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NewCAJE 4 CONFERENCE July 28th-31st

(Shabbat July 26th-27th)

Nichols College

124 Center Rd, Dudley, MA 01571

SPONSORED BY:

Jewish Federation of Central Massachusetts Howard Borer 633 Salisbury Street Worcester, Massachusetts 01609-1120

NewCAJE Inc is a 501(c)3 Corporation 354 Kenrick Street, Newton, MA 02458 617-558-0045 & 857-288-8765 Cover art by Rabbi Peretz Wolf-Prusan


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TABLE OF CONTENTS

NewCAJE WELCOME ------------------------------------------------ 4

A Note About the Cover Art -------------------------------------------------- 8 Thank You! ------------------------------------------------------------------ 9 Azkarot Remembrances -------------------------------------------------- 14 Contributors ---------------------------------------------------------------- 30

Honorary Life Members -------------------------------------------- 34

NewCAJE YEAR-ROUND ------------------------------------------ 37

Jewish Educator Journal -------------------------------------------------- 37 Webinars ------------------------------------------------------------------- 37

CONFERENCE LOGISTICS --------------------------------------- 38

Nichols College Emergency Numbers ----------------------------------- 38 Campus Map -------------------------------------------------------------- 39 Key Deposit and Raffle --------------------------------------------------- 40 Parking -------------------------------------------------------------------- 40 Residence Halls and Rules ------------------------------------------------ 40 Maintenance Issues ------------------------------------------------------- -41 Telephones ----------------------------------------------------------------- 41 Internet Access ------------------------------------------------------------- 41

GENERAL CONFERENCE INFORMATION ------------------- 41 NewCAJE Office ----------------------------------------------------------- 41 Important Numbers ------------------------------------------------------- 41 Comfort Station ------------------------------------------------------------ 41 Presenter Supplies ---------------------------------------------------------- 41 Xeroxing -------------------------------------------------------------------- 42

NewCAJE NewsPage ------------------------------------------------ 42 Job Board ------------------------------------------------------------ 42 Name tags ------------------------------------------------------------ 42 Kashrut and Meals -------------------------------------------------- 42 Daily Prayer Services ----------------------------------------------- 43 After Hours Kumsitz ------------------------------------------------ 43 Snacks ---------------------------------------------------------------- 43


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SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND TRACKS --------------------------- 44 Newer Principal’s Track --------------------------------------------- 44 Mini-MBA Program ------------------------------------------------ 45 Luncheons ----------------------------------------------------------- 46 Young Professionals Program -------------------------------------- 49 Intensives ------------------------------------------------------------ 50 SESSION DESCRIPTIONS ---------------------------------------- 52 Sunday --------------------------------------------------------------- 52 Monday -------------------------------------------------------------- 62 Tuesday -------------------------------------------------------------- 90 Wednesday --------------------------------------------------------- 114 Thursday ------------------------------------------------------------ 125 WHO’S WHO AT NEWCAJE ------------------------------------- 126 The Presenters ------------------------------------------------------ 126 The Performers ----------------------------------------------------- 150 NEWCAJE EXHIBITION ----------------------------------------- 158 Exhibitor Hours ---------------------------------------------------- 158 Exhibitor List ------------------------------------------------------- 158 ADVERTISERS ------------------------------------------------------ 162 CROSS REFERENCE BY SUBJECT ------------------------------ 166 PLANING OUT YOUR CONFERENCE ---------------------- 191


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WELCOME TO NEWCAJE4! B’RUCHIM HA’BA’IM

Dear Friends, We are so happy to welcome you to NewCAJE 4 at Nichols College in Dudley, Massachusetts! Many of you have traveled great distances to be here from over 39 states, Canada and Israel. People sometimes ask me, “Why do you come? Can’t you find professional development opportunities closer to home?” NewCAJE, unlike any other conference, is a mirror of what is happening in Jewish Education around the country. Almost half of the people who come to the conference volunteer to teach a session in which they share their vision and the practical skills they have developed in the field. I can speak for myself when I say that I would not be in Jewish education today if I did not have a way to share what I was learning in my setting with others. All fields, including the sciences, medicine and academia grow and prosper because they are able to share new ideas with colleagues who then adapt them and take them one step further. I wish there were a way to document how each of you use what you learn at NewCAJE. Observationally, it is easy to see innovations, ideas, songs etc. spreading across the country. It is easy to see what sessions are offered and which ideas don’t interest people anymore. When we get together and share our experiences it is part of reflective practice. Examining practice reflectively and reflexively leads to developmental insight. Reflection is an important human activity in which people recapture their experience, think about it, mull it over and evaluate it. Working with experience is important in our growth as educators. NewCAJE is in large part a practice-based professional learning setting. Here we learn by reflecting our professional experiences and sharing our insights with our peers, causing them to reflect on their own professional experiences. Some believe this to be the most important source of personal professional development and improvement. NewCAJE creates a field of Jewish education which is critical to our professional success. Most of us work in schools of under 500 students. We work for lay leaders who are also often the parents of our students. While many educators have advanced degrees, there is not a real professional ladder we can climb in our field. When we go to apply for a job, we are judged more on whether a committee likes us than on our past experience. Jewish education is isolating by nature, and it would remain a stagnant pool were it not for opportunities to gather and share what we’ve learned. Anyone who wants to make a name for him or herself in Jewish education needs to come to NewCAJE and teach and let the field judge the merits of their work. Some ideas just sit on the table, while others have wings


5 and fly. If you want to be known as a thought leader in the field you need to share what you do by teaching about it and by writing about it in publications like our journal, Jewish Educator. Online communities of practice are certainly valuable for certain exchanges, but you never get a chance to hear the whole story the way you do in a workshop at NewCAJE or in the pages of a journal like ours. You come to NewCAJE to meet other educators. Networking is not just making new friends or meeting old ones. When you first come to NewCAJE, networking means meeting the people who are as passionate about Jewish education as you are. It means finding mentors to guide you on your path. I remember the relief I felt when I first met “my people.” I knew that my dreams for Jewish education were possible and that my life’s work was worthwhile, even though in my isolation day to day, this wasn’t always apparent. As time goes on, networking means you have a community and a family to draw upon both professionally and personally. It means the people you see one week of the year are people you spend a lot of quality time with over a lifetime. When you lose your job or have an issue with a lay leader or clergy, your network is where you go for help. When you have to negotiate a contract or need a resource you don’t know, you call on your professional friends. You can have a discussion with strangers, but you need old friends when you are in a bind. In that vein, one more thing that is important to me is the Azkarot section of the program book. When devoted Jewish educators die, they should be appropriately honored for their contributions to the field. To us, these people are not names. They are our friends and colleagues. We mourn them and celebrate their lives. So, please understand that one job you have here is to meet and connect with as many people as possible. Don’t be shy. Reach out to each other in the dorms, at meals and in sessions. Exchange contact information. Let’s make NewCAJE the friendliest conference ever! NewCAJE can and must be a national voice for Jewish education. We need to set standards for salary and benefits. We need to make sure that every employee of the Jewish community has health insurance and a retirement benefit. We need to identify which work places are good to their employees and which are not so that we can let Jewish educators know that before they take a job. We need to recruit and retain educators and deepen their knowledge of the subjects they teach. We also need to advocate for our students. We need more time for instruction. We need to be sure that every child has a comfortable access to Jewish education whether they have special needs or not, whether their parents can afford it or not, whether their parents are intermarried or gay or single parents and whether they belong to a synagogue or not. We need to find a way at NewCAJE to discuss the bigger vision of Jewish education and share that discussion with lay leaders and clergy at home. Professional Learning is not an add-on. I would ask each of you to take a few minutes on your trip home to write down what the take-aways were for you about this experience. What new ideas did you hear that sparked your interest?


6 What new little practical tachlis ideas are you bringing home? What big new idea do you want to discuss with the parents and lay leadership? Then I want you to write that in an email which you will cc. to your clergy, your school committee members, and even your parent body if you can. Thank them for the support they gave you to come, but tell them how that support is really an investment in their children’s Jewish education. And please, put money for professional learning in your budget for yourself and for your teachers. Fight for that line and make the case that it is the difference between a good school and a great one. You are educators and these people need educating! While I believe a lot of professional learning goes on at NewCAJE, I don’t believe we exist to provide professional learning. I think our main reason for existence should be as a national voice advocating for Jewish educators and Jewish education. Maybe this time, “CAJE” should stand for Change and Advocacy in Jewish Education. Each conference should move the field one step closer to being a great place to work. We should have an advocacy platform and use the conference to speak out on important issues. What we do quietly and privately, we should do publicly and loudly. Our success as an organization depends on whether or not we pick up that challenge and whether or not we leave Jewish education better than when we found it. In closing, I would like to dedicate my work for this conference in lovingmemory of my brother, Dr. Charles Koller, who passed away two weeks ago in Houston. Chuck was the kind of doctor you’d want to have if you ever had to face cancer, which was his specialty. He was compassionate and unrushed with his patients. He always saw them as human beings with full lives and not as their tumor. He was a man who rode a 3,000 mile bicycle relay race each year with members of the Houston Police Department with the proceeds going to support Leukemia Research. He was the chair of his synagogue’s ritual practice committee, and almost nothing in his life gave him greater pleasure than reading from the Torah scroll. None of those things is the reason to dedicate a conference on Jewish education to him. This is. Chuck was an amazing teacher of Jewish life and living to his family. He created a Jewish home in which the Shabbat table was at the center. He took time before his medical practice to bake challah each week with his wife. He and Paula sang Jewish lullabies to their five kids before bed and tucked each one in with the Shema. He landscaped his backyard so he could build a Sukkah each year and he planted fig and pomegranate trees there because they were mentioned in the Bible. He named his daughters after the matriarchs. He took his kids to shul-- he didn’t drop them off. He insisted on teaching each one of them their Haftarah and Torah portions himself and delved into the Bible with them to write their Divrei Torah. He even taught our 90 year old father how to read from the Torah. His last request was that his family say the Shema for him when he died. These are powerful identity building lessons.


7 My brother Chuck was a Jewish parent—the kind of person who guarantees a Jewish future. We are in business to support and supplement such parents and to inspire /educate others to become Jewish parents like him. Our fundamental job is to increase literacy and strengthen families. Nothing we can program can substitute for the powerful influence of families. So I dedicate this conference to Chuck. May his memory be a blessing! I also dedicate this conference to all the great parents out there like my brother who enroll their kids in our schools. By their very presence in the Jewish community, no matter how tenuous, we know that these are families who have decided generation after generation, over thousands of years, to carry on the proud traditions of our ancestors. We have a sacred duty to provide the highest quality education and experience we can to the families we serve. On behalf of all who worked so hard to make this conference a reality, I welcome you and bless you for all that you do for your students, your families and for the Jewish people.

Rabbi Cherie Koller-Fox, President, NewCAJE

May all who engage in the study and teaching of Torah find abundant peace, gracious favor and mercy, long life and ample sustenance!


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A NOTE ABOUT THE COVER ART

This design is a revival from one of our favorite CAJE covers. Here is a statement from the artist: “The summer of 1984 was a transitional year for Becki and me. Our first child, Leora, was born in May, we moved to Oakland, preparing to move to Jerusalem in a year, leaving a decade of studio work as a printmaker and sofer and about to enter five years of rabbinical school. We had lived together in Palo Alto before Leora was born and I had a good idea for the logo for the 9th CAJE Conference to be held at Stanford in 1984. I drew the CAJE tree full of Hebrew letters on the sloping hills above the university, while playing Bruce Springsteen’s newly released “Born in the U.S.A.” and little Leora in her baby seat on the drawing table. I am now working in Berkeley and that little girl is finishing her doctorate in education at UCLA. Bruce is still The Boss and NewCAJE rocks on.” - Rabbi Peretz Wolf-Prusan


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THANK YOU! NEWCAJE STAFF Words cannot express our gratitude to Ezra Fox who returned to NewCAJE this year as Conference Director. He worked on site search, developed a wonderful website for us, and handled a myriad of conference details with grace. Most of you have talked with Ezra on the phone and you know that he has solved your problem and made you feel better all at the same time. Ezra provided support for me and he did this out of caring and devotion and a measure of love which I return to him. Go-forth and write, my dear. This summer we added Julia Appel to our professional staff. Her portfolio is to work with Young Leadership and to staff next year’s conference program committee. She will also work with the Grinspoon Foundation on Board Development. We welcome Julia to our NewCAJE family. This summer she worked with the Young Leadership to plan an exciting Post-Conference and other young leadership events at the conference. She also did an amazing job with conference recruitment. Thanks also to Hannah Levinson who came in to help staff the week of the conference and to Leora Koller-Fox who jumped in whenever needed with her calm manner and great skill-set. NICHOLS COLLEGE Last fall, we had called over a hundred colleges looking for a site for NewCAJE4. The words were heard most often were “no” and “impossible” and “unavailable” and “we can’t do that”. Then one very lucky day, we called a small business college in central Massachusetts that we had never heard of before and our call was answered by Justin Dolan, the Conference and Events Manager. The campus was perfect for us, the dates were available and the price was right. Justin always says “yes” to us. He has been fabulous to work with and a great ambassador for Nichols College. Justin, we cannot thank you enough for your kindness and hospitality. The next great heroes of Nichols College are their food service: Dennis Santelli, General Manager Dining Services and Aaron Hill, Executive Chef. When we said the word, “kosher” they didn’t flinch. They worked with us closely to make plentiful and tasty kosher meals that they could take pride in and you would enjoy. They worked closely with the Mashgichim from the Kosher Commission of the Vaad HaRabanut in Boston to make sure that their kitchen was koshered and their ingredients had all the right labels. Thank you to Dennis and Aaron and the whole kitchen staff. We are grateful to Principal Mary Pierangeli of the Shepherd Hill Regional High School for letting us use their theatre for our evening programs. Thanks too to Constance Galli, Coordinator of Visual and Performing Arts at the School.


10 JEWISH FEDERATION OF CENTRAL MASSACHUSETTS NewCAJE is grateful to Howard Borer, Executive Director of the Jewish Federation of Central Massachusetts. Howard was happy to welcome us to his area and make it possible for all their teachers who wanted to attend. Thank you Howard for all your help! We are happy to have you as a co-sponsor of NewCAJE4. THE HAROLD GRINSPOON FOUNDATION The Grinspoon Foundation was one of the first funders of CAJE and they continue to be our best friend in the Jewish community. The Foundation provided scholarships for any teacher from the Springfield area. It has provided consulting services to us free of charge, sent us expert workshop leaders and has made generous contributions to our organization. Grinspoon is the home of PJ Library and other very worthy projects. Its founder, Harold Grinspoon has been a generous supporter of both CAJE and NewCAJE since ours beginning. Harold is a true friend of NewCAJE and indeed of the whole enterprise of Jewish education. KASHRUT Our food is Kosher under the supervision of the Rabbinical Council of Greater Massachusetts Kashrus Commission. Our masgichim, Yitzhak Cohen and Richard Garcia have worked tirelessly on our behalf. Thank you! EVENING PROGRAMS AND OTHER ARTS This year the evening programs were lovingly put together by Sue Horowitz and her committee. Sue made a trip from Maine to see the Campus and the High School facilities and she worked to make an equitable process for determining who could be on center stage. She listened to the feedback we heard from you last year that you wanted a more participatory and experiential program and out of that came the Monday night program on Campus. Helping Sue was her committee: Jon Nelson, Michael Kates, EJ Cohen and Emily Teck. Special thanks go to Emily for the NewVoices Contest. This biennial contest, will guarantee that the NewCAJE stage will always be open for upcoming young performers. NewCAJE has formed a partnership with those in the Jewish arts. We thank every musician, storyteller, comedian, artist who donated their time and their talent to make our evening entertainment so outstanding. A new feature of our conference this year is that most of the artists who are performing are also teaching. We especially thank Ellen Allard for leading the NewCAJE Chorale. Much love and gratitude go to Nancy Katz and Mark Liebowitz who have been ongoing artistic consultants for NewCAJE since its inception. Nancy made a beautiful bookmark for us as a promotional piece and she and Mark made a piece of art for Harold Grinspoon. Thank you dear friends. Our cover this year and our T-shirt are a throwback to CAJE. Thank you to Rabbi Peretz Prusan for allowing us to use the best CAJE T-shirt design ever again.


11 DAY PROGRAM Thanks to Cherie Koller-Fox and Amy Ripps for putting together the day program. Julia Appel cut her NewCAJE teeth by helping us lay out the schedule. One hundred and twenty two people gave willingly of their time and expertise to lead a workshop at NewCAJE4. The program of NewCAJE is a picture of what is important in Jewish education in any given year. We could never pay this many people to teach. This is an act of love and service to the Jewish community for which we are very grateful. Thank YOU ALL! SHABBAT PROGRAM Thanks to Matia Angelou and Helene and Michael Kates for help planning the first NewCAJE Shabbat program. PUBLICATIONS This year’s issue of JEWISH EDUCATOR is being published in November. Judi Resnick is our founding editor and we thank her for her efforts along with the editorial committee members who provide a necessary peer review. YOUNG PROFESSIONAL LEADERSHIP Thanks to Anna Salomon and Eitan Gutin who have been leaders of the YP group of NewCAJE in the past year. Serving on this planning board are: PJ Schwartz, Etta King, Emilia Diamant, Emily Teck, Naomi Sandberg, Leah WolfPellingra and Alison Westermann. THE NEWCAJE BOARD Thanks to Jerry Benjamin, Ahouva Steinhaus, Amy Ripps, PJ Schwartz, Emily Teck, Eitan Gutin and Anna Salomon who served this year as the NewCAJE Board. Without their advice and counsel we could never have reached our 4th birthday. The board has dealt with some difficult challenges in the past. Special thanks to Ahouva who served as our treasurer for the past few years and helped us get our financial house organized and orderly. We look forward to enlarging the Board in the coming year as our organization moves forward. FINANCES AND FUNDRAISING As we move forward, NewCAJE has some significant decisions to make regarding our place in the American Jewish Community. Now with the demise of JESNA and the end to the dominance of Bureaus of Jewish Education, NewCAJE has a unique role to play. This summer, a generous donor thought it would be nice to offer two free conferences in a lottery. One for someone who couldn’t otherwise afford to attend and one for a community who had people registered but wished they could bring one more. We were shocked to learn that 180 individuals applied for these positions and we determined to bring as many as possible to NewCAJE.


12 With the wise counsel of Jonathan Koller, we decided to begin a tipping point fundraising campaign. Jerry Benjamin raised larger sums from friends of NewCAJE to match a $25,000 effort on our part. 180 generous souls contributed $25,001 dollars in just six days including a Shabbat and Tisha B’Av. Had we not met our goal, we would not have gotten any of the money. This was a nail-biter to be sure as we watched the numbers grow as midnight Wednesday got closer. Because we used social media to promote what we were doing, this campaign also sparked very spirited discussions online and off I suspect about who should pay for professional development. In communities around the country, a lot of teachers asked for money to come and saw they could get it if they could explain how the money was an investment in their professional development and in their community’s growth as a result of their experience. In the end we raised the money and it enabled lots of great and deserving folks to come to the conference. Thank you to the 180 donors and to all who made this effort possible with your kindness and generosity. As Judy Aronson said on Facebook, “What a community!” What indeed! NEWCAJE COMMUNITY You are the backbone of our organization and of Jewish education in the United States. Thank you for all the blue collar jobs you do to make children and their families feel connected to their Jewish heritage. Thank you for your learning and your teaching. Thanks to Julie Plaut Warwick, Cindi Maggied Gellert, Danny Price, Cheryl Bensky, Marvin Barish and Jon Wolf, valued members of our NewCAJE community for their ongoing support of our efforts. Finally, thanks to Everett Fox, my partner and friend who makes all things possible even on the toughest days of life. Cherie Koller-Fox, President NewCAJE


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WE REMEMBER THEM NewCAJE AZKAROT At the rising of the sun and at its going down We remember them. As we prepare for the Hanukah family program in the chill of winter We remember them. As we teach children the four questions in the rebirth of spring We remember them. As we gather at NewCAJE to recharge our souls in the warmth of summer We remember them. As we built a new curriculum for teaching Torah in the beauty of autumn We remember them. At the beginning of the school year and when it ends We remember them. As long as we live, they too will live; Their work is now our responsibility and they are a part of us so we remember them. When we are weary and in need of strength We remember them. When we are lost and sick at heart We remember them. When we have joy we crave to share We remember them. When we have decisions that are difficult to make We remember them. When we have achievements that are based on theirs We remember them. They were our teachers, our colleagues, our benefactors, our inspirations, our friends As long as we live, they too will live; for they are now a part of us as we remember them. Š based on Yizkor Prayer by Sylvia Kamens & Rabbi Jack Riemer


15 RABBI JAMES DIAMOND (1939-2013)

Jim Diamond, 74, will be remembered as a pioneer of the Hillel college movement and a man of deep intellect whose knowledge spanned both the religious and secular. He served as the director of the Hillel at Washington University in St. Louis from 1972-1995 and then became the Director of the Center for Jewish Life at Princeton until his retirement in 2004. He received a bachelor’s degree in English literature from Roosevelt University in Chicago, and earned a doctorate in comparative literature from Indiana University. He was ordained by the Jewish Theological Seminary of America in 1963. The seminary awarded him an honorary doctorate in 1988. He played hockey and enjoyed baseball and classical music; his wit was legend. It was exemplified by a statement in 2006 to the Associated Press and carried by the Post-Dispatch. He said Judaism’s high holidays could be called the “hi” holidays because “Jews who haven’t seen each other all year gather in synagogues and temples to say ‘Hi!’” Diamond, 74, was killed when a speeding driver lost control of his vehicle on a residential street in Princeton as he was leaving his weekly Talmud study group. The car slammed into a parked car Diamond was about to enter. Diamond was thrown away from the vehicle and pronounced dead at the scene. In a 2003 interview with the New Jersey Jewish News after his retirement was announced, Diamond looked back on his years at CJL. “If I’ve touched lives and given some people an idea that Judaism is broad and deep and a source of great meaning, and that being a Jew is a great gift, then I’ve succeeded,” he said. In a history of The St. Louis Hillel Center, printed on their 50th anniversary, Jim reflected, “My Hillel experience has imbued me with the conviction that fear, insecurity and ignorance need not be the touchstone of Jewish experience in this post-modern, post-Zionist, post-everything world; that Jewish life is about hope and Torah, however we choose to define Torah; and that being Jewish is not a burden to be endured but a blessing to be celebrated.” After his retirement, he continued to teach courses on literature and Talmud at the Jewish Center, the university, local senior centers, and Princeton Adult School. Michele Alperin, a bar and bat mitzvah tutor at the Jewish Center, took literature and Talmud courses with Diamond, whom she described as “humble in a way that wasn’t falsely humble.” “He really looked at people when they talked to him,” she said. “He usually had a deep, well-formed response. He’d say the unexpected.”Alperin said Diamond’s intellectual prowess combined with his caring attitude allowed him to interact with both Jewish and non-Jewish students, ranging from college students to senior citizens.“He was such a giving person,” she said. “This has left a huge tear in the community.” Diamond is survived by his wife, Judy Litman Diamond; son Etan; two daughters, Shifra Diamond and Gila Shusterman; siblings Gary Diamond and Beth Goodman; and six grandchildren.


16 MITCH DORSON (1949-2012)

Mitch Dorson, 63, was an educator for three decades working in both secular education as a high school history teacher and as a Jewish educator. For 15 years, he was the religious school director at Temple Emanu-El in Tucson Arizona. Rabbi Joseph Weizenbaum, who worked with Mr. Dorson at Temple Emanu-El, said: “his life was a story about a man standing for his principles. He never backed off.” Judaism was “so important to him,” says Rabbi Thomas Louchheim of Congregation Or Chadash, who knew Mr. Dorson for 23 years. “Mitch was one of those Jews who felt the prophets informed his life,” says the rabbi. “He lived social justice all the time. He was always the guy for the cause.” Louchheim taught seventh grade B’nai Mitzvah classes with Mr. Dorson for nearly a decade. “He helped kids write their sermons. Mitch made a complete connection with each and every individual student. That’s what made him so special. We were together almost every single week. I’ll miss him.” Because he taught the same children in Hebrew school and secular school, he consecrated and confirmed the same kids to whom he taught history. Mark Ross, one of those kids, said he was one of those rare individuals that had the ability to make you feel individually special. Stuart Mellan, president and CEO of the Jewish Federation of Southern Arizona, posted Tuesday on his Facebook page that Mr. Dorson was “truly one of a kind…He will be missed and remembered for the caring, kind and passionate community educator that he was.” Mr. Dorson is survived by his children, Elana (Mike) Giordano and Noah Dorson.

FROMA FALLIK ( 1949-2012)

A Remembrance by Rabbi Marc Soloway Froma Fallik was an extraordinary and passionate educator right up to the end. She loved the children and adults that she taught and they loved her back. In her role as principal of our Hebrew School at Bonai Shalom, she has built an amazing legacy of young people who love their Judaism and an impressive group of teachers who have her full respect and love. A few weeks before she died, Froma shared with me that she wanted nothing more than for our young people to be excited about being Jewish and that is the most powerful way that we can honor her memory. Froma was deeply grounded in her own Judaism and Jewish life with a strong attachment to the tradition and yet at the same time she was so liberated, with a modern spirit ahead of her time, like in her loving support of gay and lesbian issues. Her husband Josh told me that she used to say: “if it causes pain, it can’t be from God. We must be interpreting the Torah wrongly.” When Josh and Froma got married in 1974, a prominent Orthodox rabbi was to officiate the wedding and Froma asked for a double ring ceremony. He said that wasn’t possible. She said, “Rabbi, it has been such an honor having you as my rabbi and as


17 the rabbi of my family all these years and I am so sorry that you won’t be able to officiate at our wedding.” He found a way and they had a double ring ceremony. She always wanted to combine her depth of Jewish belief and practice with a real need to be forward-thinking and to allow for humanity. Froma was a traditionalist and a humanitarian and whoever I spoke to the story of this remarkable woman is the same; passionate, present, positive, always interested in people whoever and wherever they are and a great listener with the wisdom to give great advice. Froma was born on April 22, 1949 in Perth Amboy, New Jersey. She worked as a consultant, a librarian of the Boulder JCC and in the last years a school director of Bonai Shalom’s Hebrew School in Boulder Colorado. Her many friends remember how Froma was always there, always willing to listen and always willing to talk and to love, to laugh and offer that sharp advice and constant support. Froma has made a huge difference in the lives of so many of us. Not just the books, the films, the education, the laughter, the passion, the love of Judaism, but all of it together. Froma loved her family, her community and her friends. She loved all of the beautiful children in her Hebrew School, who honored her by singing at her funeral. I feel like I know too what Froma most wants from us now: To live each moment with presence and gratitude, as she did; To teach and to learn, to continue our love of Judaism and of humanity. Froma leaves Josh (Shuki) her loving, devoted husband, sons and daughters Nomi, Rachel and Yoni, son-in-law Yoel and grandchildren Esther, Moishy, Tzipi and Sarah.

BERENICA GRAYZEL (1915-2013)

Berenica Grayzel , 98, died peacefully on April 22, 2013, near her home in Manalapan, N.J., following a long career as an educator. She studied in Israel before graduating with a B.A. from Brooklyn College in 1940, and from the Teachers’ Institute of the Jewish Theological Seminary in 1943. She earned her M.A. degree from Hebrew Union College in 1962. She taught or was a principal in public and private schools in New York and New Jersey, and worked for NFTY. She co-wrote Rosh, a Hebrew primer in 1958. The NATE conferred on her the Fellow in Religious Education honor in 1970. Aunt B, as she was known to family members and friends, lived independently until her final days. Although never married, she had in her life many nephews, nieces, cousins, and friends who included her in family functions and activities. Aunt B was an educator throughout her career, both as a Hebrew instructor, and public school teacher. In 2005, she was awarded an Honorary Doctorate of Jewish Education by the Hebrew Union College Jewish Institute of Religion. She was an avid Jeopardy fan, Trekie and was up to date on all current political and social events. She enjoyed life and did it her way. She will be missed for her wisdom and encouragement by her family and by her friends, among them students on whom she had a lifelong influence.


18 RABBI DAVID HARTMAN (1931-2013)

David Hartman was one of the pioneers of liberal Orthodox Judaism who deeply influenced Jewish thought and education. He was ordained by Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik, and received a doctorate of philosophy from McGill University in Montreal. He was a pulpit rabbi in the Bronx and Montreal before moving to Israel in 1971. The Shalom Hartman Institute, which Rabbi Hartman founded in his father’s name in 1976, has become a theological and cultural landmark, particularly for the thousands of Diaspora Jews who attend conferences or spend summers studying there. With an annual budget of $18 million and a staff of 125, the institute has sponsored two Jerusalem high schools, runs a research center, opened a branch in Manhattan and trained more than 1,000 Israeli military officers. In the last year, more than 5,000 people participated in a Hartman learning series called iEngage. At the Hartman institute, one can see scholars from varied faiths poring jointly over a chapter in Psalms and a verse in Isaiah, and rabbis of different denominations matter-of- factly discussing a page in the Talmud or a clause in Maimonides’s Guide for the Perplexed, while on another corner of campus IDF colonels explore with professors of Jewish thought the boundaries of battlefield morality and other scholars are writing textbooks on Judaism for secular schools. Through the educational institutions he founded, Hartman sought to create a pluralistic Jewish outlook designed to provide answers for the challenges facing contemporary Judaism. “His legacy is the idea that Judaism has many faces and one can’t say ‘this is Judaism and nothing else,’” said his student Ariel Picard. “Rabbi Hartman taught that there are many different ways to be a Jew in the 21st century and that instead of closing themselves off, there must be a dialogue between all streams and approaches. Being a talmid chacham [Torah scholar] means that we’re always students, and no one owns the Torah, because if we’re all students then we can welcome other people to learn with us, but if we’re masters then this becomes impossible.” Hartman’s daughter, Tova, the founder of Shira Hadasha in Jerusalem and a scholar herself, said that every year when we read the Akeda, her father would announce that it was time once again to grapple with the concept of Sacrificial Man. Hartman was more drawn to the story of God consulting man about the destruction of Sedom, but God forbid that anyone suggest skipping over the reading of the more difficult to understand text. Hartman didn’t trust the impulse to excise things from the tradition. He said that if there was something in our Jewish house we didn’t like, we should store it in our attic because you never know when we might need it again. Grappling with difficult ideas was an important measure of our Jewish experience. As a teacher and rabbi, there were three things that made David Hartman prouder than anything else. One, when he was able to enable Orthodox yeshiva students to remain frum. Normally, if yeshiva students had crises of faith, it was like a free fall down a bottomless pit, and they would just drop Judaism


19 altogether. When Hartman was able to help them reconcile modern concepts and sensibilities with traditional categories and commitments and help the yeshiva bucher to find a way to live with a little more tension and uncertainty than perhaps he was used to, but ultimately to remain inside the fold—that made Hartman so happy. What made Hartman even happier was the ability to mekarev people to halakhic observance. Tova recounted how her father would come home glowing about how he’d helped this couple, or this family, to kosher their kitchen. He loved to tell about how before he came to Montreal there were no sukkot and by the time he left it was one of the sukka capitals of the world. Finally, David loved those who perhaps did not alter their practice, but came to understand that Judaism was something to be taken seriously, something compelling. These people were drawn to his driving passion to make sense out of things that didn’t make sense to them or him. For them, David was a religious leader, indeed a religious authority, who was brutally honest, who was at times exasperated or even infuriated with the rabbis or God, but who never exited himself. Rabbi Hartman wore a talis and tefillin to the end, every morning. Yehoshua Gurtler, 32, an attorney and a graduate of the Shalom Hartman High School, considers David Hartman to be his “Rebbe” long beyond that formal period of education, since Hartman’s revolutionary teachings during those formative years of adolescence has shaped his faith in God as a grown man. Yehoshua wrote : “Without doing injustice to the complexity of Hartman’s theology, the key message he pressed upon us, his students, as young men, was that religious observance is not about passive subservience but about an active and ongoing engagement with God - or in his picturesque words to us as 9th graders: “People aren’t monkeys.” It was Rabbi Hartman’s desire to educate generations of committed Modern Orthodox Jews that led to the creation of the Hartman Institute’s high school, originally for young men only and in recent years for young women as well. It is no coincidence that the school was titled both a place committed to the study of Torah and experimental. Hartman’s desire to create a place of Torah learning for young students that would broaden their horizons, challenge their beliefs and encourage them to be inquisitive, critical and free thinking, was nothing less than experimental. The school taught a curriculum rich with the study of halakha and Talmud, philosophical thought (Jewish and non-Jewish), science and liberal arts. The school placed a far greater emphasis on scholarship than on religious practice. Students who felt disassociated with traditional daily prayers were encouraged to participate in alternative learning activities. Hartman, always in high demand, insisted on spending time personally educating even his youngest students. He was a regular presence in his High School. When planning the institute’s new campus, he insisted that a small foot bridge (to which he fondly referred as the “bridge katan”) be built between the school and the institute’s central Beit Midrash, so that the high school students would always be just a few steps away from that center of Torah and learning. He often taught his students: “Never let anyone take your place at the table of


20 Judaism.� These words remain a simplified paraphrase of the covenantal and vital Judaism that Rabbi Hartman taught to so many thousands of his students. Many owe him their place at the table. Besides his son Donniel, who replaced him as president of the Hartman Institute, Rabbi Hartman is survived by four other children, including his daughter, Tova,; 16 grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. He is also survived by his former wife, Barbara-- the couple had married twice and were divorced twice.

BOB L. HAUSLER (1936 - 2013)

Bob L. Hausler was born in Berlin, Germany, just before World War II. His parents were fortunate enough to move to Israel, where Bob grew up and was educated. He served in the Israeli Army during the Sinai campaign and attended the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, majoring in social sciences and psychology. In 1957 he came to the United States and became certified in Hebrew Religious Education through Hebrew Union College Jewish Institute of Religion. He taught at New Rochelle and Congregation Agudath Israel, Caldwell, NJ. Bob has been involved in various youth activities such as director of a coffee house, advisor to youth groups and a leader in lab schools. His duties have also involved adult education in the form of parent forums and Bible classes. Bob was also a member of the Jewish Educators Assembly. He leaves his partner of 52 years, Richard E. Stout

AVIVA HOFFMAN (1929-2013)

Aviva Hoffman lived in East Lansing Michigan when passed away on May 17, 2013. She was born March 6, 1929, in Tel Aviv, Israel, to Elazar and Frieda Troppeh. Aviva graduated from UC Berkley with a Bachelor of Arts. She was an old school rebbitzen who was devoted to her husband and loved by her community. She met her husband in California where he was the founding rabbi of a congregation in San Rafael. In 1970, they decided to make Aliyah, but returned to the States four years later. In 1983, she arrived in East Lansing Michigan with her husband where he served the congregation as rabbi and educational director and she taught as well. She was a beloved and admired teacher both in the US and in Israel and taught Hebrew and Judaic subjects to both children and adults. Surviving are her husband, Rabbi Morton; daughters, Sharona, Ronit , Dalia and Yael Hoffman; grandsons, Yoni Hoffman Skol and Ezra Hoffman Skol.

ALAN ABRAHAM KAY (1943-2012)

Alan Kay was a wise and funny man and a frequent participant in CAJE conferences. Alan got his Doctorate in English education from New York University. He taught English for more than 30 years at City Tech and, together with his friend Father Matusik, co-founded the College’s Mickey Leland-Ivan Tillem


21 Peace Studies Seminar there. For many years, the popular seminar series worked to foster peace and understanding by creating a forum for the sharing of ideas concerning significant life issue and world events. One of the first projects in Jewish education that Alan undertook was publishing a magazine for Jewish children, called Shofar. Its format was colorful and attractive and it concentrated on Jewish holidays, interviews with prominent Jews, games, puzzles, “This month in Jewish history” and many other features of interest to children ages 9-12 and of use to their teachers. He also wrote the Teacher’s Guide to My Generations: A course in Jewish Family History. Later, he and Jo wrote MAKE YOUR OWN PASSOVER SEDER: A New Approach to Creating a Personal Family Celebration. Eventually, he came to realize that his calling was to be a rabbi and he enrolled in The Academy For Jewish Religion in New York. About his decision to become a rabbi, he wrote: “ I didn’t know I wanted to become a rabbi then, but I know now that my zaida’s stories, told between sips of sweetened tea, became the stories I wanted to tell; and that my zaida’s devotion to his congregation, shown by his study and prayer, became the devotion I wanted to offer a congregation.” In 1998, Alan took a student pulpit at Temple Beth Emeth of Mt. Sinai Long Island New York. This position turned into a life-changing one for him and for his congregants. For 12 years he was their spiritual leader. After he passed away his congregation published their remembrances of him in a touching tribute from which we quote only a few of the many memories of him they shared: “Rabbi Kay influenced and inspired virtually every aspect of congregational life,large and small…If a rabbi’s primary role is to teach, then what Alan taught us above all was how to come together as a warm, loving and holy congregation in a temple that is truly a house of prayer for all people.” “There will always be a hole in our hearts for a man who was a mensch first and a rabbi who made religion fun.” “Rabbi Kay was a strategic thinker, a visionary who was brilliant, innovative and creative. As such, he contributed much to the development of our temple, and he generously gave us his knowledge, his expertise, his skills, his good name” “Rabbi is responsible for me being comfortable in my Jewish skin…He taught me the mitzvoth of making peace and performing loving deeds.” “When I was 10, I arrived at Temple for the first time, I was kissed by a man with a long gray beard; he had big, bulky glasses, but for some reason he felt almost like family. He talked to me for the first time and I looked up at him with big innocent eyes and laughed at his corny puns, though because of him, I immediately felt like I belonged there. “Alan long had been a person with an affinity for letters and spirituality. His search for the miraculous had intensified in 1989, when he undertook a scholarly review of the literature, both ancient and modern, in search of words and ideas that would provide him comfort and reassurance at the time of the final illness and death of a central figure in his life, his father. From that he authored The Jewish Book of Comfort (1993)which is a compendium of writings


22 and readings to help those who mourn and to help those who comfort those who mourn. In a speech he gave at City Tech, Alan discussed the critical role that faith played in life and there, he encouraged his audience to talk more freely and more often in the secular setting about the spiritual dimension, and to do so without fear of judgment or criticism. He invited all to make room “for one another to believe, to worship, to pray - to search for the miraculous - each in his or her own way.” Once, Alan was a guest at a neighboring congregation discussing the topic of “Aging with Grace and Holiness”. Before he arrived, he wrote to the congregation: “As I am on my own journey, feeling both the joy and sadness of the passing years, and some of the anguish, I am thinking there is no time I would rather be alive than the present. Like the etrog, I have thrived in the sun and in the storm and like the olive, although I have been pressed and beaten, I am still a source for fire and light. Torah cannot take away the pain and fear that accompanies aging, but Torah can help us to appreciate that we are not alone in our pain and that even with our pain we can still make a positive difference in our own lives and in the lives of our families and our communities: aging and saging are not just rhyming words, they remind us that even gray hairs need to be combed.” Sadly, Alan did not live to be an old man himself. He wrote about his personal faith in the book he wrote about mourning. It was a faith he later called upon during his own battle with metastatic lung cancer. “I know my faith in Jewish ritual and God has not been tested personally by having a loved one struck by swift and awful illness and death and suffering through years of pain and debilitation, but I believe in the face of such trauma, although my faith would at first be shaken, it would ultimately be strengthened. I know that my strength came from my own predisposition to the Jewish tradition, in particular to its spirituality but also to its teachings and its sensitivities and its guidance’s as embodied in its rituals, celebrations and folklore.” Alan was a mensch of a man and a fine teacher of Torah. He leaves his wife, Jewish educator and colleague Jo Kay, his children Corinne, Lisa and Adina their partners and his grandchildren.

CHAYA NEWMAN (1937-2012)

Chaya Newman, who died this year at age 75 was for thirty-six years the principal of Bruriah High School for Girls in Elizabeth New Jersey. Today her daughter Shlomis Peikes of Passaic is one of the school’s assistant principals. Peshi Neuburger of Bergenfield, a teacher at Bruriah for the past 15 years, said that Mrs. Newman’s advice to all her teachers was that the students “don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care.” Born in Israel and raised in Baltimore, Mrs. Newman majored in math at Brooklyn College and later earned a master’s degree in psychology and family therapy at Long Island University. A certified family therapist, she was married to


23 Dr. Avigdor (Victor) Newman and taught in Cleveland, Mexico, and the Yeshivah of Flatbush before being recruited for Bruriah in 1971. The school then had about 50 students. Now it has 400. “She really raised the bar for education for Jewish women,” Ms. Neuburger said. Princeton University graduate and Rhodes Scholar Miriam Rosenbaum, Bruriah class of 2007, told the Forward that she was inspired by Mrs. Newman, and described her as “an eishes chayil [woman of valor], brilliant and strong and independent.” Known for taking an individual interest in each student and creating a broad range of extracurricular activities, Mrs. Newman and her husband also took Bruriah students on Jewish history trips to Europe. A former student, Chava Finkel, wrote on a memorial Facebook page “I will always remember Mrs. Newman with great love and respect. She was a leader and a role model for all of us. She was strong and understanding at the same time. I feel especially lucky to have gone on one of the trips to Europe with her and Dr. Newman. Rivka Goldstein wrote: “In our yearbook (‘76) she writes a quote, “When you educate a man, you have an educated man, but when you educate a woman, you have educated a family.” Amanda Bier Lyman wrote: “She touched thousands of girls and their families with her compassion, guidance, honesty and wisdom. She was always available for every girl and treated us all like her own daughters.” “I owe her everything,” Ms. Neuburger said. Formerly a computer programmer, she was invited to Bruriah more than 20 years ago to teach one class and Mrs. Newman wanted her to teach on a more regular basis. It took five years of persuasion before she accepted the offer. “I was not a good teacher at the beginning and she really nurtured me,” Ms. Neuburger said. “She believed in me.” Mrs. Newman is survived by her husband, Dr. Avigdor (Victor) Newman, and their sons Rabbi Eliyahu Newman, Rabbi Dovid Newman, Rabbi Yehuda Newman, and Rabbi Yaakov Newman, and their daughter, Shlomis Peikes.

PROFESSOR MICHAEL ROSENAK (1932-2013)

Michael Rosenak was Mandel Professor of Jewish Education, Emeritus, at the Hebrew University and head of the Department of Education and Jewish Education at the Mandel Jerusalem Fellows Program. He published many articles and books on Jewish educational thought, particularly its theological aspects. His book Commandments and Concerns: Jewish Education in Secular Society won the Jewish Book Prize in 1989. He also wrote Teaching Jewish Values (1986), Roads to the Palace (1995), Covenant and Community (2013).A festschrift in his honor appeared in 2006. Rosenak was the Samuel Rothberg Prize Laureate of the Hebrew University for 2001. He developed the Jewish Values Curriculum at the Melton Centre for Jewish Education, which has been used in Jewish schools throughout the world. Born in Bremen Germany, and raised in the United States,


24 Prof. Rosenak made aliyah in 1958 and became one of the foremost philosophers of Jewish education of our time. The loss of Mike Rosenak is of particular significance to the world of Jewish education. He was interested in two large ideas. The first was the creation of two groups – the first was an educated laity who would incorporate the enthusiasm for Jewish living into the very fiber of their beings. He saw Jewish communal living as well as Jewish text study as vehicles for the creation of, as he put it, these “lively and alive” young Jews. The second group was a new core of Jewish educators who would have charisma and a sense of the Jewish journey that would be attractive to young Jews throughout the diaspora and in Israel. According to Rabbi Danny Landes, the head of Pardes, Mike was an eager supporter of the Pardes Educators Program (PEP). He wished that the graduates would embody an ongoing concern and grappling with great Jewish values-- not only the language and literature of Judaism that he so greatly loved. In the end, he believed it was crucial that chesed, shalom, cheshbon ha’nefesh be not only ideas, but become the ongoing instruments of Jewish creative life. His advocacy was done with a quiet argument that was relentless in its logic, and irresistible in its charm. According to his colleague Rabbi Mark Rosenstein, over decades, quietly, gently, but with intellectual rigor, Mike created a language for talking about Jewish education and created a philosophical basis for a pluralistic view of Jewish education. He taught and inspired thousands of educators, who have translated his ideas into curriculum and practice around the world. He didn’t like to define himself, but it is fair to say that he belonged to the world of modern Orthodoxy in his practice, beliefs, and community affiliation. But he received honorary doctorate degrees from both HUC and JTS, and we all thought he belonged to us - which he did. Rosenak felt that the challenge comes when different members of a society have different beliefs, that lead to different values, that lead to different definitions of required – and acceptable – behaviors. What seems to be the instinctive way to deal with this conflict is to apply force: the one who shouts louder, or manages to pass a law, or throws more rocks, or has better weapons, gets to decide what values get translated into norms. By his example and by his teachings, Mike showed us a different way: to listen carefully, with respect; to dig deeply to uncover the common ground; to think creatively to find a new path; to keep a sense of humor – especially about yourself; and never to raise your voice. Pluralism turns out to be a slogan that everyone likes, but that is very hard to implement when it comes to actually hearing the truth of the other, when it comes to knowing where to “draw the line.” Trying to implement a pluralistic Jewish society – in the Jewish state or elsewhere – is a constant struggle, mostly with ourselves. Michael Rosenak’s life and work helped us understand the struggle better, and thereby made it a little less difficult. To quote Rabbi Landes : “Mike Rosenak was a great ironist who was able to see the other side and incorporate it as he argued and taught his side. He had no trouble, and indeed relished, argument and diversity of opinion; but


25 he would not relinquish advocacy out of politeness. People were drawn to Mike Rosenak – his authenticity, his humor, and simply his goodness. Finally, he embodied all that he taught.”

EVELYN (EVY) ROSENBLUM (1928-2013)

Evy Rosenblum moved from Cleveland to Columbus, OH in 1946 to study for her BA in education at Ohio State University. There, she met her love and life partner, Louis Rosenblum. They marked their 64th wedding anniversary on June 19th. Lou and Evy were amazing partners whose lives benefited the Jewish community both in Ohio and abroad. They moved to the West side of Cleveland—which is not the side of Cleveland most Jews live on. That led them to other ex-pats and in 1954, they were among the founders of the West Temple. The Cleveland Council on Soviet Anti-semitism grew out of the social action committee of the West Temple with Lou Rosenblum among the leaders. This grass-roots organization became one of the most important ones in the fight for Soviet Jewry. The synagogue leaders approached Evy with a request to create a religious school. Armed with the knowledge she had gained during her college years, she created the school from scratch and grew it to encompass K-12, including a midweek Hebrew program. The religious school opened in Jan. 1955 in rooms rented at Giles-Sweet school in Fairview Park, Ohio. Today, the school covers pre-school through grade 12 and has over 100 students. And because it was (and continues to be) an all-volunteer school, Evy trained and coached all of the teachers in addition to designing the curriculum. She did all of this as a volunteer. This school was and is the only Jewish school on the western side of Cleveland drawing students from dozens of communities. Evy served as Director of Education for almost 40 years at Beth Israel The West Temple. She received awards for her development of curricula, which was used citywide. She mentored and inspired generations of both students and teachers. In 1972, Rabbi Sally Priesand, a graduate of Beth Israel’s religious school, became the first woman ordained to the rabbinate in the U.S. Evy attended multiple CAJE conferences leading classes and workshops at both national and regional CAJE gatherings over the years. During the 1960’s and 1970’s Evy pioneered educational programs about Jews and Judaism for churches and schools in northern Ohio. She designed a sixth grade curriculum at the synagogue religious school that taught and empowered the students to help lead parts of these programs and lead tours of the synagogue for visiting Christian groups. For more than 25 years she volunteered as an archival processor at the Jewish Archives at the Western Reserve Historical Society. She enriched her life and other’s with her love of birding, cultivating flowers, folk dancing, and hiking. In addition to her husband Lou, she is survived by her children, Jan Metz, Miriam Rosenblum and Sheldon Benjamin, Diane Rosenblum and Henry


26 Gordon, and Daniel Rosenblum and Sharon Waxman; eight grandchildren, Samara, Elana, Paul, Malka, Rafi, Maya, Jonah, and Liana; two great grandchildren, Nia and Azalea; and sister, Barbara Mull.

HINDI SCHEINMAN (1958-2013)

Teaching young children to read Hebrew was just one of the ways Hindi Scheiman shared her faith with others, but it was a perfect example of her patient and nurturing nature. “She was the reading specialist, mostly teaching kindergartners and first graders,” said her sister-in-law, Michla Schanowitz, of Mrs. Scheiman’s 33-year teaching career at the Seymour J. Abrams Cheder Lubavitch Hebrew Day School in Skokie. Mrs. Scheiman, co-director of Lubavitch Chabad of Niles, came to the Chicago area in 1980 to help her husband, Rabbi Binyomin Scheiman, in the broad Lubavitch outreach work of reconnecting Jews to their faith. As director of the Jewish Prisoners Assistance Foundation and chaplain for Jewish prisoners throughout Illinois, Mrs. Scheiman’s husband stayed in touch with many former inmates and sometimes brought them home for meals and counseling. “Not everyone would be comfortable with that,” said Rabbi Daniel Moscowitz of Chabad of Illinois. “But Mrs. Scheiman took that as a matter of fact, welcoming them and helping them embrace their future.” “She wanted to bring goodness and kindness into the world,” Moscowitz said. Mrs. Scheiman, 54, died of complications from breast cancer on Tuesday, May 7, in her Des Plaines home, according to her husband. Mrs. Scheiman immediately became involved in the Hebrew Day School, her husband said. “She was the first teacher,” he said. “She started with only a few kids.” The school has grown to include an elementary school and separate high schools for boys and girls. “She welcomed guests to her home,” said Schanowitz, noting that was sometimes a challenge in a household with eight children. She brought tremendous grace to everything she did. Even through the years of her illness, she was always positive, always lived life to the fullest.”

RABBI ALVIN SCHIFF (1926-2013)

In 1976, CAJE, then the Conference on Alternatives in Jewish Education, had no friends among the senior leadership of the Jewish educational establishment. For the most part, they collectively saw our work as being part of the problem, not the solution. They felt that we would water down Jewish content and chip away at the standards for what it meant to be a Jewish teacher, and—perhaps our greatest sin—nobody had given us permission to call teachers


27 together. There was one senior Jewish educator who saw things differently. His name was Dr. Alvin Schiff z”l, then the Executive Vice President of the New York Bureau of Jewish Education—the largest and most influential bureau in America . Instead of being threatened, he was energized by us. Instead of worrying about protocol, he was delighted to hear new voices and see new faces. When others tried to stop us from organizing, he worked behind the scenes to change minds and hearts. And when we needed money and supplies, well, he pulled a rabbit out of his kipah. Alvin had a distinguished career as a Jewish educator in the broadest sense of the term. He was a pioneer in numerous areas in formal and informal Jewish education. In addition to authoring more than a dozen books and hundreds of articles in the field, he was editor of the Journal of Jewish Education for three decades. He founded important projects such as the post high school program in Israel (Tochnit Yod Gimel), the Hidon Tenakh Bible contest in the U.S., the Salute to Israel Parade and the March of the Living USA. Though he was a most distinguished and important man, he was also very funny and he had a child-like quality about him. He never stopped getting excited about Jewish education and he was a font of ideas and a great conversationalist. Alvin was a graduate of Yeshiva College, and earned his doctorate at YU’s Fekauf School of Psychology; he later became the Irving I. Stone Distinguished Professor of Jewish Education. In 1959 he established and directed the Graduate School of Jewish Education, which later was renamed the Azrieli Graduate School of Jewish Education and Administration. Alvin was the Executive Vice President of the Bureau of Jewish Education of New York from 1970-1991. He also sat on the Board of Trustees of the Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary for many years. In recognition of his long service to the institution, YU awarded him an additional honorary degree in 1977. Alvin was formally honored by the world Jewish community in 2005 by being awarded the President’s Prize in Jewish Education in Israel. His memory will long be honored by CAJE as that of an enthusiastic and open-minded supporter, who was always there with perceptive advice and encouragement. He was a significant mentor to many who worked and studied with him. We extend our condolences to his wife Miriam, their children Debra Karen (and Michael) Block, Linda Susan (and Arthur) Poleyeff, their six grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.

ELLEN HOPE SINGER ( 1953-2013)

Ellen Hope Singer was born on January 31, 1953 in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Ellen died from ovarian cancer on June 9, 2013 after nearly 9 1/2 years, during which she lived life to the fullest. Her bravery, courage and strength inspire all whose lives she touched and all whose paths she crossed. Ellen Singer was a gentle soul who loved Judaism passionately; she was a genius of a teacher, knowing exactly how to reach each of her students and share that passion with them. She was also a brilliant writer of Jewish textbooks for teachers and students alike.


28 Ellen graduated from the University of Michigan in 1975, continued her studies at Pardes Institute in Jerusalem and received her Master’s from the Jewish Theological Seminary in New York in 1980. She taught in religious schools and continued her career as a Jewish educator and author and editor of Jewish educational material. She loved learning and teaching, and strove to live a righteous Jewish life. As Vice-President, educational director and teacher at Congregation Agudas Achim of Livingston Manor, Ellen was instrumental in guiding the ritual path of this community and transmitted her energy and passion for Judaism not only to the children attending religious school and preparing for Bar and Bat Mitzvah, but to the adults as well. For thirteen years, Ellen also served as Jewish spiritual leader and teacher at the Family Foundation School in Hancock, NY. One of those who knew her there Jessica Hogan, wrote: Ellen was an amazing, big hearted woman who loved every kid she met and who worked tirelessly to help others. Many of us got to attend services at Agudas Achim synagogue with her once a month when I was at the Family, and we all enjoyed her contributions to services and her company at the gatherings afterward. Ellen was a free-lance author. She wrote books and co-authored books that are very familiar to those of us in Jewish education: Our Sacred Texts , Coming of Age as A Jew: a Bar/Bat Mitzvah Handbook, Life-Cycling: an Adult introduction to Judaism; and The Many Faces of Judaism. Along with Sharon Wechter, She taught “ Jewish values with Harry Potter” at a CAJE conference. She also was the editor of Paradigm Shift: The Jewish Renewal Teachings of Reb Zalman Schachter-Shalomi. Ellen and Don traveled all over the world, along the way reaping the fruits of their great talents for friendship. Any room Ellen entered was brightened by her infectious smile and animated presence. Her countless friends admired her beauty, wit, and generosity, and her courage and humility in the face of adversity. Right before she died, the New York State Legislature issued a proclamation commending her for 27 years of distinguished services to Congregation Agudas Achim where she served as Vice-President of the congregation and honored her as a person of remarkable integrity and character who distinguished herself in service to her faith and her community... It described her as a competent and intelligent leader who guided every student in their bar/bat mitzvah training. It went on to say that Ellen’s knowledge and understanding of the history of Judaism and her commitment to the laws and traditions of Judaism have made her a guiding force in her congregation. May her memory be a blessing for all who knew her and will continue to know her through her work, her students and her writings. She is survived by her loving husband, Don Simkin; her son, Vinny Simkin.


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NEWCAJE ACKNOWLEDGES YOUR CONTRIBUTIONS NewCAJE is sincerely grateful to all those who contributed to NewCAJE from Septempber 1st 2012 to July 20, 2013 Your faith in Jewish Education and in NewCAJE means so much. Together, we will create a lasting support system for Jewish Educators.

BUILDERS OF NewCAJE

Marvin G. Barish Cheryl Bensky Cindy and Jared Maggied Gellert Harold Grinspoon and Diane Troderman Marvin Israelow and Dorian Goldman Institute for Jewish Activism Fund Daniel Price Gerald and Louise Stein Julie Plaut Warwick Margery S. Wolf Donor Advised Fund Jonathan Wolf

SPECIAL GIFTS

Rabbi Ronald & Nancy Androphy Lorraine Arcus Debra Barsel Sherry Barsky Stephen Bayar Stephen Becker Roselyn Bell Ilene Beckman Annice Benamy Hana and Eyal Bor Kenneth Bowen Andree Brooks Treasure Cohen Susan Raye Edelstein Robin Eisenberg Varda Farber Norman Fassler-Katz Cherie Koller-Fox and Everett Fox Fort Wayne Jewish Federation

Melinda Freed Scott Glass Raizel Glicka Joanne and Larry Glosser Joel Gordon Joan Hersch Howard Jaffe Robin Joseph Abraham Katz Lester and Florence Katz Cecile Kowalski Shaul Levenson Lmillender Avram Mandell Debi Mishael Kathryn Morton Jeffrey Myers Peter Nelson Gilda Oran


31 Sydney Perry Kol Ami Salt Lake City in Honor of Mazal Peterson Pgordon245 Rabbi’s Discretionary Fund of Temple Beth El in Ithaca, NY Margie Rashti Amy Ripps Jeri Robins Jennifer Rudick Zunikoff Cherie Karo Schwartz Sunny Schnitzer Robin Shuler Julie Silver Kimberly Singer

LEADERS

Martha Joy Aft Judy Aronson Shaina Bacharach Karen Dresser Charki Dunn Judith Epstein Sam Glaser Deborah Silver Goodman Terri Ginsburg Eitan Gutin Jules Gutin Tracy Klirs

SUPPORTERS Katy Allen Alex Band Barry Barkan Judith Black Miriam Blue Barbara Bolich Helaine Braunig Sheri Brown Judith Cloutier Sharon Colbert Tanya Conley Susan Cutler

Eliot Spack Ahouva Steinhaus United Jewish Communities of Sioux City, Iowa David Waksberg Robert Waxman Joel S. Weissglass Michele Zuckerman The Musicians, Storytellers, Comedians The Teachers of Sessions and Intensives who teach and perform without compensation The Volunteers who work in way large and small to grow a NewCAJE

Allen Leider Naomi Less Rona Lesser Morah Andi Kayla Niles Liz Rolle and Phil Shechter Peninnah Schram Hanna Tiferet Siegel Simcha29 Michele Sumka Leah Wolff-Pellingra

Naomi Danis Lauren Jane Dragutsky Marge Eiseman Naomi Eisenberger Diane Elliot Lainey Feingold and Randy Shaw Elyssa Gaffin Nina Gelman-Gans Deborah Goldstein Gay Griffith Ruz Gulko Beatriz Haymer


32 Natasha Hirschhorn Judy Holzer Muriel Horowitz Dorothy Hughes Nancy Jacobson Cathy Kaplan Larry Karol Katz288 Marian Kleinman Chaye Kohl Andrew Koller Jon Koller Helene Kornsgold Sara Kupor Ruth and Larry Kurlandsky Wendy Lavenda-Carroll Cynthia Lebowitz Shirley Litowitz Kevin Margolius Douglas Marlowe Marrodney Laurence Milder Bryna Milkow Robin Morris Lisette Nayor Elana Olitsky Gilda Oran-Saperstein Stephen Parkoff Fran Pearlman Jama Purser Judi Resnick Miles Roger Rosie Rosenzweig

Mike Rothbaum Suzanne Rubens Terri Swartz Russell Julie Sabes Marjorie Saide Sara Salitan-Theill Naomi Sandberg Henry Schaffer Jeremy Schwartz Neil Schwartz P.J. Schwartz Lisa Seemann Shalomrav Robbi Sherwin Joyce Siegel David Siff Lisa Silver Ronny Simms Deborah Slosberg Paul Solyn Shira Spenadel Debbie Stiel Rochelle Steinberg Rachel Sternheim Andy Susman Nancy Sohn Swartz Emily Aranoff Teck Ronni Ticker Ben Wacks Cheryl Weiner Neil Weinstein Shoshanah Zaritt Debra Zaslow


33


34

HONORARY LIFE MEMBERS We would like to dedicate this special space to the life members of CAJE. This list is from the 2004 CAJE program book, the last to list life members. If you were a life member, but are not mentioned here, write to info@newcaje.org for next year’s list. We thank you for your generous support of Jewish Education, and hope that you will continue to help us with our vision for the 21st century—NewCAJE. Ellen Abrahams Brosbe Judith Abrams Sylvia Abrams Mitchell Ackerson Michael Aichenbaum Sanford Akselrad Janice Alper Joel Alpert David Altshuler Harlene Appelman Bruce Arbit Suzanne Arnold David Arnovitz Andi Arnovitz Bob Arnow Joan Arnow Melanie Aron Bradley Artson Ofelia Averack David Backman Marvin Barish Richard Barker Dina Barze’ev-Hochbaum Eliot Baskin Michael Bass Kim Beame Ellen Beller Els Bendheim Jerry Benjamin Cheryl Bensky Mandell Berman

Alison Bermant Toni Bloomberg- Grossman Steven Bogad Ely Braun Arthur Brody Noa Bourke Thomas Buchler Richard Calvert Judy Caplan-Ginsburgh Janet Carter Rose Ann Chasman Fred Claar Deborah Clayman Melissa Cohavi Arnold Cohen Annebelle Cohen Harvey Cohen Mina Cohen Richard Cohen Robert Cohen Treasure Cohen Aviva Comet-Murciano Selena Cousin Ralph Dalin Karen Daniel Rochelle Daube Janice Davidson Sherrie Davidson Carol Delton Naomi Demuth Liz Diamond

Rick Dinitz Barry Dolin Elliot Dorff Marlynn Dorff Perry Dornstien Judith Douglass Lori Dreffin Ellen Dreyfus Jonina Duker Adrian Durlester Tamar Earnest Linda Ecker Selma Ehrenfreund Gloria Einstein Barbara Elish Dov Elkins Shulamith Elster Larry Engelhart Marlene Engelhart Ari Epstein Janice Epstein Joan Epstein Noah Epstein Sandra K. Epstein Larry Eschler Edith Everett David Fass Morley Feinstein Barbara Fellner Marsha Fensin Steven Fink Stephen Fisch


35 Judah Fish David Fishman Jacqueline Fleekop Paul Flexner Joan Florsheim Janet Forman David Freedman Cheryl Friedman Deborah Friedman Freda Friedman Randee Friedman B. Frydman-Kohl Naomi Gabai-Fisher Sandra Gander Andrew Gilbert Nancy Ginsberg Ilan Glazer Marla Goldberg Carol Goldblatt David Goldstein Zelda Goodman Roberta Goodman Ronald Graner Jonathan Greenberg Gayla Greenberg Harold Grinspoon Joel Grishaver Daniel Grossman Deena Grossman Susan Gulack Eric Gurvis Ken Hailpern Helene Harpman Edith Harris Jonathan Hausman Minna Heilpern Judith Helman Marlene Herman Joan Hersch Carolyn Starman Hessel Adah Hirschfeld Fran Hirschman David Hoffman Barbara Hoffman Margie Holzer

Peter Hronik Susan Huntting Mitchell Hurvitz Rebecca Isgur Janet Jablon Rebecca Jacoby Michael Jaffe Reuven Jaffe Cecile Jordan Ruth Jordan Robin Joseph Reuel Karpov Betsy Katz Joanna Katz Lawrence Katz Sandra Katz Stuart Kelman Jessie Ker-Whitt Temma Kingsley Linda Kirsch Barbara Klaristenfeld Stanley Kleckner Elliott Kleinman Diane Kleinman Rosalyn Koch Robert Kogod Cherie Koller-Fox Gene Korff Deborah Kornberg Cynthia Kravitz-Entin Lena Krebs Shelly Kreiger David Kishef Terry Krulwich Gillian Kulp Paul Kurland Ruth Kerlandsky Howard Kurshner Mary Jean Kurshner Richard Kushnir Candace Kwaitek Cheryl Lane Luisa Latham Yael Lazar Barbara Leff

Malcolm Leinwohl Devra Lerner Rona Lesser Fran Levey Marcia Levinsohn Neil Levy Henia Lewin Lynn Liberman Jonathan Lifschutz Marcel Lindernbaum Jillian Lisner Hannah Litowitz Bonita Malit Susan March George Marcus Michelle Marcus Phillip Marcus Ellen Masters Myrna Matsa Batsheva Meiri Michael Mellen Florence Melton Laurence Milder Goldie Milgram Milton Miller Sue Mizrahi Bonnie Morris Robert Morris Robin Morris Jo Ann Morrison Sharon Morton Gary Moskowitz Sharon Feiman-Nemser Raquel Newman Janet Novins Brian Opitz Jodi Oskin Barbara Oslick-Brown Aaron Panken Aviva Panush Stephen Parkoff Barbara Parkoff Jordan Parr Ruth Patt Amy Perlin


36 Sara Perman Iris Petroff Rachel Petroff Peter Pogany Ruth Pogany Frumeth Polasky Janet Pont Charles Posternak Daniel Pressman Michael Price Jo-Ann Price Lauren Pulver Judith Race Judith Radousky Diane Rauchwerger Ina Regosin Susan Resnick Arnold Resnicoff Susan Rifkin Amy Ripps Carnie Rose Lisa Rosenberg Michael Rosenthal Jessica Roskin Barbara Rosoff Seymour Rossel Miriam Brun Ruberg Dov Rubin Diane Samet Dena Saslaw Jeffrey Schein Alvin Schiff Kyla Epstein Schneider Peninnah Schram Cherie Karo Schwartz Patricia Schwartz James Schawrz Neil Schwartz Linda K Schottenstein

Merril Shapiro Thelma Shenkman Michael Sherman Nadine Siegman Shoshana Silberman Michael Silver Jerry Silverman Gail Simon Kurt Simon Alan Sims Ronni Sims Betty Singer Ellen Singer Bonnie Slavitt-Moore Amy Small Roger Smith Barbara Sofer Eliot Spack Tamar Spanier Mark Staitman Carol Starin Peter Stark Olivia Starman Jonathan Stein Myron Stern Marc Sternfeld Arlene Sterfeld Lisa Stone Barbara Stoner Mark Strauss-Cohn Karen Strok Joseph Sumner Sandra Suson Barbara Sussman Burton Sutker Roberta Sutker Daniel Syme Ronald Symons Neri Tischler

John Uhlmann Faye Ullmann Miriam Van Raalte Morton Wachtler Joan Wallis Sharon Wassberg David Wattenberg Christine Wattenberg Francine Weaver Sharon Wechter Barbi Weinberg Michael Weinberg Jody Weinberg Caren Weintraub Seth weiss Gisela Weisz Stephen Weitzman Henny Wenkart Jane West Walsh Elizabeth Wexford Alan Weiner Abby Weiner Shohama Weiner Sheryl Witlin Bogad Jonathan Wolf Marcia Wollner Rochelle Wynne Diana Yacobi Bebbye Zanerhaft Shoshanah Zaritt Geri Zeller Nancy Zimmerman Edward Zissman William Zoske Leonard Zucker Julie Zupan Ellen Zuskin

We thank you for your generous support of Jewis Education, and hope that you will continue to help us with our vision for the 21st century as NewCAJE.


NEWCAJE YEAR-ROUND

37

NewCAJE PUBLICATION: THE JEWISH EDUCATOR

The Jewish Educator, edited by Judi Resnick, is a journal dedicated to research, opinion, ideas, networking, best practices and innovation—anything Jewish educators. Currently, there are three volumes available, and a fourth volume will be released in October, 2013. To access The Jewish Educator go to: http://thejewisheducator.wordpress.com/

LEHRHAUS ONLINE: THE NEWCAJE WEBINARS

Our Adult Education and Professional Development programs offer Life-Long Learning for Adults through NewCAJE’s Great Speaker Series. Bring the greatest Jewish speakers and scholars to your community. The webinars are: - 4 Times a Year - 90 Minutes long - Interactive and Affordable - Include Study Guides The following past webinars are currently available for purchase at http://www.newcaje.org/webinars/ tRabbi Bradley Artson: Almighty? No way! Learning to Love the God you really believe in. tRabbi Anne Brener: Reflections on Life, Death, and Debbie Friedman (with music by Julie Silver) tProfessor Steven M. Cohen: More Jewish Friends: A Key to the Jewish Future tRabbi Yosef Leibowitz: 3 part series: Passover in the Bible/Haggadah t Ruth Messinger: The Jewish Responsibility for Social Justice t Rabbi Arthur Waskow: Trees, Earth and Torah: How Judaism teaches us to heal the Earth tDr. Judith Rosenbaum: 50 years after the Freedom Rides: Jewish Lessons from the Civil Rights Movement t3BCCJ+FČSFZ4BMLJO: Sanity and Sanctity: Reinventing Bar/Bat Mitzvah in America tRabbi Rami Shapiro: Filling Heads and Opening Hearts: Teaching a Judaism of Compassion tDeborah Grayson Riegel: Problems to Possibilities: Using Appreciative Inquiry to Focus on the Bright Spots in Jewish Education


38

NICHOLS COLLEGE

Summer Conference Emergency Contact Department of Facilities Management

Emergency Contact Information: EMERGENCIES Department of Public Safety X5555 (Campus Phone ONLY) 508-213-2298 508-949-0737 Public Safety also assists with lock-outs, transports, and after-hour support. If you need assistance after normal business hours please call Public Safety, who can contact the appropriate on-call person to resolve the issue. General Issues & Questions: Monday-Thursday 7:00AM-3:30PM Friday 7:00AM-2:00PM Justin Dolan, Conference & Event Manager 508-213-2103 Cathy Champagne, Asst. to the Associate V.P. for Facilities Management 508-213-2424 Maintenance Issues Facilities Management: 508-213-2424 Computer/Technology Issues: Information Technology Help Desk Monday-Thursday 8:00AM-5:00PM

508-213-2206


4/2009

Soccer Field

To Rt. 197, Rt. 131, Southbridge and Thompson, CT

Lot M

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6 18

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Academic and Administration Buildings / Other Facilities

Softba Field

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Your Success Is Our Business

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124 Center Road Dudley, Massachusetts 01571 800-470-3379 or 508-213-1560 www.nichols.edu

To Oxford Rd.

Welcome to the NICHOLS COLLEGE Campus

Guest House Kuppenheimer Hall 16 Library 17 Lombard Dining Hall 18 North Hall 19 Olsen Hall 20 Recreation & Athletic Center 21 Remillard Hall 22 Shamie Hall 23 South Hall 24 Student Services 25 Winston House A – N Parking Lots

CENTER

Academy Hall Admission Center student Center Alumni Hall Auditorium Budleigh Hall Center Hall Chapel Conant Hall Conrad Hall Copper Beech I Copper Beech II Currier Center Davis Hall

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CAMPUS MAP


40

KEY INFORMATION, DEPOSIT AND RAFFLE Your key deposit is $36, which you will pay at registration (cash or check). If you lose your key you must pay a lost key fee of an additional $36, which must be paid upon reissuance of keys. If this happens, please visit the NewCAJE office in the first floor of Davis Hall, Room 104. You may choose to support NewCAJE by leaving your $36 with us when you leave. For your donation, we will provide you with two raffle tickets for a chance to win an iPad with retina display and other exciting prizes, including: t t t t t t t

Jewelry and Holocaust collection by Paul Weinberg A set of Goldie Milgram’s books A performance for elders when Peninnah Schram in booked in that city Handmade Judaica Necklace, made with swarovski crystals, semi-precious stones, and sterling silver components by Meredith Weiss Tree of Life framed print by Peggy Davis Hebrew magnetic learning case by RuthE Levy A Skype concert for friends by Naomi Less

You may buy additional raffle tickets for $20 each to increase your chances!

PARKING

Parking permits are available for purchase for $10 for the week (or for any day at the same price). They will be emailed to you prior to the conference and you must print them. Place them in the dashboard of your car to insure you won’t be towed. If you lose yours, come to the NewCAJE office for a replacement.

RESIDENCE HALL

Shamie hall and the Copper beach suites I and II are located relatively close to the dining hall and classroom buildings. They featuresbedrooms equipped with twin extra-long beds, wardrobe, desk, and chair for each guest. Standard linen service will also be provided with 1 pillow, 1 pillowcase, 1 flat sheet, 1 fitted sheet and 1 bed pad, 1 blanket, and 1 face towel, 1 hand towel, and 1 full body towel. You will check in at the Student Center lounge, or after hours at the NewCAJE office. Call Ezra Fox at all other times.

CAMPUS RULES

We ask that you please respect the rules of the Residential Halls, including: t/P"MDPIPM t/PEBNBHFTUPGBDJMJUZPSEBNBHFDIBSHFTXJMMCFJTTVFE t/PTNPLJOHJOTJEFPSXJUIJOGFFUPGCVJMEJOHFOUSBODF t/PUSBTIJODPNNPOBSFB


41

MAINTENANCE ISSUES

If you have maintenance issues, please refer to the numbers 3 pages ago.

TELEPHONES

Please use your cell phone, borrow someone else’s, or come to the office during open hours.

INTERNET ACCESS

The wifi password is: 2013Groups (Case Sensitive)

GENERAL CONFERENCE INFORMATION

NewCAJE OFFICE—LOCATION, HOURS AND PHONE Our office will be located on the first (bottom) floor of Davis Hall, room 104. The NewCAJE Office will be open from 8:30AM-12:30pm and 1:30 PM-6:00 PM. You should find Ezra or Hannah there. The phone number to call is 857-288-8765. Here you will find answers to all of your questions, post information, coordinate transportation back to the airport and access the Lost & Found. NUMBERS YOU MAY NEED If you are in physical danger or are in need of immediate medical attention, call University Public Safety at 508-213-2298. Public Safety also assists with lock-outs, transports, and after-hour support. If you need assistance after normal business hours please call Public Safety, who can contact the appropriate on-call person to resolve the issue. Other numbers you may need during your stay at the conference: t/FX$"+&0Ä?DF t)BSSJOHUPO)PTQJUBM t$741IBSNBDZ NJMFTBXBZJO8FCTUFS."    COMFORT STATION The comfort station is located in the NewCAJE office in Davis Hall, room 104. There you will find presenter supplies, minor medical supplies (band aids, aspirin etc.), information on local sites (tourism, banks, pharmacies etc.), the lost and found, and general support. If you are feeling overwhelmed or need emotional support, you are also welcome to come and talk with someone who will greet you and help you in any way they can. PRESENTER SUPPLIES We will provide the following for you, available at the NewCAJE office/ comfort station: Dry erase markers and erasers for the boards, chalk and erasers, flip charts, pencils, paper (lined, drawing and blank), oaktag upon prior request,


42 scissors, glue sticks, tape (scotch and masking), markers or crayons, and construction paper, and whatever else you find there (assorted paints etc). Anything else that you need is your responsibility to bring or buy. Presenter supplies that have been ordered in advance can be picked up in the NewCAJE office before your session. XEROXING Because we do not have a fully equipped office, presenters will have to bring their own photocopies. In a copy emergency you may ask for a limited number of copies if you have already brought at least 20 and need more than you expected. Depending on the availability of the machines we will try to help you. NEWCAJE NEWSPAGE – CONFERENCE NEWSLETTER This is your source for any last minute session changes (cancellations, additions, room changes) as well as general announcements and reminders. This is a critical part of the conference to check daily. They will be placed in the Dining Hall and also posted around campus each morning, or emailed to you if requestsed on your registration. If you would like to add something to the Newsletter, please come by the NewCAJE office before 6pm. JOB BOARD In the hallway outside of the classroom where you may post jobs, messages, and anything else you wish. Please do not clutter it with any advertisements. NAMETAGS For security reasons it is extremely important that you wear the nametags provided at registration at all times. In addition, if you are not wearing your nametag badge, campus security guards may stop you from entering university buildings and treat you as suspicious. Without a NewCAJE nametag, you will not be admitted to any evening programming, the dining hall or classroom sessions. Wearing your nametag also helps to foster community and helps strangers to know your name (not to mention those with a bad memory!). If you lose your nametag please come to the NewCAJE office. KASHRUT AND MEAL INFO All food and drinks at NewCAJE4 are prepared by the amazing college kitchen staff under the strict supervision of the The Rabbinical Council of New England. Dairy, meat and vegetarian food (as well as vegan upon request) will be served. We have communicated all of your allergy restrictions to the caterer to accommodate everyone as best they can. If you didn’t mention it in your registration application, we may not be able to accommodate your requests.


43 DAILY PRAYER SERVICE t4VOEBZOJHIU.JODIB.BBBSJWBUQN5SBEJUJPOBM4FSWJDF4UVEFOU$FOUFS t.POEBZNPSOJOH4IBDIBSJUBOE5PSBI3FBEJOHBUBN5SBEJUJPOBM4FSWJDF Student center 215; Women’s minyan - Shamie Hall 2nd floor lounge. t.POEBZOJHIU5SBEJUJPOBM.JODIBQN4VEFOU$FOUFS5SBEJUJPOBM Maa’ariv at 8:30pm - Sudent Center 215. t5VFTEBZNPSOJOH4IBDIBSJUBUBN5SBEJUJPOBM4FSWJDF4UVEFOU$FOUFS t5VFTEBZOJHIU.JODIB.BBBSJWBUQN5SBEJUJPOBM4FSWJDF4UVEFOU$FOUFS 215 t8FEOFTEBZNPSOJOH4IBDIBSJUBUBN5SBEJUJPOBM4FSWJDF4UVEFOU$FOUFS 215 AFTER HOURS KUMSITZ After evening programming there will be an open Kumsitz – a musical party of melodies and mayhem. Bring your guitars, drums, voices, and spirits and come laugh and play! Join us in the Multipurpose Room of The Heights/Machuga Residence Hall 30 minutes after the Evening Performances. SNACKS All this learning is taxing on the body. Therefore, we know that you will need periodic snacks. They will be served durring break times in the morning in the Davis Hall lounge, and late night in the Student Center Cafe’.


44

SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND TRACKS THE NEWER PRINCIPALS’ TRACK WHAT IS IT? This is a track for new and newer principals, using the conference to give you skills that will be helpful to you in the early years of your career as an educational director. REQUIREMENTS: You will be required to take certain core courses plus a specific number of outlined electives. You must also to attend the NEW PRINCIPALS LUNCHEON— Monday (12:30-1:45). If you fulfill all of the requirements, you will receive a Certificate of Jewish School Administration from us attesting to the fact that you have completed this course of study. If you are interested in substitutions for any of these classes, please see Cherie Koller-Fox (in the conference office). You’ll need a course sheet signed by each instructor indicating that you’ve accrued 11 units. (3 hour classes are worth 2 units, 1 ½ hour classes are worth 1 unit) CORE COURSES (7 Units required): 1. Mitch Gordon IMPROVISATION, LEADERSHIP & TEACHING (Tuesday 2:15-5:15) (2 Units) 2. Jeffrey Schein THE ROLE OF VISION IN THE WORK OF A JEWISH PRINCIPAL (Monday 9-10:30) (1 unit) 3. Jill Paul MANAGING CHANGE (Monday 11-12:30) (1 unit) 4. Mark Young REFLECTION AS A TOOL FOR MY PROFESSIONAL SUCCESS (Tuesday 9-10:30) (1 unit) 5. Choose ONLY 1 of these sessions: a. Yohanna Kinberg THE TORAH OF MANAGEMENT: DRAWING ON JEWISH VALUES AND CONTEMPORARY BUSINESS WISDOM TO MOVE YOUR EDUCATION TEAM TOWARDS EXCELLENCE (1 unit) (Monday 4-5:30) b. PJ Schwartz BEING A TRANSFORMATIVE LEADER (1 unit) (Wednesday 10:30-12) 6. Choose ONLY 1 of these sessions: a. Alison Westermann and Helene Kornsgold WORKPLACE ETHICS FOR THE NEXT GENERATION (Wednesday 9-10:30) (1 unit) b. Lisa Lipkin STORYTELLING STRATEGIES FOR MARKETING YOUR JEWISH PROGRAMMING (Tuesday 11-12:30) (1 unit) c. Len Samborowski PROJECT MANAGEMENT (Sunday 4-5:30) (1 unit)


45 ELECTIVES (attend 4 of the following): t5FDIOPMPHZ BOZDPVSTF

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t)BOB#PS4&37"/5-&"%&34)*1*4*5"8":50(&55)&/&95(&/ERATION TO COME TO JEWISH EDUCATION? (Wednesday 8:45-10:15) t:PIBOOB,JOCFSH-&"/*/(*/+&8*4)80.&/"/%130'&44*0/"- DEVELOPMENT (Tuesday 11-12:30) t/BUBTIB%SFTOFS1"35/&34*/-&"%&34)*1"/%-&"%&34*/1"35NERSHIP (Monday 2-3:30) t+PZDF4JFHFM)0850/05)"7&5)&"%.*/*453"5*7&%&5"*-4#0( YOU DOWN (Sunday 4-5:30) tćPVHIJUEPFTOPUDPVOUBTBVOJU ZPVBSFFODPVSBHFEUPBUUFOEUIFALL EDUCATIONAL DIRECTORS MENTORING reception on Tuesday, 5:45-6:25pm in the Student Center Lounge. This is an opportunity for you to be matched with a more experienced principal with whom you can learn and consult.

THE MINI-MBA PROGRAM WHAT IS IT? This is a course offered to experienced principals who would like to increase their knowledge of traditional business skills such as marketing, project management, and transformational leadership. We have invited both colleagues within our field with business expertise, and outside professionals to share their skills with you. REQUIREMENTS: You will be required to take certain core courses plus a specific number of outlined electives. If you do, you will receive a certificate from NewCAJE attesting to the fact that you have completed this course of study. You’ll need a course sheet signed by each instructor indicating that you’ve accrued 9 units. (3-hour classes are worth 2 units, 1-½ hour classes are worth 1 unit) CORE COURSES (5 units required from the following choices): 1. Hana Bor TRANSFORMATIONAL AND AUTHENTIC LEADERSHIP IN JEWISH EDUCATION (Tues.9-10:30) (1 unit) (If you have previously taken Hana Bor’s course at NewCAJE, you may substitute an additional elective in its place.)


46 2. Natasha Dresner PARTNERS IN LEADERSHIP AND LEADERS IN PARTNERSHIP (Monday 2-3:30) (1 unit) 3. Mitch Gordon COMMUNICATION-ACTIVE LISTENING (Mon 9:15-12:15) (2 units) 4. Attend the ADVANCED PRINCIPAL’S LUNCHEON (Monday 12:30-1:45) (1 unit) ELECTIVE COURSES (5 Units needed, with each course below worth 1 unit): t3JDIBSEBOE&MBJOF4PMPNPO.&/503*/(-"%%&3'30.13&, THROUGH GRADUATE SCHOOL, TO TEACHING AND BEYOND (Monday 2-3:30) t:PIBOOB,JOCFSH5)&503")0'."/"(&.&/5%3"8*/(0/ JEWISH VALUES AND CONTEMPORARY BUSINESS WISDOM TO MOVE YOUR EDUCATION TEAM TOWARDS EXCELLENCE (Monday 4-5:30) t-JTB-JQLJO4503:5&--*/(453"5&(*&4'03."3,&5*/(:063+&8ISH PROGRAMMING (Tuesday 11-12:30) t)BOB#PS4&37"/5-&"%&34)*1*4*5"8":50(&55)&/&95(&/ERATION TO COME TO JEWISH EDUCATION? (Wednesday 8:45-10:15) t-FO4BNCPSPXTLJ130+&$5."/"(&.&/5 4VOEBZ

t-FPSB,PMMFS'PY&''&$5*7&/&(05*"5*0/)0850(&58)"5:06 WANT IN ANY SITUATION (Wednesday: 10:30-12) t+JMM1BVM."/"(*/($)"/(& .POEBZ

t0QUJPOBMCVUIJHIMZFODPVSBHFEBUUFOEUIFALL EDUCATIONAL DIRECTORS MENTORING reception on Tuesday, 5:45-6:15pm in the Student Center Lounge. This is an opportunity for you to be matched with a less experienced principal with whom you can share your insights and expertise.

LUNCHEONS WHAT IS A LUNCHEON? Luncheons are a great way to make a large conference smaller and more intimate. Each day there will be 11 options for you to choose from. Each luncheon will be hosted and you will gather with people who have something in common with you—either you have the same job description, come from the same ideological background or you are all interested in the same topic. This is not a workshop but rather a conversation. Don’t worry. The food is exactly the same as what is available in the main dining hall. It is a great way to meet some new colleagues and have a quiet, leisurely lunch away from the hubbub of the main dining hall. WHERE WILL I GET MY FOOD? Luncheons will be held in two locations: Davis (the main classroom building)


47 and in the Student Center. In Davis, the buffets will be set up in the 2nd floor lobby area (entrance) and in the Student Center will be set up in the Lounge. From the buffets, you will transfer your food in reusable containers to the room to which your luncheon is assigned to. Please note: if you have a special diet, please go to the dining hall to pick it up or make prior arrangements with the dining hall staff to have your meal sent to your location. WHEN ARE THE LUNCHEONS? Your luncheon will begin 10-20 minutes after your last morning session. It will end no later than 1:45PM to give you plenty of time to get to your next sessions. Please be considerate of the class coming in and clean up signs that there was a lunch in that room. SOUND LIKE FUN? Please make sure you sign up in advance for the luncheon at registration. We want the kitchen to be able to plan for food delivery. But, if you decide last minute you want to join a lunch, feel free to peek in and see if there is room for you.

MONDAY LUNCHEONS: LUNCH WITH AFFINITY GROUPS:

NEW AND NEWER EDUCATIONAL DIRECTORS Davis Hall 209 Hosted by PJ Schwartz and Liz Singer

EXPERIENCED PRINCIPALS INCLUDING THOSE IN THE MBA TRACK Davis Hall 203 Hosted by Amy Ripps and Marna Meyer EARLY CHILDHOOD TEACHERS Davis Hall 201 Hosted by Julie Plaut Warwick and Emily Aronoff Teck HEBREW SPEAKERS Student Center 215 Hosted by Malka Sansani and Tirtza Kohan

LUNCHES WITH DISCUSSION TOPICS:

MUSSAR FOR WORKING MOMS AND DADS Hosted by Yohanna Kinberg Devis Hall 211


48 FOUNDING MOTHERS: FORTY YEARS OF JEWISH FEMINISM Davis Hall 111 Hosted by Jonathan Wolf JEWISH KHAN ACADEMY: EDUCATION – ANYWHERE, ANYTIME, ANYBODY Student Center 322 Hosted by Nachum Amsel ISRAEL EDUCATION IS AN ‘IN-TENTS’ EXPERIENCE Hosted by Michal Morris Kamil Student Center 323 SONG SWAP: Teens And Adults Davis Hall 208 Hosted by Susan Shane Linder

LUNCH AND LEARN FOODAISM: TEACHING REAL JEWS WHO EAT REAL FOOD Faculty Dining room (back of the dining hall) Hosted By Michael Rothbaum

TUESDAY LUNCHEONS LUNCH WITH AFFINITY GROUPS: CONSERVATIVE EDUCATORS: MEET WITH OTHERS WHO WORK IN CONSERVATIVE SYNAGOGUES AND SCHOOLS Davis Hall 111 REFORM EDUCATORS: MEET WITH OTHERS WHO WORK IN REFORM SYNAGOGUES AND SCHOOLS Student Center 323 RABBIS AND CANTORS: MEET WITH OTHER CLERGY WHO HAVE AN INTEREST IN JEWISH EDUCATION Hall Davis 211

LUNCH WITH DISCUSSIONS TOPICS: LEANING IN: JEWISH WOMEN AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Davis Hall 103 Hosted By Yohanna Kinberg


49 IS INTERMARRIAGE A 4 LETTER WORD? Davis Hall 201 Hosted by Leah Wolff-Pellingra, Alison Westermann, Liz Singer SO YOU WANT TO BE A RABBI? Davis Hall 209 Hosted by Daniel Price, Abby Eisenberg, Jeff Schein. EXPERIENTIAL EDUCATION: A FOLLOW-UP DISCUSSION TO MONDAY NIGHT’S PANEL WITH DAVID BRYFMAN AND DANIEL LEHMANN Student Center 322 Hosted by Mark Young and Chava Carlise Rausch A NATIONAL ADVOCACY AGENDA FOR JEWISH EDUCATION Hosted by Eitan Gutin, David Steiner Davis Hall 203 CONFESSIONS OF AN AMERICAN EXPAT Hosted by Lisa Lipkin Student Center 215 SONG SWAP: Early Childhood and Elementary Davis Hall 208 Hosted by Various Musicians

LUNCH AND LEARN

Host and subject TBD Faculty Dining room (back of the dining hall)

YOUNG PROFESSIONALS PROGRAM WHO ARE THE YOUNG PROFESSIONALS? The Young Professionals come from every denomination, every possible work setting, and a wide geographic distribution. They are under 42 years old. This number reflects the fact that many of them are entering the field as rabbis, cantors, graduates of Master’s and Doctoral Programs so they don’t develop in their full-time positions until their 30’s. We hope the experienced educators will reach out to the Young Professionals and the Young Professionals to the experienced educators at this conference. Let us learn from each other and work together to create a NewCAJE.


50 YOUNG PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES During the conference there are two official meet-ups. The first is Sunday night dinner, and before the concert at the high school. The second is Tuesday durring dinner. Both will be held in the faculty dining hall, at the back of the room. For the full post-conference leadership retreat schedule, see Wednesday and Thursday schedules in this book.

INTENSIVES Before and after the conference, some participants and local community members will spend seven hours exploring a myriad of subjects with great scholars. It is still possible to reserve a place at these Intensives – see the Conference Office for sign up information. PRE-CONFERENCE INTENSIVES - SUNDAY, JULY 28TH, 9AM-3PM: MITKADEM & MITKADEM DIGITAL TRAINING INSTITUTE Marlene Myerson & Joan Carr Student Center 210 TOWARDS BOTH/AND: JEWISH EDUCATION THAT HONORS BOTH CHILDREN AND THEIR PARENTS Jeffrey Schein Student Center 322 THE SPIRITUAL LIVES OF CHILDREN Deborah Schein & Michael Shire

Davis Hall 111

HOW TO TEACH BIBLE AND GUARANTEE INVOLVING ALL YOUR STUDENTS: USING THE INNOVATIVE TECHNIQUES OF NECHAMA LEIBOWITZ Nachum Amsel Student Center 323 LOOK MOM, NO CAPO: A GUITAR MASTER CLASS FOR SONGLEADERS Eric Komar Davis Hall 208 BEYOND MARKERS AND GLUE STICKS: INCORPORATING NEWER ARTS MATERIALS INTO YOUR CURRICULUM Susan Eiseman Levitin Chapel Basement - Art Room INTRODUCTION TO CREATING A TEACHER-FRIENDLY ONLINE COMMUNITY OF PRACTICE (CoP) FOR SELECTED COMPLEMENTARY AND DAY SCHOOL STAFF Richard Solomon & Elaine Solomon Davis Hall 109


51 POST-CONFERENCE INTENSIVES 1/2 WEDNESDAY 2-6PM, 1/2 THURSDAY 9AM-1PM BECOME AN EXCELLENT HEBREW/PRAYER TEACHER Joel Grishaver Student Center 322 REVISIONING B’NAI MITZVAH THROUGH A SPIRITUAL LENS: NEW PRINCIPLES, METHODS & MATERIALS Goldie Milgram Student Center 215 ANCIENT ISRAEL COMES TO BOSTON: THE DEAD SEA SCROLLS AND ARCHEOLOGY Everett Fox Wednesday: Student Center 323; Thursday at the Museum of Science, Boston USING FILM IN THE CLASSROOM: THE AMERICAN JEWISH EXPERIENCE THROUGH FILM Eric A. Goldman Student Center 210 HINEH MA TOV: VALUES & CHALLENGES OF JEWISH PLURALISM Jon Wolf Davis Hall 203


SUNDAY

52

SCHEDULE OVERVIEW

SUNDAY, JULY 28th 2013 7:30AM------------------------------------------Shacharit 10:00AM-6:00PM-------------------------------Check-In 9:00AM-3:00PM--------------Pre-conference Intensives 12:00-5:45PM------------------------------Exhibitor Area 12:00-1:00PM---------------------------------------Lunch 2:00-5:00PM--------------------------------Workshop 1A 2:00-3:30PM--------------------------------Workshop 1B 3:30-4:00PM-----------------------------------------Break 4:00-5:30PM--------------------------------Workshop 1C 5:45-6:30PM------------------------Opening Ceremonies 6:30-7:45PM----------------------------------------Dinner 7:30PM----------------Start boarding Shuttles to Theater 8PM---------------------------------------Mincha/Ma’ariv 8:15-10:15PM--------------------------Evening Programs 10:45PM-?---------------------------Late Night Programs


2-5PM & 2-3:30PM

2-5PM

DECODING THE SQUIGGLES: TORAH TROPE Student Center 215 Neil Schwartz What are the functions of those extra squiggles we see in Biblical texts? How do they show us punctuation and accents in addition to the chanted motifs? Come learn how the graphic symbols of Trope are used to show meaning in our ancient Torah texts and how that meaning is expressed through Biblical Cantillation. We will study some basic Hebrew grammar that helps decode the Torah scroll and the music motifs of Ta’amei HaMikra for Ashkenazic Torah chant. Lots of handouts - please bring a thumb-drive. Our goal is to learn to chant the six most common Torah Trope segments during this three-hour workshop. Neal’s workshop in part is based on work available for sale from TropeTrainer (Kinnor Software).

WORKSHOP 1B

2-3:30PM

SEVEN VALUES, YOUR WAY Davis Hall 203 Emilia Diamant Use TV shows, movies, music, internet memes, and more in your classroom because they are some of the best vehicles to teach teens about Jewish values. Yes, I said Jewish values. Come to talk about ways to use pop culture in your classroom, and see a few examples of successful lesson plans. Bring ideas and questions!

HOLIDAY HIGHS: CREATING HIGH HOLIDAY SERVICES FOR YOUNG FAMILIES THAT TEACH AND INSPIRE Davis Hall 201 Treasure Cohen Through prayers, props, and puppet “sermons,” This workshop will help educators and service leaders connect young children to the essence and spirit of Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur services. We will focus both on content—songs, symbols, sign language, “Birthday of the World” prop box, rituals, and liturgy— as well as the logistics of dealing with space, crowds, and timing. The goal is to create a service for young families that is uplifting, engaging, developmentally-appropriate, and authentic to the meaning and spirit of the holidays. A CD of this High Holiday music is available for purchase.

SUNDAY

WORKSHOP 1A

53


SUNDAY

54

2-3:30PM

WORDS TAKING WING (CREATING COMMUNAL PRAYER IN SONG) Davis Hall 211 Helene Kates Experience the power of the songwriting circle. We’ll create by listening, leaving space for each other’s ideas and integrating individual voices into the whole as we give forth to our communal prayer and sing unto G-d a new song. A CD of Helene’s music is available for purchase. BEST PRACTICES OF TEFILLAH-BASED HEBREW Davis Hall 101 Jeri Robins In this workshop, I will present my recent master’s thesis research on the history of Hebrew education and why Hebrew continues to matter in supplementary religious schools, even as the time allotted for teaching is reduced. This workshop will discuss research on Tefillah-based Hebrew education, share best practices, and provide a forum to develop new ideas. JEWISH TIME TRAVEL IN FIVE EASY STEPS Davis Hall 209 Etta King Real-life stories about American Jews, captured in letters, photographs, and other historical artifacts, inspire students to make explicit connections between their own lives, their passions and concerns, and the experiences of those that came before. In this workshop, we will “go back in time” in order to expand your understanding of Jewish text study and practice strategies for teaching about Jewish values, identity, and social justice. This session will focus on American Jewish stories from the 1880’s through today. This material is suitable for older elementary age students through adults. You’ll leave this dynamic and interactive session with an arsenal of new ideas and resources that will excite your students and enliven your classroom. TEACHER SURVIVAL WORKSHOP Davis Hall 205 Amy Ripps Join a veteran Jewish educator for a practical session on the opportunities and challenges faced by teachers in synagogue settings – from kindergarten through adult ed classes. Topics include planning innovative lessons, organizing your time and classroom, creating inviting learning environments, working with parents and more. Presented in a useful and direct “top 10” format, this session will provide teachers with some basic tools needed for a successful school year. NEWCAJE ORIENTATION %BWJT)BMM      /FX$"+&4UBČ Your first time at NewCAJE? Come meet other first timers, learn how to pick sessions, and get answers to all your questions!


55

2-3:30PM & 4-5:30PM

WORKSHOP 1C

4-5:30PM

HOW TO NOT HAVE THE ADMINISTRATIVE DETAILS BOG YOU DOWN Davis Hall 111 Joyce Siegel As a new Hebrew School principal, the administrative details of running a school can be daunting. This session will deal with ways to make the administrative details seem less overwhelming and allow you to do the things you really want to do like interacting with the students and families. This will be an interactive session where we can share our ideas, the problems we’ve faced and hopefully some of the difficulties we’ve overcome. PROJECT MANAGEMENT Student Center 210 Leonard Samborowski Have you ever started planning for an event or program and been overwhelmed by the details? What’s the best way to stick to the timeline and budget? In this session, participants will be exposed to the fundamentals of project management through lecture, discussion and practical exercise to help guide you efficiently and effectively through a project. The instructor will use his experience in the U.S. military and as a business consultant to describe critical aspects and characteristics of project management. Recent technological innovations will be explored in regards to their potential impact in facilitating projects. A practical exercise will be utilized to illustrate key discussion points.

SUNDAY

V’ASU TZEDAKA: JEWISH ACTIVISM IN YOUR HOME, CONGREGATION, CAMPUS, JCC, AND COMMUNITY Davis Hall 103 Jonathan Wolf ‘Social Justice’ and ‘Tikun Olam’ by now are clichés constantly and carelessly tossed around in the Jewish world. But how can you create real social activism and volunteer hesed in your local Jewish institutions? We will study principles from Pirkei Avot, and then analyze strategies for educating and organizing on issues like environmentalism, homelessness and housing, endangered Jewish communities, rights of workers, defending Israel here and internationally, immigration, food and nutrition, human trafficking, and concerns in Israel including poverty, minorities, religious liberty, and progress toward peace. We’ll consider different organizing strategies that are currently used such as Mitzva Day and Hesed Fair, projects for singles, classes for teens and adults, public demonstrations, lobbying government, coalitions with other schools and synagogues, interfaith alliances, and holiday-connected celebrations, and will then survey a list of links to numerous activist Jewish organizations— all towards mobilizing Jews to actually help heal the world.


SUNDAY

56

4-5:30PM

SHIFTING THE PARADIGM FROM A RELIGIOUS SCHOOL CONTAINED IN A CONGREGATION SETTING TO ONE WITHOUT WALLS Davis Hall 203 Eyal Bor, Hana Bor Do you have families who cannot or will not come to a regular religious school setting due to traffic, extracurricular activities, different learning styles or lack of a carpool? This is a nation-wide dilemma facing supplemental religious schools. Our Baltimore based synagogue has been studying this issue for over six years. We have developed alternative methods to combat this predicament such as the use of Chavurot (groups) and satellite schools. The answer lies in being flexible, convenient and meeting the personal needs of families while concurrently providing a high caliber of learning with innovative, hands-on multi-sensory teaching methods. By attending this session, you will learn how to duplicate these approaches. REASONS FOR THE COMMANDMENTS Davis Hall 205 Michael Pitkowsky One of the most common words found in our Jewish vocabulary is “commandment.” We use it in both ritual and teaching contexts, reciting blessings that speak of having been “sanctified by [God’s] commandments” or speaking about “observing the commandments,” but what do we mean when use this word? To begin with, how do we understand the belief that God is commanding us? Is it even necessary to believe in a “commander” in order to observe the commandments? For close to two thousand years Jews have given reasons for the commandments (ta’amei ha-mitzvot), explaining them by using rationalistic, mystical, or symbolic justifications. While giving reasons for the commandments has been frequently done, what happens when we are unable to give a satisfying explanation for a commandment? Are these commandments less important? In this session we’ll address these issues and how they relate to use as Jewish educators and learners. IN THE TENT OF ABRAHAM Davis Hall 202 Janie Grackin This dynamic, transformational and fun workshop offers energetic, interactive and insightful explorations of Torah text for every age group by combining innovative curricula. Participants will learn new techniques to involve students of all ages and infuse their classrooms and study sessions with excitement and fun! Teachers and clergy will leave with new tools of engagement for the classroom and Family Life Education programs.


4-5:30PM

57

INTIMATE TORAH FOR TODAY Davis Hall 103 Steven Bayar Whose fault was the expulsion from Eden? Why did Abraham need Lot to accompany him? Did Isaac make it off the altar? Did Jacob really steal the blessing from Esau? A close reading of these texts can yield new insights into how we learn Torah and how Torah can be a guide even in our modern age. In this workshop we will explore the P’shat (literal meaning of the text) and what these stories may have been meant to teach us. EMUNAH: SPIRITUALITY, IMAGERY, AND OLD TIME MUSIC 4UVEFOU$FOUFS   %POJ;BTMPČ &SJD-JOECFSH This musical workshop will explore spirituality through old time music and give teachers a chance to use imagery and universal themes of life to enhance the experience of prayers in their classroom. The Mama Doni Band traditionally geared their music to young children but these songs represent a step forward for them as they include an adult audience too as they infuse sounds of Bluegrass, Old Time, and Celtic style music into traditional Jewish songs and prayers. Come and learn more about these intriguing connections between music and prayer. A CD of Mama Doni’s music is available for sale. MAKING MIDRASH PERSONAL Davis Hall 101 Tziona Szajman There are 70 faces to Torah. The Torah is meant to be interpreted anew in each generation and by each individual. We call the process midrash. This class will explore a variety of simple artistic techniques from yoga to handmade paper midrash that allow students to reach beyond analysis to deep personal connections to Torah.

SUNDAY

WHEN I STUDY, GOD TALKS TO ME: TEACHING TEXTS TO UPPER ELEMENTARY AND MIDDLE SCHOOL STUDENTS ‘WARTS AND ALL’ Academy Hall 207 Deborah Goldstein, Cathy Kaplan For centuries text study has been an integral part of Jewish learning and worship. And yet, to many of our students even basic texts like Torah and Tanakh are less familiar to them than Hunger Games or Harry Potter. It doesn’t have to be that way. Come explore ways of introducing texts as basic as the Genesis story of Creation and as complex as the Prophets to children as young as 3rd grade and as old as 8th. How do we approach text? What are our concerns? What holds us back and what can propel us forward? Using a variety of translations, let’s study together and in the process find ways to bring the joy of text study to our students.


SUNDAY

58

4-5:30PM

NEWCAJE CHORALE (session 1 of 3) Davis Hall 208 Ellen Allard Join Ellen Allard’s NewCAJE Chorale and participate in a group choral experience that will engage everyone, singers AND audience alike. Our rehearsals will culminate in an uplifting performance on the final night of the conference. WRITE YOUR (JEWISH EDUCATOR) SOUL Davis Hall 211 Samantha Libby Think you can’t write? Do you dread trying to get the words out? Fear not! Writing is a powerful tool for self-awareness and refinement of goals, both personal and professional. Through a series of exercises, writing practice and group sharing, Samantha Libby will help you to connect your pen to your brain and the page to your life. Figuring out who we are as spiritual beings, and as educators, is essential for growth and development in Jewish (or any) education, and for living a full and vibrant life. Come free yourself with a notebook and pen. A NEW MODEL FOR ONLINE LEARNING Davis Hall 109 David Schwarz In this introduction to the Behrman House Online Learning Center (OLC) you will learn why over 350 education directors have set up schools in Behrman House’s new platform, the benefits their students experience with online practice, the ready-to-go resources their teachers find valuable to post, and challenges education directors face in getting everyone on board. Join David Schwarz, Behrman House’s lead OLC consultant for a live demo of an active, engaged class. This session uses materials that are for sale.

YOU DON’T HAVE TO BE JEWISH: USING SECULAR CHILDRENS’ LITERATURE TO TEACH JEWISH VALUES IN THE EARLY CHILDHOOD SETTING Davis Hall 201 Sharon Cores It has been suggested that we are in the midst of a golden age of childrens’ literature. From Dr Seuss to Eric Carle, colorful and engaging books introduce characters and concepts to which young children easily relate. The early childhood teacher can use secular books to introduce and reinforce Jewish values such as tzedakah (charity), lashon hara (gossiping) and tza’ar ba’alei chayyim (caring for animals). We will look at both typically Jewish and secular children’s books that present Jewish values and work together to prepare a curriculum web and lesson plan. Individual and group creative activities will give participants ideas to take back to their own classrooms.


4-5:30PM

59

PROJECT BASED LEARNING: MAKING JEWISH LEARNING AUTHENTIC AND RELEVANT Davis Hall 207 Ronni Ticker Project Learning is one of the newest “fads” in education. What is it? How does it work in a Jewish setting? What are the particular challenges in a part time Jewish Congregational School? Interested in deepening your students’ engagement with their Jewish learning? This workshop will look at how to use this tool to make Jewish learning authentic, real and relevant to your students’ lives. GOD IN OUR RELATIONSHIPS: USING HASIDIC STORIES TO TEACH MARTIN BUBER’S I-THOU RELATIONSHIP Academy Hall 206 Dennis Ross Bringing teens to recognize that God exists in our relationships with others is a wonderful way to introduce an important Jewish personality and idea. Certainly, Martin Buber’s I-Thou relationship is a simple and common occurrence - but it is not very widely understood. This workshop will rely on Martin Buber’s Tales of the Hasidim as well as daily experience, clear examples and plain language to explore Buber’s profound teachings of the I-Thou relationship, the I-It relationship and the Eternal Thou. Dennis Ross’s book on this subject is for sale from Jewish Lights publishing.

Opening Ceremonies

5:45-6:30PM

Dining Hall Join us for a first look around to see who’s at the conference! Please come to the dining hall immediately after your last class and be seated. Music, Introductions, Blessings, and a Welcome by NewCAJE President Cherie Koller-Fox.

SUNDAY

GAMES, STORIES, AND SONG: FINDING MOMENTS OF MEANING IN JEWISH PRAYER Davis Hall 209 Eliana Light It is easiest to learn how to say prayers through repetition, through hearing them over and over. But how do we learn about prayers? Come learn how to bring thoughtfulness, creativity, fun, and meaning into any prayer service settings. We will experience some of these programs ourselves, as well and learn techniques to create programs of our own! This is perfect for anyone who runs t’fillah services and programs, or who wants to learn creative methods of teaching Jewish content. A CD of Eliana’s music is available for purchase.


SUNDAY

60

EVENING PROGRAMS

SUNDAY NIGHT CONCERT 8:15-10:15PM

Dudley Middle School 68 Dudley Oxford Rd, Dudley, MA 01571 Join us for a wonderful night of music, story, comedy and more!

With: Bob Alper, MC Sue Horowitz New Voices Winners: Naomi Less Eliana Light Alison Westermann &NJMZ"SPOPČ5FDL %POJ;BTMPČBOE&SJD-JOECFSH Eric Komar Cherie Karo-Schwartz Jon Nelson Band +FČ,MFQQFS


61

KUMSITZ

Student Center Lounge

After evening programming there will be an open Kumsitz – a musical party of melodies and mayhem. Bring your guitars, drums, voices, and spirits and come laugh and play! Join us and the other non-sleepers in the Student Center Lounge.

SEEKING PEACE THROUGH LAUGHTER!

Library

Julie Plaut Warwick

Imagine the entire world laughing, what a peaceful world that would be. Laughter yoga is a health craze that is spreading worldwide. The goal is to promote peace. Come and laugh with Julie Plaut Warwick, certified laughter yoga leader. Laughter Yoga combines unconditional laughter with yogic breathing and meditation. The health benefits include reduction of stress, anxiety, heart disease, aches and pains, etc. and it Increases productivity, self-confidence, connection and above all Peace. Before you go to bed, make sure you laugh!

SUNDAY

LATE NIGHT PROGRAMS: 10:45PM


62

SCHEDULE OVERVIEW

MONDAY

MONDAY, JULY 29th 2013 7:15AM------------------------------------------Shacharit 8:00-9:00AM------------------------------------Breakfast 9:15-12:15AM------------------------------Workshop 2A 9:00-10:30AM------------------------------Workshop 2B 10:00AM-12:45PM-------------Morning Exhibitor Area 10:30-11:00AM--------------------------------------Break 11:00AM-12:30PM-------------------------Workshop 2C 12:15-1:45PM---------------------------------------Lunch 12:45-1:45PM----------------------------------Luncheons 2:00-6:00PM-------------------Afternoon Exhibitor Area 2:15-5:15PM--------------------------------Workshop 3A 2:00-3:30PM--------------------------------Workshop 3B 3:30-4:00PM-----------------------------------------Break 4:00-5:30PM--------------------------------Workshop 3C 5:30-6:00PM--------------Experiential Ed Study Groups 6:05PM--------------------------------------------Mincha 6:00-7:15PM----------------------------------------Dinner 7:15-7:30PM---------Honoring PJ Library & Grinspoon 7:30-8:30PM----------------------Experiential Ed Debate 8:30-8:50PM---------------------Surprise Skype Concert 8:50PM---------------------------------------------Ma’ariv 9:00-9:45PM-----------------------Interactive Festival 1A 10:00-10:45PM---------------------Interactive Festival 1B 11:00PM-?---------------------------Late Night Programs


8-8:45AM & 9:15AM-12:15PM

PRE-WORKSHOP

63

8-8:45AM

WORKSHOP 2A

9:15AM-12:15PM

COMMUNICATION - ACTIVE LISTENING Student Center 215 Mitch Gordon Musicians, as a core fundamental part of music making, have developed a strong skill of listening. This workshop weaves this skill into the arena of synagogue leadership, problem solving and conflict resolution. We have been taught to listen but not taught to hear. We habitually listen to agree. This workshop will teach you to listen to understand. Replace old habits with new ones and see what a difference active listening can make for you, your synagogue, and your success.

TORAH IN BLACK & WHITE: THE WORLD OF THE SOFER Davis Hall 103 Kevin Hale This workshop focuses on the 613th commandment to “write this song for yourselves,” the mitzvah for each of us to write a torah. Come learn about the ancient tools, materials, practices and rituals that go into this sacred craft, and a handson approach to teaching about the torah scroll. In the first half of the workshop we will visit the world of the torah scribe and learn about the current state of the Jewish scribal world. In the second half, we will practice a classic Ashkenazi torah script and get a taste of a day in the life of a sofer. Lettering sheets and supplemental materials will be provided that can be used to share this experience of “ketivat sefer torah” with the next generation of torah scribes!

MONDAY

MY SOUL THIRSTS FOR GOD: PRAYERFUL WALKS & TEXT STUDY IN NATURE Dining Hall Entrance Goldie Milgram We will leave promptly for a moderately-paced contemplative prayer walk in nature. Drawing upon sacred texts from Chumash and Siddur on each of three of the 105 names, i.e., metaphors for God in our tradition: Rock, Water and Cloud, we will explore the Rambam’s thesis in Hilchot Yesodei HaTorah, where he poses the question, “What is the path to attain love and awe [of God]?” He then explains that when a person contemplates creation we become full of love and praise and a great longing to immerse in awareness of the fullness of God as intended by “the Great Name”. He ends this poetic halachah by quoting King David: “My soul thirsts for God” (Tehillim 42:3).


MONDAY

64

9:15AM-12:15PM & 9-10:30AM

INTRODUCTION TO IMPLEMENTING TECHNOLOGY IN THE CLASSROOM Davis Hall 109 Jonathan Friesem In our digital era, Jewish education needs to be aligned with the general movement toward implementing technology into the educational system. This workshop will allow educators without technological background to explore the possibilities of supporting their teaching using digital tools. After a short overview of the theoretical background, the participants will group up to explore different ways to use digital media literacies in order to redefine their lesson plans and curriculum. During the three hour workshop, participants will be able to examine the possibilities and reflect upon their needs in their specific educational setting. The purpose is to explore new ways in which accessible, affordable, and safe use of digital media in the class can allow the students to be engaged and learn about the connection of Jewish values with the digital revolution.

WORKSHOP 2B

9-10:30AM

THE ROLE OF VISION IN THE WORK OF A JEWISH PRINCIPAL %BWJT)BMM      +FČSFZ4DIFJO New Principals Seminar: Role of Vision. “If you don’t know where you are going, any road will get you there.” Often enough Jewish schools move forward without rudder or compass. This workshop explores the value and functions of an educational vision for the school the educator directs. It also suggests some tools and resources for developing your own educational vision. A NEW LOOK AT JEWISH LIFE THROUGH THE BINOCULAR OF NATURE Davis Hall 101 Gavriel Goldman This is a fun session that also offers a very different look at Jewish practice and tradition through the eyes of nature. Nature themes are woven throughout our Biblical stories, holiday traditions, prayers, history and many of the mitzvot. Participants will explore such topics as: why we eat apples, potatoes and horseradish on holidays; what plant was the Burning Bush; why kosher animals have a split hoof and chew the cud (and what that means). Participants will also learn how to use hands-on nature crafts to teach about Judaism by making mitzvah bracelets from palm leaves; hand dipped Shabbat candles; natural sukkah decorations; nature collage prayers; and more. This session is for teachers looking for new teaching ideas, for nature lovers and for all who enjoy learning something different. Part of this session will take place outdoors weather permitting.


9-10:30AM

65

AVADIM HAYINU: DANCE YOUR WAY TO FREEDOM THROUGH THE HOLIDAYS! Davis Hall 208 Aliya Cheskis-Cotel Dance your way through the holiday cycle with new dances for the Yamim Noraim (Days of Awe), Chanuka, Tu B’Shvat, Purim, Pesach, Yom Ha’atzmaut, Shavuot, Shabbat, and Hallel (Psalms of Praise). Come kick up your heels and add rhythmic, simple, and fun folk dances to your holidays. Guaranteed to get adults and children on their feet with enthusiasm. Use for teaching or for pure enjoyment! SING IT! SAY IT! STAMP IT! SWAY IT! Davis Hall 201 Ellen Allard Join composer and Early Childhood Music Specialist Ellen Allard for a lively, entertaining, and dynamic musical workshop. You will sing and dance and laugh and cry! You will explore the wonderful world of music for young children and you will learn why it is so important to develop and nurture singing classrooms. Ellen shares her exciting repertoire of developmentally-appropriate songs, chants, fingerplays and singing games and inspires you to return to your schools committed to making music a regular part of each and every day. Ellen’s music is available for purchase. TEACHING TORAH WITH JUDAIC ART Chapel Basement Art Room Cindy Quitt This workshop will focus on a series of original, creative art projects that make learning about Judaism both memorable and joyful. The lesson plans and projects will include paper collage, drawing, mosaics, and clay techniques. The topics will include Shabbat Shirah, Mitzvot, and Tzedakah. A hands on project will be completed by each participant.

MONDAY

THE ‘HI’LIGHT OF THE DAY: GREETINGS AT THE DOOR Davis Hall 202 Anne Andrew Inspired by Ron Wolfson’s “Spirituality of Welcoming”, Temple Sholom Religious School in Vancouver, BC has developed a greetings program, run by its madrichim. When the students arrive at the steps of the synagogue they participate in a fun activity inspired by the Torah portion or an upcoming festival. This session is for you if you would like your students to start the day happy and on time! Participants will take away a list of ideas for greeting activities and will have the opportunity to contribute ideas as well.


66

9-10:30AM

MONDAY

WHISPERS OF SHEMA Davis Hall 211 Helene Kates Learn tools to help your students connect with Kavannah to the Shema and other prayers. In this interactive session we will use song, movement and meditation to develop skills that can be brought into the classroom to help your students connect to prayer. Explore together the power of connection to a deeper part of ourselves. This is a method that works across learning styles and levels and has had great success with children with ADHD and Autism. A CD of Helen’s music is available for purchase. LEARN TO READ HEBREW AT NEWCAJE! (Part 1) Academy Hall 206 Eyal Rav-Noy If you are not a Hebrew reader but would like to be, take this 3 part workshop. Using a reading method developed by CAP IT! and our book, flash cards, and our unique “Tactile Visual Mnemonics,” you will learn how to decipher letters and vowels, and read accurately in these four and a half hours. If you are interested in learning more about this method, you are welcome to observe our class. JEWISH IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT AND MORAL DECISION MAKING: WHERE ETHICS MEETS HISTORY Davis Hall 209 Jan Darsa This session will explore identity development as we consider how a Jewish identity shapes the way we see ourselves as well as the way we are perceived by others. From the biblical story of Moses’ encounter with the divine to our own questioning of who we are, we will draw upon our sacred sources to explore contemporary questions of being a Jew in the modern world. Participants will be introduced to Facing History’s latest resource – “Sacred Texts, Modern Questions: Connecting Ethics and History Through A Jewish Lens” --which integrates biblical, rabbinic and other Jewish sources into modern day questions and dilemmas that relate to students’ lives today. Jan Darsa has written a book on this subject that is for sale. HOW FAR DOES THE APPLE FALL? SHARING FAMILY STORIES Academy Hall 207 Etta King Learn how to take family history projects beyond the time-line and the tree to encourage young Jews to build deep, meaningful relationships with older relatives and establish a strong foundation for their Jewish identities. Learn how to conduct an oral history interview and see how other educators have done oral history projects in their schools or communities. Don’t expect to sit on the sidelines: come ready to share your story!


9-10:30AM

67

YOUR FLIGHT TO TEL AVIV IS NOW BOARDING: IMPACTFUL EDUCATIONAL TRAVEL TO ISRAEL Student Center 323 Ira Dounn, Rachel Meytin Many communities sponsor Israel trips, but how do we build on their experience when they arrive home? How can they best share what they’ve learned and experienced with other members of your community? We’ll explore a technique developed for BBYO’s International Leadership Seminar in Israel (ILSI), providing an educational and leadership experience for teens in Israel that did not end in Ben Gurion airport. Using Hillel’s Ask Big Questions methodology and a focus on Jewish leaders in history, teens were empowered to create programs that would allow their peers back home to have personal, meaningful, and engaging exposure to Israel. We’ll pull apart the key components and get you started on creating an experience for your community. JEWISH WISDOM IMBUED IN WORLD STORIES AND FOLK MOTIFS Student Center 322 Sarah Sinofsky Humans have so many shared myths; origin stories, great floods, emancipating prophets. As Jews, we can either be threatened by a shared history that might exceed our own time-line, or we can embrace the universal truths of the stories shared and find the Jewish lining within them. Whether we adapt a familiar tale so that Wendy, Michael, and John fly off with Pinchas Pan to the Promised Land to see the Maccabees battle for freedom, or draw parallels between Pinocchio and Jonah, it is almost too easy to bring Judaism into the world of storytelling. OUR LOVE-HATE RELATIONSHIP WITH JEWISH TEENS Davis Hall 203 David Bryfman Jewish teens are an enigmatic species in the world of Jewish education. On one hand we want to engage them in our Jewish world, and on the other hand we really just don’t get where they’re coming from and how they truly reflect the radically changing 21st century world in which we live. Together we can learn about and strategize about how to engage our post Bnei Mitzvah Jewish youth.

MONDAY

HOW TO EFFECTIVELY TEACH JEWISH HISTORY IN THE 21ST CENTURY AND MAKE IT EXCITING AND INTERACTIVE Student Center 210 Nachum Amsel Most Jewish history has traditionally been taught in as boring a manner as possible, with a litany of dates, places, and names. The Destiny Foundation’s goal is to “bring Jewish history to life” by using original video clips, moral dilemmas, and providing students with tools to do their own exploration of Jewish history. Destiny’s new digital materials include lesson plans about each film clip we’ve collected: a) the twentieth century, including pre-Holocaust Germany and Europe, and the founding of the Israel b) a Survey Course on 70 topics from Ezra until today c) Current Events -- the challenges facing Israel and the real truth behind the headlines. Teachers will walk away with 19 free video clip lesson plans in hand. These and other materials are available for sale from the Destiny Foundation.


68

MONDAY

WORKSHOP 2C

11AM-12:30PM

11AM-12:30PM

CHANGE! HOW TO LIVE AND LEAD THROUGH PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL CHANGE Student Center 210 Jill Paul An interactive workshop that will introduce the cycle of change and your place in the evolving dynamics of this amazing and challenging time in Jewish education. Were you brought in to “make change” and now wonder what to really change and what to keep? Has your school been in a rut and you know it’s time for a change but don’t know how to go about it? We’ll discuss how build on the vision and manage the process of change. HOW TO EMBED REFLECTION INTO EXPERIENTIAL EDUCATION AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Davis Hall 111 Richard Solomon, Elaine Solomon Join our interactive and engaging workshop while we discuss and demonstrate how to embed field-tested reflection practices into both experiential education and professional development activities. Participants will experience, discuss, analyze and evaluate! BUT WE DON’T HAVE A LAKE! - HOW SYNAGOGUES CAN BE (AND ARE!) A SETTING FOR EXPERIENTIAL EDUCATION Davis Hall 207 Mark Young How can the school classroom become an experiential learning environment, doesn’t there need to be a lake or sleeping bags? This interactive session will engage participants in a conversation of the multiple ingredients of Jewish Experiential Education, and how these ingredients, often seen in the stew of non-classroom environments (ex: camp, youth group, Israel-trips) can be successfully incorporated into our religious school environments to help reach the goals we have as Jewish educators. The session will draw from components of The Davidson School at JTS’ rich research and programs, including its recently launched Master’s degree program in Jewish Experiential Education. TEACHING TORAH FOR MEANING Student Center 322 Joel Grishaver Joel has been creating tools for creatively teaching Torah for forty years. In this workshop he will share a number of his and other peoples’ innovations. We will look at Being Torah, Torah Toons, God-Talk, Storahtelling, Bibliodrama, The Internet, Project based learning and a lot of other ways of getting students to “make-meaning” out of a Biblical text. This workshop uses materials that are available for sale from Torah Aura.


11AM-12:30PM

69

NEW MUSIC AND VISUAL PRAYER- A SPIRITUAL AND VIBRANT PARTNERSHIP Davis Hall 208 Sue Horowitz, EJ Cohen Explore and experience: new Jewish music by singer-songwriter Sue Horowitz and the signing of interpreter EJ Cohen. Learn how using visual prayer can enhance and beautify your services and music classes. Handouts will include sheet music to take home to your communities. Singer and non-singer, signer and non-signer- all are welcome. A CD of Sue’s music is available for purchase.

FROM SHOW AND TELL TO SHEHEKHEEYANU: NURTURING A SENSE OF HOLINESS IN YOUNG CHILDREN (Preschool through 3rd grade) Davis Hall 201 Treasure Cohen Young children bubble with natural spirit and wonder, and see the extraordinary in everyday events. In a Jewish school environment, teachers can nurture spiritual development along with every other kind of growth while connecting children to the awe, celebration, and sense of holiness that are an intrinsic part of our Jewish tradition. In this workshop we will explore the importance of preschool/ primary school rituals, activities, and relationships, and central role the teacher plays as the role model for her students. ONE STUDENT AT A TIME: DIFFERENTIATED HEBREW INSTRUCTION Davis Hall 203 Joan Carr One of the most difficult challenges Hebrew teachers face is that their classrooms are filled with students with many different learning styles and needs. During this workshop, we will be identifying some of the ways in which teachers can adapt the curriculum to ensure that every student experiences success in the Hebrew classroom. While we will not be focusing on behavioral issues in this workshop, we will be providing resources that teachers can use to address the varied learning needs of their students. This session is based on the Mitkadem materials that are for sale by URJ Books and Music but you do not need to purchase anything for this workshop to be helpful.

MONDAY

REMEMBERING DEBBIE FRIEDMAN AND HER LEGACY OF SONG %BWJT)BMM      +FČ,MFQQFS I met Debbie (z”l) in 1969 and sang with her countless times over four decades. Her presence in my life was powerful and profound. Now, two and a half years after her passing, it is time to look back at her life and her music, and its meaning for us. Along with rare video clips, I will offer some thoughts about her music and her artistry. And, of course, we will sing some of her songs.


MONDAY

70

11AM-12:30PM

ISRAEL EDUCATION AND PROBLEM-BASED LEARNING Academy Hall 207 Deborah Miller, Debra Kerschner Project Etgar, a curriculum created especially for middle school students (Grades 6-8) in Conservative synagogue settings, builds on students’ prior knowledge and experiences while promoting new learning. It rejects the outmoded view that students are empty vessels passively waiting to be filled with knowledge and love of all things Jewish. Rather, by continually addressing their developmental needs, Etgar schools throughout the country use the material we’ve created to produce a positive, productive learning experience with a problem-solving approach (particularly suited to this age group) for a realistic, sophisticated, and in-depth study of the many challenges Israel faces today. The complexity of Israel is as compelling as the romanticism that usually surrounds Israel education. Participants will discuss the potential of learning about Israel in this way through distance learning student collaboration, which can provide even small numbers of students in widely separated geographic areas with the benefits of creative discussion. Our hope is that students will gain a well-rounded view of Israel’s wonders, her accomplishments and the difficulties she faces. The project Etgar curriculum is for sale to participating schools. A FOOT IN THE DOOR: GETTING THAT INTERVIEW Davis Hall 209 Eitan Gutin I have had to search for work four times in the past 11 years. Each time I finished the job search I had been the final candidate for more than one position and had came out of the search with at least one good job offer. Even though some of those jobs were a bad fit they have all led me to where I am today - working in a wonderful community with a contract that will keep me and my family stable for at least the next three years. This session will explore key strategies that I have used and choices that I have made that have gotten my foot in the door for interviews and eventual job offers. We will explore how to personalize every aspect of the job search process including deciphering ads, doing research, writing a cover letter, and preparing for job interviews. THE PROBLEM WITH SERVICE LEARNING Davis Hall 202 Emilia Diamant Service learning is many Jewish institutions’ answer to getting students involved with Social Justice. Studies have shown that while these can be formative experiences, it often leaves young people with more questions than answers. Going into a community to do “service” has serious implications about who we are as Jews and how we interact with the world around us. While there may be a place for hands on “service learning”, the model warrants serious critique. If you love, hate, or are indifferent to service learning, come talk about what might be wrong, what might work better, and how we can help the next generation of Jews work to change the world.


11AM-12:30PM

71

I CAN SEE CLEARLY NOW: UNDERSTANDING THE ‘LENSES’ THAT AFFECT OUR WORLD VIEW Academy Hall 206 Sam Glaser In this workshop, we will discuss how thoughts and moods, fears and inner negative beliefs color our outlook and the methodologies we can use to counter this negativity. During your time together, Sam will teach some profound insights that come from kabbalah and mussar coupled with music, visual aids and group sharing, I hope you will leave with a crucial set of life tools. These ideas are part of an 18 hour seminar called “The Possible You” that was originated by Sam’s brother, renowned Jerusalem-based teacher Rabbi Yom Tov Glaser that aims to create the space for participants to realize their unlimited potential.

JEWISH SPIRITUAL EDUCATION FOR YOURSELF AND YOUR STUDENTS Student Center 323 Goldie Milgram The world is a scary place and religious educators are dearly needed who can successfully convey the many profound and effective Jewish tools of survival for the human spirit--for the sake of our students, and for ourselves. Our students require more than an intellectual knowledge of Judaism acquired through text study; they seek real relationships with Jewish educators where they can deepen in the “Torah of Real Relationships.” In this session you will experience one full replicable unit of principles and practices for gently shifting from teaching mostly “about” to also “engaging meaningfully with” in ways that can help our students to “choose life.”

MONDAY

ACCESS TO JEWISH EDUCATION: SUPPORTING THE BELIEF THAT EVERY CHILD DESERVES A JEWISH EDUCATION Davis Hall 211 Sherry Grossman Gateways provides high quality special education services, expertise, and support to enable students with diverse learning needs to succeed in Jewish educational settings and participate meaningfully in Jewish life. In our strategic plan this year we agreed that …We value inclusion and the ideal that children with special needs should be able to go to the same schools as their siblings….the school(s) that their parents select…. It also means that we advocate, educate, consult, motivate, and even mandate actions that move our Jewish community closer to consistent and comprehensive Jewish education and care of all kinds of learners. Come find out more about what we do, why and how as a panel of our professionals offers perspectives on education for all in the Jewish community.


MONDAY

72

11AM-12:30PM & 12:45-1:45PM

TEENS AND TALES: STORY-ING WITH THE NEXT GENERATION Davis Hall 101 Cherie Karo Schwartz A Big Question: How do we hold on to our teens in kehillah after B’nai Mitzvah? How do we bring them in and bring them back? We are the People of the Story, so we can use this treasure-trove of 5000 years of our evolving Jewish story to hold their interest and encourage their involvement. Come hear and participate in some well-storied ideas for stories, storytelling, Devrei Torah, Torah discussions, personal story journeys, names explorations, improvisation, creative dramatics, story mitzvot. Share your program ideas, successes, and questions in this participatory workshop. Help us design new enriching synagogue activities to help grow the next shul generation! Come with imagination and heart, and leave with ideas and experiences galore!

LUNCHEONS MONDAY LUNCHEONS: LUNCH WITH AFFINITY GROUPS: NEW AND NEWER EDUCATIONAL DIRECTORS Davis Hall 209 Hosted by PJ Schwartz and Liz Singer EXPERIENCED PRINCIPALS INCLUDING THOSE IN THE MBA TRACK Davis Hall 203 Hosted by Amy Ripps and Marna Meyer EARLY CHILDHOOD TEACHERS Davis Hall 201 )PTUFECZ+VMJF1MBVU8BSXJDLBOE&NJMZ"SPOPČ5FDL HEBREW SPEAKERS Student Center 215 Hosted by Malka Sansani and Tirtza Kohan


12:45-1:45PM

73

LUNCHES WITH DISCUSSION TOPICS:

FOUNDING MOTHERS: FORTY YEARS OF JEWISH FEMINISM Davis Hall 111 Hosted by Jonathan Wolf In 1973, Jewish Student Network (which also spawned CAJE) organized a national Jewish Women’s Conference. Last month, Yeshivat Maharat graduated its first three Orthodox women clergy. In the course of those decades: have we come a long way, baby? We will examine advances and setbacks in such areas as women learning and teaching Talmud; public prayer, Torah reading, and ‘Partnership’ minyanim; bat mitzvah, simchat bat, and more-egalitarian weddings; and women as officers of synagogues, along with the slower progress in ending the problem of women whose husband’s won’t grant them a Jewish divorce. These issues affect all Jewish women and have been dealt with at one time or another in every denomination. Now, they are particularly affecting Orthodox women. How can we become informed on these matters and support our Orthodox sisters in this battle.

JEWISH KHAN ACADEMY: EDUCATION – ANYWHERE, ANYTIME, ANYBODY Student Center 322 Hosted by Nachum Amsel The Khan Academy provides a free education for anyone anywhere. Come and dream with us about the possibility of launching a similar project in Jewish education. If your school would like to be part of the new and exciting project on the cutting edge of 21st century engagement or you would like to be part of the teaching team, come have lunch and get in on the ground floor.

MONDAY

MUSSAR FOR WORKING MOMS AND DADS Hosted by Yohanna Kinberg Devis Hall 211 Finding a sense of work and life balance is especially difficult for Jewish professionals who are working parents. In this lunch, we will discuss how we can weave humility, patience and gratitude into our personal and professional lives so that we can build our internal strength. We know that our kids and our institution are probably not going to create that balance for us. We know that if we are not feeling balanced and healthy inside ourselves, little else in our lives will feel balanced or healthy. So come and meet with other jugglers!


MONDAY

74

12:45-1:45PM

ISRAEL EDUCATION IS AN ‘IN-TENTS’ EXPERIENCE Hosted by Michal Morris Kamil Student Center 323 Imagine our space as the inside of a tent were we come together to share bread and create a ‘real time’ engaging and dialogic community. At the end of our session we disperse to our ‘other’, diversified lives. This shared meeting space, “the Ohel” has been a metaphor in liturgy, prayer, narrative and conversation from the beginnings of our history as a Jewish people. Could the ‘tent’ be the perfect symbol of ‘Peoplehood’? What would the areas be for agreement and disagreement amongst Diaspora and Israeli Jews about the relevance and suitability of the ‘tent’ as a symbol? How do these differences of perspectives reflect the deeper differences about ‘Peoplehood’? Join us for what is guaranteed to be a lively, insightful and reflective discussion! SONG SWAP: TEENS AND ADULTS Davis Hall 208 Hosted by Various Musicians Bring your instruments and spend your lunch singing with friends and learning some new songs. If you don’t play an instrument or have no songs to share, you are still welcome to bring your lunch and sing with us!

LUNCH AND LEARN FOODAISM: TEACHING REAL JEWS WHO EAT REAL FOOD Faculty Dining room (back of the dining hall) Hosted By Michael Rothbaum Over lunch, lets study texts about food and Judaism. The cliche of the food-fixated Jewish bubbe in her kitchen is well-known to Jews and non-Jews alike. Jews’ obsession with food goes back to Jacob and Esau’s fight over a bowl of stew. There are other food narratives in the Torah; there are blessings (“the fat of the land”) and guidelines; the Talmud’s regulations for food preparation and brachot; Maimonides’ medical advice for how to balance our competing food appetites; and why Jews love Chinese food. Previous experience with eating required.


2:15-5:15PM

WORKSHOP 3A

2:15-5:15PM

75

INFUSING ISRAEL INTO YOUR COMMUNITY: CUTTING EDGE RESOURCES AND IDEAS Davis Hall 103 Lesley Litman Israel is an integral part of Jewish life and Jewish identity. As such it must be part of all aspects of Jewish learning, not just a course in 5th grade or an adult education offering. This highly interactive workshop will enable participants to examine where Israel can fit into their work as Jewish educators (in expected and unexpected ways) and will introduce exciting multi-media resources that can be readily used. TV STANDS FOR TORAH VALUES Davis Hall 207 Nachum Amsel After more than 30 years of teaching this methodology, Nachum Amsel’s program is still highly effective and currently used on 6 continents, with new movies and TV shows emerging every day. Teaching students Jewish Values is our most important goal, but most do not succeed and/or do not know how. If you want your students to internalize the Jewish values you choose, then attend this session. Many of today’s TV shows and movies present very real moral issues, and participants will learn how to harness this powerful medium and then do this near impossible task - through specific techniques that will be discussed. Participants will leave with practical examples and an understanding of the methodology that can be used immediately in ANY classroom or informal setting for students with any or no Jewish background, aged 10 to 100. Some video clips will be shown, never seen before at NewCAJE. Participants will leave with 2 videos and lesson plans to use immediately in their classrooms. These and other materials are available for sale from the Destiny Foundation.

MONDAY

ADVANCED IMPLEMENTATION OF TECHNOLOGY IN THE CLASSROOM Davis Hall 109 Jonathan Friesem Educators who are implementing technology in their classroom need nonstop updates and tech support. Engaging the student by using technology is highly challenging. This workshop will address the problems that tech savvy educators encounter in the classroom and then will offer different solutions. Using digital media literacy theory, the participants will be introduced to a pedagogical framework that connects the use of technology with Jewish values. The participants will work in small groups to look into the challenges as well as solutions that can be implemented in the classroom from the pedagogical and the technological perspective. The purpose of this workshop is to reflect upon the work that the educators have done so far and create an updated, accessible, and safe curriculum of Jewish studies for the future.


MONDAY

76

WORKSHOP 3B

2-3:30PM

2-3:30PM

JEWISH PARENTING AND NEW TECHNOLOGIES %BWJT)BMM      +FČSFZ4DIFJO Once language staked out the differences between Jewish immigrants who spoke Yiddish and their native-born English-speaking children. Today the generation gap plays itself out across social media and the internet with children far outpacing their parents in their ability to access these resources. This workshop treats Mark Prensky’s 2002 article that first coined the terms “digital natives” and “digital immigrants” as a springboard for dialogue and analysis. Participants will then dive into some of the creative resources being developed by Cleveland Jewish family educators to address these new challenges for Jewish life and learning. MENTORING LADDER FROM PRE-K THROUGH GRADUATE SCHOOL, TO TEACHING AND BEYOND Davis Hall 101 Richard Solomon, Elaine Solomon Join our interactive and engaging workshop while we discuss a seven stage mentoring ladder to empower Judaic students to become madrichim, Judaic Studies teachers, mentor teachers, and instructional leaders in complementary and day schools of the future. PARTNERS IN LEADERSHIP AND LEADERS IN PARTNERSHIP Student Center 210 Natasha Dresner For a school to be successful, its Board and school Director need to have a special partnership that requires team work and collaboration but, most importantly, clarity about each other’s roles and responsibilities. This highly interactive and participatory workshop is for school Directors as well as existing and incoming Board Presidents and members. Join us and take your next step towards becoming better leaders and partners. SINGIN’ SHACHARIT %BWJT)BMM     &NJMZ"SPOPČ5FDL This experiential workshop will model songs and strategies to engage young children with every day morning (Shacharit) prayers and themes inspired by that liturgy. We will focus on ideas in the prayers that can be, and already are, implemented in early childhood classrooms; be thankful, thoughtful, loving, use your words and ask for help. This set of prayer experiences will expose young children to the concepts and ideas that are foundational to an understanding of a many prayers. A planned, guided set of experiences organized around listening, singing, moving, breathing and learning with the following songs that will transmit knowledge of these themes to the student. Participants will be asked to discover their inner child as we pray, sing, dance, move and learn together. A CD of Emily’s music is available for purchase.


2-3:30PM

77

HIDDUR MITZVAH -BEAUTIFUL CONTENT IN THE CLASSROOM Davis Hall 111 Debi Swedelson Mishael This workshop explores the benefits of creating group art projects with your class that enhance, illustrate and reinforce the content of your curriculum. We will cover educational theory as well as several practical examples with clear instructions for using these projects with your students this year. This session is “Hiddur Mitzvah” meets Martha Stewart, all to benefit your curriculum! Take your art project from being a time-filler and transform it into a meaningful learning experience.

STUDYING THE HEBREW LETTERS AS RUBRIC FOR SPIRITUALITY Student Center 323 Tova Gannana Each Hebrew letter has been imbued with meaning from our Jewish mystical tradition. Knowing these meanings can deepen the experience that you and for your students have whether you are teaching them to read or to study Bible or prayer. In this workshop, we will learn the meanings of the letters and you will be able to concentrate on letters that have personal meaning for you - such as the ones in your Hebrew name. Working in groups, we will use text study and art to learn more about the letters and share ideas of how to use this information in our teaching and in our personal lives. THE REAL STORY OF CHANUKAH...AN HISTORICAL MASH-UP Academy Hall 206 Chava Rousch-Carlisle I love the story about the oil burning for eight days, but there is more to the history behind Chanukah than that! Let’s get to the truth. When I hear complaints that Jewish history is not “real” history I just cringe. Mash it up: learn that the Chanukah story we learned in Religious school is the same story we learned in History class. Engage in activities throughout the session that you can take back with you to your own classrooms to make history authentic.

MONDAY

THE HEART OF PRAYER: MAKING WORDS IN THE SIDDUR YOUR OWN Student Center 322 Matia Rania Angelou Teaching prayer has often come to mean teaching a child to decipher the Hebrew of the prayer; however, there is another important step--namely, helping children make meaningful connections to that prayer. To do that, it is important to understand the personal connection we ourselves have to those prayers. This is especially important when dealing with a difficult or controversial prayer. In this session, we will use music, writing and art to explore the deeper meaning of the Aleinu prayer.


MONDAY

78

2-3:30PM

V’SAMAHTA: CELEBRATING JEWISH HOLIDAYS WITH GROWN-UPS Davis Hall 209 Jonathan Wolf Hanukka candle-lightings, Purim megillah readings, and visits to the Sukkah are not just for kids! We will tour through the Jewish year, identifying ways in which communities of adults can beneficially study, observe, and share days of joy and solemnity, including special Shabbatot, Rosh Hodesh, Lag Ba’Omer, Tu B’Av, Yom HaZikaron/Yom HaAtzma’ut. We have unearthed new opportunities for celebration that once were important to Jews and we’ve been fortunate enough to revive them-- such as the Tu B’Shvat Seder, End-of-Passover Mashiah Meal, Tikun Leil Hoshana Rabba, and programs for Elul (which begins next week!) Such events build community and add holiness to the year-cycle. TEACH YOUR STUDENTS ABOUT THE EASTERN EUROPEAN CULTURE OF THEIR GRANDPARENTS Student Center 215 Marcia Gruss Levinsohn, Amanda Jill Wood Children are curious about what Jewish life was like in the villages and towns where their families came from before they immigrated to America. Open a dialogue between your students and their families when you help them to become aware of their unique Yiddish heritage. In this workshop we will learn a few easy yiddish songs and create some eastern European crafts that were an important part of family holiday traditions. We will share stories originally told in Yiddish. No previous knowledge of Yiddish is necessary. WE COUNTED THEM - A CASE STUDY IN PROJECT BASED LEARNING Davis Hall 211 Max Socol It’s easy to forget you’re part of something bigger when you live in a southern town with a small Jewish community. Using the Biblical census as their guide, our 5th grade students undertook a massive demographic survey of our congregation, analyzed the data, and made recommendations to the Temple board based on their results. This session will review the planning and execution of this project, including how the classroom teachers used formal Project Based Learning techniques. Come learn how by engaging our students in difficult work, we helped them developed deeper understandings of klal yisrael, and how Project Based Learning can fit into your supplementary school. SHALEM AND SHALVA WITHIN: AN AIKIDO APPROACH TO WHOLENESS WITHIN Student Center Lounge Lori Wynters Peace and wholeness begin within as we work to build communities of peace as Jews. This is an experiential workshop, using the principles and practices of Aikido, a Japanese way of harmony, to explore the ways we return to our center. In this workshop, we will relate this practice to the ways we practice shalem, shalom and shalva in the Jewish wisdom tradition. No experience needed, just a willingness to explore our bodies as a mishkan (sanctuary) for wholeness.


79

2-3:30PM & 4-5:30PM

TAKE HOME TOOLS TO TEACH ALL TYPES OF LEARNERS Davis Hall 208 Beth Crastnopol This workshop is designed to provide teachers with an enhanced capacity to diversify instruction for all learners in their classroom. Hands-on tools and strategies will be presented to help participants with the complex task of differentiation. Students in all settings benefit from structures and strategies that meet their individual needs. Take home some tools to help you accomplish this difficult and important work. Differentiated Instruction: make it Happen!

WORKSHOP 3C

4-5:30PM

THE TORAH OF MANAGEMENT: DRAWING ON JEWISH VALUES AND CONTEMPORARY BUSINESS WISDOM TO MOVE YOUR EDUCATION TEAM TOWARDS EXCELLENCE Student Center 215 Yohanna Kinberg This workshop will provide valuable information and ideas on managing your educational staff for best results. Best results means quality educational programs that meet the needs of contemporary families. We will investigate hands-on techniques for integrating the best management wisdom from our Jewish tradition and the most innovative and effective ideas from secular leaders in team management. Because our time is limited, in this workshop we will focus on the specific themes of team building amongst your staff and effective communication internal to the team and other institutional staff and volunteers. We will also integrate into our discussion how we can create a healthy and nurturing environment for working parents within our institutions.

MONDAY

SACRED STORIES & DEBRIEFING TECHNIQUES Davis Hall 202 Cherie Karo Schwartz, Peninnah Schram Our Jewish stories, carried orally on ‘wings of breath’, carry the essential messages of Torah that are meant to be life-giving. With today’s addictive technology, Jewish educators can share stories panim el panim (face-to-face), restoring life meanings. Peninnah and Cherie will help you build replicable repertoires while emphasizing best practices for debriefing your students in ways that will help them to see, perceive and make sense of their personal Jewish experiences. Peninnah and Cherie have both authored books on Storytelling which are available to purchase.


MONDAY

80

4-5:30PM

NEW METHODS, PRINCIPLES AND RESOURCES FOR B’NEI MITZVAH PREPARATION Student Center 323 Goldie Milgram What does it take to create a more meaningful and memorable b’nei mitzvah process, ritual and celebration? After fifteen years of R&D, learn some of the most effective approaches I’ve developed in exploration with families and communities from across the full spectrum of Jewish practice. In this workshop, I will share this body of work with you and will guide you in how to implement Ten Strategic Development Shifts in your work site including a number of methods for teaching a surprising array of mitzvot to youth families that they describe as “the Judaism we have been looking for.” COLLABORATIVE FAMILY PROGRAMMING IN PUBLIC SPACES Davis Hall 209 Lara Nicolson, Judi Wisch Early engagement of families with young children can have a positive impact on their future involvement in Jewish life. How can we reach and engage families raising young children who are not yet comfortable walking into a synagogue or JCC for a Jewish program? PJ Library, a Jewish Family Engagement program that mails free Jewish books and CD’s to families in 185 communities across North America, encourages local communities to offer collaborative family programs in public spaces as one way of making Judaism more accessible. This presentation will offer a practical guide on how you can make your programs and services more accessible, using the case study of Baltimore’s “PJ on the Town” series along with examples from other PJ Library community’s public space offerings. CREATING TZEDAKAH ORIENTED COMMUNITIES Davis Hall 207 Steven Bayar It’s all well and good to teach about Tzedakah, but how do we translate what we learn into what we do? In this workshop we will explore the philosophy of action, obstacles, and political issues affecting Tzedakah orientation. Together we will strategize as to how we can make Tzedakah into a foundational value for our communities. Case studies of successful and unsuccessful projects will be presented. HANDS-ON JEWISH FUN FOR THE WHOLE CHILD: INFUSING JEWISH LIVING INTO DAILY LIFE Davis Hall 201 Treasure Cohen This workshop will present exciting, creative, developmentally-appropriate ideas to inject Jewish learning and celebration into the preschool/primary school curriculum. Using inexpensive and recycled materials, we will present crafts that will become “keepers” as well as music, stories and families activities that will infuse in children the joy and understanding that everything in their lives can be experienced in a Jewish way.


4-5:30PM

81

TEACHING JEWISH VALUES THROUGH SONG Davis Hall 111 Eric Komar Most educators would agree that an effective and fun way to learn a concept is with music. Instruments and recording devices are welcome at this presentation of repertoire proven useful for teaching such Jewish values as Mitzvot (doing commandments), K’lal Yisrael (Jewish community), Tikkun olam (repairing the world), Pikuach nefesh (saving a life), Tzedek tzedek tirdof (Justice, justice shall you pursue) and V’ahavta l’rei’acha kamocha (Love your neighbor as yourself). Share your own ideas with us; the list is not exhaustive! A CD of Eric’s music is available for purchase.

THE EDUTAINING TEACHER Student Center 210 Mira Scharf Have you hugged your iPad today? If not, then now is your chance to befriend technology! In this session we will discuss current trends in combining new media and in particular ebooks and apps into the class curriculum. We will learn how to easily create, student-driven or teacher created interactive lessons or projects, using multimedia. With a Mac, an iPad, and an ebook making software called iBooks Author (that can be downloaded for free), fun interactive lesson can be created by the teacher and by the students! Kids from the youngest ages are drawn to media. Whether it is an iPad, smart phone, computer, or TV, children today are accustomed to interacting with technology. Be an Edutaining Teacher and create motivation to learn. PARENTS AS PARTNERS Academy Hall 206 Avram Mandell Over the years, we have learned that having a teacher who is a great role model and a class that is fun and engaging is not enough to make a difference in the Jewish practice and identity of our students. We need parents to partner with us, as ultimately, they are the most important role model in a child’s life. If you can’t have an impact on the life of the family and especially on the Jewish identity of the parents, even the most fun Hebrew school experience won’t be effective with the kids. At very least you need to convince parents to work with you and to support what is happening in school and at very best, you can support them to be the kind of Jewish parents they would like to be. In this session you will learn practical ways to engage parents and families in your Religious School education program.

MONDAY

NEWCAJE CHORALE (Session 2 of 3) Davis Hall 208 Ellen Allard Join Ellen Allard’s NewCAJE Chorale and participate in a group choral experience that will engage everyone, singers AND audience alike. Our rehearsals will culminate in an uplifting performance on the final night of the conference.


MONDAY

82

4-5:30PM

USING GAMES TO IMPROVE HEBREW READING SKILLS Academy Hall 207 Deborah Gardner In this workshop, we will consider why and how to use games effectively in the classroom. Want to engage your students? Games can be fun and help you review student’s skills/content and assessing student progress. We will look at activities to improve decoding skills, fluency, and vocabulary for students to become more accurate and confident readers. We will consider a variety of games (movement, card games, paper and pencil games) for use with a whole class, small group, pairs, or an individual. These games are effective for differentiating instruction. HEBREW IN THE ONLINE LEARNING CENTER Student Center 322 David Schwarz Learn how to use the latest Behrman House Hebrew series - Alef Bet Quest and Kol Yisrael - in the Online Learning Center. Join David Schwarz, Behrman House’s lead OLC consultant who will show you how to create a vibrant and fun online supplement to your Hebrew prayer classes and extend the learning into the home. Learn how to seamlessly weave together the book and online companion, how to post assignments, and ways to assess student work online. See how Behrman House can help enrich your class with videos, quick lessons, and even your own materials. This session is based on materials that are for sale. WRAPPING THE TORAH AROUND OUR LEARNERS CREATING EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCES IN SYNAGOGUES FOR HOLISTIC JEWISH GROWTH Davis Hall 211 Mark Young When our learners enter the synagogue at 3:50 p.m., what do we hope they will gain by 6:00 p.m. when their parents pick them up? We will first examine our goals of our religious schools and our personal goals as educators. We will then begin to link these goals with both the unique setting of the synagogue and the ingredients of experiential education. We will work together to design innovative educational experiences that may help us achieve our goals. The session will draw from components of The Davidson School at JTS’ rich research and programs, including its recently launched Master’s degree program in Jewish Experiential Education. ADHD AND RELIGIOUS SCHOOL Davis Hall 203 Dan Waxman This presentation talks about what is Attention Deficit Disorder (ADHD) and how ADHD affects students, teachers, administrators, and families in a religious school setting. Learn about myths of ADHD, misconceptions, symptoms, trends, and medication. We’ll also discuss best practices and techniques for reaching students with ADHD.


83

4-5:30PM & 5:30-6PM

THE ART OF AMAZEMENT: USING JUDAISM’S POWERFUL TOOLS TO HELP STUDENTS CREATE AND MAINTAIN A SENSE OF WONDER Davis Hall 205 Sam Glaser We will explore opportunities to make “everyday” life into a bounty of amazement and excitement, stimulating deeper investigation into the teachings of Judaism on a lifelong quest for pleasure. The tools for enlightenment and awareness made popular in new age movements have roots in our heritage. This workshop will examine these ancient tools, offering participants a daily “wake up call” to the inner child and the ability to maintain a state of perpetual “wow!”

STUDY SESSION

5:30-6PM

STUDY SESSION TO PREPARE FOR EVENING DEBATE Your last classroom Stay in your last workshop space! There you will read and discuss an article about the pros and cons of experiential/project-based learning. This is the 2013 hot topic. Later this evening it will be debated by David Bryfman of the Jewish Education Project and Denny Lehmann of Hebrew College Boston. NOTE: If your last workshop was a 3-hour one, please go and join any classroom for this.

MONDAY

PLANNING TO REACH YOUR LONG-TERM EDUCATIONAL GOALS Davis Hall 202 Ira Dounn, Rachel Meytin When we sit down to write a lesson plan, we start with the goals - what we want our students to get out of the lesson. But have you ever stopped to think critically about what you want your students to get out of their whole educational experience? Why do you want them to come to your school or agency or synagogue and what you hope the outcomes of their experience will be? We’ll take a look at a recently created Educational Framework for BBYO, Inc. and give you tools to start creating your own!


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MONDAY

7:15-7:30PM

NEWCAJE HONORS PJ LIBRARY AND ITS FOUNDER HAROLD GRINSPOON Dining Hall, 7:15-7:30pm

The PJ Library is the brainchild of Harold Grinspoon, a highly innovative philanthropist from Western Massachusetts. Grinspoon knew that reading stories and listening to music are among the most powerful childhood learning experiences and found his inspiration in the literacy program of country singer Dolly Parton. “More than four years ago I brought Dolly’s Imagination Library books to inner-city children in Springfield [MA],” Grinspoon explained. “Then it occurred to me - sending books to families’ homes is an ideal project to adapt to the Jewish community.” The PJ Library currently operates in over 100 Jewish communities across North America, reaching the families of more than 50,000 children a month, ages six months through eight years. The program is a powerful tool for engaging families in the joys of Jewish life and traditions, while building a stronger Jewish people, one book at a time. Selections feature a wide array of themes such as Jewish holidays, folktales and Jewish family life. Families also receive parenting resources to enhance the reading experience. Today, more than 70,000 families in more than 135 communities in the United States and Canada are able to explore the timeless core values of Judaism through the art and literature of these free children’s books! There is a similar program in Israel and Mexico, Argentina, and Australia and soon in the Former Soviet Union. Besides PJ Library, Harold Grinspoon developed awards for Jewish teachers and significant aid to Jewish camps—to name but of few of his causes. Harold was the first donor to CAJE in 1976 and the first to NewCAJE in 2010.


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7:30-8:30PM

Dr. Bryfman

POINT COUNTERPOINT DISCUSSION Dining Hall, 7:30-8:30pm

Dr. David Bryfman, Director of the New Center for Collaborative Leadership at the Jewish Education project of New York will debate Rabbi Danny Lehmann, President of Hebrew College of Boston. Here are some of the questions they will discuss in their conversation: t

Can the camp experience be extended beyond the boundaries of the summer and lake?

t

How important is Jewish Literacy to the 21st Century learner?

t

What is the importance of recreation (a sense of fun and belonging) in a Jewish Educational context?

t

What is the importance of Judaic text-based instruction in experiential learning?

t

How do we contextualize multi-sensory learning so that students internalize the enduring understandings that are the foundation of the experience?

MONDAY

Rabbi Lehmann


MONDAY

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8:30-8:50PM Surprise Skype Performance! Who could it be? MONDAY EVENING PROGRAMS INTERACTIVE FESTIVAL Dudley College - 9-9:45PM & 10-10:45PM

WHAT IS THE INTERACTIVE FESTIVAL? Each year we try to do something new at NewCAJE. This year, instead of a Monday concert on the main stage, we’re having a more interactive program that will get you moving, learning, playing, singing, storytelling and dancing right along with your favorite performers.

HOW DOES IT WORK? Choose from the 5 dynamic experiences below. If you’re struggling which one to choose, you don’t have to! Each of these programs will happen twice, and you may go to two of them - one at 9pm and one at 10pm.

WHAT SHOULD I DO THERE?

Participate, learn, relax, enjoy. This is your chance to get ideas for your classroom, but also a time to experience a joy for your own learning.


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LIST OF PROGRAMS:

Davis 105/107

Helene Kates, Peninnah Schram, Janie Grackin

Our oral tradition lives! Come journey together with us in story and song drawn deeply from our Judaic wellspring of tradition and personal inspiration. We will lift up our voices, opening all of our hearts through this creative interweaving of Jewish spirit songs and soul stories of healing, humor and hope.

SING, PLAY, LEARN

Student Center Lounge

Hankus Netsky, Rosalie Gerut

Come prepared to sing – and bring instruments if you have them. This hands-on experience will explore nigunim, Yiddish and Ashkenazic hebrew song, and the basic elements of performance practice in traditional Eastern European Jewish musical culture.

JEWISH DANCE JAM

Gym

Bruce Bierman

Join Jewish Dance maven, Bruce Bierman, as he fits the moves of the ancestors (Yemenite, Ladino, Moroccan, Yiddish and Israeli) to the grooves of your own imagination! Bust free to some of the grooviest, rapping, hip-hop Jewish beats from around the world along with experiencing the exciting revival of Yiddish dance and a few of the classic Israeli folkdances we all love.

MONDAY

UNDER THE WINGS OF SHEKHINAH: STORIES AND SONGS OF HEALING, HUMOR AND HOPE


88 PLAYBACK THEATER

MONDAY

Ingharam Room in the Dining Hall

Lori Wynters

Join us for an evening of improvisational theatre, where your real life stories deepen your connection and sustainable joyful Jewish identity. We will create and play as a community, explore what it means to live a Jewish life, play with the ways we practice our values from the Jewish spiritual tradition in our day to day lives, what it means to be b’tzelem eloheim, and the vibrant embodied practice of l’dor va dor. Come with your curiosity, an open heart, a meaningful moment from your Jewish life, a willingness to tell, sing, move and feel a greater wholeness and connection with this chevre as we take our work into the world. DRUM TALES: AN INTERACTIVE, ENGAGING AND INSPIRING PROGRAM Library Shmueli Perkel

Jewish Drum Tales is a live musical experience combining music, rhythm, and story-telling. Each participant gets an African drum and using musical and rhythmic innovations, we bring the stories to life, allowing them to experience the characters and themes of the narrative, first hand. This program is hands-on, engaging, and entirely interactive. The goal of Drum Tales is to provide a deeper, more meaningful understanding and connection to well known Jewish ideas and stories through an inspiring and creative experience. Our programs encourage teamwork and co-operation, emphasizing the values of unity (Achdut) and the power of common purpose (Kavana) and are built on the principles of experiential learning.


LATE NIGHT PROGRAMS: 11PM

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OPEN MIKE

Student Center Lounge

Michael Kates MC

LATE LATE NIGHT PROGRAMS: After the open mike ends KUMSITZ

Student Center Lounge

After evening programming there will be an open Kumsitz – a musical party of melodies and mayhem. Bring your guitars, drums, voices, and spirits and come laugh and play! Join us and the other non-sleepers in the Student Center Lounge.

MONDAY

After evening programming there will be an open Kumsitz – a musical party of melodies and mayhem. Bring your guitars, drums, voices, and spirits and come laugh and play! Join us and the other non-sleepers in the Student Center Lounge.


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SCHEDULE OVERVIEW

TUESDAY

TUESDAY, JULY 30th 2013 7:30AM------------------------------------------Shacharit 8:00-9:00AM------------------------------------Breakfast 9:15-12:15AM------------------------------Workshop 4A 9:00-10:30AM------------------------------Workshop 4B 10:00AM-12:45PM-------------Morning Exhibitor Area 10:30-11:00AM--------------------------------------Break 11:00AM-12:30PM-------------------------Workshop 4C 12:15-1:45PM---------------------------------------Lunch 12:45-1:45PM----------------------------------Luncheons 2:00-6:25PM-------------------Afternoon Exhibitor Area 2:15-5:15PM--------------------------------Workshop 5A 2:00-3:30PM--------------------------------Workshop 5B 3:30-4:00PM-----------------------------------------Break 4:00-5:30PM--------------------------------Workshop 5C 5:45-6:25PM-----------------------------------Receptions 6:30-7:45PM----------------------------------------Dinner 7:30PM----------------Start boarding Shuttles to Theater 8:00PM------------------------------------Mincha/Ma’ariv 8:15-10:15PM--------------------------Evening Programs 10:45PM-?---------------------------Late Night Programs


9:15AM-12:15PM

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WORKSHOP 4A 9:15AM-12:15PM MODES, MOTIFS & MELODIES: THE BUILDING-BLOCKS OF BIBLICAL AND LITURGICAL CHANTS Davis Hall 109 Neil Schwartz Come learn how the musical motifs in Trope are connected to the Nusach motifs in davening. We will pick up some useful grammar tips, scan Trope for all six types of Biblical books, peek at the skeletal structure of our liturgy, visit Arabic Maqamat and Hindustani Ragas, and learn how the modal musical motifs of Nusach show the moods of our prayers. There are many handouts on Hebrew grammar, Trope, Liturgy, and the music of Nusach HaT’fillah. Bring a thumb-drive, and take home some melodies and a new way of thinking about our Biblical and liturgical chants.

BYSTANDERS, UPSTANDERS AND CIVIC RESPONSIBILITY: WHERE ETHICS MEETS HISTORY Davis Hall 202 Jan Darsa This session will explore the potential of students to be change agents in society, using the Holocaust as a historical case study together with references to Jewish sources. We will examine questions of history and human behavior such as how neighbor can turn against neighbor, what fractures a society and what holds it together, and what is the responsibility of the bystander? Participants will be introduced to Facing History’s latest resource -- “Sacred Texts, Modern Questions: Connecting Ethics and History Through A Jewish Lens” -- which integrates biblical, rabbinic and contemporary Jewish sources into modern day questions and dilemmas that relate to students’ lives today. Jan Darsa has written a book on this subject that is for sale.

TUESDAY

DUCT TAPE TALLIT Chapel Basement Art Room Janie Grackin Inspirational and artistic, bold and creative, the Tallit as an art form and ritual garment enters a New Age. YOU can make a Tallit for yourself or a loved one in just one session. Yes, you can! Stories, ideas, instruction, assistance, and the opportunity to make a memory that will touch your heart forever! All materials and instruction book included. Class size strictly limited to 24 participants.


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9-10:30AM

WORKSHOP 4B 9-10:30AM

TUESDAY

TRANSFORMATIONAL AND AUTHENTIC LEADERSHIP IN JEWISH EDUCATION Davis Hall 208 Hana Bor This workshop will provide educators with ways to transform into authentic leaders. We will examine the theory of both transformational leadership and authentic leadership; exploring the ways each participant can achieve their greatest potential. Activities will include self-assessments and questionnaires to enable participants to identify strengths, weaknesses and target areas of growth. GRANT WRITING WITHOUT FEAR Academy Hall 207 Mitch Gordon Down and dirty...learn the basics of grant research, writing the application, letter of intent. thank you letters, reporting, and project development...These skills have helped the presenter raise more than $20 million, and taught others to raise geometrically more than that. What project are you waiting to do fund if you “only had the money”? REFLECTION AS A TOOL FOR MY PROFESSIONAL SUCCESS Student Center 210 Mark Young Why do we look in the mirror? Is it to receive feedback on our appearance, organize our outfit, check-in with our mood? Our physical reflection provides us with information to prepare, make changes, and evaluate our external self. How can we gather and utilize information through reflection to do the same for our educator and professional skills, passions, and challenges? This interactive session, intended for all Jewish educators and professionals, will provide strategies, tools, and tips that will help us look in our professional mirrors, identifying opportunities for reflection throughout both our work days and career-journeys to provide the feedback, organization, and check-ins we need to position us for short-term and long-term success. HEBREW WIZARDS: CAMPFIRE KAVANNAH Student Center Lounge Deborah Salomon, Ken Cohen, Lizzie Swan Teens, Teachers, Rabbis & Cantors, here’s a whole new way of approaching prayer using songs that teach and prayers that can open our hearts to receive the sacred sayings of our ancestors. This comfortable campfire setting allows us to join in prayer and enables the participant to walk away “more in tune” than ever before. Using 13 original songs from our CD, “Time to Shine” we will teach you great new ways to reach students of all ages! You will walk away singing the whole day through! The Wizard’s CD is available for sale.


9-10:30AM

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FETA (FAMILY EDUCATION, EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING, TECHNOLO- GY AND THE ARTS) AND CONTENT Davis Hall 211 Deborah Miller, Debra Kerschner 21st century Jewish learning can blossom when it integrates compelling questions and ideas with exciting opportunities for communication, collaborating and creating. Learn one model of this intentional integration, Etgar Yesodi, in which the third grade curriculum focuses on Jewish values and holiday, and employs the elements named above to engage learners and their parents. Participants will be able to analyze this approach, and use it to reflect on their own practice. Etgar Yesodi is a curriculum for grades 3-5 available through the Melton Center.

THE REALITY APPROACH TO TORAH TEACHING Student Center 322 Hal Miller-Jacobs Looking for a nontraditional approach to teaching our traditional Torah stories? In this workshop we will frame the traditional Biblical stories in a ‘reality’ format, by using role-play to bring the Biblical characters to life. Through this process we will discover and create interesting midrashim -- a time-honored tradition in Biblical study. Come play with us and gain an extremely effective tool for teaching Torah! Guaranteed that your students will have greater involvement, insight and understanding of these tales, while remembering and enjoying these stimulating sessions.

BUILDING A TEL: AN ARCHAEOLOGICAL APPROACH TO TEACHING JEWISH HISTORY AND TEXTS Davis Hall 101 Susan Eiseman Levitin Come and learn a brand new way to convey what you teach all the time. In this workshop, I will share a compelling visual metaphor I developed for teaching Jewish History and texts to primary and middle school students.

TUESDAY

TZEDAKAH HANDS ON Davis Hall 203 Avi Zukerman Giving Tzedakah is a practice that can be taught and valued at all ages. In this workshop, we’ll learn how to engage students and community members by having them assemble and decorate their own personal and durable Tzedakah boxes. We will each make our own box, explore the different ways of giving Tzedakah, and talk about how to make an age-suitable Tzedakah box that everyone will love. You can see more of his materials in the exhibit area.


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9-10:30AM

TUESDAY

TOT SHABBAT IN THE ECE CLASSROOM: THE UNPLUGGED VERSION Davis Hall 201 Ellen Allard If there is one fact universally known about young children, it is that they like to move, dance, swing, march, sing, shout and play. Join Ellen for a unique and accessible approach to opening the eyes and hearts of your students to a new way of celebrating Shabbat. Provide a gateway to Jewish life that will give them amazing Jewish value and an experience they will always remember. Ellen’s music is available for purchase. REIMAGINE YOUR TASHLICH EXPERIENCE Davis Hall 103 Juliet Barr The Tashlich ritual has been both spiritual and environmentally-minded -- but are we being as ecologically mindful as we could be? We will begin with a text study of the sources of the ritual, and explore the environmental implications of Tashlich in the modern world. Then we’ll look at an example of a newly-imagined service that you can take back and modify for your community. Lastly, we will go outdoors (rain or shine) and have our own meaningful Tashlich experience, one that honors the environment and stays faithful to our traditions. This works well with all ages and learning styles, and you can implement it in your community this High Holy Day season. MAKING PRAYERBOOK HEBREW FUN FOR GRADES 4-6 Davis Hall 207 Eric Komar In the instant gratification age of the internet, smart phones, and shock TV, how do we successfully engage preteens in prayerbook Hebrew? Learn to implement strategies that have proven effective in my own 5th grade classes and which can be used in any grade leading up to the bar/bat mitzvah year. Special attention will be devoted to a series of fun competitive activities in which students engage in both individual and team reading challenges. Yours will have so much fun, they will barely realize the curriculum is intense, the materials serious, and the expectations high. INTRODUCING MITKADEM: A HEBREW PROGRAM THAT REALLY WORKS! Student Center 323 Joan Carr Mitkadem is the self-paced, tefilah-based Hebrew curriculum published by URJ Books and Music, available in both print and digital versions. Join me for an overview of both versions of Mitkadem, and a look at some of the challenges it is designed to address and how it addresses them. Learn why Reform, Conservative and Reconstructionist congregations are finding Mitkadem makes a difference in the classroom. This workshop is not geared toward those already using Mitkadem. If you are using it, consider instead joining us for the Mitkadem Intensive on Sunday and please stop by the URJ Books and Music booth to talk with us about your experience. This session is based on materials that are for sale.


9-10:30AM & 11AM-12:30PM

95

LEARN TO READ HEBREW AT NEWCAJE! (Part 2) Academy Hall 206 Eyal Rav-Noy If you are not a Hebrew reader but would like to be, take this 3 part workshop. Using a reading method developed by CAP IT! and our book, flash cards, and our unique “Tactile Visual Mnemonics,” you will learn how to decipher letters and vowels, and read accurately in these four and a half hours. If you are interested in learning more about this method, you are welcome to observe our class. WHY BAD THINGS HAPPEN TO GOOD PEOPLE – SOME TRADITIONAL JEWISH APPROACHES Davis Hall 111 Nachum Amsel This is THE question-- the one which causes more people to stop believing in God than anything else. How could a fair and just God allow good people to suffer and evil people to prosper? Judaism never shied away from this issue, even though, ultimately, it cannot be resolved totally. Learn about five different approaches from traditional sources that will help you in your own struggles with Judaism, and guide you when you are teaching this topic to older students and adults. No prior background or Hebrew is required.

WORKSHOP 4C 11AM-12:30PM STORYTELLING STRATEGIES FOR MARKETING YOUR JEWISH PRO- GRAMMING Davis Hall 211 Lisa Lipkin These days, capturing the attention of your audience is the hardest skill to master. Jewish institutions can no longer rely on their old tricks to sustain and attract members. They need to compete with an endless array of distractions and offerings and still offer value and meaningful programming. This hands-on workshop will introduce you to storytelling strategies to market and sell your programs. Participants will learn how to transform programs into meaningful, emotionally moving content that will seduce and captivate audiences. They will also learn how to find a story in even the most seemingly mundane subject, and will practice new ways of telling it that makes spoken and written language come alive.

TUESDAY

HEY, WHAT’S THE BIG IDEA? INNOVATIVE TOOLS TO ENGAGE TEENS IN IMPORTANT ISSUES Davis Hall 209 Batsheva Frankel As students get older they start to ask life’s biggest questions: What’s the meaning of life? What happens after this life? Why is there evil in the world? Is our fate predetermined or is there free will? What is God? Is there really such thing as a soul mate? This workshop explores innovative, creative ways to deal with these questions by presenting Judaism’s rich pageant of ideas and answers. Ideal for traditional and non-traditional educational settings. Participants will leave with fun, free tools plus lots of ideas for engaging teens in big ideas.


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11AM-12:30PM

TUESDAY

LEANING IN: JEWISH WOMEN AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Davis Hall 103 Yohanna Kinberg Inspired by Sharon Sandberg’s recent book “Leaning In, “ this workshop will address the integration of the principles of “leaning in” to your career and life as a female Jewish professional. We will discuss main concepts from the book such as making a place for yourself at the table, leadership and likability and mentorship. This is great workshop for men and women who want to see more women finding fulfillment in their work. This workshop will continue into lunch where as a group, we will have a more informal discussion about our lives and careers. EXPERIENTIAL EDUCATION: THE BIG PICTURE Davis Hall 203 Cherie Koller-Fox There is a lot of talk today about making school more like camp. Project-based learning is a new trend. But, it is not enough to talk about experiential education in the context of a school alone. It is not enough to talk about it in relation to any one child in any one year. Experiential education is a holistic concept that has to do with the family and the synagogue and the camp and the school. Come to this session and we will step back and come up with a vision of Jewish education that encompasses the whole child and their family. PHILOSOPHICAL INQUIRY WITH BIBLE %BWJT)BMM      +FČSFZ4DIFJO Abraham Joshua Heschel observed that philosophy begins with wonder and questions. This workshop guides participants through a tour of the techniques of Philosophical inquiry that have grounded a national Covenant project on “Philosophical Inquiry through Parashat Ha-Shavua” originally set in the Cleveland Jewish Community but available to you in the very near future. Come learn how to help your students find personal meaning through the stories of the Bible and explore this exciting new way to teach the Biblical text. THE PROMISE: USING CONTEMPORARY MUSIC TO INSPIRE A LOVE FOR ISRAEL Davis Hall 208 Sam Glaser This workshop will elucidate the phenomenon of the centrality of Israel to the Jewish people, opportunities for response in times of crisis and the power of music to help bind us to the Land and to each other. We will look at the deeper messages in The Promise, Sam Glaser’s latest release which explores the love affair with the Promised Land through the biblical period, two millennia of exile and the past sixty miraculous years of aliyah. We will analyze how to use the themes of these moving songs in classroom settings to impart to students the deepest feelings of empathy with Israel’s triumphs and tragedies. Recording devices welcome. CDs of Sam’s music are available for purchase.


11AM-12:30PM

97

SHIR CHADASH - A NEW SONG Davis Hall 207 Susan Shane-Linder In this workshop, I will help participants who work in a Religious school setting connect to Jewish music in a fun and memorable way! We will focus on translating prayers and songs into the language of our students and creating memories that are meaningful and relevant. We’ll explore age appropriate music repertoire, stories, techniques, and language that encourage both an open mind and an open heart for prayer & songs. We’ll sing everything from the “oldies but goodies” to some of the latest hits that will excite our students and hopefully keep them singin’ and remembering these songs for a lifetime. Come ready to sing! (A CD of Susan’s music is available for purchase).

HOW TO DO FAMILY EDUCATION Student Center 322 Joel Grishaver This is a session on secrets to success in family education.. We will answer the following questions: How do you get parents to participate in Family education programming? How do you build good a strong relationships with families and establish good communication? What do you do that makes a family education event a good time/a valuable time for the adults as well as their children? What are new models for great family education programming that are outside of the normative ones like round-robin stations or Shabbat-in-a-Sack? What motivates families to come back for more? If your job includes planning family education, come learn techniques from one of the founders of the field. Books on Family Education are available for sale by Torah Aura. A CALL AND RESPONSE MEDITATION FOR THE SHEMA Davis Hall 209 Rosie Rosenzweig This workshop will share a family education event at a school that was developed to teach the idea of God as a personal reference for children and adults. The children learned the meditation first in class, and later taught it to their parents at the event. Exercises include having everyone write or draw their concept of a personal god. This Meditation can be tailored for various holidays.

TUESDAY

TREASURE’S TOOLS FOR CREATING SUCCESSFUL YOUNG FAMILY PROGRAMS Davis Hall 201 Treasure Cohen Creating Jewish family experiences for young children and their grown-ups can be both rewarding and challenging. Inspired by her experience as the creator of Jewish Discovery Zone and Young Family Shabbat and holiday services, Treasure will share time-proven strategies and exciting programming ideas for providing fun and welcoming Jewish learning experiences that will enrich families and make them want to come back for more.


98

11AM-12:30PM

TUESDAY

THE TIME IS SHORT, THE RESULTS ARE GREAT: HEBREW THROUGH MOVEMENT Academy Hall 207 Nachama Skolnik Moskowitz Hebrew Through Movement is sweeping the country as a way to teach Hebrew language in part-time Jewish educational settings (schools and camps). By following commands in Hebrew, students not only learn select modern Hebrew vocabulary, but also better understand prayers, blessings and rituals of our tradition. Based on the language acquisition principles of Total Physical Response (TPR), all that it takes is fifteen minutes of fun learning each time students are in session! We’ll view some videos that show Hebrew Through Movement in action, try it out for ourselves, and learn what creates success! The Hebrew through Movement curriculum is a free download at www.jecc.org and the Online Learning course will be available for sale at www.hebrewthroughmovement.org

JEWISH HISTORY ILLUMINATED BY FIVE ANCIENT COINS Student Center 215 Robert Messing In ancient Jerusalem, it could take weeks, months or years to receive news from Rome, Spain or England. Images on coins were one of the most important forms of mass communication and reflected the times in which they were minted. This presentation will examine five ancient coins to highlight and explain the historic and turbulent times in Israel from the first Chanukah in 164 BCE to the destruction of the Second Temple in 70CE to the end of the Bar Kochba Revolt in 135CE. Imagine being able to touch a piece of history and hold it in your hand. It is an amazing connection to the past and those who came before us.

LIFELONG JEWISH EDUCATION, REALLY? Davis Hall 101 Judith Aronson For a long time we have bandied about the idea of “life-long learning.” Once our formal years of schooling are over, what is the curriculum of such learning? What have we learned from years of family and adult education that might help us answer that question? Sharing experiences and considering new technology, how do we move forward reaching people wherever they are on their spiritual journeys? How do we know what type of learning choices we should offer adult learners? Using developmental paradigms, we will figure out what works for different life stages.


11AM-12:30PM

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CULTIVATING MINDFULNESS & CHARACTER THROUGH JEWISH PRINCIPLES AND AFFECTIVE ACTIVITIES Student Center 323 Goldie Milgram The sages teach [Avot 4]: “Envy, desire, and pride remove a person from the world.” The Maharal, In his commentary “Derech Chaim” contradicts that teaching and explains that envy, desire and pride are necessary for the healthy functioning of a person in society and only when a person invests them with an inordinate amount of energy that “they remove one from the world.” Rabbi Mendel of Satanov identified 18 such traits to help raise our awareness of how to live in a healthy and holy way in his 1812 book “Heshbon HaNefesh”, (Accounting of the Soul). Come try on some of these often surprising principles, texts and perspectives with an eye to simple and effective incorporation of them in your life and in your classrooms in ways appropriate for both youth and adult settings. These teachings, taken from Mussar, may open a new avenue of Jewish learning to you.

WHY TRAIN MADRICHIM , HOW AND WHO SHOULD DO IT? Student Center 210 Sherry Grossman Why is it so important that we ‘train’ staff who work with Madrichim to be diligent, dedicated and dynamic? By engaging our teenage congregants as assistants in our classrooms, we are helping to strengthen our Jewish community to meet the needs of diverse learners. Teens can be placed into position to deliver needed services to enable every student to learn. Our teens can find meaningful opportunities and stay involved in synagogue life. They gain confidence and experience that can aid them in their own development. But they cannot be expected to step right in and be productive, contributing educators. It is our responsibility to provide them with foundational knowledge and an understanding of the teaching-learning experience. Gateways Madrichim Training seeks to cultivate our invaluable teen resources, improve the learning environment in our schools and enhance the learning opportunities for all students. Gateways has developed a curriculum for this that will be available online in the Fall of 2013.

TUESDAY

THE PROCESS OF GUIDING: AN INTRODUCTION TO PROJECT BASED LEARNING Student Center Lounge Sasha Kopp How do you get each child to become invested in their own Jewish journey? Implementing project based learning in schools creates a culture where the individual skills and strengths of each student is learned and known. It is then possible to create a culture of curiosity, creativity and growth. In this workshop participants will receive a brief overview of how one can use PBL in supplementary Jewish education and will see examples of ways PBL is being used in the Boston area. Lastly we will brainstorm ways of how you can bring project based learning back to your own community.


100

11AM-12:30PM & 12:45-1:45PM

TEACHER, I’M AN ATHEIST! RESPONDING TO CHALLENGES ABOUT GOD Academy Hall 206 Paul Solyn Do Jews have to believe in God? What do you say when a student declares that he or she doesn’t? In this session we’ll explore ways of responding to the challenge, ranging from classroom-management techniques to alternatives in Jewish theology. We’ll also learn about stages in faith development and consider the needs of parents who are uncomfortable with “God talk.” This session is for teachers at all levels and in all Jewish settings. You’ll go home with an armory of approaches that allow you both to keep the class on track and to meet the student’s needs.

LUNCHEONS

TUESDAY

TUESDAY LUNCHEONS LUNCH WITH AFFINITY GROUPS: CONSERVATIVE EDUCATORS: MEET WITH OTHERS WHO WORK IN CONSERVATIVE SYNAGOGUES AND SCHOOLS Davis Hall 111 REFORM EDUCATORS: MEET WITH OTHERS WHO WORK IN REFORM SYNAGOGUES AND SCHOOLS Student Center 323 RABBIS AND CANTORS: MEET WITH OTHER CLERGY WHO HAVE AN INTEREST IN JEWISH EDUCATION Davis 211

LUNCH WITH DISCUSSIONS TOPICS: LEANING IN: JEWISH WOMEN AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Davis Hall 103 Hosted By Yohanna Kinberg This lunch will be a continuation of a workshop offered on this topic by Yohanna Kinberg. You are welcome to join in this luncheon discussion even if you haven’t been to the workshop but especially if you have read the book that inspired it. We will discuss concepts such as making a place for yourself at the table, lead- ership and likability and mentorship. This is for men and women who want to discuss the role of women in the field of Jewish education.


12:45-1:45PM

101

IS INTERMARRIAGE A 4 LETTER WORD? Davis Hall 201 )PTUFECZ-FBI8PMČ1FMMJOHSB "MJTPO8FTUFSNBOO -J[4JOHFS During this lunch we will discuss in what ways intermarriage might feel threatening to our communal sense of self; Identify our own biases for and against in-marriage and intermarriage; Share and discuss personal experiences while collaborating towards best practices, both institutional and personal; Create and share strategies for addressing these controversial topics in the classroom. SO YOU WANT TO BE A RABBI? Davis Hall 209 )PTUFECZ%BOJFM1SJDF "CCZ&JTFOCFSH +FČ4DIFJO A conversation with representatives of rabbinical schools about what it takes to begin rabbinical school studies. This conversation will be hosted by Rabbi Daniel Price of AJR, Abby Eisenberg from JTS and Rabbi Jeff Schein from RRC and a representative from HUC.

A NATIONAL ADVOCACY AGENDA FOR JEWISH EDUCATION Hosted by Eitan Gutin, David Steiner Davis Hall 203 With the demise of JESNA, NewCAJE is one of the few national voices able to advocate on behalf of Jewish educators and Jewish Education. What do you think the issues are that we should be advocating for? CONFESSIONS OF AN AMERICAN EXPAT Hosted by Lisa Lipkin Student Center 215 Lisa Lipkin will share her observations on what’s unique about the American Jewish community based on her years as living as an ex-pat in Amsterdam. She will share some fascinating, unheard stories that will debunk the Ann Frank myth and shatter any illusions about the noble Dutch during the Holocaust. Together you’ll talk about why American Judaism, with its brilliant capacity for reinvention and innovation, is the hope for European Judaism. SONG SWAP: EARLY CHILDHOOD AND ELEMENTARY Davis Hall 208 Hosted by Susan Shane Linder Bring your instruments and spend your lunch singing with friends and learning some new songs. If you don’t play an instrument or have no songs to share, you are still welcome to bring your lunch and sing with us!

TUESDAY

EXPERIENTIAL EDUCATION: A FOLLOW-UP DISCUSSION TO MONDAY NIGHT’S PANEL WITH DAVID BRYFMAN AND DANIEL LEHMANN Student Center 322 Hosted by Mark Young and Chava Carlise Rausch


102

2:15-5:15PM & 2-3:30PM

LUNCH AND LEARN Host TBD Faculty Dining room (back of the dining hall)

TUESDAY

WORKSHOP 5A 2:15-5:15PM IMPROVISATION, LEADERSHIP & TEACHING Davis Hall 209 Mitch Gordon Through the understanding of jazz and theatre improvisational games, we help to develop leadership skills such as team building, attention to details, communica- tion, deadlines, accountability, listening, and conflict resolution. This workshop was first presented at Harvard Law School at the Program on Negotiation, and has been brought to mediators, lawyers, judges, and nonprofit executives and volunteers. Bring your new skills back to your synagogue...No musical experience necessary! WHAT IS MIDRASH AND WHAT CAN WE LEARN FROM IT? Davis Hall 111 Lenny Levin Lots of people throw the term “midrash” around without knowing a whole lot about it. If you would like to know more, this workshop is for you. In the first part of this workshop, we will explore how Midrash was created and where it can be found in the major works of Jewish literature. In the second part, we’ll address how the Rabbis understood the Bible, the concepts of God,of good and evil, life and death through the Midrash. We will read selections (in English) from Bialik’s Sefer Ha’Aggadah/Book of Legends, which presents selections of this literature from Talmud and Midrash.

WORKSHOP 5B 2-3:30PM SOCIAL MEDIA FOR THE EDUCATOR Davis Hall 109 Jordyn Rozensky Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, Pintrest... the list of social media platforms grows by the day. While these tools seem like a distraction in the classroom, they can actually enhance your lesson plans. Let’s talk about what they are and how to use them. We’ll cover ways to connect to other educators, ways to connect your students to materials, and how to use these platforms to keep your students (and their families) engaged and thinking outside of the classrooms.


2-3:30PM

103

THE BLESSING OF A MUSICAL CURRICULUM: BUILDING MEANING THROUGH SONG Davis Hall 208 Peri Smilow What if our students’ exposure to music in school wasn’t only through the songleader? What if our teachers could deliver a thematic curriculum through the use of song? This musical workshop will provide 1st through 8th grade teachers and administrators with a way of using songs to support their classroom teaching goals. Participants will learn how and where to find the “right” songs and how to successfully integrate them into the classroom – even when the teacher can’t hold a note! Full day and supplemental school teachers and administrators welcome. Our theme for the workshop is BLESSINGS. Join us as we sing our way to learning. A CD of Peri’s music is available for purchase.

CREATE YOUR OWN RITUAL Academy Hall 206 Rosie Rosenzweig Learn the blessing formula for various life cycle rituals and events that need attention in one’s life. Come prepared to discuss these events to stimulate some brief flash writing exercises. If there is something you want to change in your life, learn to create a ritual to help with letting go. This ritual formula can be applied to a classroom setting and even to adult education. CREATING CONNECTIONS TO JEWISH TEXT Davis Hall 203 Batsheva Frankel Teaching Jewish text often offers challenges. The language can be off-putting and the concepts may seem irrelevant. How can we introduce learners to the depths of Jewish text and excite them to continue digging? Using engaging, kinesthetic, experiential learning to explore enduring concepts from Jewish texts, we can connect our students and make the text come alive for them with relevancy. In this workshop we will look at different pieces of text from Tanach, Chumash and Pirke Avot (Bible, Torah, and the Ethics of the Fathers), and experience examples of ways to engage our students innovatively. Participants will take home inventive items and inspiring ideas to add to their teaching toolkit.

TUESDAY

CULTURAL JUDAISM & SOCIAL JUSTICE ACTIVISM: A NEW LEARNING MOVEMENT Academy Hall 207 Katherine O’Brien The Workmen’s Circle has created vibrant education, joyful celebrations, and social justice activism through a Jewish cultural lens. This hands-on workshop will focus on using progressive Jewish values and a cultural Jewish lens to generate engaging, effective social justice activism within classes and across a community. You will bring back new understandings, excitement, and scalable, adaptable ideas to your institutions wherever they lie on the denominational scale.


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2-3:30PM

TUESDAY

BEIT MIDRASH IN MOTION: CAN OUR DREAMS COME TRUE? Student Center Lounge Dalia Davis Are you looking for an alternative approach to Jewish text study? Do you find it challenging to sit still listening to a lecture? Beit Midrash in Motion approaches Jewish text study from a fully embodied perspective. In this workshop, we will incorporate movement and meditation in our study of a text that raises the question of whether or not we are actually ready for our dreams to come true. Participants will have the opportunity to consider personal dreams, ponder the often surprising paths to their discovery, and question their preparedness for true achievement.

YOU WANT ME TO DO ART PROJECTS? BUT I’M NOT AN ARTIST! Chapel Basement Art Room Susan Eiseman Levitin This workshop will show participants how to brainstorm ideas for creating visual art projects that fit organically with their curricular material. Participants should come knowing what subject areas or books, they are being asked to teach in the coming year.

PRINCIPLES FOR NURTURING SPIRITUAL DEVELOPMENT IN YOUNG JEWISH CHILDREN Davis Hall 201 Deborah Schein This workshop is designed to help educators learn more about the spiritual development of young Jewish children. First, participants will reflect upon their own spiritual memories. Then a working definition of spiritual development for young children will be explored. Through discussion and hevruta study, Buber, Heschel, and Senge will be used to offer a Jewish lens to this discussion. Finally, guiding principles will be shared and discussed as a means for putting into action thoughts and ideas discussed in this workshop.

EFFECTIVE HEBREW TUTORING TECHNIQUES FOR THE AMERICAN MIND Davis Hall 202 Avram Mandell This session will give concrete methods to help students master decoding Hebrew no matter how limited your time with the child may be. Utilizing a method of teaching called Derech HaLimud, learning Hebrew can be fun, engaging and achievable. This is a time-tested, researched and evaluated Hebrew tutoring technique.


2-3:30PM

105

THE ONE WHO DOESN’T KNOW HOW TO ASK: WHAT’S GOING ON IN THE PASSOVER HAGGADAH Davis Hall 211 Paul Solyn More Jews in the U.S. attend a Passover seder than attend services on Yom Kippur. While the seder speaks deeply to each of us, many elements of the haggadah are obscure or difficult for the modern mind to understand. In a way, this makes each of us “the child who doesn’t know how to ask.” In this session you’ll learn how the structure of the haggadah dictates how we should read it. We’ll work together on ways to make the parts that are hardest to understand meaningful to children and adults. You’ll leave with a clear sense of how to make the seder more than a series of arbitrary ritual actions and with new ideas for teaching about it.

OK, PROJECT BASED LEARNING SOUNDS GREAT -- BUT IT CAN’T WORK IN (MY SETTING) Davis Hall 103 Max Socol Yes it can! Not always, true, but more often than you might think. This session will focus on the fundamental elements of PBL from the staff perspective: what goes into planning a project, what kind of training teachers need, where to turn for advice, etc. We will look at examples of Jewish schools that have already transitioned to PBL, and workshop project proposals of your own to take home with you.

TUESDAY

HOW TO TEACH ABOUT ISRAEL TODAY EFFECTIVELY AND CONVINCINGLY IN THE DIGITAL AGE Student Center 210 Nachum Amsel We are currently losing the propaganda war about Israel, as our kids believe what they hear about Israel in the news and not what we teach about Israel in our classrooms. The Destiny Foundation has developed a new methodology to show, teach, and help internalize a true understanding of the situations facing the State of Israel, its values and love for Israel we all want. Using new film clips, with lesson plans, moral dilemmas, etc., the students will learn about the issues facing the State of Israel today, including the Palestinians State, the status of the West Bank, and why so many countries seem to hate Israel. All materials age digital and can be used in many different settings. Appropriate for anyone from age 10-100. These and other materials are available for sale from the Destiny Foundation.


106

2-3:30PM

TUESDAY

LEARNING ABOUT LEARNING STYLES Student Center 215 Sherry Grossman Supporting all learners, both children and adults, requires careful observation, using non-judgmental language to describe the observation and time to reflect on what you’ve learned before acting. The more we understand about the processes of learning and growing, the better able we are to build on individuals’ strengths and facilitate a school’s’ capacity to cultivate more inclusive practices. In this workshop we will explore different perspectives or ways of seeing. We will use a Learning Style Delineator and share how our own learning styles impact our work as teachers both in and out of the classroom.

YOUR JEWISH NAME: STORIES & METHODS FOR STRENGTHENING CONNECTION TO JEWISH NAMES & PERSONAL IDENTITY Student Center 323 Peninnah Schram, Goldie Milgram Helping our students make a meaningful connection to their Hebrew name is one of the privileges of being a Jewish educator. It gives us the holy opportunity to make our students aware of the connections throughout text and tradition, in addition to family lineage, that are embedded within their names. We learn in Sefer Meor Gadol that “There is a spiritual connection between the name of an individual and a person’s soul. The word neshamah stems from the word neshima (Gen 2:7). A soul’s essence is divine and a person’s name refers to this essence... the central letters of neshama are shin mem, meaning name. Indeed some have written that the higher soul comes to the child when [s]he is given a Jewish name.”Bring your name and curiosity and learn at least six methods, including craft, stories, texts, prayers and photo shoots for bonding to one’s Jewish name for life.

HOW DO YOU GET IT DONE WHEN YOU’RE NOT DOING IT? Student Center 322 Ira Dounn, Rachel Meytin “Teen empowerment” are more than just buzz words, they’re best practice. If the teens own the program, they will participate, get others involved, and ask for more. But how can you guide your teens toward quality experiences that have educational value? At BBYO we’ve been following teens’ lead for 90 years, and we’ll show you how to implement what we’ve learned along the way.


4-5:30PM

WORKSHOP 5C 4-5:30PM

107

HOW TO TRANSITION FAMILIES FROM PRESCHOOL TO RELIGIOUS SCHOOL Davis Hall 201 Stephanie Tankel This workshop will describe the recent innovation of a Pre-K Gan supplementary Religious School program at Washington Hebrew Congregation. Overlapping with the final Pre-K year in the Early Childhood Center, this Gan program introduces families to the Religious School experience, preparing the children and families for a lifelong connection with the synagogue. We will share how we developed this program so that it enhances what is already happening in the preschool and how this program becomes a feeder for the Religious School. This program provided an alternative to families who might have waited until 3rd or 4th grade to bring their kids to Religious School.

NOT JUST M/W OR T/TH 4-6 BUT 24/7: HOW SYNAGOGUES CAN FACILITATE LEARNING AT ALL TIMES Davis Hall 205 Mark Young Time is always an enormous constraint in synagogue education. We don’t have the luxury of creating all day and night experiences like that of immersive learning environments or, do we? This session will enable you to see how Jewish education, previously limited to the time constraints of a synagogue school, can be expanded and connected to experiences and opportunities for learning that your students have throughout their day,perhaps even throughout their lives. We will explore together opportunities that technology, engaging with parents/families, and creating partnerships with organizations outside the synagogue can have in expanding our educational reach in a strategic and pragmatic process. The session will draw from components of The Davidson School at JTS’ rich research and programs, including its recently launched Master’s degree program in Jewish Experiential Education.

TUESDAY

HEBREW WIZARDS: BRINGING CAMP INTO THE CLASSROOM Student Center Lounge Deborah Salomon, Ken Cohen, Lizzie Swan Teens & Teachers, Rabbis & Cantors brace yourself for an exciting new way of learning through games & songs. Our magical Wizards Boards create an interactive experience which will change the way you think, act and teach. Learn how to build a Teen program so that they can help you teach! Join us as we blast into a modern Jewish experience filled with new ideas for you to run away with. We have many new Boards and brand new activities so that you can bring FUN into your classroom every time! This will be a class filled with games, music and lots of gold coins. Learn how you can bring the magic of Wizards to your school. Don’t YOU Wanna Be a Wizard? This session uses materials that are for sale from Behrman House.


108

4-5:30PM

TUESDAY

CONNECTING TO TORAH: TEACHING PARASHAT HA-SHAVUA USING THE TORAH CIRCLES METHOD Davis Hall 103 Matia Rania Angelou Torah Circles is a new method to add to your teacher toolbox if you teach Parashat Ha-Shavuah. It helps students to delve deeply into the meanings of the parsha and what it means to them in their everyday lives. Come experience Torah study in sacred circles as you find your connection to the parsha and at the same time learn a new method to share Torah with your students.

HOW TO TURN YOUR CLASS INTO A SACRED COMMUNITY Student Center 322 Joel Grishaver Simple truth: Communities are built out of friendships. We build Jewish Community in our classrooms by building friendships among our students. We make it a sacred community by adding Jewish elements to the relationship. This workshop will be filled with process insights, techniques, activities and other programmatic factors that will help a teacher or a school to shape themselves into sacred communities. This session is based on a book that is available for sale from Torah Aura.

NEWCAJE CHORALE (session 3 of 3) Davis Hall 208 Ellen Allard Join Ellen Allard’s NewCAJE Chorale and participate in a group choral experience that will engage everyone, singers AND audience alike. Our rehearsals will culminate in an uplifting performance on the final night of the conference.

MUSIC IS MEMORY Academy Hall 207 Sarah Sinofsky Whether reciting the adventure of Homer’s “Odyssey” or incessantly humming the pathetic pleas of the Meow Mix cats, the human brain is innately tuned (pun intended) for relying on music for memory. Why not take advantage of this ingrown mnemonic tool to learn all about Hebrew and/or Jewish heritage? Challenge yourself and your students by not only incorporating learning through available music, but by following in the footsteps of The Maccabeats by creating some music of your own. In the workshop, I will offer examples of different songs to bring in for different ages and purposes, examples of Jews creating and adapting songs for the last half century plus, and allot time to write a song of your own/in a group.


4-5:30PM

109

PROMOTING VISUAL LITERACY AND NEW AVENUES FOR JEWISH EXPRESSION Davis Hall 109 Eric Goldman There is growing evidence that visual literacy-- the ability to read a film or a photograph-- are able to engage more competently and critically in their environment. A student who learns to react, deduce, predict and make connections in photos or film can bring these skills to other elements of study and to the written text. Media is too vital and pervasive an element of our society for students not to be skilled in deconstructing its messages. In this workshop, we will learn how to use photography and film to better teach subject matter. Further, since digital photography and filmmaking today is inexpensive, easy to learn and provides a wonderful vehicle for student expression, we will talk about how to use these skills in your classroom. Eric Goldman’s book on this topic is available for sale.

IT’S ALIVE! TRANSFORMING PJ LIBRARY BOOKS INTO DRAMATIC PRESENTATIONS Davis Hall 203 Lisa Litman Our Jewish heritage is built on a living, oral tradition. For centuries all of our ancient texts were passed on orally. This workshop will focus on techniques to turn any book into an interactive theatrical experience and get families talking to one another. We will also share ideas on how to arrange the physical environment of the space to enhance this social interaction. Participants will leave this session with: t4USBUFHJFTUPCSFBLBTUPSZEPXOUPDIJMEGSJFOEMZTDFOFTXJUIFBTJMZNJNJDLFE lines and scripts t5PPMTUPIJHIMJHIUUIF+FXJTIWBMVFTJOFBDICPPLUISPVHISFQFBUFEQISBTFTBOE movement t.FUIPETGPSDIPPTJOHBOEBSSBOHJOHUIFQIZTJDBMFOWJSPONFOUUPBVHNFOU family participation t4VHHFTUJPOTGPSTJNQMFQSPQTBOEDPTUVNFT

TUESDAY

USING MODERN MEDIA TO CREATE CURRICULA Student Center 215 Steven Bayar How can Harry Potter, the Little Mermaid, and the Simpsons help us teach about Jewish ethics, holidays, and Torah? In this workshop we will use triggers from secular films to present traditional texts. Participants will learn how to put together curricula for special projects.


110

4-5:30PM

TUESDAY

SO MUCH MORE THAN MEETS THE EYE: THE STRUCTURE AND MEANING OF JEWISH PRAYER AS SEEN THROUGH THE FRIDAY EVENING LITURGY Davis Hall 211 Cherie Koller-Fox The siddur was carefully designed to encapsulate the most important Jewish ideas and ideals. Where did the concept of prayer and even Siddur originate? Who wrote the siddur and why? What did the rabbis want us to know about believing in God? What revolutionary ideas did they want us to share with the larger world? As well as we know the prayers individually, we don’t know the deep underpinnings as well as we might. In this session, we will look at the Friday night service and other prayers from High Holiday liturgy in order to better understand and teach this seminal work of Jewish literature. ‘WHO ME?!’ TEACHING HEBREW READING AND PRAYERS WHEN YOU FEEL LIKE A NOVICE YOURSELF Academy Hall 206 Lynn Anne Cutler Some Jewish educators came into the field when someone approached them to teach beginning Hebrew or prayer. If that’s your story, you might feel overwhelmed if your skills are rusty or you don’t have a formal Jewish education in subjects like Jewish liturgy. In this workshop, we will give you the encouragement and resources you need to be a successful Hebrew School teacher anyway even as you improve your own Hebrew reading skills and build on your knowledge of core prayers and blessings. WRESTLING WITH YISRAEL: PEOPLE, LAND AND STATE 4UVEFOU$FOUFS    -FBI8PMČ1FMMJOHSB As famously framed in the New York Times, Yisrael is too often the ‘third rail’ of Jewish education and Jewish communal life. As they say in the Land, “It’s complicated.� But, it doesn’t have to be this way. This workshop empowers participants to embrace the complexity. Let’s make the beautiful, complex, confounding, modern democratic state and holy homeland of Am Yisrael an integral and honest part of our classrooms and communities. Participants will walk away with specific lesson plans that honor Yisrael while moving beyond the advocacy model to mature love and contemporary best practice. PRACTICAL YIDDISH ‘KHOKHME’ (Wisdom) Davis Hall 202 Marcia Gruss Levinsohn, Amanda Jill Wood Unfortunately many of us have learned our Yiddish from Saturday Night Live instead of at the feet of our grandparents. Come and gain an understanding of the wisdom our Yiddish ancestors have passed on to us through proverbs (shprikh verter). Here are a couple examples of what I mean: “Friends are needed both for joy and for sorrow.��A boil is fine as long as it’s under someone else’s arm “ “No man suffers from another’s sins--he has enough of his own.� We will use “web graphics� to exemplify these proverbs. No previous knowledge of Yiddish is necessary. Come laugh and learn!


4-5:30PM & 5:45-6:25PM

111

EXPANDING YOUR TEACHER’S TOOLBOX Davis Hall 101 Debi Swedelson Mishael This session is designed for anyone who has agreed to teach Religious School and is filled with equal parts of enthusiasm and trepidation! This class will show the way Jewish values and educational principles can synthesize to inform the way we teach. Both theory and concrete examples will be illustrated throughout. We will provide a myriad of “tools” to expand the repertoire of the new teacher (or reinvigorate the veteran educator). Then we’ll explore ways to develop a classroom community, create a learning environment, and produce lessons that stimulate and engage. With limited class time, teachers must make effective use of every moment. This workshop does just that.

NewCAJE RECEPTIONS 5:45-6:25PM Come drink a glass of wine and have a bite to eat before dinner. ALL EDUCATIONAL DIRECTORS MENTORING RECEPTION STUDENT CENTER LOUNGE Come meet others in this job-alike reception. Talk shop, compare notes, find a mentor or mentoree. Network! Shmooze! Complain! Enjoy! Assistant principals welcome. OPEN HOUSE AT THE EXHIBIT AREA AUDITORIUM BUILDING LOUNGE Meet your friends in the lounge outside of the exhibit area. Network! Shmooze! Shop!

TUESDAY

BRAIN-BASED STRATEGIES FOR INCLUSIVE CLASSROOMS Student Center 323 Sandy Miller-Jacobs In this workshop we will explore the ways children learn and how teachers can match their teaching to their students. In working with students who have special learning needs, it’s important to identify their strengths and use those strengths as a starting point to develop the skills that are lagging. We will then collabora- tively develop lessons that you can use to help all your students succeed academically. As students meet success in your classroom, you will also experience success as a teacher! Today’s Jewish educational settings are filled with diverse learners. For students to meet success in learning, educators must take into account how learning occurs based on the variety of thinking & learning styles as well as multiple intelligences their students exhibit. Add to this mix students with special needs (e.g., ADHD, LD, and Cognitive Challenges) and you have the inclusive classroom with many challenges for teachers. This workshop will leave you with the information you need to meet these challenges.


112

EVENING PROGRAMS

TUESDAY NIGHT CONCERT 8:15-10:15PM

TUESDAY

Dudley Middle School 68 Dudley Oxford Rd, Dudley, MA 01571 Join us for a wonderful night of music, story, comedy and more!

With: Mitch Gordon, MC Peri Smilow Emilia Diamant Ellen Allard New CAJE Chorale Wholesale Klezmer Band Avram Mandell Sam Glaser


113

LATE NIGHT PROGRAMS: 10:45PM KUMSITZ

Student Center Lounge

After evening programming there will be an open Kumsitz – a musical party of melodies and mayhem. Bring your guitars, drums, voices, and spirits and come laugh and play! Join us and the other non-sleepers in the Student Center Lounge.

TUESDAY


114

SCHEDULE OVERVIEW

WEDNESDAY

WEDNESDAY, JULY 31st 2013 7:30AM------------------------------------------Shacharit 8:00AM------------------------------------Ealy check out 8:00-9:00AM------------------------------------Breakfast 8:45-11:45AM------------------------------Workshop 6A 8:45-10:15AM------------------------------Workshop 6B 10:00AM-12:10PM-----------------Final Exhibitor Area 10:15-10:30AM--------------------------------------Break 10:30AM-12:00PM-------------------------Workshop 6C 12:10-12:30PM----------------------Closing Ceremonies 12:30-1PM -----------Boxed Lunches and Bus Boarding 12:30-1:45PM---------------------------------------Lunch 12:30-2:00PM-------------------------Regular Check out 2:00-6:00PM-------------------------------Post-Conference 6:00-7:00PM------------------------------------------Dinner 8:00PM--------------------------------------Mincha/Ma’ariv


8:45-11:45AM

115

WORKSHOP 6A 8:45-11:45AM CHALLENGING THE MYTH OF BIBLICAL HOMOPHOBIA Student Center 322 Michael Rothbaum Jewish educators sometimes avoid addressing Biblical texts regarding same-sex relationships, believing them to be homophobic. But what if a close reading revealed a text that wasn’t homophobic at all? Join us as we look at Jewish texts, in both Hebrew and English, with an eye toward what meaning they have for us today — and how we can teach a sexual ethic that is enlivening as well as inclusive.

HONEST TO GOD Student Center 215 Lenny Levin In sorting out where we stand on theology, often the questions are more important than the answers. What does prayer achieve? Where is God when tragedy strikes? If (as Heschel said) the Bible is “the word of God and the word of man,” how do we know which is which? What do we teach our students, if we ourselves are not sure?

WEDNESDAY

MASTER CLASS: JUMP IN AND BECOME A MITZVAH-CENTERED STORYTELLER Davis Hall 209 Cherie Karo Schwartz, Peninnah Schram, Goldie Milgram Part I: Telling & Tachlis: How to select, prepare and deliver messages and stories that nurture mitzvah-centered living re: holidays, values, etc. Part II: Experience a Farbrengen and using your selected theme, learn how to adapt this powerful, inspiring teaching tool for your classrooms and communities. Part III: Reflect on the role of storyteller as part of your evolving Jewish identity. If you’ve taken this workshop before, please note that we’ll be offering a new set of stories and approaches this time in order to increase your repertoire. These sessions are based on a volume edited by Goldie Milgram called: Mitzveh Stories: Seeds for Information and Learning which is available for sale.


116

8:45-10:15AM

WORKSHOP 6B 8:45-10:15AM SERVANT LEADERSHIP: IS IT A WAY TO GET THE NEXT GENERATION TO COME TO JEWISH EDUCATION? Student Center 323 Hana Bor As educators, is there a new way to get our parents, students and communities involved and learning? What if we lead by listening and learning what’s important to them? Servant Leadership gives us powerful tools to move beyond telling people what’s good for them. It provides a practical framework that shifts interaction from a top down approach to a bottom up engagement process. In this workshop we explore how to use Servant Leadership’s 10 principles to meet our people as participants rather than audiences. Our exercises explore how we can build the connections that come from knowing more about ourselves and asking more about the people we’re hoping to help.

WEDNESDAY

WORKPLACE ETHICS FOR THE NEXT GENERATION Davis Hall 101 Alison Westermann As professional Jews, many of us find ourselves in uncomfortable and unanticipated situations ranging from simply odd to truly awful. In this hour and a half workshop, participants will learn about workplace ethics through the lens of Torah, Talmud and current events. By digging into ancient examples, we will extract wisdom to apply Jewish ethics to the situations we face as Jewish educators.

WHAT IN THE WORLD IS A CULTURAL BAR/BAT MITZVAH? Student Center 210 Katherine O’Brien A cultural bar/bat mitzvah will give you valuable sparks to ignite b’nai mitzvah planning and learning in your communities. The Workmen’s Circle has created a unique model that focuses on the central aspects of active Jewish identity-creating: Jewish culture, Jewish community and beyond, and social justice activism. This workshop will use film, printed materials and demonstrations to introduce core aspects of this novel coming-of-age ceremony. Through hands-on work in small teams, we will experiment with elements of the cultural bar/bat mitzvah to explore how you can adapt and configure aspects of the model to enhance your synagogue’s existing rituals.


8:45-10:15AM

117

SINGING AND SHARING UNIVERSAL VALUES THROUGH A JEWISH LENS %BWJT)BMM     &NJMZ"SPOPČ5FDL This workshop--geared to students from age 3 to 3rd grade, will highlight the use of songs that teach universal values through a Jewish lens. Participants will study Jewish texts that relate to concepts such as sharing, kindness, protecting animals, fixing the world, visiting the sick, acting courageous, diversity, contentment, protecting the body, repentance and forgiveness. Participants will receive a FREE CD (via digital download) and activity guides so that they can immediately implement their new skills. This project is brought to NewCAJE by Jewish Learning Matters, a project of the Rosenfeld Foundation at the University of Miami.

POP-UP JEWISH HOLIDAY CARDS Chapel Basement Art Room Avi Zukerman In this workshop, you will learn the techniques for making your very own holiday pop-up cards from scratch. This is a great project for any classroom and allows students and community members of all ages to express themselves while celebrating the holidays. Together, we will create colorful examples of these cards, each catered to specific holidays and Jewish events. Avi’s materials can be seen at the exhibit area.

WEDNESDAY

HEBREW POETS WHO INFLUENCED MODERN HEBREW Davis Hall 103 Tova Gannana In the early 1950’s in Tel Aviv a new crop of poets created a magazine and published it themselves. They were writing poetry in colloquial Hebrew, which hadn’t been done before. This was the beginning for poets Yehuda Amichai, Dalia Ravikovitch, David Avidan and Natan Zach. Amichai especially layered his poems by also drawing on Biblical Hebrew to describe current events. We’ll explore his work and others’ to get a deeper understanding of Israeli culture, past and present. Then participants will break into chevruta study partners, and explore the poems in English translation and/or Hebrew. Lastly, we’ll share our insights as a group.


118

8:45-10:15AM

LOOKING AT REFLECTION, NATURE, INQUIRY, AND PROJECT APPROACH THROUGH THE LENSES OF THE HUNDRED LANGUAGES OF CHILDREN AND THE 70 FACES OF TORAH %BWJT)BMM    +FČSFZ4DIFJO %FCPSBI4DIFJO Educators will reflect upon their own use of reflection, nature, and the project approach as teaching tools for early childhood Jewish education. To accomplish this, the Hundred Languages of Children (how children learn from a myriad of artistic expressions that provide children with a variety of ways to communicate, to reflect, and to know the world and themselves) and the 70 Faces of Torah (multiple perspectives on Jewish learning) will be used to explore the holiday of Sukkot. First, educators will be invited to participate in hands-on exploration of nature and harvesting through art. Then, Sukkot will be studied through the Talmudic debate between Rabbis Eliezer and Akiva--Is the Sukkah material spiritual in its essential makeup? The intentionality behind these activities is to provide educators with a deeper appreciation of their own spiritual relationship to Sukkot, Judaism, and early childhood education.

WEDNESDAY

PRAY BALL! TEACHING MEANING THROUGH METAPHOR IN JEWISH PRAYER Davis Hall 208 Eliana Light What does baseball have to do with t’fillah? What about hip-hop? Harry Potter? Dinosaurs? Metaphors are a great way to teach meaning, and inject some fun, into a prayer service. In this session, perfect for those who run prayer services at camps, day schools, and synagogues, we will experience the “baseball minyan,” discuss the pedagogical advantages of teaching with similes and metaphors, and play fun games to construct our own! Participants will leave with a full metaphor service to use, as well as the tools to help them build metaphor services to fit their needs. RETHINKING THE TEACHING OF HEBREW Davis Hall 211 Nachama Skolnik Moskowitz It’s been whispered in the halls of our educational programs and educator conferences: “too many 6th graders don’t know all their letters and vowel signs and can’t read prayers.” The question is whether we can be courageous enough to turn traditional Hebrew learning on its head in part-time Jewish educational settings! We will explore a number of reasons why our current models of teaching Hebrew are not serving our students well and offer 4 potential changes to our programs, all that build on “hearing and speaking/reciting Hebrew” before learning to read. Some of the solutions are easy-enough to incorporate (e.g., making sure that children get the sound of prayers “in their ears” before learning to decode), and some are not for the faint-of-heart (e.g., moving the primer year out of third and fourth grade, waiting till students are older and have more Hebrew background). We’ll learn together and debate together!


8:45-10:15AM

119

LEARN TO READ HEBREW AT NEWCAJE! (Part 3) Academy Hall 206 Eyal Rav-Noy If you are not a Hebrew reader but would like to be, take this 3 part workshop. Using a reading method developed by CAP IT! and our book, flash cards, and our unique “Tactile Visual Mnemonics,” you will learn how to decipher letters and vowels, and read accurately in these four and a half hours. If you are interested in learning more about this method, you are welcome to observe our class.

HANUKKAH IN JULY...?? TEACHING JEWISH VALUES THROUGH THE FRAMEWORK OF JEWISH HOLIDAYS Davis Hall 203 Ruth Dubin Steinberg This workshop will seek to explore the connection between our Holiday stories and customs and our Jewish values. Using Hanukkah as an example, we will create a model of teaching Jewish values through the framework of a familiar holiday, with its customs and rituals, thus deepening our understanding of both. Participants will be given various text selections related to the holiday and will engage in text study in Hevruta partners. Following this, an experiential exercise engaged in by the group will allow us to relate these values to our own lives, helping us clarify what is most important to us as Jews today. Together as a group, we will evaluate what this experience has taught us and how we might use it to deepen the lives of those we teach in our communities.

WEDNESDAY

WOMEN OF THE WALL: WHAT’S THE BIG DEAL? Academy Hall 207 Ronni Ticker The struggle of the women of the Wall over the past 24 years to gain equal access to the Wailing Wall has forced them to confront the Israeli legal system where they have won small victories and had small defeats. This struggle for the right to wear Tallit and tefillin, read from the Torah and pray out loud has recently come to a head and has had a great deal of publicity in the American press. If Israeli law protects religious expression without respect to race, gender or creed, why are these women arrested and detained? In April 2013, a Solomonic compromise was put forth by Natan Sharansky. What does it mean? Where do things stand today? Through studying Jewish texts and multimedia presentations, we will peer closely at the struggle for freedom of religious expression by women in Israel at the most holy of Jewish sites.


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8:45-10:15AM & 10:30AM-12PM

USING JEWISH VALUES TO COMBAT BULLYING, SUICIDE, EATING DISORDERS AND ADDICTION Davis Hall 109 Anne Andrew Bullying, suicide, addictions and eating disorders are plaguing our communities, Jewish and non-Jewish. We have a possible antidote in three simple teachable Jewish concepts that must be not only taught, but internalized beginning in Kindergarten. These are: B’tzelem Elohim (that we are created in God’s image), Teshuvah(that we have the ability and the opportunity to change, improve and right the wrongs we have done) and Gemilut Chasadim (the imperative to reach out in kindness to others). Drawing from the work of Rabbi Shais Taub, Danny Siegel, and others, this session will present the rationale for teaching these three ideas as the foundational concepts that can alleviate terrible societal problems like the ones mentioned above, before they have chance to take root in our children. Participants will take away lesson plan ideas for each of these three concepts. ENGAGE, EXCITE, EMPOWER AND EDUCATE Davis Hall 202 Chava Rousch-Carlisle When did teaching, especially in Judaism, not include experiential and blended learning? Let’s have a REAL and HONEST discussion about teaching AND learning. We can learn by doing. We can utilize social media and on-line discussions... with the understanding that everything we do has to have a purpose grounded in our goals for Jewish education. Walk away with techniques and strategies that will engage your audience and hold them responsible for their own learning.

WEDNESDAY

WORKSHOP 6C 10:30AM-12:00PM DIGITAL STORYTELLING: THE ART OF A BLOG Student Center 210 Sasha Kopp How do we communicate? What are we trying to convey? Although often we wish to tell our communities about the work that we do, is it important to tell the WHY? Blogging is a tool to share how the mind of an educator works and why what we do is important for children and for the community at large. Together we will view and analyze blogs and create our own blog, based on an experience at NewCAJE. EFFECTIVE NEGOTIATION: HOW TO GET WHAT YOU WANT IN ANY SITUATION Davis Hall 203 Leora Koller-Fox We use negotiation everyday -- be it getting your kids to do their homework or getting the best price on a car -- yet many people run the other way when it’s time to negotiate for salaries and benefits at work. In this session, we’ll go over the basic techniques of negotiation, discuss typical scenarios you may encounter, and practice this helpful art. You’ll learn how to get what you need and keep positive relationships with colleagues, family, and friends.


10:30AM-12PM

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BEING A TRANSFORMATIVE LEADER Davis Hall 103 PJ Schwartz This session will engage participants in understanding, implementing, and evaluating strategic transformational leadership practices. Transformational leadership enhances the motivation, morale, and performance of followers by: connecting their self-identity to the project and collective identity of the organization, being a role model for followers that inspires them and makes them interested, and challenging them to take greater ownership for their work. Understanding the strengths and weaknesses of followers allows a leader to align them with tasks that enhance their performance. We will examine how these mechanisms best work in our roles as principals, supervisors, and administrators. LEADERSHIP IN THE EARLY PROPHETS Student Center 323 Everett Fox The second part of the Bible, The Early Prophets (Joshua, Judges, Samuel and Kings), contains some of the most compelling stories we have. But it also illustrates, in many different settings, problems of leadership ”like greed, power, and disregarding ethical rules” which bedeviled biblical people and modern societies alike. Using a number of stories from these books, we will discuss these and other issues of leadership in the Bible, with an eye to thinking about our own times and how to share the connections with our students. Everett Fox’s translations of the Bible are available to purchase. The volume on which this session is based will be published this coming March by Schocken Books.

IT’S ALL ABOUT RUACH! %BWJT)BMM    %POJ;BTMPČ &SJD-JOECFSH In this workshop, early childhood educators will experience the celebration of Jewish culture (holidays, food, traditions, Yiddish words) through a method of “dipping” everything in our world into the “Jewish Bucket.” We will explore ways to help our students see their lives through a Jewish lens and we will share lesson plans for you to use in your classroom as well. In this active and fun learning workshop, everyone becomes a songwriter. Mama Doni and her live band will show preschool teachers a variety of ways to create their own original Jewish music for their classrooms. A CD of Mama Doni’s music is available for purchase.

WEDNESDAY

B’RUCHIM HA BA’IM, MAKING YOUR SCHOOL MORE WELCOMING Davis Hall 211 Juliet Barr Using the experience of the presenter and the participants, this workshop will first look at the WHY’S and then explore the HOW-TO’S of making your religious school, and maybe even your synagogue, more welcoming and inclusive.


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10:30AM-12PM

NIGGUNATION Academy Hall 206 Eitan Gutin Niggunim - melodies without the words - are one of the most flexible tools that we have as educators. This session will explore a broad variety of uses for niggunim from tots all the way up to adults. We will use methods including meditation, movement, storytelling, and improvisation to explore the many pathways that a well-placed niggun offers us. You will hear some old favorites and possibly some new tunes as well.

WEDNESDAY

SOUNDS OF SURVIVAL: MUSIC OF THE WOMEN’S ORCHESTRA OF AUSCHWITZ Davis Hall 111 Jeri Robins Looking at the autobiographies of Fania Fenelon and Anita Lasker-Wallfisch and the biography of Alma Rose, we will learn about the Women’s Orchestra of Auschwitz and watch excerpts from a concert produced about their experiences. EXTREME MAKE-OVER: SHAVUOT - HOW TO TRANSFORM THE MOST NEGLECTED BIBLICAL HOLIDAY INTO A SUPERSTAR Davis Hall 101 Tracy Klirs Poor Shavuot never gets any respect! Looking for ways to revive Shavuot and put it back on the radar for families with school-aged children, teens, empty-nesters, retirees - virtually everyone? Welcome to the Shavuot Family Adventure! In this workshop Education Directors, Family Educators, Youth Directors, and Informal and Experiential Jewish Educators will hear about several different models for this program. You will learn how Shavuot’s placement on the calendar - coinciding with spring weather and late sunset times - can be exploited to design and implement fun, engaging, totally wacky experiences that take the learning out of the building and turn the learners into builders, explorers, artists and biblical characters. Participants will then work in teams to design their own programs. ISRAEL EDUCATION FOR THE YOUTUBE GENERATION Davis Hall 109 Andrea Gottlieb Step Up For Israel - Middle and High School curriculum: Are you preparing your students to proudly step up for Israel? Do they have an emotional connection and feel a sense of pride for their homeland? JerusalemU.org will present an exciting new curriculum designed to build character while building a connection to Israel. Designed for the Youtube generation, Step Up For Israel combines, short engaging films with activities to stir the imagination and capture the student’s attention. Participate in an Israel experience your students will love. This workshop uses materials that are for sale.


10:30AM-12PM & 12:10-12:30PM

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THE STARTLING FINDINGS ABOUT JEWISH EXPERIENTIAL EDUCATION THAT ALL JEWISH EDUCATORS SHOULD KNOW Davis Hall 202 Gavriel Goldman Experiential Education (EE) is the newest buzz word in Jewish education. While EE positions and programs have dramatically expanded, our understanding of what EE is and why it works has not. This session presents the findings of a 3-year study (based on hundreds of hours of observation) of experiential and conventional teachers in multiple educational settings. The findings are truly startling - some contradicting long standing beliefs and practices. Participants will learn the four defining principles of EE; why teachers do not need their students’ respect; what makes an ordinary event into a life-long learning experience; and concrete ways to implement the findings in their schools and organizations. This workshop is for all educators who are eager for guidance in how to improve Jewish education. This will be a session with hands-on learning activities.

CLOSING CEREMONIES 12:10-12:30PM Student Center Lounge We gather together to reflect on what we’ve learned and how we’ve grown in our time together at NewCAJE 4. Goodbye’s and Blessings for the new year ahead are in store. Come and join everyone for a meaningful moment.

WEDNESDAY


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POST-CONFERENCE SCHEDULE WEDNESDAY

Intensive Schedule: 2-6PM ------------------------------ Intensive part I 6-7PM ------------------------------ Dinner BECOME AN EXCELLENT HEBREW/PRAYER TEACHER Joel Grishaver Student Center 322 REVISIONING B’NAI MITZVAH THROUGH A SPIRITUAL LENS: NEW PRINCIPLES, METHODS & MATERIALS Goldie Milgram Student Center 215

WEDNESDAY

ANCIENT ISRAEL COMES TO BOSTON: THE DEAD SEA SCROLLS AND ARCHEOLOGY Everett Fox Student Center 323 USING FILM IN THE CLASSROOM: THE AMERICAN JEWISH EXPERIENCE THROUGH FILM Eric A. Goldman Student Center 210 HINEH MA TOV: VALUES & CHALLENGES OF JEWISH PLURALISM Jon Wolf Davis Hall 203

Young Professionals Schedule: 12:45-1:45PM -----------------------Lunch 2-3PM ------------------------------ Post conference check in and team building 3:30-5PM ----------------------------Visioning Session #1 6-7 PM ------------------------------Dinner 7-8PM -------------------------------Visioning Session 2 8-9PM ----------- -------------------Open Space Discussions -- offer your own! 9-10PM -----------------------------Evening Program (Bowling in Town)


POST-CONFERENCE SCHEDULE

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THURSDAY Intensive Schedule: 8-9AM ---------------------------------- Breakfast 9AM-12PM ------------------------------Intensive part 2 12-1PM------------------------------------Lunch 1-2PM ----------------------------------- Pack and Checkout BECOME AN EXCELLENT HEBREW/PRAYER TEACHER Joel Grishaver Student Center 322 REVISIONING B’NAI MITZVAH THROUGH A SPIRITUAL LENS: NEW PRINCIPLES, METHODS & MATERIALS Goldie Milgram Student Center 215 ANCIENT ISRAEL COMES TO BOSTON: THE DEAD SEA SCROLLS AND ARCHEOLOGY Everett Fox Thursday at the Museum of Science, Boston (note, from campus, the shuttle leaves at 9am. Check out with Ezra at 8:30 am in the dining hall. From the museum you will go to the airport directly.) USING FILM IN THE CLASSROOM: THE AMERICAN JEWISH EXPERIENCE THROUGH FILM Eric A. Goldman Student Center 210 HINEH MA TOV: VALUES & CHALLENGES OF JEWISH PLURALISM Jon Wolf Davis Hall 203

Young Professionals Schedule: THURSDAY

8-9AM ----------------------Breakfast 9-10AM ---------------------Open Space Discussions -- offer your own! 10-11:30AM ---------------Looking to the year ahead. What will we accomplish? 11:30AM-12PM ------------Regroup and report 12-1PM ---------------------Lunch 1:00-1:30PM ----------------Closing


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WHO’S WHO AT NEWCAJE? THE PRESENTERS

THE NEWCAJE CONFERENCE IS FULL OF AWESOME EDUCATORS WHO DONATED THEIR TIME TO SHARE THEIR EXPERTISE: ELLEN ALLARD is a multi-award winning Recording Artist, Composer, and Early Childhood Music Specialist. She presents captivating family concerts, Tot and Family Shabbat services, teacher workshops, and is committed to building community through music. Ellen has taught at HUC, is faculty at the North American Jewish Choral Festival and Hava Nashira, and has led family services at the URJ Biennial, CAJE and NewCAJE. (Sun 4PM, Mon 9AM, Mon 4PM, Tues 9AM, Tues 4PM) NACHUM AMSEL works with Berel Wein and the Destiny Foundation, “to bring Jewish history to life in an exciting, entertaining, interactive way.” Rabbi Dr. Amsel has taught thousands of teachers, and has worked in all areas of Jewish education, developing curricula, including a methodology on how to teach Jewish Values using media. (Mon 9AM, Mon 2:15PM, Tues 9AM, Tues 2PM) ANNE ANDREW is currently an education consultant to the Jewish Federation of Greater Vancouver. She was the Principal at Temple Sholom Religious School in Vancouver for over twenty years. Originally from Leeds in England, she studied geology at the University of Edinburgh and then at The University of British Columbia where she received her doctorate. Pursuing a career in Jewish education was not logical but has been magical. (Mon 9AM, Wed 8:45AM) MATIA RANIA ANGELOU received smicha as Rabbinic Pastor/Jewish Chaplain and Mashpiah Ruchanit/Spiritual Director through ALEPH: Alliance for Jewish Renewal. Currently, she serves B’nai Or as a Spiritual Director and Pastoral Counselor, is the Jewish Chaplain for Newton-Wellesley Hospital, and is an Interfaith Chaplain for Hospice of the North Shore & Greater Boston. In addition to her chaplaincy work, Matia is a Madricha/Mikveh Guide at Mayyim Hayyim Community Mikveh where, as a member of the Ritual Creation Team, she published ceremonies for use with the ritual of immersion. (Mon 2PM, Tues 4PM) JUDITH ARONSON is on the faculty of AJRCA and Claremont Lincoln College. From her first CAJE conference in Rochester, NY, she has delighted in the diversity of the attendees, presenters, musicians, and subject matter. Judy is as passionate about Jewish education today as when she started her career decades ago. (Tues 11AM)


127 JULIET BARR is a creative, innovative educator who has found her niche in developing educational programs and curricula for schools, students and families of all learning needs and styles. She is currently the Educator of Congregation Kol Ami in Vancouver, Washington, and the Director and Educator of the Kehillah Project of Bergen County, New Jersey! How does she do it? A time-turner. (Tues 9AM, Wed 10:30AM) STEVEN BAYAR, RRC ‘81, has been the Rabbi at Bnai Israel Congregation in Millburn, New Jersey since 1981; author of books on Tzedaka (Town House Publishing)and Teen Education (Torah Aura), Cofounder (with Fran Hirschman) of Ikkar Publishing and curricula on Tzedakah (Righteous Person’s Foundation), articles on Synagogue Growth and Outreach. (Sun 4PM, Mon 4PM, Tues 4PM) DR. EYAL BOR is instrumental in developing innovative educational programs used throughout the U.S., such as: Project Mishpacha; Chavurah Chadasah, family groups study together; Gesher L’Tikvah, a program to assist students with dyslexia and/or learning disabilities. Dr. Bor is a professor of Hebrew Language at Towson University and the Director of Education at Beth El Congregation in Pikesville, Maryland. He is married to Dr. Hana Bor. (Sun 4PM) HANA BOR, PhD. is the Associate Professor and Director of the Master of Arts in Jewish Education and Jewish Community Service at Towson University. She teaches courses in methodology, administration, leadership and Holocaust education. She enjoys taking her students on Study Abroad to Israel and recently developed new courses on Diversity, Culture and Team Dynamics. She lives in Baltimore with her husband Dr. Eyal Bor and their four children. (Sun 4PM, Tues 9AM, Wed 8:45AM) DAVID BRYFMAN is the Chief Learning Officer at The Jewish Education Project. David completed his Ph.D. in Education and Jewish Studies at NYU focusing on the development of Jewish adolescent identity and experiential Jewish Education. Prior to moving to New York, David worked in formal and informal Jewish educational institutions in Australia, Israel, and North America. (Mon 9AM) JOAN CARR, RJE, has worked in the field of Jewish Education for over thirty years. In addition to teaching Hebrew to children and adults, her career has included serving as Director of Education at Congregation Sha’aray Shalom, Hingham, MA, as the URJ Regional Educator for the Northeast Council and as a URJ Education Specialist for the URJ Department of Lifelong Jewish Learning. In her current role as a Curriculum Consultant for URJ Books and Music, Joan serves Reform congregations throughout the United States by providing support for educators and training teachers in the use of Mitkadem and CHAI. In addition, Joan is a Vice President of the National Association of Temple Educators. (Mon 11AM, Tues 9AM)


128 ALIYA CHESKIS-COTEL is Director of the first exclusive Jewish Talent Agency in this country that engages in fundraising – Kolot Management.com. She has taught at CAJE, NewCAJE, and several Limmud conferences. She specializes in arts programs, creative writing, and dedicates herself to special needs and enrichment Judaic learning for students 7 to 70. Author of “Open It Up! Integrating the Arts into Jewish Education,” and “The Journey to Golda’s Balcony” Study Guide. (Mon 9AM) EJ COHEN is a certified sign language interpreter and Jewish educator who has spent the last 30+ years combining both passions. She has been the interpreter at CAJE conferences, URJ biennials, concerts and nearly every other life cycle event imaginable. She has led workshops at CAJE, NewCAJE, Limmud UK, Limmud Boston, LimmudNY, Hava Nashira, and for various interpreting organizations in the US and the UK. EJ now lives in Concord NH, where she interprets in a local school system, teaches at Temple Beth Jacob and is active in the local theater group. Her new partnership with Sue Horowitz allows her to teach the signs to accompany some amazing music and it’s so much fun! (Mon 11AM) KEN COHEN (Tues 9AM, Tues 4PM) TREASURE COHEN is a Jewish family education consultant and a college professor of child development. For the last 35 years, she has focused on connecting young families to the joy of Jewish living. learning and growth. She is the former director of family and community education for the MetroWest NJ Jewish Federation, and a pioneer in developing Shabbat and holiday services for young families. (Sun 2PM, Mon 11AM, Mon 4PM, Tues 11AM) SHARON CORES is a Lead Teacher at the Jewish Preschool of Lexington in Lexington, Massachusetts. She is celebrating her Bat Mitzvah year as a teacher having previously obtained a Master’s Degree in Rehabilitation Counseling and working in a variety of clinical settings. Sharon is the Lead Teacher in the 3-4 year old class and this year is co-teaching in a mixed age classroom for ages 3 - 5. (Sun 4PM) BETH CRASTNOPOL has worked with students, parents, and teachers for over 35 years in the field of special education. She spent the bulk of her career in public schools where she taught students with a variety of disabilities and coordinated a school’s special education staff. Beth worked to train over 150 teachers in a program called Thinking Maps, which helps students of all grade levels develop and apply higher level thinking and organizational skills. In 2010, Beth joined the Gateways staff as a Learning Specialist at Maimonides and is currently the Gateways Director of Professional Development. Her primary responsibility is to support schools through the B’Yadenu grant, which involves working with six day schools to expand their capacity to reach diverse learners through professional development. (Mon 2PM)


129 LYNN ANNE CUTLER currently teaches fourth and fifth graders at Temple Beth Am in Parsippany, NJ, and Temple Sholom of West Essex in Cedar Grove, with an emphasis on early Hebrew prayer mastery. She previously taught all sorts of other things, earned an M.F.A. in Creative Writing, and directed Day Camp. She is a strong believer in Jewish Education, friendship, classroom fun, being outside, and children. (Tues 4PM) JAN DARSA is Director of Jewish education at Facing History and Ourselves. She facilitates Facing History workshops, institutes, and other professional development programs for teachers across the country and in Israel and provides follow-up consultations for individual teachers and schools. She has developed a curriculum designed for educators in Jewish day schools and supplementary schools entitled Jews of Poland. This book is being used in over 200 Jewish day and supplementary schools. She has researched the Warsaw Ghetto, the artists of Terezin, and European Jewry before the 1930’s. She has written numerous articles on Holocaust education. Prior to coming to Facing History, she taught English and social studies in public and Jewish middle and high schools and at Tufts University. Darsa received a B.A. in English literature from the University of California at Berkeley and an M.Ed. from Boston University and has studied Hebrew and Jewish Studies at the World Union of Jewish Students in Israel. She has been a Jerusalem Fellow, studying education and Jewish studies and a scholar-in-residence in South Africa. (Mon 9AM, Tues 9:15AM) DALIA DAVIS is the director of Beit Midrash in Motion, an approach to Jewish text study incorporating movement and meditation for a fully embodied learning experience. She also explores Jewish ideas through dance as Artistic Director of La’ad Dance Company (Learn, Analyze, Ask, Dance). Degrees in dance, Jewish Education and Talmud have allowed her to lead workshop for the Foundation for Jewish Camp, teach for Florence Melton Adult School, and serve as Jewish Educator of the Springfield, MA Jcc. Dalia loves to explore the interface between Judaism and dance and to discover contemporary relevance in ancient sources. (Tues 2PM) EMILIA DIAMANT, MSW is the Director of Programming and Initiatives at Prozdor, a pluralistic high school program at Hebrew College. Her work there includes leadership development, social justice, and travel with teens. She has worked with adolescents in Boston, New York, Italy, Costa Rica, and North Carolina in Jewish and non-Jewish settings. This past year she was a JOIN for Justice Organizing Fellow and spent time exploring social justice leadership from a Jewish perspective. She is thrilled to be back at NewCAJE for year four as a YP! (Sun 2PM, Mon 11AM)


130 IRA J. DOUNN is the Director of Jewish Enrichment for BBYO’s Northeast Hub. He has previously served as Program Director of South Jersey Region BBYO, Associate Coordinator of Jewish Child Care Association’s Bukharian Teen Lounge in Queens, NY, and Teen Educator at Congregation B’nai Jeshurun in Manhattan. He has a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Chicago, is pursuing an MBA at Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business and a Masters in Jewish Education from Hebrew College, and has learned at Yeshivat Hamivtar and Yeshivat Chovevei Torah. He currently lives in Manhattan. (Mon 9AM, Mon 4PM, Tues 2PM) NATASHA DRESNER has more than 20 years of experience working in the nonprofit world and holds a BA in Management and an MBA in Finance. In 2005, she joined the Harold Grinspoon Foundation and the JCamp180 as its first in-house consultant. Natasha provides consulting services in Governance and Board Development, Fundraising, Strategic Thinking and Planning, as well as Leadership Coaching to a large number of Grinspoon as well as private clients. (Mon 2PM) EVERETT FOX is the Allen M. Glick Professor of Judaic and Biblical Studies at Clark University, and the translator of The Five Books of Moses. His next volume, The Early Prophets, will appear in March 2014. (Wed 10:30AM) BATSHEVA FRANKEL’s LaunchBox won the The Jewish Federation of Los Angeles’ “The Next Big Jewish Idea” contest out of over 350 submissions. She has taught Judaic studies, English and acting for over 20 years in a diversity of places througout Los Angeles and the East coast. Batsheva has also been involved in adult education --lecturing and giving classes for Isralight Institute, JConnect, Jewlicious, and LimmudLA . Additionally, she has developed creative curricula used with teens throughout Los Angeles for Pirke Avot, Megilot, and modern Jewish history. Batsheva is also a published writer, performer and director. (Tues 9AM, Tues 2PM) JONATHAN FRIESEM is the manager of the Media Education Lab at the Harrington School of Communication and Media, the University of Rhode Island. After being a media literacy teacher in Israel and graduating from the policy and management in education program at Tel-Aviv University, he decided to pursue his doctoral degree under the supervision of Professor Renee Hobbs, one of the international leading authorities on media literacy education. He is an award winning film producer for his feature film “Yeladin Tovim” and was a member of the Israeli national curriculum committee of cinema and communication. In the last year he has been involved in many afterschool initiatives in RI, especially involving foster youth. (Mon 9:15AM, Mon 2:15PM)


131 TOVA GANNANA is the Director of Jewish Education for Kol Shalom on Bainbridge Island, WA. After attending Tichon Ramah Yerushalayim in 1999 Tova Gardner understood she didn’t want to live in a world without Israel. Because of her love for Am Yisrael she made alyiah in 2000. She served in the IDF, was a member for eight years on Kibbutz Ketura. In 2010 Tova and her husband Nisan moved to Bainbridge Island, WA. Tova is a poet, published in 2012 by Finishing Line Press. She writes film essays for berBICE{MRKT}.com and reviews poetry books for TheRumpus.net. She is the poetry editor of The Arava Review and has been a recipient of an Artist Grant three times from the Vermont Studio Center for poetry. (Mon 2PM, Wed 8:45AM)

DEBBIE GARDNER is a consultant with Gateways: Access to Jewish Education, providing workshops to teachers, administrators and madrichim. In this workshop, she will draw upon her expansive teaching experience in religious, day school and public schools, combining her prior experience as a Human Resources Director, where she designed and implemented management development programs. Her passion and expertise advocating for students with special needs is apparent in the classroom and in the tutoring she does. (Mon 4PM)

SAM GLASER’s soulful music has become part of the fabric of Jewish life in communities worldwide. Named one of the top ten Jewish artists in the US by Moment magazine, Glaser tours to over fifty cities annually and has appeared at such venues as L.A.’s Staples Center and Dodger Stadium, on Broadway and at the White House. Sam has released 24 best-selling Jewish albums including The Promise, The Songs We Sing, Hallel, Presence and the award winning children’s CD Soap Soup. In his cutting-edge recording studio, Glaser Musicworks, he produces albums for a wide variety of recording artists and composes for such networks as the WB, ESPN and PBS. (Mon 11AM, Mon 4PM, Tues 11AM)

ERIC GOLDMAN teaches cinema at Yeshiva University and The Jewish Theological Seminary and is a highly respected film educator. He is president of Ergo Media, a NJ-based distributor specializing in Jewish film. Prior to that, Eric was director of the Jewish Media Service, which was a central clearinghouse on media for the North American Jewish community. He is also film reviewer for New Jersey’s The Jewish Standard. Dr. Goldman’s latest book, The American Jewish Story through Cinema was published this past April. You can follow him on twitter at @drgoldman. (Tues 4PM)


132 GABE GOLDMAN, former Director of Experiential Learning at the American Jewish, has worked in Jewish education for four decades - classroom teacher, curriculum director, trip leader, university professor. He holds a PhD in Curriculum Development; studied at the yeshiva of the Bostonner Rebbe; and is certified to teach ancient wilderness survival skills. He is author of Guide for the Perplexed: A Jewish Meditation Primer; Indoor Gardening for Young Jewish Gardeners; and Mah Rabu Ma-asekah, Edible and Medicinal Plants. He and Pam (married 38 years) now live in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania where he directs Outdoor Jewish Classroom and serves as an educational consultant nationally. (Mon 9AM, Wed 10:30AM) DEBORAH GOLDSTEIN is a Judaica teacher at Beth Meyer Synagogue in Raleigh North Carolina. She has teaches all ages from preschool through adulta in the preschool, religious school, high school and adult education programs. For many years she has taught a variety of Jewish texts to children from upper elementary through high school, warts and all, unabridged and uncensored. Her greatest joy as a teacher is to see a child (or adult) grapple with our sacred texts. (Sun 4PM) MITCH GORDON is a Jewish lay leader, mediator, nonprofit executive, board member, consultant, writer, martial artist, musician, radio show host/producer, and trainer. He was a founding adviser to the Harvard Negotiation Insight Initiative, lead workshops for the UN’s World Food Programme, The World Bank, Israeli-Palestinian Negotiating Partners program, and Fortune 500 Companies, as well as synagogues and mediation centers. He is the founder of The Center for Alternative Dispute Resolution and Training and Gesher: Building Bridges, where he developed the program - Embracing Conflict: Tools for a Healthier Synagogue. (Mon 9:15AM, Tues 9AM, Tues 2:15PM) ANDREA GOTTLIEB is the Executive Director of JerusalemOnlineU.com, a film based Israel and Jewish education organization. She is coordinating Step up for Israel, an international grass roots Israel education campaign. She currently serves on the Jewish National Fund Eastern Region Board of Directors as well as the board for recruitment for Jack Barrack Hebrew Academy. Andrea lives in Merion, Pa with her husband Richard and 3 children. (Wed 10:30AM) JANIE GRACKIN is a Rabbi and Community Educator using the art of storytelling to inspire and educate. She creates programs for intergenerational populations in synagogues and schools in the United States, Europe and Israel, including “Being Torah Alive!”, the most cutting edge approach to teaching Torah. Janie was awarded the Solomon Schechter Gold Award for Family Education, as well as numerous other educational awards. She is a contributing author to “Mitzvah Stories: Seeds for Inspiration and Learning”, and recently led the Passover Seder, “Walking the Exodus”, at the American Embassy in Berlin, Germany. She can be contacted at www.janiegrackin.com. (Sun 4PM, Tues 9:15AM)


133 JOEL LURIE GRISHAVER is a founder of CAJE and of the Whizin Institute (now Shevet) and a co-owner of Torah Aura Productions. He writes, teaches and trains teachers. (Mon 11AM, Tues 11AM, Tues 4PM) SHERRY GROSSMAN joined Gateways: Access to Jewish Education in July, 2009 where she currently works as the Community Special Education Services Director consulting, coaching, providing professional development and grants management. In 2007-2009, She worked with the Greater Boston Bureau Jewish Education as a consultant and coach in community-based, special needs & early education. In 1988, Sherry founded Gan Yeladim Children’s Garden Day Care Center, Newton, MA for the Jewish Community Centers of Greater Boston (JCCGB) and served as the first Director of the JCCGB Early Learning Centers forging new directions bringing the early learning center programs into the 21st century. Sherry earned her B.A. in Developmental Psychology from Simmons College, M.Ed. from Tufts Eliot Pearson Sc hool of Child Study, and MAJS from Hebrew College. In private practice, Sherry supports positive lasting changes for individuals, families and organizations as a certified professional co-active coach [CPCC] and she recently became a trained Health Rhythms Facilitator. She is the proud mother of two grown sons and one granddaugther! (Mon 11AM, Tues 11AM, Tues 2PM) EITAN GUTIN is in the family business. Fortunately for his Neshama (but unfortunately for his checkbook, and occasionally sanity) that business is Jewish Education. Currently serving as the Director of Lifelong Learning for Tifereth Israel in Washington, DC, Eitan has been both a formal and informal educator in day schools, synagogues, and JCCs. He specializes in matters of Tefillah and spirituality and is a certified Maggid, one who uses stories and learning to connect other Jews with the Divine presence. Eitan, his wife Aviva, and their son Lev (6), live in Silver Spring, MD. . (Mon 11AM, Wed 10:30AM) Rabbi KEVIN HALE is a Sofer STaM, a traditionally trained Torah scribe who spends his days evaluating, repairing and writing Torah/tefillin/megillot and teaching about our sacred scribal tradition. His mentor was Rabbi Eric Ray, z�l a world-renowned sofer. A scholar and teacher of our sacred scribal traditions, Kevin works as a scholar-in-residence to congregations all over the country and beyond. He is passionate about offering hands-on education and enriching our connection to Torah. A 1997 graduate of the Reconstructionist Rabbinical College, he and his family reside in Northampton, MA. . (Mon 9:15AM)


134 SUE HOROWITZ is a Jewish singer-songwriter (religious school director, song leader, teacher, speech-language pathologist, mom-in-charge) who lives in coastal Maine. She writes, often in partnership with Rabbi Lev Baesh, highly singable and usable songs that are appropriate for synagogues, camps, and youth groups. Sue has performed at venues such as URJ Biennial, CAJE, and Limmud, as well as all over New England. Her music has been included in the Ruach music series, Songs for Jewish Head Start, and the new CCAR Hagaddah. Sue has 2 cds of new Jewish music, and she is working on her 3rd cd, to be released this summer. She is thrilled to have formed a new partnership with EJ Cohen! Sue’s engaging presence and spiritual music captivate worshippers and audiences of all ages. www. suehorowitz.com. (Mon 11AM) MICHAL MORRIS KAMIL, a genuine Israeli Irish Leprecohen Jewish educator, has developed a rich ‘armory’ of creative and engaging strategies, approaches and tools for enhancing young Jewish students’ educational learning experiences, engagement, and resolve to take ownership and direction of their community’s Jewish continuity. Michal is an Ashdown Fellow and MBA graduate in International Jewish Education Leadership. Most recently, Michal completed leading a four year extensive Israel education initiative in the Bay Area working with eleven Jewish day schools on professional and curriculum development, and capacity building, called BASIS. (Tues Lunch) CATHY KAPLAN teaches 4th grade Judaica in the Beth Meyer Religious school as well as tutoring B’nei mitzvah students and adult Torah readers, coordinating Torah readers for the synagogue and being the “go-to” woman in the religious school office. She loves being able to spend her working days (and sometimes nights) in the same place where her children have made their Jewish home. (Sun 4PM) HELENE KATES is the lead singer with The Baal Shem Tones and tours internationally providing concerts and Jewish Educational Programs for all ages. She is a music specialist with a B.A. in performing arts and offers a wide variety of workshops in music, songwriting, dance, creative dramatics, meditation and healing. In Atlanta she serves as a cantorial soloist at Ahavath Achim in Atlanta, tutors Bnait Mitzvah students at Temple Sinai and teaches pre-school music at the Weinstein School. Helene attended Beloit College and studied Creative Dramatics. She received K-8 teacher certification and earned a Bachelors degree in 1983. (Sun 2PM, Mon 9AM) DEBRA KERSCHNER is Project Manager of Etgar, and JTS’s representative on a new collaboration among JTS, Hebrew Union College and Yeshiva University, intended to enhance faculty understanding and use of technology in education. (Mon 11AM, Tues 9AM)


135 YOHANNA KINBERG is the Associate Rabbi and Director of Education of Temple B’nai Torah in Bellevue Washington. She has taught mussar in the Seattle area for over a decade. Over the past few years Rabbi Kinberg has developed a passion for team management and how to implement forward thinking and sustainable management practices within Jewish institutions. She is currently working on a book project on leadership for female Jewish professionals. Rabbi Kinberg is the mother of two very active and joyful little boys and is the wife of Rabbi Seth Goldstein. Rabbi Kinberg has a special passion for mentoring female Jewish professionals. (Mon 4PM, Tues 11AM) ETTA KING currently works as the Education Program Manager at the Jewish Women’s Archive. A graduate of Brandeis University and Habonim Dror North America, she combines her passions for storytelling, learning, and community building by helping educators bring Jewish values, culture, and history alive through primary sources. Etta also teaches cooking, nature, improvisational theater, and Israeli dance to students of all ages. You can contact Etta with questions and ideas by going to http://jwa.org/contact/education. (Sun 2PM, Mon 9AM) JEFF KLEPPER is one of the most respected cantors in American Judaism. Raised in New York City, he began to play the guitar at age eight. Early in his song leading career he befriended Debbie Friedman, and several years later met Dan Freelander, who would become his singing partner in Kol B’Seder for more than four decades. Their well known songs include “Modeh Ani,” “Lo Alecha,” and “Shalom Rav.” A graduate of HUC-JIR, Jeff has been cantor of Temple Sinai in Sharon, MA since 2003. Along with a Masters in Music from Northeastern Illinois University he holds an Honorary Doctorate from HUC-JIR, and is on the faculty of the School of Jewish Music at Hebrew College in Newton, MA. (Mon 11AM) Rabbi TRACY KLIRS is the Director of Education at Temple Israel in Charlotte, NC. Over her long career in Jewish education she has piloted dozens of new programs, curricula and initiatives to make Jewish living and learning more engaging and compelling to both children and adults. She continuously strives to make Jews more Jewish and Judaism more accessible. (Wed 10:30AM) Rabbi CHERIE KOLLER-FOX is a founder and past president of CAJE, and served as chair of its Advocacy Commission. She has written and spoken extensively about family education, innovation in Jewish education, and spiritual practices. Along with Everett Fox, she has established the Ezra Institute to promote the study and teaching of Bible. Cherie is the Rabbi of the Chapel Minyan and is practicing the art of chaplaincy. She is now a founder (once more) and president of NewCAJE. She is married to Everett Fox and they have 3 children: Akiva, Leora and Ezra. (Tues 11AM, Tues 4PM)


136 LEORA KOLLER-FOX is a veteran of the CAJE and NewCAJE conferences, having attended most and worked on several. She is flattered to be the inspiration for the Mini-MBA track at NewCAJE. Leora graduated with an MBA this spring from Simmons College School of Management and looks forward to once again bring her knowledge of business to Jewish Educators. (Wed 10:30AM) ERIC KOMAR is one of the most sought-after performers in the Jewish world. Part funky jazz, part acoustic folkiness, part bedazzling guitar soloing, part edgy lyricism ... all Judaism. He currently teaches music at several New Jersey synagogues and has appeared at Jewish venues throughout North America. Look soon for Eric’s fourth Jewish CD, a kids album featuring the vocal talents of his students. He looks forward to meeting you and planning a visit to your community soon! (Mon 4PM, Tues 9AM) SASHA KOPP works full time at Temple Beth Shalom in Needham, MA as a early-childhood educator at their children’s center and as a second and third grade Jewish Learning Guide in the project-based learning elementary program Mayim. Sasha is originally from St. Louis, MO and moved east to attend Brandeis University which she graduated from in 2011. Sasha has also spent time at URJ Camp Kaslman in Seattle as a counselor and art director. She spends her free time making fused glass mezuzot. (Tues 11AM, Wed 10:30AM) Rabbi DANIEL L. LEHMANN is a the president of Hebrew College in Boston MA. .Lehmann has rabbinical ordination from Yeshiva University. He has done graduate work in Jewish studies and education at both New York University and the Bernard Revel Graduate School of Yeshiva University. Lehmann served as the founding headmaster of Gann Academy-The New Jewish High School of Greater Boston and bi and upper-school principal at Beth Tfiloh Community Day School and Congregation in Pikesville, Md. He was the founding director of The Berkshire Institute for Music and Arts, a four-week summer-camp program devoted to music and cultural expression, now known as BIMA at Brandeis. (Mon Night) LENNY LEVIN (Tues 2:15PM, Wed 8:45AM) MARCIA GRUSS LEVINSOHN, MEd, is the founder and director/teacher of the Jewish Educational Workshop, dedicated to strengthening understanding and appreciation of our Yiddish Heritage. Specializing in Early Childhood Education, she has produced four Yiddish picture books, which she presents with accompanying songs, crafts, and activities. Currently she also leads a Yiddish “leyen-krayz” (reading-circle) and a Yiddish Conversation class and two tutoring classes for adults. (Mon 2PM, Tues 4PM)


137 SUSAN EISEMAN LEVITIN, a Wexner Fellow and artist, earned her Master’s Degree at Brandeis. She home schools her kids and makes art in Worcester, MA. (Tues 9AM, Tues 2PM) SAMANTHA LIBBY is a poet, writer and adjunct faculty in the English department at Nichols College. She is the poet in residence (poet rabbi) for an alternative spiritual community based in Weston, MA, led by Daniel Sheff. (Sun 4PM) ELIANA LIGHT is an award-winning singer-songwriter and Jewish educator. She is the Education Director of Bible Raps, an innovative organization that uses hip-hop to teach Torah. She also teaches Jewish prayer through B’nai Mitzvah tutoring, creative services, and music. A recent graduate of Brandeis University, she currently lives in the Boston area but loves traveling and teaching. Her first album of original Jewish music, “A New Light,” is available now! (Sun 4PM, Wed 8:45AM) Guitarist ERIC LINDBERG graduated from Mason Gross School of the Arts for Jazz guitar in 2006 and since has delved into Bluegrass, Country, Old Time, Celtic, and Rock and Roll. Over the last decade he has played and toured throughout the United States, Europe, and the Middle East with various musical acts and bands. Currently Eric is working, writing, and touring with Doni Zasloff, founding member of the Mama Doni Band. Doni and Eric are together combining Prayer and text of the Jewish faith with the musical sensibilities of Bluegrass and Old-time music. Eric has co-produced, recorded, and co-written two Parent’s Choice Award(c) Winning albums alongside Doni and called “Shabbat Shaboom” most recently“Emunah.” In the past 5 years Eric has also committed himself to the study of other Bluegrass instrument including Mandolin, Dobro, and Banjo. (Sun 4PM, Wed 10:30AM) LISA LIPKIN was a professional storyteller for twenty-five years before founding Storystrategies.net, a consultancy that helps organizations tell their stories more effectively. She has worked with many organizations including the European Council of Jewish Communities, Board of Jewish Education, Shell Oil, Johnson and Johnson, and The Dutch Ministry of Defense, showing them how to use the power of narrative to persuade and engage listeners. Her articles have appeared in the New York Times Magazine, Forward, and the New Yorker, among others. She is the author of Bringing the Story Home: the Complete Guide to Storytelling for Parents, and the editor of five books of American poetry. She currently resides in Amsterdam. (Tues 11AM)


138 LESLEY LITMAN is the Coordinator of the Executive M.A. Program in Jewish Education at the Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion and works with the Experiment in Congregational Education as the coordinator of its Boston-based initiative. She also consults to The iCenter in the area of curriculum design and professional development in Israel education. Lesley served as the Director of Congregational Learning at Temple Israel in Boston. Prior to her work at Temple Israel, she was the Regional Educator for the URJ and the URJ’s national specialist in Hebrew and Day School education and served on the staff of Jewish Day Schools for the 21st Century. Lesley was a founding member of Kibbutz Yahel in the Arava where she was the first treasurer and headed up the kibbutz’s search for an industrial project. She is a doctoral candidate in Jewish education at the Jewish Theological Seminary. (Mon 2:15PM) LISA LITMAN is the Director of PJ Goes to School (PJGtS). Her responsibilities include expanding the program to new school communities, providing ongoing support and resource materials, and giving the PJGtS an updated look and feel. Lisa joined the PJ Library in 2012 after a long tenure at JCC Association of North America, having served as Director of Programming and Curriculum Specialist. Lisa was a co-creator of An Ethical Start, JCC Association’s signature early childhood program based on Jewish values. Lisa has extensive experience in professional development training, both on-site and online. She has been an education consultant, workshop presenter and keynote speaker in a myriad of settings. Lisa has a M.Ed. from Gratz College and participated in the Reggio Emilia Study Tour in Reggio Emilia, Italy. (Tues 4PM) Since 2004, AVRAM MANDELL has served as Director of Education at Leo Baeck Temple, a 600-family Reform congregation in Los Angeles, California. He received a Master of Arts degree in Jewish Education (MAJE) from Hebrew Union College – Jewish Institute of Religion (HUC-JIR) in Los Angeles. For nearly twenty years, he has taught in a variety of Jewish settings, including youth groups, summer camps, religious schools, and LimmudLA. He is the creator of two popular Hebrew learning apps and an award-winning Jewish radio station. Avram authored “Carry Over the Feelings and Practices of Passover” (Reform Voices of Torah, April, 2011); “Derech HaLimud – The Way to Study” (The Hebrew Project, July, 2010); and “Funny Man”, Still Small Voice: Reflections on Being A Jewish Man (URJ Press, 2007). (Mon 4PM, Tues 2PM) ROBERT MESSING graduated Clark University with a BA in Philosophy and has MBAs from City University and New York University. His interest in archeology and ancient numismatics goes back to his first trip to Israel in 1959. Since then, he has gone on numerous archeological digs in Israel. He also identified and cleaned artifacts from the Temple Mount in Jerusalem. Bob has written articles on ancient coins that have appeared in “Hadassah Magazine” and “The Shekel” and was a founding member of the American Israel Numismatic Association. (Tues 11AM)


139 RACHEL MEYTIN is the Director of Panim and Jewish Enrichment at BBYO, Inc. Since joining PANIM in 2004, Rachel has worked with thousands of teens and professionals, helping them make the connection between Judaism and social justice - and feeling empowered make change happen. She also developed an intensive 5-day training program for Jewish service-learning professionals, through which she has trained more than 75 professionals. Rachel holds an MAEd and an MBA from the University of Judaism in Los Angeles as well as graduate-level advanced certification in service-learning through NYLC and the University of Wisconsin. She currently lives in the DC suburbs with her wife and their two children. (Mon 9AM, Mon 4PM, Tues 2PM) Rabbi GOLDIE MILGRAM, www.ReclaimingJudaism.org, is best known for her inspiring programs and innovative resources that prepare Jewish educators, clergy and families to guide students towards more meaningfully living and loving their Judaism. A widely published author, internationally acclaimed storyteller and workshop leader, who has served as a religious school teacher, principal, BJE director, Federation executive, & seminary dean, “Reb Goldie” returns with her newest releases: “Mitzvah Stories: Seeds for Inspiration and Learning” and matching 52 card decks of MITZVAH CARDS (Reclaiming Judaism Press), and “Living Jewish Live Cycle: How to Create Meaningful Jewish Rites of Passage at Every Stage of Life” (Jewish Lights). (Mon 8AM, Mon 11AM, Mon 4PM, Tues 11AM, Tues 2PM, Wed 8:45AM) Dr. DEBORAH D. MILLER directs Etgar Yesodi, a curriculum being developed for grades 3-5 in complementary settings. She is Associate Director of the Melton Research Center for Jewish Education at the Davidson Graduate School of Jewish Education, Jewish Theological Seminary. Debby was the founding editor and project director of MaToK, the Bible curriculum for Jewish day schools. Debby is the Project Director of the Education Initiative grant from the Jim Joseph Foundation at JTS. She is the author of Only Nine Chairs: A Tall Tale for Passover and other Jewish children’s books. (Mon 11AM , Tues 9AM) HALL MILLER-JACOBS spent his working life making technology usable to people; he now tries to do this with Torah & Tefilah. He works with both adults and children inviting them to develop stories (mirashim) on Torah themes. He has also been a finalist in the MassMouth story slam competition for the past several years. (Tues 9AM) SANDY MILLER JACOBS has spent most of her adult life teaching future and current teachers how to reach students with special needs so that both students and teachers can be successful. For the past 12 years she has worked in the Jewish community to support inclusive educational programs while at the Bureau of Jewish Education of Greater Boston and as a professor at Hebrew College. She is a Professor Emerita in Special Education at Fitchburg State University in Massachusetts. (Tues 4PM)


140 DEBI SWEDELSON MISHAEL earned a Master’s Degree in Education from the University of Judaism (now American Jewish University) and has been teaching for 36 years. Among Debi’s many talents is her ability to create interactive, engaging lessons that create dynamic leaning environments for all ages. Debi is the proprietor of All Yadayim, an enterprise devoted to trading visual enhancements for community tzedakah needs. Debi currently lives in Houston, TX, teaches at Congregation Brith Shalom and is an adjunct faculty member of SHEVET: Jewish Family Education Exchange. (Mon 2PM, Tues 4PM) NECHAMA SKOLNIK MOSKOWITZ is the Senior Director and Director of Curriculum Resources at the Jewish Education Center of Cleveland. She has been a camp educator, congregational director, day school head and author of Jewish educational materials. Her Masters is from the RHSOE, HUC-JIR. (Tues 11AM, Wed 8:45AM) LARA NICOLSON joined the Macks Center for Jewish Education (CJE) in Baltimore in 2011 to facilitate the Family Engagement Community of Practice and is coordinator of the jOYbaby program which welcomes first-time parents to the Baltimore Jewish Community. In 2012, she took on the role as Coordinator of PJ Library in Baltimore. She is passionate about family education and enrichment through the PJ library and particularly enjoys working on the PJ on the Town and PJ Pals programs which give her the opportunity to meet PJ families in person. Lara was also responsible for the launch of Kveller Baltimore, a franchise of the New York website, with Jewish parenting resources and a family events calendar. Prior to her current role, Lara worked as an HRand Training professional in several multinational corporations in South Africa and Europe. (Mon 4PM) KATE O’BRIEN, MA, is the Director of Education, Innovation & Organizing at the Workmen’s Circle. Her vision of Jewish education is built on three pillars: Imagination. Relationships. Action. Her mission at the Workmen’s Circle is to build new Jewish cultural Learning Communities that welcome K-8th graders and their families to connect with their Jewish cultural heritage, celebrate joyful holidays, and engage in meaningful social justice activism. Kate earned three MA degrees at Jewish Theological Seminary (Bible, Education, Jewish Studies). She has taught students of all ages in many educational settings for 15 years. She also is a trained hospital chaplain. (Tues 2PM, Wed 8:45AM) JILL PAUL is a Mentor for JCamp 180. Jill came to the Institute after a successful 25-year career in nonprofit management and fundraising as the CEO of Girl Scouts of Pioneer Valley. During her tenure there, Jill completed a successful capital campaign, with new construction and modernization of the oldest Girl Scout camp in the nation. Before coming to New England, Jill established West Pacific Girl Scouts for military families in Japan, Korea and the Philippines, living in Japan and Korea for five years. Jill holds an MA in Asian Studies from San Diego State University, and an MBA from the UMass - Amherst. (Mon 11AM)


141 MICHAEL PITKOWSKY is the Rabbinics Curriculum Coordinator at the Academy for Jewish Religion and an Adjunct Assistant Professor at the Jewish Theological Seminary of America. His areas of interst are Rabbinic and Talmudic Literature, the development of Jewish Law, Jewish Law in the Modern World, and religion in the State of Israel. He blogs about topics related to Judaism, Jewish learning, and Israel at http://menachemmendel.net/blog/. (Sun 4PM) CINDY QUITT is a Judaic Studies teacher at Congregation B’nai Israel, Rumson, NJ. She holds a M.Ed. from Monmouth University. Cindy’s teaching experience includes Art Dept. Head at Greylock Camp for Boys and Judaic Studies in Reform and Conservative after school programs. She has specialized in creative arts as a teaching tool for Hebrew and Judaic studies for K-12 curriculum. (Mon 9AM) A native of Israel, EYAL RAV-NOY has studied at various rabbinical seminaries, and at age 24, began teaching classes on Jewish topics as a hobby. He later founded JLA, where he has developed an array of classes on topics related to Judaism, specifically courses on the Bible, Jewish Philosophy, Biblical Criticism, and Biblical Archeology. Eyal is the author of the book Who Really Wrote the Bible? And Why it Should Be Taken Seriously Again and has lectured all over the US and abroad. When he is not working or spending time with his family, Eyal enjoys running marathons and playing guitar. (Mon 9AM, Tues 9AM, Wed 8:45AM) AMY RIPPS is the Director of Education and Youth Programs at Beth Meyer Synagogue in Raleigh, NC, where she also served as lay-Rabbi for one year. Prior to relocating to North Carolina almost 20 years ago, Amy was based in the Washington, D.C., area where she held a number of education and youth-related positions at both the Reform and Conservative congregations. She chaired CAJE 31 at Duke University and has presented a numerous conferences. (Sun 2PM) Cantor JERI ROBINS is a graduate of the Cantor/Educator Program at Hebrew College through the School of Jewish Music and the Shoolman Graduate School of Education. She is the Cantor/Director of Education at Temple Beth Shalom in Peabody, MA. Previously, she taught Judaica and served as the Hebrew Coordinator at Temple Beth Shalom in Needham, and taught at Temple Reyim and Temple Shalom in Newton, where she also served as Student Cantor. Cantor Robins produced the highly acclaimed scripted concert “Sounds of Survival: Music of the Women’s Orchestra of Auschwitz.” (Sun 2PM, Wed 10:30PM) A Resident Scholar in the Brandeis University Women’s Studies Research Center, ROSIE ROSENZWEIG’s memoir “A Jewish Mother in Shangri-la (re-issued as an ebook by SHambhala.com) describes her travels with her Buddhist son through France, India and Nepal to meet his gurus. She is an ordained Jewish Meditation Teacher writing a book on the process of creativity. She is a contributing editor to examiner.com, an online news agency. (Tues 11AM, Tues 2PM)


142 RABBI DENNIS S. ROSS is author of God in Our Relationships: Spirituality between People from the Teachings of Martin Buber as well as All Politics Is Religious: Speaking Faith to the Media Policy Makers and Community. He has written for The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Jewish Daily Forward, and he blogs for Religion Dispatches and RH Reality Check. Rabbi Ross directs Concerned Clergy for Choice, an interfaith reproductive rights advocacy network of 1000 clergy. He also serves at Congregation Beth Emeth in Albany, N. Y. His web site is www.DennisRoss.net. (Sun 4PM) Rabbi MICHAEL ROTHBAUM serves as Rabbi/Educator at Beth Chaim Congregation in Danville, CA, and lives with his partner, Yiddish singer Anthony Russell, in Oakland. Rabbi Mike has received accolades for his educational programming in religious school, B’nai Mitzvah, Youth Group, and Camp settings. He has also done extensive work with faith-based social justice organizations, including Bend the Arc and JFREJ This past summer, he joined a rabbinic delegation to Ghana, sponsored by AJWS. Rabbi Mike has appeared in several media outlets, including WAMC Public Radio, CNN and WABC-TV. A sermon of his was included in the anthology Peace, Justice, and Jews: Reclaiming Our Tradition. Outside of Torah, his interests include fair wages, Bob Dylan, and manual transmission. (Wed 8:45AM) CHAVA ROUSCH-CARLISLE is a member of Beth-El Congregation where she is teaching the 8th and 9th grade Midrasha program. Not only has she been teaching Religious School for over 15 years, but Chava has worked with Jewish Youth Groups and Girl Scouts as well. She also holds a teaching certificate for 4-8th grades and taught 7th and 8th Grade Science in public school. More recently, Chava has been home with her family and looks forward to earning her Master’s degree. (Mon 2PM, Wed 8:45AM) JORDYN ROZENSKY is the Director of Social Media at the Jewish Women’s Archive. Prior to her work at JWA she was the Director of Service and Young Adult Programs at the Jewish Community Relations Council of Greater Boston. She is also a photographer, having both taken courses and acted as a teaching assistant at the New England School of Photography. Her photography can be seen at www.jordynrozensky.com. (Tues 2PM) DEBORAH SALOMON is a pioneer in Jewish education. She founded the innovative and non-traditional model for Jewish learning, Hebrew Wizards. Her unique Curriculum is now being used in over 10 schools throughout the country. As Rabbi and Director, Deborah continues to engage students, teens and families. Her father was a Rabbi and her mother a Jewish educator, so it’s 2nd nature. Deborah earned her B.A in Economics and Hebrew from the State University at Binghamton and her M.B.A in Investment Management from Pace University. Deborah was ordained as a Rabbi in January, 2013 from Jewish Spiritual Leaders Institute, JSLI, under the leadership of Rabbi Steven Blane. (Tues 9AM, 4PM)


143 LEONARD SAMBOROWSKI has degrees in strategic planning and management, as well as thirty years in the U.S. Army working in intelligence, operational implementation, and coordination of large operations. He has published papers at Harvard and MIT, and is a visiting Assistant Professor at Nichols College. (Sun 4PM) MIRA SCHARF is a freelance animator, designer, illustrator, cartoonist and educator living in NYC. With an MFA in Animation, she currently teaches animation and visual design courses at Pratt Institute and at Bramson Ort College. She also teaches various courses at Touro College, one of which is called Entertainment and Education Design. In this course, current trends in new media are explored and students create their own unique ‘edutainment’ products. More recently, Mira is excited about app development. She created “Hebrew Land of Shenanigans” a fun and educational iPad app available for download. (Mon 4PM) DEBORAH SCHEIN, PhD is an early childhood educator and consultant. She specializes in professional development of teachers and nurturing the spiritual life of children. Deb lives in Cleveland, Ohio with her husband Rabbi Jeffrey Schein. They are parents to three grown children and grandparents to three young grandchildren. (Tues 2PM, Wed 8:45AM) Dr. JEFFREY SCHEIN is the director of the Adolescent initiative and special projects at the Jewish Education Center of Cleveland. For twenty years he was a professor of Jewish education at the Siegal College of Judaic Studies. He is a Reconstructionist Rabbi. (Mon 9AM, Mon 2PM, Tues 11AM, Wed 8:45AM) PENINNAH SCHRAM is a storyteller, teacher, author and recording artist. She is a professor of Speech and Drama at Yeshiva University and the author of 12 Jewish folktales. Her album is titled The Minstrel and the Storyteller, which she recorded with singer/guitarist Gerard Edery. Peninnah was awarded the National Storytelling Network’s 2003 Lifetime Achievement Award “for sustained and exemplary contributions to storytelling in America.” (Mon 2PM, Tues 2PM, 8:45AM) CHERIE KARO SCHWARTZ is a storyteller, author and educator in Denver. She has shared spirit-filled stories for four decades across the USA and abroad. Cherie creates programs for synagogues, organizations, museums, schools, interfaith, teens, seniors, multi-faith, and multi-generational groups. She has created three books: MY LUCKY DREIDEL, KIDS’ CATALOG OF PASSOVER, and CIRCLE SPINNING. (Mon 11AM, Mon 2PM, Wed 8:45AM)


144 NEIL SCHWARTZ served as “Kol Bo” Hazzan for a small congregation in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. He recently completed a Master of Arts in Religion and Culture, and he teaches Trope and Nusach online for Hebrew College. Neil also notates liturgical music for “Tefillah Trainer” (tm) software produced by Kinnor. com, and he has been very involved in community interfaith activities. (Sun 2PM, Tues 9:15AM) Rabbi P. J. SCHWARTZ is Assistant Rabbi at Temple Israel in Westport, CT. He was ordained from the Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion in June 2013. He also holds a Master of Arts in Hebrew Letters as well as a Master of Educational Administration with a Specialization in Jewish Education. He has served congregations in Marion, Indiana, Ishpeming, MI, and Marion, OH. Most recently, he served as Rabbinic Intern at Isaac M. Wise Temple and Rabbinic Chaplain for Jewish Family Service. (Wed 10:30AM) In DAVID SCHWARZ’s role as Educational Consultant and Technical Support Lead at Behrman House he speaks daily with educators from all across North America to help them make improvements in their schools. David’s goal is to make religious school a positive and impactful experience in every student’s life. David is a New Jersey native and Rutgers University graduate. He has over 10 years of formal Jewish education ranging from Hebrew language to Religious Studies. In his free time, he volunteers by teaching basic Judaism to students on college campuses. (Sun 4PM, Mon 4PM) SUSAN SHANE-LINDER is an award-winning singer, songwriter, published composer, and recording artist. She is well known and has presented and performed at numerous early childhood and religious school workshops, summer camps and national organizations including CAJE, NewCAJE & NAEYC. 2009 Nickelodeon Parents’ Picks Award for best party entertainer in Miami/Ft. Lauderdale nominee, and WON in 2010. In 2012, she won the Gerald Legow Outstanding Achievement in Jewish Education Award (known as “Teacher of the Year”). She has taught and performed for the South Florida Jewish community for over thirty years. She has three CDs with #4 due May 2013. www.singinwithsusan.com (Tues 11AM) JOYCE SIEGEL has a passion for Jewish education for all ages, and is an ordained rabbi looking to assist with lifecycle events, premarital counseling, Hebrew tutoring, and making Judaism accessible to all. Check out my website at www.judaicconsulting.com (Sun 4PM)


145 ELIZABETH (LIZ) SINGER is a third generation St. Louis, MO resident. She stayed in the Midwest to attend Drake University in Des Moines, IA completing an undergraduate degree in Performing Arts. After receiving her master’s degree in Social Work (Community Organizing) from Saint Louis University, Liz spent a year at Pardes Institute of Jewish Studies in Israel and was awarded a Fellowship, to return for a second year in 2003. Currently, Liz can be found shaping the Jewish experience for the families that she works with as the Director of the Temple Emanuel Religious School in Creve Coeur, MO. (Mon Lunch, Tues Lunch) SARAH SINOFSKY teaches preschoolers on the weekdays and middle schoolers on Sundays, but spends every day as a student of the world. She has been involved in Jewish education and leadership since birth, and dreams of bringing peace and hippie kibutznik love to her hometown community in Fort Worth, Texas. This will be her first year attending NewCAJE, and she is honored and excited to be presenting as well. (Mon 9AM, Tues 4PM) PERI SMILOW uses music to change the world. As an international performing artist, composer, educator and activist she has the unique ability to move people of all ages using her talent, passion, music and belief in community to create social change. She is the founder of The Freedom Music Project a black-Jewish musical collaboration and is currently touring her one-woman cabaret: Peri Smilow sings the Great [Jewish] American Songbook. Peri holds a Masters in Education from the Harvard Graduate School of Education and worked for nearly 20 years in educational non-profit organizations serving inner city youth during after school hours. www.perismilow.com. (Tues 2PM) MAX SOCOL is the school principal at Temple Beth Or in Raleigh, NC. He is originally from Greensboro, NC. His wife Allison is a PhD candidate at UNCCH. (Mon 2PM, Mon 2PM) ELAINE SOLOMON has taught students in elementary, middle, and high schools from 1966 to 2003. After retiring as a teacher of psychology at the high school level, Elaine turned her attention to Jewish education collaborating with her husband, Richard, on several books, articles and blog posts to enhance Jewish education. Elaine has co-designed and co-facilitated graduate courses and workshops in educational pedagogy with Richard for both Jewish and secular educators. (Mon 11AM, 2PM) RICHARD SOLOMON has served as an adjunct professor at Baltimore Hebrew University in Maryland and Gratz College in Pennsylvania, teaching graduate courses in supervision and staff development, instruction and classroom management. From 1972 to 2001 Richard was the Cantorial soloist at Temple Isaiah, Columbia, MD and also taught students in the supplemental school as well as adults in the Temple’s adult education program. He earned his Ph.D. from the University of Maryland in 1977. (Mon 11AM, 2PM)


146 PAUL SOLYN is director of the Jewish Community School in Elmira, NY. He holds the M.J.Ed. degree and family educator certificate from Hebrew College, Boston. (Tues 11AM, 2PM) RUTH DUBIN STEINBERG is the Director of Education at Congregation B’nai Brith in Santa Barbara, California and has been involved in Jewish education for over 30 years - in both formal and informal settings. She served on the faculty of Los Angeles Hebrew High School for over 10 years - and still serves on the Judaic faculty of Camp Ramah in California every summer. Ruth holds masters degrees from both the University of Southern California in Social Work and from Hebrew Union College in Jewish Communal Service. She holds an active license to practice Clinical Social Work and is also a trained Cantor. She has also been very active in the field of Holocaust Education. (Wed 8:45AM) LIZZIE SWAN (Tues 9AM, 4PM) TZIONA SZAJMAN is a rabbi at Temple Israel in Vestal NY. She has a love of midrash and has studied and taught midrash to people of all ages in synagogue and university classes. Her innovative approach incorporates poetry, music, art, drama, storytelling and yoga. Check out my blog at www.rabbitziona.com (Sun 4PM) STEPHANIE TANKEL is the Assistant Director of Religious Education at Washington Hebrew Congregation, where she has worked for the past 4 years. Stephanie received her Master’s Degrees in Jewish Education and Modern Jewish Studies from the JTS of America and received her Bachelors Degree in Comparative Literature, Hebrew, and Jewish Studies from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Prior to moving to Washington, DC, Stephanie lived in London where she served as the Principal Educator at The West London Synagogue as well as Director of Education at Finchley Progressive Synagogue. She has also worked at Central Synagogue in New York City. (Tues 4PM) ‘Miss’ EMILY ARONOFF TECK is a Jewish Music Educator who believes in the power of informal education and utilizes music as her tool of choice. She is currently pursuing a Ed.D. in Jewish Education from Gratz College. Her focus is early engagement of Jewish kids and their families through developmentally appropriate, enjoyable and meaningful musical experiences. Emily has released albums, ‘For Shabbat!’ and ‘Every Day!’ and was featured on the PJ Library’s album ‘This is Me!’. Emily also works with Jewish Learning Matters, creating and editing curricular materials to support the use of books and music to teach Jewish values. (Mon 2PM, Wed 8:45AM)


147 RONNI TICKER is the director of the Temple Institute of Religion at Congregation Ahavath Chesed in Jacksonville, FL. She has been a Jewish formal and informal educator for more than 20 years for students from tots to adults. Ronni has taught classes at previous CAJE inferences on topics ranging from Strategic Planning for Jewish Schools to Teaching Torah to Middle Schoolers Hevruta Style. She holds a MAJS from Gratz College, MBA from Duke University and BS from Lehigh. (Sun 4PM, Wed 8:45AM)

DAN WAXMAN is currently a teacher for 3rd, 6th, and 8th/9th grades and madrichim coordinator at Temple Rodef Shalom Religious School. He also works full-time at George Mason University. He is also a doctoral student in educationhigher education administration specialization with a secondary emphasis in public administration with a research interest in college students with ADHD at George Mason University. He received his Bachelors in Environmental Studies from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He holds a Master of Public Administration from George Mason University. (Mon 4PM)

ALISON WESTERMANN is a Jewish educator, singer-songwriter and mother from El Paso, TX. She combines her years of experience in Jewish education with her folk-inspired music to “sing a new song!” Alison is also a two-time national award winner for her song “Adonai Tzuri V’Goali,” first as a NewCAJE New Voices winner in 2011 and most recently on the Ruach 5773 album. (Wed 8:45AM)

JUDI WISCH serves as the Community Engagement Director for PJ Library, a program of the Harold Grinspoon Foundation. She supports PJ communities across the continent to develop strategies to reach out and engage Jewish families within and outside the organized Jewish community. Her past endeavors include: Education Director, Beit Ahavah Reform Congregation, Northampton, MA; Coordinator, Pioneer Valley Jewish Film Festival; Judaic Studies instructor, LGA Schechter. Previous to landing in the Pioneer Valley, Judi founded a havurah and her own little Jewish school in the backwoods of New Hampshire, served as a board member and director of the Conference on Judaism in Rural New England, facilitated conflict resolution workshops for Arab and Jewish Israeli teens at the Neve Shalom / Wahat al Salaam School for Peace in Israel, received a BA from Hebrew University, and a MA in Intercultural Management from the School for International Training. (Mon 4PM)


148 JONATHAN WOLF organized the full day devoted to Pluralism issues at the CAJE conference in 1986. He has taught and spoken in support of the idea of Jewish unity at many congregations, conferences, and community institutes. He helped found and lead pluralistic Jewish organizations including CAJE, Beyond Shelter Coalition, L’OLAM (the Jewish Environmental Network), Friends of Interfaith Encounter Association, LimmudChicago, Shma Magazine Fellows, AJWS Associates, NACOEJ, Meimad USA, Jewish Vegetarians, Beit Midrash Elul, New Jewish Agenda, Kibbutz Gezer, and Jewish Student Network. He believes, and practices, that Jewish progress and survival today depend on many kinds of Jews studying and working together, in order to advance in unison. (Sun 2PM, Mon 2PM) LEAH WOLFF-PELLINGRA is an Educational Consultant for URJ Press, creating Project Based curricula that builds educational experiences in ways that combine contemporary technology with tradition. She holds her ExecMAJEd from HUC-JIR. Her research focuses on women’s roles in Jewish life as a frame for the enduring dilemma between continuity and change. As a Cantorial Soloist, Leah serves as Family Worship Coordinator at Congregation Gates of Heaven in Schenectady, NY. Leah’s storytelling has been featured on NPR and RJ.org; her debut album of original Jewish music will be released this summer. (Tues 4PM) AMANDA JILL WOOD (Mon 2PM, Tues 4PM) LORI WEINSTOCK WYNTERS, PhD, MFA is a theatre artist, musician, radical thinker, Jewish educator and rabbinical student at Aleph Rabbinical Ordination program. She has directed Jewish summer camps, designed Hebrew school curriculum, led shabbat and High holiday services at Woodstock Jewish Congregation, Jewish Community of New Paltz, serves as faculty at SUNY New Paltz and Goddard College, teaches theatre education at Lesley University in Netanya, Israel and is committed to sharing the joy of the Jewish wisdom tradition, a love of t’filah, hasidut, ethics and culture as well as inviting young people’s thinking on R’Kook’s invitation to make the old new and the new holy. (Mon 2PM) MARK S. YOUNG is the program coordinator of the Experiential Learning Initiative, within the William Davidson Graduate School of Jewish Education at The Jewish Theological Seminary. In this role, Mark has developed and helped launch Davidson’s MA Program in Jewish Experiential Education. Mark has also designed and manages Davidson’s new professional development program, the Jewish Experiential Leadership Institute for JCC Professionals, coordinated in partnership with the JCC Association. Mark earned a BS in Psychology and Economics from McGill University in Montreal, Canada, and an MPA in Nonprofit Management and MA in Hebrew and Judaic Studies from New York University. (Mon 11AM, Mon 4PM, Tues 9AM, Tues 4PM)


149 DONI ZASLOFF THOMAS (aka Mama Doni) is a mom, music teacher, songwriter, and lead singer in The Mama Doni Band, honored with a 2013 Parents Choice(R) Award for her latest CD EMUNAH, a 2011 Parents Choice(R) Award for their CD, Shabbat Shaboom, and winner of the Simcha Award for “Inspiring Joy Through Music” in competition with more than 100 bands from 15 different countries at the International Jewish Music Festival in Amsterdam. Mama Doni celebrates Jewish culture with irrepressible zest in its high-energy, interactive family rock concerts and acoustic Shabbat experiences filled with a contagious and unexpected blend of reggae, rock, disco, Latin and klezmer - all woven together with soulful energy and a super hip Jewish sensibility. In Fall 2012, Mama Doni released a new book through Behrman House Publishers called “Get Cooking! A Jewish American Family Cookbook & Rockin’ Mama Doni Celebration”. This book is a family guide for adding more fun to every holiday, from Sukkot to the Suberbowl. (Sun 4PM, Wed 10:30PM) AVI ZUCKERMAN, master teacher of Jewish education through the arts in the past 25 years is the founder of The Ultimate Art Workshop, where thousands of students thought-out the US participated in creating high end Jewish art. Avi has taught in various settings in the United States, ranging from Hebrew schools and museums, to summer camps, JCCs and CAJE conferences. He has also taught in Israeli high schools for the arts , and at his own art studio in Ein Hod. (Tues 9AM, Wed 8:45AM)


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WHO’S WHO AT NEWCAJE? THE PERFORMERS ELLEN ALLARD is one of the most popular & influential Jewish musicians & educators on today’s Jewish music scene. Presenting family concerts, Tot & Family Wow Worship Experiences, keynotes & teacher workshops, and Instant Choir-On-The-Spot for children and/or adults, she is committed to building community through music. Unique, charismatic, charming, and heartwarming, Ellen knows how to engage people, sometimes goofy, sometimes serious, always meaningful. Ellen creates powerful, moving & spiritual moments that speak to heart, mind, and soul. There’s a reason why Sirius/XM satellite radio plays Rabbi BOB ALPER’S comedy bits many times daily, often sandwiched between Bob Newhart and Bill Cosby: Bob’s background…he served congregations for fourteen years and holds a doctorate from Princeton Theological Seminary… prepared him well for a twenty-five year comedy career with delicious material presented in a way that’s intelligent, hilarious, and 100% clean. The New York Times put it succinctly: Bob “…had the audience convulsing.” From Hollywood’s IMPROV to The Montreal Comedy Festival toMuslimfest 2009 (really), Bob’s unique brand of humor has a universal appeal. Bob is particularly proud of The Laugh in Peace Tour, over 200 shows with his Muslim and Arab stand-up pals, frequently on college campuses with Jewish and Muslim co-sponsorship. Visit Bob at www.bobalper.com THE BAAL SHEM TONES (Helene & Michael Kates) are simply one of the best live bands in Jewish music today. Their finely crafted songs are characterized by powerful, pulsating rhythms and vibrant vocal arrangements – skills they’ve sharply honed over years of touring experience. At festivals they can often be found surrounded by an enthusiastic crowd while they play song after song from their huge repertoire of popular music going back to the 1920s. In concert they love pulling out a beautifully rendered Gershwin or Dylan standard at the perfect moment. For their fans, a Baal Shem Tones program is much more than great music. It’s a spiritual event that resonates for years.


151 BRUCE BIERMAN is one of the leading specialists in Jewish and Klezmer dance in California and has studied with several masters in New York, Poland and Israel including: Dr. Zev Walter Feldman, Michael Alpert, Steve Wientraub, Deborah Strauss and the legendary Felix Fibich. Bruce has been a leading presenter of participatory Yiddish dance for major festivals, performances and conferences including the Berkeley Jewish Music Festival, KlezCalifornia, Klezmerquerque and the Los Angeles Jewish Symphony at the John Anson Ford Theater. He has joined forces with some of the leading klezmer bands including: Veretski Pass, The Klezmatics and the Isles of Klezbos. EMILIA DIAMANT is a Boston native who has lived in New York City, Florence Italy, Jerusalem, Costa Rica, North Carolina, and finally returned to her homeland this year. She completed her undergraduate degree in Urban Informal Education (with an emphasis on Performing Arts) at NYU, then in Costa Rica she worked at a boarding school as a Drama teacher, Dorm Supervisor, and College counselor. Finally she landed in Raleigh NC, where she worked as a substance abuse and mental health counselor and then as Principal and Youth Director of Temple Beth Or. She received her MSW with a certificate in Non Profit Business Administration in May 2012. She works at Prozdor as the Director of Programming and Initiatives, teaching social justice, organizing, and helping to re-envision the next iteration of Jewish education. She loves to write/listen to/ perform spoken word poetry and hang out with her boyfriend Nathan. SAM GLASER’s soulful music has become part of the fabric of Jewish life in communities worldwide. Named one of the top ten Jewish artists in the US by Moment magazine, Glaser tours to over fifty cities annually and has appeared at such venues as L.A.’s Staples Center and Dodger Stadium, on Broadway and at the White House. Sam has released 24 best-selling Jewish albums including The Promise, The Songs We Sing, Hallel, Presence and the award winning children’s CD Soap Soup. In his cutting-edge recording studio, Glaser Musicworks, he produces albums for a wide variety of recording artists and composes for such networks as the WB, ESPN and PBS.


152 JANIE GRACKIN has been a leader in the community serving as Director of Family Life Education and Programming in Palm Beach County, Florida, as well as performing countless programs for professional development, and engaging groups of all ages in making Torah alive. She is the recipient of numerous awards such as the 2005 Solomon Schechter Gold Award for Family Education, CAJE 2004 National Award for specialty programming “Beyond the Fringe”, Tallit program and exhibit, Commission for Jewish Education Torah Award for Jewish Education 2003, 2004, 2005, and the CJE Matarot Incentive Grant receiving in 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006 and 2007.

SUE HOROWITZ is a singer-songwriter of contemporary Jewish music. A professional musician since the age of 17, Sue has performed in both secular and spiritual venues. Sue’s debut CD , Eleven Doors Open, was produced in Boston by the multi-talented performer and composer, Josh Nelson. Her second CD, In the Water, was recorded in Nashville, and produced by Grammy-nominated Mark Niemiec, and wellknown Jewish rocker Dan Nichols. Sue’s music has been included in Ruach 5767, CCAR’s new Haggadah, and Songs for a Jewish Head Start, and has been a finalist in the Just Plain Folks awards.

HELENE KATES is the lead singer with The Baal Shem Tones and tours internationally providing concerts and Jewish Educational Programs for all ages. She is a music specialist with a B.A. in performing arts and offers a wide variety of workshops in music, songwriting, dance, creative dramatics, meditation and healing. In Atlanta she serves as a cantorial soloist at Ahavath Achim in Atlanta, tutors Bnait Mitzvah students at Temple Sinai and teaches pre-school music at the Weinstein School.


153 JEFF KLEPPER is one of the leading cantors of the American Jewish community. As composer of widely-known melodies for Shalom Rav and Oseh Shalom, he has been expanding the boundaries of contemporary Jewish music for over three decades. In 1974, he formed the musical group Kol B’seder with Rabbi Daniel Freelander, which has released six recordings. In 1980, he was invested as Cantor by the School of Sacred Music at Hebrew Union College in New York. Since then, he has served congregations in Haifa, Israel and Evanston, Illinois. While in Evanston, Cantor Klepper earned a Masters in Music from Northeastern Illinois University. Now residing in Boston with his family, he is Cantor in Sharon, MA, and continues to perform his music throughout the country. For two decades singer/songwriter ERIC KOMAR has shared his unique brand of invigorating and inspiring music to synagogues, JCCs, camps, Hillels, and Jewish conventions nationwide. His vast performance experience runs the gamut, from preschoolers to retirees, and his advanced guitar skills are recognized among the most prominent musicians in the field. His debut 3 CDs feature tracks that have been featured in Transcontinental Music’s Ruach CD series and other publications, as well as on compilations from Craig Taubman’s Craig n’ Co. Look for Eric’s newest Jewish CD for kids in the Fall of 2013! NAOMI LESS inspires and empowers audiences in her music with pop rock riffs, soulful anthems and lyrics that explore real issues in life. Dedicated to breaking gender stereotypes and putting music out that doesn’t portray women as sexual objects, like much of today’s pop music, Naomi’s strong character and unique voice make her message more powerful—be who you are, without apologies – igniting and engaging listeners in social-activism. A true rocker, Naomi was classically voice-trained at Northwestern University. Naomi combines her passion for education with her music. She and producer Glenn Grossman completed her first Jewish rock album, “The Real Me” in 2011. She founded Jewish Chicks Rock and Jewish Kids Rock, a project to empower more young, kids to pick up instruments and express themselves through rock music.


154 ELIANA LIGHT was raised in Memphis TN on Jewish music and soul. She writes impassioned Jewish tunes for all ages. Her songs engage with Jewish holidays, history, language, tfillah, and Torah, all with a midrashic, interpretive, spin. In 2013, she graduated from Brandeis University and put out her first album of original Jewish music, “A New Light,” produced by Scott Leader. Eliana runs creative family and children services, and is also the education director of Bible Raps, an innovative organization that uses hip-hop to teach Torah. This summer she is Camp Ramah in Wisconsin as head song-leader and having a fantastic time!

Since 2004, AVRAM MANDELL has served as Director of Education at Leo Baeck Temple, in Los Angeles, California. He received a Master of Arts degree in Jewish Education from Hebrew Union College in Los Angeles in 2001. He is an expert in team building and communication dynamics and travels the country assisting professional teams. He is currently developing a Jewish American Gap Year Program based in the United States called “Tzedek America.” He has been performed standup comedy at the Comedy Store, the Improv and Limmud conferences. He plays almost every instrument, but none of them well and is available for Bar Mitzvahs and weddings, but only as a guest. www.avrammandell.com

JON NELSON’s inspirational music & high energy concerts have been a staple in Jewish music for over 15 years. In addition to founding the groundbreaking Jewish rock band, Yom Hadash, Jon is also an acclaimed children’s entertainer & educator. He’s played shows at JCCs, Synagogues, Camps & Colleges across the nation, as well as concerts for the Wexner Foundation, Steven Spielberg’s Genesis Program, the Maccabi Games, The Apple Corporation, State Street Financial, JCCs, Synagogues and Music Festivals across the country. Jon is also the Music Specialist/Cantorial Soloist at Temple Emanu-El in Marblehead, MA.


155 A multi-instrumentalist, composer, and scholar, HANKUS NETSKY teaches improvisation and Jewish music. He is the founder and director of the Klezmer Conservatory Band, an internationally renowned Yiddish music ensemble. Netsky has previously taught Jewish music at Hebrew College and Wesleyan University, and has lectured extensively in the U.S., Canada, and Europe. He has composed extensively for film and television, and has collaborated with such artists as Itzhak Perlman, Robin Williams, Joel Grey, and Theodore Bikel. At Commencement 2001, Hankus Netsky received NEC’s Louis and Adrienne Krasner Teaching Excellence Award. Netsky has also been the recipient of NEC’s Outstanding Alumni Award and Laurence Lesser Award for excellence in teaching.

SHMUELI PERKEL, the founder and creative director of Musical IQ is a passionate educator and entrepreneur. Shmueli has developed Jewish content such as the renowned Drum Tales program (www.jewishdrumtales.com). Born and raised in Johannesburg South Africa, he has since traveled broadly around the world living in both Israel and the United States. In addition to Musical IQ, Shmueli is a board member and experiential education consultant for Project Mercava – www. themercava.com a new and very exciting online platform for Jewish educational content.

PENINNAH SCHRAM, storyteller, is Professor of Speech and Drama at Yeshiva University. She is author of twelve books of Jewish folktales and recorded a CD, The Minstrel and the Storyteller, with singer/guitarist Gerard Edery. The anthology, Mitzvah Stories, was published in her honor. Peninnah is a recipient of the prestigious Covenant Award for Outstanding Jewish Educator awarded by The Covenant Foundation and the first recipient of the NewCAJE Kavod Le’Morah Prize for an Outstanding Educator. She has also been awarded the National Storytelling Network’s 2003 Lifetime Achievement Award “For sustained and exemplary contributions to storytelling in America.”


156 CHERIE KARO SCHWARTZ is a Storyteller, Author, and Educator living in Denver. She has shared stories with audiences of all ages throughout America and abroad for forty years. She was co-founding coordinator of the international Jewish Storytelling Network (CAJE), working with mentor and colleague Peninnah Schram. Cherie has authored three books, numerous recordings and articles. Cherie’s storytelling includes being Storyteller/Scholar for the Maurice Sendak exhibit in Wyoming, Storahtelling, co-founding Omanim bYachad, and a myriad of other story-sharing experiences. This is her 33rd CAJE/NewCAJE experience! PERI SMILOW has been wowing audiences since the mid 1990’s. A former non-profit entrepreneur, musical theater performer and community educator, Peri became a regular at UAHC regional conventions, CAJE conferences and national gatherings. A gifted vocalist and guitar player, Peri is also an extraordinary storyteller, teacher and entertainer. Connecting with people of all ages, she creates moments of transformation. Now, nearly twenty years and four critically acclaimed albums later Peri Smilow and her music are celebrated around the world.

“MISS” EMILY ARONOFF TECK is a Jewish Music Educator who believes in the power of informal education and utilizes music as her tool of choice. She is currently pursuing a Ed.D. in Jewish Education from Gratz College. Her focus is early engagement of Jewish kids and their families through developmentally appropriate, enjoyable and meaningful musical experiences. Emily has released albums, ‘For Shabbat!’ and ‘Every Day!’ and was featured on the PJ Library’s album ‘This is Me!’. Emily also works with Jewish Learning Matters, creating and curricular materials to support the use of books and music on Jewish values.

ALISON WESTERMANN is a singer/songwriter and Jewish educator living in El Paso, Texas with her family. She is a two time NewCAJE New Voices contest winner as well as being included in the Ruach 5773 compilation album. Her music style is a blend of the old and the new, making you feel like you’ve always known it, even if you’re just hearing her for the first time. For more – www.alisonwestermann.com


157 THE WHOLESALE KLEZMER BAND has, since 1982, performed both in the traditional context of providing music and dance leadership for Jewish weddings and other simkhes, on the concert stage, and at school and college programs. Credits include performances and workshops at the Conference on Judaism in Rural New England, Conference for the Advancement of Jewish Education, the New England Festival of Folk Arts (NEFFA), a Celebration of Folk Music for the 100th anniversary of Carnegie Hall hosted by Pete Seeger, and at the Inauguration of President Clinton. Their repertoire includes music for dance, traditional Yiddish folk songs, and Yiddish theater, vaudeville songs, and original compositions.

LORI WEINSTICK WYNTERS, PhD, MFA is a theatre artist, musician, radical thinker, Jewish educator and rabbinical student at Aleph Rabbinical Ordination program. She has directed Jewish summer camps, designed Hebrew school curriculum, led shabbat and High holiday services at Woodstock Jewish Congregation, Jewish Community of New Paltz, serves as faculty at SUNY New Paltz and Goddard College, teaches theatre education at Lesley University in Netanya, Israel and is committed to sharing the joy of the Jewish wisdom tradition, a love of t’filah, hasidut, ethics and culture as well as inviting young people’s thinking on R’Kook’s invitation to make the old new and the new holy.

DONI ZASLOFF THOMAS (aka Mama Doni) is a mom, music teacher, songwriter, and lead singer in The Mama Doni Band, honored with a 2011 Parents Choice® Award for their CD, Shabbat Shaboom, and winner of the Simcha Award for “Inspiring Joy Through Music” in competition with more than 100 bands from 15 different countries at the International Jewish Music Festival in Amsterdam. Mama Doni celebrates Jewish culture with irrepressible zest in its high-energy, interactive family rock concerts, and acoustic Shabbat experiences filled with a contagious and unexpected blend of reggae, rock, disco, Latin and Klezmer – all woven together with soulful energy and a super hip Jewish sensibility. In addition to several CDs, Mama Doni released a book called “Get Cooking! A Jewish American Family Cookbook & Rockin’ Mama Doni Celebration.”


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NewCAJE EXHIBITION EXHIBITION HOURS

The NewCAJE4 Conference EXPO is located in the Auditorium Building, #4 on the map (Daniels Auditorium) and will be open during the following times: Sunday: 12:00PM—5:45PM Monday: 10:00AM—12:45PM, 2:00PM—6:00PM Tuesday: 10:00AM—12:45PM, 2:00PM—6:25PM

NOTE: There will be a reception to highlight the exhibitors at 5:45PM—6:25PM.

Wednesday: 10:00AM—12:10PM

THE WILLIAM DAVIDSON GRADUATE SCHOOL OF JEWISH EDUCATION AT JTS The William Davidson Graduate School of Jewish Education offers masters and doctorates in Jewish education. Students may enroll as part- time or full-time in the in-residence or online/blended learning programs. Generous fellowships are available. Contact: Abby Eisenberg, Director of Admissions, abeisenberg@jtsa.edu www.jtsa.edu/davidson

GRATZ COLLEGE A leading institute of Jewish learning, offering programs tailored to students, online or on campus. Contact: Dodi Klimoff, dklimoff@ gratz.edu www.gratz.edu

JerusalemU.org Israel education in an engaging interactive film curriculum for Middle and High School students. Contact: Andrea Gottlieb, andrea@ jerusalemu.org www.jerusalemu.org

CAP IT! Learning Hebrew Reading Solution Contact: Eyal Rav-Noy, eyal@capitlearning.com www.capitlearning.com

BEHRMAN HOUSE Educational Materials and Curriculum Contact: David Schwarz, dschwarz@ behrmanhouse.com www.behrmanhouse.com

myYAD.com A personalized YAD Contact: myYAD.com - Avi Zukerman www.myYAD.com

JEWISH EDUCATION CENTER OF CLEVELAND Hebrew curriculum and professional development Contact: nmoskowitz@jecc.org LetsLearnHebrew.org; www.He- brewThroughMovement.org; www. jecc.org


159 ACADEMY FOR JEWISH RELIGION The Academy for Jewish Religion is a pluralistic school that trains Rabbis and Cantors for Kelal Yisrael. Contact: Ora Horn Prouser, ohornprouser@ajrsem.org www.ajrsem.org LaunchBox LaunchBox is an innovative, out-ofthe-box approach to Jewish education. With its emphasis on experiential learning, it is the ideal toolkit for families, religious schools, day schools, youth groups and summer camps. Contact: Batsheva Frankel, B7Fran- kel@aol.com LaunchBox-LA.org IKKAR PUBLISHING Curricula Contact: Steven Bayar ikkarpublishing.com TORAH AURA PRODUCTIONS Torah Aura is one of the leading creators of high-quality educational materials that enable Jewish children to become empowered Jewish adults. Contact: Jane Golub jane@torahaura. com www.torahaura.com JEWISH DRUM TALES BY MUSICAL IQ Interactive and experiential music and rhythm programming Contact: Samantha, sam@mus-iq.com www.MusicalIQ.com and www.JewishDrumTales.com

CHAI MITZVAH Jewish Adult Education Program Contact: audrey@chaimitzvah.org www.chaimitzvah.org PEGGY H. DAVIS CALLIGRAPHY Calligraphic art & design, gifts for Hebrew school teachers, invitations & ketubot, Wholesale Klezmer Band Contact: Peggy Davis<phd@ganeydn. com> www.HebrewLettering.com ZERACH.COM Jewish Educational Materialsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Sofer STAM Contact: Zerach Greenfield zerach@ zerach.com www.zerach.com ALDEN FILMS DVDs, CDs, and Gift items (Jewelry, et al) Contact: Paul Weinberg info@alden- films.com www.aldenfilms.com JEWISH LIGHTS PUBLISHING We provide resources to help people understand why they should lead a Jewish life and resources to help them do so. Our books and LifeLights Pastoral Care Pamphlets support the work of rabbis and educators and help build strong communities and congregations. Contact: sales@jewishlights.com www.jewishlights.com


160 UNITED SYNAGOGUE OF CONSERVATIVE JUDAISM Books, CDs, Educational materials Contact: Dorrie Berkowitz / berkowitz@uscj.org www.uscj.org/booksvc ENJOY-A-BOOK-CLUB Jewish Books, Games, Book Fairs Contact: enjoybook@aol.com enjoyabookclub.com EQUAL EXCHANGE Organic & Fair Trade foods and gifts at 40% profit to your group! Contact: fundraising@equalexchange. coop www.equalexchange.coop SARAH AND DAVID INTERACTIVE Hebrew Reading Curriculum and Teacher Training Workshops Contact: Diana Yacobi www.sarahdavid.com AND THOU SHALT READ Jewish books and classroom support materials Contact: RuthE Levy, sales@ AndThouShaltRead.com www.AndThouShaltRead.com

URJ BOOKS AND MUSIC URJ Press, Transcontinental Music Publications, and Sounds Write Productions make up the book and music publishing arm of the Union for Reform Judaism. We produce textbooks, program guides, children’s books, non-fiction titles, songbooks, CDs, e-books, MP3s, and other digital content. Contact: sbecker@urj.org www.URJBooksandMusic.com JEWISH WOMEN’S ARCHIVE The Jewish Women’s Archive offers educational materials and online resources about Jewish activism, history, heroes and role models, family and community history projects, and more! We have several online exhibits, an extensive encyclopedia, and a lively blog. Contact: Jordyn Rozensky, jrozensky@ jwa.org www.jwa.org


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William Davidson Graduate School of Jewish Education of The Jewish Theological Seminary Strengthening the quality of Jewish life through the power of education

Degree and Professional Development Programs Opportunities for Schools and Their Professionals:

The Master’s Program in Jewish Education:

™ :i\VgNZhdY^VcYEgd_ZXi:i\Vg Xjgg^XjaV[dgXdc\gZ\Vi^dcVa schools) ™ BVId@/7^WaZ8jgg^Xjajb[dg9Vn Schools ™ ?Zl^h]:Vgan8]^aY]ddY:YjXVi^dc Leadership Institute ™ ?Zl^h]9VnHX]ddaHiVcYVgYhVcY 7ZcX]bVg`hEgd_ZXi ™ VcYbdgZ

™ 9VnHX]ddaIZVX]^c\ ™ :YjXVi^dcVaAZVYZgh]^e^c HncV\d\jZhVcY8dbbjcVaHZii^c\h ™ ?Zl^h]:meZg^Zci^Va:YjXVi^dc ™ Dca^cZAZVgc^c\Egd\gVb ™ @Zh]Zg=VYVh]/HZbZhiZg^c >hgVZaEgd\gVb

To learn more, contact davidsoninfo@jtsa.edu or (212) 280-6007.

The Doctoral Program in Jewish Education: ™ ;jaa"I^bZ ™ :mZXji^kZ9dXidgVaEgd\gVb To learn more, contact The Davidson School’s director of Admissions at edschool@jtsa.edu or (212) 678-8022.

William Davidson Graduate School of Jewish Education

The Jewish Theological Seminary 3080 Broadway New York, NY 10027 www.jtsa.edu/davidson


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166

CROSS-REFERENCE BY SUBJECT ABOUT PRAYER

TUESDAY 9:15AM MODES, MOTIFS & MELODIES: THE BUILDING-BLOCKS OF BIBLICAL AND LITURGICAL CHANTS Neil Schwartz

ADMINISTRATION

SUNDAY 4:00PM – HOW TO NOT HAVE THE ADMINISTRATIVE DETAILS BOG YOU DOWN Joyce Siegel 4:00PM – PROJECT MANAGEMENT Leonard Samborowski MONDAY 9:00AM – THE ROLE OF VISION IN THE WORK OF A JEWISH PRINCIPAL Jeffrey Schein 9:15AM – COMMUNICATION - ACTIVE LISTENING Mitch Gordon 11:00AM – CHANGE! HOW TO LIVE AND LEAD THROUGH PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL CHANGE Jill Paul 11:00AM – HOW TO EMBED REFLECTION INTO EXPERIENTIAL EDUCATION AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Richard Solomon, Elaine Solomon 2:00PM – MENTORING LADDER FROM PRE-K THROUGH GRADUATE SCHOOL, TO TEACHING AND BEYOND Richard Solomon, Elaine Solomon 2:00PM – PARTNERS IN LEADERSHIP AND LEADERS IN PARTNERSHIP Natasha Dresner 2:00PM – JEWISH PARENTING AND NEW TECHNOLOGIES Jeffrey Schein 4:00PM – THE TORAH OF MANAGEMENT: DRAWING ON JEWISH VALUES AND CONTEMPORARY BUSINESS WISDOM TO MOVE YOUR EDUCATION TEAM TOWARDS EXCELLENCE. Yohanna Kinberg TUESDAY 9:00AM – TRANSFORMATIONAL AND AUTHENTIC LEADERSHIP IN JEWISH EDUCATION Hana Bor 9:00AM – GRANT WRITING WITHOUT FEAR Mitch Gordon 9:00AM – REFLECTION AS A TOOL FOR MY PROFESSIONAL SUCCESS Mark Young 11:00AM – LEANING IN: JEWISH WOMEN AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Yohanna Kinberg 11:00AM – STORYTELLING STRATEGIES FOR MARKETING YOUR JEWISH PROGRAMMING Lisa Lipkin 2:00PM – THE BLESSING OF A MUSICAL CURRICULUM: BUILDING


167 MEANING THROUGH SONG Peri Smilow 2:00PM – SOCIAL MEDIA FOR THE EDUCATOR Jordyn Rozensky 2:15PM – IMPROVISATION, LEADERSHIP & TEACHING Mitch Gordon 4:00PM – HOW TO TRANSITION FAMILIES FROM PRESCHOOL TO RELIGIOUS SCHOOL Stephanie Tankel WEDNESDAY 8:45AM – SERVANT LEADERSHIP: IS IT A WAY TO GET THE NEXT GENERATION TO COME TO JEWISH EDUCATION? Hana Bor 8:45AM – WORKPLACE ETHICS FOR THE NEXT GENERATION Alison Westermann 10:30AM – EFFECTIVE NEGOTIATION: HOW TO GET WHAT YOU WANT IN ANY SITUATION Leora Koller-Fox 10:30AM – BEING A TRANSFORMATIVE LEADER PJ Schwartz 10:30AM – DIGITAL STORYTELLING: THE ART OF A BLOG Sasha Kopp

ALTERNATIVE MODELS IN JEWISH EDUCATION

SUNDAY 4:00PM – SHIFTING THE PARADIGM FROM A TRADITIONAL RELIGIOUS SCHOOL CONTAINED IN A CONGREGATION SETTING TO ONE WITHOUT WALLS Eyal Bor, Hana Bor MONDAY 9:00AM – A NEW LOOK AT JEWISH LIFE - THROUGH THE BINOCULAR OF NATURE Gavriel Goldman 11:00AM – BUT WE DON’T HAVE A LAKE! - HOW SYNAGOGUES CAN BE (AND ARE!) A SETTING FOR EXPERIENTIAL EDUCATION Mark Young TUESDAY 9:00AM – HEBREW WIZARDS: CAMPFIRE KAVANNAH Deborah Salomon, Ken Cohen, Lizzie Swan 9:00AM – FETA (FAMILY EDUCATION, EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING, TECHNOLOGY AND THE ARTS) AND CONTENT Deborah Miller, Debra Kerschner 11:00AM – EXPERIENTIAL EDUCATION: THE BIG PICTURE Cherie Koller-Fox 2:00PM – CULTURAL JUDAISM & SOCIAL JUSTICE ACTIVISM: A NEW LEARNING MOVEMENT Katherine O’Brien 4:00PM – HEBREW WIZARDS: BRINGING CAMP INTO THE CLASSROOM Deborah Salomon, Ken Cohen, Lizzie Swan 4:00PM – NOT JUST M/W OR T/TH 4-6 BUT 24/7: HOW SYNAGOGUES CAN FACILITATE LEARNING AT ALL TIMES Mark Young


168

BAR AND BAT MITZVAH

SUNDAY 4:00PM – REASONS FOR THE COMMANDMENTS Michael Pitkowsky MONDAY 4:00PM – NEW METHODS, PRINCIPLES AND RESOURCES FOR B’NEI MITZVAH PREPARATION Goldie Milgram TUESDAY 9:00AM – TZEDAKAH HANDS ON Avi Zukerman 2:00PM – CREATE YOUR OWN RITUAL Rosie Rosenzweig WEDNESDAY 8:45AM – WHAT IN THE WORLD IS A CULTURAL BAR/BAT MITZVAH? Katherine O’Brien

BIBLE

SUNDAY 4:00PM – IN THE TENT OF ABRAHAM Janie Grackin 4:00PM – WHEN I STUDY, GOD TALKS TO ME: TEACHING JEWISH TEXTS TO UPPER ELEMENTARY AND MIDDLE SCHOOL STUDENTS ‘WARTS AND ALL’ Deborah Goldstein, Cathy Kaplan 4:00PM – INTIMATE TORAH FOR TODAY Steven Bayar MONDAY 11:00AM – TEACHING TORAH FOR MEANING Joel Grishaver TUESDAY 9:00AM – THE REALITY APPROACH TO TORAH TEACHING Hal Miller-Jacobs 11:00AM – PHILOSOPHICAL INQUIRY WITH BIBLE Jeffrey Schein 2:00PM – CREATING CONNECTIONS TO JEWISH TEXT Batsheva Frankel 4:00PM – CONNECTING TO TORAH: TEACHING PARASHAT HA-SHAVUA USING THE TORAH CIRCLES METHOD Matia Rania Angelou WEDNESDAY 8:45AM – CHALLENGING THE MYTH OF BIBLICAL HOMOPHOBIA Michael Rothbaum 10:30AM – LEADERSHIP IN THE EARLY PROPHETS Everett Fox

CREATING COMMUNITY

SUNDAY 2:00PM – SEVEN VALUES, YOUR WAY Emilia Diamant MONDAY 9:00AM – THE ‘HI’LIGHT OF THE DAY: GREETINGS AT THE DOOR Anne Andrew 2:00PM – JEWISH PARENTING AND NEW TECHNOLOGIES Jeffrey Schein


169 4:00PM – COLLABORATIVE FAMILY PROGRAMMING IN PUBLIC SPACES Lara Nicolson, Judi Wisch 4:00PM – CREATING TZEDAKAH ORIENTED COMMUNITIES Steven Bayar TUESDAY 2:00PM – SOCIAL MEDIA FOR THE EDUCATOR Jordyn Rozensky 4:00PM – HOW TO TURN YOUR CLASS INTO A SACRED COMMUNITY Joel Grishaver WEDNESDAY 10:30AM – B’RUCHIM HA BA’IM, MAKING YOUR SCHOOL MORE WELCOMING Juliet Barr 10:30AM – DIGITAL STORYTELLING: THE ART OF A BLOG Sasha Kopp

CREATIVE AND CULTURAL ARTS

SUNDAY 4:00PM – NEWCAJE CHORALE (session 1 of 3) Ellen Allard 4:00PM – EMUNAH: SPIRITUALITY, IMAGERY, AND OLD TIME MUSIC Doni Zasloff, Eric Lindberg 4:00PM – WRITE YOUR (JEWISH EDUCATOR) SOUL Samantha Libby 4:00PM – MAKING MIDRASH PERSONAL Tziona Szajman MONDAY 9:00AM – AVADIM HAYINU: DANCE YOUR WAY TO FREEDOM THROUGH THE HOLIDAYS! Aliya Cheskis-Cotel 9:00AM – TEACHING TORAH WITH JUDAIC ART Cindy Quitt 9:00AM – SING IT! SAY IT! STAMP IT! SWAY IT! Ellen Allard 9:15AM – TORAH IN BLACK & WHITE: THE WORLD OF THE SOFER Kevin Hale 11:00AM – REMEMBERING DEBBIE FRIEDMAN AND HER LEGACY OF SONG Jeff Klepper 11:00AM – NEW MUSIC AND VISUAL PRAYER- A SPIRITUAL AND VIBRANT PARTNERSHIP Sue Horowitz, EJ Cohen 2:00PM – HIDDUR MITZVAH -BEAUTIFUL CONTENT IN THE CLASSROOM Debi Swedelson Mishael 2:00PM – SINGIN’ SHACHARIT Emily Aronoff Teck 4:00PM – COLLABORATIVE FAMILY PROGRAMMING IN PUBLIC SPACES Lara Nicolson, Judi Wisch 4:00PM – NEWCAJE CHORALE (Session 2 of 3) Ellen Allard 4:00PM – HANDS-ON JEWISH FUN FOR THE WHOLE CHILD: INFUSING JEWISH LIVING INTO DAILY LIFE Treasure Cohen 4:00PM – TEACHING JEWISH VALUES THROUGH SONG Eric Komar TUESDAY 9:00AM – HEBREW WIZARDS: CAMPFIRE KAVANNAH Deborah Salomon, Ken Cohen, Lizzie Swan


170 9:00AM – BUILDING A TEL: AN ARCHAEOLOGICAL APPROACH TO TEACHING JEWISH HISTORY AND TEXTS Susan Eiseman Levitin 9:00AM – TZEDAKAH HANDS ON Avi Zukerman 9:15AM – DUCT TAPE TALLIT Janie Grackin 9:15AM – MODES, MOTIFS & MELODIES: THE BUILDING-BLOCKS OF BIBLICAL AND LITURGICAL CHANTS Neil Schwartz 11:00AM – SHIR CHADASH - A NEW SONG Susan Shane-Linder 11:00AM – THE PROMISE: USING CONTEMPORARY MUSIC TO INSPIRE A LOVE FOR ISRAEL Sam Glaser 2:00PM – THE BLESSING OF A MUSICAL CURRICULUM: BUILDING MEANING THROUGH SONG Peri Smilow 2:00PM – YOU WANT ME TO DO ART PROJECTS? BUT I’M NOT AN ARTIST! Susan Eiseman Levitin 2:00PM – BEIT MIDRASH IN MOTION: CAN OUR DREAMS COME TRUE? Dalia Davis 4:00PM – NEWCAJE CHORALE (session 3 of 3) Ellen Allard 4:00PM – MUSIC IS MEMORY Sarah Sinofsky 4:00PM – PROMOTING VISUAL LITERACY AND NEW AVENUES FOR JEWISH EXPRESSION Eric Goldman WEDNESDAY 8:45AM – HEBREW POETS WHO INFLUENCED MODERN HEBREW Tova Gannana 8:45AM – POP-UP JEWISH HOLIDAY CARDS Avi Zukerman 8:45AM – SINGING AND SHARING UNIVERSAL VALUES THROUGH A JEWISH LENS Emily Aronoff Teck 10:30AM – SOUNDS OF SURVIVAL: MUSIC OF THE WOMEN’S ORCHESTRA OF AUSCHWITZ Jeri Robins 10:30AM – NIGGUNATION Eitan Gutin 10:30AM – IT’S ALL ABOUT RUACH! Doni Zasloff, Eric Lindberg

CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT

SUNDAY 4:00PM – SHIFTING THE PARADIGM FROM A TRADITIONAL RELIGIOUS SCHOOL CONTAINED IN A CONGREGATION SETTING TO ONE WITHOUT WALLS Eyal Bor, Hana Bor 4:00PM – A NEW MODEL FOR ONLINE LEARNING David Schwarz MONDAY 9:15AM – INTRODUCTION TO IMPLEMENTING TECHNOLOGY IN THE CLASSROOM Jonathan Friesem 2:15PM – ADVANCED IMPLEMENTATION OF TECHNOLOGY IN THE CLASSROOM Jonathan Friesem 4:00PM – THE EDUTAINING TEACHER Mira Scharf


171 TUESDAY 4:00PM – USING MODERN MEDIA TO CREATE CURRICULA Steven Bayar

DANCE

MONDAY 9:00AM – AVADIM HAYINU: DANCE YOUR WAY TO FREEDOM THROUGH THE HOLIDAYS! Aliya Cheskis-Cotel TUESDAY 2:00PM – BEIT MIDRASH IN MOTION: CAN OUR DREAMS COME TRUE? Dalia Davis

EARLY CHILDHOOD

SUNDAY 2:00PM – HOLIDAY HIGHS: CREATING HIGH HOLIDAY SERVICES FOR YOUNG FAMILIES THAT TEACH AND INSPIRE Treasure Cohen 4:00PM – YOU DON’T HAVE TO BE JEWISH: USING SECULAR CHILDRENS’ LITERATURE TO TEACH JEWISH VALUES IN THE EARLY CHILDHOOD SETTING. Sharon Cores MONDAY 9:00AM – SING IT! SAY IT! STAMP IT! SWAY IT! Ellen Allard 11:00AM – FROM SHOW AND TELL TO SHEHEKHEEYANU: NURTURING A SENSE OF HOLINESS IN YOUNG CHILDREN (Preschool through 3rd grade) Treasure Cohen 2:00PM – SINGIN’ SHACHARIT Emily Aronoff Teck 4:00PM – COLLABORATIVE FAMILY PROGRAMMING IN PUBLIC SPACES Lara Nicolson, Judi Wisch 4:00PM – HANDS-ON JEWISH FUN FOR THE WHOLE CHILD: INFUSING JEWISH LIVING INTO DAILY LIFE Treasure Cohen TUESDAY 9:00AM – TOT SHABBAT IN THE ECE CLASSROOM: THE UNPLUGGED VERSION Ellen Allard 11:00AM – TREASURE’S TOOLS FOR CREATING SUCCESSFUL YOUNG FAMILY PROGRAMS Treasure Cohen 2:00PM – PRINCIPLES FOR NURTURING SPIRITUAL DEVELOPMENT IN YOUNG JEWISH CHILDREN Deborah Schein 4:00PM – HOW TO TRANSITION FAMILIES FROM PRESCHOOL TO RELIGIOUS SCHOOL Stephanie Tankel 4:00PM – IT’S ALIVE! TRANSFORMING PJ LIBRARY BOOKS INTO DRAMATIC PRESENTATIONS Lisa Litman WEDNESDAY 8:45AM – LOOKING AT REFLECTION, NATURE, INQUIRY, AND


172 PROJECT APPROACH THROUGH THE LENSES OF THE HUNDRED LANGUAGES OF CHILDREN AND THE 70 FACES OF TORAH Jeffrey Schein, Deborah Schein 8:45AM – SINGING AND SHARING UNIVERSAL VALUES THROUGH A JEWISH LENS Emily Aronoff Teck 10:30AM – IT’S ALL ABOUT RUACH! Doni Zasloff, Eric Lindberg

ECOLOGY

MONDAY 8:00AM – MY SOUL THIRSTS FOR GOD: PRAYERFUL WALKS & TEXT STUDY IN NATURE Goldie Milgram 9:00AM – A NEW LOOK AT JEWISH LIFE - THROUGH THE BINOCULAR OF NATURE Gavriel Goldman TUESDAY 9:00AM – REIMAGINE YOUR TASHLICH EXPERIENCE Juliet Barr

FAMILY EDUCATION

SUNDAY 2:00PM – HOLIDAY HIGHS: CREATING HIGH HOLIDAY SERVICES FOR YOUNG FAMILIES THAT TEACH AND INSPIRE Treasure Cohen 4:00PM – IN THE TENT OF ABRAHAM Janie Grackin MONDAY 4:00PM – COLLABORATIVE FAMILY PROGRAMMING IN PUBLIC SPACES Lara Nicolson, Judi Wisch 4:00PM – PARENTS AS PARTNERS Avram Mandell TUESDAY 9:00AM – FETA (FAMILY EDUCATION, EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING, TECHNOLOGY AND THE ARTS) AND CONTENT Deborah Miller, Debra Kerschner 11:00AM – TREASURE’S TOOLS FOR CREATING SUCCESSFUL YOUNG FAMILY PROGRAMS Treasure Cohen 11:00AM – HOW TO DO FAMILY EDUCATION Joel Grishaver 11:00AM – A CALL AND RESPONSE MEDITATION FOR THE SHEMA Rosie Rosenzweig 4:00PM – HOW TO TRANSITION FAMILIES FROM PRESCHOOL TO RELIGIOUS SCHOOL Stephanie Tankel WEDNESDAY 10:30AM – EXTREME MAKE-OVER: SHAVUOT - HOW TO TRANSFORM THE MOST NEGLECTED BIBLICAL HOLIDAY INTO A SUPERSTAR Tracy Klirs


173

FINDING MEANING IN PRAYER

SUNDAY 2:00PM – HOLIDAY HIGHS: CREATING HIGH HOLIDAY SERVICES FOR YOUNG FAMILIES THAT TEACH AND INSPIRE Treasure Cohen 2:00PM – WORDS TAKING WING (CREATING COMMUNAL PRAYER IN SONG) Helene Kates 2:00PM – DECODING THE SQUIGGLES: TORAH TROPE Neil Schwartz 4:00PM – EMUNAH: SPIRITUALITY, IMAGERY, AND OLD TIME MUSIC Doni Zasloff, Eric Lindberg 4:00PM – GAMES, STORIES, AND SONG: FINDING MOMENTS OF MEANING IN JEWISH PRAYER Eliana Light MONDAY 8:00AM – MY SOUL THIRSTS FOR GOD: PRAYERFUL WALKS & TEXT STUDY IN NATURE Goldie Milgram 9:00AM – WHISPERS OF SHEMA Helene Kates 11:00AM – NEW MUSIC AND VISUAL PRAYER- A SPIRITUAL AND VIBRANT PARTNERSHIP Sue Horowitz, EJ Cohen 2:00PM – SINGIN’ SHACHARIT Emily Aronoff Teck 2:00PM – THE HEART OF PRAYER: MAKING WORDS IN THE SIDDUR YOUR OWN Matia Rania Angelou TUESDAY 9:00AM – HEBREW WIZARDS: CAMPFIRE KAVANNAH Deborah Salomon, Ken Cohen, Lizzie Swan 11:00AM – A CALL AND RESPONSE MEDITATION FOR THE SHEMA Rosie Rosenzweig 2:00PM – BEIT MIDRASH IN MOTION: CAN OUR DREAMS COME TRUE? Dalia Davis 4:00PM – SO MUCH MORE THAN MEETS THE EYE: THE STRUCTURE AND MEANING OF JEWISH PRAYER AS SEEN THROUGH THE FRIDAY EVENING LITURGY Cherie Koller-Fox WEDNESDAY 8:45AM – PRAY BALL! TEACHING MEANING THROUGH METAPHOR IN JEWISH PRAYER Eliana Light 10:30AM – NIGGUNATION Eitan Gutin

HEBREW

SUNDAY 2:00PM – BEST PRACTICES OF TEFILLAH-BASED HEBREW Jeri Robins MONDAY 9:00AM – LEARN TO READ HEBREW AT NEWCAJE! (Part 1) Eyal Rav-Noy 11:00AM – ONE STUDENT AT A TIME: DIFFERENTIATED HEBREW INSTRUCTION Joan Carr


174 2:00PM – STUDYING THE HEBREW LETTERS AS RUBRIC FOR SPIRITUALITY Tova Gannana 4:00PM – USING GAMES TO IMPROVE HEBREW READING SKILLS Deborah Gardner 4:00PM – HEBREW IN THE ONLINE LEARNING CENTER David Schwarz TUESDAY 9:00AM – MAKING PRAYERBOOK HEBREW FUN FOR GRADES 4-6 Eric Komar 9:00AM – INTRODUCING MITKADEM: A HEBREW PROGRAM THAT REALLY WORKS! Joan Carr 9:00AM – LEARN TO READ HEBREW AT NEWCAJE! (Part 2) Eyal Rav-Noy 11:00AM – THE TIME IS SHORT, THE RESULTS ARE GREAT: HEBREW THROUGH MOVEMENT Nachama Skolnik Moskowitz 2:00PM – EFFECTIVE HEBREW TUTORING TECHNIQUES FOR THE AMERICAN MIND Avram Mandell 4:00PM – ‘WHO ME?!’ TEACHING HEBREW READING AND PRAYERS WHEN YOU FEEL LIKE A NOVICE YOURSELF Lynn Anne Cutler WEDNESDAY 8:45AM – RETHINKING THE TEACHING OF HEBREW Nachama Skolnik Moskowitz 8:45AM – LEARN TO READ HEBREW AT NEWCAJE! (Part 3) Eyal Rav-Noy HEBREW DECODING MONDAY 11:00AM – ONE STUDENT AT A TIME: DIFFERENTIATED HEBREW INSTRUCTION Joan Carr 2:00PM – STUDYING THE HEBREW LETTERS AS RUBRIC FOR SPIRITUALITY Tova Gannana 4:00PM – USING GAMES TO IMPROVE HEBREW READING SKILLS Deborah Gardner 4:00PM – HEBREW IN THE ONLINE LEARNING CENTER David Schwarz TUESDAY 9:00AM – MAKING PRAYERBOOK HEBREW FUN FOR GRADES 4-6 Eric Komar 2:00PM – EFFECTIVE HEBREW TUTORING TECHNIQUES FOR THE AMERICAN MIND Avram Mandell

HEBREW METHODOLOGY

SUNDAY 2:00PM – BEST PRACTICES OF TEFILLAH-BASED HEBREW Jeri Robins TUESDAY 9:00AM – INTRODUCING MITKADEM: A HEBREW PROGRAM THAT


175 REALLY WORKS! Joan Carr 11:00AM – THE TIME IS SHORT, THE RESULTS ARE GREAT: HEBREW THROUGH MOVEMENT Nachama Skolnik Moskowitz 4:00PM – ‘WHO ME?!’ TEACHING HEBREW READING AND PRAYERS WHEN YOU FEEL LIKE A NOVICE YOURSELF Lynn Anne Cutler WEDNESDAY 8:45AM – RETHINKING THE TEACHING OF HEBREW Nachama Skolnik Moskowitz

HISTORY

SUNDAY 2:00PM – JEWISH TIME TRAVEL IN FIVE EASY STEPS Etta King MONDAY 9:00AM – HOW TO EFFECTIVELY TEACH JEWISH HISTORY IN THE 21ST CENTURY AND MAKE IT EXCITING AND INTERACTIVE FOR STUDENTS Nachum Amsel 9:00AM – JEWISH IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT AND MORAL DECISION MAKING: WHERE ETHICS MEETS HISTORY Jan Darsa 9:00AM – HOW FAR DOES THE APPLE FALL? SHARING FAMILY STORIES Etta King 2:00PM – THE REAL STORY OF CHANUKAH...AN HISTORICAL MASH-UP Chava Rousch-Carlisle TUESDAY 9:00AM – BUILDING A TEL: AN ARCHAEOLOGICAL APPROACH TO TEACHING JEWISH HISTORY AND TEXTS Susan Eiseman Levitin 9:15AM – BYSTANDERS, UPSTANDERS AND CIVIC RESPONSIBILITY: WHERE ETHICS MEETS HISTORY Jan Darsa 11:00AM – JEWISH HISTORY ILLUMINATED BY FIVE ANCIENT COINS Robert Messing WEDNESDAY 10:30AM – SOUNDS OF SURVIVAL: MUSIC OF THE WOMEN’S ORCHESTRA OF AUSCHWITZ Jeri Robins

HOLIDAYS

SUNDAY 2:00PM – HOLIDAY HIGHS: CREATING HIGH HOLIDAY SERVICES FOR YOUNG FAMILIES THAT TEACH AND INSPIRE Treasure Cohen MONDAY 9:00AM – AVADIM HAYINU: DANCE YOUR WAY TO FREEDOM THROUGH THE HOLIDAYS! Aliya Cheskis-Cotel 9:00AM – A NEW LOOK AT JEWISH LIFE - THROUGH THE BINOCULAR OF NATURE Gavriel Goldman


176 2:00PM – V’SAMAHTA: CELEBRATING JEWISH HOLIDAYS WITH GROWN-UPS Jonathan Wolf 2:00PM – THE REAL STORY OF CHANUKAH...AN HISTORICAL MASH-UP Chava Rousch-Carlisle TUESDAY 9:00AM – TOT SHABBAT IN THE ECE CLASSROOM: THE UNPLUGGED VERSION Ellen Allard 9:00AM – REIMAGINE YOUR TASHLICH EXPERIENCE Juliet Barr 2:00PM – THE ONE WHO DOESN’T KNOW HOW TO ASK: WHAT’S GOING ON IN THE PASSOVER HAGGADAH Paul Solyn WEDNESDAY 8:45AM – POP-UP JEWISH HOLIDAY CARDS Avi Zukerman 8:45AM – LOOKING AT REFLECTION, NATURE, INQUIRY, AND PROJECT APPROACH THROUGH THE LENSES OF THE HUNDRED LANGUAGES OF CHILDREN AND THE 70 FACES OF TORAH Jeffrey Schein, Deborah Schein 8:45AM – HANUKKAH IN JULY...?? TEACHING JEWISH VALUES THROUGH THE FRAMEWORK OF JEWISH HOLIDAYS Ruth Dubin Steinberg 10:30AM – EXTREME MAKE-OVER: SHAVUOT - HOW TO TRANSFORM THE MOST NEGLECTED BIBLICAL HOLIDAY INTO A SUPERSTAR Tracy Klirs

ISRAEL

MONDAY 9:00AM – YOUR FLIGHT TO TEL AVIV IS NOW BOARDING: IMPACTFUL EDUCATIONAL TRAVEL TO ISRAEL Ira Dounn, Rachel Meytin 11:00AM – ISRAEL EDUCATION AND PROBLEM-BASED LEARNING Deborah Miller, Debra Kerschner 2:15PM – INFUSING ISRAEL INTO YOUR COMMUNITY: CUTTING EDGE RESOURCES AND IDEAS Lesley Litman TUESDAY 11:00AM – THE PROMISE: USING CONTEMPORARY MUSIC TO INSPIRE A LOVE FOR ISRAEL Sam Glaser 2:00PM – HOW TO TEACH ABOUT ISRAEL TODAY EFFECTIVELY AND CONVINCINGLY IN THE DIGITAL AGE Nachum Amsel 4:00PM – WRESTLING WITH YISRAEL: PEOPLE, LAND AND STATE Leah Wolff-Pellingra WEDNESDAY 8:45AM – WOMEN OF THE WALL: WHAT’S THE BIG DEAL? Ronni Ticker 10:30AM – ISRAEL EDUCATION FOR THE YOUTUBE GENERATION Andrea Gottlieb


177

LANGUAGE AND PRAYER

SUNDAY 2:00PM – HOLIDAY HIGHS: CREATING HIGH HOLIDAY SERVICES FOR YOUNG FAMILIES THAT TEACH AND INSPIRE Treasure Cohen 2:00PM – WORDS TAKING WING (CREATING COMMUNAL PRAYER IN SONG) Helene Kates 2:00PM – DECODING THE SQUIGGLES: TORAH TROPE Neil Schwartz 2:00PM – BEST PRACTICES OF TEFILLAH-BASED HEBREW Jeri Robins 4:00PM – EMUNAH: SPIRITUALITY, IMAGERY, AND OLD TIME MUSIC Doni Zasloff, Eric Lindberg 4:00PM – GAMES, STORIES, AND SONG: FINDING MOMENTS OF MEANING IN JEWISH PRAYER Eliana Light MONDAY 8:00AM – MY SOUL THIRSTS FOR GOD: PRAYERFUL WALKS & TEXT STUDY IN NATURE Goldie Milgram 9:00AM – WHISPERS OF SHEMA Helene Kates 9:00AM – LEARN TO READ HEBREW AT NEWCAJE! (Part 1) Eyal Rav-Noy 11:00AM – NEW MUSIC AND VISUAL PRAYER- A SPIRITUAL AND VIBRANT PARTNERSHIP Sue Horowitz, EJ Cohen 11:00AM – ONE STUDENT AT A TIME: DIFFERENTIATED HEBREW INSTRUCTION Joan Carr 2:00PM – SINGIN’ SHACHARIT Emily Aronoff Teck 2:00PM – THE HEART OF PRAYER: MAKING WORDS IN THE SIDDUR YOUR OWN Matia Rania Angelou 2:00PM – STUDYING THE HEBREW LETTERS AS RUBRIC FOR SPIRITUALITY Tova Gannana 2:00PM – TEACH YOUR STUDENTS ABOUT THE EASTERN EUROPEAN CULTURE OF THEIR GRANDPARENTS Marcia Gruss Levinsohn, Amanda Jill Wood 4:00PM – USING GAMES TO IMPROVE HEBREW READING SKILLS Deborah Gardner 4:00PM – HEBREW IN THE ONLINE LEARNING CENTER David Schwarz TUESDAY 9:00AM – HEBREW WIZARDS: CAMPFIRE KAVANNAH Deborah Salomon, Ken Cohen, Lizzie Swan 9:00AM – MAKING PRAYERBOOK HEBREW FUN FOR GRADES 4-6 Eric Komar 9:00AM – INTRODUCING MITKADEM: A HEBREW PROGRAM THAT REALLY WORKS! Joan Carr 9:00AM – LEARN TO READ HEBREW AT NEWCAJE! (Part 2) Eyal Rav-Noy 9:15AM – MODES, MOTIFS & MELODIES: THE BUILDING-BLOCKS OF BIBLICAL AND LITURGICAL CHANTS Neil Schwartz


178 11:00AM – A CALL AND RESPONSE MEDITATION FOR THE SHEMA Rosie Rosenzweig 11:00AM – THE TIME IS SHORT, THE RESULTS ARE GREAT: HEBREW THROUGH MOVEMENT Nachama Skolnik Moskowitz 2:00PM – EFFECTIVE HEBREW TUTORING TECHNIQUES FOR THE AMERICAN MIND Avram Mandell 2:00PM – BEIT MIDRASH IN MOTION: CAN OUR DREAMS COME TRUE? Dalia Davis 4:00PM – SO MUCH MORE THAN MEETS THE EYE: THE STRUCTURE AND MEANING OF JEWISH PRAYER AS SEEN THROUGH THE FRIDAY EVENING LITURGY Cherie Koller-Fox 4:00PM – ‘WHO ME?!’ TEACHING HEBREW READING AND PRAYERS WHEN YOU FEEL LIKE A NOVICE YOURSELF Lynn Anne Cutler 4:00PM – PRACTICAL YIDDISH ‘KHOKHME’ (Wisdom) Marcia Gruss Levinsohn, Amanda Jill Wood WEDNESDAY 8:45AM – PRAY BALL! TEACHING MEANING THROUGH METAPHOR IN JEWISH PRAYER Eliana Light 8:45AM – RETHINKING THE TEACHING OF HEBREW Nachama Skolnik Moskowitz 8:45AM – LEARN TO READ HEBREW AT NEWCAJE! (Part 3) Eyal Rav-Noy 10:30AM – NIGGUNATION Eitan Gutin

LEARNING TO READ HEBREW MYSELF

MONDAY 9:00AM – LEARN TO READ HEBREW AT NEWCAJE! (Part 1) Eyal Rav-Noy TUESDAY 9:00AM – LEARN TO READ HEBREW AT NEWCAJE! (Part 2) Eyal Rav-Noy WEDNESDAY 8:45AM – LEARN TO READ HEBREW AT NEWCAJE! (Part 3) Eyal Rav-Noy

LIFE-LONG LEARNING

SUNDAY 4:00PM – REASONS FOR THE COMMANDMENTS Michael Pitkowsky TUESDAY 9:15AM – MODES, MOTIFS & MELODIES: THE BUILDING-BLOCKS OF BIBLICAL AND LITURGICAL CHANTS Neil Schwartz 11:00AM – LIFELONG JEWISH EDUCATION, REALLY? Judith Aronson 2:00PM – CREATE YOUR OWN RITUAL Rosie Rosenzweig


179

MIDRASH

SUNDAY 4:00PM – MAKING MIDRASH PERSONAL Tziona Szajman TUESDAY 2:15PM – WHAT IS MIDRASH AND WHAT CAN WE LEARN FROM IT? Lenny Levin

MINI-MBA

MONDAY 9:15AM – COMMUNICATION - ACTIVE LISTENING Mitch Gordon 11:00AM – CHANGE! HOW TO LIVE AND LEAD THROUGH PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL CHANGE Jill Paul 2:00PM – MENTORING LADDER FROM PRE-K THROUGH GRADUATE SCHOOL, TO TEACHING AND BEYOND Richard Solomon, Elaine Solomon 2:00PM – PARTNERS IN LEADERSHIP AND LEADERS IN PARTNERSHIP Natasha Dresner 4:00PM – THE TORAH OF MANAGEMENT: DRAWING ON JEWISH VALUES AND CONTEMPORARY BUSINESS WISDOM TO MOVE YOUR EDUCATION TEAM TOWARDS EXCELLENCE. Yohanna Kinberg TUESDAY 9:00AM – TRANSFORMATIONAL AND AUTHENTIC LEADERSHIP IN JEWISH EDUCATION Hana Bor 11:00AM – STORYTELLING STRATEGIES FOR MARKETING YOUR JEWISH PROGRAMMING Lisa Lipkin 2:15PM – IMPROVISATION, LEADERSHIP & TEACHING Mitch Gordon WEDNESDAY 8:45AM – SERVANT LEADERSHIP: IS IT A WAY TO GET THE NEXT GENERATION TO COME TO JEWISH EDUCATION? Hana Bor 10:30AM – EFFECTIVE NEGOTIATION: HOW TO GET WHAT YOU WANT IN ANY SITUATION Leora Koller-Fox

MORALS, ETHICS, AND VALUES

SUNDAY 2:00PM – SEVEN VALUES, YOUR WAY Emilia Diamant 2:00PM – JEWISH TIME TRAVEL IN FIVE EASY STEPS Etta King 4:00PM – YOU DON’T HAVE TO BE JEWISH: USING SECULAR CHILDRENS’ LITERATURE TO TEACH JEWISH VALUES IN THE EARLY CHILDHOOD SETTING. Sharon Cores MONDAY 9:00AM – JEWISH IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT AND MORAL DECISION MAKING: WHERE ETHICS MEETS HISTORY Jan Darsa


180 2:15PM – TV STANDS FOR TORAH VALUES Nachum Amsel 4:00PM – THE TORAH OF MANAGEMENT: DRAWING ON JEWISH VALUES AND CONTEMPORARY BUSINESS WISDOM TO MOVE YOUR EDUCATION TEAM TOWARDS EXCELLENCE. Yohanna Kinberg 4:00PM – TEACHING JEWISH VALUES THROUGH SONG Eric Komar TUESDAY 9:15AM – BYSTANDERS, UPSTANDERS AND CIVIC RESPONSIBILITY: WHERE ETHICS MEETS HISTORY Jan Darsa 11:00AM – CULTIVATING MINDFULNESS & CHARACTER THROUGH JEWISH PRINCIPLES AND AFFECTIVE ACTIVITIES Goldie Milgram 4:00PM – WRESTLING WITH YISRAEL: PEOPLE, LAND AND STATE Leah Wolff-Pellingra WEDNESDAY 8:45AM – HANUKKAH IN JULY...?? TEACHING JEWISH VALUES THROUGH THE FRAMEWORK OF JEWISH HOLIDAYS Ruth Dubin Steinberg 8:45AM – USING JEWISH VALUES TO COMBAT BULLYING, SUICIDE, EATING DISORDERS AND ADDICTION Anne Andrew 8:45AM – SINGING AND SHARING UNIVERSAL VALUES THROUGH A JEWISH LENS Emily Aronoff Teck 8:45AM – MASTER CLASS: JUMP IN AND BECOME A MITZVAH-CENTERED STORYTELLER Cherie Karo Schwartz, Peninnah Schram, Goldie Milgram 8:45AM – CHALLENGING THE MYTH OF BIBLICAL HOMOPHOBIA Michael Rothbaum

MUSIC

4:00PM – NEWCAJE CHORALE (session 1 of 3) Ellen Allard 4:00PM – EMUNAH: SPIRITUALITY, IMAGERY, AND OLD TIME MUSIC Doni Zasloff, Eric Lindberg MONDAY 9:00AM – SING IT! SAY IT! STAMP IT! SWAY IT! Ellen Allard 11:00AM – REMEMBERING DEBBIE FRIEDMAN AND HER LEGACY OF SONG Jeff Klepper 11:00AM – NEW MUSIC AND VISUAL PRAYER- A SPIRITUAL AND VIBRANT PARTNERSHIP Sue Horowitz, EJ Cohen 2:00PM – SINGIN’ SHACHARIT Emily Aronoff Teck 4:00PM – NEWCAJE CHORALE (Session 2 of 3) Ellen Allard 4:00PM – TEACHING JEWISH VALUES THROUGH SONG Eric Komar TUESDAY 9:00AM – HEBREW WIZARDS: CAMPFIRE KAVANNAH Deborah Salomon, Ken Cohen, Lizzie Swan 9:15AM – MODES, MOTIFS & MELODIES: THE BUILDING-BLOCKS OF BIBLICAL AND LITURGICAL CHANTS Neil Schwartz


181 11:00AM – SHIR CHADASH - A NEW SONG Susan Shane-Linder 11:00AM – THE PROMISE: USING CONTEMPORARY MUSIC TO INSPIRE A LOVE FOR ISRAEL Sam Glaser 2:00PM – THE BLESSING OF A MUSICAL CURRICULUM: BUILDING MEANING THROUGH SONG Peri Smilow 4:00PM – NEWCAJE CHORALE (session 3 of 3) Ellen Allard 4:00PM – MUSIC IS MEMORY Sarah Sinofsky WEDNESDAY 8:45AM – SINGING AND SHARING UNIVERSAL VALUES THROUGH A JEWISH LENS Emily Aronoff Teck 10:30AM – SOUNDS OF SURVIVAL: MUSIC OF THE WOMEN’S ORCHESTRA OF AUSCHWITZ Jeri Robins 10:30AM – NIGGUNATION Eitan Gutin 10:30AM – IT’S ALL ABOUT RUACH! Doni Zasloff, Eric Lindberg

NEW AND NEWER PRINCIPALS

SUNDAY 4:00PM – HOW TO NOT HAVE THE ADMINISTRATIVE DETAILS BOG YOU DOWN Joyce Siegel 4:00PM – PROJECT MANAGEMENT Leonard Samborowski MONDAY 9:00AM – THE ROLE OF VISION IN THE WORK OF A JEWISH PRINCIPAL Jeffrey Schein 11:00AM – CHANGE! HOW TO LIVE AND LEAD THROUGH PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL CHANGE Jill Paul 2:00PM – PARTNERS IN LEADERSHIP AND LEADERS IN PARTNERSHIP Natasha Dresner 4:00PM – THE TORAH OF MANAGEMENT: DRAWING ON JEWISH VALUES AND CONTEMPORARY BUSINESS WISDOM TO MOVE YOUR EDUCATION TEAM TOWARDS EXCELLENCE. Yohanna Kinberg TUESDAY 9:00AM – GRANT WRITING WITHOUT FEAR Mitch Gordon 9:00AM – REFLECTION AS A TOOL FOR MY PROFESSIONAL SUCCESS Mark Young 11:00AM – LEANING IN: JEWISH WOMEN AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Yohanna Kinberg 11:00AM – STORYTELLING STRATEGIES FOR MARKETING YOUR JEWISH PROGRAMMING Lisa Lipkin 2:15PM – IMPROVISATION, LEADERSHIP & TEACHING Mitch Gordon WEDNESDAY 8:45AM – SERVANT LEADERSHIP: IS IT A WAY TO GET THE NEXT GENERATION TO COME TO JEWISH EDUCATION? Hana Bor


182 8:45AM – WORKPLACE ETHICS FOR THE NEXT GENERATION Alison Westermann 10:30AM – BEING A TRANSFORMATIVE LEADER PJ Schwartz

NEW TEACHERS

SUNDAY 2:00PM – TEACHER SURVIVAL WORKSHOP Amy Ripps TUESDAY 4:00PM – ‘WHO ME?!’ TEACHING HEBREW READING AND PRAYERS WHEN YOU FEEL LIKE A NOVICE YOURSELF Lynn Anne Cutler 4:00PM – EXPANDING YOUR TEACHER’S TOOLBOX Debi Swedelson Mishael

PROJECT BASED LEARNING AND EXPERIENTIAL EDUCATION

SUNDAY 4:00PM – PROJECT BASED LEARNING: MAKING JEWISH LEARNING AUTHENTIC AND RELEVANT Ronni Ticker MONDAY 11:00AM – HOW TO EMBED REFLECTION INTO EXPERIENTIAL EDUCATION AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Richard Solomon, Elaine Solomon 11:00AM – BUT WE DON’T HAVE A LAKE! - HOW SYNAGOGUES CAN BE (AND ARE!) A SETTING FOR EXPERIENTIAL EDUCATION Mark Young 2:00PM – WE COUNTED THEM - A CASE STUDY IN PROJECT BASED LEARNING Max Socol 4:00PM – WRAPPING THE TORAH AROUND OUR LEARNERS CREATING EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCES IN SYNAGOGUES FOR HOLISTIC JEWISH GROWTH Mark Young TUESDAY 9:00AM – FETA (FAMILY EDUCATION, EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING, TECHNOLOGY AND THE ARTS) AND CONTENT Deborah Miller, Debra Kerschner 11:00AM – EXPERIENTIAL EDUCATION: THE BIG PICTURE Cherie Koller-Fox 11:00AM – THE PROCESS OF GUIDING: AN INTRODUCTION TO PROJECT BASED LEARNING Sasha Kopp 2:00PM – OK, PROJECT BASED LEARNING SOUNDS GREAT -- BUT IT CAN’T WORK IN (MY SETTING) Max Socol 4:00PM – NOT JUST M/W OR T/TH 4-6 BUT 24/7: HOW SYNAGOGUES


183 CAN FACILITATE LEARNING AT ALL TIMES Mark Young WEDNESDAY 8:45AM – ENGAGE, EXCITE, EMPOWER AND EDUCATE Chava Rousch-Carlisle 10:30AM – THE STARTLING FINDINGS ABOUT JEWISH EXPERIENTIAL EDUCATION THAT ALL JEWISH EDUCATORS SHOULD KNOW Gavriel Goldman

SELF CARE

SUNDAY 2:00PM – DECODING THE SQUIGGLES: TORAH TROPE Neil Schwartz 2:00PM – NEWCAJE ORIENTATION NewCAJE Staff 4:00PM – WRITE YOUR (JEWISH EDUCATOR) SOUL Samantha Libby MONDAY 9:00AM – LEARN TO READ HEBREW AT NEWCAJE! (Part 1) Eyal Rav-Noy 11:00AM – A FOOT IN THE DOOR: GETTING THAT INTERVIEW Eitan Gutin 2:00PM – SHALEM AND SHALVA WITHIN: AN AIKIDO APPROACH TO WHOLENESS WITHIN Lori Wynters TUESDAY 9:00AM – REFLECTION AS A TOOL FOR MY PROFESSIONAL SUCCESS Mark Young 9:00AM – LEARN TO READ HEBREW AT NEWCAJE! (Part 2) Eyal Rav-Noy WEDNESDAY 8:45AM – LEARN TO READ HEBREW AT NEWCAJE! (Part 3) Eyal Rav-Noy

SERVICE LEARNING AND TZEDAKAH

SUNDAY 2:00PM – V’ASU TZEDAKA: JEWISH ACTIVISM IN YOUR HOME, CONGREGATION, CAMPUS, JCC, AND COMMUNITY Jonathan Wolf MONDAY 11:00AM – THE PROBLEM WITH SERVICE LEARNING Emilia Diamant 4:00PM – CREATING TZEDAKAH ORIENTED COMMUNITIES Steven Bayar TUESDAY 9:00AM – TZEDAKAH HANDS ON Avi Zukerman 2:00PM – CULTURAL JUDAISM & SOCIAL JUSTICE ACTIVISM: A NEW LEARNING MOVEMENT Katherine O’Brien


184

SPECIAL NEEDS AND INCLUSION

MONDAY 11:00AM – ACCESS TO JEWISH EDUCATION: SUPPORTING THE BELIEF THAT EVERY CHILD DESERVES A JEWISH EDUCATION Sherry Grossman 2:00PM – TAKE HOME TOOLS TO TEACH ALL TYPES OF LEARNERS Beth Crastnopol 4:00PM – ADHD AND RELIGIOUS SCHOOL Dan Waxman TUESDAY 2:00PM – LEARNING ABOUT LEARNING STYLES Sherry Grossman 4:00PM – BRAIN-BASED STRATEGIES FOR INCLUSIVE CLASSROOMS Sandy Miller-Jacobs

SPIRITUALITY

SUNDAY 4:00PM – EMUNAH: SPIRITUALITY, IMAGERY, AND OLD TIME MUSIC Doni Zasloff, Eric Lindberg 4:00PM – WRITE YOUR (JEWISH EDUCATOR) SOUL Samantha Libby 4:00PM – GOD IN OUR RELATIONSHIPS: USING HASIDIC STORIES TO TEACH MARTIN BUBER’S I-THOU RELATIONSHIP Dennis Ross MONDAY 8:00AM – MY SOUL THIRSTS FOR GOD: PRAYERFUL WALKS & TEXT STUDY IN NATURE Goldie Milgram 9:00AM – WHISPERS OF SHEMA Helene Kates 11:00AM – FROM SHOW AND TELL TO SHEHEKHEEYANU: NURTURING A SENSE OF HOLINESS IN YOUNG CHILDREN (Preschool through 3rd grade) Treasure Cohen 11:00AM – I CAN SEE CLEARLY NOW: UNDERSTANDING THE ‘LENSES’ THAT AFFECT OUR WORLD VIEW Sam Glaser 11:00AM – JEWISH SPIRITUAL EDUCATION FOR YOURSELF AND YOUR STUDENTS Goldie Milgram 2:00PM – THE HEART OF PRAYER: MAKING WORDS IN THE SIDDUR YOUR OWN Matia Rania Angelou 2:00PM – STUDYING THE HEBREW LETTERS AS RUBRIC FOR SPIRITUALITY Tova Gannana 2:00PM – SHALEM AND SHALVA WITHIN: AN AIKIDO APPROACH TO WHOLENESS WITHIN Lori Wynters 4:00PM – THE ART OF AMAZEMENT: USING JUDAISM’S POWERFUL TOOLS TO HELP STUDENTS CREATE AND MAINTAIN A SENSE OF WONDER Sam Glaser 4:00PM – NEW METHODS, PRINCIPLES AND RESOURCES FOR B’NEI MITZVAH PREPARATION Goldie Milgram TUESDAY 9:00AM – WHY BAD THINGS HAPPEN TO GOOD PEOPLE – SOME


185 TRADITIONAL JEWISH APPROACHES Nachum Amsel 11:00AM – CULTIVATING MINDFULNESS & CHARACTER THROUGH JEWISH PRINCIPLES AND AFFECTIVE ACTIVITIES Goldie Milgram 2:00PM – PRINCIPLES FOR NURTURING SPIRITUAL DEVELOPMENT IN YOUNG JEWISH CHILDREN Deborah Schein 2:00PM – CREATE YOUR OWN RITUAL Rosie Rosenzweig 2:00PM – BEIT MIDRASH IN MOTION: CAN OUR DREAMS COME TRUE? Dalia Davis 4:00PM – CONNECTING TO TORAH: TEACHING PARASHAT HASHAVUA USING THE TORAH CIRCLES METHOD Matia Rania Angelou 4:00PM – SO MUCH MORE THAN MEETS THE EYE: THE STRUCTURE AND MEANING OF JEWISH PRAYER AS SEEN THROUGH THE FRIDAY EVENING LITURGY Cherie Koller-Fox WEDNESDAY 10:30AM – NIGGUNATION Eitan Gutin

STORYTELLING

SUNDAY 4:00PM – YOU DON’T HAVE TO BE JEWISH: USING SECULAR CHILDRENS’ LITERATURE TO TEACH JEWISH VALUES IN THE EARLY CHILDHOOD SETTING. Sharon Cores MONDAY 9:00AM – JEWISH WISDOM IMBUED IN WORLD STORIES AND FOLK MOTIFS Sarah Sinofsky 11:00AM – TEENS AND TALES: STORY-ING WITH THE NEXT GENERATION Cherie Karo Schwartz 2:00PM – SACRED STORIES & DEBRIEFING TECHNIQUES Cherie Karo Schwartz, Peninnah Schram TUESDAY 11:00AM – STORYTELLING STRATEGIES FOR MARKETING YOUR JEWISH PROGRAMMING Lisa Lipkin 2:00PM – YOUR JEWISH NAME: STORIES & METHODS FOR STRENGTHENING CONNECTION TO JEWISH NAMES & PERSONAL IDENTITY Peninnah Schram, Goldie Milgram WEDNESDAY 8:45AM – MASTER CLASS: JUMP IN AND BECOME A MITZVAH-CENTERED STORYTELLER Cherie Karo Schwartz, Peninnah Schram, Goldie Milgram


186

TEACHING TECHNIQUES

SUNDAY 2:00PM – TEACHER SURVIVAL WORKSHOP Amy Ripps MONDAY 9:00AM – HOW FAR DOES THE APPLE FALL? SHARING FAMILY STORIES Etta King 2:00PM – SACRED STORIES & DEBRIEFING TECHNIQUES Cherie Karo Schwartz, Peninnah Schram TUESDAY 2:00PM – YOUR JEWISH NAME: STORIES & METHODS FOR STRENGTHENING CONNECTION TO JEWISH NAMES & PERSONAL IDENTITY Peninnah Schram, Goldie Milgram 4:00PM – MUSIC IS MEMORY Sarah Sinofsky 4:00PM – EXPANDING YOUR TEACHER’S TOOLBOX Debi Swedelson Mishael WEDNESDAY 8:45AM – MASTER CLASS: JUMP IN AND BECOME A MITZVAH-CENTERED STORYTELLER Cherie Karo Schwartz, Peninnah Schram, Goldie Milgram 8:45AM – ENGAGE, EXCITE, EMPOWER AND EDUCATE Chava Rousch-Carlisle

TECHNOLOGY AND MEDIA

SUNDAY 4:00PM – A NEW MODEL FOR ONLINE LEARNING David Schwarz MONDAY 9:00AM – HOW TO EFFECTIVELY TEACH JEWISH HISTORY IN THE 21ST CENTURY AND MAKE IT EXCITING AND INTERACTIVE FOR STUDENTS Nachum Amsel 9:15AM – INTRODUCTION TO IMPLEMENTING TECHNOLOGY IN THE CLASSROOM Jonathan Friesem 2:00PM – JEWISH PARENTING AND NEW TECHNOLOGIES Jeffrey Schein 2:15PM – TV STANDS FOR TORAH VALUES Nachum Amsel 2:15PM – ADVANCED IMPLEMENTATION OF TECHNOLOGY IN THE CLASSROOM Jonathan Friesem 4:00PM – HEBREW IN THE ONLINE LEARNING CENTER David Schwarz 4:00PM – THE EDUTAINING TEACHER Mira Scharf TUESDAY 9:00AM – FETA (FAMILY EDUCATION, EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING, TECHNOLOGY AND THE ARTS) AND CONTENT Deborah Miller, Debra Kerschner


187 2:00PM – HOW TO TEACH ABOUT ISRAEL TODAY EFFECTIVELY AND CONVINCINGLY IN THE DIGITAL AGE Nachum Amsel 2:00PM – SOCIAL MEDIA FOR THE EDUCATOR Jordyn Rozensky 4:00PM – PROMOTING VISUAL LITERACY AND NEW AVENUES FOR JEWISH EXPRESSION Eric Goldman 4:00PM – USING MODERN MEDIA TO CREATE CURRICULA Steven Bayar WEDNESDAY 10:30AM – ISRAEL EDUCATION FOR THE YOUTUBE GENERATION Andrea Gottlieb 10:30AM – DIGITAL STORYTELLING: THE ART OF A BLOG Sasha Kopp

TEEN ENGAGEMENT

MONDAY 9:00AM – OUR LOVE-HATE RELATIONSHIP WITH JEWISH TEENS David Bryfman 9:00AM – YOUR FLIGHT TO TEL AVIV IS NOW BOARDING: IMPACTFUL EDUCATIONAL TRAVEL TO ISRAEL Ira Dounn, Rachel Meytin 11:00AM – TEENS AND TALES: STORY-ING WITH THE NEXT GENERATION Cherie Karo Schwartz 4:00PM – PLANNING TO REACH YOUR LONG-TERM EDUCATIONAL GOALS Ira Dounn, Rachel Meytin 4:00PM – NEW METHODS, PRINCIPLES AND RESOURCES FOR B’NEI MITZVAH PREPARATION Goldie Milgram TUESDAY 9:00AM – HEY, WHAT’S THE BIG IDEA? INNOVATIVE TOOLS TO ENGAGE TEENS IN IMPORTANT ISSUES Batsheva Frankel 11:00AM – WHY TRAIN MADRICHIM , HOW AND WHO SHOULD DO IT? Sherry Grossman 2:00PM – HOW DO YOU GET IT DONE WHEN YOU’RE NOT DOING IT? Ira Dounn, Rachel Meytin WEDNESDAY 8:45AM – WHAT IN THE WORLD IS A CULTURAL BAR/BAT MITZVAH? Katherine O’Brien

TEXT

SUNDAY 2:00PM – DECODING THE SQUIGGLES: TORAH TROPE Neil Schwartz 4:00PM – IN THE TENT OF ABRAHAM Janie Grackin 4:00PM – REASONS FOR THE COMMANDMENTS Michael Pitkowsky 4:00PM – WHEN I STUDY, GOD TALKS TO ME: TEACHING JEWISH TEXTS TO UPPER ELEMENTARY AND MIDDLE SCHOOL STUDENTS ‘WARTS AND ALL’ Deborah Goldstein, Cathy Kaplan


188 4:00PM – INTIMATE TORAH FOR TODAY Steven Bayar 4:00PM – MAKING MIDRASH PERSONAL Tziona Szajman MONDAY 9:00AM – TEACHING TORAH WITH JUDAIC ART Cindy Quitt 9:15AM – TORAH IN BLACK & WHITE: THE WORLD OF THE SOFER Kevin Hale 11:00AM – TEACHING TORAH FOR MEANING Joel Grishaver TUESDAY 9:00AM – WHY BAD THINGS HAPPEN TO GOOD PEOPLE – SOME TRADITIONAL JEWISH APPROACHES Nachum Amsel 9:00AM – THE REALITY APPROACH TO TORAH TEACHING Hal Miller-Jacobs 11:00AM – CULTIVATING MINDFULNESS & CHARACTER THROUGH JEWISH PRINCIPLES AND AFFECTIVE ACTIVITIES Goldie Milgram 11:00AM – PHILOSOPHICAL INQUIRY WITH BIBLE Jeffrey Schein 2:00PM – THE ONE WHO DOESN’T KNOW HOW TO ASK: WHAT’S GOING ON IN THE PASSOVER HAGGADAH Paul Solyn 2:00PM – CREATING CONNECTIONS TO JEWISH TEXT Batsheva Frankel 2:15PM – WHAT IS MIDRASH AND WHAT CAN WE LEARN FROM IT? Lenny Levin 4:00PM – SO MUCH MORE THAN MEETS THE EYE: THE STRUCTURE AND MEANING OF JEWISH PRAYER AS SEEN THROUGH THE FRIDAY EVENING LITURGY Cherie Koller-Fox WEDNESDAY 8:45AM – HEBREW POETS WHO INFLUENCED MODERN HEBREW Tova Gannana 8:45AM – CHALLENGING THE MYTH OF BIBLICAL HOMOPHOBIA Michael Rothbaum 10:30AM – LEADERSHIP IN THE EARLY PROPHETS Everett Fox

THEOLOGY

SUNDAY 4:00PM – GOD IN OUR RELATIONSHIPS: USING HASIDIC STORIES TO TEACH MARTIN BUBER’S I-THOU RELATIONSHIP Dennis Ross TUESDAY 9:00AM – HEY, WHAT’S THE BIG IDEA? INNOVATIVE TOOLS TO ENGAGE TEENS IN IMPORTANT ISSUES Batsheva Frankel 11:00AM – TEACHER, I’M AN ATHEIST! RESPONDING TO CHALLENGES ABOUT GOD Paul Solyn WEDNESDAY 8:45AM – HONEST TO GOD Lenny Levin


189

TORAH LISHMAH

SUNDAY 4:00PM – INTIMATE TORAH FOR TODAY Steven Bayar

VISUAL ART AND CRAFTS

MONDAY 9:00AM – TEACHING TORAH WITH JUDAIC ART Cindy Quitt 9:15AM – TORAH IN BLACK & WHITE: THE WORLD OF THE SOFER Kevin Hale 2:00PM – HIDDUR MITZVAH -BEAUTIFUL CONTENT IN THE CLASSROOM Debi Swedelson Mishael 4:00PM – HANDS-ON JEWISH FUN FOR THE WHOLE CHILD: INFUSING JEWISH LIVING INTO DAILY LIFE Treasure Cohen TUESDAY 9:00AM – FETA (FAMILY EDUCATION, EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING, TECHNOLOGY AND THE ARTS) AND CONTENT Deborah Miller, Debra Kerschner 9:00AM – BUILDING A TEL: AN ARCHAEOLOGICAL APPROACH TO TEACHING JEWISH HISTORY AND TEXTS Susan Eiseman Levitin 9:00AM – TZEDAKAH HANDS ON Avi Zukerman 9:15AM – DUCT TAPE TALLIT Janie Grackin 2:00PM – YOU WANT ME TO DO ART PROJECTS? BUT I’M NOT AN ARTIST! Susan Eiseman Levitin 4:00PM – PROMOTING VISUAL LITERACY AND NEW AVENUES FOR JEWISH EXPRESSION Eric Goldman WEDNESDAY 8:45AM – POP-UP JEWISH HOLIDAY CARDS Avi Zukerman

YIDDISH

MONDAY 2:00PM – TEACH YOUR STUDENTS ABOUT THE EASTERN EUROPEAN CULTURE OF THEIR GRANDPARENTS Marcia Gruss Levinsohn, Amanda Jill Wood TUESDAY 4:00PM – PRACTICAL YIDDISH ‘KHOKHME’ (Wisdom) Marcia Gruss Levinsohn, Amanda Jill Wood


190


191

PLANNING OUT YOUR CONFERENCE SUNDAY, JULY 28th

WORKSHOPS Workshop 1 or

1st CHOICE

2nd CHOICE

A B C

MONDAY, JULY 29th WORKSHOPS Workshop 2 or Workshop 3 or

1st CHOICE

2nd CHOICE

A B C A B C

TUESDAY, JULY 30th WORKSHOPS Workshop 4 or Workshop 5 or

1st CHOICE

2nd CHOICE

A B C A B C

WEDNESDAY, JULY 31st WORKSHOPS Workshop 1 or

A B C

1st CHOICE

2nd CHOICE


192 Notes:


193 Notes:


194 Notes:


195 Notes:


GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN JUDAIC STUDIES Modern programs rooted in tradition.

Towson University, a leader in higher education in the mid-Atlantic region for 150 years, is proud to offer the graduate programs in Judaic Studies introduced by Baltimore Hebrew University more than 90 years ago. Our students benefit from a convenient campus location just ten minutes north of Baltimore, a flagship community of outstanding communal organizations and institutions of education that provides rich opportunities for internships and employment. Jewish Studies M.A. Immerse yourself in the Jewish classics and gain comprehension of the scope of the Jewish experience. Graduates apply their degree to prepare for doctoral-level work in Jewish Studies or to further their careers in the Jewish non-profit world. Jewish Education M.A. By integrating pedagogy and the best educational practices with classical and contemporary Judaic Studies, the Jewish Education program prepares graduates for careers as teachers or administrators in formal or informal Jewish educational settings. Jewish Communal Service M.A. Prepare for professional leadership in the Jewish community with a combination of leadership training, communal service and practical field experience. Graduates typically work in local and national non-profit, servicebased organizations within the Jewish community.

Dual-Degree Offerings MSW and Jewish Communal Service M.A. Jewish Communal Service M.A. and Jewish Education M.A. Post-Baccalaureate Certificates Jewish Communal Service Jewish Education Generous need and merit-based scholarships Towson Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Baltimore Hebrew Institute offers generous scholarships, and cultivates and supports a vibrant, cohesive community for Towsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Judaic Studies students. For information contact: Loryn Strauzer University Admissions 410-704-4719 lstrauzer@towson.edu

www.towsonjudaicstudies.info


Pilot a Hebrew Wizards in your school! a Cutting-Edge Curriculum a Winning Methodology! NEW Pilot Programs; in Atlanta, Savannah, Manhattan, Houston, Boston, & Los Angeles.

EXODUS CHAPTER 20: 2-17

TEN COMMANDMENTS

1

DO’S

Do believe that I am G-d who freed you from slavery in Egypt.

2 isDoonlybelieve that there 1 3

G-d.

Do use G-d's name with respect.

4 Do celebrate the Shabbat.

Do honor your Mother 5 and your Father.

DON’TS

6 Do not Murder. Do not dishonor your 7 husband or your wife. 8 Do not Steal.

9 Do not Lie.

10

Do not be Jealous of what other people have.

DID WISE WIZARD SAYS:

®

YOU KNOW ?

Commandment #5 symbolizes respect for G-d by respectingour parents. our

If you follow the 10 commandments you will be on the road to righteousness.

KEY FACTS:

• Commandments 1-5 are between G-d and people • Commandments 6-10 are between people and people • Commandment #4 - Shabbat is the holiest of the Jewish holidays because G-d rested on the 7th day after creating the world

bre He

Copyright © 2009 Hebrew Wizards, Inc. Designed by Graphish Studio W

izard

TM

www.hebrewizards.com

www.hebrewizards.com

Program Book NewCAJE 2013  

Classes and information about our 2013 conference

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