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Celebrating Fine Design, Architecture, and Building

Modern Drama Designers add spice to New England’s spaces

November–December 2018

Display until December 31, 2018 nehomemag.com

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Greg Premru Photography

CAMBRIDGE | CAPE & ISLANDS 617 621-1455 www.LDa-Architects.com

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GREG PREMRU MIKE FEIN

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Jacqui has the experience and knowledge to curate art to your specific taste and budget. My clients love working with her. With Jacqui’s involvement, my projects go from fantastic to phenomenal. —Leslie Fine, Leslie Fine Interiors

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Aesthetic Guidance

For a personalized, expertly managed art acquisition experience Working with homeowners and the design community 617-513-6856 | beckerfinearts.com

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COMPOSITION COMPOSITION COMPOSITION IS AN IS ART AN IS ART AN ART So is composing So is composing So your is kitchen. composing your kitchen. The your design kitchen. Theconcepts design Theconcepts of design the SieMatic concepts of the SieMatic CLASSIC of the SieMatic CLASSIC style CLASSIC style style collection collection use seemingly collection use seemingly contrasting use seemingly contrasting elements contrasting elements to create elements to a harmonious createtoa create harmonious whole, a harmonious whole, whole, and a home andthat a home elegantly andthat a home elegantly reflects that elegantly your reflects personality. reflects your personality. your personality.

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A R C H I T E C T U R E & C O N S T R U C T I O N . M A S T E R F U L LY I N T E G R AT E D .

What makes an exceptional design and building experience? Find out at psdab.com/why

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In This Issue

November–December 2018 I Volume 14, Issue 2

130

100 FEATURED HOMES:

100 MODERN ART

For all its abstract, sculptural, statement-making looks, a Brookline, Massachusetts, house is skillfully attuned to its venerable neighborhood.

Text by Bob Curley I Photography by Richard Mandelkorn I Produced by Kyle Hoepner

110 AGED TO PERFECTION

A renovation plays up the graceful architectural details of an old Boston-area house and introduces a fresh, contemporary vibe to the interiors. Text by Fred Albert I Photography by Eric Piasecki/OTTO

120 A BOLD MOVE

A dad with a sense of adventure and a designer unafraid to make a splash team up on a Boston condo that even the kids think is pretty cool. Text by Debra Judge Silber I Photography by Michael J. Lee I Produced by Kyle Hoepner

130 FUN IN THE SUN

From dawn to dusk, glorious natural light washes every room of a mountainside home in Vermont. Text by Nathaniel Reade I Photography by Warren Jagger

110 ON THE COVER: Graphic wallpaper and chartreuse velvet dining chairs set a playful tone in a Back Bay condominium designed by Dee Elms. Photograph by Michael J. Lee. To see more of this home, turn to page 120.

SPECIAL EVENT

140 NEW ENGLAND DESIGN HALL OF FAME

Meet the class of 2018, the talented design professionals being inducted into the New England Design Hall of Fame. Text by Lisa H. Speidel November–December 2018 | New England Home  27

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In This Issue

November–December 2018 I Volume 14, Issue 2

50 163 Perspectives

Festive tabletop suggestions; a meditation room suffused with tranquility; architect David Andreozzi on the continuing importance of the classical tradition; an old barn goes from storage space to holiday party place.

174 Calendar

Special events for people who are passionate about design.

37 37

I By Lynda Simonton

180 Scene and Heard 30 From the Editor 37 Trending

Award-winning ottomans; architectural genius at play in kitchens and baths; hostess gifts to ensure a repeat invitation; site restrictions are a challenge welcomed by a creative architect; beautiful finds from New England’s shops and showrooms.

50 Artistry: Plane Truths

Furniture maker Garrett Hack’s latest masterpiece is just about perfect. He can’t wait to strive for even better. I By Lori Ferguson

56 Good Bones: A House for the Ages

Three generations gather to make memories on Rhode Island’s south coast. I Text by Megan Fulweiler  I Photography by Richard Mandelkorn

Noteworthy happenings in the New England design business.  I By Paula M. Bodah

184 Design Life

Our candid camera snaps recent gatherings that celebrate architecture and design. I By Lynda Simonton

190 Premier Properties

Notable homes on the market in New England. I By Maria LaPiana

196 Resources

A guide to the professionals and products in this issue’s features.

198 Advertiser Index 200 Bookend

Life Along the Hudson: The Historic Country Estates of the Livingston Family, by Pieter Estersohn

64 Rooms We Love: Beaux Arts Beauty

A historic home in Nashua, New Hampshire, makes a stunning backdrop to showcase New England design talent. I By Paula M. Bodah

70 5 Under 40

163

A look back at our celebration of the young winners of the 5 Under 40 Awards for 2018.

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Special Marketing Section:

PROJECTS WE LOVE

28  New England Home | November–December 2018

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Editor’s Letter

What Counts As Modern, Anyway?

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ew England has long been considered a bit stodgy, a bit conservative (not necessarily in the political sense but, then again, not necessarily not in the political sense, when it comes to certain locations and social strata). “We have our hats,” was the proper Boston lady’s supposed rejoinder, when asked where her set would purchase such items. The same has historically been true when it comes to home design; many of our region’s inhabitants remained fiercely attached to their collections of brown English furniture sitting steadfastly atop well-worn Oriental rugs. This may be a bit of a bad rap, given New Englanders’ enthusiastic participation in the development of what were then America’s cutting-edge design styles—Gothic Revival, Greek Revival, Shingle style, and Colonial Revival among them— but, like many generalizations, it does contain a core of truth. We’ve had our occasional visionaries, but they were usually outliers. Today, though, I’d say that purely traditional dwellings are few and far between. “Transitional” is

For subscriptions call 800-765-1225 or visit nehomemag.com See additional great content at:

30  New England Home | November–December 2018

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the term designers use to identify a middle ground between “traditional” and “contemporary,” and transitional has expanded to account for the vast majority of design being practiced these days. Even many “contemporary” projects are increasingly likely to include historical references or some vintage or antique items as accent pieces. This thoroughgoing combination of old and new is arguably the most “modern” development of our time. We have four feature stories in this issue, and all of them (I would argue) count as modern in this fashion—even the one chockablock with Biedermeier and art deco furniture. One suburban Boston home by architect Marcus Gleysteen and interior designer Manuel de Santaren is unapologetic in its contemporaneity, but is also redolent of Viennese architect Josef Hoffmann’s Sanatorium Purkersdorf of 1903–1905 (a reminder that “modern” architecture itself isn’t exactly all that modern; Walter Gropius founded the Bauhaus in 1919, meaning that next year will be its centenary). A Vermont compound envisioned by architectural designer Michele Foster evinces Bauhaus roots, but derives as much of its form and materials from the humble barns and sheds of that state’s agrarian past. Designer Nina Farmer, with the team at LDa Architecture & Interiors, reworked a 1911 mansion via a blend of past and present styles, resulting in a synthesis that feels classic but is also distinctively of-the-moment. Meanwhile, Dee Elms filled the traditional architectural frame of a Boston brownstone apartment with cosmopolitan furniture, wallcoverings, and decorative lighting that provide a congenial setting for her client’s collection of contemporary art. So what’s new in New England? Often, it’s a contemporary combination of elements that aren’t, in themselves, new at all. —Kyle Hoepner

Find more at nehomemag.com

Our editors and a fascinating lineup of guest blog­gers share beautiful photography, design ideas, and advice every week on the New England Home Design Blog. The site also features ongoing content updates, where you’ll encounter house tours, interviews and commentary, before-and-after stories, and other special items for lovers of great home design.

Sign up for our Design Discoveries editorial ­e-newsletter and get weekly updates on luxury home style, including the latest products, upcoming events, and green ideas.

Portrait by Hornick/Rivlin Studio

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A R C H I T E C T Custom Homes

&

B U I L D E R

Additions & Remodels

Kitchen & Bath

Editor-in-Chief Kyle Hoepner khoepner@nehomemag.com Senior Editor Paula M. Bodah pbodah@nehomemag.com Creative Director Robert Lesser rlesser@nehomemag.com Market and Digital Editor Lynda Simonton lsimonton@nehomemag.com Copy Editor Lisa H. Speidel lspeidel@nehomemag.com Contributing Editors Karin Lidbeck Brent klidbeck@nehomemag.com Stacy Kunstel skunstel@nehomemag.com Debra Judge Silber dsilber@nehomemag.com Contributing Writers Fred Albert, Regina Cole, Bob Curley, Julie Dugdale, Megan Fulweiler, Robert Kiener, Maria LaPiana, Erin Marvin, Louis Postel, Nathaniel Reade, Debra Judge Silber, Debra Spark, Lisa H. Speidel Contributing Photographers Trent Bell, Robert Benson, Tria Giovan, Sam Gray, John Gruen, Keller + Keller, Michael J. Lee, Richard Mandelkorn, Laura Moss, Michael Partenio, Greg Premru, Nat Rea, Eric Roth, Brian Vanden Brink, Jim Westphalen •

Editorial Submissions Designers, architects, builders, and homeowners are invited to submit projects for editorial consideration. For information about submitting projects, e-mail ­edit@nehomemag.com. Letters to the Editor We’d love to hear from you! Write to us at the above address, fax us at 617-663-6377, or e-mail us at ­letters@nehomemag.com.

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Upcoming Events Are you planning an event that we can feature in our Calendar of Events? E-mail information to calendar@nehomemag.com, or mail to Calendar Editor, New England Home, 530 Harrison Ave., Suite 302, Boston, MA 02118. Parties We welcome photographs from design- or architecture-related parties. Send high-resolution photos with information about the party and the people pictured to lsimonton@nehomemag.com.

32  New England Home | November–December 2018

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Integrity of design. Respect for craftsmanship. Reinterpreting New England’s rich architectural heritage for today’s living –and for the people who admire its timeless spirit.

GREG PREMRU PHOTOGRAPHY

CHRISTOPHER HALL ARCHITECTS 11983 N. TAMIAMI TRAIL NAPLES, FL 239-302-3589

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Publisher Kathy Bush-Dutton kbushdutton@nehomemag.com Executive Sales Manager Jill Korff jkorff@nehomemag.com Sales Managers Roberta Thomas Mancuso rmancuso@nehomemag.com Kim Sansoucy ksansoucy@nehomemag.com Robin Schubel rschubel@nehomemag.com Tess Woods twoods@nehomemag.com Marketing Designer Jared Ainscough jainscough@nehomemag.com Production Manager Glenn Sadin gsadin@nehomemag.com Sales and Marketing Coordinator/ Office Manager Cassidy Mitchell cmitchell@nehomemag.com •

Subscriptions  To subscribe to New England Home ($19.95 for one year) or for customer service, call 800-765-1225 or visit our website, nehomemag.com. Advertising Information To receive information about advertising in New England Home, please contact us at 800-609-5154, ext. 713, or info@nehomemag.com. Editorial and Advertising Office 530 Harrison Ave., Suite 302 Boston, MA 02118 617-938-3991, 800-609-5154 •

New England Home Magazine, LLC Managing Partners Adam Japko, Chris Legg Finance Manager Kiyomi DeBay kdebay@nehomemag.com

Interior Design: Kathleen Hay Designs Photo by: Jeffrey Allen Photography

Circulation Manager Kurt Coey

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34  New England Home | November–December 2018

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•TRENDING Fresh Looks at the Art of Living Beautifully

Cute as a . . .

Back in 2011, Kelly Harris Smith was one of New England Home’s early 5 Under 40 award winners. A good pick, as it turns out, since her career has been on fast-forward ever since. Just this past May, these Button Ottomans, tautly upholstered in a stretchy, quilt-like Dutch fabric, helped win her the Emerging Product Designer award at NYCxDESIGN, New York’s annual celebration of all things creative. They’re eminently bounceable, but also perfect for lounging and sure to add a playful accent to your space.  | Kelly Harris Smith, kellyharrissmith.com

Photo by Bob O’Connor

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November–December 2018 | New England Home  37

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Trending

Essentials

New clerestory windows in the shower may not offer an actual view, but they give this bathroom in the Cape Cod town of Truro a sense of a vista. Murdough’s associate, Jenny Tjia, points out that the expanse of mirrors above the vanities reflects the landscape, amplifying the effect. Tile in variations of gray and accents of warm wood further enhance the at-one-with-nature ambience.

Murdough keeps materials and colors spare. “When you limit a palette, there’s a clarity of design,” he says. “It also emphasizes the light as well as what’s beyond.” In a Cambridge, Massachusetts, kitchen reimagined for a pair of retired scientists, he employed a neutral scheme of white and gray lacquer, glass, and metal. “What stands out,” he says, “is the green of the landscape outdoors.”

The architect also talks about sculpting space. To remedy the odd trapezoid shape and dark conditions of a powder room in an early 1970s-era home in Westport, Connecticut, he broke through the ceiling to the attic, and cut a skylight into the roof— a maneuver he poetically describes as “a gesture to the sky.” The upper portion of the room is now gorgeously faceted, and indeed sculptural, not to mention flooded with light. “We played with the geometry to turn it into a bright and simple sanctuary,” he says.

Bringing Good Things to Light

Architect Tom Murdough marries form and function in light-filled contemporary kitchens and baths.

In the midst of chronicling a master bath renovation, while noting his use of windows and mirrors to make the space feel larger, architect Tom Murdough stops himself. “Of course, this is nothing new,” he says. “Richard Neutra was an early promoter of clean, light-filled spaces. It’s a precedent that we enjoy playing with.” And play he does, like a master. Although he maintains that he’s guided by abstraction—the aspects of design you can’t quantify, such as the relationship between interior and exterior, connecting a space to its place, and light—the intent of the spaces he designs is crystal clear. This is particularly true of his kitchens and baths. “These rooms should feel as nice as any other space in the house,” he says. “Applying these overarching principles only strengthens their function.”   | Murdough Design, Boston, murdoughdesign.com

| BY MARNI ELYSE KATZ |  38  New England Home | November–December 2018

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Photos: top Chuck Choi (2); bottom, Michael Biondo

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AU AU T TH HO OR R II Z ZE ED D D DE EA A LE LE R R

Linden Table Lamp Kelly Wearstler

Light New England | 50 Terminal St. | Building 2 - Unit #524 Boston, MA 02129 | 617.286.7181

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Trending

In Season

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You’re Invited!

A good holiday guest never arrives empty-handed. A bottle of wine, a box of chocolates, or a bouquet of flowers makes a perfectly acceptable offering to show one’s appreciation. The best guests, however, think a bit outside the box and come bearing something unexpected, unique, memorable. ¶ Boston-based designer Polly Corn went in search of gifts for the host or hostess. She suggests a little something for the home—beautifully crafted wooden utensils, a set of matches packaged in a walnut box, or a knockout ceramic bowl. Or maybe something of a more personal nature, like a handmade notebook to record secret thoughts. ¶ Ring the doorbell with one of these gifts in hand, and you can be assured of many invitations to follow. | Polly Corn Design, Boston, 617-283-8434, pollycorndesign.com

| EDITED BY PAULA M. BODAH |  40  New England Home | November–December 2018

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6 | 1. Ibride Precieuses wall tray, December Thieves, Boston, decemberthieves.com  | 2. Handcrafted wood notebooks, Michaela Crie Stone, Rockport, Maine, michaelacstone. com | 3. Luster velvet-border napkins, West Elm, West Hartford, Conn., Providence, Boston, Burlington, Mass., Portland, Maine, westelm.com | 4. Walnut match box, Hudson, Boston, hudsonboston.com | 5. Wooden serving pieces, walnut board and spreader by John Welch, serving spoons by Karina Steele, Good, Boston, shopatgood.com | 6. Freer House Mondo Bowl, Jill Rosenwald, Boston, jillrosenwald.com

Corn portrait by Cheryl Richards; serving pieces photo courtesy Good.

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508.228.3600 CHIPWEBSTER.COM

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Trending

Architecture

How Anmahian Winton Architects conjured an airy abode on an atypical lot in Cambridge. Normally, a fifty-one-foot-wide lot with side setbacks of more than eighteen feet would induce a plea for relief. Alex Anmahian regarded it as an opportunity. “We embraced it to drive the design,” the architect says. The solution? A long, skinny, sun-filled structure with copious landscaped views. Relegating the 2,500-squarefoot residence to a narrow stretch of land resulted in major upsides. For example, the team at LeBlanc Jones Landscape Architects was able to create an arboretum-like lot with an allée of deciduous trees, along with plenty of privacy. The pushed-to-one-side positioning also permits southern light to penetrate upper-story windows. Anmahian organized the house,

which was built by Gilman Guidelli & Bellow Builders, using a pair of parallel vertical lines he calls spines. The first is about getting, as he puts it, “in and up.” Bluestone stairs run to the front door, which opens to a sun-drenched stair. The longer spine encapsulates the living room, courtyard, dining room, kitchen, and garden, in that order, with three bedrooms above. “This axis drives people from room to room, and back into the landscape,” the architect says. Despite its small footprint, the living room feels expansive, with its double-height ceiling and its large window facing the courtyard. At the end of the line is the kitchen, a white-oak and stainlesssteel study in material clarity. A wall of glass looks to the back garden and turns the corner to take in the path of European Hornbeams. “The landscape is part of the house, no matter what time of year,” Anmahian says. | Anmahian Winton Architects, Cambridge, Mass., aw-arch.com

| BY MARNI ELYSE KATZ |  42  New England Home | November–December 2018

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Photos: top, Jane Messinger (3); bottom, Florian Holzherr

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In the Showrooms

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1. Casting Call Hardware inspired by ribbons and hand cast from bronze are the defining design element of this exquisite console from Debra Folz. | Providence, debrafolz.com

4. Stand Tall Ian K. Fowler’s Lola pharmacy floor lamp combines a graceful curved line with handsome brass. | Visual Comfort, Wolfers Lighting, Waltham, Mass., wolferslighting.com

2. Hot Dogs The Tom fire dogs by Kelly Hoppen reflect the bold and stylish look we have come to expect from this all-star designer. | Chesneys, chesneys.com

5. Deep Seated Who can resist a plush velvet sofa for lounging around on a cold winter day? Not us! | Verellen, Artefact Home, Belmont, Mass., artefacthome.com

3. Old is New Belwith Keeler’s Vale collection of cabinet knobs was reissued in celebration of the company’s 125th anniversary, and it looks just as stylish today as it did when it debuted in 1953. | Adaptations Unlimited, Newington, N.H., adaptationsunlimited.com

6. Cut and Color Palazzo wallcovering is crafted from wood sliced into thin veneers, dyed, and hand-laid into a geometric pattern, recalling the entrances of Europe’s grandest homes.  | Phillip Jeffries, Boston Design Center, phillipjeffries.com

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| EDITED BY LYNDA SIMONTON | 44  New England Home | November–December 2018

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5 1. The Gathering Place Simple and straightforward in its beauty, the Wire Frame table from Vermont Farm Table provides a welcoming spot to enjoy a meal and linger over good conversation. | Burlington, Vt., vermontfarmtable.com 2. In the Bag The L1798-01 leather chair by Lee Industries evokes a hipster messenger bag complete with top-stitching and chunky metal buckles. | Circle Furniture, various Massachusetts locations, circlefurniture.com 3. East Meets West Christian Liaigre meets Japanese ­influence in the Desk Nagoya available in a rich lacquer or leather tray top.

The versatile size works well both tucked in the corner of a living room or standing alone in a dedicated office space. | Montage, Boston, montageweb.com 4. Everlasting Natural curiosities gathered from nature, such as pinecones, flowers, and pods, are preserved in resin so their beauty can be appreciated for years to come. | 22 Milk St., Portland, Maine, 22milkstreet.com 5. Brickwork Soho Studio’s Bahari Brick tile made from glazed lava stone brings rich color with touchable texture to kitchen or bath. | Old Port Specialty Tile Co., Portland, Maine, oldporttile.com

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general contractor Thoughtforms Corp | Nat Rea Photography

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Artistry

Plane Truths

Furniture maker Garrett Hack’s latest masterpiece is just about perfect. He can’t wait to strive for even better.

project began as a patronage chal• The lenge to furniture maker Garrett Hack: build

the most incredible piece you can imagine and have fun doing it. It culminated five years later in Outside In, a piece of artistic entertainment created in collaboration with his wife, artist Carolyn Enz Hack, and comprising twenty-two different woods, twenty-two drawers and hidden compartments, and north of 2,000 hours of labor. The cabinet, which stands a bit more than fiftytwo inches tall, is a visual smorgasbord of asymmetry, delineated in a riotous swirl of ripples, swells, waves, and curves. Hack and his wife admit long hours were spent talking through the piece’s many shapes and resolving transitions from one surface to another. “Every morning I faced a new challenge,” he concedes, “but it was amazingly rewarding to solve the problems this piece presented.” Hack has been pushing himself steadily since beginning his woodworking career more than forty years ago. After earning degrees in electrical engi-

CLOCKWISE FROM

TOP LEFT: Outside In (2017), in collaboration with Carolyn Enz Hack, Douglas fir, cherry, ebony, and eighteen other woods, 52½"H × 29"W × 18½"D. Back of Outside In, showing a series of curved drawers. Weikwa Shimmering (2008), curly birch, ebony, gold, abalone, and other woods, 30"H × 26"W × 16"D.

| TEXT BY LORI FERGUSON | 50  New England Home | November–December 2018

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Photographs by Bill Truslow

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catherine truman architects architecture

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Artistry

CLOCKWISE FROM

ABOVE: Two Nuts

(2009), butternut, black walnut, rosewood, and abalone, 37½"H × 46"W × 18"D. Duet (2014), Engelmann spruce, curly maple, ebony, holly, abalone, with paint details by Carolyn Enz Hack, 42"H × 21"W × 14"D. Detail from X-Ray demilune (2008), curly birch, Brazilian rosewood, ebony, and abalone, 30"H × 32"W × 15"D. Examples of details that reappear in Hack’s work.

neering and architecture from Princeton University, he entered Boston University’s Program in Artisanry, then struck out on his own as a furniture maker. Today he is a member and former chair of the New Hampshire Furniture Masters and highly sought after as both a furniture maker and a teacher. He and Carolyn live on a bucolic working farm in southern Vermont, where they maintain studios and care for their draft horse, two milk cows, and a flock of chickens. He also travels extensively, leading woodworking classes throughout the U.S. and overseas. Hack selects woods—cherry, curly maple, ebony, holly, Douglas fir, and rosewood—like a painter plucking colors from his palette, customizing the blend for each project to achieve the most dramatic colors, patterns, and patinas. He confesses to an affinity for curly birch, a wood that many furniture

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makers eschew because of its difficulty. “It’s beautifully colored, and the patterns in the wood are spectacular, but it is very tough to work,” he admits. “The wood fibers tear out unless your tools are incredibly sharp and your patience is strong.” He is also known for the liberal use of sensual curves and wavy surfaces, design elements he creates through laborious coopering and painstaking laminations. For Outside In, he pulled out all the stops. “There are virtually no straight lines in the entire piece,” he says. The coopering—the creation and arrangement of the staves that make up the body of the cabinet—is among the most complicated he has done to date. “Each stave has unique angles that depend on the tightness of the curve it describes, and every single one is shaped like a human body—with shoulder, waist, and hips—that must fit perfectly with the one right next to it.” The coopering was further complicated by the inclusion of an interior tambour door and myriad Top of page: Bill Truslow (3); left: Garrett Hack (4)

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TOP TO BOTTOM: The interior of Hack’s studio. The studio Hack built, beginning in 1993, using old brick and granite and a recycled slate roof.

drawers on the surface of the cabinet as well as within the piece. In the front, three wavy, curved drawers swing out and act as a combination lock to open a door below. In the back, four more curved drawers emerge from various spots on the smooth Douglas fir skin. “It took a few tries in mock-ups to get those drawers working right,” says Hack. “The sides have to be curved and parallel, which seems simple, but it’s not.” Another element in every one of his

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Transformation is a beautiful thing. For 30 years we’ve been transforming lives through exceptional design. Let’s talk about your next act. svdesign.com pieces is a message in Morse code. For Outside In, he inscribed the completion date, his signature, and the initials of the piece’s name in a series of dots and dashes that encircle the raised top. Also, in this piece, as in many others, Hack’s work was given additional visual flair by Carolyn, who adorned several of the interior surfaces with brilliant splashes of acrylic paint, offering a contrapunto to the wood’s earthy tones and grain. Hack is already toiling away on his next challenge. “You can think about a problem indefinitely, but the best way to solve it is to jump in and start working. Outside In was a challenging piece, but also tremendous fun. And fun,” he concludes, “is very high on my list.” 

Architecture • Interiors • Landscapes Beverly • Chatham

EDITOR’S NOTE: To see more of Garrett Hack’s work, visit garretthack.com. Above: Garrett Hack (2)

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Good Bones

Park-like grounds further the manor-house feel, and a random pattern of different-colored stones (including Venetian buff for the window heads and sills) lends the new building the patina of age. BELOW: The arched portico softens the design’s formality, while the windows above gather natural light for the stair hall.

A House for the Ages

Three generations gather to make memories on Rhode Island’s south coast.

happy marriage of past and present • Acreates visual harmony, and no one knows this

better than Newport architect Paul Weber. Take this estate on Rhode Island’s south coast. The columned portico and the symmetrical composition of windows with twin chimneys above is classic. But Weber has tweaked his design ever so slightly, angling the cupula-crowned garage/guest wing to, as he explains, “break it down and make it more casual.” He uses the same clever formula inside, where traditional details lend character to an open and functional floorplan. Strong affection for Rhode Island (the husband is a University of Rhode Island alumnus) drew the owners to the waterfront property. It seemed the idyllic spot for building a retreat their grown children and grandchildren could enjoy—one of those places where memories pile up. A Shingle-style house was an option, but the owners envisioned instead a nest with “a stronger sense of permanence,” Weber says. The solution? A grand 13,000-squarefoot stone house with all the elements the couple love, like gables, dormers, and ornamental moldings.

| TEXT BY MEGAN FULWEILER |  | PHOTOGRAPHY BY RICHARD MANDELKORN | 56  New England Home | November–December 2018

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Good Bones

CLOCKWISE FROM

TOP LEFT: A large expanse of covered porch merges with a screened porch resting within a convenient distance of the popular fire pit. The utilitarian porte cochere is made even more appealing with a soaring gable and dormers. Bountiful windows on the home’s dramatic water-facing side pull in south and east light for the main living areas.

“PORTE COCHERES ARE ONE OF MY FAVORITE DESIGN FEATURES, ESPECIALLY IN OUR NEW ENGLAND CLIMATE,” SAYS ARCHITECT PAUL WEBER. Today, a long driveway (the owners purchased an adjacent property to enhance privacy) carries visitors to the front door. A sightline zooms from the threshold through to the home’s opposite side, providing a gorgeous water view. Parking is staged unobtrusively on the back side of the wing where the porte cochere is bookended with garages. “Porte cocheres are one of my favorite design features, especially in our New England climate,” Weber says. A turret (Weber labels it “a knuckle”) with an acorn top links the main house with the wing that holds the garage below and a guest suite, game room,

and handy bunk room above. The fully outfitted basement level reveals a generous-sized exercise room along with a media/game room equipped with an enviable walk-in wine cellar. The main living areas take advantage of the vistas. The double-height foyer is matched by a lofty, window-lined receiving room. The latter spills into the principal gathering space that combines the kitchen, living, and dining areas. An airy hall zipping from a screen porch on the home’s south end to the master suite at the opposite end aids circulation. “Weber has a wonderful sense of scale and proportion,” says Doug Shear, president of Newport Housewrights, the general contractor for the project. Indeed, it’s a seamless layout made better by a series of striking delineations. Bronze-rimmed mahogany columns on stone bases, for instance, frame the foyer and receiving room. The family room has a stone fireplace and a coffered ceiling, while the

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Good Bones RIGHT: The finely detailed bar bears the stamp of both the architect and designer Jennifer Garrigues, who chose the room’s intense color and Moroccaninspired light fixture. FAR RIGHT: The stair hall and foyer are bisected by the spine of the house. Engineered hardwood flooring with a rugged character plays off the meticulous woodwork. FACING PAGE: An unobtrusive branch of the drive swings around the house to the parking court and a pair of two-bay garages.

dining area sports an elliptical ceiling that speaks to a large curved window. Rather than one beefy kitchen island, there are two islands (one for prep, one for eating) to accommodate the cook as well as guests. Throughout, there are also myriad attention-

getting materials (another Weber trademark) and details. Among them: reclaimed European stone floors in the foyer and receiving room, Australian cypress paneling in the library, and pewter kitchen counters. The upper kitchen cabinets—crafted by

Design now for Summer 2019

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Jutras Woodworking, which also executed the home’s millwork— sport intersecting Gothic arch muntins, while the generous porches incorporate vertical-grain fir ceilings. “Architects and interior designers always collaborate,” Weber says, crediting interior designer Jennifer Garrigues and her project manager, Diana El‑Daher, for the home’s high degree of style and comfort. Among Garrigues’s many contributions are a host of intriguing Moroccan references, like the Chinese-red bar off the kitchen and a turret room with a plethora of pillows, adding personality and interest. The upstairs hall, which offers access to five guest bedrooms and baths, holds a balcony with views of the foyer and receiving room below. The openness invites natural light and modernizes the home. So does the soaring gable with arched trusses on the house’s water-facing side. The gable, sheltering a sitting area below, reaches out to embrace the heavenly grounds devised by landscape architect

Dan Solien of Horiuchi Solien Landscape Architects. There, among the sea roses and grasses, a fire pit stands at the ready to extend the family’s precious summer days into starlit nights.  RESOURCES : For more information about this home, see page 196.

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Rooms We Love

Beaux Arts Beauty

A historic home in Nashua, New Hampshire, makes a stunning backdrop to showcase New England design talent.

the many lovely old homes in the historic North End of Nashua, • Among New Hampshire, the Beaux Arts-style house built in 1906 by Frank Anderson,

a shoe magnate, stands out as a true gem. The redbrick and Vermont marble building is a study in symmetry with its pair of tall chimneys, its twin iron balconies adorning each end of the facade, and its tastefully ornate columned entry. Several families owned the house, which eventually became a private high school for girls, and today is owned by the Thomas More College of Liberal Arts. The college generously lent the property to Home Health & Hospice Care for its fundraising Designer Showhouse. Eighteen New England designers turned every corner of the house into a showcase of beauty. Here is a peek at a few of our favorites.

| TEXT BY PAULA M. BODAH |

The Meditation Room

It’s all about serenity in this light-filled area designed by Lisa Law. The designer makes meditation a daily part of her own life, and she encourages her clients to create nooks in their homes where they can slow down and restore their energy. She put her knowledge of and experience with the principles of feng shui to work, using low furniture to encourage a sense of being grounded and introducing round forms— which just happen to echo the architectural details already in place—to promote a sense of clarity. Fresh plants add to the feeling of tranquility, making this a spot to get away from the hectic pace of daily life. INTERIOR DESIGN: Lisa Law, Lisa Law Lifestyle Designs PHOTOGRAPHY: Jason Greenleaf

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MICHAEL J. LEE PHOTOGRAPHY

Hawthorn Builders 97 chapel street | needham, ma 781-707-6564 | hawthorn-builders.com

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COLLABORATE & BUILD

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Rooms We Love

The Library

Men’s Scotch Lair

Designers Michaele Boehm and Kacey Graham took inspiration from this space’s former life as a billiards room to create a handsome, undeniably masculine spot. The designers wisely let the oak-paneled and green-tiled fireplace stand as the focal point, and introduced richly colored fabrics (including the Graham family’s own green-and-blue tartan) in the draperies and pillows. Oversize ferns and artwork pick up on the green theme, and pops of gold here and there add a regal touch and ramp up the elegance. We can almost swear we catch a whiff of cigar smoke in the air.

Frank Hodge’s school bus used to pass by the Frank Anderson house when he was a boy, and he remembers wondering what the inside of such a beautiful home must look like. Forty-five years later, the designer was delighted to discover that the library still had its stunning original architectural details, including the built-in bookcases with leaded glass doors and the gorgeous ornamental plaster trim on the ceiling. Those details made the perfect backdrop for Hodge’s vision of an elegant, tailored space outfitted in a sophisticated palette of russet, beige, and chocolate brown and a mix of antique and contemporary furniture and accessories. INTERIOR DESIGN: Frank Hodge, F.D. Hodge Interiors PHOTOGRAPHY: Rob Karosis

INTERIOR DESIGN:

Kacey Graham and Michaele Boehm, Boehm Graham Interior Design PHOTOGRAPHY:

Rob Karosis

RESOURCES :

For more information about these rooms, see page 196.

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Rooms We Love

The South Bedroom

Designer Dianna Normanton envisioned a young woman with cosmopolitan flair inhabiting this sunny bedroom. Her design choices nod to the traditional but have a stylish—often witty—modern approach. Witness the glossy finish on the fourposter bed, or the Osborne & Little wallpaper that is reminiscent of old plaster paint but is really a quiet symphony of lemony gold, white, and silver. The muted paisley wool rug makes a beautiful foil for the navy velvet bench and the daring navy ceiling (and the even more daring purple ostrich feather chandelier!). The finishing touch? A saucy toss pillow bearing the countenance of everyone’s favorite cosmopolitan girl: Audrey Hepburn. INTERIOR DESIGN: Dianna Normanton, Dianna Normanton Interiors PHOTOGRAPHY: Kelli Ruggere

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he fall season kicked off with a bang as the design community came together to celebrate the most promising young regional talent in residential architecture and design at New England Home’s ninth annual 5 Under 40 awards party. Close to 400 people gathered at Landry & Arcari Rugs and Carpeting’s Boston showroom to celebrate this year’s honorees: interior designers Kelly Healy, Calla McNamara, and Sarah Scales, architect Jeremy Roc Jih, and landscape designer Russell D.H. Stott. The happy crowd spilled out into the atrium at 333 Stuart Street, where fantastic floral arrangements by Marc Hall Design added to the festive atmosphere. Guests sipped signature cocktails by Wiggly Bridge Distillery, local beer from Portico Brewing Company, and fine wines from 90+ Cellars while enjoying delicacies prepared by Davio’s restaurant. They were also sent home with a treat from Bisousweet Confections. A photo booth was a popular spot for friends and colleagues to strike a pose. A highlight of the evening was the spirited auction of one-of-a-kind rugs designed by the 5 Under 40 winners and handcrafted by Landry & Arcari’s weavers. Acting as celebrity auctioneer was WGBH radio and television personality Jim Braude, who encouraged a friendly bidding war to raise funds to benefit Barakat, a Cambridge, Massachusetts-based charity that supports literacy and education for women and children in Afghanistan and Pakistan. The 5 Under 40 program has raised more than $180,000 for Barakat since its inception. 70  New England Home | November–December 2018

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| 1. Sarah Weilbrenner Viteri, Betsy Perry, and Patricia Espinosa of The Local Vault | 2. Sana Saeed of Barakat | 3. The crowd of almost 400 people enjoying the party | 4. The evening’s celebrity auctioneer Jim Braude, the host of Greater Boston and co-host of Boston Public Radio on WGBH | 5. Sienna MacArthur, Brittney Lombardo, Katherine Elliott, and Elizabeth Tobin of Pinney Designs | 6. New England Home’s editorin-chief Kyle Hoepner with Sean T. Reynolds of Woodmeister Master Builders | 7. Let the bidding begin! | 8. David Woods of Wiggly Bridge Distillery pouring tastings for the crowd. 5

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Party photos by Allan Dines

10/16/18 6:43 PM


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| 1. Honorees Jeremy Roc Jih, Calla McNamara, Sarah Scales, Kelly Healy, and Russell Stott | 2. Jay Arcari, Ben Arcari Cook, Julie Arcari, and Jeffrey Arcari | 3. This year’s judges, Glen Valentine of Stephen Stimson Associates, Patrick Planeta of Planeta Design Group, and David Foley of Foley Fiore Architecture  | 4. Mark Jordan and Courtney Jones of Karastan | 5. The Hutker Architects team with winner Calla McNamara | 6. Bill Morton of Back Bay Shutter, LaDonna Hyndman, honoree Kelly Healy, and Nancy Sorensen of Back Bay Shutter  | 7. Troy Sober, Gregory Lombardi, Jason Harris, Rebecca Verner, Michael Wasser, and Holly Charbonnier of Gregory Lombardi Design  | 8. New England Home’s publisher Kathy Bush-Dutton with Gregory Sweeney of Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams | 9. Mark Dinkel of Payne Bouchier, honoree Russell Stott, and Jared Paine and Alex Zook of Payne Bouchier | 10. Tony Montes, Alexa and Angel Centeno, and Renier Beltran of Systems Design & Integration, Inc.

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photos / Greg Premru

Kevin Cradock Builders

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Special Advertising Section

PROJECTS WE LOVE Special spaces that reveal the creative genius of New England’s design professionals

IMAGE COURTESY OF SELDOM SCENE INTERIORS

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Special Advertising Section

PROJECTS WE LOVE

Wide-Open Upgrade Why do you love this project? I loved this project because it was a changeup from a lot of the work we’ve been doing. The ambience of the home brought me back to my childhood. It was simple, yet modern and elegant all at the same time, and the project had such a feeling of home. Sometimes, I feel like people go for extravagant looks and designs, and this project was just refreshing because these clients were looking for the complete opposite. What were the clients’ goals for this project, and how did you address them? The clients’ goals for this project were simply to upgrade and introduce a more modern and sleek feel into the home. We had a great open canvas to work with, and the clients were open to ideas and suggestions, which made this project so fun.

Was there an “aha” moment when working on this project that you knew you were creating something unique for the homeowners? An “aha” moment for me was when I saw how much space there really was to work with. You know, you see so many homes that are cluttered, or because of the way they’ve been designed, it seems like you have little to no wiggle room to work on a new masterpiece. But, once the clutter is out, and you envision the possibilities with a blank canvas, it’s so exciting to share ideas and watch the creation unfold.

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Special Advertising Section

STEVE DEERING

Catamount Builders 472-A West Broadway Boston, MA 02127 617-315-7430 catamountbuilders.com

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Special Advertising Section

➊ PROJECTS WE LOVE

Eye-Catching Contrast Why do you love this project? This project seamlessly blended contemporary and traditional styles that included a wide variety of woods and finishes. I love the eye-catching contrast between the natural walnut kitchen trim and the vibrant blue traditional cabinets. Likewise, the credenzas create a contrast between custom bookmatched veneer panels and the rustic, unpredictable sculptural nature of the live-edge slab countertops. The live edge walnut tops with inlaid butterflies were a perfect choice to complement the surrounding details and finishes. So incredibly warm and inviting. Every project has its challenges, what were the challenges faced in this particular project? One of the challenges for this project was to procure two live-edge walnut slabs in the correct sizes, with 78  New England Home | 2018

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interesting live edges, promising color, grain, and character. Another challenge was meeting the aggressive timeframe. We were able to effectively manage this project and exceed our customer’s expectations. Was there an “aha” moment when working on this project that you knew you were creating something unique for the homeowners? My ultimate “aha” moment came during installation, when we could finally see all the finished cabinetry and millwork assembled on site. That’s when I realized just how the skillfully chosen combination of finishes and unique design elements worked together to create a perfect showpiece.

PHOTOGRAPHY: GREG PREMRU | DESIGNER: KRISTEN RIVOLI

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Special Advertising Section

➊ Solid walnut face frames surround and accent the custom cabinetry that is finished in Benjamin Moore’s Fiji blue. ➋ Custom millwork permeates this home and flows through the large living space spanning from the upper kitchen down to a mid-level dining area and down a few more steps to an open living area. ➌ Both credenzas are topped with live-edge walnut slabs. Walnut crossgrain butterflies contain checks and add an interesting aesthetic. Epoxy filling was used as needed to fill any voids before a factory finish was applied.

GARY ROUSSEAU

Herrick & White Architectural Woodworkers 3 Flat Street Cumberland, RI 02864 401-658-0440 x314 herrick-white.com Instagram: herrick_white

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PROJECTS WE LOVE

Historic Addition What were the clients’ goals for this project? The goal of this project was to create additional living space for an existing home situated on the outskirts of Boston in a historic neighborhood. Working with the homeowners, D. Michael Collins Architects determined a timber-frame structure would pay homage to local traditional buildings while remaining modern and fresh. They connected with us to help create a light look for the timber frame. We crafted split scissor chord trusses with a rough sawn and whitewashed finish. The split chords give an open aesthetic to the timber structure, and the added white tone is intended to be bright, airy, and coastal. What did your clients appreciate most about this project’s process? The collaboration between Michael, our teams, and the homeowners was vital. In the homeowners’ own words: “The process was fun, the collaboration was tremendous, and give and take (each time with a smile) was never an issue. You achieved exactly what we had in our minds—superb workmanship, yet casual and welcoming, new but a nod to old and post and beam.” 80  New England Home | 2018

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What were the challenges faced in this particular project? The project is a block from the historic center of town in a very urban area with tight constraints for fitting truck, crane, timbers, and crew. The raising was relatively quick as this was a modest addition—but the site and the neighborhood made for a unique raising experience. How is this project unique? The home itself has unique details hidden throughout. One of the core goals was to bring disparate architectural elements into a coherent whole. Taking cues from the architect and owner, we worked with smaller timber members to take away some of the heaviness that is usually associated with timber design. We achieved structural requirements by doubling smaller members and using steel connectors that fit well with the overall aesthetic. For our part, the structural aspects, the split chords, the custom finish, and the raising location make this a highly custom project— the kind we like best, in addition to our partnerships throughout the project.

MEGHANN GREGORY PHOTOGRAPHY

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At New Energy Works we specialize in crafting heavy timbers for complex projects across the nation. We find great fulfillment in helping bring architect, builder, and homeowner plans to fruition. Our company operates on Triple Bottom Line placing equal importance on our people, our planet, and our prosperity.

NEW ENERGY WORKS design | timberframing | woodworks

New Energy Works Farmington, NY & Burlington, VT 800-486-0661 newenergyworks.com

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PROJECTS WE LOVE

Captain’s House What were your clients’ goals for this project and how did you address them? This 1840s Greek Revival captain’s house captured our clients’ hearts; however the interior layout was poorly organized for entertaining with a rabbit-warren of indoor-oriented rooms that failed to capture the picturesque views of the wetlands and harbor beyond. We removed the second floor to create a grand, vaulted great room that opens to a kitchen and dining space. Large windows feature panoramic views, and flanking the fireplace is a pair of French doors that open out to a bluestone covered porch with a fireplace and a pool. What do your clients appreciate the most about this project? With a passion for food and entertaining, the wife truly enjoys the ability to socialize with her guests while cooking in the kitchen. Meanwhile, the great

room can comfortably fit gatherings of all sizes, from a large cocktail party to an intimate night to themselves. Every project has its challenges, what were the challenges faced in this particular project? FEMA required the home to be raised three feet to maintain habitable space on the lower level. The biggest challenge was camouflaging the steep ascent from the sidewalk to the front door. We raised and lowered the house on a new layered brick foundation screened by extensive landscaping. The traditional Edgartown fence helps the home regain its natural position on the streetscape. Why do you love this project? Despite having doubled the program, the home maintains its intimate scale, yet it lives large and the way people want to live today.

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If I have done my job correctly, I am like a ghost who visits in the night—leaving no trace and most successful when no one sees my hand.

Patrick Ahearn Architect, LLC 160 Commonwealth Ave., Ste. L3 Boston, MA 02116 617-266-1710 patrickahearn.com

PATRICK AHEARN, FAIA

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➊ PROJECTS WE LOVE

Living Large in a Small Space Is there something specific you love about this project? I particularly love the chic, swanky midcentury style we created in this space and the play between traditional forms and modern furnishings. For example, we decided to put a traditional gold frame around the peacock painting over the fireplace, but rather than having it be attached like most frames are, its floating which gives the painting a dramatic pop.

risky but sensational! The client loved it so much that I repeated it in furnishings throughout the space.

Where did you look for inspiration on this project, and what makes it stand out? This apartment was a spec that we turned into a personalized space for a very particular client, who in the past, had been drawn toward a more traditional look. When we really thought about their personalities, the hip neighborhood they were living in, and the energy of city living we decided there was room for bold and glamorous. The black lacquer wall, for example was

What do your clients appreciate most about this project? My clients love the comfort and livability we created in this pied-à-terre. They were delighted by the attention to all details from the vintage barware and furniture to the custom rugs. Our client remarked that the initial experience of coming home and walking into her exquisite new space was a moment she wished she could live over and over again.

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What were the challenges faced on this project? The main challenge of this newly renovated historic building on Beacon Hill was the small unusable spaces. After moving a wall, adding fantastic vintage lighting and stunning mill work, the space radiated the elegance we knew was waiting to be unveiled.

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➊ No one believed anything but a chair and sofa could fit into the space. With the right planning we created a luscious environment that could accommodate entertaining family and friends. ➋ When our client comes home she is met by city-chic, Parisian ambiance. ➌ I appreciate Dorothy Draper’s approach, now known as “Modern Baroque”, adding a modern flair to a classical style. Of course, we incorporate our own wonderful Seldom Scene interpretation of this. ➍ Designing a small space demands cohesive ideas throughout. Each room speaks to the others.

Seldom Scene Interiors 2038 Mountain Road Stowe, VT 05672 802-253-3770 seldomsceneinteriors.com

WENDY VALLIERE

international design firm

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Finish Material Development Furnishing, Artwork + Accessory Procurement

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How is this project unique/different from your other projects? It feels unique to me because of how clear the concept reads throughout. We set out to create an interior that allowed the outdoors to set the scene. To that goal, we brought the palette from the outside in, while thoughtfully refining each space to reflect our clients’ sophistication and clean aesthetic. Our client/team supported us in really taking hold of the interior scope (millwork, fixtures, materials, lighting, etc., down to the last hand towel) so having the ability to pull from a cohesive concept for every detail, I think, really took this project to the next level.

Construction Documentation

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Why do you love this project? First and foremost, because of the clients and their unwavering trust and partnership as well as the team collaboration between interior designer, architect, and general contractor. A harmonious team always makes for a better end result. I also love this project because it incorporates so many of the principles I covet. When walking through the home, there is a clear relationship between each space. We achieved this by repeating a restrained materials palette throughout the home. Although there is repetition of material, the use and application shifts to give each detail the attention it deserves. I also feel this project is such a great representation of our approach to design and attention to detail.

Interior Architecture + Millwork Design

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Maine Family Home

Interior Design Services

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PROJECTS WE LOVE

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Belhaakon 152 Main Street, Unit #2 Wenham, MA 01984 978-338-4532 belhaakon.com

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PROJECTS WE LOVE

Mountain Modern What were your clients’ goals for the project? My clients, a Boston couple with significant professional lives and two wonderful kids, wanted a cozy yet stylish place to escape to—the perfect getaway for enjoying their favorite outdoor activities and entertaining family and friends. We gave the kids a mod bunk room, the parents have a dedicated office space for working remotely, and everyone makes use of the luxe family room and custom-built mudroom. How is this project unique? After working for 20 years on primarily urban homes, this “slope-side” vacation home at Stowe Mountain was a wonderful change of scenery—literally! It was a pleasure to work with the local trades and

JESSE SCHLOFF PHOTOGRAPHY

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Blanchard Design Studio is a Boston-based design firm, specializing in custom architectural and interior design projects throughout New England.

artisans. I also tapped into a more playful side of my aesthetic, incorporating casual pull-up seating options, a polka dot rug to coordinate with the fun furniture in the kids’ room, and a custom built-in for board games and puzzles. Why do you love this project? The sight of a 4,400-foot-high mountain peak was true creative inspiration. The design complements the breathtaking scenery framed in the two-story windows with an organic color palette and the use of natural textures and materials. I love that the vastness of the mountain view and the gorgeous surrounding landscape are now part of this living space without overwhelming it.

CHELSEA BLANCHARD

Blanchard Design Studio 131 N Street Boston, MA 02127 617-861-7733 blancharddesignstudio.com

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blanchard DESIGN STUDIO custom residential design

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PROJECTS WE LOVE

Family Dream Room Why do you love this project? This beautiful, fully accessorized addition was conceived by a combination of two homeowners, two CB principals, and one architect all in similar stages of life working together to create, design, and construct their own dream room. Unfortunately for three of them, only one great family is able to keep and experience this dream space. Such a spectacular room warranted in-depth conversation when each finish element was selected. Some were dialed in on beauty and others were focused on how beauty survives two kids under five and a rambunctious Vizsla! What were your challenges in this project? Before, during, and after schematic design, ideas and inspiration photos were plenty. Living up to the most beautiful photos on

Instagram and Pinterest was a tall task. Sourcing the actual components to mimic those photos was a combination of searching and insisting. The mantels, ceiling beams, barn doors, floors, and running trim were all sourced from separate suppliers. Was there an “aha” moment when working on this project that you knew you were creating something unique for the homeowners? What really brought the project together was the installation of a custom barn door, and rare tile that fit the project perfectly. It wasn’t until the installation of the tile, wallpaper, and light fixtures that I realized how much we were all pursuing the same outcome. We are honored to have built such a beautiful space and lucky to have enjoyed such a great process.

Antique granite, reclaimed Elm Beams, and hand scraped live oak floors add a little patina to this bright breathtaking space.

Everybody’s Favorite Room Concept Building 31 Green St Waltham, MA 02451 781-703-5970 conceptbuildinginc.com

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PROJECTS WE LOVE

Zinc Countertops What were your clients’ goals? Our clients were looking for a unique texture that provides a weathered character and neutral tones. More important, they wanted a durable solution and material that will withstand the test of time. Incorporating a backsplash, a custom zinc table for their banquet, or an island top are just a few add-ons our clients choose to complement their zinc counter tops. What do your clients appreciate most about project? Our clients appreciate our hands-on approach. Throughout the New England region and into New York, our team will template onsite, fabricate the project in our

Rhode Island workshop, and then install. The person who is making the countertop is the same person templating and installing. We make it an easy and seamless process. What materials did you use? We use real zinc sheet adhered to a cabinet-grade plywood core. The underside is sealed from water and moisture. The zinc surface receives a patina wash that oxidizes the zinc to a light to medium gray tone with mottled patterns that mimic a timeworn past. We offer the option to seal the surface with a maintenance-free sealant. Or they can go natural and leave it unsealed, letting the zinc patina continue to develop and tell its own story.

Kingston Krafts 475 Harris Ave. Providence, RI 401-272-0292 kingstonkrafts.com Workshop hours by appointment

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PROJECTS WE LOVE

Cape Cod Vernacular What do you love about this project? What was so refreshing about this project? The clients came to the table having put a tremendous amount of thought into their vision for the house. This is not unique, but what was special about this instance was the level of sophistication of their vision. All projects benefit from a team approach between the design professional and the client. From the first meeting we knew this was going to be a special project. What were the clients’ goals, and how did you address them? It is very common for clients to have different ideas in regard to their design goals. We are very adept at listening to our clients and finding a common ground. Her tastes leaned more toward a modern design, and his traditional Cape. Her vision called for “pavilions joined by glass” while his focus

Ocean Side Rendering to show the finished design intent of the vernacular and landscape design.

was, “it needs to look like it belongs on the Cape.” We gravitated toward the saltbox as it lends itself to a modern aesthetic devoid of unnecessary decoration. The saltbox relies on proportion and clean lines, which is where its beauty resides. Was there any historic architecture that influenced this project? In general, Cape and Islands architecture was born out of necessity, and this is why historically, simple, pure Cape Cod forms, i.e. the “saltbox,” are used to suit and adapt to the New England winters. In this particular instance we used the “transitional” approach to the Cape Cod home. This is a modern interpretation that suits today’s architectural environment and affluence, but is true to the simple form, detail, and materials of historic Cape Cod.

GREG E. GRAHAM, COREY R. MACPHERSON, CHRISTIAN H. PRESCOTT

Latitude, LLC 492 Trapelo Rd., #185 Belmont, MA 02478 617-993-0018 latitude-architects.com

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PROJECTS WE LOVE

Architectural Metalwork Why do you love this project? We love this project because it is such a predominant feature in the space. It is large and fairly imposing with bold details and characteristics, such as the corner angles of steel and rivet heads, yet has the detail of particular consistent reveals and a subtle, unique aqueous patina. What do your clients appreciate most about the project? Our clients appreciate that we hung more than 6,000 pounds of steel safely, efficiently, and with little impact on the project site, while the site was in full-blown construction with other trades. Additionally, we feel that the piece installed is exactly the piece that was envisioned.

MICHAEL PARTIENO

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What were the challenges faced in this particular project? The biggest challenge was replicating a finish that was incidental or a byproduct of applying a different finish. We were given a finish sample that was previously submitted by another firm that was not holding up well, so we were confident we could apply a similar but more lasting finish. It turned out that the one that we were asked to simulate was the finish on the back side of the sample. After several considerations we arrived at a finish that was layered and unique. It was similar to making an accident happen repeatedly; it was completely organic and spontaneous while ordered and calculated.

MAKE Architectural Metalworking 2358 Cranberry Highway West Wareham, MA 508-273-7603 makearchmetal.com

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PROJECTS WE LOVE

Penthouse With a View What were your clients’ goals for this project? This penthouse features magnificent views of the Back Bay skyline. One side of the home had views that were not as desirable. Our goals were to provide an outdoor living space that would visually screen mechanical equipment and adjacent buildings, mitigate the sound from the equipment, and provide usable entertaining space within a long and narrow corridor. A finely crafted ipe slat wall was constructed along the extents of the roof terrace. The backside of the wall was clad with soundproofing panels to help reduce noise. Integral seating saves room for a narrow dining table that abuts a row of large bamboo shoots that allow light to pass through. We provided a small grilling area and counter for the owner.

MDLA created a contemporary roof terrace space using a limited material and plant palette. Attention to detail, such as precise joint alignment and the use of hidden fasteners, makes this space stand out.

What do your clients appreciate most about the project? The enhanced view the moment they walk in the door. They also appreciate the ability to spill outside and entertain in this additional living space without the sound of adjacent mechanical equipment. What were the challenges faced in this particular project? Working on any roof deck project can be a challenge based on weight restrictions, light conditions, mechanical equipment and skylight locations, wind, and condominium board rules and regulations. This project had all of these challenges and more. Width limitations meant we had to be creative with a dining area that still allowed for passable space. Our solution was a built-in bench on one side and a narrow screen wall with a thin sound attenuation cladding.

MICHAEL D’ANGELO

Michael D’Angelo Landscape Architecture LLC 732 East Broadway, Suite #3 Boston, MA 02127 203-592-4788 m-d-l-a.com

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PROJECTS WE LOVE

The wood counters are matched to the existing wood flooring, seamlessly integrating the old and new.

Intimate Remodel What were the clients’ goals for this project and how did you address them? This client loved their neighborhood, but they weren’t in love with their home. The split-level was stagnant and disjointed with an odd layout. Our design introduced a more modern aesthetic and opened up the circulation in the public spaces while enlarging the kitchen and connection to the outdoors. What were the challenges faced in this particular project? With the main project, we cannibalized a bedroom on the first floor and completely reconfigured the layout, creating an open space with ample natural light. The kitchen

was made to feel more intimate with a lowered ceiling height, while exposed collar ties draw the entire space together cohesively. Was there an “aha” moment when working on this project that you knew you were creating something unique for the homeowners? The client was so ecstatic with the construction process when we started, we moved forward with the design and creation of a second-level in-law suite and powder room. This second project was far more budget-constrained than the first, so we had to be much more creative with reusing existing fixture locations and reconfiguring walls.

BRADLEY CASHIN

New England Design & Construction 103 Terrace St. Boston, MA 02120 617-708-0676 nedesignbuild.com

“lifting spirits with spaces”

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PROJECTS WE LOVE

Wooden Kitchen Island What were the clients’ goals for this project? The primary goal of this young couple was to create a functional island top that would hold up to heavy daily use and still be an inviting center point to the kitchen. The island serves as both the primary seating area for the family in everyday life, as well as valuable counter space where cooking prep can be done. A butcher block counter has a soft feel, warm coloring, and strength to hold up for generations. The couple did not like the cold feel of granite or quartz. What did you love about this project? I was really happy when the couple gave us the green light on making the top extra thick and allowing us to show color variation. The top is approximately 1¾” thick so it will hold up for years. The weight and density of edge grain make it incred-

ibly strong, and I love the way it dampens sound when you put something down with force. And by showing the light color of the sapwood in the walnut, it has great swirls of caramel and cappuccino browns. Overall an awesome contrast with the clean, white cabinets in the kitchen. What were the challenges faced in this particular project? Butcher block, or edge-grain, counter tops can be difficult when setting up in these large sizes. The boards need to be extremely tight together with no chip-out or flaws on any of the edges, and on a top this size there are many edges. Lastly, moving a hardwood top at these dimensions into a house can be back-breaking work. But the payoff was well worth it. A great project and we look forward to the next one!

ROLAND JACKSON AND DAN CROSSMAN

Saltwoods 19-D Calvin Rd Watertown MA 02472 617-744-9401 saltwoods.com

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PROJECTS WE LOVE

Indoor Playground How is this project unique? How often do you get to design a playground inside a house? It was certainly a first for us, and the farthest thing from our clients’ minds when they sat down with us. They were a family with five young boys who moved from a large house in the suburbs to a brownstone in the city. The parents were sad they had taken away the kids’ favorite part of the old house—the big yard to play in—and wanted to find some way to make them happy. Every project has its challenges. What were the challenges faced in this particular project? Adding monkey bars and a swing set

It’s never too cold or rainy to go for a swing inside!

requires a significant amount of structure and headroom! To create enough room depth for the swings to really swing, we had to dig out the floor, and existing columns were cleverly integrated to provide support. What do your clients appreciate the most about this project? The parents initially thought we were crazy, but they absolutely love the space. It’s fun and durable, but also an appealing room with traditional details like wainscoting, extensive trim, a retro fridge, a comfortable lounging area, and lighting fixtures protected against flying balls. It’s become the neighborhood hang-out spot, a safe, inviting sanctuary in the middle of the city.

SALLY DEGAN

SpaceCraft Architecture 5 Raymond Street Lexington, MA 02421 781-674-2100 SpaceCraftArch.com

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PROJECTS WE LOVE

Multi-Media Pit Room Why do you love this project? It escapes the ordinary vision of a media room. The custom-built seating and upholstered blue fabric in this pit room is unlike any other media room. Systems Design prewired the space with a 5.1 Cinema Series Bowers & Wilkins surround sound and an in-wall JL Audio Subwoofer. We installed and programmed Savant Motorized Shades that integrate with the Savant Home Automation control system. We love the seamless AV design of this space, where everything is high-end and creatively concealed. We love the cool tech in this home; pressing a button opens the front door and the garage, and turns off the lights on every floor of this five-story home. Were there any architects/designers that influenced this project? ARC design was inspired by the unique pit room at Spring Place, a private club in New York. The creative design was a col-

laboration between the builder, buyers, and the AV company. Tyler Murphy and Tim Caraboolad with ARC Design, high-end designers/builders in Boston, worked on the layout and design while the buyer was in charge of unique finishes. Angel Centeno, owner of Systems Design, was involved in all aspects of the AV with state-of-the-art audio/video and home automation equipment, including motorized shades. What were the challenges faced in this particular project? There were a lot of pipes and soffits running through the space that had to be eliminated. By using open web trust and a thoughtful layout, the builder was able to create this beautiful space. Systems Design installed a complex, large AV system with a goal that it had to be concealed in a small space. The client wanted the shades hidden, so the builder created custom built-in pockets for the motorized shades.

Systems Design works with designers, builders, architects and homeowners to design-install integrated AV systems for homes and commercial spaces.

ALEXA AND ANGEL CENTENO

Systems Design & Integration, Inc. 5230 Washington Street, Suite #4 West Roxbury, MA 02132 617-391-8919 sdiboston.com

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PROJECTS WE LOVE

Kitchen with Soul What were the challenges faced in this particular project? Both of the homeowners had an active interest in the granite selection, so there were two distinct opinions. The project required a significant amount of granite, which needed to be consistent enough while maintaining the movement that the clients preferred. Using our array of suppliers, we were able to find a large quantity of granite that both clients loved. What were the clients’ goals and how did you address them? The client wanted to minimize seams as much as possible, but several of the sec-

tions were quite long. By raising the end of the island top up to bar height we were able to eliminate an obvious seam, while creating an interesting bi-level top. The kitchen ended up with only one seam that measures less than eight inches total, at the main sink, and is virtually invisible.    Why did you love this project? I love this project because this kitchen really is the soul of the house. The way they changed their layout to make this kitchen happen really amazed me. And it was a pleasure to work with such great people.  It’s no wonder why we are friends.  

CAROL GOMES

The Granite Place 374C Cambridge St. Burlington, MA 01803 781-362-4774 thegraniteplaceinc.com

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PROJECTS WE LOVE

Lakeside Retreat Why do you love this project? Our Muskoka Cottage on Ontario’s beautiful Lake Muskoka was designed to capture magnificent lake views from the moment of arrival onward—with expansive windows and an open floor plan that celebrates indoor/outdoor living and light-filled spaces. Turkel Design co-founder Meelena Turkel spent her childhood summers in Muskoka, and later shared her appreciation for Canadian lake country vernacular on long canoe rides with her husband and cofounder Joel Turkel. Years later, this project brought them back to Muskoka, where our panelized prefab method offered maximum efficiency and predictability. What were the clients’ goals for this project? This project began with two families who wanted a communal summer cottage where

Muskoka Cottage by Turkel Design is open to nature on both sides, with expansive lift-andslide doors that provide a fluid indoor/outdoor connection. To see more of this house, go to: turkeldesign.com/ muskoka

friends and family could gather to enjoy their idyllic natural surroundings all year long. In addition to designing two master bedrooms with lake views, we created an airy living space with soaring ceilings and lift-and-slide doors that open the space to nature on both sides. What were the challenges faced in this particular project? Working with a harsh winter and remote location, this project would have been challenging without the efficiencies and predictability of prefab. Our panelized construction method allowed us to manufacture the prefab shell in a controlled factory environment, and have it assembled before winter hit. And getting to remote locations is not a problem, as we flat-pack our panels onto a flatbed truck for delivery—allowing us to build anywhere.

JOEL AND MEELENA TURKEL

Turkel Design 840 Summer Street, #104 Boston, MA 02127 617-868-1867 turkeldesign.com

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A.J. Rose Carpets & Flooring is a Proud Sponsor of

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modern art

For all its abstract, sculptural looks, a Brookline, Massachusetts, house is skillfully attuned to its venerable neighborhood.

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undamentally, most traditional home designs aren’t terribly different from a child’s drawing of what a house is supposed to look like, full of familiar features like eaves, gables, and windows bracketed by shutters. Designing a contemporary home, on the other hand, “dispenses with all those things and works with abstract forms”— essentially rectangles and squares—says architect Marcus Gleysteen. The challenge in a project like this striking home in Brookline, Massachusetts, he says, is balancing the size of the house to its shape. “It’s difficult to make a two-story modern home look like a house, rather than a small museum or high-school science building,” he says. The sleek, blocky basis of the home’s abstract design is mitigated by the addition of a floating canopy, brise-soleil, and extensive plantings around the entry.

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BELOW: Varied ceiling heights help define spaces throughout the home, while artwork provides color and texture. A wood panel buffed to a high gloss mirrors the custom staircase, itself a piece of functional art. FACING PAGE: A huge slab of polished marble serves as a focal point in the living room, complementing the views of the lush backyard and acting as a counterpoint to the room’s sleek, modern design.

The owners envisioned a house full of natural light, for example, but Gleysteen also needed to scale windows to be “house sized.” A floating canopy over the entry and a brise-soleil running the length of the house helped break up the blockiness of the design and reduce the sense of height, bringing the home down to human scale. “It’s abstract and sculptural, but also completely accessible,” Gleysteen says, with every square foot tailored to meet the everyday needs of an active family with a busy social and entertaining schedule. Beds of carefully tended ornamentals, tall groomed evergreens, and planters flanking the steps to the front door,

installed by landscape architect Michael Coutu, also help connect the home to its environment and soften some of the sharp edges of the design. “The planters provide seasonal color as well as dress up the entrance,” Coutu explains. None of this means that the home lacks drama, however. Entering it is like stepping into an art gallery. The staircase, a geometric marvel in metal and glass, is reflected in a wall-sized slab of wood polished to a mirror-like sheen. Designed by Gleysteen and interior designer Manuel de Santaren, the panel was inspired by the work of prominent minimalist sculptors such as Sol Lewitt, Donald Judd, and John McCracken. “The wood panel helps to warm up a large volume of space,” de Santaren says. “We knew we had some great vertical real estate, so there were times where we wanted to make a visual

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impact with art,” which largely came from the owners’ collection of concretist works by South American artists of the 1960s and 1970s. “This one space brings the whole house together,” says Gleysteen of the glass-walled entry hall, which he likens to the overture to the symphony of the rest of the home. “All of the upstairs bedrooms are grouped around this staircase that brings you down to the living room and dining room.” Hanging above the stairs is a literal greeting to guests—a crystal chandelier forming the pattern of a voiceprint of the word “welcome.” Even more dramatic is the monumental slab of marble hung above the living room fireplace, another reflective surface that embellishes an otherwise bright, white room. With its natural striations

he monumental slab of T marble, with its natural striations and whorls, is “almost an abstract painting,” says Manuel de Santaren. PROJECT TEAM Architecture: Marcus Gleysteen, Marcus Gleysteen Architects Interior design: Manuel de Santaren Builder: Kenneth Vona, KVC Builders Landscape design: Michael Coutu, Sudbury Design Group

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Marilyn Monroe smiles over the art deco dining room, where Parsons-style J. Robert Scott chairs surround a custom table by interior designer Manuel de Santaren. FACING PAGE: The main staircase echoes the geometric design of the home and incorporates the building blocks used in its construction—wood, metal, and glass. Above twinkles a welcoming crystal chandelier, one of the few truly ornate elements in the home.

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CLOCKWISE FROM BELOW: A Holly Hunt sofa beckons in the library, an interior room that nonetheless receives plenty of natural light. Wood-grained Eggersmann cabinetry hides major appliances and provides contrast to the monumental marble kitchen island. Polished tile and marble make for a glamorous bathroom. A variety of textures is at play in the wet bar, where a mix of tile, marble, and polished wood brings warmth to the ultra-modern design.

and whorls, the marble panel is “almost an abstract painting,” says de Santaren. The durable piece also works well for a spot where heat from the fireplace might damage other more fragile works of art. The panel makes a nice backdrop when the family settles into the living room couches to watch TV. An AV system installed by Maverick Integration simultaneously lowers a movie screen in front of the hearth, drops a projector from the ceiling, and shades the windows in the room. That’s a good illustration of how the home is, in Gleysteen’s words, “fully programmed.” The custom furnishings that fill the

rooms come from what de Santaren describes as “the great contemporary workrooms,” including J. Robert Scott, John Boone, and Holly Hunt. The design is understated, but deliciously tactile, thanks to de Santaren’s use of varied textures and warm materials like leather. A cerused oak bar topped with Egyptian onyx stands as an example of the designer finding opportunities to layer textures to keep things from feeling too austere. “We wanted a very quiet environment, he says, “because we didn’t want to distract from the landscaping and the oldgrowth trees on the property. The house is clean and sleek, but not clinical.” Brookline may seem an unlikely setting for such a bold design. “This house is an object in the landscape, rather than pretending it’s not there,” Gleysteen says. The Boston suburb isn’t the design monoculture one might expect, however, with some modernistic homes dating back to the 1930s sprinkled in among

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rookline may seem an unlikely setting for such a bold design. “This house is an object in the landscape, rather than pretending it’s not there,” Marcus Gleysteen says.

B

ABOVE: The backyard and pool area echo just enough of the geometry of the home to remain harmonic, while landscaping, ornamental flowers, discreet lighting, and a welcoming cabana soften the edges of a space used frequently for entertaining and family time. RIGHT: “Home-sized” windows, a bedroom balcony, and native trees help create a residential feel for a structure that intends to stand out from, not blend into, its environment.

the colonials. “Typically, we expect the client to want a more traditional home, and we have to talk them into doing something more contemporary,” says Gleysteen. “In this case, the owners wanted a modern home, but they didn’t think they could do it in that part of Brookline.” Coutu’s carefully considered landscaping helps to integrate the home into its rare two-acre lot as well as the surrounding neighborhood. Evergreens planted along the perimeter screen the home from neighbors, while a low wall at the back of the yard helps define the property. A tennis court was sunk about five feet into the ground to minimize its visual impact, and a series of long limestone steps softens the elevation change from the back of the house to the pool and creates continuity between the home and the

outdoor spaces. “The steps give the sense that the living room and dining room flow right into the back lawn,” says Coutu. A bold abstract sculpture by Venezuelan artist Lugufelo, centered on the pathway, draws the eye across the pool and patio with its shaded loungers and sheltered pool cabana. Effortless in execution, the house is of a piece with those neighbors who had the foresight to embrace the twentieth and twenty-first centuries even when surrounded by homes from the eighteenth and nineteenth. And like its neighbors, no matter what century they represent, “It’s designed in a way that it will be just as nice fifty years from now as it is today,” says Gleysteen.  RESOURCES : For more information about this home, see page 196.

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Aged to Perfection Text by Fred Albert Photography by Eric Piasecki/OTTO 

A renovation plays up the graceful architectural details of an old Bostonarea house and introduces a fresh, contemporary vibe to the interiors.

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The architects wrapped the old sunporch and rear additions in ribbons of horizontal glass, but preserved the stately old steps flanking the 1911 home. FACING PAGE: Planting strips bisect the front lawn, softening the facade, which was rejuvenated with new stucco, shutters, and copper downspouts. The aging tile roof was replaced with durable composition shingles.

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LEFT: Although the living room is more formal than other spaces, its eclectic mix of styles keeps pretention at bay. BELOW: Designer Nina Farmer dressed the powder room in glamorous materials, so it feels like you’re walking into a jewel box. FACING PAGE: An heirloom Biedermeier table anchors an expansive entry hall that Farmer outfitted with art deco flourishes and a midcentury modern–style sideboard.

Expectations weren’t high the day a Brookline, Massachusetts, couple went to visit a home for sale on the other side of town. The pair had been house-hunting for nearly five years with no success, and the place they were about to see—a grand old relic, now faded with time—had languished on the market almost as long. If the couple didn’t like the place, their real estate agent assured them, they could always demolish it and start over. Any thoughts of demolition vanished the moment they stepped inside. “There’s no way we would ever knock this house down!” the wife exclaims. “It had these incredible bones. It had incredible personality. We couldn’t have destroyed all that beauty and handiwork and artistry.” Built in 1911 on a generous parcel overlooking a reservoir and the city skyline, the colonial-revival

manse had clearly seen better days. But the broad stucco exterior and spacious, elegant rooms were welldesigned and retained much of their original detailing, despite some updates to the 10,625-square-foot interior. The sense of bygone graciousness spoke to the civic-minded buyers, who enjoy hosting charitable events as well as casual gatherings with friends. “It was

PROJECT TEAM Architecture: LDa Architecture & Interiors Interior design: Nina Famer, Nina Farmer Interiors Builder: Charles Gadbois, Wellen Construction Landscape design: Matthew Cunningham, Matthew Cunningham Landscape Design

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“T

he house is imposing in its architecture and some of its formality, so I was trying to bring that down a notch,” says Nina Farmer.

really as perfect a house as we could have imagined for ourselves and our family,” says the wife. The couple enlisted architect Treff LaFleche and contractor Charles Gadbois to bring new life to this aging artifact. But before they could add any architectural flourishes, the house was taken down to the studs and fitted with new plumbing and electric, insulation, double-pane replacement windows, and roof. Most of the exterior was treated to a fresh coat of stucco, and long-absent shutters were introduced once again, adding depth and interest to the facade—which now included a new attached garage. “We weren’t making an old house look brand new,” explains Gadbois. “We were making a period home look updated and crisp.” Interior detailing that couldn’t be saved was carefully reproduced, instilling a sense of grandeur that interior designer Nina Farmer tried to honor—but not imitate. “The house is imposing in its architecture, so I was trying to bring that down a notch,” she explains. Farmer mixed periods and styles throughout, adding healthy doses of art deco and midcentury modern furnishings to the expected ration of traditional and antique pieces. Since the owners have two young children, upholstery fabrics were treated with stain protectant and coffee tables were customized with upholstered tops to encourage leisurely sprawling. “We didn’t want anything seriously formal, because we knew we wouldn’t use it,” says the wife. The eclecticism not only enhances the home’s comfort, but makes it look like the furnishings were assembled over time. That comes through

Farmer divided the living room into two seating groups to help fill its thirty-two-foot length and preserve views of the fireplace from the entry hall. The nesting coffee table can expand to fill the void and provide a game area for the children. “We didn’t want huge coffee tables that you had to circulate around at a party,” the designer says.

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CLOCKWISE FROM NEAR RIGHT:

Decorative ceiling moldings add architectural interest to the relocated dining room, where Farmer covered the walls in silk and hung a chandelier inspired by the fixtures in Boston’s Symphony Hall. The kitchen was designed for casual entertaining, with room for two families on the vinyl-topped banquette. Architectural flourishes complement the home’s period design, while an eight-burner Lacanche range and custom hood offer serious cooking power. In the newly added family room, a linen sectional surrounds a coffee table with an upholstered top that invites you to put your feet up.

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RIGHT: Calming colors reign in the new master bedroom, which rests atop the kitchen addition at the rear of the house. BOTTOM: A pedestal tub finished in polished nickel sits on a marble mosaic floor in the master bath. FACING PAGE: The enclosed porch was totally redone with heated floors and walls of glass that surround the husband in nature while he’s working.

most emphatically in the living room, where a tufted roll-arm sofa is paired with streamlined art deco chairs and a modern stacking coffee table festooned with rivets. Contemporary light fixtures illuminate the assemblage, which includes a grand piano that was a wedding gift to the wife’s great-grandparents. The dining room, which sat at the rear of the house, was moved to the front, alongside the other formal spaces. “I wanted the detailing of that room to rise to the level that the reception hall and living room had,” says LaFleche, who collaborated on the project with colleagues Dean Hofelich and Thomas Jonak. The team rejected colonial flourishes in favor of a geometric design that riffs on traditional coffered ceilings, but was crafted from layers of wood, for a solution that proved both elegant and economical. While Farmer pondered what kind of chandelier to hang from that ceiling, her clients took her to a Boston Symphony Orchestra concert. During the performance, she admired the fixtures hanging in Symphony Hall, and had the Urban Electric Co. make a small-scale version inspired by the McKim, Mead and White originals. The chandelier illuminates the upholstered silk walls, custom table, and the couple’s old dining chairs, which Farmer revived with brown velvet seats and retro bargello-patterned backs. Like most residences of the period, the house was oriented to the street and lacked adequate kitchen or family space. LaFleche seized the opportunity to introduce these rooms at the rear of the house with an addition that opened the interior to the backyard, light, and views. The new rooms are wrapped in ribbons of horizontal glass, making it clear that they are contemporary interventions. “We’re not being a slave to the original house; we’re bringing our own inter-

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e’re not being a slave to the original house. We’re bringing our own interpretation, but it’s done in a way that still respects the formality of the front,” says Treff LaFleche. 10/19/18 3:18 PM


pretation,” the architect says. “But it’s done in a way that respects the elegance and formality of the front.” The spacious new kitchen includes an eight-burner Lacanche range, which the husband commands with consummate skill while family and friends watch from the twelve-foot island or expansive breakfast nook—sized to accommodate guests. Serviceberry branches fill the adjacent windows, entertaining diners with flitting birds and frolicking squirrels. The same horizontal windows surround the old sunporch, enfolding the room in a pastoral panorama that makes you forget you’re only a few miles from downtown Boston. “You get that thrill of being both outside and inside simultaneously,” notes LaFleche, who added a radiant-heated floor to fend off winter chills. The husband uses the space as an office, but it doubles as a family retreat, augmenting the family room that was added alongside the kitchen. The garden got a new lease on life thanks to landscape architect Matthew Cunningham, who cast

aside formal conventions to create a contemporary garden teeming with native plants. “We were trying to work with materials that will be habitat-friendly and more durable than the materials you might typically find on an estate like this,” says Cunningham, who was assisted on the project by Jen Stephens. Since the family is often away in the summer, the landscape architect eschewed billowing flower beds in favor of shrubs that showcase their color in spring and fall. A procession of white magnolia trees bisects the front lawn, buffering the home from the street and lending a sense of scale to the facade. “A fence wouldn’t have been right,” Cunningham says. “It was all about opening it up and making it feel stately.” With its blend of Old World grandeur and upto-date appointments, the renovated home offers its owners the best of yesterday and today—and the satisfaction of knowing they’ve preserved a gracious relic for generations to come.  RESOURCES : For more information about this home, see page 196. November–December 2018 | New England Home  119

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BOLDMOVE

A dad with a sense of adventure and a designer unafraid to make a splash team up on a Boston condo that even the kids think is pretty cool. Text by Debra Judge Silber | Photography by Michael J. Lee Produced by Kyle Hoepner

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High-gloss finishes and an LED fixture Elms dubbed “the ring of fire” put some shine into the living room. The deep window seat and sleeper sofa provide extra room for friends and family.

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RIGHT: The comfortable sectional in the family room was one of the first pieces chosen for the space. BELOW: Dramatic veining with hints of amethyst make a custom marble sink the focus of the powder room. FACING PAGE: An encaustic work by artist Martin Kline frames the space above a custom-designed cantilevered shelf opposite the elevator in the entry hall.

“You’ve got to break a lot of eggs to make an omelet” isn’t something you

hear a lot in conversations about interior design. But it seems oddly fitting when Dee Elms’s client uses it to describe the creative collaboration that transformed a bland Back Bay apartment into a boldly beautiful home that reflects him—and his family—to a T.

Cracking the mold wasn’t necessarily the aim when the recently divorced dad purchased the singlefloor unit overlooking the Charles River. His goal was a comfortable, stylish, but not stuffy home base for himself and his three teenage children, two of whom would be living with him. “I didn’t want it to be a traditional ‘Boston’ place,” he explains. “I didn’t want it to be boring.” “He said, ‘I want a place that’s super comfortable, that I love, and that’s cool enough that my kids’ friends will want to visit,’ ” recalls Elms. She had met the client previously in consultation on another project, and he asked her to walk through the 2,800-square-foot condominium before he purchased it. She remembers its rooms as blandly

PROJECT TEAM Interior design: Dee Elms, Elms Interior Design Builder: Chris Rapczynski, Sleeping Dog Properties

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RIGHT: Offering a bird’s eye view of activity along the Charles River, the breakfast nook is the client’s favorite place to enjoy a cup of coffee. BELOW: In the kitchen, the designer removed a large existing island to make room for window-side dining, and topped off the new island with a dramatic waterfall of Calacatta marble. FACING PAGE: The bold, hand-painted wallpaper of the dining room creates a lively first impression.

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he owner said, ‘I want a place that’s super comfortable, that I love, and that’s cool enough that my kids’ friends will want to visit,’ ” recalls Dee Elms. traditional, monochromatic, with tray ceilings and pilastered fireplaces. “It was white, white, white, and white,” Elms says. Still, she told her client, “This could be amazing.” That Elms succeeded in her prediction is clear the moment one steps off the elevator into the entry hall, where the fluid brushstrokes of hand-painted Porter Teleo wallpaper draw immediate attention to the nearby dining room. A playful chandelier from Apparatus Studio hovers like a fistful of balloons over the dining table, around which chartreuse velvet dining chairs pop against the graphic backdrop. “I wanted it to make a splash,” Elms says. “The dining room became a kind of statement that we’re not too serious in this home. We’re having fun.” Having fun with the design process seemed a natural consequence of the designer-client relationship, which both say was marked by a lively give-and-take that balanced the homeowner’s ideas and expectations with the designer’s experience. “We’d have these debates on what would work,” the client says, referring to conversations with Elms and project manager Carolyn Kotowski. “I think I surprised them with the things I was willing to do, and they surprised me with the things they came up with.” Elms concurs. “We’d talk about what he liked and

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what he didn’t like. I knew he had a cool, hip vibe and we could play that up. But I also had to understand how far he would go.” This was tested in the dining room, where Elms’s choice of the chandelier led to a slew of agonizing phone calls. “I kept thinking, this will look ridiculous,” he says, “and then it goes up and . . . she was right.” Other conversations were easier, such as the one about the kitchen, where Elms proposed painting the existing cabinets. “I said, ‘I want to paint your cabinets black,’ ” she says. “And he was like, ‘I’m cool with that.’ ” Nor did he flinch when she suggested carrying the black into the wall treatment. “He just had so much trust,” Elms says. Threaded with silver, the paper actually appears much lighter than one would expect. “It was really a great marriage of client to designer

and designer to contractor, with outstanding results,” says Chris Rapczynski, president of Sleeping Dog Properties, which managed the construction. He praises Elms’s ability to communicate as well as her understanding of the choices required to achieve high-end results. “In the end, what you see is a glossy paint finish that looks great,” he says, pointing to the shine on the living-room woodwork. “But beneath that is so many layers of decision-making. Those are the discussions we have with Dee.” The high-gloss shine Rapczynski refers to belongs to a storage wall Elms designed for the living room that pumps up the room’s sophistication while providing closet space for the client’s son when he visits. She also ditched the formal fireplace, putting in its place a gas unit trimmed with riveted brass and framed in marble. On the opposite end of the entry

“I

f you’re in a dude zone, you’re not going to be using pale lavender drapery fabric. I think we balanced him, his kids, and his life really well,” says Elms. ND18 Elms-Boston-BeaconSt.indd 126

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LEFT: In the master bedroom, gray tones play out in a variety of textures, including the leather and chenille of the Holly Hunt chair, cashmere drapes, and high-gloss lacquer on the dresser. BELOW: Pendants from Fuse Lighting hang like tassels beside the master bed. FACING PAGE, LEFT: A favorite piece the client purchased in New Orleans finds a home in the master closet. FACING PAGE, RIGHT: Designer Dee Elms revitalized existing shelving and storage in the master closet with beefy hardware and a high-gloss gray finish.

hall, the fireplace in the family room got a modern makeover as well. In both rooms, Elms had deep window seats built into the curve of the existing bay windows. “He loved that idea,” she says of her client. “It’s another place for people to crash.” Crashing—or let’s say recumbent relaxation—is further encouraged by the family room’s cushiony sectional. “All three of my kids said, can we please get a couch we can all sit on?” the homeowner says. “It was the very first piece we picked out.” Throughout the project, Elms consulted with the children, the daughters particularly, to make sure the space would reflect their tastes as much as their

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A

fter a slew of agonizing phone calls, “I kept thinking, this will look ridiculous,” the owner says, “and then it goes up and . . . Dee was right.”

father’s. Despite this, the client says, some people describe the home as “masculine.” But he’s fine with that. “If it comes off masculine, I’d say, mission accomplished.” He also adds, “When my daughters’ friends come over, they absolutely love the place.” Elms has her own take. “I would never call it overly masculine,” she says. “If you’re in a dude zone, you’re not going to be using pale lavender drapery fabric. I think we balanced him, his kids, and his life really well.” Even, it turns out, when her client returned from a trip to New Orleans with a new purchase: a large

OPPOSIT PAGE: One wall of a bold floral print from Flavor Paper brightens up a daughter’s bedroom. THIS PAGE, LEFT TO RIGHT: A tub from Italian manufacturer Agape is deep enough for a luxurious soak. Elms kept the layout in the master bath but replaced the vanity with a custom-designed one; a skirt on the marble top creates an illusion of thick stone.

painting by artist Ashley Longshore depicting an oversize hundred-dollar bill stamped with the words: Grow a Pair. “I have to be honest. I hoped it wasn’t going in the dining room,” Elms says. Their compromise (which the client goodnaturedly describes as a four-to-one vote) landed the artwork in the master bedroom’s walk-in closet, where it stands out against the flannel pinstriped wallpaper. “It fits perfectly there,” Elms says. And, she adds. “It’s so him.”  RESOURCES : For more information about this home, see page 196. November–December 2018 | New England Home  129

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In order to maximize sunlight and views in every room, architectural designer Michele Foster kept the footprint narrow. To blend it into the mountain setting, she sheathed it in treated cypress that mimics the color and tone of bark and granite.

FUN IN THE SUN TEXT BY NATHANIEL READE 

PHOTOGRAPHY BY WARREN JAGGER

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Michele Foster has a special relationship with the sun. “It’s really the most reliable thing in our lives,” she says. “It does the same thing every day, year after year.”

The principal at Foster Associates, a design studio in Portsmouth, Rhode Island, Foster says that the job of architecture is to create spaces that are animated by the play of light. And as she frequently points out to clients, you can’t have beautiful sunlight in your home if the sun doesn’t reach it. Clients have asked her to make their buildings brighter, and she has told them that all the skylights and tree cutting in the world won’t change the fact that the house was built in the wrong place. “One thing about the sun,” she says, “is that you can’t move it.” Which is why on a cold February day in 2015, Foster drove for five hours to a fifty-acre parcel in Stowe, Vermont, even

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PROJECT TEAM Architectural and interior design: Michele Foster, Foster Associates Builder: Cleve Patterson, Patterson & Smith Construction Landscape design: Keith Wagner, Wagner Hodgson Landscape Architecture

though the owners intended to design their house with someone else. She’d worked with them before, she liked them, and no matter who they hired, she wanted the site selection to be right. She arrived to a hillside covered in three feet of snow. So she strapped on snowshoes, tramped up the mountain to the intended site, and said to the husband, Sam, “Look what the sun is doing.” Her topographic maps and sun diagrams flapped in the wind as she pointed out that the house would always be dark in winter, and that the pool would be shaded and uninviting by noon. When she showed him a better site she’d already identified a few hundred feet to the south,

Sam decided to hire her instead. “That was not the first time I’d snowshoed in to do a site analysis,” she says. “But it’s good to get a little messy. It’s what makes architecture fun.” Foster now faced a series of design challenges. “The site always has huge impacts on design decisions,” she says, “and it can’t be taken lightly.” No pun intended. Her group tends to design narrow buildings, she explains, because they allow for more light; this house is essentially one room wide, providing light and views from three directions in virtually every room. A stairway with a stainlesssteel frame and Lightblocks resin panels leads upstairs to the master bedroom,

Careful site selection means the buildings receive sunlight throughout the day. Having separate guest quarters above the garage, to the left of the main house, allows the owners to keep their home cozy for four, but accommodate extra visitors when necessary.

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playroom, and loft space, all under one simple roof line. Vermont can be hot in the summer, however, and all that light can turn a home into a solar oven. Foster used her knowledge of the sun to design overhangs that let in light in the early part of the day, but provide shelter from hot, overhead rays. Floor-to-ceiling windows slide into the walls to produce a porch-like effect with a cross-breeze. The skylight at the top of the stairwell opens, creating a heat chimney like an attic fan. Because air conditioning is rarely needed, solar panels provide most of the electricity. Sam and his wife wanted a house that would accommodate big groups of relatives and friends, but still feel intimate when they were alone with their two kids. Foster designed a main house that’s comfortable for four, with a guest house above the garage that can be closed down or used as needed. The two buildings combine to about 4,400 square feet in a ski town where some new houses are now three times that.

he owner wanted “the land to be as much a centerpiece of the project as the house,” and Michele Foster agreed. “No building is as important as the natural environment.”

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FACING PAGE TOP: Keith Wagner’s landscape design includes lots of stone to help the structures melt into the site. FACING PAGE BOTTOM: The kitchen’s tall windows slide into the walls, ushering in breezes and blending indoors and out. LEFT: A trampoline and a chalkboard let the kids’ loft double as a playroom. BELOW: The master bath’s Dry Ice resin tub from Lightblocks is as stunning as the view.

Sam says they also wanted “the land to be as much a centerpiece of the project as the house,” and Foster agreed. “No building is as important as the natural environment,” she says. To keep the structure nearly invisible from a distance, they saved as many trees as possible and sheathed the exterior with specially treated siding that mimics the color and feel of weathered barn board or granite outcroppings. The homeowners also credit Keith Wagner’s landscape architecture with helping the building melt into its environment. “Beautiful as the site was on its own,” Sam says, “Keith convinced us to add a lot of dry-laid stone walls, which became some of the most important design aspects—and look spectacular.” Wagner says that’s the best way with any house: “Extend out from the geometry of the design using things like stone walls that blend into the terrain, and then you can soften that with plant materials.” The ground sloped from the top of the pool to the main house, for instance, so he designed a low stone wall that levels and retains the soil, defines separate areas, provides seating during gatherings, and helps link the structure to all the natural stone on site. And there was a lot of stone on site. Builder Cleve Patterson describes it as the most extensive excavation of his career. For six weeks his crews blasted, dug, and hauled out rock. Sam says he knew the location would present unique problems, November–December 2018 | New England Home  135

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eith Wagner installed a “jumping stone” rather than a diving board for the pool, embedded the fire pit into an excavated rock, and built the kids a rock-climbing park.

Builder Cleve Patterson says his crew spent weeks excavating rock, much of which was put to good use, like the boulder that serves as the “jumping stone” for the pool. FACING PAGE: Another boulder taken from the property became a surround for the fire pit.

but he was nonetheless surprised at the number of meetings to discuss how to dispose of all the rock. Wagner and his team found various creative outlets. They installed a “jumping stone” rather than a diving board for the pool, embedded the fire pit into an excavated rock, and built the kids a rock-climbing park by the driveway. The clients wanted their interior rooms to be simple, eco-friendly, and both intimate for small groups and accommodating of larger groups and house concerts. Foster managed this with minimal furnishings that can be moved aside when needed, covered in natural, non-toxic, easily cleaned fabrics. She and her design team washed the oak floors and cypress

paneling with a white stain to evoke the bark of the trees outside. Because they collect dust, she eliminated baseboards, requiring meticulous carpentry where wall panels meet the floor. The intention was practical and modest, but Patterson and his team nonetheless created a house that landscape architect Keith Wagner describes as fine furniture. “I was impressed with the whole process,” he says. “An intriguing site, wonderful architecture, clients who wanted to do the right thing, and talented artisans who built everything. I’ve been doing this for thirty-three years, and it was the most fun project I ever worked on.” Foster agrees. “It was one of my favorite projects. I feel very fortunate.” And as for the sun, it’s still reliable. Foster recently got an email from the owners, describing how the summer light made the pool inviting even in late afternoon. She thought, “Yeah, I know.”   RESOURCES : For more information about this home, see page 196. November–December 2018 | New England Home  137

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LANDSCAPE DESIGN ARCHITECTURE

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SPECIALTY

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ARCHITECTURE

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THE TWELFTH ANNUAL NEW ENGLAND DESIGN HALL OF FAME AWARDS AND GALA Inductee portraits by NAT REA Text by LISA H. SPEIDEL Furniture and shoot location courtesy of JANUS et Cie

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2018 NEW ENGLAND DESIGN HALL OF FAME

Introduction Our favorite time of year is upon us once again: awards season! Every November, we get to raise a glass to the stars of our industry and celebrate their decades of truly exceptional work. They are responsible for defining—and redefining—our buildings and our landscapes. They are arbiters of taste and style. They are industry influencers and leaders. For twelve years now, we have had the true honor of introducing the latest class of New England Design Hall of Fame inductees. Over those years, we’ve celebrated a stellar group of architects, interior designers, landscape architects and designers, custom builders, and other professionals who have made an indelible mark on New England’s residential design scene. This year’s group is every bit as impressive as their predecessors. So without further ado, please welcome the 2018 class: architects Mark P. Finlay of Mark P. Finlay Architects and Brian J. Mac of Birdseye; interior designer Mollie S. Johnson of Mollie Johnson Interiors; landscape architect Douglas Jones of LeBlanc Jones Landscape Architects; and in the specialty category, Robert Marzilli of R.P. Marzilli & Company, and David Webster of Webster & Company. Arriving at the short list is a job in and of itself, and for this work we are indebted to our judges (and past winners): Maryann Thompson of Maryann Thompson Architects; Michael Carter of Carter & Company;

Anne Penniman of Anne Penniman Associates; and Mark Doughty of Thoughtforms; as well as Theodore (Ted) Landsmark, the director of the Dukakis Center for Urban and Regional Policy at Northeastern University and a board member of the Boston Planning & Development Agency. The process was overseen by New England Home’s editor-in-chief, Kyle Hoepner. Our winners will get to relax for the night when they are fêted at our annual awards gala, which benefits Heading Home, a nonprofit committed to ending homelessness in Greater Boston. Then, it’s back to work—designing, building, creating—so we can all reap the benefits of what they produce next.

The selection committee for the 2018 New England Design Hall of Fame inductees (left to right) Ted Landsmark, Maryann Thompson, Mark Doughty, Michael Carter, and Anne Penniman. 144  New England Home | November–December 2018

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Photo by Kyle Hoepner

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2018 NEW ENGLAND DESIGN HALL OF FAME

Inductee Announcement Ceremony The six design professionals chosen for induction into the New England Design Hall of Fame for 2018 were announced at a festive cocktail party that served as a high point of Boston Design Market and the kick-off for Heading Home to Dinner—a design and dine event that raises funds for Heading Home to combat homelessness. More than 450 people gathered at the Boston Design Center to view the creative table displays and bar carts, and to celebrate the talented people joining the Hall of Fame this year. 3

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1. Joanne DiFrancesco of JD Communications with Rosemary Porto of Poggenpohl | 2. Kristen Rivoli of Kristen Rivoli Interior Design and New England Home’s Adam Japko get the crowd bidding for the selection of creatively designed bar carts | 3. The crowd eagerly awaits the announcement of the 2018 New England Design Hall of Fame inductees | 4. Kristine Mullaney of Kristine Mullaney Design, Phoebe Lovejoy Russell of Lovejoy Interiors, and Libby Silvia of Artstyle | 5. Matthew Cunningham of Matthew Cunningham Landscape Design with Beezee Honan of Designer Bath and Salem Plumbing Supply | 6. Kristan McLaughlin of Jamestown raises a glass to the Hall of Fame inductees | 7. Lisa Fabiano of Roomscapes Cabinetry and Design Center with Nancy and Kevin Lagassé of The Lagassé Group | 8. Artist Ellen Rolli with Chris Magliozzi and Larissa Cook of FBN Construction | 9. Cecilia Walker of Cecelia Walker Design, Matt Kane of Kane Contract Group, and Addie Dunn of Office Resources | 10. Rob Bagshaw of Stark Carpet with inductee Mollie Johnson of Mollie Johnson Interiors | 11. New England Home’s Kathy Bush-Dutton with Eric Haydel of Eric Haydel Design  | 12. Dane Austin of Dane Austin Design with Zhanna Drogobetsky from Casa Design Group

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Photography by Allan Dines

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ARCHITECTURE 2018 NEW ENGLAND DESIGN HALL OF FAME

MARK P. FINLAY

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“I knew when I was eight years old that I wanted to do this,” says Mark P. Finlay, “I just didn’t know what it was called.” As a young boy, Finlay loved nature and animals, so he started building cages to house them. When his family moved to New Canaan, Connecticut, he and his father designed their home. His dad suggested he get a job with an architect in high school. “I made $1.25 an hour, and I worked, listened, and watched,” remembers Finlay. Emptying wastebaskets turned into measuring, drawing, and making models. Finlay formalized his on-the-job training by earning an associate’s degree in architectural engineering from the Wentworth Institute in Boston and a bachelor of architecture from the University of Kentucky at Lexington, and studying in Paris and Venice for a semester. Upon graduation, he worked for a couple of firms, notably Roche Dinkeloo, in Hamden, Connecticut, before striking out on his own with Mark P. Finlay Architects, in Southport. He knew early on that he wanted to do both residential and commercial work, as well as showcase

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various architectural styles. “I never liked being pigeonholed,” he says. “I like being a chameleon and doing different things for different people.” A flip through his portfolio illustrates such stunning diversity: Shinglestyle, French Country, Georgian, Regency with a Norwegian influence. New builds or meticulous restorations, traditional or modern, they all have one thing—besides being aesthetically pleasing, of course—in common: “The buildings are comfortable and livable; they’re designed from the inside out, so they’re intuitive, natural, and easy to move through,” he says. After almost thirty-five years in business, the architect’s passion has grown with his reputation and project list. And while the houses he designs are anything but simple, the key to his success is surprisingly so. “Make people happy,” he says. “They don’t teach you that in architecture school.” Top to bottom: Warren Jagger, Andrew Moore

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INTERIOR DESIGN 2018 NEW ENGLAND DESIGN HALL OF FAME

MOLLIE S. JOHNSON

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A General’s daughter, Mollie S. Johnson grew up moving every couple of years. “It was a race to unpack boxes,” she remembers, “and see how fast we could make a house a home.” As her dad progressed in rank, they moved abroad, exposing Johnson to a refined European aesthetic. At one property in Berlin, a ten-year-old Johnson was allowed to decorate her bedroom. “All that exposure, my husband jokes, has corrupted me for life,” she says. She studied French and fine arts at Hollins University in Virginia, and attended Mt. Vernon School of Design in Washington, D.C. Twentyfive years ago, she started her eponymous Wellesley, Massachusetts-based design firm. She describes her style as “rooted in her Southern heritage and refined by her European upbringing.” Her interiors are characterized by elegance and are classically inspired. “I love soft palettes with rich wood tones, shots of black, and gilding in mirrors and framed art,” she says. “I also like to mix antiques with more clean lines.” The roster of fine homes that Johnson has designed is varied. There’s the 1920s Tudor in Wellesley, Massachu-

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setts, that underwent a large-scale renovation and required a deft hand to incorporate the owners’ vast art collection with the new decor. And the Shingle-style vacation home in Wolfeboro, New Hampshire, with dramatic high ceilings and a commanding stone fireplace. And the lake home in Spring Lake, New Jersey, that she outfitted with new furnishings, accessories, and colors then traveled to Clignancourt, France, to scour flea markets for artwork and accessories. Johnson’s work is not only beloved by clients, but also admired by peers. Says 2018 New England Design Hall of Fame judge and past winner Michael Carter, “In a world where good taste is a vanishing attribute, Mollie has always stood out. You can count on her work being appropriate, refined, and beautifully edited.” Top to bottom: Richard Mandelkorn, Sam Gray

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LANDSCAPE DESIGN 2018 NEW ENGLAND DESIGN HALL OF FAME

DOUGLAS JONES

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Doug Jones has been working his magic on New England landscapes for three decades, the last seventeen years as a principal and partner at the Boston-based LeBlanc Jones Landscape Architects. He was inspired early on by the beautiful, diverse natural landscapes of his home state of Idaho. At fourteen, he worked in a local nursery, and then decided to study botany in college. Partway through, he told his father that he was switching his major to art. His dad’s response? “That’s fantastic; you’ll have to pay for it.” In the end, perhaps his dad’s response was for the best, as it spurred Jones to a career in landscape architecture—clearly his métier. “I liked that it was technical and creative at the same time,” he says. The craft also speaks to his quest for excellence. “I’m obsessed with precision,” he admits. “But you just can’t reach it. There’s a healthy limit to how much you can control a site.” While that may be true, Jones has racked up many accolades wrangling sites into stunning submission. His scope is broad, ranging from rooftop terraces and urban gardens to rolling estates and multi-acre farms. Coastal or woodland; formal or natural; residential or commercial, Jones is celebrated not only for his technical dexter-

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ity, but also his carefully considered approach to the land, its history, and its context. Says fellow landscape architect, 2018 New England Design Hall of Fame judge, and past inductee Anne Penniman, “His work is restrained, elemental, and beautiful with appropriate use of materials according to the architectural context. A clarity and rationality of design result in landscapes that convey a quiet elegance.” In short, Jones continues to extract from—and give back to—the craft exactly what he hoped back in college: he has created landscapes that are both artful and ­beautiful. Top to bottom: Jane Messinger, Keith LeBlanc

10/18/18 8:56 PM


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ARCHITECTURE 2018 NEW ENGLAND DESIGN HALL OF FAME

BRIAN J. MAC

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As founder and principal of Birdseye, a forward-thinking Vermont-based architecture and building company, Brian J. Mac has designed many of the state’s most progressive homes. His work is rooted in place, but it goes far beyond this as he imagines modern buildings that reinvent the region’s established vernacular. Mac is known to take iconic local forms and turn them on their heads. There’s the classic woodshed silhouette that he reinterpreted into a guest house; the village farmhouse that merges an 1840s Greek Revival farmhouse with an addition inspired by the local agrarian culture; and the modern play on a camp retreat that elevates and lends formality to a traditional structure. While there’s certainly a cool factor to Mac’s work, there’s also an intellectual component. When the architect reflects on what he’s accomplished in the twenty-one years since starting Birdseye, he points to a recent project that speaks to the firm’s ideology and process. Invited to participate in the “Time Space Existence” exhibition during the 2018 Venice Architecture Biennale in Italy, Mac and his team built a model—in three weeks, no less—that starts with a vernacular Vermont barn and transitions into a contemporary home. “It mimicked a home, but it

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was rooted in how we think about design, history, our region,” he says, “and how we use that as inspiration.” Over the years, this process has earned Mac many accolades—including most recently being elevated by the American Institute of Architects to its prestigious College of Fellows in 2018—and solidified his legacy. Says New England Design Hall of Fame judge Mark Doughty of Thoughtforms, “Brian’s work interacts with its surroundings in a way that suggests people are part of, rather than masters of, the natural world. He has accomplished this in a way that is accessible, and this accessibility is so important to the future of design.” Top to bottom: JIm Westphalen, Jeff Clark

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SPECIALTY 2018 NEW ENGLAND DESIGN HALL OF FAME

ROBERT MARZILLI

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You could say the landscaping business is in Bob Marzilli’s blood. He got his start working with his father and uncles in their landscape maintenance business, and then enrolled in the Stockbridge School of Agriculture and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, earning degrees in landscape construction and landscape architecture. Marzilli quickly discovered that he favored building landscapes over designing them. With this in mind, he struck out on his own, founding R.P. Marzilli and Company, a landscape construction firm. “I set up shop in my mom’s basement and parked two trucks in her driveway,” he remembers. “It was a real bootstrap operation.” Today, his business is housed on an eleven-acre site in Medway, Massachusetts, and employs 200 people, from landscape architects and horticulturists to stone masons and equipment operators. The scope of the work they tackle is impressive and their list of services—including consulting, site development, drainage, grading, planting, lighting, pool installation, tree management, irrigation, and soil and structural engineering—is long. Take, for example, an exquisite fourteen-acre private compound on Nantucket. Marzilli and his team took a flat site and incorporated meandering paths, long stone

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drives, sculpted land masses, sweeping lawns, a bentgrass tennis court, a croquet court, putting greens, and an 18,000-square-foot natural swimming pool. Another project—one of Marzilli’s favorites—involved sourcing, excavating, and transporting 600 tons of aged granite blocks from a near-abandoned quarry in New Hampshire to find just the right tan shade of stone to complement a home’s architectural detailing. It is this level of detail, expertise, and care that sets Marzilli and his team apart. And it’s what has earned them countless contracts constructing some of the region’s most significant—and striking—residential landscapes. Top to bottom: Rosemary Fletcher, Warren Patterson

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SPECIALTY 2018 NEW ENGLAND DESIGN HALL OF FAME

DAVID WEBSTER

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Three decades ago, because of the proliferation of desktop publishing, the graphic design industry had taken a hit. “I closed down my business and had to reinvent myself,” remembers David Webster, who had headed up a thriving company for almost a quarter of a century. On holiday in Palm Beach, Florida, he was contemplating his next act, when a friend with a decorative fabric business suggested he open a showroom in the Boston Design Center. “We were all sitting around on the terrace having lunch, and he came bounding out and said, ‘I have the most brilliant idea, and you’d be fabulous at it—you have a wonderful sense of design, style, color. . . .’ ” Needless to say, Webster took the idea to heart, opening a 2,600-square-foot space called Webster & Company in 1991. “I totally immersed myself in it, seven days a week,” he says. “It was all so fascinating to me.” In September 2019, after almost thirty years in business, he’ll retire, having grown to 25,000 square feet and amassing a reputation as the premier to-the-trade showroom for high-end home furnishings, art, and antiques.

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He traveled often—to Paris, London, the West Coast—looking for new product and returning to Boston over the years with an array of highly prestigious product lines, such as Holly Hunt, Rose Tarlow Melrose House, and Nobilis. Area designers credit Webster with single-handedly elevating the industry and eradicating Boston’s rep as a brown furniture town. They speak of him as a leader, a mentor, a visionary, a friend; they admire his keen eye, his beautifully curated showroom vignettes, and his larger-than-life personality. “There is no one,” says designer Gerald Pomeroy, “who has had such an effect on the field of interior design and totally changed the landscape as such in this area than David Webster.” And for this, New England designers—not to mention their homeowner clients—are grateful. Top to bottom: Eric Roth, courtesy of Webster & Company

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•PERSPECTIVES New England Design Considered From Every Angle

Ready, Set, Celebrate!

Glamorous pieces for the table to help you enjoy the holiday season in high style.

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Perspectives

Style Scheme

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Om Zone

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Whether your route to meditation is Zen or Transcendental, a space devoted to calm and reflection is increasingly landing on homeowners’ wish lists. ¶ Interior designer Ariana Fischer envisions a room filled with beautifully simple objects, copious natural light, and lush plants as the calming backdrop to a meditation practice. ¶ This space is designed to please all the senses, starting with sculptural beeswax candles that emit a delicious natural scent. Blankets made from soft wool can be used for warmth or rolled up for support. Run a circle around the singing bowl or just hit play on the Beoplay to fill the room with relaxing sounds, such as rolling waves or Gregorian chants. And be transported. | Ariana Fischer Interior Design, Portland, Maine, 207-210-6450, arianafischer.com | 1. Brass Singing Bowl Set, Simon Pearce, various New England locations, simonpearce.com  | 2. Metal Banded Lantern, Portland, Maine, 22milkstreet.com | 3. 20th Century Thai Sitting Buddha, Leonards, Seekonk, Mass, leonardsantiques.com | 4. 108 Beads Lapis Meditation Mala, Buddha Groove, buddhagroove.com | 5. Niho Candles, The DeCordova Museum Shop, Lincoln, Mass., decordovastore.org, and 22 Milk Street  | 6. Herringbone Throw by Evangeline, 22 Milk Street | 7. Passo Rug, Restoration Hardware, Boston, restorationhardware.com  | 8. Beoplay A1 by Bang and Olufsen, Apple Store, various New England locations, apple.com | 9. Nelson Daybed, Design Within Reach, Cambridge, Mass., dwr.com 

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Fischer portrait by Trent Bell

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Perspectives

Five Questions

David Andreozzi explains the attractions and benefits of classically based residential architecture.

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What attracted you to traditional design? Most architects, including me, were trained modern. However, I took a class on vernacular architecture that included examples from Alaska to Mexico to New England. The class explored what it was about each architecture’s DNA that made it indigenous to that climate and region and soul. It made me realize that designing with that DNA is our social responsibility as architects. It’s not about walking in and saying, “I am going to design an object in this space

that looks beautiful but does not relate or makes one uncomfortable.” I admire lots of modern architecture, but there is too much of it that is more like sculpture than architecture. It may be fun to look at, but is that architecture?

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And quality has often suffered? Absolutely. I am going to blame our industry and ourselves as architects for not doing a better job of educating our consumers as to the importance of

| INTERVIEW BY ROBERT KIENER | PHOTOGRAPHY BY JASON EVANS | 166  New England Home | November–December 2018

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Perspectives:

Five Questions

well-designed architecture. For example, instead of building a 4,500-square-foot home, it is often better to hire an architect to build a 3,500-square-foot house that doesn’t waste space and uses higher quality materials. If you put it next to the bigger but less well-designed house and sell both, twenty-five years from now you will get back a lot more money for the house that used better materials than the one that is falling apart. Some of this emphasis on size rather than quality is due to the disposable society in which we live.

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How do you see the role of the architect? One view is that the role of the architect is to be a shepherd, guiding you through the process of working with the contractor and also protecting your resale value, your nest egg. The American Institute of Architects may celebrate those of us who are doing something fancy and different, but our duty as a guardian doesn’t get talked about enough. I often tell clients

that, rather than spending your money on areas that won’t return their value when it comes time to sell your home, spend it wisely. They might not need that lap pool or wine cellar but should put that money into things like better windows that will give them a greater return on their investment. It’s our job to help the clients maximize their investment.

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As president of the New England Chapter of the Institute of Classical Architecture and Art (ICAA), you are a champion of traditional, classical design. How do you adapt that design to suit modern tastes? Very few of my houses are based solely on traditional design principles, such as a classical Victorian house design that features individual rooms off a spine of a hallway. Lifestyles have changed. For example, in my own home, a Shinglestyle house, my kitchen, breakfast room, and family room are one single room. So is my living and dining area, which features a fireplace with a traditional mantel. I created a traditional house but made it relate to modern design values. People are coming back to classic archi-

tecture because these positives of modern architecture have blended into its DNA . You need to design from the inside; that’s the soul of good architecture.

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What are your hopes for the future of classical design? I came up with this term I call “cultural sustainability,” and I believe—I hope— that this is where the future of architecture is going to be. I make the analogy to the slow food movement that stresses the importance of eating what’s local, what’s in season, was sustainably caught, has no GMOs, etc. It only took three decades for this to catch on, and I hope over the next three decades, architects and their clients will start to say, “Maybe I don’t need to be bringing in marble from Turkey or Italy, maybe I should be working with what is available in Vermont, or in Massachusetts. Maybe I don’t need to buy a kitchen cabinet made in Italy but should be using local labor and local materials.” More architecture can then become regional again and take on more regional ­characteristics.  | Andreozzi Architecture, Barrington, R.I., andreozzi.com

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Perspectives

Before & After BEFORE

AFTER

Historically, the Needham Women’s Club had depended on homeowners to festoon their own homes to show off on its annual Holiday House Tour. When a local couple offered up the barn behind their farmhouse, on the condition that the ladies transform it themselves, club president Elaine Oppenheimer jumped at the unique opportunity. Oppenheimer approached local interior designer and fellow club member Rebecca Wilson with the proposal. Undeterred by the one-month time frame, Wilson came up with a concept and assembled a team that, in addition to Oppenheimer, included members Helen Gregory, Cindy McGowan, and Susan Saeli. “We begged, borrowed, and got creative,” Wilson says. “I have to admit, I was kind of bossy about it!” Wilson’s vision—Ralph Lauren hosting Christmas dinner in a barn behind his ski lodge—was the epitome of rustic sophistication. She divided the barn into holiday-themed zones, including a conversation area sporting a leather sofa and hunter green Adirondack chairs unearthed in the barn; a gift-wrapping station; a festive bar with cut-crystal decanters; and of course, a towering tree. They trimmed

the showpiece with wide swathes of plaid ribbon, white lights, and candy canes. “Candy canes were originally used to keep mice away,” says Wilson. “We figured that was a good idea in a barn.” The dining table took center stage. Gregory fashioned a burlap tablecloth as a backdrop for place settings of gold trays, rattan chargers, and plaid plates topped with charming place cards. Wilson supplemented tufted-leather head chairs with side chairs made cozy with plaid pillows. The community was enchanted. “People said it was their favorite part of the tour,” Wilson says. | RW Interiors, Needham, Mass., rwinteriors.net

| BY MARNI ELYSE KATZ |  170  New England Home | November–December 2018

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Before photo by Helen Gregory. After photos: top, Heather Goss: bottom, Georgina Arrieta-Ruetenik (2)

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Calendar

EDITED BY LYNDA SIMONTON

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1 1) The Fells, in New Hampshire, is all dressed up for the holidays 2) Give the gift of art at the annual sale benefiting Boston’s School of the Museum of Fine Arts 3) The summer “cottages” of Newport are even more beautiful during the holiday season

NOVEMBER Christmas at The Fells Decorator Showhouse November 2–11 Professional interior designers, floral artists, and volunteers transform the historic main house of The Fells for the holiday season. A highlight of the event is a charming boutique offering unique holiday gift ideas. The festivities kick off with a gala on November 2 to get you in the spirit of the season. I Gala $100; boutique open weekends 10 a.m.– 3 p.m. with tour ticket, weekdays 10 a.m.–4 p.m. with no tour ticket required. $23, $5 children. Newbury, N.H., thefells.org NH Open Doors November 3–4 NH Open Doors is a statewide shopping and sightseeing event designed to appeal to all ages. Visit and shop the open studios of New Hampshire artisans and craftspeople, tour farms, orchards, and wineries, and peruse the many galleries and retail shops.  I nhopendoors.com Fine Furnishings Show November 9–11 Expect great things at the 23rd Annual Fine Furnishings Show–New England Region, where 80-plus well-respected regional and national craftspeople will fill every inch of the Waterfire Arts Center. I Friday

New England Design Hall of Fame Gala November 8

New England Home honors the careers of the region’s most esteemed design talent through the New England Design Hall of Fame. The annual gala, held in Boston’s iconic State Room, is a highlight of the fall social season for the design community. This year’s fête recognizes six new inductees for 2018. I 6:30 p.m. Boston, nehomemag.com/ hall-of-fame/about. For more information, see page 140. 174  New England Home | November–December 2018

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5 p.m.–9 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Sunday 10 a.m.–4 p.m., $10, Waterfire Arts Center, Providence, finefurnishingsshows.com/pawtucket SMFA Art Sale November 15–18 This annual art sale benefiting the School of the Museum of Fine Arts is a great opportunity to start an art collection or add to your existing one. Students, alumni, faculty, and affiliated artists donate their works to support the school. Come ready to purchase, or simply enjoy the work of the artists. The art rotates so there is something new every day. I November 15–17, 11 a.m.–7 p.m.; November 18, 11 a.m.–5 p.m. School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, smfa.edu Christmas at the Newport Mansions November 17–January 1 Indulge in the splendor of the holiday season by touring three of Newport’s historic mansions bedecked for Christmas. The Breakers, the Elms, and Marble House will be decorated for the holidays. Highlights of the tour include gingerbread replicas of the mansions, Christmas trees, and tables set with period silverware and china. I The Breakers opens daily at 9 a.m., the Elms and Marble House open at 10 a.m. The last tour admission at all three houses is at 4 p.m., and the houses and grounds close at 5 p.m. Admission to all three houses, $30 for adults, $10 for children 6–17; closed Thanksgiving and Christmas with a 3 p.m. closing on December 24. The Preservation Society of Newport County, newportmansions.org Victoria Mansion House Tours November 24–January 7 Portland’s Victoria Mansion will open its doors so visitors can enjoy the historic home in its holiday New England Design Hall of Fame Gala photos by Allan Dines

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Calendar Candlelight Stroll at the Strawbery Banke Museum splendor. This year, the mansion will be decorated from top to bottom by area designers in the theme Christmas in the City by the Sea. The annual event includes a gala on November 29. I Gala $60. Open daily 11:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m., Portland, Maine, victoriamansion.org ABX 2018 November 28–29 ArchitectureBoston Expo (ABX) is one of the largest architecture, design, and construction events in the United States. Fortunately for us, it’s located right here in New England. The two-day event features exhibitors and a wide variety of educational programs. Take the opportunity to learn and connect with others in the industry. I Boston Convention Center, 10 a.m.–6 p.m., abexpo.com

DECEMBER SoWa Winter Festival Weekend 1: November 30–December 2 Weekend 2: December 7–9 Enjoy Boston’s largest winter shopping village and festival at the iconic SoWa Power Station. I 540 Harrison Ave., Boston, sowaboston.com Concord Museum Holiday House Tour December 1 Get inspired to decorate your home for the holidays at the annual Concord Museum Holiday House Tour. This self-guided tour lets you explore some of the historic town’s most interesting homes decked for the holidays by a professional designer or florist. I 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Advance tickets $45 members, $50 nonmembers. Concord, Mass., concordmuseum.org 39th Annual Candlelight Stroll at the Strawbery Banke Museum December 2–3, 9–10, 16–17 This annual holiday tradition at Strawbery Banke showcases 350 years of seasonal and holiday traditions at the historic living history museum. The Museum grounds glow with hundreds of lighted candle lanterns, and houses are decorated with handmade decorations. Holiday music fills the air and a festive holiday cheer abounds. Why not make this a family tradition? I Tickets are $25 adults, $12.50 children (ages 5–17), and $60 for a family (2 adults and 2 children age 5–17). Free for children under 5. strawberybanke.org

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Calendar Woodstock Wassail Weekend December 7–9 Kick off the holiday season in classic Vermont style at the 34th annual Woodstock Wassail Weekend. There is a Wassail parade, historic homes decorated in their holiday best, breakfast with Santa, and more. A highlight is the farmhouse at the Billings Farm and Museum decorated in authentic turn-of-the-century holiday decor. I Woodstock, VT, woodstockvt.com Art Providence Holiday Show December 8–9 This juried show will feature more than 200 artists—many of them Rhode Island School of Design alumni—from New England and beyond. I Saturday 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Sunday 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $8.50, Rhode Island Convention Center, Providence, artprovidenceshow.com

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Custom House Maritime Museum Holiday House Tour December 8 For more than 20 years, people have kicked off the holiday season at this annual holiday house tour in beautiful Newburyport. I 10 a.m.–4 p.m., Newburyport, Mass., thechmm.org Boston Society of Architects Gingerbread House Design Competition December 11–31 Boston-area architects flex their creative muscles with a new medium—gingerbread! Local firms construct confections out of gingerbread that are put on display for all to enjoy at the BSA Space. The creations are auctioned off, with proceeds going to the Community Design Resource Center of Boston. I Free. Monday–Friday 10 a.m.–6 p.m., weekends 10 a.m.–5 p.m., BSA Space, Boston, architects.org CraftBoston Holiday December 13–16 Presented by The Society of Arts and Crafts, CraftBoston is the premier New England exhibition and sale of contemporary art, craft, and design. There will be 175 national and international artists showcasing unique and limited-edition work in furniture, jewelry, clothing, and home decor. Shop among the booths, and learn first-hand about their skill, training, and inspiration. On December 13, the event kicks off with a gala preview and benefit. I General admission $15, Friday 11 a.m.–7 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Sunday 11 a.m.–5 p.m., Hynes Convention Center, Boston, craftboston.org  EDITOR’S NOTE: Events are subject to change. Please confirm details with event organizer prior to your visit.

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Scene & Heard BY PAULA M. BODAH

It’s a design coup of sorts for Modern Relik. The powerhouse duo of John Dransfield and Geoffrey Ross have hopped on board at the Waltham, Massachusetts, store to act as creative directors and lead interior designers. The two will work with Modern Relik’s president (and good friend) Meg Kimball and her designers, curating the shop’s new collections and lending their considerable talents to the design team’s work with residential and commercial clients throughout New England and farther afield. I Waltham, Mass., modernrelik.com

DYNAMIC DUO

Geoffrey Ross and John Dransfield with India

Continuing The Legacy

Scott James Pacheco was just fifteen years old when he took a job working with furniture maker Stephen Plaud. For more than twenty years, he worked alongside Plaud, crafting custom traditional and contemporary beds and other pieces for architects and designers. So it made perfect sense, when Plaud was ready to retire, for his onetime apprentice to take the reins of the company. Scott James Furniture & Design operates out of the same Rhode Island workshop with the same team of craftspeople dedicated to creating what Pacheco hopes will becomes treasured heirlooms. I Tiverton, R.I., scottjamesfurniture.com

In Memoriam

The design world in Boston and beyond is mourning the death of Richard FitzGerald. The designer, a native of Lawrence, Massachusetts, who passed away at the age of eighty in his home in Osterville on the Cape, leaves behind a rich creative legacy, for his editorial work for magazines such as House Beautiful and Architectural Digest, for his work through the interior design firm he ran in Boston for many years, and for the many area designers who have been influenced by him through the decades. We are proud to have been able to feature his talents in the pages of this magazine.

GENERATION NEXT Way back in 1828, Kenneth and David Castellucci’s great great grandfather opened a stone shop in the Italian region of Abruzzo. In the 1890s, their grandfather moved to Deer Isle, Maine, and opened the American branch of Castellucci Stone. The shop in Italy closed in 2016 (“They ran out of Castelluccis,” quips David), but here in America, the family business is still going strong. Now located in Lincoln, Rhode Island, Kenneth Castellucci & Associates is celebrating 190 years of sourcing the finest stone and working with the best fabricators around the world. Given that several members of the seventh generation of the family are now on board, Ken and Dave are feeling pretty confident that the company will still be at the top of its game when it begins its third century in business in ten short years. I Lincoln, R.I., castellucci.com

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Dynamic Duo photo by Manuel Rodriguez; Richard FitzGerald portrait by Michael Fein

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Scene & Heard A Perfect Ten

Happy tenth anniversary to Shor Home, Kevin Miller and Herbert Acevedo’s design firm and home shop in Provincetown, Massachusetts. The duo’s interior and architectural design services have found their way into homes on the Cape and in Boston as well as in New York City and Florida, while their retail boutique charms shoppers with its array of items chosen to complement seaside living. | Provincetown, shorhome.com

SOPHISTICATED SELECTIONS The SoWa neighborhood in Boston continues to attract the best in high-end design. Among the most recent additions to the area is Design Group 47’s new showroom, a companion to its Peabody, Massachusetts, space. The 5,000-squre-foot space offers an array of beautiful furniture, cabinetry, and flooring for the home, including sophisticated contemporary products from the Brazilian companies Saccaro and Dell Anno. I Peabody and Boston, designgroup47.com

APPLAUSE, APPLAUSE

The new Marvin Window and Door Experience Center by A.W. Hastings at 7 Tide in Boston is a beauty, and they’ve got an award to prove it. Window & Door magazine and the Window & Door Dealers Alliance bestowed its Dealer of the Year Award on the 3,700-square-foot showroom, praising it for “Excellence in Technology and Innovation.” Those innovations include a Smart Touch Table that lets clients build their own windows and doors and the Marvin Living Room, where customers can view life-size images of products. Meanwhile, Porch & Patio, a Rhode Island-based business that specializes in outdoor furnishings, took home its own industry award, earning the 2018 Apollo Award for excellence from the International Casual Furnishings Association. | Boston, seventide.com/ marvin-windows-and-doors; Warwick, R.I., and Mystic, Conn., porchandpatiocasual.com

182  New England Home | November-December 2018

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Design Life

EDITED BY LYNDA SIMONTON

Networking Event

Divine Design Center, located on Battery Wharf in Boston, was the setting for New England Home’s fall networking event in celebration of the September– October issue. Members of the design community connected after the summer as they perused the stylish showroom and enjoyed delicious food from the North End’s legendary restaurants.

New England Home Networking Event at Divine Design Center

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| 1. The stylish showroom | 2. Shelby Littlefield of Siemasko + Verbridge with Leslie Francis of Divine Design Center | 3. Sophia Wensberg, Magued Barsoum, and Samantha DeMarco of Divine Design Center | 4. Christian H. Prescott of Latitude Architects, Brittney Lombardo of Pinney Designs, Emily Pinney of Pinney Designs, and Greg Graham of Latitude Architects | 5. Corey MacPherson of Latitude Architects with Matt Remeika of Audio Video Design | 6. Michael D’Angelo of Michael D’Angelo Landscape Architecture, Beezee Honan of Designer Bath and Salem Plumbing Supply, and Peter Griffin of FBN Construction | 7. New England Home’s Kim Sansoucy with Mariette Barsoum of Divine Design Center | 8. Matt Gillen and Paul Cady of Gregory Lombardi Design | 9. Photographer Shelly Harrison with Tony Fusco of Fusco & Four | 10. The Divine Design Center | 11. Claire Federman of Sewfine Drapery Workroom, Beezee Honan of Designer Bath and Salem Plumbing Supply, and Jean Verbridge of Siemasko + Verbridge | 12. Oliver Bautista of Turkel Design with Paul Saraiva of Sensuus

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Photography by Allan Dines

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Design Life Nantucket by Design

Design glitterati from around the country hopped the ferry to Nantucket to enjoy the offerings of Nantucket by Design. The four-day event presented by the Nantucket Historical Association featured lectures and social events celebrating inspiring interior design. From pop-up shops to exclusive dinners at private homes—the island was buzzing with creativity.

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New England Home at the Ogunquit Playhouse

| 1. An opening reception at the home of event chair Phoebe Tudor drew a happy crowd | 2. Design panelists Nick Voulgaris III, Amanda Lindroth, and David Netto with moderator Chesie Breen | 3. House Beautiful editor Sophie Donelson interviewing guest speaker David Kleinberg at the Design Luncheon | 4. Phoebe Tudor and Janet Sherlund | 5. Chip Webster and Sara Boyce | 6. Elizabeth Fish with Kathleen Hay

French-American amity was the theme when friends of New England Home headed to Maine’s Ogunquit Playhouse for their production of the Broadway musical An American in Paris. Kitchen Chicks Catering served up an array of edible treats from both sides of the Atlantic for guests to enjoy before heading into the evening’s performance.

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| 1. Elizabeth Ethridge McGann and Tami Gilmartin | 2. New England Home’s Tess Woods with Diana James | 3. Gary and Lynn Rousseau with Chuck Dutton | 4. Shelby ­Littlefield and David Messier | 5. Carrie and Bob Davis | 6. Tim Giguere and Ted Acworth | 7. Catherine Truman and Leslie Mark

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Ogunquit photos by Kyle Hoepner Nantucket photos courtesy of Nantucket by Design

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Design Life Designer Bath and Salem Plumbing Supply

A mix of homeowners and members of the local design community gathered at Designer Bath and Salem Plumbing Supply’s Watertown showroom for a panel discussion entitled “Living Well: How to Hit Your Personal Stride with Home Design, Style & Wellness.”

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| 1. Jason Sevinor, New England Home’s Kyle Hoepner, Kerri Axelrod, Claudine Eaton, and Gary Moffie | 2. Alex Zook and Mindy Sevinor | 3. Jason Sevinor greeting the crowd and introducing the panel of design, style, and wellness experts.

Polo Outing with Herrick & White

Herrick & White Architectural Woodworkers hosted several members of the building, architecture, and design community at their annual event at Glen Farm in Portsmouth, Rhode Island, home of the Newport Polo Club. The group enjoyed an afternoon of fine sport and genteel tailgating.

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| 1. The Herrick & White team: Jay Walden, Steve Brannigan, Kevin Fuoroli, Renee Brannigan, Gary Rousseau, Tim Army, Ken Bertram, Jeff Amylon, Richard Roy, and Dennis Caton | 2. Spirits were high as fans high-fived players taking a victory lap | 3. Ken Bertram and Gary Rousseau | 4. Guests taking in the match | 5. Steve Brannigan and Corey MacPherson

One Dalton Reception

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The One Dalton Gallery at Boston’s Four Seasons Hotel threw a reception to honor designer Vani Sayeed, who has been named preferred interior designer for the residences. The new hotel and residential building, designed by Henry Cobb and Cambridge Seven Associates, is slated to open in April 2019.

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| 1. Sertac Cakim, Vani Sayeed, Bob Ernst, and Zainab Almakzom  | 2. Gabrielle Baron and Laura Baldini | 3. Deborah Collins, Vani Sayeed, and Lauren Kennedy  | 4. Jon Fox, Sadath Sayeed, and Chris Magliozzi

Top: photos courtesy of Designer Bath and Salem Plumbing Supply; Bottom: One Dalton photos by Roger Farrington

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Rohl Auth Lux Summit

The beautiful Langham Hotel made a fitting backdrop for designers to ponder the nature of luxury at Rohl’s Auth Lux Boston Summit. The event featured Mally Skok, a member of the Auth Lux Designer Guild, and other leaders in the field. The group shared their thoughts on authentic luxury and the future of design.

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| 1. Mally Skok, Samantha Nestor, and Greg Rohl  | 2. Imogen Wilson, Kristen Irby, Kristen Rivoli, and Elizabeth Benedict | 3. Drew Rust, Martin Goebel, and Annsley McAleer | 4. Kathy Marshall and Cassia Wyner | 5. Table centerpieces featured Rohl faucets | 6. Kaytlyn Constantinou and Nance Marshall

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November–December 2018 | New England Home  189

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Premier Properties

Marble Marvel

BY MARIA L A PIANA

Modern Farmhouse

An Artful Reproduction

An Artful Reproduction

This property’s current claim to fame is that it’s a faithful reproduction of a Montauk, Long Island, estate once owned by Andy Warhol. But this compound in South Kingstown, Rhode Island, is a standout property on its own. For starters, it sits on fifteen acres dotted with pastures and stone walls, bordering on conservancy land, a site that happens to be ideal for the horse lover who wants to be near the beach. The single-story, white clapboard home with shake roof is “mostly one room wide to capture cross-breezes,” says listing agent Claudia Philbrick. The design element she loves best is that “the interior is almost entirely wide-board pine, so that when you first walk into

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the house, the scent of the pine is delicious.” There are four bedrooms, two with fireplaces, all with en suite baths and access to the outdoors. The master suite has two fireplaces: one in the bedroom and one next to the soaking tub in the bath. The kitchen is elegant in its simplicity, with a whitewashed brick floor, pine cabinetry, marble countertops, and twelve-over-twelve windows. The beautifully landscaped yard includes parterre-style gardens, and ROOMS: 10 an outdoor dining area with 4 BEDROOMS 4 FULL BATHS wisteria-covered pergola. 1 HALF BATH Duly Noted: The Andy Warhol con4,195 SQ. FT. nection: in the early ’70s, Warhol pur$2,850,000 chased land in Montauk, Long Island, for some $225,000 (about $1.2 million today). The oceanfront property included six historic cottages on 5.7 acres. The East End getaway was quite the place to be seen when the artist lived there; | Continued on page 194 An Artful Reproduction photos by Robert Van Petten; Modern Farmhouse photos by John Gruen; Marble Marvel photos: exterior by Jared Vincent, interior by Sam Price

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Harwich Port 5 Flake Yard Road Harwich Port Office

North Chatham

$4,200,000 508.432.8800

$3,249,900

Enjoy a serene waterfront setting at this expanded renovated Cape. Orleans Office 508.255.3001

Orleans, MA

$2,995,000

Spacious, gracious salt-waterfront home with panoramic views. Orleans Office 508.255.3001

Barnstable Village

$2,699,000

Yarmouth Port Office

508.362.3000

Storybook seaside setting with panoramic views of Barnstable Harbor, Sandy Neck & Cape Cod Bay.

At New Seabury

$2,095,000

Brewster

$1,375,000

Truro

$1,200,000

Osterville Office

508.420.1130

Brewster Office

508.896.7000

Truro Office

508.349.2782

Pocasset

$1,190,000

North Chatham, MA

$1,139,000

North Falmouth Office

508.563.7173

Fabulous waterfront home with deep water dock on Spinnaker Cove. Completely renovated.

Classic Cape Cod waterfront Cottage retreat on the Wing’s Neck peninsula. Breathtaking views.

Resort living at its finest.Enjoy the best of the Cape with bayside beach living in this 5 bedroom gem.

Nestled on a quiet lane off the beaten path. Custom home is close to beaches & village Chatham Office 508.945.1856

Bay view Contemporary home blends interesting architectural design with warmth and coziness.

East Sandwich

$925,000

Custom built Colonial in Carleton Shores has “welcome home” appeal and open floor plan.

Sandwich Office

508.833.3333

Cape Cod | South Coast | South Shore

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W H E R E E XC E L L E NC E L I V E S

WESTON, MASSACHUSETTS Magnificent estate on 23 acres in the heart of Weston. Beautifully renovated main residence, guest cottage & field house. Spectacular grounds, gardens & freshwater pond with waterfall. $12,500,000 Kathryn Alphas-Richlen, Sales Associate C. 781.507.1650

WESTON, MASSACHUSETTS Classic New England Estate on 3.5 acres in top country club location. Custom built with 6 Bedrooms, tennis court, movie theatre, gym, game room, plan for a carriage house. $6,448,000 Rosemary McCready, Broker Associate C. 781.223.0253

B S n a D C

DUXBURY, MASSACHUSETTS Beachfront property with 190 ft. of rare frontage on Duxbury Bay. Walls of glass afford panoramic water views throughout 7,349 sq. ft. Patios, porches, and in-ground pool. $5,750,000 Reggie Irving, Sales Associate C. 508.523.0943

GILFORD, NEW HAMPSHIRE Sophisticated 8,100 sq. ft. home set on 300 ft. waterfront with 14 rooms, 5 bedrooms, high ceilings, walls of glass, hardwoods, decks, designer kitchen, dock, and beach. $4,995,000 Susan C. Bradley, Broker Sales Associate C. 603.493.2873 | O. 603.581.2810

N S r e D D

BROOKLINE, MASSACHUSETTS Fabulous level lot, an acre of lush grounds, fountain, Koi pond, stone patios and porches. Greenhouse, theater, new contemporized baths and windows, new separate guest quarters. $4,599,000 Jill Streck, Sales Associate C. 617.510.0771

WESTON, MASSACHUSETTS Elegant Georgian Colonial country estate set on 2 acres with exquisite period details, 6 bedrooms, 11 fireplaces, 2-story great room, wide plank floors, and guest cottage. $3,990,000

H M b s

Deena Powell, Sales Associate C. 781.718.6555

A A

COLDWELLBANKERLUXURY.COM

T

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BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS Sophisticated 3,246 sq. ft. corner unit offering new white oak floors, built-ins, new closet systems, updated kitchen, 3 bedrooms, walls of glass, terrace, park and river views. $6,000,000 David Mackie, Sales Associate C. 617.480.6044

GILFORD, NEW HAMPSHIRE Private, Lake Winnipesaukee, 2-home estate set on 1.14 acres with 566 ft. of waterfront, 8 total bedrooms, post and beam porches, fireplaces, wine cellar, docks, patios, and 5-car garage. $5,995,000 Susan C. Bradley, Broker Sales Associate C. 603.493.2873 | O. 603.581.2810

NEWTON, MASSACHUSETTS Sprawling W. Newton Hill home designed for grand entertaining offering formal room, spacious rooms, dream chef’s kitchen, grand master, spa like bath, 4 add’l en suite, and patio. $4,980,000 Deborah M. Gordon & Kami D. Gray, Sales Associates D. 617.974.0404 | K. 617.838.9996

CHESTNUT HILL, MASSACHUSETTS Chestnut Hill - 1890 home updated & restored, accessed by a long-hidden drive, offers 16 sun-drenched rooms, carriage house with 2 bedroom suite, lush grounds, and 4 car garage. $4,900,000

HINGHAM, MASSACHUSETTS Much-admired home near Derby Academy with elegant rooms, 3 fireplaces, 4 bedrooms, palatial master, gourmet kitchen, 2-story foyer, recreation rooms, pool, spa, and patio. $3,550,000

MATTAPOISETT, MASSACHUSETTS Spectacular Craftsman style home in The Bay Club of Mattapoisett with 12 rooms, 4 bedrooms, custom woodwork, chef’s kitchen, hot tub, wine cellar, plus club amenities. $1,790,000

Alice Pierce & Tara Coveney, Sales Associates A. 781.724.7622 | T. 617.823.9781

MaryAnn Hayes, Broker Sales Associate C. 508.982.7558

Deborah M. Gordon, Sales Associate C. 617.974.0404

C O L D W E L L B A N K E R R ES I D E N T I A L B R O K E R AG E The property information herein is derived from various sources that may include, but not be limited to, county records and the Multiple Listing Service, and it may include approximations. Although the information is believed to be accurate, it is not warranted and you should not rely upon it without personal verification. Real estate agents affiliated with Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage are independent contractor sales associates, not employees. ©2018 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Owned by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. Coldwell Banker, the Coldwell Banker logo, Coldwell Banker Global Luxury and the Coldwell Banker Global Luxury logo are registered service marks owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. 458683NE_9/18

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Premier Properties

Continued from page 190 |

Warhol entertained A-list celebrities (Mick Jagger, Halston, John Lennon, Jackie Onassis, and Elizabeth Taylor to name a few) all the time. In real estate terms, the purchase really was a steal, because a few owners later, in 2015, the estate known as Eothen sold for a record $50 million. Contact: Claudia Philbrick, Mott & Chace Sotheby’s International Realty, Narragansett, R.I., 401-789-8899, mottandchace.com, MLS# 1162686

Modern Farmhouse

The barn-style influence is obvious in this threebedroom, three-bath farmhouse (that also has a 1,040-square-foot guesthouse) on thirty-three acres in the pastoral northwest corner of Connecticut. That’s “barn style” with distinctive modern notes. Clean lines, a sprawling footprint, wide windows, and multiple standing seam metal roofs put an inventive spin on the vernacular architecture of this Lakeville home. The interiors are striking, with soaring ceilings and a lean, clean, and soothing aesthetic. A fresh mix of materials includes bluestone floors, soapstone counters, whitewashed shiplap paneling, ROOMS: 8 and hundreds of board feet of cypress 3 BEDROOMS 3 FULL BATHS wood. The home was custom designed 2 HALF BATHS and built by the current owners, with 4,229 SQ. FT. attention to both siting (the entire $3,645,000 home gravitates to long views over Lorenzo Pond) and architectural detail. The home has very discrete spaces: public (one first-floor wing is designed for entertaining) and private (the other wing houses peaceful living quarters). The vaulted living room, anchored by a twenty-foot stone fireplace, is at the heart of the open plan, but the extraordinary kitchen—with sleek countertops to spare—more than holds its own. The first-floor master suite has a private terrace, while two more bedrooms on the second floor feature stunning views. A second-floor glass-andmetal balcony overlooks the living room. Duly Noted: Along with a desirable zip code, Lake­ ville has history: The street grid of the village center’s historic district remains virtually unchanged from the late nineteenth century, and until 1846, Lake­ ville was called Furnace Village, for the nearby early blast furnaces of the iron industry. Today some of the

most beautiful homes, rolling hills, pristine lakes, and iconic New England scenery can be found in the area. This property’s level site, a long, private driveway, and proximity to both a Metro North train station and the Appalachian Trail add to the appeal of the home. Contact: Elyse Harney Morris, Elyse Harney Real Estate, Salisbury, Conn., 860-435-2200, harneyre.com, MLS# 170085200

Marble Marvel

This gracious Burlington, Vermont, home is proof positive that they don’t make them like they used to. Rare blue marble was meticulously hand-quarried and cut by stonemasons for the foundation of the house when it was built in 1896—and that marble “has needed virtually no maintenance after more than 120 years,” says listing agent Kathy O’Brien. Plus, the intricate interior cherry and bird’s-eye maple finishes would be cost prohibitive to replicate today. The Victorian sits on a west-facing lot in one of the city’s most desirable neighborhoods. Its pedigree is unmistakable and, over time, thoughtful ROOMS: 16 updating has made it immensely livable. 5 BEDROOMS 4 FULL BATHS A grand staircase and floor-to-ceiling 2 HALF BATHS nineteenth-century Tiffany windows 6,178 SQ. FT. steal the show upon entering, but there $1,929,000 are impressive spaces at every turn. The kitchen, which opens to an atrium, was fully renovated in 2017. An oversize master suite on the second floor features a copper soaking tub. Several of the five bedrooms have been reconfigured (one is a custom closet) and could easily be restored. There are striking common rooms and private living spaces too: one on the third floor holds a family room, two bedrooms, a bath, and a small kitchen, and a 720-squarefoot studio apartment is located at the rear of the home. Duly Noted: Details, details: The marble foundation runs halfway up the exterior of the house, and the rest is brick—with blue marble keystones over all windows and blue marble cut sills. A new Vermont slate roof was added in 2010. On the inside you’ll find examples of the finest woodworking of the period, period. These include the cherry-clad entryway, fabulous wainscoting and coffered ceilings, turret rooms, fireplace surrounds, chair rails, ten-inch baseboards, dentil molding, and flooring made from maple, oak, and fir throughout. Contact: Kathy O’Brien, Four Season’s Sotheby’s International Realty, South Burlington, Vt., 802-3439433, fourseasonssir.com, MLS# 4699011 

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Resources

A guide to the products and professionals in this issue’s featured homes

GOOD BONES: A HOUSE FOR THE AGES PAGES 56–61

Architecture: Paul F. Weber, Paul Weber Architect, Newport, R.I., 401-849-3390, pfwarchitect.com Interior design: Jennifer Garrigues and Diana El-Daher, Palm Beach, Fla., 561-659-7085, jennifergarrigues.com Builder: Newport Housewrights, Middletown, R.I., 401-849-2449 Stonework and masonry: Newport Housewrights Interior millwork and cabinetry: Jutras Woodworking, Greenville, R.I., 401-949-8101, jutraswoodworking.com Landscape design: Dan Solien, Horiuchi Solien, Falmouth, Mass., 508-540-5320 Landscape contractor: Field of Dreams Landscaping, North Stonington, Conn., 860-559-2559 Audio/Video design/installation: Messenger Systems, Tiverton, R.I., 401-625-1111, messengersystems.com Lighting design: Schweppe Lighting Design, West Concord, Mass., 978-371-2831, lightandhue.com

ROOMS WE LOVE: BEAUX ARTS BEAUTY PAGES 64–68

Page 64: Interior design, Lisa Law, Lisa Law Lifestyle Designs, Nashua, N.H., 603-566-6109, lisalawlifestyle designs.com. Page 66: Library interior design: Frank Hodge, F.D. Hodge Interior Design, Boston, 617-267-8103, fdhodgeinteriors.com; Men’s Scotch Lair interior design: Kacey Graham and Michaele Boehm, Boehm Graham Interior Design, Bedford, N.H., 617-692-0400, boehmgrahamdesign.com. Page 68: Interior design, Dianna Normanton, Dianna Normanton Interiors, Litchfield, N.H., 601-930-2761, diannanormantoninteriors.com.

MODERN ART PAGES 100–109

Architecture: Marcus Gleysteen, Marcus Gleysteen Architects, Boston, 617-542-6060, mgaarchitects.com Interior design: Manuel de Santaren, Manuel de Santaren, Inc., Boston, 617-330-6998, manueldesantaren.com Builder: Kenneth Vona Construction, Waltham,

Mass., 781-890-5599, kenvona.com Landscape design: Michael Coutu, Sudbury Design Group, Sudbury, Mass., 978-443-3638, sudburydesign.com Interior metalwork: Jake Ducharme, Metalmorfis, East Longmeadow, Mass., 413-237-3441, metalmorfis.com Exterior metalwork: Bartek Konieczny, Solutions in Metal, Abington, Mass., 617-921-1166, bartekkonieczny.com Custom millwork: Peter Murray, Fine Finish, Framingham, Mass., 508-875-2020, finefinishinc.com Lighting consultant: Nancy Goldstein, Light Positive, Marblehead, Mass., 781-631-2502, lightpositive.com Audio/Video: Maverick Integration, Nashua, N.H., 603-490-1177, maverickintegration.com Pages 102–104: Stairway glass, Prestige Custom Glass and Mirror, prestigecmg.com; wall panel finish, Wayne Towle, Wayne Towle Master Finishing & Restoration, waynetowle.com; chandelier from Wired Custom Lighting, wired-designs.com; fireplace marble slab from Famar, Medford, Mass., 617-839-1163; lounge chairs by Holly Hunt, hollyhunt.com, through Webster & Company, webstercompany.com; cocktail table from John Boone, johnbooneinc. com; table lamps from Donghia, donghia.com, through Webster & Company; John Lyle floor lamps from Ailanthus, ailanthusltd.com; area rug designed by Manuel de Santaren, fabricated by Studio Four NYC, studiofournyc.com; Sahco drapery fabric through Webster & Company; draperies fabricated by Eliot Wright Workroom, ewworkroom.com. Page 105: Dining chairs from J. Robert Scott, jrobertscott.com; custom table from Manuel de Santaren, Inc.; draperies fabricated by Eliot Wright Workroom; chandelier from Wired Custom Lighting; carpet from Studio Four NYC. Page 106: Library sofa from Holly Hunt through Webster & Company; cocktail table from Manuel de Santaren, Inc.; chair from J. Robert Scott with Jerry Pair leather through Studio 534, s5boston. com Page 107: Cabinetry by Eggersmann, eggersmannusa.com; Powell & Bonnel bar stools from Dennis Miller Associates, dennismiller.com; marble counters and backsplash from Famar and United Marble, unitedmarble.com.

AGED TO PERFECTION PAGES 110–119

Architecture: Treff LaFleche, LDa Architecture & Interiors, Cambridge, Mass., 617-621-1455, lda-architects.com

Interior design: Nina Farmer, Nina Farmer Interiors, Boston, 857-233-5812, ninafarmerinteriors.com Builder: Charles Gadbois, Wellen Construction, Marlborough, Mass., 508-460-9508, wellenconstruction.com Interior millwork and cabinetry: Peter Murray, Fine Finish, Framingham, Mass., 508-875-2020, finefinishinc.com Wood finishing: Wayne Towle Master Refinishing & Restoration, Needham, Mass., 781-449-1313, waynetowle.com Landscape design: Matthew Cunningham, Matthew Cunningham Landscape Design, Stoneham, Mass., 617-905-2246, matthew-cunningham.com Landscape contractor: Paragon Landscape Construction, Hanover, Mass., 781-834-1000, paragonlandscape.com Audio/Video: Jim Claflin, JRC Audio & Video, Blackstone, Mass., 508-320-9829, jrcav.com Drapery workroom: Tyler & Sash, Winchester, Mass., 781-729-6639, tylerandsash.com Page 112: Vintage rug from Steven King Decorative Carpets, skcarpets.com; painting by Bernard Lorjou, bernardlorjou.com. Pages 113–115: Stacking coffee table from Jean de Merry, jeandemerry.com; rug from Steven King Decorative Carpets; curtain fabric and trim from Holland & Sherry, hollandandsherry.com; custom sofa by Crimson & Brighton Upholstering, fabric-showroom.com; daybed from Dmitriy & Co., dmitriyco.com; vintage pendant light from L’Antiquaire, lantiquaire.net; elliptical-base lamp from Stephen Antonson, stephenantonson.com; art over fireplace by Hugo Guinness, hugoguinness. com; powder room wallcovering from Calico, calicowallpaper.com; sconces from Urban Archeology, urbanarcheology.com; pendant light from

The Urban Electric Co., urbanelectricco.com. Page 116: Custom dining table from Keith Fritz, keithfritz.com; velvet chair fabric from Rogers & Goffigon, rogersandgoffigon.com; bargello chair fabric from Old World Weavers, scalamandre. com; chandelier from The Urban Electric Co.; rug from Steven King Decorative Carpets; painting by Hunt Slonem, huntslonem.com; family room sectional by Partners in Design, partnersindesignltd. com; coffee table by The New Traditionalists, thenewtraditionalists.com; lounge chair and footstool from Jean de Merry, jeandemerry.com, with Alpaca fabric from Rogers & Goffigon; chandelier from Lucca Antiques, luccaantiques. com; rug from Steven King Decorative Carpets. Page 117: Range from Lacanche, lacanche.com; quartzite counters from Cumar, cumar.com;

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breakfast table from Keith Fritz; chandelier from Charles Edwards, charlesedwards.com; chairs from Soane, soane.co.uk, with vinyl upholstery from Silver State fabrics, silverstatetextiles.com. Page 118: Barkskin by Caba Company wallcovering, barkskin.com; rug from Steven King Decorative Carpets; bed and table lamp from Dmitriy & Co., with headboard fabric from Holly Hunt, hollyhunt.com; bench from Century Furniture, centuryfurniture.com, with Holly Hunt fabric; custom nightstands by Masterpiece Furniture Creations, masterpiecefurniture.com; St. Toulon bathtub from The Bath Works, thebathworks. com; filler from Watermark Designs, watermarkdesigns.com; floor tile and sconces from Waterworks, waterworks.com; small table from Leonards Antiques, leonardsantiques.com; vanity top from Cumar, cumar.com. Page 119: Desk from Julian Chichester, julianchichester.com; desk lamp from Ralph Lauren, ralphlaurenhome.com; loveseat and coffee table by Partners in Design; game table from Lucca Antiques; blue rug from Steven King Decorative Carpets.

Let’s Sell Your Furniture. Together.

New England’s Finest Pre-Owned Furniture

Hanover | Natick | Plymouth | furnitureconsignment.com

A BOLD MOVE PAGES 120–129

Interior design: Dee Elms, Elms Interior Design, Boston, 617-451-1555, elmsid.com Builder: Chris Rapczynski, Sleeping Dog Properties, Boston, 617-576-6100, sleepingdogproperties.com Pages 120–121: Butler sleeper sofa from Bradley, Bradley-usa.com; patterned side chair from Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams, mgbwhome.com; gray Papa Bear lounge chair from McLaughlin Upholstering, mclaughlinupholstering.com; cocktail table from The Bright Group, thebrightgroup.com. Page 122: Wall art by Martin Kline, martinjkline. com; custom shelf by Elms Interior Design. Page 123: Powder room sink designed by Elms Interior Design and fabricated by Cumar, cumar. com; Venetian plaster walls by Pietra Viva, pietravivaitaly.com; Meridiani sectional sofa from Casa Design, casadesignboston.com; Mattaliano round coffee table from Webster & Co., webstercompany.com; vintage Serge Mouille chandelier from Benjamin Wilson Antiques, Hudson, N.Y., 518-822-0866. Page 124: Dome pendant lights and Pepper counter stools from Holly Hunt, hollyhunt.com; marble island top fabricated by Cumar; Black Ink cabinet color from Benjamin Moore, benjaminmoore. com; Dizzie oval table from Suite NY, suiteny.com; Saarinen chairs by Knoll, knoll.com; banquette by Elms Interior Design.

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From urban lofts to mountain retreats, lofts to From urban lofts compounds toFrom urban coastal to mountain retreats, From urban lofts toestates, we mountain retreats, suburban to mountain retreats, coastal coastal compounds to bestcompounds celebrate the of suburban estates, we coastal compounds toEngland. suburban estates, we living in New celebrate the best of suburban estates, celebrate the best we of living in New England. celebrate the England. best of living in New living in New England. November–December 2018 | New England Home  197

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Resources Page 125: Dining table from Casa Design; Tompkins sideboard from Wud Furniture, wudfurniture.com; Cloud 37 orb chandelier from Apparatus Studio, apparatusstudio.com; Tangled wallpaper from Porter Teleo, porterteleo.com; mirror wall art by Oskar Zieta, zieta.pl. Page 126: Art by Ashley Longshore, ashleylongshore.com; Savile Suiting Pinstripe wallcovering by Phillip Jeffries, phillipjeffries. com; Ashland Slate shelf paint from Benjamin Moore. Page 127: August bed from Nathan Anthony, nafurniture.com; Boa triple pendant light from Fuse Lighting, fuselighting.com; rug from Stark, starkcarpet.com; Oreille wing chair from Holly Hunt, hollyhunt.com; Grove 6 dresser from Desiron, desiron.com. Page 128: Moooi ceiling light from Casa Design; bed from Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams; Avellino bench from Julian Chichester, julianchichester.com; wallpaper from Flavor Paper, flavorpaper.com. Page 129: Master bath vanity by Elms Interior Design; Barber wall sconce from The Urban Electric Co., urbanelectricco.com; tub from Agape, agapedesign.it.

Ad Index

LeBlanc Jones Landscape Architecture 165

A.J. Rose Carpets & Flooring 99

Leslie Fine Interiors, Inc. 4–5

Art Providence Show 199 Authentic Designs 178 Back Bay Shutter Co., Inc. 71 Belhaakon 86 Bertola Custom Homes & Remodeling 161 Blanchard Design Studio 87 Boston Stone Restoration 181 Bradford’s Rug Gallery 177 Butter Pat Industries 182 C.H. Newton Builders, Inc. 149 California Closets 43 Casa Design 151 Catamount Builders 76–77 Cataumet Sawmill 189 Catherine Truman Architects 51 Chip Webster Architecture 41 Christopher Hall Architect 33 Clarke Distributors 187 Coldwell Banker Previews International 192–193 Colony Rug Company, Inc. 68 Concept Building 88 Concord Museum 199 CraftBoston 195 Cumar, Inc. 147 Cypress Design 177 Dan Gordon Landscape Architects 57 Darby Road Home 155 DC Home Systems 179 Designer Bath/Salem Plumbing Supply 138 Divine Design Center 16–17 Dover Rug & Home 142–143 East Coast Design 169 Elms Interior Design 20–21 F.H. Perry Builder 59

Architectural and interior design: Michele Foster, Foster Associates, Portsmouth, R.I., 401-682-1633, mfosterassociates.com Builder: Cleve Patterson, Patterson & Smith Construction, Stowe, Vt., 802-253-3757, pattersonandsmith.com Landscape design: H. Keith Wagner, Wagner Hodgson Landscape Architecture, Burlington, Vt., 802-864-0010, wagnerhodgson.com Drapery and pillow workroom: Fabric Connection, Middletown, R.I., 401-847-2856, fabricconnection.net Page 134: Gumi kitchen pendant lights from Token Lights, tokenlights.com; counter stools from Yliving, yliving.com; Scandia drapery fabric from Rogers & Goffigon, rogersandgoffigon.com. Page 135: Custom birch log headboards by Patterson & Smith Construction; linens and chair from Serena & Lily, serenaandlily.com; resin vanity top and tub from Lightblocks, lightblocks.com. Page 136: Adirondack chairs from Design Within Reach, dwr.com. 

Latitude Architects 90

A helpful resource for finding the advertisers featured in this issue

Crown Point Cabinetry 63

FUN IN THE SUN PAGES 130–137

KVC Builders 2–3

Falcetti Pianos 179 Fallon Custom Homes, Inc. 35 FBN Construction Co., LLC 145, back cover Fine Furnishings Shows Providence 160 Finelines 55 Flavin Architects 47 Frank Webb Home 153 Furniture Consignment Gallery 197 Garage Headquarters 181 The Granite Place 97 Hampden Design+Construction 69

LDa Architecture & Interiors inside front cover

Lifetime Roofing 183 Light New England 39 Longfellow Design Build 32 Make Architectural Metalworking 91 Mally Skok Design 48 Marc Hall Design 22–23 Matthew Cunningham Landscape Design, LLC 157 MGa | Marcus Gleysteen Architects 62 Michael D’Angelo Landscape Architecture, LLC 92 New Energy Works Timberframers 80–81 New England Design & Construction 93 Newton Kitchens & Design 1 Oak Hill Architects, Inc. 49 Paragon Landscape Construction 185 Patrick Ahearn Architect, LLC 82–83 Paul F. Weber Architect, LLC 29 Payne Bouchier 8–9 Pellettieri Associates, Inc. 14–15 Pinney Designs 176 Polhemus Savery DaSilva Architects Builders 26 PRG Rugs 175 R.P. Marzilli & Company, Inc. 171 Rachel Reider Interiors Inc. 173 The Real American Dream Home Company 178 Roche Bobois 25 Saltwoods Boston 94 Scandia Kitchens, Inc. 172 Seldom Scene Interiors 84–85 Sewfine Drapery Workroom 34 Shope Reno Wharton 67 Siematic Mobelwerke USA 12–13 SpaceCraft Architecture 95 Splash Kitchen and Bath Showroom 45 Stark Carpet 24 Sudbury Design Group, Inc. 18–19 Surroundings 185 SV Design, Siemasko + Verbridge 53 Systems Design & Integration, Inc. 96 TMS Architects 6–7 Turkel Design 98 Tyler & Sash 162 Upstate Door, Inc. 183 Wayne Towle Master Finishing & Restoration 167 Wolfers 159 Youngblood Builders, Inc. inside back cover ZEN Associates, Inc. 60–61

Hawthorn Builders 65 Heather Vaughan Design 36 Herrick & White Architectural Millwork 78–79 Jacqueline Becker Fine Arts Consulting Services 10–11 Jamestown LP/Boston Design Center 31 Janine Dowling Design, Inc. 54 Jewett Farms + Co. 168 Kevin Cradock Builders, Inc. 74 Kingston Krafts 89 Kinlin Grover 191 Kistler and Knapp Builders, Inc. 139 Kitchen Views at National Lumber 73

New England Home, November–December 2018, Volume 14, Number 2 © 2018 by New England Home Magazine, LLC. All rights reserved. Permission to reprint or quote excerpts granted by written request only. New England Home (USPS 024-096) is published 6 times a year (JAN, MAR, MAY, JULY, SEP, NOV) by New England Home Magazine, LLC, 530 Harrison Ave, Ste 302, Boston, MA 02118, 617-938-3991. Periodical postage paid at Boston, MA, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to New England Home, PO Box 5034, Brentwood, TN 37024. For change of address include old address as well as new address with both zip codes. Allow four to six weeks for change of address to become effective. Please include current mailing label when writing about your subscription.

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A r t P r o v i d e n c e S h o w. c o m 8

Shop Handmade for the

Holidays! ART CRAFT DESIGN Dec 8 & 9 | 200 Artists Including RISD Alumni

RI Convention Center

The Concord Museum’s Guild of Volunteers presents

8 th Annual

Holiday House Tour Saturday, December 1 in historic Concord, Massachusetts Enjoy a tour of six of Concord’s most beautiful homes professionally decorated in the holiday spirit Plus, pop-up holiday market perfect for gift shopping!

Information & Reservations: www.concordmuseum.org Sponsored by

Bert Rosengarten Antiques Cambridge Savings Bank Butler Wheeler Team Concord’s Colonial Inn Dewing Schmid Kearns Special thanks to Platt Builders, Inc. our media sponsor:

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Bookend

Design Ideas In Print

Yes, technically the Hudson Valley isn’t part of New England and doesn’t share quite the same Colonial roots as most of our region. And yet, when you page through Pieter Estersohn’s gorgeously illustrated Life Along the Hudson: The Historic Country Estates of the Livingston Family, you’ll find yourself beguiled by beauties that have a great deal in common with Litchfield County or the North Shore of Massachusetts. Thirty-five homes dating from 1730 to 1946 have been captured by the renowned architectural and interiors photographer, largely country houses built by the grand families

of America’s aristocracy—the Astors, the Aldriches, the Delanos, and so on—on land owned by the influential Livingston clan, who settled the area in the late seventeenth century. Many properties remain in the hands of descendants, while some have been lovingly restored by preservation-minded newer inhabitants such as artist Brice Marden, Rolling Stone founder Jann Wenner, and Richard Jenrette, founder of the Classical American Homes Preservation Trust. A river journey well worth making for fans of architecture, interiors, and splendid views.  | $85, Rizzoli New York, rizzoliusa.com

ABOVE: The façade of Teviotdale (1774) graces the book’s cover. LEFT: The look of C ­ hiddingstone (1860) today was created for the current owners by Carey Maloney and Hermes Mallea of the New York firm M (Group) Architecture and Decoration.

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Photography by Pieter Estersohn

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LUXURY RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION, RENOVATIONS AND HISTORIC RESTORATIONS

www.YoungbloodBuilders.com

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ARCHITECT: HACIN & ASSOCIATES DESIGNER: JAMA SAMEK PHOTOGRAPHER: TRENT BELL

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Photographer: Michael J Lee Designer: Kotzen Interiors

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If You Dream It, We’ll Build It... If You Design It, We Can Build It. ...And You’ll Love It!

FBN is Celebrating 40 Years. 17 WOLCOTT COURT, BOSTON, MA 02136 617.333.6800 | FBNCONSTRUCTION.COM HIGH-END REMODELING, BOSTON

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Profile for New England Home Magazine LLC

New England Home November - December 2018  

Modern Drama

New England Home November - December 2018  

Modern Drama