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Produced by: NEW: ART CENTER / Het Plafond Edited / Curated by: Romuald Demidenko Cooperation: Willem Besselink, Guus Vreeburg Contributors: Ada Avetist, Andrew Birk, Billy Gallery, Anne de Boer, Eloise Bonneviot, Sebastian Cichocki, Douglas Cloninger, Gerardo Contreras, Martyn Richard Coppel, Debora Delmar Corporation Corporation, Guia Cortassa, DJ New Jersey Drone, Julie Grosche, Gzozia, Hard-Core, Hrafnhildur Helgadóttir, Sæmundur Þór Helgason, Blair Kneppers, Riemer Knopp, Perla Montelongo, Museum of Internet, Kubiat Nnamdie, Wyatt Niehaus, Gordon Palmas Palmas, Karolina Plinta, Lauren Reid, Kcireed Reswob, Bong R.I.P, Manuel Roßner, Gregor Rozanski, Roelof van der Schaff, Nicolaus Schafhausen, ScreenSaverGallery, Karin Stroo, Johannes Thumfart, Weronika Zielińska, Guus Vreeburg, Beata Wilczek Featuring works by: Andrew Birk, Rafał Czajka, Debora Delmar Corporation Corporation, Travis Egedy (Pictureplane), Manuel Forte, Kubiat Nnamdie, Gregor Rozanski, Manuel Solano, Jasper Spicero Design by: Magdalena Heliasz Special thanks to: Het Plafond - het ruimte voor kunst en cultuur / Andrew Birk, Debora Delmar Corporation Corporation, Gregor Rozanski / Hard-Core / Pieterjan de Jager / Upominki and culture.pl

newartcenter.info hetplafond.org


# intro

What if there is nothing at the end of our path and the imagined future-context for our work doesn’t exist? What if we only believe there are better conditions as the result of our efforts? What are we really doing this for? There has been an attempt to find an answer to questions about the basic things surrounding us. We know that there is something that resonates supremely between ideas and their object-based manifestation. The Internet has fundamentally changed the manner by which we perceive our surroundings – the way we communicate with each other, and what we believe is genuine and relevant to understanding contemporaneity. The Internet is not only a new realm of communication, not only a tool, but more than ever a non-material form that becomes real forever because we want it to, because it is embedded in us. This publication intermittently reflects results of the ongoing research project IS IT ART OR IS IT JUST – addressed to and populated by emerging artists and curators, and conceived by the communication platform NEW: ART CENTER in conjunction with Het Plafond, who recently hosted our pop-up project. Tapping the resources of our project space’s esteemed visitors, we delivered a series of outstanding URL and IRL auxiliary events. This project is a follow-up. And we’d love you to participate, of course. We asked several artists, curators and other specialists: What, in your opinion, will bring the future?

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Andrew Birk #The Future

IN THE FUTURE THERE WILL NOT BE BAD ART THERE WILL ONLY BE GOOD ART THERE WONT EVEN BE ART THERE WILL ONLY BE GOOD ART THERE WILL ONLY BE GREAT ART THERE WILL ONLY BE GREAT ARTISTS THERE WILL NOT BE ART. IN THE FUTURE THERE WILL NOT BE MODELS THERE WILL JUST BE ARTISTS THERE WILL NOT BE ATHLETES THERE WILL JUST BE ARTISTS THERE WILL NOT BE ACTORS THERE WILL JUST BE ARTISTS THERE WILL NOT BE WHORES OR PORNSTARS THERE WILL ONLY BE ARTISTS. ARTISTS WILL BE BRAND SPOKESPERSONS ALL ART SHOWS WILL BE SPONSORED BY MAINSTREAM CORPORATIONS ARTISTS MIGHT HAVE GOVERNMENT CONTRACTS ARTISTS WILL SURELY OVERWHELM ALL GOSSIP TABLOIDS AND PUT OUT PORNO VIDEOS IN UNDERGRADUATE SCHOOL AS THEIR GRADUATION THESES TO GAIN FAME AND FORTUNE AND FUCK MORE CURATORS. IN THE FUTURE FUCK ART AND FUCK ART OBJECTS AND FUCK ART GESTURES AND FUCK HISTORY FUCK YOUR HEROS FUCK YOURSELF FUCK IDEAS FUCK EVERYTHING THE FUTURE WILL NO LONGER CARE ABOUT DEPTH. ALL CONTENT AND CULTURE WILL EMBRACE ITS FLATNESS IN THE FUTURE IF YOU ARE NOT HOT YOU ARE NOT AN ARTIST POINT


BLANK IN THE FUTURE ART SCHOOLS WILL BE IVY LEAGUE SCHOOLS THE ONLY WAY TO GET INTO THE CIRCLE IS IF YOU ARE A LEGACY OF COURSE THERE WILL BE NO EXCEPTIONS IN THE FUTURE ART WILL B IMMEDIATELY CHANNELED INTO MAINSTREAM CULTURAL CONSUMERISM THERE WILL BE NO LAG. A BOARD OF DOCTORS AND MARKETING EXECUTIVES PAIRED WITH LAWYERS WILL SCREEN FRO MANIPULATIVE ART IDEAS TO TRICK THE PUBLIC TO CONSUME AND APPLY THEM TO MAINSTREAM CULTURE POST HASTE IN THE FUTURE ALL ART WILL BE LASER RED AND NEON YELLOW IN THE FUTURE CEOs WILL CONVERT INTO ARTISTS AND BUILD GLASS AND TITANIUM AND L.E.D. BASED MONUMENTS THAT SIT IN THE MIDDLE OF WIFI CLOUDS THERE WILL BE NO INTEGRITY ARTISTS WITH INTEGRITY WILL NO LONGER BE ARTISTS STOP THIS CONVO RITE NOW U R NOT N ARTIST IN THE FUTURE THE VIEWER THE LAYMAN WILL NOT BE CONSIDERED U R EITHER IN R U R OUT EVERYONE THAT MATTERS WILL BE AN ARTIST EVERYONE THAT DOESNT MATTER WILL NOT BE AN ARTIST, DUH IN THE FUTURE WE WILL FINALLY REACH THE LAST CANCEROUS STAGE OF CAPITALIST PERVERSION THERE WILL ONLY BE GREAT ART THERE WILL ONLY BE DRAKE AND JAY 7


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Andrew Birk #The Future

Z THERE WILL BE NO REASON TO GAUGE QUALITY IF YOU ARE AN ARTIST THAT MEANS YOU ARE A HOT SEXY FUCKING RICH GENIUS AND UR WORK IS FOREVER. INSIDE OF THIS SPIRALING GLISTENING GUTTER, DOPAMINE AND MAGIC AND HEARTBEATS WILL BECOME COMPLETELY VACUOUS WE WILL NO LONGER HAVE PASSION PASSION IS SO PLAYED OUT PASSION IS SO NOT HOT RIGHT NOW GREAT ART WILL BE FUCKING FUCKING CLEVER DONT YOU GET IT?! IN THE FUTURE THE ART WORLD WONT BE CALLED THE ART WORLD IT WILL JUST BE CALLED THE WORLD IN CAPS LOCKS ITALICIZED OF COURSE. ALL INSTUTIONAL MEMBERS LIVESTREAMING THEIR BIRTHS AND DEATHS AS PERFORMANCE ON SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS ALL ARTISTS MUST HAVE PLASTIC SURGEONS AND NUTRICIANS R ELSE. IN THE FUTURE CIRCULATING AROUND ART WILL BE MORE IMPORTANT THAN SELF PRESERVATION. “IM GONNA DIE IF I DONT MAKE IT TO BASEL.” IN THE FUTURE WE WILL ALL BLOW OUT OUR EARS BLOW COCKS AND BLOW OUT OUR BRAINS FOR ART, 2 B SEEN W/ ART, 2 B SEEN W/ ARTISTS, AND TO B SEEN AS ARTISTS OURSELVES. AT AN EARLY AGE ART SCHOOL BABIES AND CHILDREN WILL BE WEEPING TO VIDZ OF MARINA


AND ULAY AND DEDICATE THEIR LIVES TO THE CAUSE IN THE FUTURE THE AMERICAN GOVERNMENT WILL HAVE A FINE ART BRANCH. THEY WILL OFFICIALLY STEP INTO THE RACKET, IT WILL BE TAUGHT IN HISTORY CLASSES THAT FINE ART IS THE LAST INVISIBLE LEASH OF COLONIALISM SPREADING TO ALL THE DARK CORNERS OF THE UNIVERSE ALL PRESS RELEASES PROMOTIONAL MATERIALS AND RAP SONGS WILL EMPLOY INTERNATIONAL ART ENGLISH WHICH WILL HAVE BECOME AN OFFICIAL AND DISTINCT LANGUAGE IN THE FUTURE EVERY TREE PLANTED WILL BE A SCULPTURE AND EVERY SUICIDE WILL BE A PERFORMANCE AND THEY WILL ALL HAVE DEDICATED TUMBLRS. WHEN THE UNIVERSE IMPLODES THAT WILL HAVE A DEDICATED TUMBLR 2 IT WILL SOON BE REVEALED THAT GOD WAS THE FIRST CONCEPTUAL ART PIECE WE WILL STOP TALKING ABOUT DUCHAMP AND CONTINUE TALKING ABOUT JESUS ANDREW BIRK THE FUTURE

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#Kubiat Nnamdie

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WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART? COLLAPSE WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART INSTITUTION? IRRELEVANCY WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART EDUCATION? DISAPPEARANCE WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART PRODUCTION AFTER THE INTERNET? CONFUSION

Gerardo Contreras

Hi Romuald, The future of art is internet. The future of art institution is internet. The future of art education is internet. The future of art production after internet is internet. Thank you for asking.

Museum of Internet

WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART? A limitless possibility WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART INSTITUTION? Immersion with the internet. Good and bad shit. WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART EDUCATION? The internet. WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART PRODUCTION AFTER THE INTERNET? Anything you want it to be. New times.

KCIRRED RESWOB

WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART? It’s a matter of time when art will switch in treating its default medium space - from current ‘white cube’ to the Internet. Whole model of current art evaluation & economy is evolving around material objects. Art from the one side seems as the most dynamic discipline of culture but from the other it is the only culture area that didn’t make a switch to the digital age. And this is a crucial move because current model doesn’t really change since XIX century and is hugely constraining scope of art creation.

Billy Gallery

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WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART INSTITUTION? Let us imagine that public institutions are signing artists on time based contracts alike footballers are by sport clubs, actors by theaters, musicians by philharmonics. Anyway, currently the art sector is exception when thinking about distribution of public money in culture. Public money in theater, music, film in much serious parts are going to creators themselves. When art world will fully embrace Internet as a medium - institutions could shrink in size and money that formerly have been spent on - building & maintaining huge spaces, realizing temporary exhibitions, funding artworks existing for onemonth (that are later disassembled or sold to a private collection), salaries of builders, electricians, managers could be invested in signing executive teams of artists/ designers/curators to realize art to the Internet. WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART EDUCATION? We live in the post-conceptual landscape. Clear division of the curator and artists is fake. After conceptualism we simply cannot believe in the gap between interpretation and the artwork. Art and its theory and context. So both way - artists will be increasingly working on their theory and curators/art historians on aesthetics. WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART PRODUCTION AFTER THE INTERNET? Youtube has already more than a thousand partners who make 6 figures ($) annually. The dynamic of the art establishing itself on the Internet - depends on the development of services that could bring sustainable gains to authors. Though, current system that is based on flat view count is to be replaced. It is sure that it’s not about mesmerizing masses of eyes with the catchy cat video. It’s about compensating authors with sustainable pay-off for the important, meaningful, inspirational content. It’s obvious from the art history - that very often avant-garde languages, which were formerly very niche and that only latter got to the position of a classics and most breed-able forms of culture. Therefore viewers should be able to decide on the weight of their ‘like’ or to be able to determine how much their particular view “counts” - all for the sake of better identifying valuable content and stimulating culturally important authors with sustainable production situation.


WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART? In essence, art will remain the same as it serves a fundamental purpose in life. That is: art is the expression of the human condition. It has always been the fastest changing aspect of society; a forbearer of things to come, a trendsetter, even a monitor of the general mood in contemporary culture. Art is always the first aspect that is influenced when society succumbs to a revolution, a tool used to identify and self-identify. Action and reaction. WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART INSTITUTIONS? Art institutions are faring in troubled waters. As the practice and appreciation of art is the pinnacle of existence, it is the first thing to be cut back on in times of crisis – this has always been the case. Aside from that, traditional institutions are struggling to remain relevant in a modern world; they have been floating on a bubble of High Culture, unobtainable and unwelcoming to a large group of people. Today, ‘art’ and ‘culture’ are things that belong to the people. Democratic, bottom-up, informal. Institutions need to climb down from their ivory towers and join the party. WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART EDUCATION? Digitisation and Internet access really open doors for exploration and education. Now that anyone from anywhere in the world can acquaint themselves with a broad variety of art (history), appreciation for art increases immeasurably. People are curious by nature, and by encouraging informal discovery, you are encouraging self-development. Just look at something simple like the explosion of digital photography as an art form, with the social side of this visible on mainstream platforms such as Flickr or Instagram. Or the popularity of curatorial platforms such as Tumblr and Pinterest. It’s a very natural thing: show and tell. WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART PRODUCTION AFTER THE INTERNET? The Internet is effectively an extension of our existing tools for interaction. Apart from the digital plane, it makes so much possible in ‘real life’. Collaboration, skill-sharing, remixing… these are a few keywords that describe what the Internet is for. Though a great deal of

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people online are ‘lurkers’ – passive spectators – I would like to think that artists will increasingly use the internet to expand their creative possibilities.

BONG R.I.P.

WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART? A post-art world. WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART INSTITUTION? Jay-Z Center for Performance Art WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART EDUCATION? Teaching young people how to archive their own work. Become their own collectors, curators, and psycho-therapists. WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART PRODUCTION AFTER THE INTERNET? Post-Internet = Space-time travel Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure

DOUGLAS CLONINGER

WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART? The future of art is essential. As long as there are dreams and actions related to them, there is a future to behold for everyone. WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART INSTITUTIONS? They will crumble into dirt and arise in various forms for all of time. WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART EDUCATION? To educate oneself. WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART PRODUCTION AFTER THE INTERNET? I would wager it is unfathomable from this distance.

Guia Cortassa

WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART? No future for you no future for me No future no future for you WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART INSTITUTION? You tell me it’s the institution Well, you know You better free you mind instead WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART EDUCATION?


I believe the children are our future Theach them well and let them lead the way Show them all the beauty they possess inside give them a sense of pride. WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART PRODUCTION AFTER THE INTERNET? The ice age is coming, the sun’s zooming in Meltdown expected, the wheat is growing thin Engines stop running, but I have no fear Guia Cortassa is an art, music and nonfiction writer and curator based in Milan

WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART? ‘ART’ is a too inclusive/excluding term, I feel; let’s discuss ‘ARTS’ instead – this extra ‘S’ is essential! Already now, unlike maybe in the past, there’s no longer one all comprising, universal definition of what ‘art’ might be, or not be for that matter. ‘ARTS’ – that may include other artistic disciplines as well, not just ‘Fine Art’ / ‘Bildende Kunst’ / ‘Beeldende kunst’ / etc; all these disciplines, once each locked up within their discipline’s boundaries, are now crossing their borders, resulting into multidisciplinary collaborations and interdisciplinary projects – with the arts and the artists now meeting and benefitting from scientists, scholars, salespeople and other social actors; with the arts ‘going digital’ and (re-) entering the virtual world through 3D techniques; with ‘hi arts’ mingling with popular arts and ‘mass culture’; with arts employing both industry and artisanship; with artists from ‘here’ communicating and exchanging with artists from ever more ‘there’s’; with the arts operating ever more international, i.e. both ‘global’ and ‘local’, or ‘glocal’… ‘FUTURE’ – what is that, or rather: just when is that? 2014? 2024? (I will turn 70 then…) 2054? (my first centenary – if I shall live that long, hope not…). States of the arts in, say, 1954 were completely different, hardly recognizable from our present perspective; 1994 seems long ago as well, and even in 2012 things were different from now… “You have to change to stay the same” – said Willem de Kooning in 1979, 75 years old at the time, and still very much an active painter. Art will

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Guus Vreeburg


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have to change as well – in order to be able to continue to be the same active, activating, provocative and mind provoking, integrative and disintegrative, explorative and explicative force as it has been in the last 10 and 100 and 1000 years. WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART INSTITUTIONS? see below, “… after Internet”. WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART EDUCATION? Willem de Kooning Academy / ‘Media – Art – Design – Education’ in Rotterdam, where I serve as an art historian, has been offering bachelor courses in Leisure Management for some years now… WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART PRODUCTION AFTER THE INTERNET? 130715 – a posting found at the www: “HONG KONG — The much talked-about 3D printing technology has made its way to the art world. A set of original paintings by Vincent van Gogh, scanned and finely recreated [sic! GV] using three-dimensional printers, will be shown for the first time at Harbour City from July 16 to August 4. The exhibition, titled “Relievo Collection of Van Gogh Masterpieces,” is supported by the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam. It will replicate five original paintings by the late Dutch postimpressionist currently shown at the museum. Each painting is reproduced precisely in size, color and brightness to the originals, while the distinctive brushstroke and texture on Van Gogh’s paintings are also reproduced to near perfection, thanks to a team from Fujifilm. These paintings include “Sunflowers” (1889), “Wheatfield under thunderclouds” (1890), “Almond blossoms” (1890), “The harvest” (1888); and, “Boulevard de Clichy” (1887). Fans [sic; GV] of Van Gogh’s artworks can also purchase copies of these replicas for around HK$200,000 (US$25,780) [sic; GV] a piece. […]” (source: http://hk.blouinartinfo.com/news/ story/927928/3d-van-gogh-artworks-debutatharbourcity; cfr: http://www.whiteboardmag.com/3d-scan-vangogh-perfect-replicaformart/). Note: The Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam – one of the three Dutch museums housing the bulk of Van Gogh’s total artistic output – will use the funds thus ‘earned’ to help finance a new wing. It might be worthwhile to


contemplate the need of this extension when no longer hordes of tourists will have to visit ‘Èmsterdèm’ now that they shall be able to admire these ‘recreated’ ‘Vèn Goug’s’ in their home-towns… Besides: I feel that in Auvers-sur-Oise the earthly remains of Van Gogh would ‘turn around in the grave’ if Vincent’s ear(-s) would hear of this… And: would Walter Benjamin consider this the ultimate pinnacle of the ‘work of art in the age of its mechanical reproduction’? And: when can we have a 3D reproduction of, say, Lionel Messi or Cristiano Ronaldo and the likes (in a limited edition of 20, at a mere $ 25.000 a piece), or – why not? – new versions, fully operational, of Vincent himself (dig up DNA at Auvers…) or Johann Sebastian Bach? The ‘Ènn Frènk House’ could do good business as wel… And, and, and…

WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART? Why believe in linearity in art? It doesn t have ‘ to develop or end. Art just is, and will last till last human being. WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART INSTITUTIONS? They were always situated between churches and political parties, and so are their educational activities. WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART EDUCATION? Since thousands of years the best way of education are immediate interactions between pupil and teacher, especially in front of an art object. Despite using many new devices, nothing will change in this field. WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART PRODUCTION AFTER THE INTERNET? art is either personal or commercial. These two channels will find their ways.

Gzozia

WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART? Harder, better, bigger, faster, stronger - our work is never over.

Julie Grosche

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WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART INSTITUTIONS? -----------------------------------------------WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART EDUCATION? I just read an excellent article about why people shouldn’t go in MFAs in the states and more generally how schools should be in the future. I couldn’t express this better. Throwing the Gauntlet @ Art Programs Why we need art programs and how we can reform them. Artists are still key to the American experience. The sustainability of the American democratic experiment, within an increasingly diverse society impoverished by unrestrained capitalism, requires professionally creative publicly critical citizens. But can America’s art programs produce them? As long as most remain in bed with banks as self-serving, tuition-driven institutions producing nonunionized workers for a dated, late-twentiethcentury economy of rarefied trophies, they will remain morally and ethically bankrupt, unable to face the future. Reasons During the 1980s, most art programs grew exponentially as art training was streamlined by universities and colleges to fall in line with general undergraduate and graduate structures, degree-granting processes, and fundraising. However, art training was never totally based on skills acquisition, but on the more intangible notion of talent. Indeed, some great talents have been self-taught or cultivated by a single mentor. Academia cannot award talent, no matter its Ivy League pedigree, celebrity faculty, theory seminars (currently out of control, overburdening students with excessive reading and writing without enough time for making), increasing micromanagement of students, and skyrocketing tuition fees that generate the inevitability of a degree no matter the lack of talent. After a graduate student has spent thousands, a degree becomes a consumer’s right, not to mention the avoidance of lawsuits. By the 1990s, there were more and bigger art programs than ever generating an overpopulation of MFAs deep in debt. In-house tuition assistance was practically zero. It was not uncommon for art students to graduate with $80,000 in loans, plus. Yet the system was growing, so it immediately hired them back in, but as artists with short


rÊsumÊs and as teachers whose only training was as teaching assistants. In that regard, no second thought was given to the fact that Education was a discipline with a history and theory and that if art programs were now in the business of graduating art teachers because art students needed full-time jobs instantly in order to start paying back their loans immediately, they might need basic training in pedagogy. It has always been mistakenly presumed that all artists can teach. Yet regardless of student age, teaching requires the knowledge of how people learn. Ultimately, by 2000 almost everyone became a willing or unwilling accomplice as art programs began to create institutionalized artists and, by default, institutionalized art strictly informed by history and theory rather than by primary sources and long-term American field experiences. This charted a course in which American contemporary art began heading toward a total disconnect from society. Art increasingly became about art, and though this pleased those who yearned for the continuation of Modernism, it was nothing but a decadent, intellectually incestuous, high recycling of culture—a sign of the end of empire. We are now entering the second decade of the twentyfirst century, with a Ph.D. in fine arts looming in the horizon, ready to complicate things more, to add more debt burden. Had our society remained increasingly homogeneous and affluent, we would not have noticed this critical state of affairs. But the MFA industry is saturated: There are few new jobs and very low salaries to whatever is offered. As with the residential real estate mortgage credit bubble, the art program tuition credit bubble is bursting. Politicians are even talking about the unimaginable: forgiving excessive student loan burden. Our entire economy is in crisis, and no matter what you hear and read, this is not a passing recession. Regardless, what we need culturally from artists lies beyond the hermetic academic cloister. This is the end of an era, and things need to change fast. Reform Nationwide, many art programs need to downsize, which is difficult because they are a mayor source of employment to thousands of artists. This will cause

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much pain; many will feel betrayed by the system—and they should. All art programs also need to reevaluate their tenured faculty. It is not only adjunct professors who should be evaluated yearly; everyone should be evaluated regularly irrespective of job security. Too many tenured faculty have become complacent and stopped making art or are merely repeating themselves, plus a new tool or two, only exhibiting at college and university galleries in de rigueur, promotional, program faculty group shows. I do not care for our current cult of youth at the expense of historical memory, but we need to select our culture’s true elders wisely. In addition, all art programs need to engage in curriculum overhaul. They need to do this through two approaches: The first is to seek a truly interdisciplinary curriculum that surrenders cynicism and the anxiety of making art to the goal of producing interdisciplinary artist citizens. We are a nation of storage units; we do not need more art inventory. However, interdisciplinarity does not mean accepting people from other disciplines (without BFAs) into MFA programs and turning them into bad painters, because MFA programs are not designed to teach students how to paint so late in the game. Interdisciplinarity does not mean that we have a studio creative process informed by interdisciplinary research that produces yet another neo-modernist collectible for the old economy. True interdisciplinarinity means that artists sit down with professionals from other fields to listen, learn, and eventually contribute to a non-art making process. Art may or may not be generated immediately as the result of that humble dialogue, but whatever is generated, in terms of designing a new bridge, a new building, a new park, or delivering a service will be better because artists were involved. Later, those artists may produce something informed by that out-of-studio experience, and it may look like art as we once knew it, or not. True interdisciplinarity is about art processes mixing with the processes of other disciplines, informing and being informed, transforming the participants and altering all outcomes. It means artists actively engaged in all aspects of the contemporary human experience: politics, labor, the economy, immigration, environmentalism,


scientific breakthroughs, animal rights, new technologies, war and peace. The second is that sincerity needs to make a comeback into art making: art programs need to take on publicly held points of view. They need to acknowledge that to remain “neutral,” which is to say, merely formalist, is a counter-cultural, institutionally suicidal, retrograde point of view. Increasingly, art students are selecting programs because they want to work with the environment through radical urban and suburban ecology, with political and economic activism through the Occupy movement, with populations in need, such as migrants and exiles, with workers rights at home, the Middle East and China. Art programs must develop expertises in those areas much like they once developed expertise in painting or sculpture. If these programs cannot be developed rapidly “in-house,” they can be through functional partnerships with other institutions. In addition, all art programs should offer this interdisciplinary training complemented by internships that go far beyond working in galleries and museums: placing art students in nursing homes, hospitals, hospices, schools for the deaf, schools for the blind, autism programs, and all manner of research laboratories and think tanks. (Improving career counseling services will be wise, as art students will be challenged to rethink their initial goals.) Most young artists worry that they have nothing yet to say, but this will give them plenty. This will also turn art programs into active participants if not agents of change in their own communities. I want to make it clear that I believe that art programs must also continue to teach shop skills or run the risk of producing producers so dependent upon capital that they will become conservative over time. But those skills must be updated through new technologies. The middle class romance with painting must end, even as painting is part of the human condition and must be reframed within the slow movement (in food, in fashion, etc.), significant not because of copying skills but because of its full engagement of our senses, grounding us, reminding us what it means to be embodied no matter our outofbody virtual fantasies. There is much talk about socially

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engaged artists pushing socially engaged art. Indeed, that may be the next fashionable class elective joining the interdisciplinary misnomer. But I fear that this is a new category that excuses all other art making from social responsibility, while it also fosters a prosaic art devoid of metaphor. Metaphor is not something dated. Just ask the advertising industry whose most successful campaigns remain all about sexy or poetic metaphors. If we stop teaching metaphor-making to artists, we might as well become craftsmen or social workers. I work in the public sphere with very difficult, religiously and politically conservative audiences. I do not consider myself a socially engaged artist making socially engaged art. I am a sitespecific, durational performance artist who creates portraits of people and places by generating space and time for silent reflection. The template is formal, the content is a vessel, my crew and our audience consist of everybody. Revolution So this is the disastrous state of many of our art programs, no matter how good our MFA shows look across the land. In fact, it feels as if graduate art programs are increasingly obsessed about producing commercial-galleryquality MFA shows that promote the programs (save face yet another year and increase enrollment) more than helping the indebted students start off. And yes, there are exceptional programs and exceptional teachers doing prophetic work that amounts to the heroic as they are surrounded and even sabotaged by mediocre colleagues and employers. Many more art teachers than we suspect have great field practices, but they are forced to leave them outside the classroom for the sake of fossil art program compliance. Thus, we need to start a revolution not just among art students but among art teachers, too. I love teaching; I am the product of memorable teachers. We need a horizontal and vertical academic revolution right now. Why? Because we cannot do without art programs. When healthy, they are the repository of art training history; they provide old and new technical resources; they offer a critical but safe and supportive community of peers, nurturing the visionary. While practically every


other career is drowning in conservatism, the visual and performing arts continue to offer a promise of individual and collective renewal if only we can liberate art training. This is a time of parting the waters between those that will lag as commercial craft programs and those that will rise as flexible laboratories for the artists that America and the Planet need. Considering the speed of hardware and software development, art curricula are now fluid, and as such we will need to revise them every few years. I hope that you are in the right art program. If not, dare to jump ship, swim across the river, and climb into the right ship. If you skip a semester during your transition, that is better than wasting years in the wrong program and receiving a meaningless degree full of angry regrets. Or start a revolution in your art program, but only if you can win it. Do not waste your money. Money talks; take it elsewhere. Take control of your education. I think that we Americans are a people constructed through lies: from religious utopia, to Native American genocide, to slavery, to generic whiteness (deethnified), to the American Dream of entitled abundance and the “right” to waste. Because the fantasy is bankrupt, ecologically unsustainable, and finally globally exposed, it has ultimately generated an angry people who are nice on the surface—sentimental but raging inside. We need art program to produce artists to address this. Our future depends on it. WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART PRODUCTION AFTER THE INTERNET? I don’t think that the art production will change that much. Internet brought a bigger diversity of material and an easier way to get them. If we talk strictly about the internet (after the tentativ to bring/make art only online wish didn’t met a big success) I don’t think it will make much of a change. Technology in another hand could potentially change production. I am mostly thinking about the 3D printer. When you will be able to print any shape, suddenly sculpture will become accessible and will pop up everywhere like prints do today. I personally don’t believe in the digitalization of art. Art needs to be an experience outside of the screen-art

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works need to keep their organic equation. In a world of object, art can not diseappear. But still, painters will keep painting, sculptors will keep carving wood, photographer will keep the pleasure of spending time in the dark room. Because nostalgia comes along with technology.

Karin Stroo

WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART? art was and is and is going to be a story a language a story about life a different story about life, a story which we forget if we just stick to the daily routine of our daily business and society. At one hand it is unique and vulnerable and special and hidden in the daily life routine while on the other hand it is a language that every one speaks or at least understands as soon as it is spoken. So the future of art is just the continuation of it. Of the story of the language in the form in which it appears; pops up. That is all right. WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART INSTITUTIONS? to activate, stimulate, protect, gather, give shelter to art, give a roof to discussions and recognize art and artists and give a stage to art; to make art a movement. A severe task is to do the meta-communications about art and the marketing of art. WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART EDUCATION? to bring artists to their own source of creation WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART PRODUCTION AFTER THE INTERNET? it will continue in the old forms and in all the new possible forms; there will be no ending

Riemer Knoop

WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART? That s as meaningless a question ‘ as asking What’s the future of the weather. The development of creativity/ies cannot be predicted. WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART INSTITUTIONS? Ah, now we’re talking. They will inevitably lag behind,


become obsolete, implode under self esteem. New forums and platfoms will appear, then new forms and alternative media. Who knows. WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART EDUCATION? I was not aware that there is any art education in general to speak of. Art institutions do a bit, and there’s a modicum in the educational system and the media. But don’t overestimate it. Since the end of isms, art educators have had a harder job, This will not become easier. WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF THE ART PRODUCTION AFTER THE INTERNET? The suggestion is that changing media will povide new art forms. Print did, photography did, the moving image did, radio/tv did. The telegraph did not, neither the telephone. Nor interstellar travel. But who knows. Perhaps online racing will, or 2nd Life, or Google Glass, or 3D printing. Google Art led to My Rijks Studio.

WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART? THE FUTURE OF ART IS ITS PAST, AND EXACTLY THE YEARS 1969-1972. WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART INSTITUTIONS? THE FUTURE OF THE ARTS IS A FICTION, AND SO IT SEEMS BRIGHT. MORE TRAVELLING, CONFABULATION, RUMORS, FABRICATED EVIDENCE, SEANCES AND TELEPATHY ARE AWAITING. WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART EDUCATION? ART EDUCATION IN ITS PRESENT FORM (FINE ART ACADEMIES) SHALL HAVE NOT A LOT TO DO WITH THE OFFICIAL CIRCUIT OF CONTEMPORARY ART. SURE NOT MORE THAN SOCIAL AND POLITICAL SCIENCES, BOTANICS, ASTROPHYSICS OR PHILOSOPHY. WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF THE ART PRODUCTION AFTER THE INTERNET? THE SAME AS PAST PRODUCTION ART FROM

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Sebastian Cichocki


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#interviews

INTERNET. ART IS ONE OF THE LAST AREAS, THAT CAN NOT BE DOWNLOADED FROM THE WEB. THIS IS RATHER NOT GOING TO CHANGE. PEOPLE TEND TO SHARE / STEAL / BUY / PASS ON E-BOOKS, FILMS AND MUSIC - BUT NOT SHOW OR WORKS OF ART. E-ART IS AT MOST EMBARRASSING.

Roelof van der Schaff

WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART? + 10 WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART INSTITUTIONS? - 100 WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART EDUCATION? +5 WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF THE ART PRODUCTION AFTER THE INTERNET? + 150

Weronika Zielinska

WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART? There’s no need to imagine the ‘future of art’. Art is in the now, in the present, and we should be able to carry it on parallel with the live we are living. WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART INSTITUTIONS? These are interdependent matters. Refer to no. 1. WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART EDUCATION? -//WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART PRODUCTION AFTER THE INTERNET? In the Internet era it seems important for art to not resign from the basics of social (tangible) relations. For more refer to no. 1.


WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART? Pelotas en una canasta con vino. (Balls in a basket with wine.)

Gordon Palmas Palmas (Translated with Google)

WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART INSTITUTIONS? Miscelaneas. (Misc.) WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART EDUCATION? Saludos a la bandera, en público y con dos asistentes. (Greetings to the flag,in public and with two assistants.) WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART PRODUCTION AFTER THE INTERNET? Severa y larga. (Severe and long.)

WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART? The best thing we know about the future of art is that we don’t know it. I could tell you that in 2031 we are going have new sources of energy and communicating systems that are going to change the way we function. And now I am wrong and right at same time. The only thing I am sure of is that art is going to exist. And in terms of foresight and upcoming trends I guess there will be an ongoing tendency towards interdisciplinary collaborations and using art as another perspective for other disciplines because words: creative, cultural and innovative are gaining more and more positive meaning and value. WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART INSTITUTION? Now I have noticed the huge education turn within art institutions. So far my favorite example is Jeff Koons doing kids workshops in Brighton Museum & Art Gallery during his solo show. At the exhibition you can even watch a video where cute teenagers say what it was like to work with him and how they enjoy his work now. They finally get it, art institution - mission complete. But to know the future we just need to make a little trip to Brussels and ask politicians and EU officials.

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Beata Wilczek


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#interviews

WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART EDUCATION? I am awaiting a moment when theoretical and critical approach is going to be passé and people will stop quoting Deleuze, Foucault and stressing about society, capital, class difference - even though I enjoy and participate in this quasi-scientific artistic discourse. I think that art schools should also teach how to run a company, deal with money, write proposals, get funding all this real life stuff. WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ART PRODUCTION AFTER THE INTERNET? The same as its presence, both in making as in ‘artist makes art’ and producing as in ‘we need to get some money for this art’ or/and ‘we need to organize making of this art’. I am interested more in bodies after Internet, the way bodies are being represented and how the virtual/ real affects the body itself and the body of work. As Mark Leceky sad recently in one interview: ‘Paradoxically cold autistic cyberspace takes us back to an appreciation of sensuality’. So lets appreciate it. P.S. Jeff Koons and kids http://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=PPwLY3Bdy1k


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#Andrew Birk

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#Andrew Birk

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#Andrew Birk

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#Debora Delmar Corporation

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#Debora Delmar Corporation

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# Debora Delmar Corporation

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#Debora Delmar Corporation

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#Debora Delmar Corporation

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#Hard-Core

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Here comes the era of the future of Art. The future of the future is nothing new and Art will remain the same. But it will explore a New Public or a New Public Sphere, through dissemination of Art from the academic toward uncharted field and back again / Waves. The Artificial publicness (public faces, in-timate/ex-timate)of Beings; technology and its ramifications. It is an undergoing quiet quartering between active forces from within and without Art, Society, Environment, Self... Art is a parasite, a networked entity, a thousand faces bug, constantly changing shapes according to its surroundings. The play is a one of withdrawing and stepping forward. Yes, new technologies will bring new possibilities. Artists will get more in tune with the available tools around them. The tools become a part of their approach to their work. The main question is the choice of tools used in relation to their function to a specific work. The medium becomes fluid. A particular attitude towards a specific medium is in the foreground. A heightened awareness towards a chosen medium. The medium is in the center of the work. The content comes through an attitude towards its manifested form. The art-historical references are still valid but not vital. It, art, will continue its journey to the uncertain. Contradictions are crucial. An artist is a simple being, communicating its own existence. Trusting it self. Art will not depend on its medium, and by not depending on its own medium it becomes even more dependent on other mediums. Art will become liquefied brain matter that runs through people. Methodology and making is in the foreground. Language will disappear, and other ways of communication will replace it. Holistic communication systems reaching all beings and matter, comprehended by a human brain as well. The Future is a carpet, it serves as a practical object that one can still totally live without. But when walking


barefoot on a carpet it can stimulate your feet and make one understand one’s physical existence in a new way. As for some the carpet functions as a flying object, the future of art will be the same. A mystical flight through different points of view that in itself should assemble a crazy ride. Here comes the era of the future of Art Institution. The future of the future is nothing new and Art Institution will remain the same. This is a Laboratory with daily schizophrenia. A silicon membrane of selfcriticism and eternal self-crisis. It is a strategies builder, between business, politics, a heaven yet to achieve, so forth.... It mingles with us, unaware, despite its proclamations. // Takes a stand for its position IN the ecosystem. Accepts the fight of powers as a norm. Questions what is artist; why specific fields/ disciplines are considered mundanes. Acquires a flexibility through format: time and space ===> a layered extension of itself. The New Public standpoint has a boomerang effect on the New Institution standpoint. Less isolated, more... It gets over it self, becomes humble and de-canonized. It searches through the vast access it has to artists all over the world. It has new strategies of scouting for artist, going outside its limited network and preference. It becomes more aware of their choice of artists in relation to the ones not chosen. It stops choosing artists and finds systems of doing that. It tries to be a neutral space. This neutral space no longer to be found within the limiting borders of a whitecubed situation. Less prestigious buildings will be sufficient as a carrier for art, especially in museums of contemporary art. Instead of hiring the most fancy architects, money will go into support of exhibition making, production of works, and an educational system surrounding it.

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#Hard-Core

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The Art institution has to react to ideas of Neoliberalism. The institution does not have to create capital value. The institution has to be convincing of importance of other kind of values, and most important the value of non-value. The institution has to create curiosity. The institution is a fictional place. The Institution has to become ANTI-Liberal, it has to provide precision in its decision making, responsibility to the public and to the artist, forget about its prestige but instead become serious about their role in the cultural development of society. Their role is to ask the artist challenging questions about the work of an artist, and through that help the artist to ask precarious questions to the society. Here comes the era of the future of Art Education. The future of the future is nothing new and Art Education will remain the same. Though the existence of an artist (educated or not), in a world and market, starts to turn more and more around the educational degree; where the requirement to become a teacher is one of owning a master-degree (and soon a PhD?) yourself; where one finds access to higher education merely with a filled bourse. Is this something where especially art education is willing to contribute to? As a future for art education it should be again investigated how it could be possible to let students, for a large part, educate themselves. And when students find ways of self-educating, how to give these credits an importance similar to a regular accreditation system. When money starts to become a major problem there should be a possibility to find ways around. If art production becomes less reliant on real material production, is it necessary for art education to own the most extended and well equipped workshops. If the need is there for a


specific way of production, can a student arrange this on its own. The education will then be only focused on an extensive discourse and into dept methods in understanding and contributing to a conceptual background of a work. The fall of the institution will happen in similar way as the fall of the economy. The education system and the world of economy are bound together. And when right wing politics will neglect the educational institutions, because they don’t produce the “right kind of people” then people will find that the educational institutions can no longer fulfill the needs of people that wish to educate themselves (Heyr heyr). Therefore self-organisations are the key to collectively fulfill the demand for individual attention when it comes to education. The art academy needs to become de-authoritized and salute to the student. They have to meet on an equal ground, where the teacher is open to learn from the student and visa versa. They, teacher - student, are likely to be of different generations and thus likely to disagree on various matters. They both need to be open-minded if a fruitful exchange should take place. The Thing-Public, assemblies are gathering for more fluid knowledge and responsibility. In this game of influences, two opposite forces are working against and with each other. Multiple shaped data generated by genius autodidacts / New fields, terminologies appears, more preciseness and more professionalisation again. ===> It’s a double-helix formation with highly conceptual over-specialisations in constant bridge with self-initiatives and great confidence in the possibility to happily mash the system. Every link and being has the potential to be an artist in its own field and far beyond. Here comes the era of the future of Art Production after Internet. The future of the future is nothing new and Art Production after Internet will remain the same.

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#Hard-Core

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After the internet there will be something new. Shared knowledge and the collective multipolar thinking will be at the center of artistic practices as it does this day. It will remain a platform for an exchange of viewpoints. It will continue its dialogue with itself. It will change. Production will change with political power shifts. It will go back to renaissance. It will go to outerspace. And be all red because it will all happen on the planet Mars. Post-internet will be humans living partly in virtual space, where art products will be binary poetry. The word production is disappearing as the idea of outcome and goal will no longer be necessary. There is no post -internet there is only INTERNET. Nanotechnology will influence the scale of art production and the way art is perceived. Production will be influenced by the anti gravity. There is no singular author in the new art production. There is total chaos. Its about aesthetic of human waste. Art-production is already something merely done by a craftsman somewhere else. Art production will become a solely re-arrangement of existing things. Ordered, produced and placed all over the world. Works will be produced and never viewed by the artist itself, but only seen as pictures or other variations as a documentation of a work. In this production process art will be more and more dependent on these other craftsman, somewhere else. Even an artwork produced in a digital environment and seemingly non-material, is one build out of materials. The equipment where these works are being displayed on are very very material, with a very dark and shadowy production process behind. There will be a shift in spendings on material-costs for an artist. Where normally the main investment would be in material and tools as separate things, material and tools are unified in within the carrying and producing equipment responsible for the creation of a work. Beside this complexity within the production itself, the production causes also an absurd situation within


the value of the outcomes. The work itself will be something valuable even though being non-material. To display a work it is not enough to have ‘a space’ or ‘a wall’, but an investment in presentation material will be necessary to let the work even exist. A crisis of virtuality leading to an increase of digitality in stuff. Easier productions and playfulness in mediums: the true era of the ready-made. ===> Artistic sensible act becomes a fragmented visions of impersonal elements. The artist give birth to complicated Hydras, reflecting over species productions and their meanings. What is the true status of whatever form of additions thus including humans and artistic productions? The ‘’Act’’ is not alone anymore. It is firmly tied to the EVERYTHING. All the actants undergo a change of balance. Therefore an artist cannot ignore anymore, he is constructing in an hyperawareness state : An inspector of networks pulling nods here and there. Art production will become less and less important, it will transform into the production of a statement. Art production will lose its separation from the life of an artist, it is again merged but instead, as Kaprow in the sixties, it is not the philosophy that will guide the life and the production, but it is capitalism or economie. Hence post-capitalist statements will form against production and opportunism. A future of contra-positions, manifestos, the singling out of ones own opinion, an Art that is again the masses but instead intimate and highly subjective. The Art product will wear off its importance, instead art production will become an activity of re-connecting and disconnecting meanings, history and values. The future is the acceptance of contradictions and working with this contradiction rather than flattening everything to one understanding. kind regards, Hard-core

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#Manuel Solano

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#Manuel Solano

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#Manuel Solano

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#Piotr Ĺ akomy

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#Piotr Ĺ akomy

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#Piotr Ĺ akomy

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# Perla Monelongo & Lauren Reid

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Following from the tenet that there are many different ways to measure the potential ‘success’ or ‘failure’ of art or an artwork, Untitled Prophecies is an ongoing project where Perla Montelongo and Lauren Reid conduct an analysis of its past, present and future via measurements that traverse the Zodiac, I Ching, Numerology and more.


1 September 2013 Sun 22º 17’ in Virgo

13 January 2014 - Sun 22º 42’ in Capricorn

24 February 2014 - Sun 5º 17’ in Pisces

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#Perla Monelongo & Lauren Reid

13 April 2014 - Sun 22º 59’ in Aries

10 July 2014 Sun 17º 41’ in Cancer

Peru Mercury/DS Line

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Bolivia Moon’s Node/MC Line (Moon’s Node in Zenith)

Brazil Moon/MC Line (Moon in Zenith)

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#Perla Monelongo & Lauren Reid

Top 20 Art Museums 5.26% 10.53%

Top 20 Art Museums 10.53%

5.56%

11.11% Rat

Aries

Ox 10.53%

10.53% 21.05%

Tiger

Taurus 16.67%

22.22%

Rabbit

Leo

Snake

Virgo

Horse

Libra

Goat

Scorpio 5.56%

Rooster Dog

21.05%

Cancer

Dragon

Monkey

10.53%

Gemini

Pig

5.56%

16.67%

5.56%

11.11%

Sagittarius Capricorn Aquarius Pisces


Institution Louvre Metropolitan Museum of Art British Museum

City Paris, FR

Visitors 9720260

Opened 10/08/1793

Zodiac Leo

Chinese Ox

New York, US

6115881

20/02/1872

Pisces

Monkey

London, UK

5575946

7/06/1753

Gemini

Rooster

Tate Modern

London, UK

5304710

11/05/2000

Taurus

Dragon

National Gallery Vatican Museums

London, UK

5163902

10/05/1824

Taurus

Monkey

Vatican City, IT

5064546

14/02/1506

Aquarius

Tiger

Taipei, TW

43608156

10/10/1925 (Beijing) 12/11/1965 (Taipei)

Libra (B) Scorpio (T)

Ox (B) Snake (T)

Washington D.C., US

4200000

17/03/1941

Pisces

Snake

Paris, FR

3800000

31/01/1977

Aquarius

Snake

Paris, FR

3600000

9/12/1986

Sagittarius

Tiger

London, UK

3231700

01/05/1852

Taurus

Rat

Seoul, KR

3128550

3/12/1945

Sagittarius

Rooster

2882385

5/2/1852

Aquarius

Rat

2805659

7/11/1929

Scorpio

Snake

National Palace Museum National Gallery of Art Centre Pompidou Musée D’Orsay Victoria & Albert Museum National Museum of Korea State Hermitage Museum Museum of Modern Art

St Petersburg, RU New York, US

National Folk Museum of Korea

Seoul, KR

3128550

25/04/1946

Taurus

Dog

Reina Sofia

Madrid, ES

2565000

10/09/1992

Virgo

Monkey

Centro Cultural Banco do Brasil

Rio de Janeiro, BR

2235354

12/10/1989

Libra

Snake

London, UK

2096858

04/04/1896

Aries

Monkey

Shanghai, CN

1944820

21/12/1952

Sagittarius

Dragon

National Portrait Gallery Shanghai Museum

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#Perla Monelongo & Lauren Reid

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#Perla Monelongo & Lauren Reid

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#Perla Monelongo & Lauren Reid

Internet - Rooster

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Art – Pig

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#Jasper Spicero

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#Jasper Spicero

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#Jasper Spicero

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#Rafał Czajka

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#Rafał Czajka

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#Rafał Czajka

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# Manuel Rosner

A couple of questions to Manuel Rossner

Manuel Roßner is the founder of the online/ offline art exhibition space CERMÂ. He studied at University of Art and Design in Offenbach (2010-2013) and École nationale supérieure des Arts Décoratifs in Paris (2013 - ). Lives and works in Paris You established CERMÂ as an online/offline space for emerging artists active within the new artistic tools like Internet and digital devices. What actually is Centre d’Art Mâtiné? It is a gallery coming from a definition of space, which includes fundamental changes arising through the new forms of communication and creation of the last decade. While it offers a very contemporary way of production, the exhibitions refer to the traditional framework of a gallery space. So to say it extends the classical exhibition space, approaching digital forms of existence.


The Internet has clearly changed the way that people communicate and it even influenced the way they live, now it becomes also much more a tool for artists but, of course, not everyone likes net art. Do you receive any negative feedback about CERMÂ? There were no negative opinions, though not everybody is convinced about the relevance of digital art. A gallery owner told me that it is a nice way to try things out, but then one should change to classical ways of production. I think for a younger generation there’s no doubt about the internet being an important tool of creation. Do you think art schools follow this shift? Yes! What do you think the future of art is? Red-Green-Blue.

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Chris Timms, Sensual Objects, 2013


# Manuel Rosner

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Francoise Gamma, Ecstasy Rmx, 2013 Courtesy of CERMĂ‚

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#Manuel Forte

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#Manuel Forte

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#Manuel Forte


#Manuel Forte

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#Jasper Spicero

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#Nicolaus Schafhausen

Interview with Nicolaus Schafhausen


© Steffen Jagenburg, 2012

Nicolaus Schafhausen is a director of Kunsthalle Wien since June 2012. From 2006 to 2011 he was artistic and commercial director of Witte de With, Center for Contemporary Art in Rotterdam. In June 2005 he was appointed founding director of the European Kunsthalle in Cologne – a project initiated to sound out a model for a potential institution for contemporary art – for a period of two years. He has been commissioned to curate the German pavilion for the 52nd and 53rd Biennial in Venice in 2007 and 2009.

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#Nicolaus Schafhausen

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You have been working with a number of the most established contemporary artists, recently as a director of the Kunsthalle Wien and as the curator of this year’s Bucharest Biennale. But your experience reaches way further as you also directed Witte de With Contemporary Art in Rotterdam, Netherlands with an impressive program and international outreach and you also founded European Kunsthalle in Cologne, Germany, not mentioning two projects curated for the German Pavilion at the Venice Biennale. What, in your opinion, is the most interesting in the art scene right now? What seems the most interesting for you as a curator? What I find challenging nowadays is the art’s extensive popularity and broad appeal. Art is of interest for an extremely diverse group of people. Compared to the 20th century it became important to people from all social classes, ethnic groups, life styles, backgrounds and generations. In this sense the public is as broad as never before. If we think of Olafur Eliasson, Marina Abramović or Jeff Koons, it can be seen, that our society produces artists who reach the status of popular stars. The mechanisms behind it are that what I find interesting. To experiment with the established is what I enjoy the most. What does art means to our society? Which role does it play nowadays? Is art per se political? There are many attempts of remodeling the established models present in the way the art institutions function nowadays. I would like to refer to the case of one of the most interesting projects of that kind - European Kunsthalle, an initiative to establish a new art institution in Cologne. What is essential for the art institutions in the future? What is the ‘model of tomorrow’? The European Kunsthalle conceives itself as a basis for a broad range of art forms including both known and emerging contemporary art practices, approaching these in an interdisciplinary and experimental way. It considers itself a forum in which the aspect of artistic production is ascribed a similar significance as the presentation and reflection of art and culture. It knows the value of


sound research; and it develops innovative exhibition formats reflecting the diversity of artistic media. But most important is, that the European Kunsthalle is an institution free in space and time. It is not bound to a building or timeframe. We think of it as a nomad, an outsider who gets to know new locations every time that it looks for places to settle down. However I believe, that institutions often mark their individuality in comparison to other institutions around them. At the same time formats, contents and programs do overlap. I enjoy crossover moments and strongly believe that new things can happen in this field. The battlefield lies there where institutions want to be individual and flirt with other disciplines. Let us imagine that you were asked to conceive an exhibition or a different project with an unlimited budget and without any spatial frame given by a commissioner where would you like to work and what would this be? I would do a collaborative group show about poverty. I imagine a global exhibition in all kinds of institutions. I think it could be possible that we would extensively work together content wise and also form new strategic alliances.

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#Travis Egedy

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#Travis Egedy

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www.daphnemajor.org/projects/floreana/ 117


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#Gregor Rozanski

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14.02-9.03.2014

new: art center

@ BWA Zielona Gora

Poland

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IS IT ART OR IS IT JUST  

#trendbook s/s 2014

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