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August 17, 2019 | Special Advertising Supplement

SCHOOL Reading can help get kids ready to go back to school

After-school Program Tips for finding the right one for your child

Special Giveaway Event August 20 See inside for details sponsored by


Back to School Saturday, August 17, 2019 | The Brattleboro Reformer | Reformer.com

Dear Families, Welcome back to a new school year! Since everyone left in June, custodians, administrative assistants, teachers, and principals have been getting ready for a new year! When you start school at the end of August you will see that custodians have scrubbed, painted and redone walls and floors all across the buildings. They take everything out of a room then put everything back in! Be sure to tell the custodians how nice the buildings look and thank them for all the extra work they have to do in the summer to get ready for a brand-new year. The administrative assistants have been getting all the school supplies into rooms, including paper, pencils and new books. They have also been registering new students who have moved to the area. Teachers and principals have been working this summer taking courses and working together to create new curriculum and ensure that everything is ready for a terrific new school year. There is always a lot of information for families at the beginning of a new school year. You can find information about bus routes in local newspapers and on the WSESU website. Each school will have available handbooks, either hardcopy or online, that will give specific information about daily start and end times, how to contact the school to report an absence as well as forms to fill out and return. Please take a moment to review this information. Please contact your child’s school for any additional information that you might need. Once again, welcome back! We look forward to meeting you all on August 29 and 30. Have a great, new school year! Sincerely, Lyle Holiday Superintendent of Schools

School Calendars Subject to change

Windham Central Supervisory Union

25: Memorial Day (Holiday)

June August 21: New teacher orientation 22-27: In-service 28: First day of classes

September

10: Last day for students (no snow days) 11: In-service 13: Leland & Gray High School Graduation

2: Labor Day (Holiday)

October 14: Indigenous People’s Day (Holiday) 15: K-12 Conferences (Early release)

November

Windham Northeast Supervisory Union August

December

21-22: New teacher orientation 23, 26-27: In-service 28: First day of classes

23-31: December Recess

September

January

2: Labor Day (Holiday) 27: In-service

25-26: In-service 27-29: Thanksgiving Break

1: New Year’s Day (Holiday) 20: Martin Luther King, Jr. Day (Holiday) 21: Teacher Report Card Day

February 17-21: February Recess

March 2: In-service 3: Town Meeting Day (Holiday) 19: K-12 Conferences (Early release)

April 2

May

20-24: April Recess

October 14: Indigenous People’s Day (Holiday) 15: In-service (PreK-8 only for parent conferences) 25: In-service (Early release)

November 1: Tech Boot Up Day 11: Veterans Day (Holiday) 27-29: Thanksgiving Recess

December 20: In-service (Early release) 23-31: December Recess


December

1: New Year’s Day (Holiday) 20: Martin Luther King, Jr. Day (Holiday) 21: In-service

23-31: December Recess

January

17-21: Winter Recess

1: New Year’s Day (Holiday) 20: Martin Luther King, Jr. Day (Holiday) 27: In-service

March

February

2: In-service 3: Town Meeting Day (Holiday) 27: In-service (Early release)

17-21: Winter Recess

February

March

24-31: Holiday Break

28: In-service (Early release) 29: In-service

January

2: In-service 3: Town Meeting Day (Holiday) 30: Early release 31: Early release

1: New Year’s Day (Holiday) 18: In-service 21: Martin Luther King, Jr. Day (Holiday)

May

April

February

8: In-service (Early release) 27: Memorial Day (Holiday)

25: Memorial Day (Holiday) 13: In-service (Early release)

20-24: Spring Recess

6: In-service (Early release) 18-22: February Break

June

June

25: Memorial Day (Holiday)

18: Bellows Falls Union High School Graduation 18: Last student day (with five snow days) 19-22: In-service

June

April 13-17: Spring Recess 10: In-service (Early release)

May

19: Student school year ends 22: In-service

Windham Southwest Supervisory Union Windham Southeast Supervisory Union August

23-24: In-service 27: WSSU Opening Day 28: First student day

September

1: Labor Day (Holiday)

3: Labor Day (Holiday) 19: In-service (Early release)

October

October

14: Indigenous People’s Day (Holiday) 15: In-service

8: In-service 9: In-service (Early release)

November

9: In-service 12: Veteran’s Day (Holiday) 21-23: Thanksgiving Break

September

7: Early release 8: Early release 11: Veteran’s Day (Holiday) 25-26: In-service 27-29: Thanksgiving Recess

November

December 21: Holiday Break (Early release)

4: In-service 5: Town Meeting Day (Holiday)

15-19: Spring Break

May

10: 175th student day 17: Last student day (with five snow days) 2 teacher days to follow last student day

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The Brattleboro Reformer | Reformer.com

26-28: In-service 29: First day of classes

August

March

April

Back to School | Saturday, August 17, 2019

January

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Back to School Saturday, August 17, 2019 |

Tips for finding an after-school program After-school programs are invaluable to families in which both parents work. Finding the right program may involve a combination of strategies. Today’s children grow up differently than their parents did. Technology has changed the way students learn in the classroom, but perhaps the biggest difference between how today’s kids grow up and how their parents were raised concerns the dynamic at home.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 2018 both parents worked in 63 percent of households that were home to married-couple families with children. Many of those parents likely did not grow up in households in which both of their parents worked full-time throughout

their childhoods, marking a significant difference in the dynamics of modern families compared to those of yesteryear. After-school programs take on heightened importance when both parents work full-time, especially if neither parent works from home. Many schools and community organizations offer after-school programs. While it’s great to have options, too many options can make it daunting for parents to find the program for their children. The Afterschool Alliance (www.afterschoolalliance.org), which works to ensure all youth have access to affordable, quality afterschool programs, offers the following tips to parents as they look to find after-school programs for their children. · Contact educators at your child›s school. Many schools have afterschool programs on school premises. Speak with school administrators or teachers about school-sponsored afterschool programs. Even if a school does not have such a program, educators might be able to provide a list of nearby programs other students attend. · Contact community organiza-

tions. The Afterschool Alliance notes that many community organizations, such as the YMCA, the Boys & Girls Clubs of America and the 4-H Council, may offer after-school programs. Local churches, synagogues and mosques also may offer after-school programs to local families, regardless of their religious affiliation. When speaking to community organizations, discuss how kids are typically transported from school to the program. · Speak with fellow parents and neighbors. Your community is a great resource. Fellow parents and neighbors, even those whose kids may be in high school or even out of the house, may be able to recommend local programs. Reach out at school-sponsored events or via social media. · Contact your local government. Local government offices and officials also can help parents find after-school programs in their communities. Local Child Care Resource and Referral agencies (www.childcareaware.org) can be valuable assets for parents having trouble finding after-school programs for their children.

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Whether you just need to be shown the ropes or you’re looking to fulfill your circus dreams, we’re here to help you climb. Join our Fall session classes. Registration opens August 12th.

MORE INFO PHOTO BY METRO CREATIVE

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ACCEPTING ASPIRATIONS

(802) 254-9780 10 Town Crier Dr. Brattleboro, Vermont necenterforcircusarts.org


Decorate your own backpack!

Back to School | Saturday, August 17, 2019

KIDSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; CORNER

The Brattleboro Reformer | Reformer.com

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Back to School Saturday, August 17, 2019 | The Brattleboro Reformer | Reformer.com 6

Reading can help get kids ready to go back to school It is common for children to backslide during summer vacations as they get further away from their daily school year routines. The rigors of schoolwork may come as a shock as children return to school and must reacquaint themselves with studying and doing their homework. But there are some steps students can take to keep their minds sharp as they ease back into school. One of the most effective ways for students to stay sharp over summer is to continue reading. Pearson Education says evidence suggests that children who read for enjoyment every day not only perform better on reading tests than those who don’t, but also develop a broader vocabulary, increased general knowledge and a better understanding of other cultures. Reading for pleasure also bears more influence on a child’s academic performance than his or her social or economic background. Summer reading assignments may not be mandated, but children can take it upon themselves to continually push themselves through recreational reading and language arts pursuits. Here are ways that parents

can facilitate that process. · Set up a reading time. Children should have a set time each day that they devote to reading. Many find a regular reading time later in the evening before bed or as a precursor to other activities, such as watching television or playing video games, can help make reading a priority. · Keep fresh reading materials. Stock the house with new books, magazines, newspapers, and even graphic novels. The more reading materials children have access to, the more likely they are to become habitual readers. · Parents can lead by example. Parents should read as well. Choose books and periodicals over time spent on digital devices. · Read in the world around you. Stop and read signs, menus, cereal boxes, billboards, and anything with the written word. Jot down difficult words and look them up together and discuss the definitions. · Consult with the teacher. Educators have tools they use to assess reading levels and abilities. Knowing a child›s reading level and choosing the appropriate reading materials for that level can set kids up for success.

PHOTO BY METRO GRAPHICS


Back to School

Music instruction both in and out of the classroom can be a benefit to young learners. National Association for Music Education. · The relationship between music and academic performance has been studied for decades. As far back as 1988, studies have been conducted about the benefits of music education. An analysis of data from the National Educational Longitudinal Study of 1988 demonstrated a significant correlation between participation in school music groups and achievement in math and English. And a 1996 study published in Nature found first graders who participated in special music classes as part of an arts study program saw their reading skills and math proficiency increase dramatically. · Introducing music lessons to young children can have profound effects on their social development. Music fosters greater trust and cooperation, as well as a sense of community and belonging. · Another benefit of music education is it allows children to harness their creativity and express it in a healthy way. · The music instruction company Music U says children with developmental disorders and mental health issues might be able to unlock their potential with music. Music therapy has been shown to affect significant change in children with autism-spectrum disorders, learning disabilities, attachment disorders, cerebral palsy, and more.

, 4-7 200 0 2 t s u g Au at the Backpack ALL M O T U A ORO BRATTLEB D, BRATTLEBORO Challenge A O R UTNEY PM

P

In conjunction with:

and

The Brattleboro Reformer, and the Brattleboro Auto Mall are pulling together to give out 200 backpacks to children in need this upcoming school season. In addition to the giveaways, there will be free haircuts and refreshments available. Registration is not required. Backpacks will be given out on a first come, first serve basis.

Shear Hair Design Studio will be offering basic children’s haircuts at the Backpack Challenge on a first come, first served basis.

Items that will be included in the backpack are: PHOTO BY METRO CREATIVE

Water bottle Crayons Safe-scissors Ruler Notebook

Regular pencils Pencil sharpener Glue stick Tissues

The Brattleboro Reformer | Reformer.com

Many children are introduced to music instruction at school. After being introduced to band, chorus and various instruments, students may be eager to explore music. Young students are often introduced to the recorder or ukulele in the early grades and then given the opportunity to join primary bands as they move through elementary school and into middle school. Some children also may want to supplement school music lessons with private music tutors, who can provide more in-depth instruction. Parents considering making a commitment to music instruction may find that kids benefit from being involved with music in many ways, some of which may be surprising. · The New England Board of Higher Education says several studies show that consistent music education improves vocabulary and reading comprehension skills. Emerging evidence points to an area of the brain that controls both musical ability and language comprehension as being more closely related than previously thought. · Music education may help young children learn words and how to pronounce them, as learning to play music enables them to process the many new sounds they hear from others. · Researchers have discovered a strong relationship between participating in school arts and academic success as demonstrated by students› grade point averages, according to the

| Saturday, August 17, 2019

The benefits of music instruction for young learners

Students from Windham County will be beneficiaries of this program.

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Back to School Saturday, August 17, 2019 |

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Back To School 2019  

Get ready for the coming school year with the Brattleboro Reformer

Back To School 2019  

Get ready for the coming school year with the Brattleboro Reformer