research has demonstrated that despite certain universals among human societies, norms in non-Western societies sometimes differ from those in Western Europe and North America. In this course, students learn to make distinctions between behaviors exhibited by all humans, like the use of language, and culturally determined behaviors. To that end, the class explores the influence of culture on perception, cognition, education, individual and social behavior, expressions of physical and mental illnesses, and selfperception.  (3 credits) Abnormal Psychology  NPSY3501 A 15 sessions. Mon. & Wed., 6:00–7:50 p.m., beg. June 2. Noncredit tuition $650. Instructor to be announced

Using a multitheoretical model of psychopathology, students explore basic contemporary and historical conceptions of abnormal behavior. They are introduced to the current classification system of mental disorders, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-V), and consider its strengths and weaknesses in an increasingly complex field. Psychodynamic, cognitive, humanistic, and sociocultural approaches to major Axis I and Axis II disorders are presented. Students employ critical thinking as they examine current controversies over classification, assessment, and treatment of mental illness.  (3 credits)

You can register for most courses for either noncredit or general credit status. The noncredit tuition is listed as part of the course description. General credit tuition for courses in this catalog is $1,170 per credit. For information about registration options, see pages 38–39.

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HUMANITIES

HUMANITIES Art and Music

ART AND MUSIC Housing the Modern Dweller  NARH3874

Literature

A 9 weeks, June 2 thru Aug. 1. Noncredit tuition $650.

Philosophy

Emily Bills

FOR COURSE ADVISING, CALL 212.229.5961. w w w. n e w s c h o o l . e d u / c e / h u m a n i t i e s

The first few decades of the 20th century saw dramatic changes in the physical and social landscape of New York City, including the digging of subway tunnels, the construction of skyscrapers, and waves of immigration. Many American artists asserted their modernity with paintings, photographs, and experimental films that chronicled these changes in the urban environment. This course examines New York cityscapes and street scenes by the Ashcan School, members of the Stieglitz circle, the Precisionists, Social Realists, and artists associated with the Harlem Renaissance. An institutional context frames this survey of modern American art, including discussion of the watershed Armory Show of 1913 and the founding of MoMA and the Whitney Museum circa 1930.  (3 credits)

Great works of art, literature, and music, along with profound philosophical thought, have the capacity to bridge ages, languages, and cultures. The study of cultural works in the context of their own time and place, as well as ours, is the cornerstone of a liberal arts education. It provides crucial fuel for artists, writers, musicians, and thinkers of all kinds, and it helps develop the kinds of skills—critical reading, attention to detail, and analytic writing—that are useful in all walks of life.

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ONLINE


HUMANITIES

LITERATURE

The Music Video  NMUS3701 A 9 weeks, June 2 thru Aug. 1. Noncredit tuition $650.

ONLINE

Sonya Mason

NEW Literature in Action  NPUB3500

This course traces the history of the music video from the early 1980s to the present, exploring the connections and interrelations between culture, film and television, and music. We explore and analyze techniques such as the use of editing to create a visual landscape and reinforce the rhythm or form of the music. We survey video genres and the use of setting to trigger cultural associations in listeners, such as outdoor settings in hip-hop videos, as in Lauryn Hill’s “Doo-Wop (That Thing),” and fantasy settings in pop videos, as in Duran Duran’s “Wild Boys.” We discuss sexuality, gender, and ethnicity and look at how their portrayal has changed over time, to bring us Lady Gaga’s “Judas” and Ricky Martin’s “Livin’ La Vida Loca.”  (3 credits)

A 15 sessions. Tues. & Thurs., 4:00–5:50 p.m., beg. June 3. Noncredit tuition $650. Leah Nahmias

Conversation-based programming creates opportunities for strangers to become neighbors and for neighbors to shape communities. This course, offered in partnership with the New York Council for the Humanities, invites students to create these kinds of conversations, primarily by using literature. We read and debate a wide range of texts that explore the roles of community members, volunteers, activists, and nonprofit professionals and consider what it means to discuss controversial ideas with a broad, diverse public. Students learn how to design ways for the public to participate by facilitating conversations that build community and help participants think critically about ideas that matter to everyone. We take an in-depth look at methods for developing effective discussion questions, best practices for connecting with participants and managing the flow of conversation, and ways conversationbased programs can build and strengthen civic engagement and public discourse. Students also conduct research on potential audiences for such discussions and design materials for use in public settings across New York City.  (3 credits) Emily Dickinson  NLIT3324 A 5 sessions. Mon., 6:00–7:50 p.m., beg. June 2. Noncredit tuition $220. Andrew Rubenfeld

Radical in her own time, still relevant today, Emily Dickinson’s poetry probes universal themes such as love, death, society, nature, and God. Her style is deeply personal, sometimes enigmatic, always innovative—yet surprisingly accessible. This course, an introduction to her poetry, considers topics including Dickinson’s metrical debt to hymns, her relationship to transcendentalist philosophy, the use of various literary masks, feminist approaches to gender, and the nature of the creative impulse itself. Dickinson explores not just American life but the cosmos itself from the vantage point of mid-19th-century Amherst, Massachusetts. An investigation of Dickinson’s correspondence reveals the indistinct line between lyric and letter, each telling the truth, but, in her own words, telling it “slant.”  (1 credit) Nineteenth-Century Novels and Movies  NLIT3880 A 9 weeks, June 2 thru Aug 1. Noncredit tuition $650.

ONLINE

Abigail Bloom

Great novelists are able to see beyond the limitations of their own society, to glimpse the realities beneath the surface and draw out the psychological depths of their characters. Is this subtlety of penetration lost in the transition from the printed page to the screen? Does the quest for popularity demand alteration of the original? Or does translating a novel into a movie in a different era give it new depth? Through analysis of the choices made in creating adaptations, deeper levels of the novel and the film emerge, revealing the richness and depth of both art forms. We read three classic novels (Jane Austen’s Emma, Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights, and Charles Dickens’ Great Expectations) and consider how they have been changed, envisioned, and enlivened by filmmakers. (Films are not posted online; students must arrange to view the films on their own.)  (3 credits)

ONLINE

This logo indicates that the course is offered online. See page 39 or visit the website at www.newschool.edu/online for more information.

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HUMANITIES

PHILOSOPHY

Into the Woods: Andersen, Carroll, and Wilde   NLIT3542 A 9 weeks, June 2 thru Aug 1. Noncredit tuition $650.

ONLINE

Margaret Boe Birns

On the Nature of Free Will  NPHI3545

This course examines the work of three extraordinary and original authors whose enchanting stories teach people of all ages much about life, the imagination, and the mysteries of the human heart. Employing a double articulation that reaches both child and adult, these authors wrote fantasies that, like dreams, take us beyond the conventional idiom of ordinary reality into worlds of wonder and that allow us to explore deep-rooted wishes, needs, and fears. We examine how each of these highly sensitive authors confounded the categories that license sexual normality, valued the eccentric and the singular over the conventional and the standardized, and promoted the development of social consciousness through either satire or social criticism. Each author employed fantasy in a revolutionary way, as a means of countering an overly puritanical, utilitarian mentality that tended to be deeply suspicious of the imagination; and, because all wonder tales depend on the experience of the miraculous, their stories are a vehicle for spiritual exploration as well. We read a selection of innovative tales by Hans Christian Andersen, Lewis Carroll’s brilliant Alice in Wonderland, and Oscar Wilde’s strange and beautiful fairy tales as well as his ambiguous morality tale The Picture of Dorian Gray.  (3 credits)

A 15 sessions. Tues. & Thurs., 6:00-7:50 p.m., beg. June 3. Noncredit tuition $650.

Modern Classics: Joyce, Woolf, and Faulkner  NLIT3545 A 15 sessions. Tues. and Thurs., 4:00–5:50 p.m., beg. June 3. Noncredit tuition $650. Margaret Boe Birns

This course focuses on challenging works by three of the greatest authors of the 20th century, each a major force in the cultural awakening we call the modernist movement in literature. We begin with James Joyce’s groundbreaking experimental novel Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, in which he transforms his suffocating Dublin boyhood into a symbol for the struggle of young modern artists everywhere. We then turn to Virginia Woolf ’s To The Lighthouse and Mrs. Dalloway, each a metaphysical and psychological journey taken within the context of daily life. Last we read William Faulkner’s The Sound and The Fury, a narrative rooted in the American South but reflecting the universal landscapes of the human soul, and The Reivers, a novel that weaves together rascality and wisdom. We also view major screen adaptations of “The Dead” from Dubliners, The Reivers, and Mrs. Dalloway.  (3 credits) The American Short Story  NLIT3364 A 9 weeks, June 2 thru Aug. 1. Noncredit tuition $650.

ONLINE

Nicholas Birns

It has long been observed that the short story, in its brevity and sense of implied significance, is more like a poem than a novel. Readers who feel overwhelmed by the all-embracing quality of a long novel find the enigmas posed by short stories a more satisfying literary experience. How is a short story not just shorter but fundamentally different from a novel? How, therefore, do we read it differently? Reading 20th-century American short stories gives us access to some of our greatest writers, from Ernest Hemingway, James Baldwin, and Willa Cather to Ursula K. Le Guin and Tillie Olsen. It also provides an opportunity to sample the cultural and geographical diversity of the United States. Tracing the changes in style and subject matter elucidates the evolving priorities and preoccupations of American culture from 1900 to 2000.  (3 credits)

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Luis Guzman

What does it mean to believe we are free? How do we reconcile the concept of an omniscient god with the idea of individual freedom? Are our actions predetermined? These questions have been raised by philosophers for 2,500 years. Without an answer to them, our self-understanding as moral beings, responsible for our actions, is jeopardized. In this course, students consider different answers to these questions offered by thinkers from Plato to Nietzsche and beyond. Focusing on the problem of free will from both religious-ethical and scientific-materialist points of view, students learn the importance of ascribing moral responsibility to human action.  (3 credits)


MEDIA STUDIES AND FILM

MEDIA STUDIES AND FILM Media Studies Film Studies and Production Screenwriting FOR COURSE ADVISING, CALL 212.229.8903. w w w. n e w s c h o o l . e d u / c o n t i n u i n g - e d u c a t i o n / m e d i a - s t u d i e s - f i l m

Graduate Certificate in Documentary Media Studies

This one-year intensive course of study integrates documentary history, theory, and social practice with documentary craft. Each student completes an original short documentary video. Credits are eligible for transfer to the Master of Arts in Media Studies after admission to that program. For more information, visit the website at www.newschool.edu/docstudies, call the Office of Admission at 212.229.5630, or email nsadmissions@newschool.edu.

Anne Balsamo, Dean, School of Media Studies Melissa Friedling, Director of Undergraduate Studies

At The New School, you can both study media as a scholar and learn how to create it. We offer instruction in the most current of digital technologies as well as traditional filmmaking. We update our courses all the time to reflect the ongoing advances in the fields of film and media

Graduate Certificate in Media Management

This 12-credit course of study provides working and aspiring media professionals with a state-of-the-art education in the principles and skills they need to become leaders in the industry. Content includes an industry overview and media economics, information technologies, leadership and competitive strategies, and corporate responsibility. Credits are eligible for transfer to the MA in Media Studies after admission to that program. For more information, visit the website at www.newschool.edu/mmp or contact the Office of Admission at 212.229.5630 or nsadmissions@newschool.edu.

studies and production. Our mission is to help people understand and analyze modern communication and realize their personal vision in narrative, experimental, and inter-media forms. Courses can be taken for undergraduate credit or on a noncredit basis.

MEDIA STUDIES Hip-Hop to Dubstep: International Music Styles and the Remix   NCOM3039 A 9 weeks, June 2 thru Aug. 1. Noncredit tuition $650.

Certificate in Film Production

The New School awards a certificate attesting to successful completion of a sequence of courses in which students master the art and craft of filmmaking. For more information, see Film and Media Production (opposite) or go online to www.newschool.edu/ce/filmproductioncert.

Certificate in Screenwriting

The New School awards a certificate attesting to successful completion of a sequence of courses in which students master the art and craft of writing for the cinema. This curriculum can be completed entirely online, on campus, or through a combination of online and on-campus courses. For more information about the certificate program, see Screenwriting in the following pages or at www.newschool.edu/ce/screenwritingcert.

ONLINE

Eduardo Navas

This course is a theoretical and historical survey of popular music that was influenced by or is part of the remix tradition in hip-hop and electronica. The emphasis in the class is on the shaping of culture by media and vice versa. Remixes are compositions that reconfigure existing music recordings, often to make them more danceable. As simple as the definition sounds, remix involves a complex set of cultural variables that include issues of class, gender, and ethnicity. In the class, listening exercises and analysis of music recordings are complemented by readings that familiarize students with the historical context and theoretical underpinnings of remix practices. Our survey begins with American popular music of the early 1950s, including blues, R&B, rock ’n’ roll, and early funk. These forms influenced Caribbean music of the 1960s and gave rise to new styles: calypso, ska, reggae, and dub. The development of these styles came full circle with the emergence of hip-hop in the United States. We also examine the rise of international styles such as trip-hop, drum ’n’ bass, and dubstep and the parallel history of techno and house music and styles in between. By the end of the class, students will have acquired an understanding of the complexity of contemporary music and the extent to which it has been defined by the principles of sampling and remix.  (3 credits)

Master of Arts in Media Studies

Since 1975, The New School has offered the Master of Arts in Media Studies in an innovative program that combines theoretical and practical understanding of media and their role in our rapidly changing world. For more information, go to www.newschool.edu/mediastudies. To speak to a counselor, call the Office of Admission at 212.229.5630 or email nsadmissions@newschool.edu.

Master of Science in Media Management

Expanding on its successful Media Management certificate, The New School now offers the MS in Media Management. This curriculum combines a solid foundation in managerial skills with critical analysis of media industries and their products and is designed to develop innovative thinking and entrepreneurship. For more information, visit the website at www.newschool.edu/mediastudies. To speak to a counselor, call the Office of Admission at 212.229.5630 or email nsadmissions@newschool.edu. 11


MEDIA STUDIES AND FILM

Writing Across Media  NCOM3241 A 9 weeks, June 2 thru Aug. 1. Noncredit tuition $730.

ONLINE

Carol Dix

Professional writers produce copy for a variety of media: They write topof-the-line stories for local, national, and global newspapers; features for national, regional, and special-interest magazines; copy for corporate publications, such as newsletters, house magazines, company brochures, and annual reports; PR, such as press releases and press briefings; copy for direct-mail campaigns and advertising; promotional materials for sales and, in the nonprofit sector, fundraising campaigns; and copy for nonprint media such as radio, TV, and multimedia, including the Internet. This writer’s workshop is open to beginners as well as those with various kinds of writing experience. Students experiment with writing in different styles and share their writing for class discussion. They come away from the workshop with a range of practical writing skills that can be readily applied in different kinds of media.  (3 credits)

FILM STUDIES AND PRODUCTION All film courses can be taken individually for undergraduate credit or on a noncredit basis. Students have the option of earning a certificate in film production (see below) or taking production courses as part of an undergraduate degree program of study. For information about degree programs, call the Office of Admission at 212.229.5630 or email nsadmissions@newschool.edu.

Certificate in Film Production

The New School awards a Certificate in Film Production for the successful completion of a sequence of eight courses that guide the student through the contemporary art and craft of filmmaking using traditional 16mm film and digital technologies. Taught by our faculty of experienced teachers and working professionals, the courses explore all creative aspects of filmmaking and professional development in the film industry. The certificate program is designed for the committed student at any level of experience and can be completed in four academic terms. Students have the opportunity to submit their finished films for the annual New School Invitational Film Show. The sequence consists of four production courses using 16mm film and/or digital media leading to the completion of a final film project. Production courses are complemented by classes in which students can explore technical and aesthetic aspects of film and digital production and a range of cinematic practices, including directing, cinematography, screenwriting, acting, and producing. The following courses must be taken either sequentially or concurrently, as indicated: • The Art of Film • Filmmaking Studio 1 (concurrently with The Art of Film) • Cinematography and Lighting: Film and Digital

There is no formal admission process for the certificate program, but students must enroll for certificate status when registering and pay the certificate registration fee—certificate approval cannot be awarded for any course retroactively. Students must obtain written permission from the film production coordinator or the instructor before registering for advancedlevel courses. General policies governing New School certificate programs are described in the Educational Programs and Services section of this catalog (see Table of Contents). To make an appointment for advising, call 212.229.8903. (International students must also call 212.229.5630.) The Art of Film  NFLM3411 A 15 sessions. Tues. & Thurs., 8:00–9:50 p.m., beg. June 3. Noncredit tuition $650. Rebecca Qidwai

This course enables students to lay the foundations for understanding the practical techniques, specialized language, and unique aesthetics of motion pictures. Students consider the expressive range of cinematic language and the ways complex emotions and ideas are communicated to the viewer. They analyze the basic elements of cinematic form as seen through essential properties of the medium, including editing, cinematography, production design, and sound design, and gain an appreciation of film history and of the impact of culture and technology on the development of the cinema. The filmmaking process and the impact of the film industry are also studied. The class examines films by a range of directors including Jean-Luc Godard, Agnes Varda, Jane Campion, Werner Herzog, Alfred Hitchock, Orson Welles, Wong Kar-Wai, Yasujirō Ozu, Ingmar Bergman, Pedro Almodóvar, and Michelangelo Antonioni and supplement the discussion with readings. Students acquire a general familiarity with the range of cinematic expression and are prepared to make surer and sounder judgments about their own film experiences and to speak and write about those judgments with greater clarity and skill.  (3 credits) Filmmaking Studio 1   NFLM3660 A 15 sessions. Mon. & Wed., 7:00–9:45 p.m., beg. June 2. Noncredit tuition $1,440. Joel Schlemowitz

This course offers the serious beginner an opportunity to learn the fundamentals of 16mm filmmaking. Students engage in a series of exercises in basic cinematography, lighting, scriptwriting, directing, and editing. Discussions emphasize the theoretical and practical framework of film language, and student work is critiqued by both the instructor and classmates. Students are expected to crew on one another’s projects to develop production skills and gain on-set experience. A substantial commitment of time outside of class is required. Cameras and digital editing equipment (Avid Media Composer) are provided, but students will incur modest additional costs for film stock, developing, and supplies. By the end of the course, students will have experienced all aspects of MOS (nonsync) filmmaking, from preproduction to production and postproduction, and will be ready for more ambitious personal film projects at the next level of production courses. Familiarity with the Macintosh platform is assumed.  (3 credits)

• Film 2: Advanced Preproduction and Development (concurrently with Cinematography) • Film 3: Advanced Film Production • Film 4: The Art of Film Editing Two elective courses from the following list complete the certificate curriculum: Script Analysis, Developing Ideas for Film, The Aesthetics of Directing, Audio Production, and Independent Filmmaking A–Z. U N D E R G R A D U AT E D E G R E E P R O G R A M F O R A D U LT S The New School for Public Engagement provides an opportunity to complete your undergraduate degree at your own pace in a largely selfdesigned liberal arts program. For more ­information, call 212.229.5630 or visit www.newschool.edu/nspe/undergrad.

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MEDIA STUDIES AND FILM

Digital Video Production  NFLM3700

NEW Remake: Production Workshop Intensive  NFLM3077

A 15 sessions. Mon. & Wed., 7:00–9:40 p.m., beg. June 2. Noncredit tuition $1,440.

A 3 days. Fri. thru Sun., 12:00–5:30 p.m., June 13–15. Noncredit tuition $480.

Michele D. Beck

Timothy L. Sutton

With digital cameras and computer editing equipment widely accessible, the possibility of creating engaging, professional-quality moving images is within virtually everyone’s reach. Digital video is an exciting and powerful medium of expression, but knowing how to use the tools isn’t enough to enable you to create a coherent and articulate video project. This course can help artists in any genre create works that are both technically and conceptually sound. Students work toward this goal by learning digital editing and using it to experience the power of editing as creative expression. They are also introduced to production techniques, including use of the digital camera, storyboarding, and basic lighting and sound. Several short video projects are completed during the term. There are no prerequisites, but familiarity with the Macintosh is assumed. Students have access to New School digital video cameras and editing software but must have a firewire drive.  (3 credits)

Influenced by filmmakers like Michel Gondry and Wes Anderson, as well as the countless digital mash-ups and tributes on sites like Youtube, the remake is truly a 21st-century production process. In this three-day intensive course, students follow the tradition of copying the work of “masters” as a way to gain an appreciation of and master art and craft. Students develop a better understanding of filmmaking by deconstructing, reconstructing, and reproducing scenes from feature films, but with a DIY difference. The class views four films of historic note, then “crews up” to re-create specific scenes from a selected film down to the frame, using inexpensive resources immediately at hand. Crews are challenged to use makeshift alternatives and make cost-saving choices in every detail as they create a textured, atmospheric scene. The class is a hands-on creative experience that ignites the collaborative spirit good filmmaking requires and immerses students in cinematic history and theory as well as the art and craft of production, cinematography, production design, costume design, acting, directing, and editing. Students’ finished short pieces will be ready for festival screening. Prerequisite: Digital Video Production or the equivalent.  (1 credit)

Digital Editing: Basics Intensive  NFLM3079 A 4 days. Mon. thru Thurs., 10:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m., July 14–17. Noncredit tuition $720. John Didato

This four-day intensive course is an introduction to the craft of professional editing for news and documentary, commercial spots, and scripted narrative films using Avid Media Composer, the non-linear film/video editing application used in most movie and television productions. The class covers essential tools necessary to begin a basic project, assemble a story, and output a project to multiple platforms. Through lectures, demonstrations, and handson exercises using existing professional projects, students gain foundational skills that include organizing and setting up a project, managing media, executing three-point editing, constructing and reworking a scene, syncing editing and trimming dialogue, mixing music and sound effects, and creating titles and transitions. Familiarity with Macintosh computer functions is required. Bring a firewire drive to the first session.  (2 credits) Master of Suspense: The Films of Alfred Hitchcock  NFLM3006 A 9 sessions, June 2 thru July 7. Noncredit tuition $220.

ONLINE

Rebecca Qidwai

Alfred Hitchcock was both a masterful technician and a uniquely gifted storyteller. His films are remembered equally for their riveting narratives and for their cinematic innovations. Most of his films are psychological thrillers, but all are marked by his wry humor and distinctive reflections on contemporary sociopolitical conditions. Hitchcock’s bold style revolutionized film technique, particularly shot composition and editing. His films of the 1950s and 1960s, touching upon suspicion, espionage, and voyeurism, could serve as a visual documentary history of the Cold War. The class studies four of Hitchcock’s greatest films: Vertigo (1958), Psycho (1960), Rear Window (1954), and North by Northwest (1959). Students watch one film weekly outside of class and read related texts assigned by the instructor, approaching the films from the standpoints of history and feminist, formalist, and structuralist film theory. We discuss and deconstruct narrative elements and the social context of the films and examine filmic elements—lighting, framing, shot composition, editing, and sound design.  (1 credit)

NEW Writing Film and Television Criticism   NFLM3078 A 15 sessions. Mon. & Wed., 6:00–7:50 p.m., beg. June 2. Noncredit tuition $650. Caryn James

The landscape of film and television criticism has changed dramatically in the last decade, expanding from print to an ever-growing Internet. The line between film and television has also blurred, with television gaining new respect and film becoming accessible in more ways than ever. This course considers criticism in the context of that new landscape. Students read, analyze, and evaluate recent criticism in both genres—from substantive essays to general-interest reviews and blogs—and apply those analytical tools to their own writing, learning to create strong critical arguments and developing a lucid, lively, individual style. Questions to be considered include: How does critical writing vary, both in style and in content, according to the needs of the audience? What are the different demands of a first-day review and of a more reflective critical essay that puts a work in cultural or historical context? Of what value are episodic reviews of television series? Is there such a thing as “auteur TV,” television that reflects a unified creative vision? How should one evaluate classic films and television shows, some of which have decades of criticism behind them? Students watch assigned films and television shows outside of class and discuss and evaluate assigned readings in class. The goal for students is to develop sharp analytical skills and to write criticism expressing original opinions, presenting well-reasoned arguments, and reflecting a personal voice. The instructor is a prominent film and TV critic, formerly chief television critic for the New York Times.  (3 credits)

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MEDIA STUDIES AND FILM

SCREENWRITING Students can take screenwriting courses for undergraduate credit or on a noncredit basis. For those interested in a structured program of study, The New School offers a certificate (see below). The screenwriting curriculum has been cooperatively designed by our distinguished faculty to create a cohesive program for the serious student. Upon completing the core sequence of screenwriting courses, students have a comprehensive grounding in story, character, theme, action, visuals, and dialogue, as they have been carefully guided through the entire screenplay writing process. Early registration is strongly advised. In order to ensure the quality of each course, enrollment is strictly limited. If a desired course is filled, call 212.229.8903 to find out about additional classes that might still be open or to be placed on the waiting list.

Certificate approval is based on attendance and participation, comprehension of theories and techniques, and final projects. General policies governing New School certificate programs are described in the Educational Programs and Services section of this catalog (see Table of Contents). For more information and program advising, call 212.229.8903. (International students must call 212.229.5630 for important admission information.)

Online Certificate in Screenwriting

All four required courses and selected electives are offered online, so that students can now complete the Certificate in Screenwriting entirely online or combine on-campus and online study. Visit www.online.newschool.edu for more information about our distance learning environment. Script Analysis  NSRW2800

Certificate in Screenwriting

The New School awards a Certificate in Screenwriting for successful completion of six approved courses. The certificate program is open to the committed student at any level of experience. There is no formal admission process, but students need the written permission of the instructor or the Department of Media Studies and Film to register for Screenwriting 2 and 3. Upon completion of the sequence of courses, students should have a professional screenplay ready for the marketplace. Four required courses must be taken sequentially: • Script Analysis • Screenwriting 1: Fundamentals • Screenwriting 2: Writing the Screenplay • Screenwriting 3: Finishing the First Draft Students select two courses from the Film Studies curriculum to complete the certificate program. The certificate program can be finished in as little as one year, but a longer course of study is acceptable.

A 15 sessions. Tues. & Thurs., 8:00–9:50 p.m., beg. June 3. Noncredit tuition $760. William Pace

B 9 weeks, June 23 thru Aug. 12. Noncredit tuition $760.

ONLINE

Greg Takoudes

Whether you are a writer, a director, or a producer, an understanding of story structure and dramatic principles is essential. In-depth analysis of screenplays’ storylines, characters, dialogue, images, and themes reveals a wide range of narrative techniques and storytelling styles, from Hollywood to independent and everything in between. Students view successful films and analyze their scripts, learning how essential information is conveyed, how story elements are communicated through visual means, how dramatic momentum is built with cause and effect, and what makes a character credible and complex. By the end of the term, students will have learned to analyze any film script and to apply that knowledge to their own screenwriting.  (3 credits) Screenwriting 1: Fundamentals   NSRW3810 A 15 sessions. Mon. & Wed., 8:00–9:50 p.m., beg. June 2. Noncredit tuition $760. Loren-Paul Caplin

HOW TO REGISTER ONLINE Register online with payment by American Express, MasterCard, Discover, or Visa. Visit www.newschool.edu/register. BY FAX Register by fax with payment by American Express, MasterCard, Discover, or Visa. Fax 212.229.5648. Use the ­appropriate registration form in the back of this catalog. BY PHONE Noncredit students can register by telephone with payment by American Express, MasterCard, Discover, or Visa. Call 212.229.5690, Monday–Thursday, 8:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m., Friday, 9:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m. BY MAIL Use the appropriate registration form in the back of this catalog. Mail registration will be accepted if postmarked no later than two weeks before your class begins. IN PERSON Register in person at 72 Fifth Avenue, 4th floor. See page 49 for the schedule. For details of registration procedures and deadlines, see pages 49–50 or call 212.229.5690.

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This course, designed for the beginning screenwriter, introduces the tools, vocabulary, and techniques used to tell a screen story and put an original idea into outline form. Assignments illustrate basic three-act structure, economical use of dialogue, visual storytelling elements, development of complex characters, revelation of background information, and effective use of dramatic tension. Students become familiar with screenwriting terminology as the class analyzes scenes from well-known films on video to find structural elements in the writing. By the end of the course, each student will have developed an original idea into a detailed step outline for a feature-length screenplay and written the opening scene. Prerequisite: Script Analysis.  (3 credits) TV Sitcom Writing 1  NSRW3842 A 9 weeks, June 2 thru Aug. 1. Noncredit tuition $760.

ONLINE

Greg DePaul

One of the most popular genres on TV today, with some of the most innovative writing in any genre, the TV sitcom is no joke. This course investigates the peculiar art of the sitcom and offers students the challenge of writing a script for a half-hour TV comedy. Students work step by step, developing a premise, creating an outline, writing pages, revising the draft, and critiquing the script in the classroom workshop. After analyzing a number of current and past televised sitcoms, students complete a script for an existing half-hour comedy (from a selection approved by the instructor). They also learn about the business of the sitcom and are prepared for professional work.  (3 credits)


WRITING PROGRAM

THE WRITING PROGRAM Summer Writers Colony Writing on Location

Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing

The New School offers the Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing with concentrations in fiction, nonfiction, poetry, arts writing, and writing for children. For more information, visit www.newschool.edu/writing or call the Office of Admission at 212.229.5630.

Fundamentals Poetry Fiction Nonfiction and Journalism Special Topics FOR COURSE ADVISING, CALL 212.229.5611. w w w. n e w s c h o o l . e d u / c e / w r i t i n g p r o g r a m

The Leonard and Louise Riggio Honors Program: Writing and Democracy The Riggio program is a sequence of writing workshops and close-reading seminars for students matriculated in undergraduate degree programs. Tuition assistance is provided for students admitted to the program. For more information, visit www.newschool.edu/riggio.

Luis Jaramillo, Interim Director Laura Cronk, Associate Director for Undergraduate Curriculum

In 1931, The New School pioneered a new curriculum, the writer’s workshop. Since then, The New School has been a leading forum for writers and for the teaching of creative writing. We offer courses on campus and online in academic writing, poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, writing for children, and specialty subjects like dramatic writing and magazine writing. Every year, hundreds of adult students at all levels of experience enroll in our courses. Many of them go on to publish or enter a graduate writing program, including our own prestigious MFA program at The New School. The roster of distinguished writers who studied at The New School is a veritable who’s who of American literature.

SUMMER WRITERS COLONY 3 weeks, June 2–19, 2014

Discover the writer’s life in New York City. This intensive three-week program provides a challenging yet supportive atmosphere in which to embark on a new writing project or develop a work-in-progress. Workshop instructors guide discussion of student work and provide detailed written feedback. Literary salons bring notable writers into conversation with the students and faculty of the colony. In supplemental sessions, students try their hand at everything from experimental fiction to children’s writing to walking poems created during a literary tour of Greenwich Village. The Summer Writers Colony community also gathers for celebratory readings of student and faculty work. Courses meet from noon to 8:00 p.m., Monday through Thursday. Mornings and weekends are reserved for regular writing practice. Creditseeking students can earn 6 credits. The Writers Colony is also open to noncredit students. Credit tuition: $7,020 for 6 credits ($1,170 per credit). Noncredit tuition: $4,340 (no academic records are kept for noncredit students). To register or for more information: Visit the website at www.newschool. edu/summerwriters, call the School of Writing at 212.229.5611, or email summerwriters@newschool.edu. Early registration is advised, as workshops and salons fill quickly. University housing is available.

It includes figures of the stature of James Baldwin, Jack Kerouac, and Mario Puzo. Many of our recent students are no less impressive. You can read about their accomplishments on the School of Writing blog. In workshops, our practitioner-teachers—all published authors—focus on students’ manuscripts. Fellow students and the instructor work to improve the material and to speed the creative evolution of each student writer. Also available are classes on the fundamentals of grammar, structure, and style, ideal for students who haven’t taken a college course in composition or who need a refresher. Enrollment is limited, so early registration for the course of your choice is recommended.

Summer Writers Colony Workshop  NWRW3590 A Poetry: Kathleen Ossip B Nonfiction: Madge McKeithen C Fiction: Sharon Mesmer

Each workshop is limited to 12 students. The writing workshop is the core of this intensive curriculum. An experienced writer-teacher focuses on students’ manuscripts, guiding students in the creative acts of revision and self-editing through class exercises and private conferences. To register for the Summer Writers Colony, select the workshop you would like to attend. Note: After you have registered, choose one literary salon for each week and email your list to summerwriters@newschool.edu. Information about craft sessions, readings, and other supplemental activities is sent to registered students.  (6 credits)

The Summer Literary Salon In each of these unique seminars, a member of the New School Writing faculty introduces a notable book or books over two evenings of informed, lively discussion. On the third evening, the author joins the class for a salonstyle reading and conversation. 15


WRITING PROGRAM

Note: A number of places in the literary salons are available on a noncredit basis to individuals not enrolled in the Summer Writers Colony. Enrollment is limited, so early registration is recommended. The tuition is $230 for each salon for students not enrolled in the Summer Writers Colony. Literary Salon: Zadie Smith  NWRW0551 A 3 sessions. Mon. thru Wed., 6:00–7:50 p.m., beg. June 2. Andrew Zornoza

“Nowadays I know the true reason I read is to feel less alone, to make a connection with a consciousness other than my own.” So says the writer Zadie Smith. The desire for connection and the loneliness of consciousness are vividly brought to life in NW, Smith’s fourth and latest novel. Shortlisted for the National Book Critics award, NW dives into the chasm between two territories—what we aspire to and who we are—while painting a highly realistic portrait of life in a global city for first- and second-generation immigrants. NW is not for the timid; experimentalism and the harsh realities of urban living flow together here in quick currents and eddies, much as they did for Joyce in the Dublin of Ulysses. In this salon, we explore the language and architecture of one of the finest writers in the English language, to better understand the craft of narrative, to examine how detail and feeling can bring to life a universe. Note: Read NW before the first day of the salon.  (noncredit) Literary Salon: Alysia Abbott  NWRW0552 A 3 sessions. Mon., Tues. & Thurs., 6:00–7:50 p.m., beg. June 2. Madge McKeithen

In Fairyland: A Memoir of My Father (Norton, 2013), Alysia Abbott tells the story of her life with her father, Steve Abbott, bisexual writer and activist, in the charged cultural scene of San Francisco in the 1970s and 1980s, the early post–Stonewall Inn days of gay liberation. Born to openly gay parents and motherless following Barbara Abbott’s death when Alysia was two, the author weaves an irresistibly compelling tale from her experiences and memories and her father’s letters, journals, poems, and drawings. Written two decades after her father’s death from AIDS, Fairyland depicts a childhood of wonder, an adolescence of yearning and at times profound isolation, a young woman’s moves to New York and Paris, and her return to Haight-Ashbury for her father’s last months. Alysia Abbott’s memoir is many stories: of a father and daughter, a motherless daughter, American culture at the end of a period of bohemianism and the beginning of the AIDS epidemic, an introspective and contextually aware coming of age, a writer born of a writer, and abiding, imperfect, lifelong love between two people. Fairyland offers especially rich material for a community of writers to read, study, and discuss with the author, as we will in the salon. Note: Read Fairyland before the first day of the salon.  (noncredit) Literary Salon: Roger Bonair-Agard  NWRW0553 A 3 sessions. Mon. thru Wed., 6:00–7:50 p.m., beg. June 9. Laura Cronk

In his powerful new collection, Bury My Clothes, Roger Bonair-Agard makes an almost reckless leap down the rabbit hole of violence, sex, and lineage. In his poems and essays, Bonair-Agard asserts that art is about survival. It is about establishing personhood in a world that says you have none. With a music that grooves and digs, Bonair-Agard turns over and over what is most difficult and dangerous in the places he sings of and in one man’s history and identity. “I don’t know / what to think people expect anymore / when the word black blooms all inside / their bodies like smoke and blood, who / they expect to walk out of this fog.” Roger Bonair-Agard is a native of Trinidad and Tobago, a Cave Canem fellow, a two-time National Poetry Slam Champion, founder of New York City’s louderARTS Project, author of the poetry collections Tarnish and Masquerade and Gully, and co-author of Burning Down the House. Bury My Clothes was longlisted for the 2013 National Book Award for Poetry. Note: Read Bury My Clothes before the start of the salon.  (noncredit)

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Literary Salon: Lynne Tillman  NWRW0554 A 3 sessions. Mon. & Tues., 6:00–7:50 p.m., & Thurs., 12:30–2:00 p.m., beg. June 9. Sharon Mesmer

Lynne Tillman’s prose comes to us from a luminous intersection: an uncertain present filled with possibility that meets a past vexed by it. Each ineffable stage produces surprisingly tangible states of desire, dread, and doubt, which Tillman masterfully captures in her novels No Lease on Life, Cast in Doubt, Motion Sickness, and American Genius: A Comedy and short story collections Absence Makes the Heart, The Madame Realism Complex, Someday This Will Be Funny, and This Is Not It, which she wrote in response to the work of 22 contemporary artists. Tillman’s character Madame Realism observes, “[S] tories do not occur outside thought. Stories, in fact, are contained within thought.” In Tillman’s work, thought is writing and writing is thought; her mind acts as a discerning curator. To read her work is to stand firmly, attentively, in the stream of liminal experience. In this class, structured like a salon, we read Tillman’s newest collection of essays, What Would Lynne Tillman Do? Tillman joins us in class to discuss the intersections of her essays and fiction and her relationship to traditional and “experimental” writing. We also talk to her about the 1990s New York literary scene, how it has changed, and how it has remained the same, as well as the role of the writer at a time of rapid change in the publishing industry and shifting distribution channels for literary work. Note: Read What Would Lynne Tillman Do? before the start of the salon.  (noncredit) Literary Salon: Jennifer Egan  NWRW0555 A 3 sessions. Mon. & Tues., 6:00–7:50 p.m., & Wed., 12:30–2:00 p.m., beg. June 16. Karen McKinnon

In A Visit from the Goon Squad, Jennifer Egan’s novel of interconnected lives on the margins of the music industry, life’s wear and tear is rendered with bravado and tenderness. Winner of the 2010 National Book Critics Circle Award for Fiction and the 2011 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, the novel deploys first, second, and third person to span time and cross the globe in ways that are inventive and moving. This salon explores the author’s astute storytelling and exhilarating play with time, character, and structure. Jennifer Egan has published stories in the New Yorker, Harper’s, Granta, and McSweeney’s. She is also a journalist who has written award-winning cover stories for the New York Times Magazine. Note: Read A Visit from the Goon Squad before the first day of the salon.  (noncredit) Literary Salon: CAConrad  NWRW0556 A 3 sessions. Mon. & Tues., 6:00–7:50 p.m., & Thurs., 12:30–2:00 p.m., beg. June 16. Kathleen Ossip

Since CAConrad introduced his (Soma)tic exercises in 2005, they have been used to summon the whole spectrum of human experience in the name of poetry. A Beautiful Marsupial Afternoon collects 27 exercises and the poems that resulted, incorporating unorthodox steps in the writing process, moving from the tangible everyday to the cosmos of the imagination, from the body to the consciousness, heart, and spirit. Together the poems in this collection represent an urgent call for a connective, concentrated, and unfettered creativity, with the goal of a Whitmanesque radical inclusion of everyone and everything, expanding and enlarging the utterly free space of poetry. CAConrad is the author of six books of poetry, a 2014 Lannan Fellow, and a 2011 Pew Fellow. He conducts workshops on (Soma)tic poetry and Ecopoetics. Note: Read A Beautiful Marsupial Afternoon before the first day of the salon.  (noncredit)


WRITING PROGRAM

Writing on Location Intensive: Writing from Art at The Met  NWRW3445

FUNDAMENTALS

A 2 weeks. Mon. thru Thurs., 10:00 a.m.–3:30 p.m., June 23–July 3.

These courses are for students who are native or near-native speakers of English. For courses in English as a second language, see pages 26–28.

Noncredit tuition $730. Star Black

New York City has a long tradition of artistic exchange and collaboration between writers and painters and of exchange between writing and the visual arts]. Kenneth Koch and Larry Rivers, John Ashbery and Jane Freilicher, and James Schuyler and Fairfield Porter were close friends and collaborators. Derek Walcott and e. e. cummings both painted and wrote, and photographers like Rudy Burckhardt documented writer friends creating art in their studios. The class splits its time between The New School, where we share our writing, and the city’s preeminent art museum, The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Students meet at The New School from 10:00 to noon, break for lunch, and reconvene on the steps of The Metropolitan Museum of Art at 1:00 p.m. They spend the next two and a half hours exploring its collections and writing flash fiction and “ekphrastic” poetry, poems responding to art. We spend the first week writing in The Met’s European Painting Galleries, Sculpture Courts, Medieval Art and Armor Collection, and Costume Institute. The second week is devoted to writing in the 20th Century Wing, Contemporary Art and Photography Galleries, Asian and Islamic wings, Rooftop Outdoor Projects, and Egyptian Collections. On the final Thursday of the course, the class visits and writes at the nearby Neue Galerie, located at Fifth Avenue and 86th Street, then enjoys a picnic and an outdoor reading in Central Park.  (3 credits)

The Mechanics of Writing  NWRW1011 A 15 sessions. Mon. & Wed., 6:00–7:50 p.m., beg. June 2. Noncredit tuition $730. Noelle Kocot-Tomblin

B 9 weeks, June 2 thru Aug. 1. Noncredit tuition $730.

ONLINE

Randi Ross

The study of effective English prose makes the sentence its principal focus. In this course, designed to meet the needs of beginning writers, we examine the sentence, looking at syntax, the parts of speech, and other aspects of grammar. Later we look ahead to considerations of effectiveness and style. Chapters from a grammar and style textbook are assigned. Students workshop short writing assignments weekly. They look at what is correct versus what is incorrect and when rules should be broken, how language changes, how context determines choices, and how these choices develop into a style. Note: Students for whom English is a foreign language should take the relevant English as a second language course instead of this course.  (3 credits) Academic Writing   NWRW1104 A 15 sessions. Tues. & Thurs., 6:00–7:50 p.m., beg. June 3. Noncredit tuition $730. Margaret Stanek Fiore

B 9 weeks, June 2 thru Aug. 1. Noncredit tuition $730.

ONLINE

Rebecca Reilly

Writing well is key to success in college. This course teaches students the foundations of academic writing: the nature of research; the skills of criticism, analysis, and argumentation; the process of revision; and the basics of correct grammar and American English usage. Note: Students for whom English is a foreign language should take ESL Academic Writing instead of this course.  (3 credits)

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WRITING PROGRAM

POETRY

FICTION

From Silence to Poem   NWRW3204

Introduction to Fiction   NWRW2301

A 15 sessions. Mon. & Wed., 6:00–7:50 p.m., beg. June 2. Noncredit

A 9 weeks, June 2 thru Aug. 1. Noncredit tuition $730.

tuition $730.

B 15 sessions. Tues. & Thurs., 6:00–7:50 p.m., beg. June 3. Noncredit

Richard Tayson

tuition $730.

Beginning and advanced writers work on dismantling silences in their lives and generating poems from personal experience. We work in a safe, functional community to open hidden places within ourselves. The heretical Gospel According to Thomas says, “If you do not bring forth that which is within you, that which is within you will destroy you. If you bring forth that which is within you, that which is within you will save you.” This notion informs our work together, enabling the writer to follow the poem’s impulse in order to break old habits and write something challenging and difficult.  (3 credits)

Jessie Sholl

Poetry: The Language of Music  NWRW3205 A 9 weeks, June 2 thru Aug. 1. Noncredit tuition $730.

ONLINE

This course is intended to encourage and guide students who are starting to explore the many creative possibilities fiction affords. Through reading assignments, writing exercises, and discussions, students consider character development, dialogue, point of view, and significant detail. Attention is also paid to recognizing good ideas, developing stories, deciding on the best structure, and finding one’s own unique voice. Most class time is spent reviewing projects by students, which are workshopped on a weekly basis. Readings include works by Rick Moody, Jhumpa Lahiri, Tim O’Brien, Lorrie Moore, and Michael Cunningham.  (3 credits)

ONLINE

John Johnson

This study of musical poetics focuses on the buried linguistic and musical structures of poetry and the way these structures create voice and meaning in a poem. We discuss how music serves as a muse for the poet and creates a relationship between form and content. Some class time is devoted to close reading of established and younger poets representing different poetic styles and to close listening to the voices of poets reading from their own work. Most class time, however, is devoted to examination of student writing, with the goal of helping students find their own music and voice within the poem. This course is open to poets at all levels, but beginners are especially welcome.  (3 credits)

Advanced Fiction Writing: Revise and Polish  NWRW4310 A 15 sessions. Tues. & Thurs., 8:00–9:50 p.m., beg. June 3. Noncredit tuition $730. John Reed

This workshop is an opportunity for writers to speed their creative and technical maturation. It is for students who have mastered the basics and are ready to take their writing to a higher level. Workshop time is dedicated primarily to student work; assignments look toward and initiate tasks commonly encountered by aspiring writers. The course is intended to help writers prepare themselves and their work for the next phase of their vocation, be it approaching editors, agents, and literary journals or applying to graduate schools. These subjects are addressed realistically and reasonably, with the quality of the writing always foremost on the agenda.  (3 credits)

HOW TO REGISTER ONLINE Register online with payment by American Express, MasterCard, Discover, or Visa. Visit www.newschool.edu/register. BY FAX Register by fax with payment by American Express, MasterCard, Discover, or Visa. Fax 212.229.5648. Use the ­appropriate registration form in the back of this catalog. BY PHONE Noncredit students can register by telephone with payment by American Express, MasterCard, Discover, or Visa. Call 212.229.5690, Monday–Thursday, 8:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m., Friday, 9:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m. BY MAIL Use the appropriate registration form in the back of this catalog. Mail registration will be accepted if postmarked no later than two weeks before your class begins. IN PERSON Register in person at 72 Fifth Avenue, 4th floor. See page 49 for the schedule. For details of registration procedures and deadlines, see pages 49–50 or call 212.229.5690.

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U N D E R G R A D U AT E D E G R E E P R O G R A M F O R A D U LT S The New School for Public Engagement provides an opportunity to complete your undergraduate degree at your own pace in a largely selfdesigned liberal arts program. For more i­nformation, call 212.229.5630 or visit www.newschool.edu/nspe/undergrad.


WRITING PROGRAM

NONFICTION AND JOURNALISM

SPECIAL TOPICS

Introduction to Creative Nonfiction   NWRW2401

Fiction Writing: Creating a Compelling Narrative   NWRW3315 ONLINE

A 9 weeks, June 2 thru Aug. 1. Noncredit tuition $730.

A 9 weeks, June 2 thru Aug. 1. Noncredit tuition $730.

ONLINE

Lisa Freedman

Carol Goodman

This workshop is for serious beginners as well as more experienced writers who want to delve into the still-evolving genre of creative nonfiction, which includes personal essay, memoir, documentary, and literary journalism. Through in-class writing and weekly assignments, students develop the skills to build a narrative frame around real-life events and situations. Student work is read and discussed in class. Readings from both The Art of the Personal Essay: An Anthology from the Classical Era to the Present, edited by Phillip Lopate, and Vivian Gornick’s The Situation and the Story guide our considerations of the choices made by James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Natalie Ginzburg, Walter Benjamin, and other masters.  (3 credits)

What keeps the reader engaged in a story? How does voice pull us into the fictional world? How can atmosphere enhance the narrative? What marks the difference between a story that is merely serviceable and one we can’t put down? This is a class for fiction writers who want to learn how to create a compelling narrative. We look at the basic elements of storytelling— characterization, point of view, description, and dialogue—and examine the way these elements work together to create mystery and tension. Student work is critiqued in a supportive and constructive workshop environment. Outside readings illustrate issues of craft that arise as students get to know one another’s work. Guest speakers from the publishing industry discuss what they look for in assessing works of fiction.  (3 credits)

Literary Nonfiction: Art in the Everyday  NWRW3405

ONLINE

A 9 weeks, June 2 thru Aug. 1. Noncredit tuition $730.

Writing for New York City Newspapers and Magazines  NWRW3601

Chris Pastore

A 8 sessions. Mon., 6:00–10:00 p.m., beg. June 2. Noncredit tuition $730.

Students explore selected forms of creative nonfiction: the personal essay, reportage, biography, travel writing, food writing, profile, memoir, and linked fragments. The use of dialogue, setting, characterization, plot, and narrative voice is emphasized. The discipline of writing regularly is encouraged and supported through the assignment of short weekly exercises. Students are also assigned longer pieces, which are workshopped in class. Discussions about the forms, techniques, and history of nonfiction are supplemented by readings from work by Joan Didion, V.S. Naipaul, Jamaica Kincaid, W.G. Sebald, Sherman Alexie, Abigail Thomas, and other writers.  (3 credits)

Susan B. Shapiro

The New York Times, the Daily News, Newsday, the New York Post, and the Wall Street Journal all use freelance writers for profiles, features, reviews, news stories, humor, and editorials. So do New York Magazine, the Village Voice, Time Out New York, and the New Yorker. Taught by a writer whose work has appeared in more than 100 publications, this course reveals the secrets of breaking in. Topics include tailoring pieces to specific columns, writing a perfect cover and pitch letter, contacting the right editors, and submitting the work, following up, and getting clips. Assignments are read and critiqued in class. Speakers include top Manhattan editors.  (3 credits)

Writing Memoirs   NWRW3410 A 15 sessions. Mon. & Wed., 6:00–7:50 p.m., beg. June 2. Noncredit tuition $730. Candy Schulman

“The memoir is the novel of the 21st century,” writes Susan Cheever. This is a workshop for writers who have started a memoir and those looking to develop an idea into a memoir. Students can work on short, self-contained personal histories or on book-length projects. They learn how to develop a compelling voice, create dramatic tension, and set scenes with sensory detail. The class also discusses what makes a memoir publishable and fruitful ways of working with agents and editors.  (3 credits) Experimental Writing   NWRW3531 A 9 weeks, June 2 thru Aug. 1. Noncredit tuition $730.

ONLINE

Robert Lopez

This workshop is for writers who want to try something different and work in multiple genres. As Samuel Beckett wrote, “To find a form that accommodates the mess, that is the task of the artist now.” The mess is the whole of our modern world: How do we harness it into form? Writers address this question by challenging conventions, experimenting with and blurring the lines between prose and poetry. In this course, students are encouraged to work on fiction that looks like poetry, poems that read like plays or fiction, and plays that incorporate all genres. Students discuss and critique one another’s work along with works by writers like David Markson, Lydia Davis, James Tate, Sandra Cisneros, Will Eno, and Carole Maso.  (3 credits)

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FOREIGN L ANGUAGES

FOREIGN LANGUAGES Arabic Chinese (Mandarin) French German Italian Spanish Turkish FOR COURSE ADVISING, CALL 212.229.5676. w w w. n e w s c h o o l . e d u / f o r e i g n l a n g u a g e s

Self-Placement Test

Contact the Foreign Languages Department early in the registration process to ensure proper placement. When choosing a course level, keep in mind your previous experience with the language you wish to study: high school and college courses, extended stays in a country where the language is spoken, frequent contact at home, or work with speakers of the language. To assist you in finding the level that best suits your needs, we offer selfplacement tests for most languages. If you think you might be beyond Level 1, take the self-placement exam for the level at which you would like to start. The exam can be taken in 15–20 minutes and can be obtained from the Department of Foreign Languages, 66 W 12th Street, 6th floor, or by calling 212.229.5676 or emailing foreignlanguages@newschool.edu (we would be happy to email, mail, or fax the self-placement exam to you). Return the completed exam to the Department of Foreign Languages for scoring; the results will be emailed, mailed, faxed, or telephoned to you, in accordance with your request.

Marie-Christine Massé, Interim Chair

Foreign language study is for anyone who wishes to better understand and appreciate our increasingly globalized

ARABIC

society. The New School has been successfully teaching

Hani Alam, Iman Maiki, Karam Tannous

foreign languages for decades to people who travel abroad,

Nargis Virani, Coordinator

who conduct business in other countries or engage with New

For an explanation of Arabic course levels and their equivalents at other institutions, contact the Foreign Languages office at 212.229.5676 or foreignlanguages@newschool.edu.

York City’s multicultural communities, who wish to appreciate great literature or films in the original languages, or whose scholarly pursuits mandate facility with other languages.

Arabic on the Go: Level 1   NARB0804 A 3 days. Fri. thru Sun., June 6, 7 & 8. Noncredit tuition $350.

Learning a Foreign Language at The New School

New School foreign language courses are designed to help you achieve linguistic independence in the language you have chosen to study. Most of the modern language instructors are native speakers, and all courses are designed to introduce students to a language in its cultural context. The emphasis is on interaction in class between students and instructor and between students themselves.

Before traveling to the Middle East, stop at The New School for a weekend immersion in Levantine Arabic. Master common situations such as asking for directions, handling currency, ordering in restaurants, and shopping. Make rapid progress learning to converse in Levantine Arabic. Level 1 is for complete beginners. No prior knowledge of Modern Standard Arabic is required. Since the focus of this course is conversation, phonetic transliterations are used. The workshop meets Friday, 6:00–9:30 p.m.; Saturday, 10:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m. (with a one-hour lunch break); and Sunday, 10:30 a.m.–3:00 p.m., for a total of 14 hours of instruction.  (noncredit) Introductory Intensive 1  NARB1003 A 13 sessions. Mon. thru Thurs., 10:00 a.m.–1:45 p.m., beg. June 2.

Choosing the Proper Course

With some exceptions (such as the Graduate Reading courses and Arabic), foreign languages are taught in a five-term course sequence, designated as Levels 1 through 5. Each level corresponds to one semester of study. Levels 1, 2, and 3 represent introductory stages of language learning; Levels 4 and 5 represent intermediate stages. Content courses are advanced stages. Those who wish to learn a language at an accelerated pace can opt for an Intensive course. These courses provide the equivalent of one and half to two semesters of study in one term. Intensive courses can be taken for 4 undergraduate credits. Reading courses are designed for graduate students preparing for their reading exams and any others who need to read texts in another language. On the Go workshops are noncredit immersion weekends offered in several popular languages and oriented to travelers. These courses offer 14 hours of intensive instruction over three days. You can register for most courses for either noncredit or general credit status. The noncredit tuition is listed as part of the course description. General credit tuition for courses in this catalog is $1,170 per credit. For information about registration options, see pages 38–39.

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Noncredit tuition $1,000.

This accelerated first course integrates Modern Standard Arabic (Fus-ha) and Levantine Arabic, introducing the Arabic alphabet and sound system along with basic conversational skills in Levantine. Students learn to engage in simple conversations and write short compositions about themselves, their families, and other familiar topics. This course is for beginners who would like to progress rapidly.  (4 credits) NEW  Introductory Intensive 2  NARB1004 A 13 sessions. Mon. thru Thurs., 10:00 a.m.–1:45 p.m., beg. June 30. Noncredit tuition $1,000.

This accelerated course is a continuation of Introductory Intensive 1 and concludes the study of the fundamentals of spoken Levantine Arabic. Students continue studying elementary grammar and expanding their vocabulary. More complex topics of conversation are introduced, such as eating at restaurants, shopping at the market, and visiting places. Students learn about the cultures of Jordan, Syria, Lebanon, and Palestine while enhancing their communicative skills. Prerequisite: Arabic Introductory Intensive 1 or the equivalent.  (4 credits)


FOREIGN L ANGUAGES

CHINESE (MANDARIN)

Level 2   NFRN1002 A 13 sessions. Tues. & Thurs., 6:00–7:50 p.m., beg. July 8. Noncredit

Judy Deng, Li Duan, Bernard Geoxavier, Yiqi Zhang-Giaccio Lei Ping, Coordinator

NEW Chinese for Study Abroad   NCHM1105 A 13 sessions. Mon. & Wed., 6:00–7:50 p.m., beg. June 2. Noncredit tuition $590.

This course is designed for students with limited or no background in Mandarin Chinese who plan to study or travel in China and other Mandarinspeaking areas and would like to begin speaking Chinese within a short time. Students acquire basic language survival skills through practice in everyday conversations and scenarios. Although there is instruction in reading and writing, the class emphasizes oral communication to prepare students for their time abroad. Note: Students applying for the New School Study Abroad Program in Shanghai are strongly encouraged to enroll in this course.  (2 credits)

FRENCH Noëlle Carruggi, Daisy Bow, Xiaofu Ding, Steven Gendell, MarieLaure Hoffmann, Samuel Howell, Ida Kummer, Sabine Landreau-Farber, Florence Leclerc-Dickler, Alfredo Marques, Philippe-Gérard Montanari, Sanaz Partovi, Stephane Zaborowski Marie-Christine Massé, Coordinator

French on the Go: Level 1   NFRN0804 A 3 days. Fri. thru Sun., June 6, 7 & 8. Noncredit tuition $350.

French on the Go: Level 2  NFRN0805 A 3 days. Fri. thru Sun., July 8, 9 & 10. Noncredit tuition $350.

tuition $590.

This is the second course of a three-term sequence that introduces students to the fundamentals of the French language through speaking, listening, reading, and writing. They continue to study elementary grammar (irregular present tenses, past tense, pronouns) and practice by conversing and writing about leisure, celebrations, holidays, and travel. They continue to learn about French and Francophone cultures.  (2 credits) Introductory Intensive 1  NFRN1003 A 13 sessions. Mon. thru Thurs., 10:00 a.m.–1:45 p.m., beg. June 2. Noncredit tuition $1,000.

This is an accelerated course for beginners with little or no knowledge of French. Students learn the fundamentals of the French language through speaking, listening, reading, and writing. They acquire elementary grammar skills (present and past tenses, pronouns), learn how to express negation and ask questions, and practice by conversing and writing about university life, friends and family, hobbies and leisure, celebrations, holidays, and travel. They learn about France and the Francophone world while building their communicative skills.  (4 credits) Introductory Intensive 2   NFRN2003 A 13 sessions. Mon. thru Thurs., 10:00 a.m.–1:45 p.m., beg. June 30. Noncredit tuition $1,000.

This accelerated course is a continuation of Introductory Intensive 1 and concludes the study of the fundamentals of the French language through speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students continue to study elementary grammar (present and past tenses, expressing negation, asking questions, and using pronouns). They practice by conversing and writing about shopping, food, daily life, health, technology, and ecology. While enhancing their communicative skills, students continue to learn about France and the Francophone world. Prerequisite: French Introductory Intensive 1 or the equivalent.  (4 credits)

B 3 days. Fri. thru Sun. June 27, 28 & 29. Noncredit tuition $350.

French on the Go: Level 3  NFRN0806

NEW De la Table au Texte  NFRN3740

A

A 13 sessions, Mon. & Wed., 6:00-7:50 p.m., beg. June 2. Noncredit tuition $590.

3 days. Fri. thru Sun. June 6, 7 & 8. Noncredit tuition $350.

French on the Go: Level 4  NFRN0807 A 3 days. Fri. thru Sun. June 27, 28 & 29. Noncredit tuition $350.

Before traveling to France or another country where French is commonly spoken, stop at The New School for a weekend immersion in the French language. Master common situations such as asking for directions, handling currency, ordering in restaurants, and shopping. Make rapid progress learning to converse in French. Level 1 is for complete beginners; Level 2 is for students familiar with basic elements of the language. Each workshop meets Friday, 6:00–9:30 p.m.; Saturday, 10:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m. (with a one-hour lunch break); and Sunday, 10:30 a.m.–3:00 p.m., for a total of 14 hours of instruction.  (noncredit)

In this French conversation course, we examine literary and cinematic representations of food through the ages. Among the topics discussed are food and memory, food and social change, food and cultural identity, table manners and dining etiquette, diets, and literary recipes. There will be film viewings, readings, and short written assignments, but the emphasis is on conversation and oral presentations. Prerequisite: French 4 or the equivalent.  (2 credits)

GERMAN Rainer L. Brueckheimer, Alan Paddle, Adelheid Ziegler

Level 1   NFRN1001 A 13 sessions. Tues. & Thurs., 6:00–7:50 p.m., beg. June 3. Noncredit tuition $590.

This is the first course of a three-term sequence that introduces the fundamentals of the French language through speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students acquire elementary grammar (present tense), learn to express negation and ask questions, and practice by conversing and writing about university life, hobbies, friends, and family. They learn about France and the Francophone world while building their communicative skills.  (2 credits)

Graduate Reading: Level 1  NGRM0501 A 13 sessions. Mon. & Wed., 6:00–7:50 p.m., beg. June 2. Noncredit tuition $590.

This course is designed for graduate students preparing for the reading examination and others who would like to read books and articles in German. The essentials of German grammar are covered, and students practice reading and translating various kinds of texts. The course is open to students with no previous knowledge of German.  (noncredit)

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FOREIGN L ANGUAGES

ITALIAN

Level 2   NITL1002 A 13 sessions. Tues. & Thurs., 6:00–7:50 p.m., beg. July 8. Noncredit

Caterina Bertolotto, Monica M. London, Francesca Magnani, Giuseppe Manca, Fabio Parasecoli

Italian Brushup: Intermediate   NITL0901 A 6 sessions. Mon. & Wed., 6:00–7:50 p.m., beg. June 2. Noncredit tuition $275.

This course is designed for students who have completed at least one year of Italian and want to review grammar and vocabulary while learning to communicate at a low intermediate level. Coursework includes discussions and study of Italian culture through authentic materials, including videos and readings. Class activities include writing compositions, show-and-tell presentations, and a final oral presentation. Prerequisite: Italian Level 2, Italian Introductory Intensive 1, or the equivalent.  (noncredit) Level 1   NITL1001 A 13 sessions. Tues. & Thurs., 6:00–7:50 p.m., beg. June 3. Noncredit tuition $590.

This is the first course of a three-term sequence that introduces students to the fundamentals of the Italian language through speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students acquire elementary grammar skills (present and past tenses of regular and irregular verbs) and practice by conversing and writing about themselves, friends, family, hobbies, and university and professional life. They learn about Italian culture while building their communicative skills.  (2 credits)

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tuition $590.

This is the second course of a three-term sequence that introduces students to the fundamentals of the Italian language through speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students acquire elementary grammar (present and past tense of regular and irregular verbs) and practice by conversing and writing about themselves, friends, family, hobbies, and university and professional life. They learn about Italian culture while building their communicative skills.  (2 credits)


FOREIGN L ANGUAGES

SPANISH

Level 2   NSPN1002 A 13 sessions. Mon. & Wed., 6:00–7:50 p.m., beg. July 7. Noncredit

Teresa A. Bell, Ernesto Fedukovitch, Sonia Granillo-Ogikubo, Luis Guzmán, Rodolfo Long, Cristina Ross, Ron Sarcos, Victor M. Tirado Sara Villa, Coordinator

Spanish on the Go: Level 1  NSPN0804 A 3 days. Fri. thru Sun., June 6, 7 & 8. Noncredit tuition $350.

Spanish on the Go: Level 2  NSPN0805

tuition $590.

This is the second course of a four-term sequence that introduces the fundamentals of the Spanish language through speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students continue using the basic grammatical structures learned in Level 1 and learn new ones, such as past tenses, pronouns, reflexive constructions, and demonstratives. They practice by conversing and writing about topics such as food, daily routines, shopping, seasons, and travel. They continue learning about Spanish and Latin American culture while building communicative skills.  (2 credits)

A 3 days. Fri. thru Sun., June 27, 28 & 29. Noncredit tuition $350.

Spanish on the Go: Level 3  NSPN0806

NEW Musica e Imagen: Conversación  NSPN3732

A 3 days. Fri. thru Sun., June 6, 7 & 8. Noncredit tuition $350.

A 13 sessions. Tues. & Thurs., 6:00–7:50 p.m., beg. June 3. Noncredit

Spanish on the Go: Level 4  NSPN0807 A 3 days. Fri. thru Sun., June 27, 28 & 29. Noncredit tuition $350.

Before traveling to Spain or Latin America, stop at The New School for a weekend immersion in the Spanish language. Master common situations such as asking for directions, handling currency, ordering in restaurants, and shopping. Make rapid progress learning to converse in Spanish. Level 1 is for complete beginners; Level 2 is for students familiar with basic elements of the language; Level 3 is an intermediate-level course for students with a good working knowledge of Spanish; Level 4 is an advanced course. Each workshop meets Friday, 6:00–9:30 p.m.; Saturday, 10:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m. (with a onehour lunch break); and Sunday, 10:30 a.m.–3:00 p.m., for a total of 14 hours of instruction.  (noncredit)

tuition $590.

This is a conversation course for students who have attained intermediatelevel fluency and wish to refine their speaking skills through participation in discussions, debates, oral presentations, and role-play in class. Songs, short films, and images taken from different media (newspapers, advertisement, magazines) are used to provide students with a contextualized, content-based approach to oral communication. While building oral proficiency, students will also explore and increase their awareness of Latin America’s rich cultural and literary production. Prerequisite: Spanish Level 3 or Spanish Introductory Intensive 2.  (2 credits)

TURKISH

Introductory Intensive 1   NSPN1003 A 13 sessions. Mon. thru Thurs., 10:00 a.m.–1:45 p.m., beg. June 2. Noncredit tuition $1,000.

This is an accelerated course for beginners with little or no knowledge of Spanish. Students learn the fundamentals of the Spanish language through speaking, listening, reading, and writing. They acquire a wide range of elementary communicative competencies such as using the present, past, and future tenses; expressing likes and dislikes; describing things; and asking questions. They practice conversing and writing about themselves and others, school and leisure activities, time, weather, and shopping. They learn about Spanish and Latin American culture while building their communicative skills.  (4 credits)

Turkish on the Go: Level 1  NTRK0804 A 3 days. Fri. thru Sun., June 6, 7 & 8. Noncredit tuition $350.

Before traveling to Turkey, stop at The New School for a weekend immersion in Turkish. Make rapid progress learning to converse and master common situations, such as asking for directions, handling currency, ordering in restaurants, and shopping. Level 1 is for complete beginners. Since the focus of this course is conversation, phonetic transliterations are used. The workshop meets Friday, 6:00–9:30 p.m.; Saturday, 10:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m. (with a onehour lunch break); and Sunday, 10:30 a.m.–3:00 p.m., for a total of 14 hours of instruction.  (noncredit)

Introductory Intensive 2  NSPN2003 A 13 sessions. Mon. thru Thurs., 10:00 a.m.–1:45 p.m., beg. June 30. Noncredit tuition $1,000.

This accelerated course is a continuation of Introductory Intensive 1 and concludes the study of the fundamentals of the Spanish language. Students develop their communicative skills as they build their knowledge of grammar, learning how to express opinions (using the past and present subjunctive) and make conjectures (using the conditional and the future). They continue learning about Spanish and Latin American culture.  (4 credits) Level 1   NSPN1001 A 13 sessions. Mon. & Wed., 6:00–7:50 p.m., beg. June 2. Noncredit tuition $590.

This is the first course of a four-term sequence that introduces the fundamentals of the Spanish language through speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students acquire elementary grammar (present and future tenses), learn to ask questions, and practice by conversing and writing about family members, school and leisure activities, likes and dislikes, time, and weather. They learn about Spanish and Latin American culture while building their communicative skills.  (2 credits)

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ENGLISH L ANGUAGE STUDIES

ENGLISH LANGUAGE STUDIES Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages English as a Second Language FOR COURSE ADVISING, CALL 212.229.5372. w w w. n e w s c h o o l . e d u / c e / e n g l i s h l a n g u a g e s t u d i e s

Gabriel Diaz Maggioli, Chair Caitlin Morgan, Director

English has become the language of international communication; command of spoken and written English is important in business, the arts, and other professions all over the world. The demand for ESL courses and trained ESL teachers continues to grow. The mission of

Prospective students should apply online to the Department of English Language Studies. The application includes a writing sample and a grammar test. Once the application materials have been received and reviewed, applicants will be contacted for an in-person interview. Note: Non-native speakers of English must have a TOEFL score of at least 250 (CBT), 100 (IBT), or 600 (PBT). For the application and complete program information, go to www.newschool.edu/english. For more information, contact English Language Studies, 68 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10011; 212.229.5372; email elsc@newschool.edu. The certificate in Teaching English is awarded for successful completion of the program of study outlined below. This program can be completed in two academic terms, depending on the availability of classes. Courses need not be taken in the order listed unless a prerequisite is indicated in the course description. The courses can be taken for undergraduate credit or on a noncredit basis, but if you are not enrolling for undergraduate credit, you must register as a certificate student. Certificate approval cannot be awarded for any course retroactively. • Methods and Techniques of Teaching ESL/EFL • English Grammar for ESL Teachers

English Language Studies at The New School is to address

• Teaching the Sound System of English

this demand by offering high-quality courses in English

• Using Authentic Materials to Teach ESL

language instruction and teacher training.

• ESL Teaching Practicum

TEACHING ENGLISH TO SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES Language institutes in the United States and around the world are looking for native or near-native English speakers trained to teach the language; the demand for them continues to grow. There are adult language programs throughout the country in need of properly trained staff to work with immigrants. Thousands of foreign students come to the United States each year to study, and many colleges now have ESL programs that regularly hire instructors. And many people living, studying, or working in the United States employ private tutors to help them with their English. In short, training in English language teaching can prepare you for a wide variety of careers at home and abroad.

Noncredit students receive grades of AP (Approved) or NA (Not Approved) in each course and can obtain transcripts. Credit students must earn grades of C+ or better in all the courses. For general rules governing all New School certificate programs, consult the Educational Programs and Services section of this catalog (see Table of Contents). C E R T I F I C AT E I N T E A C H I N G E N G L I S H O P E N H O U S E Wednesday, April 30, 6:00–8:00 p.m., 2 West 13th Street, Bark Room (room 101). Learn more about ESL/EFL teaching as a career and The New School’s Certificate in Teaching English. Members of the staff are present to answer your questions. Location to be announced. Please call 212.229.5372 or email elsc@newschool.edu and let us know if you plan to attend.

English Grammar for ESL Teachers  NELT3412 A 15 sessions. Tues. & Thurs., 6:00–8:40 p.m., beg. June 3. Noncredit tuition $1,035.

Master of Arts in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages The New School offers the master of arts degree in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) with concentrations in teaching and curriculum development. For more information, visit the website at www.newschool.edu/matesol. For a printed brochure, call the Office of Admission at 212.229.5630 or email nsadmissions@newschool.edu.

Delis M. Pitt

Enrollment limited. Permission required; call 212.229.5372. This course is designed to strengthen understanding of the formal rules of English speaking and writing in order to facilitate effective teaching of the language.  (3 credits) Using Authentic Materials to Teach ESL  NELT3432 A 7 sessions. Wed., 6:00–7:50 p.m., beg. June 4. Noncredit tuition $405. Theresa M. Breland

Certificate in Teaching English The New School offers a five-course certificate for aspiring or working ESL teachers for whom a master’s degree is inappropriate or impractical. The certificate curriculum stresses communicative, student-centered learning and has a practical orientation. Participants are introduced to a variety of methods and techniques readily applicable to classroom teaching. This program does not certify teachers to teach ESL in New York public or proprietary schools.

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Enrollment limited. Permission required; call 212.229.5372. This course presents techniques for choosing and using appropriate TV and radio broadcasts, films, cassette tapes, newspapers, magazines, brochures, flyers, and other media. Participants learn how to prepare teaching exercises that incorporate these kinds of materials, and, as time permits, the class experiments with them.  (1 credit)


ENGLISH L ANGUAGE STUDIES

Professional Development

Teaching the Sound System of English  NELT3414 A 7 sessions. Thurs., 6:00–7:50 p.m., beg. June 5. Noncredit tuition $405. Linda Pelc

Enrollment limited. Permission required; call 212.229.5372. The sound system of English is studied, with special attention to characteristics that learners of English as a foreign language often find difficult. Participants learn to develop contextualized pronunciation exercises and incorporate them into an ESL syllabus.  (1 credit)

ESL/EFL Needs Assessment and Course Design  NELT0435 A 3 sessions. Mon., 6:00–8:40 p.m., beg. June 2. Noncredit tuition $170. Theresa M. Breland

Corpora for Language Teaching  NELT0514 A 5 weeks, June 2–July 4. Noncredit tuition $600.

Professional development workshops are offered regularly for working ESL teachers. Enrollment in the certificate program is not required.

ONLINE

Scott Thornbury

This course introduces the use of (mainly online) corpora, or digitalized databases of texts, in language teaching. The field of corpus linguistics has developed rapidly in the last two decades, and corpus data now inform the design of dictionaries, grammar references, and language textbooks. Specialized corpora, such as academic English and spoken language corpora, have become essential resources in the preparation of specially targeted (ESP, EAP) courses. Access to corpora has been facilitated by the rapid growth of (often free) online resources as well as the development of a variety of functional tools easily accessible in “smart classrooms” and on mobile devices. Students review the history of corpus linguistics, with special reference to lexicography, phraseology, text linguistics, and second language teaching. They experiment with a number of online corpora and their associated functionalities, including concordancing, frequency lists, keywords, and cluster analysis. They develop and report on a small-scale study of a selected genre or register, showing how corpus analysis can inform the design of classroom materials and tasks.  (1 credit) ESL Teaching Practicum in Wroclaw, Poland   NELT3416 A 3 weeks, Aug. 1–22. Noncredit tuition $630. Tuition does not include travel or accommodations.

Enrollment limited. Learn how to assess your students and plan and write a communicative syllabus that will meet their needs. The syllabus should be relevant, with topic-based lessons that incorporate grammar and pronunciation as natural products of the subject matter. Writing a syllabus based on a textbook is also covered.  (noncredit) X-Words and Their Verb Forms  NELT0542 A 2 sessions. Mon. and Wed., 6:00–8:50 p.m., beg. June 23. Noncredit tuition $125. Tamara Kirson

X-word grammar (XWG) is a linguistics-based pedagogy that demystifies the teaching and learning of grammar. It focuses on relationships between elements of grammar that reveal the logic and consistency rather than the exceptions in English grammar. One type of relationship, or “match,” taught in x-word grammar is that between the 20 x-words and six verb forms. X-word grammar clarifies these grammatical patterns, helping educators develop the confidence to guide students in their own discovery of the patterns and application of this knowledge in their writing. Educators who attend these two workshops adopt the role of grammar analysts, just as they will teach their students to assume that role. The diverse methodologies used in the workshop can be immediately applied in the classroom.  (noncredit)

Caitlin Morgan

Enrollment limited. Permission required; call 212.229.5372. Following a two-day orientation in Poland, students teach or team-teach English classes daily for three weeks and meet together in a seminar twice a week. Certificate students who are ready to take the practicum must notify the English Language Studies office during the registration period for the preceding academic term. The English Language Studies office will provide information about travel and accommodations when you seek permission to register. Prerequisites: Methods and Techniques of Teaching ESL/EFL, English Grammar for ESL Teachers, and Using Authentic Materials to Teach ESL.  (3 credits)

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ENGLISH L ANGUAGE STUDIES

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE

Academic Writing 3  NESL0313 A 20 sessions. Tues. & Thurs., 9:00 a.m.–11:50 a.m., beg. June 2.

Theresa M. Breland, Andrea de Toledo, Jessica Dukes, Joan Durk, Richard Humphreys, Jaclyn Lovell, Cristina Patterson, Cathy Shikler, Dolly Setton, Katya Pronin, Darleen Lev, Suzanne Kaplan Fonseca, Elizabeth Marner-Brooks

Noncredit tuition $1,190.

Study Options in English as a Second Language

Enrollment limited. Permission required. Students at the low-intermediate to intermediate level work on writing paragraphs and build to writing essays consisting of an effective introduction, well-developed body paragraphs, and a solid concluding paragraph. They learn how to write evaluative essays, compare-and-contrast essays, and argumentative essays. Students revise their work and develop skills used by successful writers. Specific grammar points are covered based on problems revealed in students’ writing or as otherwise determined by the instructor. Call 212.229.5372 for required placement advising.  (noncredit)

Individual Classes: Students who do not need a visa can take classes from four to 18 hours per week.

Academic Writing 4  NESL0413

Placement Advising: All students must see an English Language Studies advisor for testing and placement at the appropriate level before they register. Call 212.229.5372 or email elsc@newschool.edu.

Certificate: A Certificate in English as a Second Language can be awarded to those who successfully complete a minimum of 100 hours of ESL coursework. All students who enroll as certificate students can obtain a transcript of the courses they have taken even if they do not complete 100 hours of coursework. Policies governing all New School certificate programs are stated in the Educational Programs and Services section of this catalog (see the Table of Contents). Note: The registration fee for certificate students is $80 per semester. Intensive Study: The Department of English Language Studies has developed a unique program for intensive study of English as a second language. A full-time curriculum (18 hours per week) is designed for each student, made up of courses at an appropriate level chosen from those offered in this catalog. Selected New School lectures, film screenings, concerts, and other events are free of charge to students enrolled in the ESL Intensive Study program. • 10-week intensive program: June 2 through August 7. Tuition $4,020.

A 20 sessions. Tues. & Thurs., 9:00 a.m.–11:50 a.m., beg. June 3. Noncredit tuition $1,190.

Enrollment limited. Permission required. Students at the high-intermediate level work on writing five-paragraph essays consisting of an effective introduction, well-developed body paragraphs, and a solid concluding paragraph. Students write personal narratives, summary-response essays, argumentative essays, critiques, analytical essays, and compare-and-contrast essays. They learn how to revise their work and develop other skills used by successful writers. Specific grammar points are covered based on problems revealed in students’ writing or as otherwise determined by the instructor. Call 212.229.5372 for required placement advising.  (noncredit) Academic Writing 5  NESL0513 A 20 sessions. Tues. & Thurs., 9:00 a.m.–11:50 a.m., beg. June 3. Noncredit tuition $1,190.

Enrollment limited. Permission required. Practice in basic English language skills and grammar for students at the low intermediate to intermediate level. Call 212.229.5372 for required placement advising.  (noncredit)

Enrollment limited. Permission required. Advanced-level students practice formulating a thesis, organizing their ideas into paragraphs, writing topic and concluding sentences, including specific examples from a variety of sources, and developing a personal writing voice. Projects include compare-andcontrast essays, analytical essays, argumentative essays, summary-response essays, persuasive essays, and critiques. Students learn how to revise their work and develop other skills used by successful writers. Specific points of grammar are covered in addition to those that arise in student writing. Call 212.229.5372 for required placement advising.  (noncredit)

Grammar of English 4  NESL0403

Academic Writing 6  NESL0613

A 20 sessions. Mon. & Wed., 9:00 a.m.–11:50 a.m., beg. June 2.

A 20 sessions. Tues. & Thurs., 9:00 a.m.–11:50 a.m., beg. June 3.

Grammar of English 3   NESL0303 A 20 sessions. Mon. & Wed., 9:00 a.m.–11:50 p.m., beg. June 2. Noncredit tuition $1,190.

Noncredit tuition $1,190.

Enrollment limited. Permission required. A high-intermediate-level course focusing on the grammar, structure, and usage of written English. Call 212.229.5372 for required placement advising.  (noncredit) Grammar of English 5  NESL0503 A 20 sessions. Mon. & Wed., 9:00 a.m.–11:50 a.m., beg. June 2. Noncredit tuition $1,190.

Grammar of English 6  NESL0603 A 20 sessions. Mon. & Wed., 9:00 a.m.–11:50 a.m., beg. June 2. Noncredit tuition $1,190.

Enrollment limited. Permission required. High-intermediate and advanced students review the basics and explore the more complex points of grammar in written English while improving their general command of the language. Call 212.229.5372 for required placement advising.  (noncredit)

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Noncredit tuition $1,190.

Enrollment limited. Permission required. This course is designed to help international students meet university writing requirements. They learn how to develop, focus, organize, and support ideas in extended essays. They then learn the research techniques practiced in the United States and the conventions for documentation, such as footnotes, citations, and bibliographies. The course includes in-class writing, homework, and a short research paper. Call 212.229.5372 for required placement advising.  (noncredit) Listening/Speaking 3  NESL0323 A 20 sessions. Mon. & Wed., 1:50–3:40 p.m., beg. June 2. Noncredit tuition $820.

Enrollment limited. Permission required. Low-intermediate to intermediate students practice speaking and listening in a variety of informal and formal situations. Problems with grammar, vocabulary, and pronunciation are addressed. Call 212.229.5372 for required placement advising.  (noncredit)


ENGLISH L ANGUAGE STUDIES

Listening/Speaking 4: New York Life  NESL0423 A 20 sessions. Mon. & Wed., 1:50–3:40 p.m., beg. June 2. Noncredit tuition $820.

Listening/Speaking 5: Thinking Critically   NESL0523 A 20 sessions. Mon. & Wed., 1:50–3:40 p.m., beg. June 2. Noncredit tuition $820.

Enrollment limited. Permission required. High-intermediate and advanced students learn to recognize the key elements and supporting details in various examples of authentic spoken English such as movies, interviews, live discussions, and television programs. They develop successful listening strategies and speaking skills. Problems with the grammar of spoken English, vocabulary, and pronunciation are reviewed as they come up. Call 212.229.5372 for required placement advising.  (noncredit) Listening/Speaking 6: Advanced Workshop  NESL0623 A 20 sessions. Mon. & Wed., 1:50–3:40 p.m., beg. June 2. Noncredit tuition $820.

Enrollment limited. Permission required. Students practice advanced listening points, using authentic materials such as news broadcasts, films, and documentaries. Pronunciation and presentation skills are emphasized. Problems with grammar and vocabulary are addressed as they come up. Call 212.229.5372 for required placement advising.  (noncredit) Reading 3   NESL0333 A 20 sessions. Tues. & Thurs., 1:50–3:40 p.m., beg. June 3. Noncredit tuition $820.

Enrollment limited. Permission required. Practice in reading, with an emphasis on building vocabulary for students at the low-intermediate to intermediate levels. Call 212.229.5372 for required placement advising.  (noncredit) Reading 4: American Experience  NESL0433 A 20 sessions. Tues. & Thurs., 1:50–3:40 p.m., beg. June 3. Noncredit tuition $820.

Reading 5: Self and Identity   NESL0533 A 20 sessions. Tues. & Thurs., 1:50–3:40 p.m., beg. June 3. Noncredit tuition $820.

Enrollment limited. Permission required. Students read and discuss fiction and nonfiction. Formal and structural issues are explored, and reading strategies and vocabulary are developed. The emphasis, however, is on developing language skills through discussion of personal reactions to the readings. Call 212.229.5372 for required placement advising.  (noncredit) Reading 6: Topics in Culture and Society  NESL0633

 GIVE YOUR   KIDS AN   EARLY START.  The New School offers exciting programs in art, design, and music for children from preschool through high school—in a supportive atmosphere that promotes creative thinking and self-discovery. –– Parsons Pre-College Academy offers students in grades 3–12 the opportunity to develop new skills through hands-on art and design projects that promote creative thinking, problem solving, and collaboration. –– Mannes Preparatory combines a warm and supportive atmosphere with thorough pre-professional music training. Programs are tailored to meet the needs of pre-K through high school students—from the absolute beginner to the most proficient.

www.newschool.edu/precollege3

A 20 sessions. Tues. & Thurs., 1:50–3:40 p.m., beg. June 3. Noncredit tuition $820.

Enrollment limited. Permission required. In this reading and discussion class, students explore current issues from various cultural perspectives. Among the topics discussed are individualism, competition, materialism, and attitudes toward change. Call 212.229.5372 for required placement advising.  (noncredit)

For help in interpreting course descriptions, see chart on page 48.

An Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Institution.

27


ENGLISH L ANGUAGE STUDIES

ESL + Design Certificate

ESL + Music Certificate

Parsons The New School for Design and the Department of English Language Studies together offer the ESL + Design Certificate program. This pre-enrollment program is for international students who plan to attend an art or design college in the United States but need to improve their scores on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). It is also appropriate for students who wish to refresh their English language skills and adjust to university life in the United States before beginning art and design studies. The certificate program of study is based on a structured set of intensive English language (ESL) courses and incorporates design studio classes, short workshops, and an orientation to life in the United States. English language courses cover grammar, academic reading and writing, and listening and speaking. Students who test at the high-intermediate level (Level 5 or 6) are eligible to take the Design and Language Studio course in place of Listening/Speaking 6.

Mannes College The New School for Music Extension Division and the Department of English Language Studies together offer the ESL + Music Certificate program. This pre-enrollment program is designed for individuals who need to improve their scores on the Test of English as a Foreign Language in order to be admitted to a music school in the United States or another English-speaking country. It is also appropriate for students who want to adjust to university life in the United States before starting a music program. The certificate program of study is based on a structured set of intensive English language courses and includes private music lessons with Mannes College faculty, a Techniques of Music course, and performance seminars. ESL + Music students are eligible to live in university housing and have access to many of the services and academic resources offered by The New School, including health services, an email account, practice rooms, library and computing services, tutoring, and free admission to Mannes College concerts, recitals, and other university events.

ESL + Design students are eligible to enter the United States on a student visa and have access to university facilities and services such as student housing (separate application and fees), tutoring at the University Learning Center, Health Services, a New School email account, and library privileges. Admission: Download the application form and instructions from the website, www.newschool.edu/continuing-education/esl-design-certificate. If you have questions about the application, contact the English Language Studies Center by email at elsc@newschool.edu or by telephone at 212.229.5372. Tuition and Fees • ESL + Design core (Grammar, Writing, Listening/Speaking, and Reading): $4,020 • ESL + Design core with Design and Language Studio (not for credit) instead of Listening/Speaking: $4,598 • ESL + Design core with Design and Language Studio (for credit) instead of Listening/Speaking: $7,130 Design and Language Studio  PNSO1506 A 20 sessions. Mon. & Wed., 4:00–6:50 p.m., beg. June 2. See fee schedule above.

Permission required. Students enrolled in the ESL + Design Certificate program develop their language skills by working collaboratively in an art and design studio at Parsons The New School for Design. Course assignments are based on New York City themes; some involve field research in the urban environment. Students explore a number of art and design disciplines as they work on a variety of independent and group projects. Students practice speaking and writing English in the context of art and design studies by taking part in class discussions and group projects; they learn design terminology vital for future studies and professional practice in the United States. Prerequisite: enrollment in the ESL + Design certificate program and high-intermediate or advanced English language skills (Level 5 or 6).  (3 credits)

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Admission: Apply through Mannes College The New School for Music Extension Division. For the application and complete program information, go to www.newschool.edu/mannes/eslm-certificate. For more information, call 212.580.0210 x4802, email mannesextension@newschool.edu, or visit the Mannes Extension Office at 150 West 85th Street, ground floor.


VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS

VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS

DRAWING AND PAINTING

Photography Drawing and Painting

Beginning Painting: Short Course   NART1609

Music Theory and Performance

A 6 sessions. Wed., 6:00–8:40 p.m., beg. June 4. Noncredit tuition $330.

Creative Arts and Health Certificate

Nuno de Campos

FOR COURSE ADVISING, CALL 212.229.5961. w w w. n e w s c h o o l . e d u / c e / v i s u a l a n d p e r f o r m i n g a r t s Daniel Hill and Luis Galli, Coordinators

The New School’s founders sought to establish a “dynamic center of modern culture in which adults could learn to appreciate new art forms, or even become artists themselves” (Rutkoff and Scott, New School: A History of the New School for Social Research). In the decades that followed, The New School has supported and been enriched by many modern pioneers of American fine arts, theater, and dance. This commitment to teaching and nurturing the creative arts has continued, and today The New School offers a wide range of courses in the arts for students at all levels. O P E N H O U S E N I G H T AT T H E N E W S C H O O L

Limited to 18. This course assumes no painting experience. Students are introduced to fine art materials, with demonstrations of their uses and proper care; colors, including setting up the palette, mixing colors, contrasting warm and cool colors, and realistic and abstract uses of color; beginning a painting; working from still life and live models; and fundamentals of composition and design, including proportion. Bring an 11"×14" canvas pad, a disposable palette, acrylic gloss medium, a jar, a tube of white and a tube of black acrylic paint, and #2 and #3 brushes to the first session.  (1 credit) Drawing at the Metropolitan Museum   NART1210 A 15 sessions. Tues. & Thurs., 10:20 a.m.–1:00 p.m., beg. June 3. Noncredit tuition $650. Michelle Greene

Limited to 12. Beginning students learn to draw using the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art as subject matter. Working from a different artwork or artifact each week, the course covers the fundamental principles and techniques of drawing, including basic gestural studies, learning how to see form, and experimenting with different kinds of mark making and materials. The setting and the small size of the class allow for instruction geared to the specific needs of individual students. Bring an all-purpose sketch pad and a pencil to the first session. The first session meets at the Group Registration desk in the lobby of the Metropolitan Museum, Fifth Avenue and 82nd Street.  (3 credits)

Thursday, April 28, 6:00–8:00 p.m., 66 West 12th Street To find out more about our visual and performing arts courses, come to our open house and speak to members of our faculty and staff. No reservation is necessary, but if you need more information, call 212.229.5961.

Note: For class locations, check in the lobby of 66 West 12th Street, where on-campus room assignments are always posted. Off-campus meeting locations are listed in the course descriptions. Tuition does not include art supplies, which, if not listed in the course description, are discussed during the first session. For more information, class locations, directions, or advising, call 212.229.5961.

29


VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS

Printmaking

PHOTOGRAPHY

These courses are offered at Parsons The New School for Design as part of that division’s continuing education Arts and Foundation curriculum. Note: Registration policies and deadlines and credit tuition rates for these classes may differ from those for the other courses in this bulletin. For more information and to register, visit www.newschool.edu/parsons/ce or call 212.229.8933.

Since Berenice Abbott’s classes in the 1930s, The New School has been at the forefront of photography education and experimentation. The tradition continues in our current program of workshops and lectures, taught by working professionals. Recommended sequence of courses for beginners: Introduction to Photography 1 and 2. Class locations are posted in the lobby at 66 West 12th Street. For placement advising, call 212.229.5961.

Introduction to Printmaking   PCFA1800 A 12 sessions. Tues. & Thurs., 6:00–8:30 p.m., beg. June 5.

Introduction to Photography 1: Technical Foundation  NPHG0001

Noncredit tuition $719.

A 12 sessions. Tues. & Thurs., 6:00–7:50 p.m., beg. June 3. Noncredit

Michael Kirk

tuition $520. Noncredit students only; credit students must register for NPHG1000, below.

Silkscreen Printing   PCFA1802 A 12 sessions. Mon. & Wed., 6:00–8:30 p.m., beg. June 4. Noncredit tuition $719.

B 12 sessions. Tues. & Thurs., 6:00–8:30 p.m., beg. June 5. Noncredit tuition $719. Marie Dormuth

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Michael Grimaldi

This lecture/demonstration course for beginners covers the fundamentals of digital photography. The goal is to give students a sense of the power of photography and confidence in using a camera without bogging them down in excessive technical detail. Topics include different types of cameras, how to choose a camera, and how to hold the camera to ensure sharp photographs. Aperture opening (f-stop) and shutter speed are explained in detail so that students learn how the two work together to control exposure, sharpness, and depth. There is also discussion of lighting techniques; control of image size and perspective by choice of lens and focal length; creative application of depth-of-field; how and when to use automatic features of electronic cameras; accessories such as tripods, flashes, and filters; and the digital darkroom. Shooting assignments are supported by assigned technical readings. Individual creativity is stressed, and students’ work is viewed and discussed in class. All topics are handled informally, and open discussion and questions are encouraged. If you own a camera, bring it to the first class session.  (noncredit)


VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS

Introduction to Photography 1: Technical Foundation  NPHG1000

MUSIC PERFORMANCE

A 15 sessions. Tues. & Thurs., 6:00–8:50 p.m., beg. June 3. Credit students only.

This lecture/demonstration course meets concurrently with NPHG0001, above, then resumes for credit students after a short break. The last three sessions are devoted to critique of student work. If you own a camera, bring it to the first class session.  (3 credits)

Listed below are a few courses from the varied music curriculum for adult students in the Extension division at Mannes College The New School for Music. Note: Registration policies and deadlines and credit tuition rates for these classes may differ from those for the other courses in this bulletin. See all the courses and register online at www.newschool.edu/mannes/ce. Call Mannes Extension at 212.580.0210 x4802 for more information.

Available Light Photography  NPHG3007

Beginning Piano   XINS1001

A 15 sessions. Tues. & Thurs., 6:00–7:50 p.m., beg. June 3.

8 sessions. Mon., 7:00–8:15 p.m., beg. June 2. Noncredit tuition $385.

Michael Grimaldi

Noncredit tuition $650. Tod Bryant

Limited to 18. This course explores the interrelation of the aesthetic and the technical in photography by focusing on its most demanding and rewarding dimension: the use of existing light. Students learn to work with the methods and materials required by difficult conditions, including dim lighting. They develop their vision and technical abilities as they translate light, color, and ideas to film and digital media. Special films, software processes, equipment, and camera techniques and their use in creating evocative images are demonstrated and discussed. Regular assignments and critiques are an important part of the course. Prerequisite: Introduction to Photography 1 or equivalent experience. Bring samples of your prints and negatives or digital files to the first session for review.  (3 credits)

Katya Stanislavskaya

Untangling the Dots   XTOM0003 8 sessions. Tues., 7:00–8:45 p.m., beg. June 3. Noncredit tuition $385. Ben Ringer

Flute Ensemble  XPER1009 6 sessions. Wed., 7:05–8:45 p.m., beg. May 28. Noncredit tuition $385. Mary Barto

Chamber Music  XPER1002 12 sessions. Scheduled based on group availability/placement. Noncredit tuition $480. Various Instructors

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VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS

CREATIVE ARTS AND HEALTH CERTIFICATE w w w. n e w s c h o o l . e d u / p u b l i c - e n g a g e m e n t / c r e a t i v e - a r t s and-health-certificate

Roles and Relationships: Drama Therapy and Group Process  NCAT3501 A 5 sessions. Thurs., 12:00–5:50 p.m., beg. June 5. Noncredit tuition $680. Jennifer Wilson

Louise Montello, Coordinator

The certificate program in Creative Arts and Health is a nine-course sequence culminating in a 150-hour fieldwork experience. There are four tracks, each emphasizing a particular healing modality—Art, Music, Drama, and Dance/Movement. The courses integrate mind-body techniques such as creative visualization, guided imagery, mindfulness, and therapeutic touch with more traditional arts therapy and psycho-educational approaches. Fieldwork opportunities are available in diverse settings. Our distinctive curriculum encourages students to work in multiple artistic modalities while developing general therapeutic insights and skills. The certificate is offered on a noncredit basis for college graduates and for college credit for undergraduate students who wish to incorporate the curriculum into a bachelor’s degree program, for example, in psychology or education studies. For health, social services, and education practitioners interested in professional development, this program offers a systematic approach to integrating the healing power of the arts into their professions. It can also be used as preparation for advanced professional training in creative arts therapy. Creative arts therapists integrate arts modalities and creative activities into the practice of psychotherapy in clinical settings, such as hospitals, nursing homes, group homes, outpatient psychotherapy clinics, special education, and private practice. For more information, call 212.229.5567 or email CATinfo@newschool.edu. Note: Students are strongly encouraged to register early, as classes often fill up. Individual courses may be taken by students not enrolled in the certificate program. Symbolism in Art Therapy   NCAT3114 A 5 sessions. Tues., 12:00–5:50 p.m., beg. June 3. Noncredit tuition $680. Claudia Bader

Permission required. In this course, we consider the function of symbols in the psyche, studying symbol systems and their application in interpreting art and dreams, with particular attention to C. G. Jung’s work with alchemy. The relevance of symbols to the art therapy process is discussed in detail. Certificate students must register in person with a certificate registration form signed by the program coordinator. Call 212.229.5567 or email CATinfo@newschool.edu for an advising appointment.  (3 credits) Music, Mind, and Healing   NCAT3308 A 15 sessions. Mon. & Wed., 6:00–7:50 p.m., beg. June 2. Noncredit tuition $680. Allegra Themmen-Pigott

Permission required. Music as a healing modality is coming of age in our society. This seminar surveys research and clinical practice in the exciting field of music medicine, which combines clinically tested techniques of music therapy with the latest advances in mind-body healing. Music as a tool for self-reflection and transformation is explored in psychotherapeutic and medical settings. The course is recommended especially for educators and people working in the helping and health-care professions. Formal musical training is not a prerequisite. Topics covered include guided imagery and music, clinical improvisation, musical meditation for stress reduction and enhancement of immunity, and clinical research and case studies demonstrating the effectiveness of these techniques. Certificate students must register in person with a certificate registration form signed by the program coordinator. Call 212.229.5567 or email CATinfo@newschool.edu for an advising appointment.  (3 credits)

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Permission required. Drama therapy is an eclectic form of creative arts therapy in which role-playing, improvisation, psychodrama, storytelling, masks, puppets, and performance are used to promote growth, transformation, and healing. This course offers students an opportunity to explore themselves in relation to others through the medium of drama. Drama therapy techniques are practiced in class both to promote the personal growth of students and to demonstrate the philosophies and methods of clinical and theater theorists. The course combines experiential and didactic activities. Readings, journal writing, and active participation in class are required. Certificate students must register in person with a certificate registration form signed by the program coordinator. Call 212.229.5567 or email CATinfo@newschool.edu for an advising appointment.  (3 credits) Multicultural Issues in Dance/Movement Therapy  NCAT3551 A 15 sessions. Tues. & Thurs., 6:00–7:50 p.m., beg. June 3. Noncredit tuition $680. Nancy Koprak

Permission required. In a multicultural society like the United States, creative arts therapists must be able to deal with racial, ethnic, and other cultural differences in clinical settings. How can we, as mental health professionals, become more skilled in negotiating cultural misunderstandings with patients? How can we gain insights into the social, emotional, and political realities of people whose worlds may differ from ours? This workshop uses dance/ movement therapy exercises, social theory of intercultural relations, and group dialogue to build understanding and sensitivity. Working individually and as a group, we learn how to use one another as resources in creating a dynamic community of inquiry and learning. Guest practitioners join us to share their insights. Certificate students must register in person with a certificate registration form signed by the program coordinator. Call 212.229.5567 or email CATinfo@ newschool.edu for an advising appointment.  (3 credits) Creative Arts Therapy Fieldwork Seminar  NCAT3900 A Fieldwork individually arranged; group seminar meets 4 times: Wed., 4:00–5:50 p.m., June 4 & 18 and July 2 & 16. Noncredit tuition $680. Instructor to be announced

Limited to 12. Permission required; call 212.229.5567 to arrange a placement interview. Clinical fieldwork in a variety of settings is offered to certificate students who have completed the two required psychology and four concentration courses. Students work in a clinical facility under the supervision of a certified arts therapist for at least 150 hours. They attend a concurrent seminar at The New School that focuses on clinical issues relevant to specific populations.  (3 credits)


MANAGEMENT AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP

MANAGEMENT AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP FOR COURSE ADVISING, CALL 212.229.5124. w w w. n e w s c h o o l . e d u / c o n t i n u i n g - e d u c a t i o n / m a n a g e m e n t entrepreneurship

Entrepreneurship  NMGT2140 A 15 sessions. Tues. & Thurs., 4:00–5:50 p.m., beg. June 3. Noncredit tuition $650. Brian Gurski

Vivette Ancona, Coordinator

The Management and Entrepreneurship curriculum teaches organizational practices and enables students to develop an in-depth understanding of the effects of social and

Start-ups are the drivers of today’s economy. It takes specific skills and qualities to lead an organization to success in this vibrant sector. This hands-on, highly interactive course teaches students how to assess an idea, find funding, and bring the product to the market. We review the concept of entrepreneurship and the practices associated with the successful development and launch of a start-up. This is a practical course that combines textbook study with real-life exercises such as developing an elevator pitch, devising a business plan, and delivering an investor presentation.  (3 credits)

economic forces on today’s businesses, not-for-profits, and other organizations. Whether your interest is in acquiring

NEW Introduction to Spreadsheets  NMGT1003 A 5 sessions. Tues. & Thurs., 6:00–7:50 p.m., beg. June 3. Noncredit

or polishing job-related skills, positioning yourself for a

tuition $220.

new career, launching your own start-up, or supporting

Instructor to be announced

your work with nonprofits or in the arts, The New School

You’re hoping to get a start-up going, and you want to experiment with various scenarios before deciding what funding, equipment, and other resources are necessary. Or your organization is entering a new phase and you need to see where the data are taking you. In both cases and many others, you need to use spreadsheets. This course teaches you how to use Excel and other applications in the beginning and later stages of your organization’s development.  (1 credit)

can help you develop the skills necessary to adapt to an ever-changing environment. Introduction to Management  NMGT2100 A 9 weeks, June 2 thru Aug. 1. Noncredit tuition $650.

ONLINE

Richard Walton

NEW Introduction to QuickBooks  NMGT1004

This is a skill-building course for people whose job responsibilities or career interests require knowledge of basic management principles. We study concepts of organization, communication, decision making, planning, motivating, group dynamics, leadership, and change. Examples of common day-to-day management and supervisory problems provide realistic case studies.  (3 credits)

A 5 sessions. Tues. & Thurs., 6:00–7:50 p.m., beg. June 24. Noncredit tuition $220.

Basic Accounting   NMGT2110 A 9 weeks, June 2 thru Aug. 1. Noncredit tuition $650.

Instructor to be announced

Long before there were mobile apps to use in your leisure time, applications existed to help you keep track of and manage your enterprise. Among those that have stood the test of time is QuickBooks. This course teaches you how to use QuickBooks and other accounting apps to track the progress of your business.  (1 credit)

ONLINE

Vivette Ancona

NEW Writing in the Workplace  NMGT1005

This course introduces basic concepts and practices of accounting and double-entry bookkeeping. Journals, ledgers, and various types of accounts are described and discussed. Real-world business transactions are analyzed, and their proper entry into financial records is demonstrated. Students learn how to determine profit or loss on a cash or accrual basis and related skills, such as preparing budgets and reading basic financial statements  (3 credits)

A 5 sessions. Tues. & Thurs., 6:00-7:50 p.m., beg. July 15. Noncredit tuition $220.

All About Advertising  NMGT2119 A 15 sessions. Mon. & Wed., 8:00–9:50 p.m., beg. June 2. Noncredit tuition $650.

Instructor to be announced

You’ve done a lot of writing for your courses, possibly some creative writing, and you text constantly. Now you’re being asked to do writing of various kinds at work—memos, reports, letters—and you find that the kinds of writing you have done before are not appropriate for the workplace. This course teaches you how to write for work and what kinds of writing are the most effective.  (1 credit)

Kurt Brokaw

Advertising is changing before our eyes. This course explores mobile media, social networks, viral and experiential campaigns, and user-generated, stealth, and guerrilla marketing. We define psychographics, in-your-face appeals, behavioral targeting, and extreme imagery and language, as well as the newer advertising paradigms of Facebook, Twitter, and mobile device applications. This course features discussions with guest professionals in the field. Invited guests include LGBT activist Daryl Presgraves of GLSEN; Matt Miller, CEO of the Association of Independent Commercial Producers (AICP); Sarah Wehrli, account director at Greenpoint Entertainment (Omnicon); and AnnaKate Roche (Eugene Lang College ’08), copywriter on Apple at the Media Arts Lab of TBWA/Chiat-Day.  (3 credits)

You can register for most courses for either noncredit or general credit status. The noncredit tuition is listed as part of the course description. General credit tuition for courses in this catalog is $1,170 per credit. For information about registration options, see pages 38–39.

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FOOD STUDIES

FOOD STUDIES FOR COURSE ADVISING, CALL 212.229.5124. w w w. n e w s c h o o l . e d u / c e / f o o d s t u d i e s Fabio Parasecoli, Coordinator

 EARN A DEGREE   IN FOOD   STUDIES. 

Food studies at The New School draws on a range of disciplines to explore the connections between food and culture, media, politics, history, and the environment. Our faculty of scholars, policy activists, entrepreneurs, and scientists provide the theoretical and practical tools you need to engage in what has become a global conversation about food production, distribution, quality, and safety and to promote positive change in your local food chain.

The BA and BS degree programs in Food Studies—offered through the Bachelor’s Program for Adults and Transfer Students at The New School—are your pathway to a career or graduate study in areas including –– Food policy research and advocacy –– Environmentally sustainable agriculture –– Food marketing and distribution –– Business administration for governments and NGOs –– Culinary journalism

www.newschool.edu/publicengagement/ba-bs-food-studies/

Drinking History: Fifteen Beverages That Shaped America  NFDS2102 A 10 sessions. Mon. & Wed., 6:00–7:50 p.m., beg. June 2. Noncredit tuition $440. Andrew F. Smith

What is American drink? Is it warmed-over traditional British beverages: tea, ale, hard cider, syllabubs, toddies? Is it versions of beverages originally brought over by successive waves of immigrants: lager and pilsner, sangria, tequila, bubble tea? Is it the vigorously marketed creations of America’s beverage industries, such as Kentucky Bourbon, Kool-Aid, Snapple, Coors, and CocaCola? This course examines the cultural, social, technological, and economic history that has influenced what Americans drink today. It is an action-packed history, filled with rumrunners, soda manufacturers, coffee moguls, cocktail inventors, temperance preachers, prohibitionists, health advocates, and hardhitting advertisers, all of whom contributed to the contentious American drinkscape of the 21st century.  (2 credits) Professional Food Writing   NFDS3601 A 10 sessions. Tues. & Thurs., 6:00–7:50 p.m., beg. June 3. Noncredit tuition $440. Andrew F. Smith

In this course, students explore the special challenges of professional food writing, learning to write and submit inquiry letters, newspaper articles, magazine stories, restaurant reviews, recipes, and op-ed pieces as well as book and cookbook proposals. The course covers research, interviewing, and networking techniques that will help students succeed in the field. Guest speakers include newspaper and magazine editors, acquisitions editors, and professional food writers. Good writing skills are a prerequisite.  (2 credits)

U N D E R G R A D U AT E D E G R E E P R O G R A M F O R A D U LT S An Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Institution.

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The New School for Public Engagement provides an opportunity to complete your undergraduate degree at your own pace in a largely selfdesigned liberal arts program. For more i­nformation, call 212.229.5630 or visit www.newschool.edu/nspe/undergrad.


FOOD STUDIES

The Past and Future of American Food  NFDS3101 A 15 sessions. Tues. & Thurs., 6:00–7:50 p.m., beg. June 3. Noncredit tuition $650.

Thomas Forster

Local, healthful, and sustainable food movements are often defined as alternatives to the dominant industrial model of global food supply. This class examines the history that led to present-day systems of food production and distribution. How did the institutional and political power of industrial agriculture become so well established? How did technology come to dominate food production, at the expense of social and environmental approaches? The history of feeding cities and regions, explored through readings, class discussion, and visits from guest speakers, offers insights into the future of food systems design and management. Among the topics examined is the rise of local and regional food systems in the early 21st century. What are the roots of the organic, sustainable, locavore, fair and food justice movements? How do they relate to the rise of food sovereignty movements in the Global South? How does the history of policy relate to the future of food?  (3 credits)

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INSTITUTE FOR RETIRED PROFESSIONALS

INSTITUTE FOR RETIRED PROFESSIONALS www.irp.newschool.edu Michael I. Markowitz, Director

In 1962, a group of retired New York City schoolteachers, dissatisfied with the senior learning programs available to them, organized a learning community at The New School, the Institute for Retired Professionals (IRP). At the time of its founding, the IRP was one of the first examples in the United States of what would come to be called the “positive aging” movement and elder empowerment. The original IRP students developed a unique model of adult continuing education based on peer-learning, in which all members share responsibility for the scholarly venture, being simultaneously curriculum creators, teachers, and students. Today's IRP students, ranging in age from 54 to 94, develop and participate in challenging study groups (see the list opposite for examples). The IRP curriculum is limited only by the imagination of the program’s participants. IRP Learning Model The IRP model has been highly influential, and today many colleges welcome elder learning communities to their campuses. These programs have attracted to college campuses people who had formerly been excluded while contributing to a dialogue on the changing paradigm of aging and retirement. Over time, the IRP helped give birth to the ILR (Institute for Learning in Retirement) movement. Today, more than 300 campus-based programs follow the ILR model. Like the IRP, many are associated with the Elderhostel Institute Network (EIN), founded in 1989 as a clearinghouse for existing and new ILRs. That the Institute for Retired Professionals was welcomed and nurtured at The New School, with its historic roots in educating the educated, is not surprising. The New School has always been part of a movement in our society to make institutions of higher education more inclusive and more welcoming to women, people of color, and other underrepresented groups. The IRP program is still unique in the New York area. Mature students from various backgrounds design, teach, and participate with their peers in weekly courses that would meet academic standards in any college degree program. Applying for Membership Open house events and interviews are scheduled throughout the year. Applications are received and reviewed throughout the year for a limited number of September and February admissions. For more information about the program or membership, contact New School Institute for Retired Professionals, 66 West 12th St., New York, NY 10011; tel: 212.229.5682; fax: 212.229.5872; email: irp@newschool.edu. Academic Program IRP study groups are noncredit, and there are neither tests nor grades. However, all members of the community take their responsibilities seriously, and student participation in the study groups is an essential element in the continuing success of the institute. In the IRP model, information is created by the students themselves in study groups rather than transferred from teacher to student. Students also have opportunities to explore the broad range of New School courses and to participate in other aspects of university life as part of its diverse student body. The IRP itself sponsors regular public events at The New School, including the annual conference on elder abuse.

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Typical Study Groups The study group is the heart of the IRP experience. Study groups are scheduled mornings and afternoons Monday through Thursday and Friday mornings. A small curriculum is now being offered in summer term as well. Class sizes range from 12 to 35. Every term, 20 or so new groups are started and the same number of old ones dropped. Some recent course titles are listed below. Literature and Arts World Dance T.S. Eliot Greek Drama Joyce’s Ulysses Jane Austen History of Jazz Plays of Albee and O’Neill Irish Poetry Japanese Literature Literature of Baseball Benjamin Britten Politics in 20th-Century Music Virginia Woolf Public Affairs The Constitution Human History and the Environment Globalism The Origins of War Great Decisions Socio-cultural Issues Immigration Policy Gender Issues Race and Society Slavery Past and Present 20th-Century Migrations Bioethics News Without Newspapers

Science and Psychology Cosmology 20th-Century Physics Origins of Personality Mathematics and the Arts Brain, Mind, and Consciousness Philosophy of Science Genetics Art and Physics Workshops Writer’s Workshop Watercolor Painting Area Studies Hispanic/Latino Experience The Pacific Rim Understanding Islam History American Radicals Early Civilizations Byzantium The Middle Ages Brazil’s History and Culture Russian History: 900–1917 Chinese History and Culture The American West Gay History and Literature The Harlem Renaissance

Social and Other Activities Learning in the IRP is both a social and an intellectual experience. Common learning interests provide a foundation for new friendships. In addition to classroom activities, the IRP sponsors group art shows, special lectures, and readings; publishes a literary journal; organizes urban walks, day trips, and domestic and international study trips; and offers inexpensive tickets to many cultural events.


POETRY WRITING WORLD POLICY MUSIC LITERATURE ART LECTURES ETHICS PHILOSOPHY PHOTOGRAPHY ARCHITECTURE COLLABORATION COMMUNITY READINGS TECHNOLOGY MEDIA STUDIES FILM POETRY WRITING MUSIC WORLD POLICY LITERATURE ART LECTURES ETHICS PHILOSOPHY WRITING ARCHITECTURE COLLABORATION COMMUNITY READINGS TECHNOLOGY MEDIA STUDIES FILM POETRY WRITING WORLD POLICY MUSIC LITERATURE ART

LEC-

TURES ETHICS PHILOSOPHY PHOTOGRAPHY ARCHITECTURE COMMUNITY READINGS TECHNOLOGY MEDIA STUDIES FILM POETRY WRITING MUSIC WORLD POLICY LITERATURE ART LECTURES ETHICS PHILOSOPHY WRITING ARCHITECTURE COLLABORATION COMMUNITY READINGS TECHNOLOGY MEDIA STUDIES FILM POETRY WRITING WORLD POLICY MUSIC LITERATURE ART LECTURES ETHICS PHILOSOPHY PHOTOGRAPHY ARCHITECTURE COMMUNITY READINGS TECHNOLOGY MEDIA STUDIES FILM POETRY WRITING MUSIC ARTS

ABOUT THE NEW SCHOOL The New School for Public GeneralEngagement Studies Educational Programs and Services The University University Administration Policies Administrative Other DivisionsPolicies of the University www.newschool.edu/public-engagement

www.newschool.edu/

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FA A BLOLU2T 0T1H2E PNUEBW LIC S CPHROOOGLR A M S

THE NEW SCHOOL FOR PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT David Scobey, Executive Dean, The New School for Public Engagement Kathleen Breidenbach, Vice Dean Celesti Colds Fechter, Associate Dean for Academic Services L.H.M. Ling, Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs Joseph Heathcott, Associate Dean for Academic Initiatives Nicholas Allanach, Director of Academic Operations Thelma Armstrong, Executive Assistant to the Dean Seth Cohen, Director of Administrative Services Merida Escandon, Director of Admission Emily Martin, Assistant Dean of Academic Operations Suk Mei Man, Director of Academic Systems Cecilia Ponte, Director of Faculty Affairs Chrissy Roden, Director of Academic Student Services Pamela Tillis, Director of Public Programs Allen Austill, Dean Emeritus

The New School was founded in 1919 as a center for “discussion, instruction, and counseling for mature men and women.” It became America’s first university for adults. Over the years, it has grown into an urban university enrolling more than 10,000 students in undergraduate and graduate degree programs. The New School for Public Engagement, the founding division of the university, has never neglected its o­ riginal mission. It continues to serve the intellectual, cultural, artistic, and professional needs and interests of adult students. The curriculum published in this bulletin offers an enormous range of opportunities for intellectual inquiry and skills development. Certain values inform the process of preparing a curriculum each term. These were articulated in a statement of purpose prepared by a University Commission on Continuing Education in the spring of 1984: “The New School does not set any limits to its p ­ rograms in regard to subject matter. Whatever ­seriously interests persons of mature intelligence properly falls within the province of the school. History and philosophy, the social and behavioral sciences, literature and art, the natural and b­ io­logical sciences, e­ ducation, and ethics naturally take up a significant part of the New School curriculum, since these are the fields in which the forces of ­culture and change are most significantly active, and in which human beings, their institutions, and their products are directly studied. The centrality of the liberal arts is maintained and strengthened in every possible way, but not to the exclusion of o­ ther educational programs that serve a legitimate need for mature adults in a mature community.” Some of the finest minds of the 20th century developed unique courses at The New School. W.E.B. DuBois taught the first course on race and African-American culture offered at a university; Karen Horney and Sandor Ferenczi introduced the insights and conflicts of psychoanalysis; Charles Abrams was the first to explore the complex issues of urban housing; the first university course on the history of film was taught at this institution; and in the early sixties, Gerda Lerner offered the first university course in women’s studies. Over the years, lectures, s­ eminars, and courses have examined most of the important national and i­nternational issues of our time. To this day, many talented teachers and professionals choose The New School as a place to introduce new courses and explore new ideas. The New School maintains its tradition of educational innovation and keeps its place on the cutting edge of intellectual and creative life in New York City. Accreditation The New School and its degree programs are fully a­ ccredited by the Commission on Higher Education of the Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. Its credits and degrees are r­ ecognized and accepted by other accredited colleges, universities, and professional schools throughout the United States. The New School, a privately supported institution, is chartered as a u ­ niversity by the Regents of the State of New York. 38

Board of Governors of The New School for Public Engagement Gail S. Landis Randall S. Yanker, Chair Robert A. Levinson Anthony J. Mannarino, Vice Chair Bevis Longstreth George C. Biddle Victor Navasky Hans Brenninkmeyer Lawrence H. Parks, Jr. James-Keith (JK) Brown Julien J. Studley Gwenn L. Carr Monsignor Kevin Sullivan Christopher J. Castano Paul A. Travis John A. Catsimatidis Judith Zarin Marian Lapsley Cross Susan U. Halpern, Esq. Jeffrey J. Hodgman Honorary Members Joan L. Jacobson The Honorable David N. Dinkins Alan Jenkins Lewis H. Lapham Eugene J. Keilin

EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS AND SERVICES The New School is committed to creating and maintaining an environment of diversity and tolerance in all areas of employment, education, and access to educational, artistic, and cultural programs and activities. It does not discriminate on the basis of age, race, color, sexual orientation, gender (including gender identity and expression), pregnancy, religion, religious practices, mental or physical disability, national or ethnic origin, citizenship status, veteran status, marital or partnership status, or other protected status. Students with disabilities should read Services for Students with Disabilities in this bulletin for information about obtaining accommodation of their needs and how to proceed if they feel such accommodation has been denied. Students who feel they have suffered disability discrimination other than denial of reasonable accommodation, or discrimination on any basis described above, may file a complaint pursuant to the University Policy on Discrimination (see University Policies Governing Student Conduct on the website at www.newschool.edu/studentservices/rights/other-policies). Inquiries about the application of laws and regulations concerning equal employment and educational opportunity at The New School, including Title VI (race, color, or national origin), Section 504 (people with disabilities), and Title IX (gender) may be referred to the office of the General Counsel, The New School, 80 Fifth Ave., suite 801, New York, NY 10011. Inquiries may also be referred to the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs, U.S. Department of Labor, 23 Federal Plaza, New York, NY 10278, or the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), New York District Office, 201 Varick Street, Suite 1009, New York, NY 10014. For individuals with hearing impairments, EEOC’s TDD number is 212.741.3080.

Study Options Noncredit The majority of courses in this bulletin can be taken on a noncredit basis. ­Noncredit students pay tuition and fees as listed in the course d ­ escriptions. Noncredit students are entitled to receive the instructor’s ­evaluation of any assigned coursework they complete, but no letter grades are reported. Except for students in certificate programs (see opposite), the university does not maintain a permanent or official record of noncredit enrollment. We can provide a noncredit record of attendance, which may be used for tuition reimbursement from your employer or for your own records. This record of attendance must be requested during the term in which the course is taken. See Records, Grades, and Transcripts in this bulletin. There is a fee for this service.


SG CR HA OM O LS FA L L A2B0O1U2T PTUHBEL IN C E PWR O

General Credit (Nonmatriculated) A student interested in earning undergraduate college credits may register on a general credit basis for most courses in this bulletin, accumulating a maximum of 24 ­credits without matriculating. The number of credits awarded for any course is shown in parentheses at the end of the course description. The ­student receives a letter grade in each course and is entitled to transcripts of record. A general credit student is outside any degree program at The New School and is registered on a nonmatriculated basis. General credit students have ­limited access to university facilities: They have access to The New School’s Fogelman and Gimbel Libraries but not to the Bobst or Cooper Union Libraries; they do not have access to academic computing facilities unless they are enrolled in a course that includes such access. Answers to most questions about access to ­facilities can be found on the website at www.newschool.edu/resources. Credits are ­usually transferable to the New School Bachelor’s and other undergraduate degree programs, but it is seldom possible to determine in advance whether credits will be accepted by a particular institution; that will be decided by the school and for a particular degree program. When possible, students taking courses for transfer to another school should confirm that the credits will be accepted before they register here. You should consider registering for general credit if you think you will need an official record of your course work for any reason: you are testing your ability to handle college-level study; to qualify for a salary increment from the Board of Edu­cation (NYC or other employer); to make up educational deficiencies (prerequisites for an MA, for example); to fulfill a ­language requirement for graduate school; or for career advancement. Specific requirements for credit vary from course to course, and each ­student is responsible for learning from the instructor what they are: the books to be read, the paper(s) to be written, and other criteria to be used for evaluation. General credit registration for any course should be completed before the first class session. General credit registration for 9 or more credits requires prior approval and must be completed in p­ erson. Schedule an advising appointment with Academic Services: 212.229.5615; academicservices@newschool.edu. General credit tuition for courses in this catalog is $1,170 per credit for undergraduate students, and an $80 University Services Fee is charged each term at registration. Certificates The New School for Public Engagement awards certificates of completion in several areas of study. A certificate attests to successful completion of a structured program of courses designed to establish proficiency in a specific field. For more information, contact the Office of the Dean: call 212.229.5615. The following certificates are currently offered: Creative Arts Therapy (HEGIS code 5299.00) English as a Second Language (noncredit only) Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (HEGIS code 5608.00) TESOL Summer Institute certificates (noncredit only) Film Production (HEGIS code 5610.00) Screenwriting (HEGIS code 5610.00) Each certificate has specific requirements, and certificates are offered only as specified. Consult the particular sections of this bulletin or visit the website for information about these requirements and necessary ­educational advising. All certificate students are responsible for knowing and completing attendance and aca­demic performance requirements for their courses. Tuition for Certificate Students: Tuition for noncredit certificate students is the tuition listed with the course descriptions in this catalog. If the student is taking the course for credit, tuition depends on the student’s status and the number of ­credits assigned to the course.

Registration: All certificate students must have their programs approved by the appropriate course advisor before they register, must register in person, and must specifically request certificate ­status for each approved course at registration. Certificate students pay the $80 University Services Fee each term at registration. Grades and Records: Certificate students receive a grade of Approved (AP) or Not Approved (NA) at the conclusion of a course. (Credit students should consult their program advisor to find out the minimum letter grade required for Certificate Approval.) Permanent records are maintained for all certificate students, and transcripts are available. Request for Certificate: A student who has completed all the requirements of a certificate p ­ rogram should file the Petition for Certificate form available at the Registrar’s Office. Certificates are conferred in January, May, and August.

Study Online www.newschool.edu/online

The New School is a pioneer in extending teaching and learning into the Internet environment. Distance learning courses, online enhancement of campus courses, and public programs and discussions are available through the online portal. Using an Internet connection, you can enter The New School from anywhere in the world, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Visit www.newschool.edu/online to learn more. More than 300 courses are offered in the full distance learning environment every year, enrolling more than 2,000 credit and noncredit students. Students matriculated in the New School for Public Engagement Undergraduate Program and graduate programs in Media Studies and TESOL can take some or all of their courses online. For additional information about degree programs online, contact the Office of Admission, 72 Fifth Avenue, 3rd floor, 212.229.5630, or email nsadmissions@newschool.edu.

Libraries and Computing Facilities The Raymond Fogelman Library has relocated to 55 West 13th Street. Emphasizing the social sciences, the Fogelman Library is the principal library for New School students. The Adam and Sophie Gimbel Library on the second floor of the Sheila Johnson Design Center (enter at 2 West 13th Street) has a rich art and design collection. The Harry Scherman Library at Mannes College The New School for Music, 150 West 85th Street, is devoted to European and American classical music. Reference services and instruction in library resources and technologies are available at all libraries. For ­further information about library services and procedures, consult with the reference librarians on duty in the libraries or visit www.newschool.edu/library. In order to visit the libraries, a student must present a valid New School ID card. Students taking courses for credit or certificate and members of the IRP are entitled to a photo ID. Noncredit students receive a New School ID without photo valid for the duration of their course(s) and must show a personal photo ID with their New School ID to use the library. Many library services are available online at library.newschool.edu. Computing Facilities All students matriculated in certificate programs have access to the Academic Computing Center, with Windows workstations and printers, and the University Computing Center, with Macintosh and Windows workstations, laser printers, and plug-in stations for laptops. Computing centers are part of the Arnhold Hall Multimedia Laboratory at 55 West 13th Street. Nonmatriculated students have only limited access to these facilities, which is described in the tech help and access directories on the website: www.newschool.edu/at/help/helpdir. 39


ABOUT THE NEW SCHOOL

International Student Services The New School is authorized under federal law to enroll non-immigrant alien students. The mission of International Student Services is to help international students reach their full potential and have positive experiences at The New School and, in cooperation with other departments, faculty, staff, and the students themselves, to promote diversity and foster respect for cultures from all over the world. International Student Services helps international students help themselves through printed handouts, orientations, and workshops, and individual advice and support. Before registering, all international students are required to attend an orientation and check in with International Student Services to confirm that they have been properly admitted into the United States and to review their rights, responsibilities, and regulations. Visit the website at www.newschool.edu/studentservices.

Students develop their programs from the hundreds of courses described in this bulletin and other courses open to degree students only. Visit the website to see a current list of courses. In addition, they may select courses offered by Eugene Lang College The New School for Liberal Arts, Parsons The New School for Design, and Mannes College The New School for Music Extension. Advanced undergraduates and those approved for a bachelor’s/master’s option can take graduate courses offered in Media Studies or International Affairs or other graduate programs of the university. Every student in the New School for Public Engagement’s Undergraduate Program is responsible for organizing the course offerings of The New School into a coherent academic program. To do so requires thoughtful planning and consideration of a v­ ariety of options. Each student forms a strong relationship with a faculty advisor with whom s/he talks through options, gains access to the full range of curricular resources available in the university, and shapes a group of courses into a coherent program suited to individual needs and interests. Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Science

Services for Students with Disabilities The Office of Student Disability Services shares the university’s philosophy of encouraging all students to reach their highest levels of achievement and recognizing and embracing individual differences. Student Disability Services assists students with disabilities in obtaining equal access to academic and programmatic services as required by the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) and Section 504 of the Federal Rehabilitation Act of 1973. For more information about Student Disability Services, please visit www.newschool.edu/studentservices. Students who have disabilities are encouraged to self-identify. While there is no deadline by which to identify oneself as having a disability, early disclosure helps ensure that reasonable accommodations can be made prior to the start of the student’s courses. Once a student has self-identified, a meeting will be arranged to review appropriate medical documentation from a qualified clinician and discuss the student’s needs and concerns. Students who need special accommodations, please contact Student Disability Services: 212.229.5626; studentdisability@newschool.edu. Students with disabilities who feel they have been denied reasonable accommodation should follow the procedure provided for by the New School Policy for Requesting Reasonable Accommodations available on the website at www.newschool.edu/studentservices/rights/other-policies or at the Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities.

THE NEW SCHOOL FOR PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM www.newschool.edu/nspe/undergrad Bea Banu, Dean of the School of Undergraduate Studies

An Individualized Degree Program for Adults and Transfer Students The New School for Public Engagement’s Undergraduate Program is designed specifically for adult s­ tudents who are committed to completing their undergraduate education with a solid foundation in the liberal arts. Within a set of broad guidelines and working closely with a f­ aculty advisor, each student chooses courses that make sense for his or her personal goals. Students can attend part- or full-time, on campus, online, or by combining on-site and online courses.

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The New School for Public Engagement bachelor’s degree in liberal arts requires satisfactory completion of 120 credits. The Bachelor of Arts degree requires a minimum of 90 credits in the liberal arts and sciences. For the Bachelor of Science degree, a student must complete a minimum of 60 credits in the liberal arts and sciences. The liberal arts and sciences, as defined by the New School Bachelor’s Program, correspond generally to the following chapters of the New School Bulletin: Social Sciences Writing Humanities Foreign Languages Media Studies and Film English Language Studies Screenwriting Food Studies Bachelor of Arts students may elect to include up to 30 credits, and Bachelor of Science students up to 60 credits, in non-liberal arts areas of study, again corresponding roughly to sections of the New School for Public Engagement Bulletin, such as Management and Business, Visual and Performing Arts, Media and Film Production, and Film and Media Business. New School for Public Engagement Undergraduate Program students may also take university undergraduate courses in Environmental Studies and Global Studies. (Note: The New School also offers the BFA degree in Musical Theater to graduates of the American Musical and Dramatic Academy integrated program. Contact the Office of Admission, 212.229.5630, for information about the AMDA program.) Complete information about admission and degree requirements, financial aid, course offerings, facilities and student services is published in the New School for Public Engagement Bulletin, available as a PDF on the website at www.newschool.edu/nspe/undergrad. Admission Matt Morgan, Assistant Director of Undergraduate Admission

The Office of Admission is open throughout the year to assist prospective students. Any student i­nterested in a degree program should make an appointment to speak with a counselor: Call 212.229.5150; email admission@newschool.edu; or come in person to 72 Fifth Avenue. Office hours are 9:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.


ABOUT THE NEW SCHOOL

THE UNIVERSITY www.newschool.edu

The New School for Public Engagement is one of seven divisions of The New School, a unique urban university offering undergraduate, graduate, and continuing education programs in the liberal arts and social sciences, design, and the performing arts. The other divisions are described briefly below. The New School is located in Manhattan’s Greenwich Village, with a few facilities elsewhere in Manhattan. There is a map on the inside back cover of this catalog that includes all facilities of the university. The New School provides the following institutional information on the university website at www.newschool.edu: FERPA (Family Education Rights and Privacy Act); financial assistance information (federal, state, local, private, and institutional need-based and non-need-based assistance programs, Title IV, FFEL, and Direct Loan deferments); institutional policies (fees, refund policies, withdrawing from school, academic information, disability services); completion/graduation and transfer-out rates (graduation rate of degree-seeking students, transfer-out rate of degreeseeking students). To request copies of any of these reports, contact the appropriate office as listed on the website.

THE DIVISIONS OF THE NEW SCHOOL As we approach the 100th anniversary of the university’s founding, The New School’s legacy of change remains a source of pride. The New School has been evolving since the day it began offering nondegree courses for working adults, responding to changes in the marketplace of ideas, career opportunities, and human curiosity. Each area of study, degree program, and school within the university has a unique story—from the founding division’s focus on nontraditional students to the new approaches to design, management, urban policy, and the performing arts introduced by the divisions that have become part of The New School since the 1970s. Today undergraduate, graduate, and continuing education students still come to The New School expecting a university like no other. For that reason, the story of The New School’s seven divisions, themselves the products of continuous reinvention, occupies a special place in the history of higher education. Visit the home page of each division for information about degrees offered and areas of study. Eugene Lang College The New School for Liberal Arts www.newschool.edu/lang 65 West 11th Street, New York NY 10011 | 212.229.5665 Eugene Lang College is The New School’s four-year liberal arts college for traditional-age undergraduates. The college began in 1972 as the Freshman Year Program, an experimental program for high school seniors. It became the Seminar College, a full-time bachelor’s program, in 1975 and a separate division of the university in 1985. This bold experiment in undergraduate education is named in honor of New School trustee Eugene M. Lang, a generous supporter of the college. Students at Eugene Lang College enjoy small seminar-style classes taught by a faculty of prominent scholars, many of whom are also affiliated with the graduate departments of The New School for Social Research. Lang’s location in the center of a major metropolitan area offers its students opportunities for civic engagement and internships available to students of few other small liberal arts schools.

Mannes College The New School for Music www.newschool.edu/mannes 150 West 85th Street, New York, NY 10024 | 212.580.0210 Founded in 1916 by David Mannes and Clara Damrosch, Mannes College became part of The New School in 1989. Mannes is one of the leading classical music conservatories in the world, providing professional training for a select group of talented student musicians. A comprehensive curriculum and faculty of world-class artists enable students to attain virtuosity in vocal and instrumental music, conducting, composition, and theory. Students also enjoy access to the resources of the university as a whole. Like the students they teach, Mannes faculty members come from every corner of the world. They include performers and conductors from prominent orchestras, ensembles, and opera companies and renowned solo performers, composers, and scholars in every field of classical music. Mannes offers undergraduate and graduate music degrees, professional diplomas, an extension program for adults, and a preparatory program for children. The New School for Drama www.newschool.edu/drama 151 Bank Street, New York, NY 10014 | 212.229.5150 The New School has been a center of innovation in theater since Erwin Piscator brought his Dramatic Workshop here from Europe in the 1940s. His students included Marlon Brando, Walter Matthau, Harry Belafonte, Elaine Stritch, and Tennessee Williams. Piscator established a tradition of excellence in theater education that continues at The New School today. The New School for Drama began in 1994 as a program to train talented individuals for careers in the theater as actors, directors, and playwrights. The New School’s New York City setting offers students abundant opportunities to learn through observation and make professional connections through the broadest theater career network in the United States. The New School for Jazz and Contemporary Music www.newschool.edu/jazz 55 West 13th Street, New York, NY 10011 | 212.229.5896 In 1986, The New School established an undergraduate program offering talented young musicians the opportunity to study with professional artists from New York City’s peerless jazz community. The teaching model is based on the tradition of the artist as mentor: Our students study and perform with some of the world’s most accomplished musicians. They are immersed in the history and theory of and latest developments in jazz, blues, pop, and the everevolving genres of contemporary music. Learning takes place in classrooms, student ensembles, one-on-one tutorials, public performances, and master classes. Students develop their creative talents to meet the high standards of professional musicianship exemplified by the legendary faculty. The New School for Public Engagement www.newschool.edu/public-engagement 66 West 12th Street, New York, NY 10011 | 212.229.5615 The New School for Public Engagement embodies the values that motivated the university’s founders in 1919. The division was renamed in 2011 to reflect its position as an enterprise designed to connect theory to practice, foster innovation in culture and communication, and promote democratic citizenship through lifelong education. The division offers undergraduate degree programs for adult and transfer students and graduate degrees and certificates in its schools of languages, media studies, and writing and in the Milano School of International Affairs, Management, and Urban Policy. The division also offers hundreds of open-enrollment continuing education courses on campus in Greenwich Village and online.

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ABOUT THE NEW SCHOOL

The New School for Social Research www.newschool.edu/socialresearch 16 East 16th Street, New York, NY 10003 | 212.229.5700 In 1933, The New School gave a home to the University in Exile, a refuge for scholars fleeing persecution by the Nazis. In 1934, The New School incorporated this community as a graduate school of political and social science. Today’s graduate students enjoy opportunities to cross disciplinary boundaries and collaborate with scholars, designers, and artists in other divisions of the university. The New School for Social Research addresses the most urgent political, cultural, and economic concerns of the day and upholds the highest standards of critical inquiry. Parsons The New School for Design www.newschool.edu/parsons 2 West 13th Street, New York, NY 10011 | 212.229.8950 Parsons is one of the world’s preeminent colleges of art and design. Founded in 1896 by artist William Merritt Chase and his circle, Parsons was renamed in 1936 for its longtime president, Frank Alvah Parsons, who dedicated his career to integrating visual art and industrial design. Parsons became part of The New School in 1970. It was the first institution in the United States to award university degrees in fashion design, interior design, advertising and graphic design (originally commercial illustration), and lighting design. Parsons has earned and maintained an international reputation as a school at the vanguard of design education. Students in its undergraduate and graduate degree programs hold themselves to exceptional standards of creativity and scholarship, developing their skills and building knowledge in laboratories, workshops, and seminars. Parsons offers general art and design courses and certificate programs for students of all ages. Visit the home page of each division for information about degrees offered and areas of study.

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION David E. Van Zandt, President Tim Marshall, Provost and Chief Academic Officer Anne Adriance, Chief Marketing Officer Andy Atzert, Vice President for Distributed and Global Education Carol S. Cantrell, Senior Vice President for Human Resources and Labor

Relations

Chris Ferguson, Vice President for Strategic Enrollment Management Lia Gartner, Vice President for Design, Construction and Facilities

Management

Kerry Kruckel, Chief Development Officer Roy P. Moskowitz, Chief Legal Officer and Secretary of the Corporation Anand Padmanabhan, Senior Vice President and Chief Information Officer Linda Abrams Reimer, Senior Vice President for Student Services Michelle Relyea, Vice President for Student Success Donald Resnick, Chief Enrollment and Success Officer Bryna Sanger, Deputy Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic

Affairs

Tokumbo Shobowale, Chief Operating Officer Steve Stabile, Vice President for Finance and Business and Treasurer

42

Deans and Directors Stephanie Browner, Dean, Eugene Lang College

The New School for Liberal Arts

Contemporary Music

Richard Kessler, Dean, Mannes College The New School for Music Martin Mueller, Executive Director, The New School for Jazz and Pippin Parker, Director, The New School for Drama William Milberg, Dean, The New School for Social Research David Scobey, Executive Dean, The New School for Public Engagement Joel Towers, Executive Dean, Parsons The New School for Design

Visit the website at www.newschool.edu for the university board of trustees as well as information about administrative and academic offices.

UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATIVE POLICIES University Registrar William Kimmel, Assistant Vice President and University Registrar Jennifer Simmons, Associate Registrar

Student Financial Services Lisa Shaheen, Director of Financial Aid Barbara Garcia, Director of Student Accounts Leslie King, Associate Director of Financial Aid Lisa Banfield, Associate Director of Financial Aid Lissette Gonzalez, Associate Director of Student Accounts Johanna Torres, Associate Director of Student Accounts

The administrative policies of The New School are designed to expedite enrollment in our courses and make our facilities and services accessible to all. The registrar’s office, Student Financial Services, and other student services offices at 72 Fifth Avenue are open to assist students throughout the year. Policies as stated in the following pages apply to certificate and nonmatriculated (noncredit/nondegree) students at The New School for General Studies. Students interested in undergraduate degrees offered by The New School for General Studies or courses, programs, and degrees offered by The New School for Social Research, Parsons The New School for Design, Milano The New School for Manage­ment and Urban Policy, Mannes College The New School for Music, The New School for Jazz and Contemporary Music, Eugene Lang College The New School for Liberal Arts, and The New School for Drama should consult the appropriate school’s website or catalog for tuition and fees as well as other administrative and academic information. Visit www.newschool.edu.

Student Accounts and Records All registered students can access their personal current student information on the Internet through a secure connection. Go to my.newschool.edu and follow the links to look up your Net ID and set or reset your password. You will need your New School ID number (N plus 8 digits). Once you log in, click the Student tab for access to up-to-date records of your student ­activities, including your enrollment in courses, the status of your tuition and fees (paid, owed, refundable), and, if you enrolled as a credit or certificate student, your grades. You can also authorize parents, guardians, or employers to view your student accounts and make payments on charges due.


ABOUT THE NEW SCHOOL

Students are responsible for keeping their own addresses and telephone numbers current in university records. They can update this information online at my.newschool.edu as necessary. Note: All university correspondence will be mailed to the address designated “official” in the student’s record and/or emailed to the student’s email address. For family educational rights and privacy policies, see page 47.

Tuition and Fees

Authorization letters and forms should be faxed to 212.229.8582; mailed to The New School, attention Third Party Billing, 79 Fifth Avenue, 5th floor, New York, NY 10003; or brought in person to the cashiering office at 72 Fifth Avenue. Payment may be made online at my.newschool.edu by ACH or credit card, or by faxing a credit card authorization along with the deferral form to 212.229.8582. Payment of all charges is the responsibility of the student. The student is liable for any and all deferred charges that the employer does not pay for any reason. The student’s liability is not contingent on receiving grades, receiving passing grades, or completing courses. Terms of Reimbursement

Tuition and fees are payable in full at the time of registration. Payment may be made by bank debit card or cash (in person only for both), personal check, credit card (MasterCard, Visa, Discover, American Express), or wire transfer. Please make checks payable to The New School and include the student’s name and (if assigned) New School ID number in the memo section. Registration is not complete until payment or payment arrangements, such as verification of employer reimbursement (see the next page), have been made. Confirmation is the Statement/Schedule received at the cashier (mailed to students who register online or by fax, mail, or telephone). Verify the accuracy of your class schedule: You are not registered for and will not earn credit for any course that does not appear on your class schedule. You are responsible for all courses and charges that appear on the statement/schedule.

Tuition and Fees: Continuing Education Student Status

Tuition

Materials Fees, etc.

University Services Fees

Noncredit

Stated in each course description in this catalog

Stated in course description if applicable

Registration fee: $7 per term

Undergraduate General Credit

$1,170 per credit

Same as above

$80 per term

Noncredit Certificate

The noncredit tuition

Same as above

$80 per term

Payment to the university is the responsibility of the student. Liability for tuition and fees is not contingent on completing courses, receiving grades, receiving passing grades, or realization of financial aid awards or loans. Failure to complete payment does not void your registration nor charges due. Contact Student Financial Services at 212.229.8930 with inquiries about payment of tuition and fees (or email sfs@newschool.edu using your New School email account if you have one). Access your personal account information online at my.newschool.edu.

If the reimbursement will be made upon receipt of grades: There is a participation fee of $150, and the student must complete both the Employer Reimbursement Deferment Form and the Deferral Credit Card Payment Authorization. (These forms can be downloaded from the website: go to www.newschool.edu/studentservices and select Billing and Payment.) Payment of the $150 participation fee and any balance of tuition and university fees not covered by the authorization letter must be made prior to or submitted with the deferment forms. Deferred charges must by paid in full by February 1 for the fall semester, June 15 for the spring semester, and August 15 for summer term. If payment is not contingent on receipt of grades and The New School can bill the employer directly: There is no participation fee. The student submits only the Employer Reimbursement Deferment Form (found on the website; see above) with the employer authorization letter. The New School will send an invoice for payment to the employer according to the authorization. Payment for any balance due not covered by the authorization letter must be made prior to or submitted with the deferment form. For answers to questions regarding employer reimbursement, email sfs@newschool.edu or call 212.229.8930. Tax Deduction for Education Under certain circumstances, educational expenses undertaken to maintain or improve job skills may be deductible for income tax purposes. Students are advised to bring this to the attention of their tax advisors. Returned Check Policy If, for any reason, a check does not clear for payment, a penalty of $30 is charged to the student’s account. The university cannot presume that a student has withdrawn from classes because a check has not cleared or has been stopped; payment and penalty remain due. Payment for the amount of the returned check and the $30 penalty must be made with cash, certified bank check, or money order; another personal check will not be accepted. An additional 10 percent penalty is charged if payment for a returned check is not received within four weeks. After a second returned check, all future charges must be paid with cash, certified bank check, or money order, and no further personal checks or ACH online payments will be accepted. If it becomes necessary to forward an account to a collection agency, an additional 10 percent penalty will be charged on the remaining balance.

Deferral of Payment for Employer Reimbursement Students expecting reimbursement from an employer or sponsor may defer payment of tuition and fees by submitting a signed authorization letter on official employer/sponsor letterhead along with the appropriate deferral form(s) as described below. This may be done by mail or fax or in person, but not by email. The authorization letter must show a current date and must include the student’s full name (and, if available, the student’s New School ID number), the amount to be reimbursed, the academic term for which the charges will be covered, the signer’s address and telephone number, and the specific terms for reimbursement (either contingent on receipt of grades or else billable upon registration; see below). Any portion of charges that the employer has not agreed to pay may not be deferred. Certificate and nonmatriculated students must submit these forms with their registration forms.

Cancellations, Refunds, Add/Drop, Status Changes Students are responsible for knowing university policies regarding adding or dropping courses and refund of tuition and fees. The policies and deadlines published in this bulletin are applicable to all certificate and nonmatriculated (noncredit or general credit) students. Students matriculated in the New School Bachelor’s Program should consult the Bachelor’s Program PDF catalog on the program website. Students taking courses in other divisions of the university should consult the appropriate school or program online catalog for policies and deadlines applicable to their programs.

43


ABOUT THE NEW SCHOOL

Schedule and Status Changes

Grade of “W”

Withdrawals, transfers from one course to another, registration for ­additional courses, and changes of status (e.g., from noncredit to credit) must be completed within the deadlines shown in the table opposite. Transfers from one course to another and changes of status can be made in person or in writing by fax. (They may not be made by telephone or email.) Any additional tuition or fees resulting from a course transfer or status change are payable at the time the change is made.

A student taking any course for academic credit may withdraw from the course without academic penalty by filing a request for a grade of “W” with the Registrar’s Office within the appropriate deadline. Deadlines are given in the Add/Drop Schedule at right. A grade of “W” will be recorded for the course, which will appear on the student’s transcript. Deadlines for refunds of tuition and fees, described in the same Add/Drop Schedule, will apply.

Certificate students must obtain advisor approval for all program changes, including withdrawals, grade of “W,” add/drop, and status changes.

Summer Add/Drop and Refund Deadlines

Refunds for Canceled Courses The New School reserves the right to cancel courses or to adjust the curriculum. Courses may be canceled due to insufficient enrollment, the withdrawal of the instructor, or inability to schedule appropriate instructional space.

Classroom Courses Schedule

If you are registered in a course that is canceled, you will be notified by telephone or email. You will be asked if you wish to transfer to another course or if you wish a full refund of tuition and fees (including registration fees). If you are a certificate student, consult with your advisor in the event one of your courses is canceled. Withdrawals and Refunds: Continuing Education Requests to withdraw from a class or obtain a refund must be made in writing. Include your first and last name, date of birth or New School ID number, and the course from which you would like to withdraw. For convenience, you may use the Request to Drop form available at www.newschool.edu/ce-drop-form.

Deadline to add or change status

• By fax to 212.229.5648

Credit student withdrawal for grade of “W”

11 or more sessions

Before 3rd session

Before 1st session (full refund) Before 4th session (10% per session)

Between 4th & 7th sessions

6–10 sessions

Before 2nd session

Before 1st session (full refund) Before 3rd session (15% per session)

Between 3rd & 4th sessions

3–5 sessions

Before 2nd session

Before 1st session (full refund) Before 2nd session (30% charged)

Not applicable

1–2 sessions

Before 1st session

Before 1st session (full refund)

Not applicable

Summer Writers Colony

Before 3rd session

May 25 No refund after May 25

Before 7th session

You may submit your request by email, fax, mail, or in person. • By email to reghelp@newschool.edu using the same email address you provided upon registration.

Deadline for tuition refunds (tuition charged)

• By mail to The New School, Registrar’s Office, 72 Fifth Ave., New York, NY 10011 • In person at 72 Fifth Ave., 4th floor The following policies apply. • Full refund of course tuition requires advance withdrawal. Otherwise the refund will be pro-rated—see the Add/Drop table at right.

Online Courses 9 weeks

Before end of week 2 (week 1 of the course is orientation)

• Refunds are computed from the date and time the written notice is received in the ­Registrar’s Office, or the date of the postmark if the notice is mailed. • The registration/university services fee is not refundable unless a student’s withdrawal is due to a change of course schedule or instructor or the course is canceled by the university. • Withdrawals or refund requests may not be made by telephone. • Refunds of fees paid by credit card will be processed as a credit to that same account. • Failure to attend classes or notification to the instructor does not ­constitute official withdrawal. Failure to make or complete payment does not constitute official withdrawal. • Questions? Email reghelp@newschool.edu or call 212.229.5620.

Refund processing takes approximately four weeks.

44

End of week 1, 100% refund End of week 2, 90% End of week 3, 80% End of week 4, 70%

End of 5th week

Admission to Class The New School reserves the right to deny a person admission to or ­continuance in its courses of study. All persons wishing to attend any course at The New School must be properly registered. Students should be prepared to show a valid Statement/Schedule to the instructor or designated faculty services a­ ssistant for admission to any class. Possession of a current New School student ID card does not entitle the bearer to attend any particular course or session of a course. For classroom locations visit my.newschool.edu and select the Class Finder link (do not log in). Classrooms are also posted daily in the lobby at 66 West 12th Street. See the last page of this catalog for more information. Instructions for accessing online courses will be mailed to you.


ABOUT THE NEW SCHOOL

The Statement/Schedule is issued by the Office of Student Financial Services upon receipt of payment. If you register by mail, telephone, or fax, or on the Web, your Statement/Schedule will be mailed to you. Please retain this form. If you have not yet received your Statement/Schedule or have forgotten or lost it, you will be admitted to the class if your name appears on the class ­roster. You can access your course schedule online at my.newschool.edu (you will need your New School student ID number). Student ID Card Upon receipt of payment, noncredit students are mailed a New School ID card (without photo) valid only for the academic term in which they are enrolled. Please carry this ID whenever you come to The New School and be prepared to show it to security staff on request. If you do not receive your ID card within two weeks of registration, contact Student Financial Services at sfs@newschool.edu or 212.229.8930. All students taking courses for credit or certificate and members of the IRP are entitled to a student photo ID card. New students should obtain the photo ID as soon as they complete payment or payment arrangements. See the last page of this bulletin for Photo ID office location and hours. If your photo ID has been lost or stolen, call the Campus Card Services Office, 212.229.5660 x4472, to check if the card has been returned. There is a fee to replace a lost or stolen ID card. If you withdraw from your courses, The New School may terminate your student privileges, including access to university buildings and resources. Campus Security The New School employs a security staff to monitor and maintain the rights, privileges, and safety of members of the university community and the security of university property. It is assumed that members of the community will comply with security measures such as the checking of ID cards at building entrances and will report incidents to the security staff, if and when they occur. The university’s latest crime reporting statistics can be viewed at www.newschool.edu/security. Admission to Public Programs Tickets to lectures, readings, concerts, and other events listed in the front of this bulletin with a fee but without a course registration number are available at the Box Office in the lobby of the Johnson Building, 66 West 12th Street. Visit www.newschool.edu/publicprograms, call 212.229.5353, or email specialprograms@newschool.edu for more information about New School events that are open to the public.

Academic Honesty The university community, in order to fulfill its purposes, must maintain high standards of academic behavior. All members of the community are expected to exhibit honesty in their academic work. Students have a responsibility to acquaint themselves with and make use of proper procedures for writing papers, taking examinations, and doing research. The principle of academic honesty is understood to apply to all student work, including papers, reports, computer work, quizzes, and examinations. The New School reserves the right to suspend or dismiss a student whose conduct is found to be in conflict with the principle of academic honesty. Full information about New School policies and procedures in case of suspected violations is available in the office of Academic Student Services, 66 West 12th Street, room 301. Use of Photographs The New School reserves the right to take or cause to be taken, without remuneration, photographs, film, video, and other graphic depictions of students, faculty, staff, and visitors for promotional, educational, and other non-commercial purposes, as well as to approve such use by third parties with whom the university may engage in joint marketing. Such purposes may include print and electronic publications. This paragraph serves as public notice of the intent of the university to do so and as a release to the university giving permission to use your image for such purposes. License in Works to the University Under The New School’s Intellectual Property Policy, the university shall have a non-exclusive, royalty-free, worldwide license to use the works created by its students and faculty for archival, reference, research, classroom, and other educational purposes. With regard to tangible works of fine art or applied art, this license will attach only to stored images of such work (e.g., slides, videos, or digitized images) and does not give the university a right to the tangible works themselves. With regard to literary, artistic, and musical works, this license will only attach to brief excerpts of such works for purposes of education. When using works pursuant to this license, the university will make reasonable efforts to display indicia of the authorship of a work. This license shall be presumed to arise automatically and no additional formality shall be required. If the university wishes to acquire rights to use a work or a reproduction or image of a work for advertising, promotional or fund-raising purposes, the university will negotiate directly with the creator in order to obtain permission.

Tickets can be reserved in advance with a credit card. Call 212.229.5488 and give your name, email or contact phone number, program title(s), and number of tickets required. The Box Office accepts cash and MasterCard, Visa, Discover, and American Express credit cards. Students and alumni with a valid university ID card can obtain free tickets to most special events by presenting their ID at the Box Office.

Other University Policies The board of trustees has adopted policies on Free Exchange of Ideas and Freedom of Artistic Expression, Discriminatory Harassment, Sexual Harassment, Alcohol and Illegal Drugs, Smoking, and University-Wide Disciplinary Procedures, among others. Copies of these policies are available on the website at www.newschool.edu/studentservices/rights/other-policies and from the Office of Student Services.

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ABOUT THE NEW SCHOOL

RECORDS AND GRADES

Grade Descriptions A

4.0

C+

2.3

A–

3.7

C

2.0

B+

3.3

C–

1.7

B

3.0

D

1.0

B–

2.7

F

0

I

 emporary Incomplete: Indicates failure to complete T assigned work. This mark is not given automatically but only on the request of the student and at the discretion of the instructor. A Request for Grade of Incomplete Form must be completed and signed by student and instructor. The time allowed for completion of the work and removal of the “I” mark will be set by the instructor but may be no later than the seventh week of the following fall semester for spring or summer term incompletes or the seventh week of the following spring semester for fall term incompletes. Grades of “I” not revised in the prescribed time will be recorded as a final grade of “WF” by the Registrar’s Office.

W

 fficial Withdrawal Without Academic Penalty: Written O request must be presented in person at the Registrar’s Office by the published deadline (see Add/Drop Schedules on page 78).

WF

 nofficial Withdrawal and Failure (GPA value 0): Issued by U an ­instructor to a credit student who has not attended or not completed all required work in a course but did not officially withdraw before the grade of “W” deadline. It d ­ iffers from “F,” which would indicate that the student technically completed requirements but that the level of work did not qualify for a passing grade.

Grade Reporting

AP

Approved (noncredit certificate student)

Grades are recorded for all students registered in a course for credit or noncredit certificate.

NA

Not Approved (noncredit certificate student)

GM

Grade Not Reported for Student

Academic Transcripts An official transcript carries the Registrar’s signature and the New School seal. It documents a student’s permanent academic record at the university. Students may have a transcript mailed to any address, including other colleges and institutions, by submitting an official request to the Office of the Registrar. This can be done online at my.newschool.edu. Transcripts are not issued for students who have outstanding debts to The New School. For additional information, visit www.newschool.edu/studentservices/registrar/transcripts. Noncredit Record of Attendance Noncredit students can request a noncredit record of attendance during the academic term in which they are registered. This record identifies the course and verifies the student’s completion of the course. It is not an academic e­ valuation and does not provide a course grade. A noncredit record of a­ ttendance must be requested from the Registrar’s Office in writing no later than four (4) weeks before the final session of the course. The written request may be faxed to 212.229.5648 (credit card payment only), mailed, or presented in person at the Registrar’s Office. A s­ eparate record is issued for each noncredit course; the nonrefundable fee is $20 per course, which must be paid by the student’s own personal check or MasterCard, Visa, Discover, or American Express card; cash is not accepted. The noncredit record of attendance is not available for any event listed in the New School Bulletin without a course number or for any course meeting fewer than four times.

The New School does not maintain a permanent or official record of noncredit enrollment.

Students must be properly registered in order to attend any course or session of a course. Attendance in class and/or completion of course requirements is not the equivalent of registration and will not make a student eligible to receive academic credit or certificate approval for any course. Grades are normally posted within two weeks after a course ends. Students can view their grades on the Internet at my.newschool.edu. A student ID number (printed on your Statement/Schedule and photo ID card) is required for access. A printed copy of the grade report is available from the Registrar’s Office upon request by the student.

Grade Review Policy A student may petition for review of any grade within 60 days after the grade was issued. Before deciding to appeal a grade, the student should first request from the course instructor an informal explanation of the reasons for assigning the grade. If the student is not satisfied with the explanation or none is offered, the student may pursue the matter as follows: 1. The student submits a formal letter briefly stating objections to the assigned grade directly to the faculty member with a copy to the department chair or director (or if the faculty member is the department chair, with a copy to the dean). 2. The instructor is required to respond in writing to the student’s letter within one month of receipt, also with a copy to the department chair or director or the dean, as appropriate. 3. If the student is unsatisfied by the faculty member’s written explanation, further appeal can be made by a written request to the dean’s office for a review of the previous communications. An appropriate administrator designated by the dean will then convene an appeals committee to review the student’s letter and the instructor’s response, clarify any outstanding questions or issues, and make a recommendation to the dean. The dean’s decision is final.

46


ABOUT THE NEW SCHOOL

Change of Grade Final grades are subject to revision by the instructor with the approval of the dean’s office for one semester following the term in which the course was offered. After one semester has elapsed, all grades recorded in the Registrar’s Office become a permanent part of the academic record, and no changes are allowed.

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, with which The New School complies, was enacted to protect the privacy of education records, to establish the right of students to inspect and review their education records, and to provide guidelines for correction of inaccurate or misleading statements. The New School has established the following student information as public or directory information, which may be disclosed by the institution at its discretion: student name; major field of study; dates of attendance; full- or part-time enrollment status; year level; degrees and awards received, including dean’s list; the most recent previous educational institution attended, addresses, phone numbers, photographs, email addresses; and date and place of birth. Students may request that The New School withhold release of their directory information by notifying the Registrar’s Office in writing. This notification must be renewed annually at the start of each fall term.

As of January 3, 2012, the U.S. Department of Education’s FERPA regulations expand the circumstances under which your education records and personally identifiable information (PII) contained in such records—including your Social Security Number, grades, or other private information—may be accessed without your consent. First, the U.S. Comptroller General, the U.S. Attorney General, the U.S. Secretary of Education, or state and local education authorities (“Federal and State Authorities”) may allow access to your records and PII without your consent to any third party designated by a Federal or State Authority to evaluate a federal- or state-supported education program. The evaluation may relate to any program that is “principally engaged in the provision of education,” such as early childhood education and job training, as well as any program that is administered by an education agency or institution. Second, Federal and State Authorities may allow access to your education records and PII without your consent to researchers performing certain types of studies, in certain cases even when we object to or do not request such research. Federal and State Authorities must obtain certain use-restriction and data security promises from the entities that they authorize to receive your PII, but the Authorities need not maintain direct control over such entities. In addition, in connection with Statewide Longitudinal Data Systems, State Authorities may collect, compile, permanently retain, and share without your consent PII from your education records, and they may track your participation in education and other programs by linking such PII to other personal information about you that they obtain from other Federal or State data sources, including workforce development, unemployment insurance, child welfare, juvenile justice, military service, and migrant student records systems.

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to their education records. These rights include:

The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the university to comply with the requirements of FERPA.

The right to inspect and review the student’s education records within 45 days of the day the university receives a request for access:

The name and address of the office that administers FERPA is:

A student should submit to the registrar, dean, head of the academic department, or other appropriate official, a written request that identifies the record(s) the student wishes to inspect. The university official will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. If the records are not maintained by the university official to whom the request was submitted, that official shall advise the student of the correct official to whom the request should be addressed.

The right to request the amendment of the student’s education records that the student believes are inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of the student’s privacy rights under FERPA: A student who wishes to ask the university to amend a record should write to the university official responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record the student wants changed, and specify why, in the student’s opinion, it should be changed. If the university decides not to amend the record as requested, the university will notify the student in writing of the decision and the student’s right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing.

Family Policy Compliance Office U.S. Department of Education 400 Maryland Ave. SW Washington, DC 20202–4605

The Student Right to Know Act The New School discloses information about the persistence of undergraduate students pursuing degrees at this institution. This data is made available to all students and prospective students as required by the Student Right to Know Act. During the 2012–2013 academic year, the university reports the “persistence rate” for the year 2011 (i.e., the percentage of all freshmen studying full time in fall 2011 who were still studying full time in the same degree programs in fall 2012). This information can be found under the common data set information. Visit the Office of Institutional Research at www.newschool.edu/admin/oir for more information.

The right to provide written consent before the university discloses personally identifiable information from the student’s education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent: The university discloses education records without a student’s prior written consent under the FERPA exception for disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the university in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and health services staff); a person or company with whom the university has contracted as its agent to provide a service instead of university employees or officials (such as an attorney, auditor, or collection agent); a person serving on the New School Board of Trustees; or a student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibilities for the university.

47


R E G I S T R AT I O N I N F O R M AT I O N

READING AND UNDERSTANDING THE COURSE DESCRIPTION Please read the full course description. It provides information about the structure of the course: number of sessions, fees, etc. A course description may also include instructions such as required equipment, special class meeting locations, and prerequisites.

Course master number: Use this number with the section letter to register. Number of class meetings

Section letter

Date of first class session

Days and hours of class sessions

Drawing at the Metropolitan Museum  NART1210 A 15 sessions. Wed., 12:10–2:50 p.m., beg. Jan. 30. Noncredit tuition $650.* Susan Cottle

Limited to 12. Beginning students learn how to draw using the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art as subject matter. Working from a different artwork or artifact each week, the course covers the fundamental principles and techniques of drawing, including basic gestural studies, learning how to see form, and experimenting with different kinds of mark making and materials. The setting and the small size of the class allow for instruction geared to the specific needs of individual students. Bring an all-purpose sketch pad and a pencil to the first session. The first session meets at the Group Registration desk in the lobby of the Metropolitan Museum, Fifth Avenue and 82nd Street.  (3 credits)

Limited enrollment: Register early if enrollment is limited.

Instructor: For more information, see Biographical Notes in this bulletin.

Off-campus meeting site. Room assignments for courses meeting at The New School can be viewed online at my.newschool.edu (Class Finder) and are posted daily in the lobby at 66 West 12th Street.

Indicates that this course carries three credits. Most courses in this bulletin can be taken either on a noncredit basis or for undergraduate credit. The number of credits assigned to the course appears in the parentheses. For guidance in deciding whether to take a course for credit, see pages 38–39.

ONLINE

48

This logo indicates that the course is offered online. See page 39 or visit the website at www.newschool.edu/online for more information.

*If you are taking the course for credit, you do not pay this fee. General credit tuition is charged per credit.


R E G I S T R AT I O N I N F O R M AT I O N

REGISTRATION INFORMATION FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION STUDENTS

Before Registering

Register and Pay •  Online at www.newschool.edu/register.* Pay by MasterCard, Visa, American Express, or Discover. •  By phone at 212.229.5690 (noncredit only) Hours: Monday–Thursday, 8:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m., Friday, 9:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m. Pay by MasterCard, Visa, American Express, or Discover.

• Select a course. •  Note the course number and section (for example, NLIT1000 section A). •  Decide whether to register as a noncredit, noncredit certificate, or general credit student. Most students take courses on a noncredit basis (the cheapest option; no grade or permanent record is kept). See pages 38–39 to learn more about registration options. • Prepare payment. Full payment is due at the time of registration.

Tuition and Fees: Continuing Education Student Status

Tuition

University Services Fees

Lab, Materials, etc. Fees

Noncredit

Printed in each course description in this bulletin

Registration fee: $7 per term

Printed in course description if applicable

General Credit (Nondegree)

$1,170 per credit

$80 per term

Same as above

Noncredit Certificate

The noncredit tuition

$80 per term

Same as above

•  By fax to 212.229.5648 Use the detachable registration forms in the back of this bulletin. Pay by MasterCard, Visa, American Express, or Discover. •  By mail to The New School, Registrar’s Office, 79 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10003 Use the detachable registration forms in the back of this bulletin. Pay by MasterCard, Visa, American Express, or Discover, or by personal check/money order payable to The New School. • In person at 72 Fifth Avenue, 4th floor Regular hours: Monday–Thursday, 10:00 a.m.–5:45 p.m. Friday, 10:00 a.m.– 4:45 p.m. (closed May 26 and July 4) Extended hours: May 27–30: Tuesday–Thursday, 9:00 a.m.–5:45 p.m. Friday, 9:00 a.m.–4:45 p.m (closed May 26) June 2–6: Monday–Thursday, 9:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m. Friday, 9:00 a.m.–4:45 p.m. Pay by MasterCard, Visa, American Express, or Discover; by personal check or money order payable to The New School; or with cash. For questions regarding registration, email reghelp@newschool.edu. *Please note that online registration is not live. The registrar will contact you if there are any problems processing your registration request.

 egister early. The class you want might fill or, on the other hand, be R cancelled because of insufficient registration. Deadlines: Online, telephone, and fax registrations must be submitted three business days before the class starts. Mailed registrations for all courses must be posted two weeks before the class starts. If you miss these deadlines, you can still register in person (see opposite). Note: Students enrolled in certificate programs must have their courses approved by an academic advisor before they register and must register in person. General credit registration for nine or more credits requires prior approval and must be completed in person. Schedule an advising appointment with Academic Services: 212.229.5615; academicservices@newschool.edu.

Confirmation of Registration •  There is no need to confirm your registration. If there is a problem registering you for a class, the Registrar’s Office will contact you. •  A n official Statement/Schedule will be issued when your payment has cleared (mailed if you registered online or by phone or fax). Bring this to your class. (If you have not yet received it, you will still be admitted to class if your name appears on the course roster.) Also, bring a photo ID for admission to university buildings. •  Online confirmation is available at my.newschool.edu. Follow the links to look up your Net ID and set or reset your password. You will need your Student ID number (N plus 8 digits). Once you log in, select the Student tab to view your schedule. •  If you are a noncredit student and will need a Record of Attendance (for employer reimbursement or any other purpose), you must request that now. See page 46.

49


R E G I S T R AT I O N I N F O R M AT I O N

Student ID Number and ID Cards • ID  Number (the letter N plus 8 digits): Appears on your Statement/ Schedule. Use this number for future registrations and correspondence with The New School. • ID  Cards: Upon receipt of payment, noncredit students are mailed an ID card (without photo) valid only for the term in which they are enrolled. If you do not receive your ID card within two weeks of registration, contact Student Financial Services at sfs@newschool.edu or 212.229.8930. All certificate, general credit, and IRP students can obtain a photo ID at Campus Card Services, 66 West 12th Street, room 404. The hours are Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday, 9:00 a.m.–5:30 p.m.; and Wednesday, 9:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m. (Card Services is closed May 26 and July 4.) There is a fee to replace a lost or stolen card.

Summer Add/Drop and Refund Deadlines

Classroom Courses Schedule

Deadline to add or change status

Deadline for tuition refunds (tuition charged)

Credit student withdrawal for grade of “W”

11 or more sessions

Before 3rd session

Before 1st session (full refund) Before 4th session (10% per session)

Between 4th & 7th sessions

6–10 sessions

Before 2nd session

Before 1st session (full refund) Before 3rd session (15% per session)

Between 3rd & 4th sessions

3–5 sessions

Before 2nd session

Before 1st session (full refund) Before 2nd session (30% charged)

Not applicable

• In  person on the day the class starts: room assignments are posted in the lobby at 66 West 12th St. (between Fifth and Sixth Avenues).

1–2 sessions

Before 1st session

Before 1st session (full refund)

Not applicable

Most classes meet at 66 West 12th St. or 6 East 16th St. See the neighborhood map on the inside back cover. Some courses meet at off-site locations as indicated in the course description.

Summer Writers Colony

Before 3rd session

May 25 No refund after May 25

Before 7th session

Find Your Class Location • Online  at my.newschool.edu. Do not log in. Just select the Class Finder link. Room assignments can change, so check as close to your class start time as possible.

If your course is online, instructions for logging in to your virtual classroom will be mailed to you.

Withdrawal/Refund Policy • To  cancel your registration in a course, you must formally withdraw in writing to the Registrar’s Office (by fax, mail, or in person). See the table opposite for deadlines and refundable charges. For a more complete statement of university policy regarding withdrawals and refunds, see page 44. Nonattendance does not constitute withdrawal.  registration/university services fee is not refundable unless you • The are withdrawing because of changes in the course schedule or instructor. • Refund processing takes approximately four weeks.

Published by The New School for Public Engagement Produced by Communications and External Affairs, The New School The information published here represents the plans of The New School at the time of publication. The university reserves the right to change without notice any matter contained in this publication, including but not limited to tuition, fees, policies, degree programs, names of programs, course offerings, academic activities, academic requirements, facilities, faculty, and administrators. Payment of tuition or attendance at any classes shall constitute a student’s acceptance of the administration’s rights as set forth above. Photography: Michelle Gevint, Karinna Gylfphe, Samantha Grace Lewis, Jessica Miller, Matthew Septimus, Michael Skinner.

50

Online Courses 9 weeks

Before end of week 2 (week 1 of the course is orientation)

End of week 1, 100% refund End of week 2, 90% End of week 3, 80% End of week 4, 70%

End of 5th week


Mannes

J

17TH ST.

(150 West 85th Street)

O

Goldmark Practice Center

16TH ST.

(37 West 65th Street)

D

79 Fifth Avenue

Albert and Vera List Academic Center (6 East 16th Street)

UNION SQUARE and GREENWICH VILLAGE AREA

Z

W

6th Ave. – 14th St. Subway (F,L,M)

The New School For Drama

14th St. – Union Square Subway (4,5,6,L,N,Q,R) M

M

14TH ST.

80 Fifth Avenue Fanton Hall/Welcome Center

Arnhold Hall

G G

(72 Fifth ( YOU AREAvenue) HERE )

FIFTH AVE.

(151 Bank Street)

UNION SQUARE

UNION SQUARE W.

15TH ST.

71 Fifth Avenue

V

Kerrey Hall Residence (65 Fifth Avenue)

University Center (63 Fifth Avenue) U E

H

I

(55 West 13th Street)

Parsons East (25 East 13th Street)

13TH ST.

N

Johnson Center Annex

(2 West 13th Street, 66 Fifth Avenue)

(68 Fifth Avenue) 12TH ST.

Alvin Johnson/J.M. Kaplan Hall

A

(66 West 12th Street)

B

AY BROADW

M

UNIVERSITY PLACE

SEVENTH AVE.

SIXTH AVE.

L

Sheila C. Johnson Design Center

Eugene Lang College Building

(65 West 11th Street)

Lang Annex

11TH ST.

C

(64 West 11th Street)

UNION SQUARE and GREENWICH VILLAGE AREA

The New School Campus Map CONTINUING EDUCATION OFFICES AND FACILITIES A

Creative Arts Therapy program office. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 916 English Language Studies office. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6th floor Foreign Languages Department. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6th floor Humanities Department. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9th floor Institute for Retired Professionals.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 511 New School Bachelor’s Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9th floor New School for Public Engagement Dean’s Office. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301 Social Sciences Department. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9th floor Writing Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 503 The Auditorium at West 12th Street. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ground floor Classrooms Posted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . lobby Classrooms B

65 West 11th Street(enter at 66 West 12th Street) Wollman Hall. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5th floor Classrooms

C

64 West 11th Street

D

6 East 16th Street Media Studies and Film office.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16th floor Classrooms

E

25 East 13th Street Art, Architecture, and Lighting Studios, Making Center

G

80 Fifth Avenue Student Health Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3rd floor

H

72 Fifth Avenue Registrar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4th floor Student Financial Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4th floor Office of Admission

I

J

66 West 12th Street

55 West 13th Street Fogelman Library Circulation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ground floor Media Laboratories.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3rd, 4th, 8th, 9th floors Theresa Lang Community and Student Center. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2nd floor Classrooms

L

150 West 85th Street Mannes Extension Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ground floor Scherman Music Library

2 West 13th Street Film Production studios.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4th floor Classrooms

OTHER OFFICES AND FACILITIES OF THE UNIVERSITY Accounting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cafeterias. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 West 13th Street

B

I

G U

Center for New York City Affairs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

H

Community Development Research Center. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

H

M

68 Fifth Avenue

India China Institute.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

N

N

66 Fifth Avenue

International Center for Migration, Ethnicity and Citizenship. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

I

Schwartz Center for Economic Policy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

D

Student Development. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

H

Parsons Dean’s Office. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6th floor Parsons SPACE.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2nd floor Printmaking studio. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4th floor Kellen Auditorium. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ground floor Classrooms, Galleries U

63 Fifth Avenue, University Center Gimbel Library. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6th and 7th floors Tishman Auditorium. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ground floor

79 Fifth Avenue International Student Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5th floor

THE NEW SCHOOL FOR PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT. . . . . . . . . .

A

B

D

H

I

L

N

EUGENE LANG COLLEGE THE NEW SCHOOL FOR LIBERAL ARTS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

B

C

MANNES COLLEGE THE NEW SCHOOL FOR MUSIC

J

Tishman Environment and Design Center

79 Fifth Avenue

Transregional Center for Democratic Studies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

G

University Administration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Fifth Avenue

H

A

G

University Center. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

U

University Writing Center. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

W

AFFILIATES Beth Israel Hospital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 317 East 17th Street Cardozo Law Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Fifth Avenue Cooper-Hewitt Museum .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 East 91st Street

O

Cooper Union Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cooper Square

THE NEW SCHOOL FOR DRAMA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Z

Elmer Holmes Bobst Library. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Washington Square South

THE NEW SCHOOL FOR JAZZ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

I

THE NEW SCHOOL FOR SOCIAL RESEARCH.. . . . . . . .

D

G

PARSONS THE NEW SCHOOL FOR DESIGN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

M

N

D

E

I

L

The New School is undergoing expansion and renovation. Visit www.newschool.edu to view updates of the map. Published April 2014.

51


Please provide all information requested on the registration form. Incomplete forms will not be processed. Fax to 212.229.5648 or mail to: New School Registrar’s Office, 72 Fifth Ave., New York, NY 10011. Note: Post Office will not deliver without correct postage.

NONCREDIT REGISTR ATION

Term: SUMMER

Year: 14

NOCR

THE NEW SCHOOL If you have been a New School student before, enter your student ID number below. N

Student ID No.

Sex

Term first attended New School

Birthdate

Last Name

First Name

Init.

Address Street Apt. or c/o etc. City

Home Phone

Work Phone

State –

Zip Ext.

Email

Please read instructions in the last two pages of the catalog. Enter your courses below. COURSE MASTER

N

X

Y

Z

9

9

9

9

SECT.

COURSE TITLE

A

SAMPLE COURSE TITLE

NONCREDIT TUITION*

$ XXX

REG. OFFICE USE REGISTERED

M

DATE_____________ INIT.________

T

$ PERSONAL DATA ENTERED

P

DATE_____________ INIT.________ $ Check enclosed Charge to MasterCard, Visa, Discover, AmEx Exp. Date Account No. Signature

Nonrefundable Registration Fee

$7

Total of special fees (materials, etc.)

$

Total enclosed

$

BURSAR USE DATE____________________________

T #______________ INIT.___________

*Stated in the course description with the schedule.


Please provide all information requested on the registration form. Incomplete forms will not be processed. Fax to 212.229.5648 or mail to: New School Registrar’s Office, 72 Fifth Ave., New York, NY 10011. Note: Post Office will not deliver without correct postage. General credit students are nonmatriculated—not candidates for any New School degree. Credits for courses in this catalog are undergraduate credits. If you have not previously registered for general credit at The New School or wish help in choosing courses, consult Academic Services in the dean’s office before registering: 212.229.5615; academicservices@newschool.edu. Credits for courses taken prior to matriculation in a degree program may be a­ pplicable to the degree, subject to evaluation at the time of matriculation. All students are responsible for knowing the academic regulations published in this catalog. General credit registration for 9 credits or more requires prior approval and must be completed in person. Schedule an advising appointment with Academic Services: 212.229.5615; academicservices@newschool.edu.

GENER AL CREDIT ( NONDEGREE )

Term: SUMMER

Year: 14

NODG

THE NEW SCHOOL If you have been a New School student before, enter your student ID number below. N

Student ID No.

Sex

Term first attended New School

Birthdate

Last Name

First Name

Init.

Address Street Apt. or c/o etc. City

Home Phone

State

COURSE CREDITS**

TUITION*

Work Phone

Zip Ext.

Email

Please read instructions in the last two pages of the catalog. Enter your courses below. (For noncredit courses, enter 0 in “credits” column.) COURSE MASTER

N

X

Y

Z

9

9

9

9

SECT.

COURSE TITLE

A

SAMPLE COURSE TITLE

$ XXX

REG. OFFICE USE REGISTERED

M

DATE_____________ INIT.________

T

$ PERSONAL DATA ENTERED

P

DATE_____________ INIT.________ $ Check enclosed Charge to MasterCard, Visa, Discover, AmEx Exp. Date Account No. Signature

Nonrefundable Registration Fee

$ 80

Total of special fees (materials, etc.)

$

Total enclosed

BURSAR USE DATE____________________________ T #______________ INIT.___________

$

*General credit tuition is $1,170 times number of credits. (The tuition listed with each course description is the non-credit tuition.) **Credits are stated in the course description.

Continuing Education Summer 2014 Catalog | The New School for Public Engagement  

This catalog lists course offerings for the Summer 2014 term. Discover hundreds of courses available to you at The New School. The New Schoo...

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