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‘Highway Robbery’ Drivers allege Rohnert Park police illegally seized cannabis, cash By Sukey Lewis of KQED News


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Contents 4 4 6

Mailbox Poem

21

Whitethorn Doorway

22

News 24

Guest Views

24

NCJ Daily Week in Weed

Home & Garden

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Service Directory

27

For Defense Work Only

The Setlist

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Fathers and Fests

On The Cover

30

‘Highway Robbery’

20

Down and Dirty Summer Garden Bling

Plenty of Canni, No Fest

14

It’s Personal A Mother Gets Through Graduation Season

‘The You in KHSU’

11 13

Humboldt Made Special Advertising Section

Cliffhanger

10

Serious Felonies Cultivation/Drug Possession DUI/DMV Hearings Cannabis Business Compliance Domestic Violence Juvenile Delinquency Pre-Arrest Counseling

Music & More! Live Entertainment Grid

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Calendar Filmland A Girl’s Best Friend

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43 47 47 48

Workshops & Classes Free Will Astrology Cartoons Field Notes Correlation ≠ Causation

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— Zev Levinson

‘Incomparably Magnificent’ Editor: You think anyone would dare pitch you a humor column after reading the incomparably magnificent “The Cat Would Like to Open a Dialogue” (May 31) by Jennifer Fumiko Cahill? Joyce King, McKinleyville

‘Cancel Your Contributions’ Editor: Regarding the firing of longtime KHSU employee Katie Whiteside (“Consternation at KHSU,” June 7), though I, along with many others, have emailed, written and/or called KHSU General Manager Peter Fretwell, Humboldt State University Vice President for Advancement Craig Wruck and HSU President Lisa Rossbacher, I fear that our consternation is falling on deaf ears. Peter Fretwell was responsible for firing Katie with Craig Wruck’s and Lisa Rossbacher’s blessings. It’s hard to imagine they will back down from their initial stance unless the community makes a huge statement. As of June 5, KHSU has lost approximately $27,000 in community support. Because two-thirds of KHSU’s funding comes from community contributions, withdrawal of underwriter and member support is a powerful message to HSU’s administration. I encourage more KHSU members and underwriters to withdraw their support. KHSU’s

budget can absorb a $27,000 loss, but can it absorb a loss of $50,000 or more? KHSU’s planned mini-pledge drive scheduled to begin on June 12, has, as of the writing of this letter (June 8 at 1:45 p.m.) been postponed by Dr. Rossbacher under advisement from KHSU’s Community Advisory Board. Interestingly enough, KHSU office staff was unaware of the postponement and nothing about the postponement appeared on the KHSU website. Postponing the pledge drive could be a way to minimize public relations/financial damage rather than directly address the issues. So, until Mr. Fretwell is dismissed and Katie Whiteside is offered an opportunity to resume employment I will withhold any contributions. I would also encourage community members to call KHSU underwriters and ask them to withdraw their contributions. A list of underwriters can be found at khsu.org by typing “underwriters” into the search option. All of these actions can add power to our consternation. Please act now; call, write, email and cancel your contributions. Kathleen Marshall, Arcata

Good News Editor: Your June 7 paper, “The Media Literacy Issue,” is fantastic. Thank you so much for putting this out. It is very necessary. Every article, “A Word From the Lying Media,” “Media Basics for Activists,” “Sinclairly Yours,” “How We News,” “Fake News” and “Look at All These Ads,” provides very important information and is very necessary in these days of disturbing news, contrary news, fake news, newsless news and the many attempts to take control of the news. Thank you Marcy Burstiner, Jennifer Fumiko Cahill, Thadeus Greenson, Jennifer Savage and Deidre Pike. Dave Rosso, Eureka

Write a Letter! Please make your letter no more than 300 words and include your full name, place of residence and phone number (we won’t print your number). Send it to letters@northcoastjournal. com. The weekly deadline to be considered for the upcoming edition is 10 a.m. Monday. ●


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News

June 14, 2018 • Volume XXIX Issue 24 North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2018

Publisher Judy Hodgson judy@northcoastjournal.com General Manager Chuck Leishman chuck@northcoastjournal.com News Editor Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com Arts & Features Editor Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com Assistant Editor/Staff Writer Kimberly Wear kim@northcoastjournal.com Staff Writer Linda Stansberry linda@northcoastjournal.com Calendar Editor Kali Cozyris calendar@northcoastjournal.com Contributing Writers John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Wendy Chan, Barry Evans, Gabrielle Gopinath, Collin Yeo Art Director/Production Manager Holly Harvey holly@northcoastjournal.com Graphic Design/Production Miles Eggleston, Carolyn Fernandez, Jacqueline Langeland, Amy Waldrip, Jonathan Webster ncjads@northcoastjournal.com Creative Services Manager Lynn Leishman lynn@northcoastjournal.com Advertising Manager Melissa Sanderson melissa@northcoastjournal.com Advertising Linus Lorenzen linus@northcoastjournal.com Tyler Tibbles tyler@northcoastjournal.com Kyle Windham kyle@northcoastjournal.com Social Media Coordinator Sam Armanino sam@northcoastjournal.com Classified Advertising Mark Boyd classified@northcoastjournal.com Office Manager Annie Kimball annie@northcoastjournal.com Bookkeeper Deborah Henry billing@northcoastjournal.com Mail/Office 310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 707 442-1400 FAX: 707 442-1401 www.northcoastjournal.com Press Releases newsroom@northcoastjournal.com Letters to the Editor letters@northcoastjournal.com Events/A&E calendar@northcoastjournal.com Music thesetlist@northcoastjournal.com Classified/Workshops classified@northcoastjournal.com CIRCULATION VERIFICATION C O U N C I L

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 21,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 450 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

On the Cover Illustration by Jonathan Webster

Cliffhanger

A look at Sundberg’s chances to take the Fifth and why it takes so long to count the votes By Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com

B

y the time this paper hits newsstands, it will have been a week since Election Day and a fifth of the county’s electorate remains on edge, awaiting the results of a nail-biter of a supervisorial race currently separated by just 33 votes. With the final and generally definitive post-election tally at least a week away, many have expressed dismay at the delay between when the polls close and when the last votes get counted. With that in mind, the Journal stopped by the Humboldt County Elections Office on June 8 to get a tour and a rundown of all that has to be done before they can start counting the 11,000 or so ballots that remain uncounted countywide. And because we know some of you out there just want to know who will ultimately prevail in the race to represent the Fifth District on the Humboldt County Board of Supervisors — a race that currently has challenger Steve Madrone besting twoterm incumbent Ryan Sundberg by just 0.69 percent of the 4,796 votes counted thus far — we also took a deep dive into the numbers to see what they might indicate about where the race will fall.

Too Close to Call

If there was a jaw-dropping moment on election night, it came when Madrone shocked anyone who happed to be watching at 12:40 a.m. when the final election night report posted, showing he’d erased a 185-vote deficit and pulled ahead of Sundberg. But as indicated above, there are a lot of ballots left to be counted. In the Fifth District specifically, Humboldt County Registrar of Voters Kelly Sanders says there are 1,220 vote-by-mail ballots that arrived the week of Election Day and have yet to be counted. Additionally, she says 717 such ballots were turned in at polling locations in the Fifth District, though the office has yet to verify whether all of those are Fifth

6 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 14, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

District ballots. (Voters can drop these ballots off at any polling location.) Finally, she says 315 provisional ballots were cast at Fifth District polling locations on Election Day, though her office has yet to vet them to determine how many are valid. So that means there are anywhere from 1,220 and 2,252 Fifth District ballots that remain uncounted. So what’s Sundberg need to happen in order to pull this thing out? Well, if we take the 1,220 number, Sundberg would need to take at least 51.39 percent of the outstanding ballots to finish with a one-vote victory. The margin he needs to pull in order to win shrinks as the number of outstanding ballots grow, so if there proves to be 2,252 votes yet to be tallied, he’d need to win 50.75 percent of them to come out on top. What’s the likelihood of this happening? It’s anyone’s guess — remember, just 33 votes separate the candidates with at least 1,220 left to count — but we combed through past supervisorial races involving Sundberg to see if there were any trends that could potentially apply to the current race. First, let’s look back at Madrone’s election night surprise. To recap, while Sundberg took almost 55 percent of the first votes counted from the Fifth District polling locations, Madrone more than flipped those numbers in the final tally, taking 57.56 percent of the 1,416 votes counted between 11:57 p.m. on election night and 12:40 a.m. the following morning. That was enough to move him from 5.5 points down to a hair ahead. Shocking, right? Well, maybe it shouldn’t have been. In 2010, Sundberg was squaring off against three others vying for the seat he would go on to win. In that race, he took 51.58 percent of the first votes counted from polling locations but his percentage of the take dropped to 33.1 percent in the next batch and came in at 35.7 percent in the final election night tally. The 2014 election followed a similar

pattern, with Sundberg taking a whopping 64.8 percent of the first votes from the polls then petering off to 55.77 percent when the rest of the Fifth District polling locations returned their ballots. Without fully diving into the precinct-level data, it’s hard to pinpoint why, but Sundberg has a solidified pattern of starting fast in the early polling location returns before slowing down as more precincts report. But what does history tell us about how Sundberg fares with all those votes that are counted after Election Day? In short, it tells us that he hasn’t done as well as he did in the final election night tallies. In 2010, Sundberg finished election night pulling 39.02 percent of the vote but his numbers dipped in the votes tallied after Election Day to 37.11 percent. Four years later, he took 60.58 percent of the vote tallied on Election Day but 58.58 percent of those counted after. So what’s this all mean? With such small sample sizes, it’s hard to say but it certainly shouldn’t make Sundberg feel better about his 33-vote deficit. This election followed the pattern set in the last two in which Sundberg fared better with early election returns than those that came later in the night. There’s also a pattern of his numbers


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Bundles of provisional ballots wait to be vetted and counted in the Humboldt County Elections Office. Photo by Thadeus Greenson dipping in the post-election counts, though we don’t know if that will hold true this time around. The Journal reached out to both campaigns to ask if they have any plans to monitor the counts or post-election procedures moving forward. Sundberg didn’t respond but Madrone says he plans on having someone from his campaign at the elections office to observe. “It’s not a mistrust over the process — that’s not what it’s about at all,” he says. “We just value every voter and want to make sure each vote is counted.” With just 0.69 percent of the vote currently separating the candidates, it seems worth noting that there is no trigger for an automatic recount in California. Candidates or citizens may file for one within five days of election results being certified, though the requesting party has to cover the costs, which typically run well into the thousands of dollars. Fortunately, Humboldt County has a first-of-its kind tool that allows citizens to do unofficial recounts without footing the bill (more on that later).

Checking it Twice

It’s just about 60 hours after the polls closed and Sanders looks notably spry as

she greets the Journal at her new office on West Sixth Street in Eureka. “I really don’t think people understand the process after an election,” she says as she leads the way past a string of employees sorting through large stacks of vote-bymail ballots. As soon as election night ended in the wee hours of Wednesday morning, Sanders says the office’s focus shifts from vote counting to sorting and auditing. Per state law, the first order of business immediately became ensuring there were no problems on Election Day and that the final election night report — which contained 20,045 ballots — was accurate. “We won’t actually scan any more ballots until we make sure everything is audited and correct,” she explains. That means inventorying everything that came back from polling locations to make sure the number of ballots returned matches the number that went out. For example, if a voter made an error on a ballot at the polls and requested another, poll workers are required to keep and return the “spoiled” ballot. It also means comparing the logs that people dropping off voteby-mail ballots at the polls had to sign and Continued on next page »

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News Continued from previous page

Volunteers Wes Rishel and Carolyn Crnich scan ballots for the Elections Transparency Project. Photo by Thadeus Greenson making sure they match with the ballots received, and cross checking traditional voter sign-in sheets with final ballot tallies. “We want to make sure every piece of paper is accounted for,” she says. Then there’s the audit. State law requires each elections office to conduct a manual recount of 1 percent of precincts in the county. So Sanders says elections staff randomly select one county precinct — they draw the precinct number from a bowl — and manually recount every race on that ballot. Then, for races that don’t appear on that precinct’s ballot, they randomly select one precinct that voted in the race to recount. The manual recounts are a tedious affair and work like this: Four elections employees sit in a room. One holds a ballot and reads the vote aloud, with an observer looking over his or her shoulder, as two other employees log the results. When the last ballot is read aloud, the two employees tracking the results compare numbers. If they match, the audit for that race in that precinct is complete. If not, they do it over again and find the discrepancy. As this goes on, a parallel effort is underway involving up to half a dozen employees to prepare the thousands of vote-by-mail ballots for counting. First, this means taking the envelopes they arrive in and scanning a bar code into their computer. This brings up the voter’s signature on the screen for the employee to check against the signature on the envelope. If they match, the envelope gets sorted by precinct and sent down the line. (If they don’t match, the ballot is discarded and the voter is alerted of the discrepancy and asked to come down to the elections office to provide another signature.) Once the envelopes are verified and sorted, they go to an employee who opens them to remove the ballot. A second

8 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 14, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

employee then checks all envelopes to make sure their ballots have been removed before the envelopes are discarded and the ballots are prepared for scanning and counting. “There’s a double check on everything,” Sanders says, adding that she doesn’t expect the office will get to counting outstanding ballots until the week of June 18 at the earliest. Meanwhile, a volunteer effort is underway at a desk in a back corner of the elections office, near the locked cage where the ballots are housed. As stacks of ballots whir through an optical scanner in the background, former Registrar of Voters turned volunteer Carolyn Crnich explains that the county’s groundbreaking Elections Transparency Project is now a certified nonprofit organization. (Those looking to donate should note the organization is in the midst of trying to raise $25,000 for a new scanner as its old one broke down and it’s currently using a loaner from the elections office.) The project saves images of all the ballots cast in a local race and then makes them available to anyone from the public who requests them and is willing to pay for a flash drive or DVD to store them on. Then, paired with open-source software available online, concerned citizens can sort and recount the ballots as they see fit to ensure the final tallies are accurate. (Learn more or request ballot images online at www.electionstransparencyproject.org.) It’s a safe bet some Fifth District voters will find the tool useful in the coming weeks. ● Thadeus Greenson is the Journal’s news editor. Reach him at 442-1400, extension 321, or thad@northcoastjournal.com. Follow him on Twitter @thadeusgreenson.


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Guest Views

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‘The You in KHSU’ By Alan Sanborn

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first heard of Katie Whiteside’s firing from my dear old Mom and thought to myself, “You must have heard it wrong. No, that just can’t be.” After a few phone calls, I felt that I had to repeat that sentence in a more imperative way: No. That just can’t be. After (in order of importance) the Humboldt community, HSU and NPR, Katie is the single greatest resource the station has ever had. Katie has been our voice in every way imaginable for the past two decades and more. KHSU General Manager Peter Fretwell has been amongst us (not with us) for a little over a year. He is just the latest in a parade of NPR “professionals” who seem to be sent here to bide their last few years before retirement. At best, we aren’t sure exactly what they do — and then they vanish as soon as their contracts are up. At worst, they do what Fretwell has just done. And their salaries continue to suck up the better part of one of the fall or spring pledge drives. KHSC was founded very much as a college radio station. Around the time it became KHSU, it began to attract the financial support of the community. There is no doubt that the introduction of NPR drastically increased the community support. However, that community support — now the station’s lifeblood — has always been tied to KHSU’s commitment to local access, homegrown volunteer programming and a feeling of inclusion. While I don’t for a minute doubt the value of NPR, its self-preservation seems to be tied to an idea of perpetual growth. As NPR produces more and more programs, the push is on to fill affiliates’ air time with NPR content even to the detriment of locally produced content. There is a very imperialist nature to NPR’s hold on radio stations nationally. Unlike other content producers like PRI and Democracy Now, you can’t just purchase NPR’s programming. You must become an affiliate and abide by NPR oversight — and be saddled with the salary and dictatorial rule of its NPR-qualified station

10 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 14, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

general managers. HSU is KHSU’s station licensee. In essence, it is the owner of the station. At its founding, this made perfect sense, since HSU was the station’s sole support. However, over time, and with the blessing of HSU, the Humboldt community (contributing almost two-thirds of the station’s annual dollar income) has become far and away the greatest financial supporter of KHSU. Since the question of who contributes what and how much to KHSU seems to be a matter of debate, I based my “almost two-thirds” on the latest published KHSU budget I could find online. HSU claims that it contributes 44 percent of the operating budget. I consider that a bit of a bookkeeping slight-of-hand. Much of that figure is “in kind” — space, rent, license, transmitters, physical facilities and hardware. Whether that is inflated or not, I’m surely not one who could make that call. However, much of that actual physical equipment, and the improvements to it, has been bought and paid for over the past couple decades with money from listeners and underwriters. HSU might own it and take financial credit for it, but we the community bought maybe the lion’s share of it. As to NPR, on paper it appears that it contributes almost as much as the university. However, everything that NPR contributes is paid back to NPR in the form of programming costs and general manager salary. So it seems that the party that ends up paying very little into KHSU’s coffers has the most say in how the station is run. The final say and rubber stamps of approval come from the license holder HSU, which pays a bit over a sixth of the money coming in. And you — the community, the real financial supporter of the station — you have nothing to say. Or, rather, you may have a lot to say but your voice doesn’t matter. If your voice mattered, Katie Whiteside’s voice would still be giving us comfort at KHSU. While your voice may not matter, your

money does. Sadly, money is the only voice we have. Even before the word of Katie’s firing had spread, KHSU had lost $16,000 worth of underwriting. Although I’m small peanuts, being merely a day sponsor for a couple decades, I won’t be sending any money to KHSU until Peter Fretwell has left the area. I would urge anyone who has similar inclinations to, first, email both KHSU and HSU President Lisa Rossbacher to let them know why you cannot support the station at this time. Katie has been adamant that this battle should not be about her. I have a couple disagreements with her on that count. First, no matter what arcane excuses someone came up with to fire her, Katie is one of the most valuable pieces of this community — she is one of those rare people who perfectly fits her job, and in her very public role she has made this particular part of the world a better place. Second, she is the very soul and nature of what KHSU has become — the kind, welcoming, all-encompassing center of our community. She has been there for us all like no one else. That is what community is and what community radio should be. KHSU may be a small side issue for both NPR and HSU — but it is the heart of the true “owners” of the station — “the You in KHSU.” Katie has done everything in her power to let our voices be heard for the past 23 years. So, whether through money or emails, this is the time to let our community voice be heard. l Alan Sanborn is an Arcata watercolor artist who has been listening to KHSU since 1968 — and has been pitching and pledging for the past 25 years. Have something you want to get off your chest? Think you can help guide and inform public discourse? Then the North Coast Journal wants to hear from you. Contact us at editor@northcoastjournal. com to pitch your column ideas.


From NCJ Daily

Feeling Crabby

HSU Working to ‘Finalize’ Agreement on Massive Housing Project

H

umboldt State University is touting its effort to “finalize a partnership” with a private developer on a massive student housing project near campus. According to President Lisa Rossbacher’s June 6 letter to Arcata council members, the university had been receiving information about The Village for more than a year but didn’t “make progress” on a formal relationship with AMCAL until May 8, which happens to be the same day a divided planning commission voted not to recommend the needed general plan and zoning amendments to the council. The proposed two-and three-story complex for some 600 students has drawn the ire of an organized group of community residents who have voiced concerns about its size and impacts to surrounding neighborhoods. (“Community Group Presents New Plan for Student Housing at Arcata’s Craftsman’s Mall,” March 22.) Due to an anticipated heavy turnout of people looking to weigh in, the city council’s consideration of the project was split into two phases on June 6 and 7, with staff and developer presentations one night and public comment the next.

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The university has previously said it was uninvolved in the development but Rossbacher did pen a letter to the council in December citing the critical lack of available student housing. The HSU releases states that “significant” revisions made to the project allowed for the partnership to progress — including reduced rents, downsizing by about 200 students and additional parking spots (43 were added for a total of 409) — although at least one planning commissioner cited a lack of significant changes in response to community concerns while casting a no vote on May 8. “The situation is urgent. I have heard countless stories from students who have struggled to find housing, and I have seen the statistics. We need to act,” Rossbacher said in the release. According to the university, AMCAL would own the buildings but HSU would manage the complex much like its campus dorms with a residential coordinator and advisers living onsite and the University Police Department and HSU facilities staff would provide services. — Kimberly Wear READ MORE ONLINE. POSTED: 06.07.18

New Chief in Town: The Arcata City Council has appointed Richard “Rick” Ehle interim chief of the Arcata Police Department and he stepped into the role June 11. Ehle is a 47-year veteran in law enforcement who served the bulk of his tenure with the Oakland Police Department. His last permanent gig was as chief of the Capitola Police Department, where he served until 2010, and he recently served stints as interim chief in Ione and Parlier, California. POSTED 06.07.18

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Digitally Speaking

The amount of a grant received by the Humboldt County Department of Health and Human Services and the Humboldt County Office of Education that will be used to staff 22 positions, including mental health clinicians, case managers and support personnel, in local schools over the next four years. POSTED 06.07.18

Jenny Karevoll and her family gave their youngest member-to-be a head start on Crab fandom at Arcata Ball Park this weekend, where the Crabs swept a three-game set with Fresno’s Valley Bears by a combined score of 41-1. The belly painting appears a lucky charm, as the Crabs have now scored 60 runs across five games, all wins, heading into a June 13 matchup with the Colt .45s. Read more of Thomas Oliver’s weekly Crabs coverage, including game recaps, a look at the upcoming schedule and notable heckles, at www.northcoastjournal.com. (Bonus: Oliver reports three people have been booted from games to date this year, the latest for vaping in the stands during a June 9 contest.) POSTED 06.11.18 Photo by Matt Filar

Lawsuit Filed: The local environmental nonprofit Friends of the Eel River has filed a lawsuit against the county challenging its cannabis cultivation and land use ordinance, alleging it does not provide sufficient oversight to protect salmon species and river health in local watersheds. Stephanie Tidwell, the nonprofit’s executive director, said the board of supervisors’ ordinance fails to build a sustainable cannabis industry and instead props “up yet another boom and bust industry.” POSTED 06.06.18

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They Said It “I didn’t really see that one coming but it happens.” — Industrial Workers of the World representative Nathan Irvine said after employees at two local dialysis clinics voted not to unionize, despite complaints by some of being overworked due to chronic understaffing. POSTED 06.11.18

Murder Suspect Caught: Zach Harrison, a 27-year-old murder suspect who was on the lam for nine months, was arrested June 6 and is being held on $1 million bail. Harrison has long been the suspect in a September of 2017 shooting in Alderpoint that left Robert James Holtsclaw dead of a single gunshot wound. Eureka police officers arrested Harrison in the Bayshore Mall parking lot 11 minutes after getting a tip as to his whereabouts. POSTED 06.06.18

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Comment of the Week “I was sobbing.” — “Miah Ree Lname” commenting on the Journal’s Facebook page on a story about Eureka City Councilmember Natalie Arroyo’s surprise — and very public — proposal to boyfriend Jason Lopiccolos during a Humboldt Roller Derby match. To fully convey her excitement, Lname added one sobbing happy face, four double heart and 10 clapping hand emojis after the comment. POSTED 06.10.18

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ho amongst us shall be crowned? It is up to all who dwell in the County of Humboldt. The most humble subjects at North Coast Journal are taking votes for the best in the land. That is the question posed by NCJ’s 2018 Best of Humboldt Readers Poll: Who treats you like royalty? Which people, places, and things shall be deemed the best?

Vote!

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Here’s how Best of Humboldt works:

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round II rules: You can vote for as many or as few subcategories as you like, and you can vote every day from June 4 to June 30. (But just once a day!) Most of the categories have the top three nominees to choose from, but a few have ties. We need you to break those ties!

So how do we make sure there’s no cheating or robo-voting? You’ll have to make an account and confirm your email, but it’s super quick and easy, we promise! This year’s system has been redesigned to be easier to use than ever. All hail to the best!

12  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 14, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com


Week in Weed

Plenty of Canni, No Fest By Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com

I

t’s official. Humboldt County — long considered the heart of California’s marijuana country — will not have a cannabis festival in the foreseeable future. The Ferndale Enterprise reported this week that organizers’ final push to put on Cannifest — a locally produced “cannabis festival and trade gathering” — has met an immovable object in the form of Ferndale Police Chief Bret Smith. According to the report, Smith is of the firm belief that current law prohibits cannabis events from being held at the Humboldt County Fairgrounds, one of just two locations in the county where they would ostensibly be permitted under current state regulations. The problem, according to Smith, is that state law restricts smoking cannabis in public spaces or where tobacco use is prohibited, and within 1,000 feet of a school. The fairgrounds are public property and the fair’s lease agreement with the county specifies they be maintained as a “no-smoking” facility. Plus, Smith notes, they fall within 1,000 feet of Ferndale High School and within the city limits of Ferndale, which has prohibited cannabis sales. While California’s cannabis regulations issued late last year do allow for a licensed operator to put on a cannabis festival, they limit the location to the 80 county fair or district agricultural association properties in the state. In Humboldt County, that means the fairgrounds in Ferndale or Redwood Acres in Eureka. While Redwood Acres has held such events in the past, its board has decided cannabis events are no longer a good fit becaues of an increased presence of children and youth on the property due to a variety of businesses and programs operated there. “It’s unfortunate,” Cannifest organizer Stephen Gieder told the Enterprise about Smith’s decision. “I understand the rights of the cities and the counties — everyone has their rights to do things the way they want to do it — but Ferndale and the county fairgrounds are the agricultural center for expositions and education and the city is unwilling to allow us to educate about the largest ag crop in the county.” A bill by North Coast Assemblymember Jim Wood, A.B. 2461, aims to allow such festivals by issuing temporary event licenses for festivals that could be held at any venue that receives local approval. The bill passed the Assembly late last month on a 54-15 vote and is now being taken up in the Senate.

For his part, Gieder told the Enterprise he doesn’t see cannabis festivals in Ferndale being a reality until the federal government reverses its long-standing prohibition. l In related news, after decades of dead-on-arrival bills being introduced in Congress, federal lawmakers have introduced a bill that seems to have some momentum behind it. A bipartisan bill known as the STATES Act introduced June 7 by Sens. Cory Gardner (R-Colorado) and Elizabeth Warren (D-Massachusetts), and backed by a bipartisan group of 12 governors and some banks, would allow states to pass their own marijuana laws without federal interference by amending the Controlled Substances Act so its provisions no longer apply to those in compliance with state marijuana laws. In contrast to the Marijuana Justice Act introduced by Sen. Corey Booker last year (“A Snowball’s Chance in D.C.,” Aug. 3, 2017), this bill would not be implemented retroactively, meaning it would not expunge the records of scores of people convicted in past federal cases. But the limits on its scope are part of the reason why pundits believe it has a real shot at passing. Another reason is that the legislation is being billed as a strengthening of the 10th Amendment, which some believe might make it an easier vote for Republicans in staunchly red districts. Sor far the bill has gotten nods of approval from those in the cannabis industry, with California Growers Association Executive Director Hezekiah Allen telling the San Francisco Chronicle it’s a “really elegant solution” and Dale Gieringer, the executive director of the California chapter of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws, calling it the “most realistic” path toward ending federal prohibition. The bill got an extra boost the day after it was introduced when President Donald Trump told reporters, “We’re looking at it. But I probably will end up supporting that, yes” (”Trump ‘Probably Will Support State Choice on Cannabis,” posted online June 8). Of course, as Dreamers and LGBTQ communities can attest, the president’s statements of support — much like the cannabis industry itself — aren’t exactly bankable. l Thadeus Greenson is the Journal’s news editor. Reach him at 442-1400, extension 321, or thad@northcoastjournal.com. Follow him on Twitter @thadeusgreenson.

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On the Cover

‘Highway Robbery’

Drivers allege Rohnert Park police illegally seized cannabis, cash By Sukey Lewis/KQED News This story was reported in collaboration with the North Coast Journal and independent reporter Kym Kemp.

Drivers allege Rohnert Park police illegally seized cannabis, cash By Sukey Lewis/KQED News in collaboration with the North Coast Journal and Humboldt County blogger Kym Kemp. U.S. Highway 101 near Cloverdale. Photo by Adam Grossberg

H

uedell Freeman was heading south on U.S. Highway 101 through Cloverdale and was just over the Sonoma County line when he said a police squad car flipped a U-turn across a 25foot grass median and pulled up behind him with lights flashing. Freeman said he was carrying 47 pounds of marijuana in his rental car that day, Dec. 29, 2016, but he wasn’t too worried about the weed because he had a permit to grow medical cannabis in Mendocino County. He was driving it down to his client, a licensed dispensary called The Higher Path in Sherman Oaks, near Los Angeles. And, he said, he had the paperwork to prove it. It struck Freeman as odd, though, that the two police officers pulling him over weren’t from Cloverdale. They were from Rohnert Park, some 40 miles south on 101. Freeman said he’d been obeying the traffic laws and the cruise control on the car was

set at the speed limit. He expected the traffic stop to end quickly. He didn’t expect to lose a year’s worth of income. As Rohnert Park Department of Public Safety officer Joseph Huffaker approached the car, Freeman said he rolled down his window and asked why he’d been pulled over. Freeman said Huffaker told him his vehicle had “touched the white line” on the side of the road. “I had not, so I looked at him, and I said, ‘No I didn’t,’” Freeman said. “And he grinned and smiled at me and did not respond. At that moment I knew I’d been had. I knew that this was not a normal traffic stop.” Then Huffaker asked if he had any marijuana in his car, Freeman said. “Yes, I do,” Freeman remembered saying. He also carried a large battered black leather briefcase filled with documentation — what he calls his “compliance

14  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 14, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

briefcase” — and he said he provided the officer with a grower’s permit issued by the Mendocino County Sheriff’s Office, contact information for The Higher Path dispensary — with which he had an agreement to both grow and transport marijuana — and his compliance lawyer’s information. Essentially, Freeman was trying to be as legitimate as he could be. Freeman said that as he and Huffaker talked another Rohnert Park officer, Sgt. Jacy Tatum, stood off to the side, barely speaking except to ask Freeman at one point about the strains of marijuana he was carrying. The two officers would go on to seize that marijuana and Freeman hasn’t seen it since. But, an odd fact remains about this seizure: No case against Freeman was ever referred to the district attorney for prosecution. Freeman’s account of his run-in with Rohnert Park police echoes those of eight

other drivers who say a group of officers from the city conducted pretextual traffic stops with the goal of unlawfully seizing marijuana and cash. Four people allowed us to share their stories publicly, while five others would tell us about their encounters only if we agreed not to name them, saying they feared police retaliation. Their stories suggest a pattern of questionable and potentially illegal stops and seizures over the past three years by officers from a small city along a major marijuana transportation corridor that connects the Emerald Triangle to markets in the southern half of the state. The city of Rohnert Park said in a statement that its police officers “joined other law enforcement agencies in drug interdiction efforts” along Highway 101 seeking drugs including “methamphetamines, opioids, cocaine, ecstasy and marijuana.” But the city says it ceased “most interdiction efforts” related to marijuana in 2017. There is a financial benefit to the city


for this work. Through a legal process pulled him over just north of the Mencalled asset forfeiture, both the Rohnert docino County line, about 50 miles north Park Department of Public Safety and the of Rohnert Park. Flatten, like Freeman, was also in a rentSonoma County District Attorney’s Office al car and said he, too, was not speeding get to keep a cut of seized cash suspector violating any traffic laws. He pulled ed to be the proceeds of a crime. over and showed the officer his driver’s A report issued by the California Attorney General’s Office shows license and the rental agreethat from 2015 to 2016, the ment for his car. Rohnert Park Department of The officers did not identify what agency they Public Safety received more were with, Flatten said, and than $1 million in seized he noticed they were not cash. The Sonoma County wearing departmental police District Attorney’s Office badges or identifying name received $188,419 of the tags. assets seized. “At that point, I really Tatum was responsible felt something was wrong,” for much of that asset forfeiture windfall to his local Flatten said. department. In 2015, the Flatten said he had 3 mayor publicly recognized pounds of marijuana in his him for his drug prevention car from a farm in Humboldt work. Tatum thanked the County and he was taking city council for allowing him it to a laboratory in Santa the opportunity to “fight Rosa for testing. He said he the war on drugs.” was working on developing But Tatum has another a number of cannabis products he hoped to bring to reputation: A growing chorus of defense attorneys say market after California’s law he’s a rogue cop. He’s being allowing recreational use for sued for unlawfully taking adults kicked in. a man’s cash and he has Flatten also offered Above: Jacy Tatum is a documented history of to show the officers his sworn in as a Rohnert Park dishonesty on the witness doctor’s prescription for police sergeant in July 2015. medical cannabis, but he stand. City of Rohnert Park Police “When I say highway said they weren’t interested. & Fire Facebook page) robbery, I really mean it,” The officers said they Below: Officer Sonoma County defense were working for the ATF — Joe Huffaker. attorney Izaak Schwaiger the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, City of Rohnert Park Police said. “Officer Tatum has Tobacco, Firearms and & Fire Facebook page) been involved in dozens of Explosives — according to questionable traffic stops Flatten. He said they took both above and below the his marijuana and left him Mendocino-Sonoma County line, where on the side of the road, all in just a few he has seized marijuana farmers’ prodminutes. They did not issue him a citation uct and/or their cash and given them no or arrest him. receipt and no criminal charges were ever Flatten reported the Dec. 5 incident to brought.” the Mendocino County Sheriff’s Office, Now Tatum and his partner Huffaker the Mendocino County district attorney, are under investigation by the city of the Mendocino County Grand Jury and Rohnert Park. They are both on leave, the FBI. Kemp spoke with an ATF spokesperson who said the agency wasn’t inaccording to their attorney. volved in Flatten’s traffic stop. “Mr. Flatten did contact the FBI and the information he provided, we were not able to corroborate it as reported,” FBI spokesperson Rohnert Park began an administrative Prentice Danner said. investigation around April of this year The Mendocino County Sheriff’s Office after independent Humboldt County said it wasn’t their case and pointed to blogger Kym Kemp published a series of a press release from Rohnert Park police articles about another suspect traffic stop written on Feb. 13, not long after Flatten’s and marijuana seizure. stop. The statement, written by Tatum Texas resident Zeke Flatten said he was and Cmdr. Jeff Taylor, touted a large “black driving south from Humboldt County market” marijuana bust on Highway 101 on Highway 101 last December when an Continued on next page » unmarked black Ford Police Interceptor

Allegations of a Cover-Up

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during the month of December. Rohnert Park produced an incident report of the Dec. 5 stop, also written by Tatum, that diverges in many places from Flatten’s account. The redacted report doesn’t include any names. It describes a traffic stop involving a white Mercedes-Benz with no license plates. Yet Flatten said he drove a Kia rental car with California license plates. The report says that 30 pounds of marijuana and several hundred containers of hash were seized from the person driving the Mercedes. Flatten maintains he had 3 pounds of marijuana with him. Records show that officer Huffaker did book 30 pounds of seized marijuana into evidence, but not until Dec. 18, nearly two weeks later. The several hundred containers of hash are not mentioned in the evidence log. Flatten doesn’t believe Tatum was among the two officers who stopped him, although he does think Rohnert Park officer Huffaker was one of the officers who pulled him over. The report says a CHP officer and trainee assisted on Flatten’s stop. But a CHP spokesman wrote in an email, “There is no dispatch record of us assisting with this incident and no one recalls it.” Flatten said he thinks Tatum crafted this report after the fact to cover up an illegal stop and seizure by police officers. “I felt very strongly that I was robbed by legitimate police officers,” Flatten said. Finally, the report said the case was referred to the Sonoma County district attorney for prosecution. The Sonoma County District Attorney’s Office has no record that Rohnert Park ever referred a case against Flatten. There are no charges against him. The city of Rohnert Park would not respond to questions about this incident, but it is investigating. Attorney Justin Buffington, who is representing Tatum and Huffaker, confirmed the officers are on leave pending an administrative investigation related to Flatten. He stressed that the city’s probe is not a criminal investigation. Tatum and Huffaker did not wish to comment for this story, according to Buffington.

“I felt very strongly that I was robbed by legitimate police officers.”

» » » »

Seizing Cash

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16  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 14, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

of unlawful seizure. A gambler from Las Vegas named Lucas Serafine alleges in a lawsuit against the city that Tatum and Rohnert Park police officer Nick Miller unlawfully seized more than $120,000 from him on March 10, 2016. Serafine was also in a rental car traveling on Highway 101 near Cloverdale with a friend when he said the two officers pulled him over for allegedly driving too fast in the rain. Serafine said he was headed to a high-stakes poker game at the Bear River Casino in Humboldt County and that the large amount of cash in the car was from a lawsuit he settled with the California Department of Corrections and a workers’ compensation claim. The officers suspected Serafine’s money was related to drug purchase or sales, according to court documents, and seized it. Serafine remembers Tatum looked him in the eyes while pushing on his chest with a pointed finger and saying, “I took $1.2 million off the road this year. Nobody shows up for it and neither will you.” A review of incident reports provided by Rohnert Park in response to a public records request back up the statement. KQED reviewed 23 incident reports on traffic stops involving Tatum. The city continues to provide more reports on a rolling basis. Between late 2013 and the end of 2016, Tatum was involved in stops that resulted in the confiscation of well over $1 million in cash, according to the incident reports released so far. The department saw a 182 percent increase in funds from asset forfeitures between 2015 and 2016. According to data reported to the California Attorney General’s Office, Rohnert Park police netted $756,062 in 2016, an increase of nearly half a million dollars from the year before. In Serafine’s case, $121,920 was logged into evidence and turned over to the district attorney for asset forfeiture proceedings. On June 28, 2016, Serafine’s lawyer sent a letter to Rohnert Park contesting the amount of money seized, but Serafine says he did not get a response. Serafine said he actually had $132,000. After district attorney brought a civil action to seize Serafine’s cash, he provided the prosecutors with proof of income for most of the cash and eventually got

This is not the first time Rohnert Park police officers have faced allegations


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Huedell Freeman. Sukey Lewis/KQED News

$100,000 of his money returned to him. The Sonoma County District Attorney’s Office declined to comment on Serafine’s asset forfeiture case or to say whether it investigated Serafine’s dispute about the amount of cash seized. The city is fighting Serafine’s lawsuit alleging police officers inappropriately confiscated his cash. A trial in that case is scheduled for November. Serafine has a criminal history, including a conviction in 2001 when he was 18 for unlawful sex with a minor, and was forthcoming about his record. While Flatten admits he didn’t have a legal license to transport marijuana, he said that still doesn’t give law enforcement the right to essentially steal from people. “I knew that what these officers were doing was so much of abuse of power and so just wrong for police officers to be doing that,” Flatten said. Tatum’s attorney, Buffington, said he is not under investigation for any additional matters. “To my knowledge, none of the other matters [aside from the Flatten stop] that you referenced are, or have been, the subject of internal investigations undertaken by the department,” Buffington wrote in an email. “That is a very strong indication, based on the law, that the complaints, assuming there were such, were deemed frivolous by the department.”

An Unreliable Witness

At least a year before Flatten went public with his allegations against Rohnert Park police, Tatum was known by prosecutors to have written false information

in police reports and to have testified dishonestly in court. “He [Tatum] doesn’t have a problem lying, and he does so with some regularity,” said Izaak Schwaiger a civil rights and defense attorney who has had run-ins with Tatum. Schwaiger, who was a Sonoma County prosecutor from 2010 to 2012, said then-officer Tatum already had a reputation. “His testimony was not of the highest quality,” Schwaiger said, “and sometimes gave rise to people disbelieving it, even on the side of law enforcement.” Later, when Schwaiger became a defense attorney, the stories about Tatum mounted. KQED has spoken to five defense attorneys in Sonoma County who say their clients alleged that Tatum — and often his partners — stopped them on a flimsy pretext, fabricated police reports and unlawfully seized cash and marijuana. In 2016, Tatum entered false information into an incident report. He and Huffaker pulled over a New Jersey man named Konstantine Charalidis, who the DA charged with having a concealed weapon. Charalidis’ attorney, Evan Zelig, provided KQED with Huffaker’s body-camera footage from the stop. It contradicts the police report written by Tatum. The incident report says that a knife taken off Charalidis was “completely concealed” by his clothing. Huffaker’s body-camera footage shows Charalidis immediately pointed out both knives, Continued on next page »

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On the Cover Continued from previous page

neither of which were concealed. “There’s a difference between incorrect police reports and police reports that are falsified,” Zelig said. “The one with Mr. Charalidis, this was not incorrect. It was just falsified. The facts in there were not true.” In the body-camera footage, both Huffaker and Tatum ask repeatedly whether there is any cash in the car, which Charalidis and his friend deny. Then Tatum says on the body-camera video he found $10,000. Zelig said the officers became angry at Charalidis because he wouldn’t admit that $10,000 was related to illegal activity, which would have allowed them to seize it. “Give us fucking bullshit ass fucking answers, that’s what happens,” one of the officers says on the body-camera footage as Charalidis stands handcuffed. “We’re going to see a judge.” The police report does not mention any money. “It was absolutely an unlawful arrest,” said Zelig, “that they did solely because he would not give them the money.” Prosecutors dismissed the charges against Charalidis because of the

body-camera footage. Zelig says his client still had to pay attorneys fees and deal with the hassle of a California court case while living in New Jersey. In a separate 2016 case, Schwaiger suspected Tatum was lying about his justification for a traffic stop. He collected sworn statements from three other defense attorneys who said Tatum was dishonest and detailed specific instances of him lying. Tatum’s dishonest testimony in that case led him to be placed on a list of officers with credibility issues maintained by the Sonoma County District Attorney’s Office, Schwaiger and other defense attorneys said. Tatum gave shifting explanations in an attempt to justify the traffic stop and was caught lying on the witness stand. A judge dismissed the case. Being on what’s called “the Brady list” meant, after that case, prosecutors had a duty to disclose evidence of Tatum’s past dishonest testimony to defense attorneys, who can use it to attack his credibility if he’s called as a witness. The Sonoma County District Attorney’s Office declined to comment on Tatum’s credibility as a witness but no perjury charges have been filed against him.

A Rohnert Park police squad car. Sukey Lewis/KQED News

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Schwaiger and another defense attorney say they were both interviewed by an investigator for the DA’s office regarding Tatum, but prosecutors would not say what the nature or the outcome of this investigation was. “People want to believe police officers because we don’t want to live in a world where cops can’t be trusted,” Schwaiger said. “That’s a scary world. Those are the people that are here to protect us. They’re the people here to keep us safe. And if they can’t be trusted, who can be?”

Broken Trust

For years, unlawful seizures and asset forfeitures were often considered by people in the marijuana industry as the cost of doing business. But now, legalization is offering people like Freeman a path to legitimacy. He pays taxes and permit fees — those are the costs of doing business. Freeman remembered the day in 2015 when a deputy from the Mendocino County Sheriff’s Office took his picture in front of his cannabis farm. “‘You don’t know how weird this is for me’,” Freeman recalled saying to the deputy. “And he laughed and he said, ‘I think I do,’ he said. ‘We used to call this evidence. Now we call it verification’.” It was scary to go legal, Freeman said, but it felt good, too: no more lying, no more hiding, no more risk of going to prison for doing what he loves. Now he grows more than a dozen varieties of cannabis that are tailored to specific medical ailments. “I don’t care about the 22 year olds that want to get stoned and park on the couch,” he said. “I have nothing against that, but that’s not why I do this.” Freeman said he explained all this to Tatum and Huffaker. He had nothing to hide. He gave them the name and phone number of Colin Stewart, partner and manager of The Higher Path dispensary in Sherman Oaks. Huffaker spoke to Stewart and to Freeman’s attorney, Hannah Nelson, who both confirmed what Freeman said: His cannabis was for medicine, not the black market. He was legit. But the officers came back and told Freeman that they were seizing his property because he did not have a license issued by the state to transport marijuana. The state Bureau of Cannabis Control

declined to comment for this story and refused repeated requests to explain licensing and regulations for transporting marijuana legally in California. The officers wrote Freeman a citation for possessing more than an ounce of marijuana but they did not give him any documentation for the property they seized. The Sonoma County District Attorney’s Office said no case against Freeman was ever referred to them. Freeman said he called the Rohnert Park Department of Public Safety the next day. Sgt. Eric Matzen assured him that his cannabis was safe and that if the department determined its legality, he would get it back, Freeman said. Freeman’s attorney wrote to the city and asked for it to return her client’s property. But the city of Rohnert Park never returned Freeman’s cannabis. On June 27, 2017, he filed a claim against the city of Rohnert Park for the value of his cannabis. The city has rejected it. Assistant City Manager Don Schwartz would not respond to a series of detailed questions about traffic stops by the city’s officers. “Rohnert Park is committed to compliance with the law and the constitution and its mission to serve and protect the public,” Schwartz wrote in an emailed response. “If or when concerns are raised about police officer conduct, we take the concerns seriously and investigate as each situation may warrant. Once all of the facts are known, we take any and all appropriate measures.” The statement continued: “Rohnert Park participated in these [interdiction] efforts to reduce the flow of illegal drugs to Sonoma County, including the city of Rohnert Park,” Schwartz wrote. “Recreational marijuana was illegal until Jan. 1, 2018.” Freeman said he has still not recovered from the financial loss of his property. But he said even harder to recover is the faith he lost in a system that promised to protect him if he came out of the shadows. “They broke my trust,” Freeman said.

“They’re the people here to keep us safe. And if they can’t be trusted, who can be?”

l Julie Small of KQED News and Kym Kemp contributed to this report. northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, June 14, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

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Homemade Silver Pin Noodles A childhood favorite to make with the kids By Wendy Chan

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T

here are many recipes for handmade Chinese silver pin noodles, sometimes called needle noodles or yin zhen fen. However my favorite is the one my grandma used to make for us when I was a kid. Every time I make these noodles, I think of the good old times with her in China. The fragrance of the freshly ground rice flour dough, the moonlight shining on our kitchen door, the endless songs from the frogs and crickets — and there we were making bundles of needle noodles in our tiny farm kitchen. Grandma would give me a handful after the first batch. I would sit outside on the still warm stone steps, eating one by one, counting the fireflies. We didn’t have much then but those plain needle noodles were the most delightful snack of my childhood. Now I enjoy making them with my kids, too. I recently showed the kids at a Jefferson Community Center cooking class how to make them and we had a blast. I love the variety of dishes we can create with them, too. Little kids might enjoy the noodles plain for a healthier snack. I like them served with my garlic chili sauce (recipe below). My family likes them stir fried with meat and vegetables in chili sauce. The noodles are also excellent in soup. Their texture is springy and the taste delicious and light. 

Silver Pin Noodles Serves 4. Ingredients: 2 cups rice flour 2 cups tapioca flour 1 teaspoon salt

20  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 14, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

Pin noodles with chili sauce, pan fried or straight from the pot. Photo by Wendy Chan

1 tablespoon vegetable oil 2 cups boiling water 1/2 cup rice flour for dusting  To make the dough: Mix the flours and salt together in a large mixing bowl. Add the boiling water and carefully stir with a pair of chopsticks or a wooden spoon. After the mixture is incorporated, add oil and combine. The dough will still be very hot, so I usually put on gloves to knead the dough. Or you can let it cool off a little first. But I find kneading the warm dough therapeutic. After kneading for 8 minutes, the dough will become soft and smooth. Cover it with a clean towel and let it rest for 5 minutes. To form the noodles: Snip a fingertip-sized piece of still warm dough and put it in the center of your palm. Use both palms to roll it into a rope about 3 inches long with tapered ends like a needle’s point. Flour your hands as needed and work as quickly as you can

before the dough gets cold and dried out (this yields broken needles). To steam the noodles: Punch a few holes in a sheet of parchment paper and place it in the bottom of a bamboo. Scatter the noodles or group them in small bundles onto the parchment. Cover and place the steamer over boiling water for 8 minutes. Let the noodles sit for another 2 minutes before taking cover off. 

Spicy Garlic Chili Sauce This sauce can be added to many dishes and brings a kick to your palate. Making it involves some smoke so have your range fan on. Ingredients: 1 cup chili flakes or a handful of dried Thai chilis 3 tablespoons minced fresh garlic 2 tablespoons minced fresh ginger 


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¼ cup raw sesame seeds 1 teaspoon ground cumin 1 teaspoon white pepper  1/2 teaspoon Chinese five spice  1/2 cup soy sauce  1/2 cup vegetable oil Toast the chili flakes in a warm pan for until just aromatic. If using whole dried Thai chilis, roast them on a baking sheet in an oven on low heat for about 10 minutes or just until they are aromatic, then crush them into flakes with a rolling pin or mortar and pestle. Mix all ingredients except the oil together in a metal bowl on a heat-proof surface. Heat up a pan over medium-high heat, add the oil and cook until boiling hot — a tiny drop of water should sizzle in the pan. Slowly pour the hot oil into the chili mixture. It will immediately sizzle and smoke, so be very careful. After the mixture cools, stir well and serve. When placed in a clean jar and kept refrigerated, it can keep up to a couple of months. l

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northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, June 14, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

21


It’s Personal

A Mother Gets Through Graduation Season approaches with alarming speed. A few years ago we sent our son off to college and, more recently, our daughter. The months of rushing and planning and calculating suddenly ended. My children took off on their own adventures and we were left in a quiet house, while one by one their aging childhood pets sickened and died. Such is the nature of parenting. I bet they don’t tell you that in What To Expect When You’re Expecting. But with the quiet house came an awakening of opportunity. It took a little while to see things this way. I’d hesitated to change much in the children’s old bedrooms — subconsciously holding their rooms for them like a hopeful concierge in a boutique hotel. But as I observed the dust gathering on my daughter’s dance trophies or rummaged through a

drawer full of my son’s music awards, it occurred to me that our children appeared to be serious about this whole moving out and growing up thing. You know something? I thought. I don’t think they’re coming back. It was time to sort through the keepsakes, box up the essentials, refinish the hardwood floors and apply a new coat of paint. We set about the arduous task of moving out the furniture. But one afternoon, as I stood in the emptiness of my son’s former bedroom, my mind overflowed with memories. More than two decades ago, I had stood in this room while the afternoon light flooded through these windows. I had just received the key to our new house and had wandered in with my 6-month-old son balanced on my hip. “What do you think, M’ijo?” I asked him, as I surveyed the four empty walls. “You think this might be a good room for you?” His kicking feet and gummy smile seemed like a definite “yes.” From that moment on, we began to fill up that room with my son. Even the current emptiness could not completely remove him. He was there in all the

pinpricks left on the wall from his posters, in the smudges of fingerprints that started low on the door and moved their way up the frame. He was even there in the silence, which only enhanced the memory of the bass -thumping music that once emanated from his room. Moving on to stand in my daughter’s room brought a similar deluge of memories. I recalled an evening, long ago, when I had come home from a brief outing. My 5-year-old daughter greeted me at the door, so excited to show me what she and her brother had accomplished while I was gone. She took me by the hand and led me to her room. Jumping in her bed, she flicked off the light and gestured to the hundreds of glowing stars that they had affixed to the ceiling and walls. “Wow,” I breathed, truly stunned at what they had wrought. “Did your brother help you with all this?” “Yes,” she answered, snuggling into her covers. “Because he doesn’t want me to ever be afraid of the dark.” Now, in the stillness of this room, I remember her tiny face illuminated under her own night sky and realize that if I am

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A

s June approached, I opened my mailbox to an assorted collection of high school graduation announcements. Just as it once seemed that everyone I knew was birthing children, it now seems that everyone I know is graduating children. How well I remember the chaotic pace of the senior year. Eighteen years of parenting coalesce down to that final sprint: prom dresses, tux rentals, senior photos, financial aid, college tours and applications. Not to mention the all-consuming task of keeping your children alive as they push their way past curfews, careening down county roads in cars stuffed with friends, struggling toward an independence that CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE

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to paint this ceiling, these stars will have to come down. I climb a ladder and slip a putty knife under each star, working my way across the room. I think of the graduation announcements that I have collected in the last few weeks: The graduating seniors arranged against beautiful backdrops, the vulnerability that hesitates around each confident smile. I know that behind each graduating senior trails a loving parent, one who is both bereft and brimming with pride. As I work at loosening these stars, I hold in my mind all the graduating children and their parents. I hold my own children, who are living their independent lives, far away. I realize that I am praying — which is perhaps just a form of wishing — the quiet chant of mothers everywhere: Let them burn brightly. Let them be safe. Let them shine. I send out these small, fervent wishes, as all around me the stars fall. l

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23


Down and Dirty

Home & Garden

Summer Garden Bling

Planting for color and flavor By Katie Rose McGourty

downanddirty@northcoastjournal.com

H

ang on to your hats — the heat of the home garden season is on. As we continue to enjoy defrosted or canned pumpkin puree from last year’s Great Pumpkin in muffins, curries and pies, we are thinking ahead by planning our harvest for the fall to come. Longer, warmer days offer plenty of inspiration to plant out summer bling over the last full moon (the Flower moon, FYI). What do I mean by summer bling? Those special plants that add splashes of color and flavor to meals all summer and beyond. Here are some of my favorites.

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Berry medley

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24 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 14, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

We are lucky to live in berry country here on the North Coast. Of anything to plant in the home garden, berries are an excellent choice due to the ease of growing them versus the high price of buying them. Berries add nutrition and color to summertime breakfasts and smoothies, and may offer bumper crops for jams, jellies and pies. There’s nothing more dazzling than picking fresh morning raspberries glowing like rubies thick with morning dew or enjoying the tart sweetness of a bowl of blueberries. The planting window for these is winter through early spring but there’s no harm in planning for next year. If you’ve got them going already, here’s how to get the most from them. Right now all the berries are setting fruit like crazy. To make them really pop, we are adding a few handfuls of spent coffee grounds and tea leaves to the soil under acid-loving blueberries, and composting and mulching around the raspberries and strawberries. All berries do best in full sunshine with room to expand. Strawberries require the regular maintenance of cutting back runners during berry season so that the plant puts it energy toward fruit rather than vegetative growth.

To prevent pests such as snails, slugs and pill bugs from chewing moonscapes in our strawberries, we twist developing berries around each other to keep them off the ground. Birds love blueberries as much as we do so we cover them with a light plastic mesh or tie flashing silver paper to deter the birds from snatching. Raspberries like to roam, sending up canes outside of their designated raised bed. We cut them back to allow plants to concentrate on producing more berries.

Corn patch

A few years ago, our generous neighbors cut down a spruce tree that shaded about a third of the farm. We, of course, wanted to thank them with home-grown garden bounty and they requested corn. We’d never had success with corn at the farm before but we set out the following year to try again. Nothing motivates better than returning a favor and we had success at last. Growing corn turned out to be pretty simple once we let it take over the backyard! Corn requires enough space in the garden to create a few rows. We don’t mind, we love freshly picked corn so much that we decided to take out the back lawn and make a corn patch instead. The stalks transform the garden landscape with vertical texture and sound. Late last summer, just before corn harvest, there was a lightning storm. The wind whipped through the corn and lightning exploded white hot against a black sky. Who knows if that will be recreated this summer but we wouldn’t want to miss the chance. Now’s the time to get planting if you haven’t already. We like to recreate the “three sisters” in our corn patch (winter squashes, corn and beans). Why not follow the expertise of Native Americans who’ve been planting these three together for more than 5,000 years? Corn provides a trellis


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for the beans, beans provide nitrogen for the corn and squash provides living-mulch weed control. We plant corn in hills made from freshly dug farm soil with coirbased planting medium (see the recipe “Victory Gardening,” April 19). We feed fish emulsion (available at garden supply shops) into the soil and look forward to knee-high stalks by the Fourth of July. The first tassel offers the perfect summertime decoration. Fresh cobs arrive mid-to-late September and amaze us with their incredible sweetness. The price of commercial corn is expected to rise by 90 percent in the near future due to increasing distribution costs, so there’s no time like the present to grow this amazing crop right at home.

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Pickled fare

Pickling offers the home farmer an easy way to preserve garden bounty for later enjoyment. Homegrown pickles go beyond the quintessential deli dills. Abundant harvest of green beans, carrots, corn, cucumbers and zucchini all make delicious pickles. We’re not afraid to pickle exotic combinations of vegetables and spices, either, but cucumbers are a fine place to start and you’re just in time to plant if you hurry. Last year we experimented with companion planting and discovered the amazing cucumber-sunflower garden. Sunflower stalks provide trellis structure for cucumber vines, as well as dappled shade cucumbers prefer and something beautiful to look at. Allow your imagination to wander through all of the tasty and pretty possibilities. ● Katie Rose McGourty is the owner of Healthy Living Everyday at www. healthy-living-everyday.com.

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Setlist

Fathers and Fests By Collin Yeo

music@northcoastjournal.com

W

e are creeping toward the salad days of summer, my dears, and this week has some proper preludes for that laziest, grasshopper-ish of seasons. Oyster Fest is here (a truly strange notion to me as no one sensible in my former home of Louisiana eats oysters in the warm months, but we are luckily blessed with a much milder climate here), Father’s Day is on Sunday and the days of this week and next will be the longest of 2018. So get out there and enjoy what Louis Armstrong called the skies of blue, the clouds of white, the bright blessed day and the dark sacred night. And have a wonderful week.

Thursday KEET/KHSU continues its free Lost Coast Sessions series at the Arcata Playhouse tonight at 7:30 p.m. with superb local funksters Object Heavy as the solo act on the bill. Word on the street suggests that the music won’t be the only free attraction and that pizza from The Jam and a free copy of the Heavy’s latest effort will be featured, too, so make sure you reserve your space on the dancefloor.

Friday New York jazz pianist, composer and Columbia and Julliard grad Ben Rosenblum is known for his rhythm block-chorded, Bill Evans-esque chops. With bassist Kanoa Mendenhall and drummer Ben Zweig he has formed — what else — the Ben Rosenblum Trio, which will present its modern jazz sounds to the lucky people at the Sanctuary tonight at 7:30 p.m. ($10$20 sliding scale). Ben will be playing the

in-house Sanctuary piano, a 1914 Steinway Upright made in Astoria, Queens, in the factory on the titular street/place. When I lived in NYC, I used to find myself wondering: Were there more garrotings around that piano district in its heyday? Perhaps The Power Broker author Robert Caro owes us a book about it.

Saturday Well it’s Oyster Fest in Arcata today on the plaza. Will my heroic love of bivalves win over my seething dislike of crowds? I don’t yet know but I will suggest two shows to appease those who are either drawn to the spectacle or smitten by the idea of wedging a healthy distance between oneself and the bright-eyed bon vivants. For the former, The Jam is hosting a post-fest party with Grateful Dead cover band extraordinare Rosewater playing two sets. The first is an all-ages and free affair kicking off at 6 p.m. and the second is a 21-and-over adventure for $10 and will start no earlier than 9:30 p.m. For those of you who wish to avoid the mother of pearl-tinted daytime adventures in non-kosher eating, may I suggest a free joint going down at the Vista Del Mar at 7:30 p.m. Come join fuzzy jumpers Hollow Down, punkers Dead Drift and super-weirdos CV for an evening of waterside anthems.

Sunday (Father’s Day) I’d like to take this opportunity to wish my own father a happy one from afar because he is currently visiting his parents’ land of Canada. And having outed my family as immigrants, I would also like to take a moment to state that ICE is an

The Ben Rosenblum Trio plays the Sanctuary on Friday, June 15 at 7:30 p.m. Courtesy of the artist

American Gestapo and that I fully support its disbandment and the prosecution of its agents. The Nuremburg defense isn’t any more acceptable today than it was in 1945. There, now you know that I am my father’s son. Happy Father’s Day, Pop. Anyway, here are a couple things to do with your own daddies on this most holy of dad days. The Humboldt Botanical Gardens is hosting a Music in the Garden event at 1 p.m. with music by The Handshakers. Admission is $8, $5 for seniors and students and free for Humboldt Botanical Garden members. Meanwhile, there’s an open house fundraiser at the Sanctuary starting at 4 p.m. with games, food and drink, and a silent auction. Live music will kick off at 7 p.m. with a generally folk-toned series of sets by Cold Light of the Day, The Bandage and J Street Regulars so please bring your best-est patriarch to this multi-generational affair.

Monday Sushi Spot in McKinleyville continues to host the jazz duo Anemones of the State on the first and third Monday of every month for a free set for the roll-and-sake crowd starting at 5 p.m. Bring your hungry ears and mouths like some sort of beautiful shellfish and just gorge on the tastiness.

Tuesday Syracuse’s bouncing old skool hip-hop and funk trio Sophistafunk rolls through Humbrews tonight at 9 p.m. A mainstay of the festival and party circuit, these sophisti-cats have also made their bones as a featured act tapped for his birthday party by the frosted-one himself, Guy Fieri. So if that seems like the sign of a hot time in Flavortown to you then come on down ($10).

Wednesday It’s Pints for Non-Profits night again at the Mad River Brewery at 6 p.m. The tunes are free and supplied by the folk and blues-flavored Frogbite, and the cause of the week is Humboldt Homebrewers, so it sounds like a delightfully beery ouroboros to me. ● Full show listings in the Journal’s Music and More grid, the Calendar and online. Bands and promoters, send your gig info, preferably with a high-res photo or two, to music@northcoastjournal.com. Collin Yeo knows about modesty and propriety and when the time is right to simply shut up. Sadly, he acts on none of this information. He lives in Arcata.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, June 14, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

27


The nail or banger of the rig is heated with a propane torch. Many people use a small creme brulee torch.

Dab rigs are usually made of glass and resemble a regular water pipe, with noticable differences. Make sure your rig is clean and the water level high enough to properly bubble, but not high enough to splash you in the face While inhaling.

Dabbing is a method of cannabis consumption using concentrated cannabis extract. Extracts come in several varieties: live resin, budder, shatter, rosin, solvent free extract, wax, and BHO (butane hash oil) all refer to some variety of dabbing extract, each with unique properties. START SMALL! Because cannabis extracts are much more potent that cannabis flower, it is critical to take a cautious approach when trying it out. It is easy to overconsume while dabbing, and you don’t want to have a negative experience! As with all cannabis use, keep in mind that cannabis affects everyone differently and should be used responsibly.

The carb cap is used to cover the banger and keep the vapor from excaping into the air.

or

Cannabis extract is applied separate piece of the rig called a nail or banger, as shown here.

The “dabber” or “scooper” is a simple metal tool used to apply the concentrate to the heated dab nail or banger.

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The nail or banger of the dab rig is heated until it is red hot. If you are not comfortable with a torch, there are electronic nails on the market that will heat to your precise specifications (580-600 degrees is ideal). The time required to heat the nail can vary depending on the material and thickness of your nail. The nail must be hot enough to vaporize the extract, but cool enough to be easy on your lungs. A good rule of thumb is a 1-3 ratio. For example if you heat your nail for 15 seconds, cool it for 45 seconds, etc. Be patient, there’s no rush!

Once the heated nail or banger has cooled for the appropriate time, a small amount of extract is applied. Start with a tiny crumb -sized amount*, even if you’re a seasoned cannabis smoker. Each product is different, and all will affect you differently. Inhale slowly through the mouthpiece of the rig, while applying the extract to the nail or banger. Cover the banger with the carb cap to preserve the vaporized extract, and enjoy! It’s a good idea to wait for a half hour or so to observe the effects of the extract before using more. Good quality extracts will taste pleasant & invigorating and will be quite potent in small amounts.

*Look for an extract with a golden color and pleasant smell. Always source from a reputable company and ask your favorite dispensary about their recommendations.

FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED SINCE 2010 NOW OPEN FOR MEDICAL AND REC

HUMBOLDT’S FINEST -THE HYPE IS REAL

*FUN FACT!* OUR JARS MAKE GREAT CARB CAPS! 1670 Myrtle Ave, Eureka M-F 10-6 WEEKENDS 11-5

hfraw.com 707.798.6069 @humbodtsfinestrawanduncut

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, June 14, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

29


SUPER

HAPPY HOUR FRIDAY 4pm

3

$

WELL DRINKS, PINTS, HOUSE WINE

3 OFF SPECIALTY

$

COCKTAILS

5 COSMOPOLITANS,

$

MOSCOW MULES, MARGARITAS

LATE NIGHT HAPPY HOUR Sun-Thurs 9-11pm • Fri & Sat 10-12pm EARLY BIRD HAPPY HOUR Sun-Thurs 5-6pm Bar Specials • Small Plates $5

OPEN SUN-THURS 5-9:30 FRI & SAT 5-10 707.826.0860

Live Entertainment Grid

Music & More VENUE ARCATA PLAYHOUSE 1251 Ninth St. 822-1575

THUR 6/14 Lost Coast Sessions: Object Heavy 8-9pm Free

ARCATA THEATRE LOUNGE 1036 G St. 822-3731 BLONDIES FOOD AND DRINK Legendary Open Mic 420 E. California Ave., Arcata 7pm Free 822-3453 BLUE LAKE CASINO WAVE LOUNGE Throwback Karaoke Contest 777 Casino Way, 668-9770 8pm Free CENTRAL STATION SPORTS BAR 1631 Central Ave., McKinleyville, 839-2013 CHER-AE HEIGHTS CASINO FIREWATER LOUNGE 677-3611 27 Scenic Drive, Trinidad CLAM BEACH TAVERN 839-0545 Legends of the Mind 4611 Central Ave., McKinleyville (blues, jazz) 6pm Free THE FORKS 38998 State Route 299, Willow Creek 530-629-2679 THE GRIFFIN 937 10th St., Arcata 825-1755 HUMBOLDT BREWS 856 10th St., Arcata 826-2739 THE JAM 915 H St., Arcata 822-4766

ARCATA & NORTH FRI 6/15

SAT 6/16

SUN 6/17

M-T-W 6/18-20

McKinleyville Community Choir Spring Concert 3pm Donation

Lost Coast Sessions: Paula Jones Band

[W] Sci-Fi Night: R.O.T.O.R. (1988) DJ Holden (hip-hop) 8pm Free

Jazz Night 6pm Free

Jessie Leigh (country rock) 9pm Free

Miracle Show (Grateful Dead) 9pm Free

Karaoke w/Rock Star 9pm Free

The Undercovers (covers) 9pm Free

Money (Pink Floyd tribute) 9pm Free

Blue Rhythm Revue (R&B, funk) 9pm Free

Karaoke w/KJ Leonard 8pm Free [M] 8-Ball Tournament [W] Karaoke w/Rock Star 9pm Free Karaoke w/DJ Marv 8pm Free Anna Hamilton (blues) 6pm Free

[W] Pool Tournament & Game Night 7pm Free

The Movers and The Shakers (rock, blues, funk) 8pm Free DJ Rickshaw and The Bustop (DJ music) 10pm Free Keznamdi Winstrong, Benji One Wise Sounds (reggae) 9:30pm $22, $20 Lounge Act: A Tribute to Nirvana 9:30pm TBA

[W] Salsa Dancing with DJ Pachanguero 8:30pm Free Soul Party #13 9pm $5 Rosewater Oyster Fest After Party Early Show 6-8pm All ages, Free Late Show 9:30pm 21+ $10

[T] Sophistafunk (hip-hop, funk) 9pm $10 Deep Groove Society 9pm $5

[M] The Hip Connection10pm [T] Dancehall at the Jam 10pm TBA [W] Whomp Whomp 10pm $5

THE ORIGINAL • SINCE 2002

Open Tues.-Sun. 8am - 2am

JUNE SALE $

10 OFF

The Only Alibi You’ll Ever Need!

BOARDSHORTS

$

5 OFF

BEACH TOWELS SUNGLASSES (707) 822-3090 987 H ST, Arcata

(707) 476-0400 Bayshore Mall

www.humboldtclothing.com

30 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 14, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

744 9th St. on the Arcata Plaza 822-3731 www.thealibi.com


Arcata • Blue Lake •McKinleyville • Trinidad • Willow Creek VENUE

THUR 6/14

LARRUPIN 677-0230 1658 Patricks Point Dr., Trinidad LOGGER BAR 668-5000 510 Railroad Ave., Blue Lake MAD RIVER BREWING CO. 101 Taylor Way, Blue Lake 668-4151

FRI 6/15

Eureka and South on next page

SAT 6/16

SUN 6/17

M-T-W 6/18-20

Blue Lotus Jazz 6pm Free

[W] Aber Miller (jazz) 6pm Free

Trivia Night 8pm Free

Kindred Spirits (bluegrass) 9pm Free

The Lost Dogs (blues, R&B) 8:30pm Free

Fred & Jr. (swing jazz) 6pm Free

Cadillac Ranch (country rock) 6pm Free

Live Music TBA 6pm Free

THE MINIPLEX 401 I St., Arcata 630-5000

[T] Dogbone (feral jazz) 6pm Free [W] Pints for Non-Profits: Humboldt Homebrewers, music w/ Frogbite 6pm Free Goat Karaoke 9pm Free

NORTHTOWN COFFEE 1603 G St., Arcata 633-6187

[T] Sonido Pachanguero (salsa/cumbia) 9pm Free

Open Mic 7pm Free

[T] Spoken Word Open Mic 6pm Free

OCEAN GROVE COCKTAIL LOUNGE 480 Patrick’s Point Drive., Trinidad 677-3543 REDWOOD CURTAIN BREWERY 550 South G St., Arcata 826-7224

[M] Rudelion DanceHall Mondayz 8pm $5 Dogbone (feral jazz) 8pm Free

THE SANCTUARY 1301 J St., Arcata 822-0898 SIDELINES 732 Ninth St., Arcata 822-0919 SIX RIVERS BREWERY 839-7580 1300 Central Ave., McKinleyville

Left on Tenth 8pm Free Ben Rosenblum Trio (jazz trio) 7pm $10

DJ Music 10pm

DJ Music 10pm TBA

Summer at the Sanctuary 4-10pm Donations welcome DJ Tim Stubbs 10pm TBA

After Work Sessions with DJ D’Vinity 4-7pm Free

Trivia Night 8pm

SUSHI SPOT MCKINLEYVILLE 1552 City Center Road 839-1222 TOBY & JACKS 764 Ninth St., Arcata 822-4198 WRANGLETOWN CIDER CO. 1350 Ninth St., Arcata 508-5175

[M] Bingo 7pm

[M] Karaoke w/DJ Marv 8:30pm [M] Anemones of the State (jazz) 5-8pm Free

DJ Music 10pm Free

[W] Reggae w/Iron Fyah 10pm Free

Stephenson Jazz Ensemble 6-8pm Free admission

Vote for Us…

BEST OPTOMETRY O FF I C E Full Service Optometry & Frame Gallery Monday-Saturday • atozeyecare.com 707.822.7641 northcoastjournal.com/BOH18

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, June 14, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

31


brunch with us

Bellinis and Mimosas $3 Saturday & Sunday 11 - 2:30

Live Entertainment Grid

EUREKA & SOUTH

Music & More VENUE

Arcata and North on previous page

Eureka • Fernbridge • Ferndale • Fortuna • Garberville • Loleta • Redway

THUR 6/14

FRI 6/15

BEAR RIVER CASINO RESORT 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta 733-9644

Karaoke Night 9pm Free

Joey Leone’s Chop Shop (classic rock, blues) 9pm Free

BRASS RAIL BAR & GRILL 3188 Redwood Drive, Redway 923-3188

Pool Tourney 8pm

EUREKA INN PALM LOUNGE 518 Seventh St., 497-6093

Golden Stellar Haze (R&B, jazz) 7-9pm Free

GALLAGHER’S IRISH PUB 139 Second St., Eureka 442-1177

The Gatehouse Well (Irish/Celtic) 6pm Free

HUMBOLDT CIDER CO. TAP ROOM 517 F St, Eureka 517 F St

White Deer (bluegrass, Americana) 6pm Free

LIL’ RED LION 1506 Fifth St., Eureka 444-1344 MADAKET PLAZA Foot of C Street, Eureka OLD TOWN COFFEE & CHOC. 211 F St., Eureka 445-8600

SAT 6/16

SUN 6/17

The Roadmasters (country) 9pm Free

[T] Karaoke 9pm [W] Open Mic/Jam Session 7pm Free Silver Hawk Dragon 9pm Free

Kids Play, The Sometimes Island 8pm Free Summer Concert Series w/Cleen Sweep (R&B, blues) 6pm Free Open Mic w/Mike Anderson 6:30pm Free

PACIFIC BAR & GRILL, THE RED LION INN 1929 Fourth St., Eureka 445-0844

[W] Karaoke w/DJ Marv 6-9pm All ages

PEARL LOUNGE Reggae Thursdays w/DJ D’Vinity, 507 Second St., Eureka 444-2017 Selecta Arms 9:30pm Free 301 L St. Eureka 707.444.8062 carterhouse.com

PHATSY KLINE’S PARLOR LOUNGE 139 Second St., Eureka 444-3344

15% Off

15% Off

15% Off

20% Off

Steaks & Seafood

Pizzas & Calzones

DJ D’Vinity (hip-hop, top 40) 10pm Free [T] Phat Tuesdays (live music) 7pm Free [W] Live Jazz 7pm Free

Laidback Lounge (DJ music) 6-11pm

$

5 off deliveries only

Select Your Savings!

Selecta Arms (hip-hop, reggae hits) 10pm Free

with $30 purchase or more with this coupon VALID THROUGH 06/30/18.

Daily Specials

Lunches M-Sat 11-3

limit one item per person, per day

American food, bar and games

RESTAURANT 301 & CARTER HOUSE INNS

M-T-W 6/18-20 [W] Western Wednesday LSJ Line Dancing 7pm Free, Lonestar Junction 8pm Free

DELIVERIES UP TO 11PM FROM FERNDALE TO SCOTIA

Open Every Day For Lunch & Dinner 773 8th St. Arcata & 305 F St. Eureka

32 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 14, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

MON-FRI 4-11PM SAT-SUN 12PM-11PM 1875 RIVERWALK DR. FORTUNA 707.725.1600

623 Fernbridge Dr., Fortuna • 707-786-3900 exit 691 from 101 South, exit 692 from 101 North Weekdays 8am-2pm, Weekends 7am-2pm Closed Tuesdays


NEW UNDER

THUR 6/14

THE SIREN’S SONG TAVERN 325 Second St., Eureka 442-8778

FRI 6/15

SAT 6/16

SUN 6/17

The

M-T-W 6/18-20

Isenordal, Void Omnia, Time Out Timmy (punk rock) Addaura, Presents Goth Night A Whisper Wakes the Signals 8pm $5 Hell House 8pm Free Wolves 7:30pm $5-$10 siding

THE SPEAKEASY 411 Opera Alley, Eureka 444-2244 STONE JUNCTION BAR 744 Redway Dr., Garberville 923-2562

RSHIP!

Perfect 10

The Gatehouse Well plays Gallagher’s Irish Pub on Thursday, June 14 at 6 p.m. (free).

VENUE

OWNE

[T] The Opera Alley Cats (jazz) 7:30pm Free [M] Pool Tournament 8:30pm $10 buy-in [W] The Bridge City Sinners (Gypsy jazz) w/ Dead Bird Son 7pm $5

Upstate Thursdays 9pm Free

TIP TOP CLUB 443-5696 6269 Loma Ave., Eureka

Friday Night Function (DJ music) 9pm Free before 10pm

VICTORIAN INN RESTAURANT 400 Ocean Ave., Ferndale 786-4950 VISTA DEL MAR 91 Commercial St., Eureka 443-3770

Sexy Saturdays w/Masta Shredda 9pm TBA

Jeffrey Smoller (solo guitar) 6pm Free [T] Tuesday Blues w/Humboldt’s veteran blues artists on rotation 7pm Free [W] Karaoke Nights 9pm Free

Hollow Down, Dead Drift, CV (rock, punk) 7:30pm Free

it’scrazy crazy it’s good! good!

ALWAYS 100% LOCAL GRASSFED BEEF

445 5th St, Eureka • 707-268-1295

@surfsideburgershack Celebrating 30 Years!

20% OFF

The

Sea Grill

our TEPPANYAKI menu

Always Sourcing The Freshest Sustainable Seafood Full Bar

lunch time special only every day from 11 am - 3 pm reservations recommended

one f street, eureka ca  • 707.443.7489

Private dining room seats up to 50 for your party or event!

A Caribbean Bistro

613 3rd St, Eureka (707) 798-6300 www.atasteofbim.org

316 E st • OLD TOWN EUREKA • 443-7187 D I N N E R : M O N D A Y- S A T U R D A Y 5 - 9 pm

Optimizing health while treating the underlying cause of illness Check out our shrimp additions!

Authentic mexican food 955 Main St., Fortuna | (707) 725-5546 Mon-Fri 10-9 sat 11-8 Closed Sun

$3 

off

$20 purchase or more

EXPIRES 6/30/18 NOT GOOD WITH ANY OTHER OFFERS. LIMITED TO ONE COUPON PER TRANSACTION.

North Coast Naturopathic Medicine 1727 Central Ave, McKinleyville, CA (707) 840-0556 www.ncnatmed.com

PROLOTHERAPY AND PLATELET RICH PLASMA: REGENERATIVE INJECTION THERAPIES SUPPORTING YOUR BODY’S ABILITY TO HEAL ITSELF. For chronic joint pain due to arthritis, old injuries, tendonitis of the shoulder, knee, wrist, neck, back & sacroiliac joint.

Dr. Deborah Anqersbach, ND.

Now Accepting New Patients!

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, June 14, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

33


COME & MAKE SOME MEMORIES

d o A o c w re s’ d e R mb

u H f o t s e B

old t Fair

California Carnival

Truck Pulls

Redwood Acres Fairgrounds 3750 Harris Street, Eureka • 707-445-3037 34  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 14, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

Livestock


Come Join Us! June 21st-24th

The Stingray Encounters

Steve, the Pretty Good Magician

Jr Livestock Shows

BMX

Nature Joe

Jest in Time

Mexican Rodeo

Come Enjoy: Carnival, Daily Demonstrations in the Garden, Truck Pulls, Mexican Rodeo, Boat Races, BMX, $3,000 giveaway from Living Styles, Quilts, Flowers, Livestock, Great food and much, much, more. ADMISSION $12 - Adults • $5 - Seniors & Kids (6-12) *Active Military & Kids Under 6 Free*

THURSDAY FREE! Thanks to Blue Lake Casino

FRIDAY

Sponsored by Shafer’s Ace Hardware

SATURDAY

Sponsored by Harper Motors

Pre-Sale Carnival Wristbands $25

SUNDAY

Sponsored by Pierson’s Lumber

For a complete schedule of events visit WWW.REDWOODACRES.COM or find us on Facebook northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, June 14, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

35


Calendar June 14 – 21, 2018

14 Thursday ART

Figure Drawing Group. 7-9 p.m. Cheri Blackerby Gallery, 272 C St., Eureka. Chip in for the live model and hone your artistic skills. Go into the courtyard on C Street to the room on the right. $5. 442-0309.

BOOKS Trinidad Library Book Buddies Club. Second Thursday of every month, 11 a.m.-noon. Trinidad Library, 380 Janis Court. This casual community gathering discusses books, shares recent reads and offers new suggestions of titles to read. No mandatory reading, just a love of books. Free. trihuml@co.humboldt.ca.us. 677-0227.

DANCE Submitted

Submitted

Hot summer nights are in full stomp with an evening of Flamenco dance, courtesy of Seattle-based dancer Savannah Fuentes and her latest show Feria, an Evening of Flamenco at Bayside Community Hall on Saturday, June 16 at 8 p.m. ($34 VIP reserved, $20, $15 student, $7 kids). Fuentes is joined by acclaimed Spanish-Romani guitarist Pedro Cortes and singer/percussionist Jose Moreno.

The Trinidad Fish Festival makes its splash on Father’s Day, Sunday June 17 from 11 a.m.-5 p.m. in downtown Trinidad (free admission). The 61st annual festival serves up local craft beer, fish and chips and grilled salmon plus food and arts and crafts from scores of vendors, live music all day and an “ultimate Kid’s Zone” in Trinidad Town Hall.

Photo by Lynn Harrington

On the turf end of this week’s surf and turf festival spectrum, there’s Rodeo in the Redwoods, June 15-17 at Southern Humboldt Community Park ($10, $8 seniors, $5 kids under 12, free for kids under 6). Round up the family for barrel racing, Bull-O-Rama and rodeo action, plus a parade through town, steak barbecue, live music and a dance on Saturday night.

Redwood Fusion Partner Dance. 7-10 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. Contemporary partner dance with an improvised, lead-follow approach. A 7 p.m. lesson, 8 p.m. dancing. $5, first time free. www.redwoodraks.com.

MUSIC Summer Concert Series. 6 p.m. Madaket Plaza, Foot of C Street, Eureka. Open-air music each week on Eureka’s waterfront. Presented by Eureka Main Street. This week enjoy rhythm and blues and funk with Clean Sweep. Free. www.eurekamainstreet.org.

THEATER Hedwig & the Angry Inch. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. Glam-rock muscial tale of a genderqueer East German rock-and-roll singer. Recommended for mature audiences only. $16 - $18. Ruzzante Comes Home From The War. 8 p.m. Dell’Arte Amphitheatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. The Dell’Arte Company presents a humorous Commedia dell’Arte performance about coming home from war. $18, $15 senior/student; $12 kids. info@dellarte.com. dellarte. com/shows-and-events/2017-2018-season/. 668-5663.

EVENTS File

Photo by Tushar Matthew

True Oyster Cult

We’re All Mad Here

The summer festival scene in Humboldt doesn’t mess around. From bustling farmers markets to music and food extravaganzas, weekends June through August have a ton to offer. This weekend thousands of locals and out-of-towners flood the plaza for the Arcata Bay Oyster Festival. On Saturday, June 16, follow your nose to the Arcata Plaza for the 28th annual shellfish fest from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. to sample the savory and sweet offerings of oysters from dozens of area chefs and vendors. Barbecued, raw, stewed and skewered, drizzled in garlic-jalapeño aioli and honey sriracha or topped with honeydew melon and cucumber gazpacho and golden trout caviar. You name it, you’ll find it and more. About 70 percent of California’s oysters are sustainably grown in Humboldt Bay and this all-day party joyfully celebrates the shellfish so embedded in our community, waters, hearts and bellies. Enjoy live music on stages surrounding the plaza, the crowd-pleasing (if somewhat gross) Shuck & Swallow Contest, a vibrant Art Market, the Flupsy Family Fun Zone, a silent disco, Arcata Playhouse/Playhouse Arts street performances, the Mermaid Lounge with performances by Va Va Voom Burlesque, Ya Habibi Dance Co., Spectrum Drag Cabaret and more. Wear sunscreen, hydrate, designate a driver and come hungry. And if oysters aren’t your thing, shucks, there’s a plethora of other tasty food vendors on site.

Dell’Arte International’s sprawling Mad River Festival spans over four weeks with original theatrical work by the Dell’Arte Company, robust family fun and larger-than-life performances, plus a week-long folklife festival with foot-tapping tunes from some pretty tight musicians. Now in its 28th year, the festival runs June 14-July 15 and offers audiences groundbreaking experimental theater, shadow plays, an adult cabaret, stories in the tent and more. Also this year, the festival sprawls even further, taking some acts out of Blue Lake and on the road with performances at Synapsis Nova in Eureka and at the Arcata Playhouse. This year’s mainstage show is Ruzzante Comes Home From The War, a Commedia dell’Arte performance about soldiers from a rural place returning from battle, directed by Producing Artistic Director Michael Fields. Ruzzante premieres June 14 at Dell’Arte’s Carlo Theatre, with Dell’Arte offering 50 percent off ticket orders to military personnel, veterans and their immediate families. The festival features the DAI Family Series, MAD LABS, DAI Presents Series, the MRF Offsite Series, 2018 Prize of Hope presentation and dinner, Red Light in Blue Lake adult cabaret, Eli and the Bear, and the Humboldt Folklife Festival strumming along from July 7-14, culminating in a free all-day folk music show. Festival venues include Dell’Arte’s Carlo Theatre (indoors), Dell’Arte’s Rooney Amphitheatre (outdoors) and the Pierson Big Hammer Circus Tent. For a complete line-up/ticket information see the special MRF insert in the May 31 issue of the Journal or visit www.dellarte.com.

— Kali Cozyris

36 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 14, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

— Kali Cozyris

The Mad River Festival. Dell’Arte, 131 H St., Blue Lake. The Dell’Arte Company presents the 28th annual festival featuring original company work, a family big-top series, an experimental theatrical laboratory, a late-night cabaret, a week of local music with the Humboldt Folklife Festival and more. Through July 14. www.dellarte.com.

FOR KIDS Trinidad Library Toddler Storytime. 10-11 a.m. Trinidad Library, 380 Janis Court. Stories with the little ones. Free. trihuml@co.humboldt.ca.us. 677-0227. Young Discoverers. 10:30 a.m.-noon. Redwood Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. A unique drop-off program for children ages 3-5. Stories, music, crafts, yoga and snacks. $8, $6 members. redwooddiscoverymuseum@gmail.com. www.discovery-museum.org. 443-9694.

FOOD Henderson Center Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Henderson Center, Henderson near F Street, Eureka. Fresh local produce, straight from the farmer. Live music every week. www.humfarm.org. 441-9999. McKinleyville Farmers Market. 3:30-6:30 p.m. Eureka Natural Foods, McKinleyville, 2165 Central Ave. Local, GMO-free produce. Live music. Free. info@humfarm. org. www.humfarm.org. 441-9999. Willow Creek Farmers Market. 5-8 p.m. Community


Humboldt Crabs Baseball 2018 Season

JUNE SCHEDULE Crabs Ballpark, 9th & F Arcata www.humboldtcrabs.com Commons, state routes 299 and 96, Willow Creek. Fresh local produce, straight from the farmer.

MEETINGS Conservation Meeting. Second Thursday of every month, 12-1:30 p.m. Rita’s Margaritas & Mexican Grill, 1111 Fifth St., Eureka. Discuss conservation issues of interest to the Redwood Region Audubon Society. Free. www. rras.org/calendar.html. 445-8311. Humboldt Grange 501. Second Thursday of every month, 6:30-8 p.m. Humboldt Grange Hall, 5845 Humboldt Hill Road, Eureka. Regular monthly meeting. nanettespearschade@gmail.com. www.facebook.com/ humboldt.grange. 443-0045.

The Fight for Clean Water, Wetlands and Wildlife. info@ northtownbooks.com. www.northtownbooks.com/ event/sharon-levy-marsh-builders. 822-2834.

DANCE Baile Terapia. 7-8 p.m. The MGC, 2280 Newburg Road, Fortuna. Paso a Paso hosts dance therapy. Free. www. ervmgc.com. 725-3300.

MUSIC Ben Rosenblum Trio. 7-9:30 p.m. The Sanctuary, 1301 J St., Arcata. New York-based jazz pianist Ben Rosenblum will be accompanied by bassist Kanoa Mendenhall and drummer Ben Zweig. $10. 822-0898.

SPORTS

Blues Through The Years. 7-10 p.m. Westhaven Center for the Arts, 501 S. Westhaven Drive. Bill Moenhke, Dale Cash, Ron Perry and Jim Lahman perform an acoustic blues show in chronological order with historical information on the songs. Sliding scale. lahmantone5@ gmail.com. 499-9031.

Humboldt B-52s Baseball. 6 p.m. Bomber Field, Redwood Acres, Eureka. The semi-professional, wood-bat summer ball team swings away. Season is June through August. Humboldt B-52s vs. Healdsburg Prune Packers June 14-15, Team Australia June 19-20 $5, $3 seniors/kids 5-12, free for kids 4 and under. www.humboldtb52sbaseball.com.

Lost Coast Sessions: Paula Jones Band. 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. KEET and KHSU present Lost Coast Sessions, celebrating Humboldt’s music and spoken word. TV recording. Please arrive no later than 7:45 pm. Beer and wine available. Free. mikedronkers@khsu. org. khsu.org/post/lost-coast-sessions-free-concertstv-cameras-arcata. 599-6568.

Humboldt Crabs Baseball. 7:15 p.m. Arcata Ball Park, Ninth and F streets. The oldest continuously operated summer collegiate baseball program takes the plate. Games through Aug. 5. Humboldt Crabs vs. Valley Bears June 8-10, Redding Colt 45s June 13-14. $9, $6 students and seniors, $4 kids 12 and under. www.humboldtcrabs. com.

THEATER

Toastmasters. Second Thursday of every month, noon. Redwood Sciences Laboratory, 1700 Bayview St., Arcata. Give and receive feedback and learn to speak with confidence. Second and fourth Thursdays. Visitors welcome.

NBA Finals 2018. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Doors TBD. Teams/game time TBD. All ages. Free w/ $5 min. food or beverage purchase. www.arcatatheatre. com.

ETC Community Board Game Night. Second Thursday of every month, 7-9 p.m. Bayside Community Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. Play your favorite games or learn new ones with North Coast Role Playing. Free. oss1ncrp@ northcoast.com. www.baysidegrange.org. 444-2288. Humboldt Cribbage Club. 6:15 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Play cards. 444-3161. Standard Magic Tournament. 6-10 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Put your deck to the test. $5. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline. com. 497-6358.

15 Friday ART

A Call to Yarns. 12-1 p.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh St. Knit. Chat. Relax. Free. sparsons@co.humboldt. ca.us. www.facebook.com/events/213407052804090/. 822-5954. Community Art Night. Third Friday of every month. The MGC, 2280 Newburg Road, Fortuna. Family friendly, all ages welcome. All supplies are provided. Free. www. ervmgc.com.

BOOKS Sharon Levy. 7-9 p.m. Northtown Books, 957 H St., Arcata. The author talks about her book The Marsh Builders:

SUN MON TUE WED Kids run the bases every Sunday after the game Check the website for promotions and special events 3 Corvallis Knights 12:30pm

10 Valley Bears 7pm

4

5 Seals Baseball 7pm

11

12

12:30pm

1pm

13 at Redding Colt 45s

7:15pm

17 Seattle Studs 18 24 at San Luis Obispo Blues

6 Seals Baseball 7pm

25

THU May 31 Crabs Fan Fest 5pm 7 14 at Redding Colt 45s

7:15pm

19 at Healdsburg 20 at Healdsburg 21 Prune Packers Prune Packers 6pm

6pm

26 Humboldt B52s 7pm

27 Humboldt B52s 7pm

Check the website for promotions and special events

28

FRI

SAT

June 1 Corvallis 2 Corvallis Knights 7pm Knights 7pm 8 Valley Bears 7pm

9 Valley Bears 7pm

7pm

2:30pm

22 at San Luis Obispo Blues

23 at San Luis Obispo Blues

29 California Expos 7pm

30 California Expos 7pm

15 Seattle Studs 16 Seattle Studs

6pm

= Appearance by the World Famous Crab Grass Band

4pm

= Road Game

Fieldbrook Winery

Open Sundays for wine tasting noon-5pm • 4241 Fieldbrook Rd. 5 miles east of McKinleyville on the Murray Road exit

Hedwig & the Angry Inch. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. See June 14 listing. Ruzzante Comes Home From The War. 8 p.m. Dell’Arte Amphitheatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. See June 14 listing.

EVENTS Friday Night Market. 5 p.m. Clarke Plaza, Old Town, Eureka. A night farmer’s market with live music, farmers, local artists, beer/wine/distillery features and more. Rodeo in the Redwoods. Southern Humboldt Community Park. Barrel racing, Bull-O-Rama, junior rodeo, parade, greased pigs, animal scramble and crowning the king and queen are all part of this fun weekend. Surfrider Summer Party & Paddle. 6-10 p.m. Humboldt Bay Social Club, 900 New Navy Base Road, Samoa. Spend International Surfing Day with live music, games, a barbecue potluck and an optional group paddle at 5 p.m. from Woodley Island to Oyster Beach. BYO gear or RSVP via email/facebook to borrow a kayak or SUP. Free. Humboldt@surfrider.org. www.humboldtbaysocialclub.com.

FOR KIDS Family Storytime. 10:30-11 a.m. Fortuna Library, 753 14th St. A rotating group of storytellers entertain children ages 2-6 and parents at Fortuna Library. Free. www. humlib.org. 725-3460. Redwood Empire BMX - BMX Practice/Racing. 5-6 p.m. Redwood Empire BMX, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. Learn good sportsmanship and safety for kids of all ages. Friday and Sunday practices followed by racing. $2 practice, $5 ribbon race, $8 medal race, $11 trophy race. redwoodempirebmx1992@gmail.com. 845-0094.

FOOD Southern Humboldt Farmers’ Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Garberville Town Square, Church Street. Local produce, pasture-raised meats, baked goods, plant starts, crafts and more. Live music and food vendors. sohumfm@ yahoo.com. 559-246-2246. Continued on next page »

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Calendar Continued from previous page

No power... No problem!

SPORTS Eureka Chamber Golf Classic. 9 a.m. Baywood Golf & Country Club, 3600 Buttermilk Lane, Arcata. For more info, call 442-3738. www.baywoodgcc.com. Humboldt B-52s Baseball. 6 p.m. Bomber Field, Redwood Acres, Eureka. See June 14 listing. Humboldt Crabs Baseball. 7 p.m. Arcata Ball Park, Ninth and F streets. See June 14 listing.

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ETC Drop-in Volunteering. 1-6 p.m. SCRAP Humboldt, 101 H St., Suite D, Arcata. Lend your hand organizing and helping the environment at the creative reuse nonprofit. Free. volunteer@SCRAPhumboldt.org. www.scraphumboldt.org. 822-2452. Solidarity Fridays. 5-6 p.m. County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka. Join Veterans for Peace and the North Coast People’s Alliance for a peaceful protest on the courthouse lawn. www.northcoastpeoplesalliance.org.

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16 Saturday DANCE

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Dancing in the Great Outdoors. 6-8 p.m. Arkley Center for the Performing Arts, 412 G St., Eureka. Colorful show featuring award-winning tap, jazz, ballet and hip-hop dancers. $12.50-$19. nolimitstapandjazz@yahoo.com. www.nolimitsdanceacademy.com/june-recital.html. 825-0922. Feria, an Evening of Flamenco. 8-9:30 p.m. Bayside Community Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. Seattle-based dancer Savannah Fuentes performs with guitarist Pedro Cortes and singer/percussionist Jose Moreno. $34 VIP reserved, $20 general, $15 student, $7 child. savannah3017@ gmail.com. www.savannahf.com. 206-409-2161.

MOVIES The Bleeding Edge. 6-8 p.m. Freshwater Community Guild, 49 Grange Road, Eureka. Netflix documentary about the medical device industry. Medical, anatomical and some graphic language. Parental discretion advised. Panel discussion follows. Free.

MUSIC Fun with Music Storytime. 11-11:30 a.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh St. Children ages 9 months to 6 years and their caregivers play instruments, sing, dance, and read with Ms. Sue. Sponsored by First Five Humboldt and Friends of the Arcata Library. Free. sparsons@co.humboldt.ca.us. 822-5954. Song Circle with Maggie McKnight. 3-3:30 p.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh St. Go places through song with Maggie and Humboldt SINGS! All ages welcome. Pick up a summer reading log. Completed logs can be submitted for a prize after July 4. Free. sparsons@co.humboldt. ca.us. 822-5954.

THEATER Hedwig & the Angry Inch. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. See June 14 listing. Ruzzante Comes Home From The War. 8 p.m. Dell’Arte Amphitheatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. See June 14 listing.

EVENTS Arcata Bay Oyster Festival. 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Live music all day, shucking contests, kids’ activities and a bevy of local chefs selling

38 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 14, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

their oyster creations and vying for the coveted Best Oyster title at this 28th annual event. Rodeo in the Redwoods. Southern Humboldt Community Park. See June 15 listing.

FOR KIDS Meet the Guide Dog Puppies. 2-3 p.m. Fortuna Library, 753 14th St. Learn about raising and training puppies to become guide dogs from Humboldt County Puppy Raisers and meet four young dogs. Kids may read stories to the dogs. Free. 725-3460. Nature Story Time. 2-3 p.m. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. Join naturalist Ashley Hansen for crafts, props and movement activities geared for ages 3-6. Free. ashley@friendsofthedunes. org. 444-1397. Storytime and Crafts. 11:30 a.m. Blue Lake Library, 111 Greenwood Ave. Storytime followed by crafts at noon. Now with a Spanish and English Storytime every 1st and 3rd Saturday. Free. blkhuml@co.Humboldt.ca.us. 668-4207. Young Inventors’ Club. Third Saturday of every month, 10:30 a.m.-noon Redwood Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. Hands-on science program with one or more activities planned each month. Free with museum admission. redwooddiscoverymuseum@gmail.com. www. discovery-musuem.org. 443-9694.

FOOD Arcata Plaza Farmers Market. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Local produce, plants, food vendors and live music. CalFresh EBT cards welcome at all NCGA markets, Market Match available. Breakfast and Flea Market. Third Saturday of every month, 8:30 a.m. Dow’s Prairie Grange Hall, 3995 Dow’s Prairie Road, McKinleyville. Enjoy pancakes, eggs and browsing knick-knacks. Flea market ends at 3 p.m. $5, $3 for kids, First responders eat free. dowsgrange@gmail. com. www.dowsprairiegrange.org. 840-0100.

GARDEN Dune Ecosystem Restoration. 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. Help remove invasive plants to make room for native plant diversity. Tools, gloves and snacks provided. Please bring water and wear work clothes. Free. jess@ friendsofthedunes.org. 444-1397. Regenerative Cannabis Farm Tour. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Beginnings Lower Parking Lot, 5 Cemetery Road, Redway. Daniel and Taylor Stein of Briceland Forest Farms take you on a tour of their integrated cannabis and vegetable farm. Bring lunch and water. For more information, visit www.sanctuaryforest.org. Free. anna@sanctuaryforest. org. sanctuaryforest.org/event/regenerative-cannabis-farm-tour/. 986-1087.

MEETINGS Photoshop User Group. Third Saturday of every month, 10 a.m.-noon. Prosperity Center, 520 E St., Eureka. Adobe Photoshop or LightRoom beginners and power users gather to swap ideas and techniques. Informal lunch usually follows. Free. wrishel@gmail.com. www. eurekaphotoshop.com. 510-410-3310. Understanding Dementia Behavior: Managing Communication and Behavioral Challenges. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Healy Senior Center, 456 Briceland, Redway. Learn strategies for communication with a person with dementia and more. $20 (scholarships available for family caregivers). mxm@redwoodcrc.org. www.redwoodcrc. org. 542-0282 x100.


Arcata Marsh Tour. 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 569 S. G St. Meet a trained guide for a 90-minute walk focusing on the ecology of the marsh. With leader Leslie Scopes Anderson. Free. 826-2359. Audubon Society Arcata Marsh Bird Walk. 8:30-11 a.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary, South I Street. Bring your binoculars and meet in the parking lot at the end of South I Street (Klopp Lake) in Arcata, rain or shine. Walk leader is Christine Keil. Free. www.rras. org/calendar. Humboldt Pet Supply’s Monthly Marsh Cleanup. 9:30-11 a.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary, South I Street. Enjoy coffee and donuts before helping clean dog waste. Cleanup materials provided. Meet at the South G St. parking lot near the Interpretive Center. Pet food raffle. Free. humboldtpet@gmail.com. 633-6216. Sanctuary Forest Hike. Sanctuary Forest Office, 315 Shelter Cove Road, Whitethorn. Locations throughout Southern Humboldt. Call 986-1087 or visit www.sanctuaryforest.org for more information about hike focus/ location/time. Free. www.sanctuaryforest.org.

SPORTS Humboldt Crabs Baseball. 2:30 p.m. Arcata Ball Park, Ninth and F streets. See June 14 listing.

ETC Tailgate Sale. 8 a.m.-noon. United Methodist Church of the Joyful Healer, 1944 Central Ave., McKinleyville. Fundraiser for the Church of the Joyful Healer where people can “rent” a space and sell their wares. Free to attend, $10/space to sell. umc.joyfulhealer@gmail.com. www.umc-joyfulhealer.org. 839-5691. Women’s Peace Vigil. 12-1 p.m. County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka. Dress in warm clothing and bring your own chair. No perfume, please. Free. 269-7044. Yu-Gi-Oh! Standard League. 1-4 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Bring your decks and claim your prizes. $5. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline.com. 497-6358.

17 Sunday

Summer at the Sanctuary. 4-10 p.m. The Sanctuary, 1301 J St., Arcata. For this family friendly event, the building and yard will be in full display as a Creative Playground, with games, activities, live music, food and drinks. Plus silent auction and a gallery exhibition. Free, donations welcome. info@sanctuaryarcata.org. 822-0898. Summer Music Series. 1-3 p.m. Humboldt Botanical Garden, 7351 Tompkins Hill Road, Eureka. Bring your family, a picnic lunch and lounge on the lawn and take in the sounds of The Handshakers before touring the Garden or Butterfly House. $5-$8, Free for members. hbgf@hbgf.org. 499-3133. Wine and Jazz. Third Sunday of every month, 3-5 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Sip and listen. After every performance, audience members with instruments can jam with the band. Music by The Fatherlies. $5, $2 students/seniors, free to HAC members and children 17 and under. alex@humboldtarts.org. www. humboldtarts.org. 442-0278.

THEATER DAI FAMILY SERIES: Writing My Way Out Of Adolescence. 2 p.m. Dell’Arte Big Top Tent, 131 H St., Blue Lake. A “psychedelic solo show about growing up, going crazy, and living to tell about it,” written and performed by Jeff DeMark. $12, $10 senior/student. dellarte.com. 668-5663. Ruzzante Comes Home From The War. 8 p.m. Dell’Arte Amphitheatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. See June 14 listing.

EVENTS Father’s Day Pancake Breakfast. 8-11 a.m. Redcrest Community Center, 115 Sorenson Rd. Enjoy a drive through the redwoods, breakfast and gathering with family and friends. $6, $4 kids 12 and under. hallintheredwoods@FaceBook. Rodeo in the Redwoods. Southern Humboldt Community Park. See June 15 listing. Trinidad Fish Festival. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Downtown Trinidad. 61st annual Fish Festival on Father’s Day. Local craft beers, fish and chips, food vendors, live music and kids zone. Free. Trinidadfishfestival@gmail.com. trinidadcalif. com. 677-1610.

FOR KIDS

ART

Lego Club. 12:30-2 p.m. Redwood Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. Lego fun for younger and older kids featuring Duplos and more complex pieces. Free with museum admission. redwooddiscoverymuseum@gmail. com. www.discovery-museum.org. 443-9694.

Trinidad Artisans Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Saunder’s Plaza, 353 Main St. Next to Murphy’s Market. Featuring local art and crafts, live music and barbecue. Free admission.

Redwood Empire BMX - BMX Practice/Racing. 1-2:30 p.m. Redwood Empire BMX, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. See June 15 listing.

DANCE

FOOD

Dancing in the Great Outdoors. 2-4 p.m. Arkley Center for the Performing Arts, 412 G St., Eureka. See June 16 listing.

Food Not Bombs. 4 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Free, hot food for everyone. Mostly vegan and organic and always delicious. Free.

MUSIC

Pancake Breakfast. Third Sunday of every month, 8-11 a.m. Mattole Grange, 36512 Mattole Road, Petrolia. All the homemade pancakes you can eat, organic oatmeal, local fresh eggs and sausage, and more. $8, $3. evenson@ igc.org. 629-3421.

Bayside Grange Music Project. 5-9 p.m. Bayside Community Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. From 5-7 p.m. anyone playing any instrument with any ability is invited; 7-9 p.m. people with wind instruments for Bandemonium. Donations. gregg@relevantmusic.org. www.relevantmusic.org/Bayside. 499-8516. McKinleyville Community Choir Spring Concert. 3 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Assorted songs featuring the full choir, several ensembles, a number of solos and duets. Refreshments served. Donations accepted.

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SPORTS Humboldt Crabs Baseball. 12:30 p.m. Arcata Ball Park, Ninth and F streets. See June 14 listing. NBA Finals 2018. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. See June 14 listing. Continued on next page »

40

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per person

Open Sat. & Sun. 11-5 Call 707.498.3835 to book private parties humboldtpaintballcommunity.com 601 Vance Ave. Samoa, CA 95564

paintball in the humboldt nation

OUTDOORS

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Calendar

Elevated American

Continued from previous page

fare & craft cocktails

ETC — comida & cantina —

HOMEMADE MEXICAN FOOD

Nominated Best Mexican Restaurant 2018

Pokémon Trade and Play. 3-5 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Bring your cards to play or learn. Free. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline. com. 497-6358.

18 Monday MUSIC

Humboldt Harmonaires. 7-9:30 p.m. First Congregational United Church of Christ, 900 Hodgson St., Eureka. Sing four-part men’s a cappella barbershop harmony, no experience needed. All voice levels and ages welcome. Free. singfourpart@gmail.com. 445-3939. McKinleyville Community Choir Practice. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Grace Good Shepherd Church, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. All choral voices are welcome with a particular call for male voices. Opportunities for solos and ensemble groups. $50 registration fee w/scholarships available. 839-2276.

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One-Log Farmers Market. 1-5:30 p.m. One-Log House, 705 U.S. Highway 101, Garberville. On the lawn. 672-5224.

MEETINGS Volunteer Orientation. 2:30 p.m. Food for People, 307 W. 14th St., Eureka. Learn to pack and sort food, work with clients, collect donations and cook. panderson@ foodforpeople.org.

19 Tuesday DANCE

Let’s Dance. 7-9:30 p.m. Humboldt Grange Hall, 5845 Humboldt Hill Road, Eureka. Let’s dance to live music. Tonight dance to Jim Lahman Band. $5. www.facebook. com/humboldt.grange. 725-5323.

MUSIC

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Humstrum Ukulele Play and Sing Group. Third Tuesday of every month, 1:30 p.m. Humboldt Senior Resource Center, 1910 California St., Eureka. All skill levels. No experience necessary. Other instruments and singers welcome. All ages. $2 optional donation. lynne@ dalianes.com.

FOR KIDS Playgroup. 10-11:30 a.m. Redwood Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. Come to the museum for stories, crafts and snacks. Free for children age 0-5 and their caregivers. Free. redwooddiscoverymuseum@gmail.com. www. discovery-museum.org. 443-9694.

FOOD Fortuna Farmers Market. 3-6 p.m. Fortuna Main Street. Locally grown fruits, veggies and garden plants, plus arts and crafts. WIC and Cal Fresh accepted with $10 bonus match when using EBT card. Free. Miranda Farmers Market. 2-6 p.m. Miranda Market, 6685 Avenue of the Giants. Fresh produce, herbs and teas, eggs, plants and more. sohumfm@yahoo.com. 943-3025. Old Town Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Old Town, F Street between First and Third streets, Eureka. Purchase GMO-free produce, humanely raised meats, pastured

40 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 14, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

eggs, plant starts for your garden, flowers and more. Live music every week and CalFresh EBT cards accepted. Free. info@humfarm.org. www.humfarm.org. 441-9999. Shelter Cove Farmers Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Mario’s Marina Bar, 533 Machi Road, Shelter Cove. Fresh fruits and vegetables, flowers and premium plant starts. sohumfm@yahoo.com. 986-7229.

MEETINGS Soroptimist of McKinleyville monthly General Meeting. Third Tuesday of every month, 5:45 p.m. Luzmila’s, 1751 Central Ave., McKinleyville. A local volunteer organization working to improve the lives of women and girls. Free. aprilsousa13@gmail.com. www.facebook. com/208188105867679.

SPORTS Humboldt B-52s Baseball. 7:05 p.m. Bomber Field, Redwood Acres, Eureka. See June 14 listing.

ETC Bingo. 6 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Speed bingo, early and regular games. Doors open at 5 p.m. Games $1-$10. Board Game Night. 6-9 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Choose from a large variety of games or bring your own. All ages. Free. www.nugamesonline. com. 497-6358. Ferndale Cribbage. 10 a.m. Our Savior’s Lutheran Church, 425 Shaw Ave., Ferndale. Cards and pegs. Pokémon Trade and Play. 3-6 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. See June 17 listing.

20 Wednesday MOVIES

Sci-Fi Night: R.O.T.O.R. (1988). 6 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Malfunctioning crime-fighting robot runs amok. Free w/ $5 min. food or beverage purchase. www.arcatatheatre.com.

THEATER MAD LABS: The Beaverttes & YOU’RE IN DANGER!. 8 p.m. Dell’Arte Amphitheatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. A comic play featuring the boozy Beaver Sisters followed by the tale of a man defending his suburban neighborhood from an evil boy next door. Pay-What-You-Can. 668-5663.

FOR KIDS Storytime. 1 p.m. McKinleyville Library, 1606 Pickett Road. Liz Cappiello reads stories to children and their parents. Free.

FOOD Free Produce Market. Third Wednesday of every month, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Fortuna Community Services, 2331 Rohnerville Road. For income-eligible folks. Some markets have fruit and vegetable samples, cooking tips and demos, and assistance applying for CalFresh. Please bring your own reusable bags. Free. hmchugh@ foodforpeople.org. www.foodforpeople.org/programs/ free-produce-markets. 445-3166.

MEETINGS AfterWork Network Mixer. 5:30-7 p.m. Eureka Woman’s Club, 1531 J St. Stilson Snow speaks on entrepreneurship


Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

in Business with Heart: a Few Things They Don’t Teach You in Business School. Free. ewc@eurekawomansclub. org. www.eurekawomansclub.org/about-us/afterwork-network/. 442-3458.

and assistance applying for CalFresh at some markets. Bring reusable bags for produce. Free. hmchugh@ foodforpeople.org. www.foodforpeople.org/programs/ free-produce-markets. 445-3166.

Dow’s Prairie Grange. Third Wednesday of every month, 6 p.m. Dow’s Prairie Grange Hall, 3995 Dow’s Prairie Road, McKinleyville. Get involved in your community grange. dowsgrange@gmail.com. www.dowsprairiegrange.org. 840-0100.

Henderson Center Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Henderson Center, Henderson near F Street, Eureka. See June 14 listing.

SPORTS Humboldt B-52s Baseball. 7:05 p.m. Bomber Field, Redwood Acres, Eureka. See June 14 listing.

ETC Casual Magic. 4-9 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Bring your decks and connect with the local Magic community. Beginners welcome. Door prizes and drawings. $5. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www. nugamesonline.com. 497-6358.

21 Thursday ART

Figure Drawing Group. 7-9 p.m. Cheri Blackerby Gallery, 272 C St., Eureka. See June 14 listing. Witch Craft. 6-8 p.m. SCRAP Humboldt, 101 H St., Suite D, Arcata. Create new and intentional items for your spaces and for ritual. Tools and materials provided. $12. education@scraphumboldt.org. www.scraphumboldt. org. 822-2452.

DANCE Redwood Fusion Partner Dance. 7-10 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. See June 14 listing.

MOVIES Teen Movie and Book Club: The Outsiders. 4-6 p.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh St. Francis Ford Coppola’s 1983 film (PG13) is based on S.E. Hinton’s novel set in 1950s Oklahoma. Free. sparsons@co.humboldt.ca.us. 822-5954.

MUSIC Humboldt Ukulele Group. Third Thursday of every month, 5:30 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. A casual gathering of strummers. Beginners welcome. $3. dsander1@arcatanet. com. 839-2816.

McKinleyville Farmers Market. 3:30-6:30 p.m. Eureka Natural Foods, 2165 Central Ave., McKinleyville. See June 14 listing. Willow Creek Farmers Market. 5-8 p.m. Community Commons, state routes 299 and 96, Willow Creek. See June 14 listing.

OUTDOORS Summer Solstice Sunset Stroll. 7-9 p.m. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. Join a Friends of the Dunes naturalist for a sunset guided walk on the longest day of the year. Call or email to reserve a space. Free. info@friendsofthedunes.org. 444-1397.

SPORTS Humboldt Outlaw Karts. 5 p.m. Redwood Acres Racetrack, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. Pits open at 10 a.m. Racing. Free w/Fair admission. www.humboldtoutlawkarts.com.

ETC Humboldt Cribbage Club. 6:15 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. See June 14 listing. Standard Magic Tournament. 6-10 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. See June 14 listing.

Heads Up … Low-cost firewood vouchers available June 19 at 9 a.m. at the Humboldt Senior Resource Center. Households with an individual age 55 or older and living on a low to moderate income are eligible. Vouchers sold Tuesdays through Fridays from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. until all vouchers are sold. For more info, call 443-9747 ext. 1228 or ext. 1240. The Blue Lake Chamber of Commerce invites craft and food vendors to have a booth at the Annie and Mary Day celebration July 8. Application deadline July 3. Visit www. sunnybluelake.com or call 668-5567. Businesses, organizations and individuals are also invited to participate. The theme is LocalMotion. Visit website or call 667-6233.

EVENTS

The Humboldt Branch of Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom is seeking donations of paperback books in good condition for its annual Fourth of July Book Sale benefiting the Edilith Eckart Memorial Peace Scholarship. Call 822-5711.

Best of Humboldt Fair. Redwood Acres Fairgrounds, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. Local arts, crafts, food and more at an old-fashioned fair. www.redwoodacres.com.

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife Dove Banding Program seeks volunteers. More information at www.wildlife.ca.gov/Science-Institute.

Summer Concert Series. 6 p.m. Madaket Plaza, Foot of C Street, Eureka. See June 14 listing.

FOR KIDS Trinidad Library Toddler Storytime. 10-11 a.m. Trinidad Library, 380 Janis Court. See June 14 listing. Young Discoverers. 10:30 a.m.-noon. Redwood Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. See June 14 listing.

FOOD Free Produce Market. Third Thursday of every month, 12-2 p.m. Food for People, 307 W. 14th St., Eureka. For income-eligible folks . Samples, cooking tips and demos,

h c n Ra le to Tab

Humboldt Bay Fire seeks residents within the city of Eureka and the greater Eureka area to join the HBF Steering Committee. Letters of interest can be mailed, dropped off or emailed to Humboldt Bay Fire, Attn: Deputy Chief Bill Reynolds, 533 C St., Eureka, CA 95501, or wreynolds@hbfire.org. Call 441-4000. Tri County Independent Living seeks trail volunteers to visit trails to identify future accessibility signage needs. Call 445-8404 or email Charlie@tilinet.org.

We serve our own grass-fed beef. now accepting:

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623 Fernbridge Dr., Fortuna W-M, 7 am - 2 pm • 707-786-3900

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SEMIT E IVOM JCN

MOVIE TIMES.

TRAILERS. REVIEWS.

A Girl’s Best Friend Ocean’s 8 pulls it off, Hereditary and mommy issues By Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com

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42  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 14, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

Reviews

OCEAN’S 8. Steven Soderbergh’s Ocean’s 11 (2001), itself a remake of a Rat Pack vehicle, and a franchise that’s been uneven at best, isn’t old enough for an all-lady spin-off to provoke rending of clothing over ruined childhoods, which is a nice change. Director Gary Ross may not have Soderbergh’s pacing or the edits that make crossing a casino seem action-packed, but Ocean’s 8 assembles a remarkable cast with co-captains Cate Blanchett and Sandra Bullock, and delivers the clever cons, grudges, sleight of hand, glamour, low-key humor and camaraderie you came for. More could have been made of the varied talents of its stars but Ocean’s 8 adds dimension to the heist genre and is a damn good time. Following family tradition, Debbie Ocean (Bullock), sister of the late Danny, bullshits her way to parole after a five-year stint in prison, slinks back into her evening gown and sets out to pull off the job she’s been planning from her cell. With barely enough arm-twisting to wrinkle her blazer, Lou (Blanchett in aspirational Chrissy Hynde bangs), Debbie’s bestie in crime who’s been running a nightclub, partners up for the caper. From there the two assemble a team of familiar accomplices and new talent: Amita (Mindy Kaling), a jeweler looking to move out of her mom’s; washed up Betsy Johnson-esque designer Rose (Helena Bonham Carter); fence-turned-suburbanmom Tammy (Sarah Paulson); enviably chill hacker Nine Ball (Rihanna); and pickpocket Constance (Awkwafina). Debbie unveils her plan to nick a 6-pound diamond Cartier necklace from the neck of actress Daphne Kluger (a nutty Anne Hathaway) during the Met Gala and we’re off, with recon missions, blueprints and glitches, plus a little revenge subplot. This squad has goals. The pleasures of the heist movie are both in being in on the scam and not seeing how all the pieces fit until the end. We know they’ll pull it off but there’s fun in the clockwork, close calls and reveals. The genre has been almost exclusively male turf with a woman or two thrown in for motivation. As she and Lou list recruits, Debbie justifies her team of ladies: “A him

gets noticed, a her gets ignored. And for once, we’d like to be ignored.” Ross and co-writer Olivia Milch tap into the angles a female team offers, with much of the action taking place in spaces defined by women (or at least their images) but seldom run by them, including the Met. The large and small cons exploit Hollywood insecurities and male ego without falling into tired female character tropes. As much as the entertainment industry sets out to create fantasies for women (mostly in the form of Nicholas Sparks adaptations), this is the first major feature that speaks to — I can’t be alone here — the dream of putting on some amazing coats and stealing jewels at the world’s fanciest party with your sharp-ass girlfriends. Watching the team scheme and deploy their skills (and eat all over New York) is a vicarious pleasure, and the banter and Cheshire Cat grins between Blanchett and Bullock are the stuff of true pro-mance. PG13. 110M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK.

HEREDITARY. I am hoping against hope that giving Toni Collette an Oscar for her performance in this artful, disturbing movie will complete this curse and make my nightmares stop. Members of the Academy, help a girl out. The story opens with a bare bones obituary and a trippy transition from a dollhouse bedroom to the real thing, planting the echoing idea that the characters may not have much control over what happens to them. The dollhouse is the work of Annie (Toni Collette), an artist working in miniatures and processing the death of her formerly estranged mother, a woman she refers to in her tense eulogy as difficult and secretive. But Annie has her own isolating secrets, hiding her struggle and her visits to a support group from her husband Steve (Gabriel Byrne), who in turn shields her from the news that her mother’s grave has been dug up. Their son Peter (Alex Wolff) hides the usual high school stuff but their 13-year-old daughter Charlie (Milly Shapiro, taking a stock creepy kid character next level with startling vulnerability), who’s unable to connect with others, guards a strange inner life that bubbles


Workshops & Classes

Continued on next page »

List your class – just $4 per line per issue! Deadline: Friday, 5pm. Place your online ad at classified.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Arts & Crafts GLASS BLOWING − June 20th − Craft a Drinking Cup − June 27th Simple Vessel. 5:30pm − 7:30pm. Call CR Community Education at 707−476−4500.

Communication SPANISH Instruction/Tutoring Marcia 845−1910 (C−0712)

Dance/Music/Theater/Film

All the stages of watching the North Korean summit. Ocean’s 8

up in disturbing drawings. Strange then tragic events bring out the family’s rage at — and terror of — one another and reveal the horrors of Annie’s lineage. Collette’s astounding portrayal of a woman coming unmoored is as hard to look away from as it is to watch as she peels away the protective layers of control Annie has built to deal with even the earthly miseries of parenthood and growing up amid cruelty and severe mental illness. There are Lynchian shots rendering the banal surreal and a parade of gory horrors to make Hieronymus Bosch flinch. But at the core of every brilliantly lowtech scare is the fear that we may be one another’s worst fear, unwilling or unable to forgive or comfort those we have left — that love fails against anger, grief and pain. R. 127M. FORTUNA, MINOR.

—Jennifer Fumiko Cahill See listings at www.northcoastjournal. com or call: Broadway Cinema 443-3456; Fortuna Theatre 725-2121; Mill Creek Cinema 839-3456; Minor Theatre 8223456; Richards› Goat Miniplex 630-5000.

Previews

THE CHINA HUSTLE. Documentary about a post-mortgage crisis Wall Street scam that will make you stuff your money in a mattress. R. 82M. MINIPLEX. INCREDIBLES 2. The super family snaps on the spandex for a sequel. With Holly Hunter and Craig T. Nelson. R. 127M. FORTUNA, MINOR.

RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK (1981). Harrison Ford, Karen Allen and a bunch of melting Nazis. PG. 115M. BROADWAY. SUPERFLY. Trevor Jackson stars as an Atlanta coke dealer looking to leave the

game in a remake of the blaxploitation classic. R. 116M. TAG. School chums go hard on an annual game of tag. Starring Isla Fisher, Annabelle Wallis, Jon Hamm and Jeremy Renner. R. 93M. FORTUNA,

Continuing

ADRIFT. A couple (Shailene Woodley, Sam Claflin) sailing across the ocean get caught in a massive hurricane and I don’t think fitting on a door together is going to save them. PG13. 96M BROADWAY. AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR. Seriousness suffocates the best of this parade of characters in this massive supermovie.

A CAPPELLA DOO−WOP − July 11 − August 15, Wednesdays 6pm − 8pm. CR Garberville Site. Call CR Community Education at 707−476−4500. (D−0531) GUITAR/PIANO LESSONS. All ages, beginning & intermediate. Seabury Gould (707)845−8167. (DMT−0531) REDWOOD RAKS WORLD DANCE STUDIO, OLD CREAMERY IN ARCATA. Belly Dance, Swing, Tango, Hip Hop, Zumba, African, Samba, Capoeira and more for all ages. (707) 616−6876 www.redwoodraks.com (DMT−0405) STEEL DRUM CLASSES. Weekly Beginning Class: Fri’s. 10:30a.m.−11:30a.m., Level 2 Beginners Class Fri’s. 11:30a.m.−12:30 p.m. Beginners Mon’s 7:00p.m.− 8:00p.m. Pan Arts Network 1049 Samoa Blvd. Suite C (707) 407−8998. panartsnetwork.com (DMT−0531)

SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids & adults, child care, fitness gym & more. Tae Kwon Do Mon−Fri 5−6 p.m., 6−7 p.m., Sat 10−11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825−0182. (F−0531)

Food & Drink FOODWISE whole. plant based. kitchen. Cooking classes, Nutritional education, Sunday meal prep www.foodwisekitchen.com (F−0705)

50 and Better OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE (OLLI). Offers dynamic classes for people age 50 and over. Call 826−5880 or visit www.humboldt.edu/olli to register for classes (O−0531)

Spiritual KDK ARCATA BUDDHIST GROUP. Practice Tibetan Meditation on Loving−Kindness and Compassion in the Kagyu tradition, followed by a study group. Sun’s., 6 p.m., Community Yoga Center 890 G St., Arcata. Contact Lama Nyugu (707) 442−7068. Fierro_roman@yahoo.com. www.kdkarcatagroup.org (S−0531) SOTO ZEN MEDITATION Sunday programs and weekday meditation in Arcata locations; Wed evenings in Eureka, arcatazengroup.org Beginners welcome, call for orientation. (707) 826−1701 (S−0426)

97M. BROADWAY.

DANCE WITH DEBBIE: Remember the innocence of dancing when you were little? Remember moving to the music and just feeling the joy of dancing? That’s what we work on recapturing. We are your ballroom dance experts, offering group and private lessons to all levels of dancers. (707) 464−3638, debbie@dancewithdebbie.biz (D−0531)

DEADPOOL 2. Ryan Reynolds in his destined role with a better story, action and jokes. It’s almost fun, kind and rough enough to make you forget it’s spawn of the Marvel juggernaut. R. 113M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK. HOTEL ARTEMIS. Jodie Foster stars as a nurse in a hospital for elite bad guys in this eccentric action thriller. R. 93M. BROADWAY,

Fitness

Sports & Recreation

NORTH COAST FENCING ACADEMY. Fencing (with swords!). Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout. New classes begin the first Mon. of every month. Ages 8 to 80+ Email: northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com or text, or call Justin at 707 601−1657. 1459 M Street, Arcata, northcoastfencing.tripod.com (F−0531)

LEARN TO ROW THIS SUMMER! Sessions for Teens are held throughout the summer. Adult sessions in June. For more details: www.HBRA.org

PG13. 149M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK.

BOOK CLUB. Candice Bergen, Jane Fonda, Diane Keaton and Mary Steenburgen are consummate pros in a light, all-toorare comedy about dating later in life. PG13.

MILL CREEK.

RBG. Documentary about Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the U.S. Supreme Court justice in the fly collar. PG. 97M. MINIPLEX. SOLO: A STAR WARS STORY. A fun if trivial prequel with solid action sequences, winking callbacks, Han and Chewbacca (Alden Ehrenreich, Joonas Suotama) bonding and a cheekier Lando (Donald Glover). PG13. 135M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK, MINOR.

— Jennifer Fumiko Cahill l

ZUMBA WITH MARLA JOY. Elevate, Motivate, Celebrate another day of living. Exercise in Disguise. Now is the time to start, don’t wait. All ability levels are welcome. Every Mon. and Thurs. at Bayside Grange 6−7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. (707) 845−4307 marlajoy.zumba.com (F−0531)

YOUR CLASS HERE

4 4 2 -14 0 0 × 3 1 4

TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres. www.tarotofbecoming.com (707) 442−4240 carolyn@tarotofbecoming.com (S−0531)

Therapy & Support ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS. We can help 24/7, call toll free 1−844 442−0711. (T−0531) SMOKING POT? WANT TO STOP? www.marijuana −anonymous.org (T−0629) FREE DEPRESSION SUPPORT GROUP. Feeling hopeless? Free, non−religious, drop−in peer group for people experiencing depression/anxiety. UMCJH 144 Central Ave, McK 839−5691 (T−0809) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATION− SHIPS? Confidential help is available. 707−825− 0920, saahumboldt@yahoo.com (TS−0405)

NORTHCOAST COASTJOURNAL JOURNAL  northcoastjournal.com •• Thursday, Thursday,June June14,14,2018 2018• •NORTH northcoastjournal.com

43


Workshops

Continued from previous page

Vocational FREE AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE CLASS Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education at 707 476−4520 for more information or come to class to register. (V−0607) FREE BEGINNING COMPUTER CLASS Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education at 707 476−4520 for more information or come to class to register. (V−0607) LOAN SIGNING − Monday, July 9th 5:30pm− 9:30pm. CR Main Campus. Must have or be in the process of obtaining a California State Notary Public Commission. Call CR Community Education at 707−476−4500.

MEDICAL ASSISTING − Info. Meeting Wednesday July 11th or August 1st 3pm − 5pm 525 D St. Eureka. Only need to attend one. Class dates Sept. 10 − Dec. 17. Call CR Community Education at 707−476− 4500. (V−0531) FREE CLASS TO PREPARE FOR THE GED OR HISET Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education at 707 476−4520 for more information or come to class to register. (V−0607) FREE ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE (ESL) CLASSES Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education at 707 476−4520 for more information or come to class to register.(V−0607) FREE LIVING SKILLS CLASSES FOR ADULTS WITH DISABILITIES Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education at 707 476−4520 for more information or come to class to register. (V−0607) MEDICAL ASSISTING CERTIFICATION REVIEW − August 6 − September 12, Mon./Wed. 5:30pm − 8:30pm. Call CR Community Education at 707−476− 4500. (V−0531)

The North Coast’s Complete Restaurant Directory

NOTARY − Tuesday, July 10th 8am−6pm. CR Main Campus. Call CR Community Education at 707−476− 4500. (V−0531) PHLEBOTOMY INFO. MEETING Thursday July 12th, 5pm − 8pm. CR Main Campus Humanities 129. Class starts September 13th. Call CR Community Educa− tion at 707−476−4500. (V−0531)

Wellness & Bodywork

2018 EDITION

COMING SOON

AYURVEDIC "SUMMER FOODS" COOKING IMMERSION, MASSAGE, FACIALS & AROMATHERAPY TRAINING W/TRACI WEBB. @ NW Inst. of Ayurveda. Bring on the Bliss! Cooking: June 27−July 1, Massage: July 11−Aug 5, $100 OFF by 6/29, Deadline: 7/6. Facials: Aug 24−26. $250 OFF by 7/29! Aromatherapy + Distillation: Sept 7−16. Reg. Online: www.ayurvedicliving.com, (707) 601−9025 DANDELION HERBAL CENTER CLASSES WITH JANE BOTHWELL. Beginning with Herbs. Sept 26 − Nov 14, 2018, 8 Wed. evenings. Learn medicine making, herbal first aid, and herbs for common imbalances. 10−Month Herbal Studies Program. Feb − Nov 2019. meets one weekend per month with three camping trips. Learn in−depth material medica, plant identification, flower essences, wild foods, formulations and harvesting. Springtime in Tuscany: An Herbal Journey. May 25 − June 5, 2019, 2018. Immerse yourself fully in the healing tradi− tions, art, architecture and of course the food of an authentic Tuscan villa! Register online www.dandelionherb.com or call (707) 442−8157. (W−0830) YONI & YOU THE SACRED CONNCECTION Create a new and healthy relationship with your yoni in this clothed, 3−hour interactive program of guided meditation, sound healing, energy work, setting personal intentions, creative expression, thera− peutic movement and crafting. Through compas− sionate reflection, you will discover the emotions your yoni is holding and how to acknowledge her spirit. Workshop guides: Heather Rose and Megan Rodman − Holistic Health Practitioners specializing inn Reiki, Cranical Sacral, Polarity, spiritual/psychic development and guidance. Saturday June 23rd 2− 5pm Om Shala Yoga 858 10th St., Arcata 480−878− 3937 freetobehealed.com $20 in advance through Brown Paper Tickets (or $25 at door) https://yoniandyou.bpt.me (W−0623)

44 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 14, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

Legal Notices SUMMONS (Citation Judicial) CASE NUMBER: DR180261 -------NOTICE TO Defendant: RAYMOND SCHELLING, Deceased; Testate and Intestate Successors of RAYMOND LEON SCHELLING, DEBRA POTTS, possible Intestate Successor, and all persons claiming by through, or under such decedent; all persons unknown, claiming any legal or equitable right, title, estate, lien, or intestate in the property described in the property adverse to Plaintiff’s title or any cloud on Plaintiff’s title thereto, and DOES 1 through 10, Inclusive. You are being sued by Plaintiff: Daniel M. Wojcik and Robin C. Wojcik Notice: You have been sued. The court may decide against you without you being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more infor− mation at the California Courts Online Self−Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the court− house nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for free waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal require− ments. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the Cali− fornia Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self−Help Center(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/self− help), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Humboldt County Superior Court 825 Fifth Street Eureka, CA 95501 The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: Timothy J. Wykle 216943 Mathews, Kluck, Walsh & Wykle, LLP Date: April 18, 2018 clerk, by James C., Deputy 5/31, 6/7, 6/14, 6/21 (18−153)

Eureka, CA 95501 The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: Timothy J. Wykle 216943 Mathews, Kluck, Walsh & Wykle, LLP Date: April 18, 2018 clerk, by James C., Deputy 5/31, 6/7, 6/14, 6/21 (18−153)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00283 The following person is doing Busi− ness as DEAMARAE Humboldt 1963 B Ave. McKinleyville, CA 95519

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00313 The following person is doing Busi− ness as UNIVERSITY OF METAPHYSICAL SCIENCES/HUMBOLDT Humboldt 4779 Valley East Blvd., Suite 2 Arcata, CA 95521 P.O. Box 4505 Arcata, CA 95518

Deborah Benavides 1963 B Ave McKinleyville, CA 95519

Wisdom of the Heart Church CA P.O. Box 4505 Arcata, CA 95518

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Deborah Benavides, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 8, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Christine Breese, CEO This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 17, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by sm, Humboldt County Clerk

6/7, 6/14, 6/21, 6/2 (18−162)

5/24, 5/31, 6/7, 6/14 (18−147)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00312

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00316

The following person is doing Busi− ness as FRESH + FRUITY AND MORE

The following person is doing Busi− ness as HOUSE OF HUMBOLDT

Humboldt 3300 Broadway St #430 Eureka, CA 95501 2300 Cochran Rd McKinleyville, CA 95519

Humboldt 520 2nd St. Eureka, CA 95501 1228 La Pointe Rd Eureka, CA 95503

La Patria Mariscos and Grill Restaurant CA C3902379 1718 4th St Eureka, CA 95501

Zach R Zinsmann 1228 La Pointe Rd Eureka, CA 95503

The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Siclari Ayala, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 17, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by se, Humboldt County Clerk 5/24, 5/31, 6/7, 6/14 (18−145)

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Zach Zinsmann, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 16, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by sm, Humboldt County Clerk 5/24, 5/31, 6/7, 6/14 (18−150)


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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00289

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00374

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00327

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00348

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00339

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00349

The following person is doing Busi− ness as ADAM’S TRANSPORTING

The following person is doing Busi− ness as LIGHTHOUSE GRILL

The following person is doing Busi− ness as MARLEY DOG PRODUCTS

The following person is doing Busi− ness as NEW TROY CLEANERS

The following person is doing Busi− ness as Golden Bough Coaching

The following person is doing Busi− ness as LOST EUREKA

Humboldt 344 Glenwood Lane McKinleyville, CA 95519

Humboldt 355 Main Street Trinidad, CA 95570

Humboldt 1775 Heuer Dr. Eureka, CA 95503

Humboldt 101 4TH St. Eureka, CA 95501

Humboldt 1323 I Street Eureka, CA 95501

Humboldt 3986 Cedar Street Eureka, CA 95503

Adam K Smith 344 Glenwood Lane McKinleyville, CA 95519

Sherry Vanderpool Charles Vanderpool 707 Underwood Drive #902 Trinidad, CA 95570

Steve Anderson 1775 Heuer Dr. Eureka, CA 95503

Kun J. Han 101 4th St. Eureka, CA 95501

Vida Hofweber 1323 I Street Eureka, CA 95501

Solomon Everta 3986 Cedar Street Eureka, CA 95503

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Steve Anderson, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 23, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by sm, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Kun J. Han, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 30, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Vida Hofweber, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 25, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Solomon Everta, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 31, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

5/31, 6/7, 6/14, 6/21 (18−154)

6/7, 6/14, 6/21, 6/28 (18−158)

6/14, 6/21, 6/28, 7/5 (18−168)

6/14, 6/21, 6/28, 7/5 (18−166)

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Adam K. Smith, Owner/Operator This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 9, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 5/17, 5/24, 5/31, 6/7 (18−135)

The business is conducted by a Married Couple. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Sherry Vanderpool, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on June 11, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by se, Humboldt County Clerk 6/14, 6/21, 6/28, 7/5 (18−167)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00317

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00347

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00375

The following person is doing Busi− ness as SHAKTI SPACE

The following person is doing Busi− ness as ADVANCED BASKETBALL COACHING: FUNDAMENTALS

The following person is doing Busi− ness as TIME TRAVELER 2.0

Humboldt 431 First Avenue Blue Lake, CA 95525

Humboldt 1113 J Street Eureka, CA 95501

Kaleidoscope Coffee Company Inc. CA C3302682 3125 Sunny Lane Redding, CA 96001

Krystal M Kamback 825 Westhaven Drive S Trinidad, CA 95570

Bryce C. Patton 1113 J Street Apt. #4 Eureka, CA 95501

Arcata Vapery LLC CA 201812510056 1020 8th Street Arcata, CA 95521

The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Daniel W. Burton, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 18, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by sm, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Krystal M Kamback, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 23, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by se, Humboldt County Clerk 5/31, 6/7, 6/14, 6/21 (18−152)

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Bryce Patton, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 30, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Casey T Grewen, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on June 11, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by sm, Humboldt County Clerk

6/7, 6/14, 6/21, 6/28 (18−156)

6/14, 6/21, 6/28, 7/6 (18−169)

The following person is doing Busi− ness as KALEIDOSCOPE COFFEE Humboldt 3300 Broadway St. Eureka, CA 95501

6/7, 6/14, 6/21, 6/28 (18−159)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00326

Humboldt 1020 8th Street Arcata, CA 95521

Submit your Calendar Events ONLINE or by E-MAIL @ northcoastjournal.com / calendar@northcoastjournal.com PRINT DEADLINE: Noon Thursday, the week before publication

FIRST 5 HUMBOLDT IS HOLDING PUBLIC HEARINGS FOR THE STRATEGIC PLAN 2016-2020, AND THE FIRST 5 CALIFORNIA ANNUAL REPORT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2016-17. The public hearing for the FIRST 5 CALIFORNIA Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2016/17 will be on Wednesday, June 20, 2018 from 3-4 pm, in the FIRST 5 HUMBOLDT conference room at 325 Second Street, Suite 201. The report can be viewed at http:// www.ccfc.ca.gov/pdf/about/budget_perf/annual_report_pdfs/ Annual_Report_16-17.pdf The public hearing for FIRST 5 HUMBOLDT’s Strategic Plan 2016-2020 will be on Wednesday, June 20, 2018 from 4-5 pm in the FIRST 5 HUMBOLDT conference room at 325 Second Street, Suite 201. The Strategic Plan 2016-2020 can be viewed at www.first5humboldt.org. The public is invited to attend. For more information about FIRST 5 HUMBOLDT, visit our website at www.first5humboldt.org or call our office at (707) 445-7389.

LEGALS? 442-1400 ×314

classified@north coastjournal.com

County Public Notices Fictitious Business Petition to Administer Estate Trustee Sale Other Public Notices

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, June 14, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

45


Legal Notices

Continued from previous page

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00351

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00330

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00357

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00360

The following person is doing Busi− ness as OAXACA GRILL

The following person is doing Busi− ness as CAROLINE’S TX BBQ

The following person is doing Busi− ness as ETP, HETP, and ELECTION TRANSPARENCY PROJECT

The following person is doing Busi− ness as MSTY MIX

Humboldt 508 Henderson St. Eureka, CA 95501

Humboldt 1317 California Eureka, CA 95501 2208 Summer Eureka, CA 95501

Humboldt 100 Summer St. Loleta, CA 95551

Caroline D Chaffin Brooks 2208 Summer Eureka, CA 95501

Elections Transparency Project CA C3524278 100 Summer St. Loleta, CA 95551

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Caroline Chaffin Brooks, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 24, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Carolyn Crnich, Treasurer This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on June 1, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

6/14, 6/21, 6/28, 7/6 (18−170)

6/7, 6/14, 6/21, 6/28 (18−160)

Maribel Pimentel 2301 Fischer Ln. Eureka, CA 95503 Yuridiana Pimentel 2301 Fischer Ln. Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by a General Partnership. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Maribel Pimentel, Co−Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 31, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by sm, Humboldt County Clerk 6/7, 6/14, 6/21, 6/28 (18−157)

RESTAURANTS A-Z Search by food type, region and price. Browse descriptions, photos and menus. www.northcoastjournal.com

Humboldt 531 O St. Apt. 1 Eureka, CA 95501 Chanina Thao 531 O St. Apt. 1 Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Chanina Thao, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on June 1, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by sm, Humboldt County Clerk 6/14, 6/21, 6/28, 7/5 (18−164)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00364 The following person is doing Busi− ness as PICKLED PLANTS Humboldt 1800 Carson Woods Rd. Fortuna, CA 95540 Lindsey Dalton 1800 Carson Woods Rd. Fortuna, CA 95540

classified@north coastjournal.com

442-1400 × 314

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME SEVERINA LEONORA HARRIS CASE NO. CV180456

SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501

SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501

PETITION OF: RONALD JEAN ELSEA TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: RONALD JEAN ELSEA

PETITION OF: SEVERINA LEONORA HARRIS TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: SEVERINA LEONORA HARRIS

for a decree changing names as follows: Present name RONALD JEAN ELSEA to Proposed Name RONDALL GENE ELSEA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: August 1, 2018 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: June 7, 2018 Filed: June 7, 2018 /s/ Kelly L. Neel Judge of the Superior Court

for a decree changing names as follows: Present name SEVERINA LEONORA HARRIS to Proposed Name HADASAH LEONORA HARRIS

6/14, 6/21, 6/28, 7/5 (18−165)

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Lindsey Dalton, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on June 6, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 6/14, 6/21, 6/28, 7/5 (18−163)

LEGALS? 46 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 14, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME RONALD JEAN ELSEA CASE NO. CV180487

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 10, 2018 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: May 23, 2018 Filed: May 23, 2018 /s/ Kelly L. Neel Judge of the Superior Court 6/7, 6/14, 6/21, 6/28 (18−161)

NCJDAILY NCJDAILY

No longer just a weekly, the Journal covers the just news as it happens, with No longer a weekly, the Journal depth and context readers won’t covers the news as it happens, with depth and context readers won’t find anywhere else. find anywhere else.

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Astrology

Cartoons

Free Will Astrology Week of June 14, 2018 By Rob Brezsny

Homework: Many of us try to motivate ourselves through abusive self-criticism. Do you? If so, maybe it’s time to change. Testify at Freewillastrology.com.

freewillastrology@freewillastrology.com ARIES (March 21-April 19): My Aries acquaintance Tatiana decided to eliminate sugar from her diet. She drew up a plan to avoid it completely for 30 days, hoping to permanently break its hold over her. I was surprised to learn that she began the project by making a Dessert Altar in her bedroom, where she placed a chocolate cake and five kinds of candy. She testified that it compelled her willpower to work even harder and become even stronger than if she had excluded all sweet treats from her sight. Do you think this strenuous trick might work for you as you battle your own personal equivalent of a sugar addiction? If not, devise an equally potent strategy. You’re on the verge of forever escaping a temptation that’s no good for you. Or you’re close to vanquishing an influence that has undermined you. Or both. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You have caressed and finessed The Problem. You have tickled and teased and tinkered with it. Now I suggest you let it alone for a while. Give it breathing room. Allow it to evolve under the influence of the tweaks you have instigated. Although you may need to return and do further work in a few weeks, my guess is that The Problem’s knots are now destined to metamorphose into seeds. The awkwardness you massaged with your love and care will eventually yield a useful magic. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “Whether you love what you love or live in divided ceaseless revolt against it, what you love is your fate.” Gemini poet Frank Bidart wrote that in his poem “Guilty of Dust,” and now I offer it to you. Why? Because it’s an excellent time to be honest with yourself as you identify whom and what you love. It’s also a favorable phase to assess whether you are in any sense at odds with whom and what you love; and if you find you are, to figure out how to be in more harmonic alignment with whom and what you love. Finally, dear Gemini, now is a key moment to vividly register the fact that the story of your life in the coming years will pivot around your relationship with whom and what you love. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Congratulations on the work you’ve done to cleanse the psychic toxins from your soul, Cancerian. I love how brave you’ve been as you’ve jettisoned outworn shticks, inadequate theories, and irrelevant worries. It makes my heart sing to have seen you summon the self-respect necessary to stick up for your dreams in the face of so many confusing signals. I do feel a tinge of sadness that your heroism hasn’t been better appreciated by those around you. Is there anything you can do to compensate? Like maybe intensify the appreciation you give yourself? LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): I hope you’re reaching the final stages of your year-long project to make yourself as solid and steady as possible. I trust you have been building a stable foundation that will serve you well for at least the next five years. I pray you have been creating a rich sense of community and establishing vital new traditions and surrounding yourself with environments that bring out the best in you. If there’s any more work to be done in these sacred tasks, intensify your efforts in the coming weeks. If you’re behind schedule, please make up for lost time. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “Necessity is the mother of invention,” says an old proverb. In other words, when your need for some correction or improvement becomes overwhelming, you may be driven to get creative. Engineer Allen Dale put a different spin on the issue. He said that “if necessity is the mother of invention, then laziness is the father.” Sci-fi writer Robert Heinlein agreed, asserting that “progress is made by lazy men looking for easier ways to do things.” I’m not sure if necessity or laziness will be your motivation, Virgo, but I suspect that the coming weeks could be a golden age of invention for you. What practical innovations might you

launch? What useful improvements can you finagle? (P.S. Philosopher Alfred North Whitehead attributed the primary drive for innovative ideas and gizmos to “pleasurable intellectual curiosity.”) LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Would you have turned out wiser and wealthier if you had dropped out of school in third grade? Would it have been better to apprentice yourself to a family of wolves or coyotes rather than trusting your educational fate to institutions whose job it was to acclimate you to society’s madness? I’m happy to let you know that you’re entering a phase when you’ll find it easier than usual to unlearn any old conditioning that might be suppressing your ability to fulfill your rich potentials. I urge you to seek out opportunities to unleash your skills and enhance your intelligence. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The temptation to overdramatize is strong. Going through with a splashy but messy conclusion may have a perverse appeal. But why not wrap things up with an elegant whisper instead of a garish bang? Rather than impressing everyone with how amazingly complicated your crazy life is, why not quietly lay the foundations for a low-key resolution that will set the stage for a productive sequel? Taking the latter route will be much easier on your karma, and in my opinion will make for just as interesting a story. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Each of us harbors rough, vulnerable, controversial, or unhoned facets of our identity. And every one of us periodically reaches turning points when it becomes problematic to keep those qualities buried or immature. We need to make them more visible and develop their potential. I suspect you have arrived at such a turning point. So on behalf of the cosmos, I hereby invite you to enjoy a period of ripening and self-revelation. And I do mean “enjoy.” Find a way to have fun. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): For the next two-plus weeks, an unusual rule will be in effect: The more you lose, the more you gain. That means you will have an aptitude for eliminating hassles, banishing stress, and shedding defense mechanisms. You’ll be able to purge emotional congestion that has been preventing clarity. You’ll have good intuitions about how to separate yourself from influences that have made you weak or angry. I’m excited for you, Capricorn! A load of old, moldy karma could dissolve and disperse in what seems like a twinkling. If all goes well, you’ll be traveling much lighter by July 1. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): I suggest you avoid starting a flirtatious correspondence with a convict who’ll be in jail for another 28 years. OK? And don’t snack on fugu, the Japanese delicacy that can poison you if the cook isn’t careful about preparing it. Please? And don’t participate in a séance where the medium summons the spirits of psychotic ancestors or diabolical celebrities with whom you imagine it might be interesting to converse. Got that? I understand you might be in the mood for high adventure and out-of-the-ordinary escapades. And that will be fine and healthy as long as you also exert a modicum of caution and discernment. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): I suggest that you pat yourself on the back with both hands as you sing your own praises and admire your own willful beauty in three mirrors simultaneously. You have won stirring victories over not just your own personal version of the devil, but also over your own inertia and sadness. From what I can determine, you have corralled what remains of the forces of darkness into a comfy holding cell, sealing off those forces from your future. They won’t bother you for a very long time, maybe never again. Right now you would benefit from a sabbatical — a vacation from all this high-powered character-building. May I suggest you pay a restorative visit to the Land of Sweet Nonsense? ●

@northcoastjournal @ncj_of_humboldt northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, June 14, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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66. Japanese watchmaker 67. Shade of green 68. Quick smoke? 69. Minuscule, informally 70. Killed, as a dragon 71. Heart chart: Abbr.

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1. Farthest 2. Pale yellow Danish cheese 3. Agitates 4. Miss America accessory 5. It may follow a def. 6. ____ Kadabra (DC Comics foe of the Flash) 7. Flies (through) 8. Tries to catch shrimp, say 9. Fight in the backwoods 10. Helpful connections

11. Summer in Provence 12. Pixel, e.g. 15. It’s 1 on the Mohs scale 21. What Lot’s wife looked back at 22. Cracklin’ ____ Bran 25. Fifth qtrs. 26. It comes between chi and omega 27. ____ ed 29. Chemical suffix 30. Org. with a campaign called “Degrees Not Debt” 31. One of the Jackson 5 34. ____ Ranch (onetime “Texas White House”) 35. Have legs 38. Fib 39. Trio after K 40. Offspring 41. Hotel capacity: Abbr. 42. “How cool!” 43. Maidenform

product 45. “It’s true whether or not you believe in it”: Neil deGrasse Tyson 46. Free of hormones, say 47. Retirement fund 49. Pants 50. Crime novelist James who wrote “L.A. Confidential” 51. Response to an online joke 54. Tears for fears, for example 55. Persons 58. Elec., e.g. 59. Smuggler’s hideaway 60. Freshly 61. “The Waste Land” poet’s monogram 62. Neckline shape 63. Longtime Dodger announcer ____ Scully EASY #91

© Puzzles by Pappocom

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www.sudoku.com

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS TO BUMBLE J A B A T A C T O N A D R O P O U A N D D I L E M M N U C H S R E B L O A B U M B L S P R E O P Y R O N P L A S M T E S O F T H E I R R E A M S O D D E U L N A S T I A M E Y R T S C R O A X I L L A E T A N F E E L S A W O S F D A A V I K E S S N Y E

L A B E L I O A K L E U E S P N N C A A C O T T W H I C I R S T E T L S T A S Y U C A O N E T U E Y

Photo by Charles Daghlian, public domain

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called himself “a ACROSS Democrat without 1. Canadian prefix, without interjections suffix, and without 4. Rising concerns in apology” modern times? 36. ____ Flags 8. Presided over, as 37. Key ingredients in a case Italian wedding 13. “The Confessions of soup ____ Turner” (1967 41. Steal from Pulitzer winner) 14. Facing the pitcher 44. Author of the 2007 book “If I Did It” 16. Totaled 48. Tiny bit to eat 17. Roman 506 18. Neighbor of Jordan 52. Like a small farm, perhaps 19. Opposite of a 53. Key ingredients in liability Bordelaise sauce 20. Key ingredients in Rice Krispie Treats 56. Freaks (out) 57. Buffet deal ... or a 23. “... ish” three-letter feature 24. Key ingredients of 20-, 24-, 37- and in Coquilles St. 53-Across Jacques 61. ‘80s-’90s 28. Classy person? entertainment 32. Fly over the combo Equator 64. Stage, as a play 33. Speaker of the 65. Reverse of SSW House who

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CROSSWORD by David Levinson Wilk

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48 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 14, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

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ention just about any scientific finding involving a chain of causation — anthropocentric global warming, monarch butterflies/milkweed destruction, fluoridation/fewer cavities (“Colorado Brown Stain,” May 31) — and you’ll hear “correlation isn’t causation” from skeptics. And they’re right. If you suggest A causes B, they’re going to ask, “How are you so sure B doesn’t cause A?” (Does high self-esteem cause kids to get high grades or the other way around?) Or, “How do you know C doesn’t cause both A and B?” (Does the correlation between increased ice cream sales and more drownings mean that ice cream causes drownings, or does hot weather cause an increase in both?) In fact, it’s often impossible to prove that A causes B with 100 percent certainty. Solid Correlation-causation: Smoking and lung cancer. The poster child for causation is smoking and lung cancer. We all know that smoking is the prime cause of lung cancer. Except “all” doesn’t include tobacco company lawyers, who regularly point out that (1) fewer than 10 percent of lifelong smokers will get lung cancer and (2) non-smokers also get the disease. (This probably won’t convince anyone to quit so if I were a doctor, I’d turn the statistics around and tell my patients: Smoking accounts for 30 percent of all cancer deaths and 87 percent of lung cancer deaths; male smokers have 23 times the risk of developing lung cancer as non-smokers and life expectancy for tobacco smokers is 14 years less than the national average.) How can we be sure that smoking causes lung cancer? We can’t and it doesn’t — not definitively. It adds to the risk, sufficiently for most of us to either quit or never start. Evidence for the increased-risk causation is solid, starting with statistical studies in the 1950s, when the American Cancer Society followed the smoking habits of 188,000 men; the ones who died of lung cancer were much more likely to have been smokers than not. Also, researchers can actually see that smoke damages epithelial cells lining the windpipe and lungs, reducing the

ability of the hair-like cilia on the surface of these cells to push mucus out of the lungs (hence smoker’s cough). Not to mention the several dozen carcinogenic chemicals found in tobacco smoke. And on and on. Shaky Correlation-causation: Breakfast and obesity. WebMD is a reputable healthcare website. It’s the first place many of us go when we have an odd pain or weird swelling or dizzy spell. A few years ago, WebMD published an article under the heading “Eating Breakfast May Beat Teen Obesity.” The article summarized a study published in Pediatrics which analyzed the five-year diet and weight patterns of over 2,200 adolescents in Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota. According to the WebMD summary, “Teens who regularly ate breakfast tended to gain less weight ... than breakfast skippers” and “regular breakfast eaters seemed more physically active than breakfast skippers.” So the article suggests that A (eating breakfast) causes B (more activity). But maybe B causes A: physical activity makes for hungry kids. Or maybe C causes both A and B, where C is physical activity which leads to both hunger for breakfast and calorie burning, which helps reduce obesity. Or (from a suggestion by science educator Sal Khan, from whom I first heard about this study) perhaps the root cause (C) of both skipping breakfast and obesity is poverty, that is, poverty results in both parents leaving the house early for work, so the kids don’t get proper breakfasts and they’re eating less healthily, leading to obesity. Now eating breakfast may indeed help alleviate obesity in teens. But the study as reported sure didn’t make the case for causation. To sum up: Correlation is “When A happens, B happens, and vice versa” while causality is “A causes B.” Time to ask yourself: Does reading the Journal make you happy or does feeling happy make you read the Journal? ● Barry Evans (barryevans9@ yahoo.com) can’t decide whether he’s alive because his heart beats or his heart beats because he’s alive.


Employment Opportunities AMERICAN STAR PRIVATE SECURITY Is Now Hiring. Clean record. Drivers license required. Must own vehicle. Apply at 922 E Street, Suite A, Eureka (707) 476−9262. HOME CAREGIVERS PT/FT Non−medical caregivers to assist elderly in their homes. Top hourly wages. (707) 362−8045.  DON~RN~LVN Actively Interviewing Licensed Nurses in Fort Bragg, California We require a nurse with strong clinical assessment and interpersonal skills. This is a great opportunity to work in a high-quality, nursing facility. Multiple Shifts and Extensive Benefits Package.

707-964-6333 or terriem@SOHCFTB.com

Hiring? EDUCATION: EQUAL OPPORTUNITY TITLE IX For jobs in educa− tion in all school districts in Humboldt County, including teaching, instructional aides, coaches, office staff, custo− dians, bus drivers, and many more. Go to our website at www.humboldt.k12.ca.us and click on Employment Opportunities. Applications and job flyers may be picked up at the Personnel Office, Humboldt County Office of Education 901 Myrtle Ave, Eureka, or accessed online. For more information call 445−7039.

Hiring?

442-1400 ×314 northcoastjournal.com

Post your job opportunities in the Journal. 442-1400 ×314 classified@ northcoastjournal.com

YUROK TRIBE JOB OPENINGS For information www.yuroktribe.org, hr@yuroktribe.nsn.us or 707-482-1350 #0857 Webmaster

RG/FT KLAMATH $21.84-28.39 6/15/18

default

#0936 JOM Tutor

RG/PT EUREKA/HOOPA $12.68-20.69 6/15/18

#0959 Accountant

RG/FT KLAMATH $45,576-72,068 6/15/18

#1000 Water Operator

VISITATION SPECIALIST This full-time position provides supervised visitation for children, youth and their families in a variety of settings, providing parenting skills coaching , as well as related tasks. . Requirements include: transporting clients in employee’s own vehicle throughout Humboldt County (mileage is reimbursed), ability to lift and carry car seats and children, minimum two years of experience working with children, youth or families or two years working in a social service agency . Stipend available for qualified bilingual candidates (English/ Spanish). Starts at $14.11/hour. Please see job description for comprehensive list of requirements and detailed list of duties. Excellent benefits: paid vacation/sick leave, holidays and paid insurance. Must be able to pass DOJ/FBI criminal history fingerprint clearance. Must possess a valid California driver’s license, current automobile insurance, and a dependable vehicle for work. Application and job description available at www.changingtidesfs.org, 2259 Myrtle Ave., Eureka, CA 95501, or by calling (707) 444-8293. Please submit letter of interest, resume, and application to Nanda Prato at the above address or via email to nprato@changingtidesfs.org.

Open Until Filled.

County of Humboldt

ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER

$2,658.90 - $3,411.97 monthly, plus excellent benefits Under general supervision, enforces County laws regarding stray, dangerous and nuisance animals; promotes responsible pet ownership; investigates complaints, patrols assigned areas and captures animals; administers the animal licensing program, including collecting and accounting for fees; performs related work as assigned. Applicants MUST successfully complete a detailed background investigation prior to appointment. Final filing date: July 2, 2018. Apply online at https://www.governmentjobs. com/careers/humboldtcountyca Questions: 707-476-2349. AA/EOE.

County of Humboldt

LABORER–PUBLIC WORKS $2167- $2780 mo. plus benefits

This position performs light and heavy semi-skilled manual labor for a variety of County maintenance projects. Positions are characterized by the presence of fairly clear guidelines from which to make decisions and the availability of supervision in non-routine circumstances. Must possess a valid California driver’s license.

RG/FT WEITCHPEC $15.91-20.69 6/22/18

Filing deadline: July 9, 2018.

#1009 YIHA Executive Director

For a complete job description and to apply online go to: http://www.humboldtgov.org/hr or contact Human Resources 825 5th St., Rm100, Eureka, CA 95501 (707) 476-2349 AA/EOE

RG/FT KLAMATH DOE OUF

#1010 YIHA Fiscal Director RG/FT KLAMATH DOE OUF

#1013 Trail Crew Member TEMP/FT KLAMATH $12.24 OUF

#1016 Assistant to Deputy Director RG/FT KLAMATH YEDC/DOE OUF

#1018 Planner II or III Transportation RG/FT KLAMATH $19.72/21.84 DOE 6/15/18

#1020 Youth Advocate

TEMP/FT EUREKA 19.72 6/15/18

#1022 Peer Counselor (10) TEMP KLAMATH $10.33 6/13/18

#1025 Bus Driver/Teacher Aide RG/FT KEPEL $16.34-21.24 6/15/18

#1026 Fisheries Biologist II

RG/FT KLAMATH $24.12-34.54 6/18/18

#1027 Transit Dispatcher

RG/FT WEITCHPEC $14.22 6/15/18

#1029 Maintenance Worker I RG/FT WEITCHPEC $12.68 6/15/18

#1030 Security Control Operator RG/FT WEITCHPEC $12.68 6/15/18

#1031 Fisheries Technician I/II

RG/FT WILLOW CREEK $12.68/14.22 6/22/18

#1032 Admin. Assistant II Education RG/FT KLAMATH $15.91-20.69 6/22/18

Humboldt County Office of Education

Printing & Communications Technician

FT, M-F, 7.5 Hrs./Day, $15.15-$21.43/Hr. DOE. Qualifications: Coursework in communications, graphic design web-based systems, graphic design programs, 2 years of related experience. Eligible for H&W, PERS. Applications available at HCOE or online: www.hcoe.org/pers/appinfo.php Reply to: PERSONNEL, HCOE, 901 Myrtle Ave., Eureka, CA 95501 Deadline 6/22/18, 4 p.m.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, June 14, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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Employment

Hiring? Post your job opportunities in the Journal. 442-1400 ×314 classified@ northcoastjournal.com

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CITIES OF ARCATA, EUREKA & FORTUNA

Informal Competitive Bid Process

ENTRY LEVEL–DISPATCHER TEST

for Fiscal Years 2018/19 & 2019/20

Are you interested in a career as a Police Dispatcher at any of the above agencies? Attend our next test session at 10 a.m., Saturday, June 23rd in Arcata. The “no study needed” test is 3 ½ hours, free of charge and passing scores qualify you for employment opportunities! Visit www.cityofarcata.org for a test reservation form to secure your space. EOE

Evaluator FIRST 5 HUMBOLDT has initiated an informal competitive bid process to select and Evaluator whose primary role will be to conduct annual evaluation activities and complete reporting requirements for FIRST 5 HUMBOLDT. For job qualifications and information, please visit the website www.first5humboldt.org, or contact FIRST 5 HUMBOLDT at (707) 445-7389. All bids must be received by 4pm on Wednesday, June 20, 2018.

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SIGN-ON BONUS FOR NURSES!!! We are looking for team-oriented nurses to coordinate care for patients in their home and at our in-patient unit. Fulltime and part-time options available. We offer outstanding benefits, competitive wages, and professional growth opportunities. Current California RN license and one year experience required. Visit www.hospiceofhumboldt.org or call 707-445-8443 for more information. default

The Hoopa Valley Tribe is accepting applications to fill the following vacant position

Grocery Store Manager

open door Community Health Centers NOW SEEKING:

Payroll Technician The Payroll Technician is responsible for supporting the Compensation Specialist in maintaining all of the payroll systems of the clinical network that is Open Door Community Health Centers. In addition, the Technician will work to ensure the accurate reporting, and updating of all payroll records. This position requires a detail-oriented, organized individual who can support the Compensation Specialist and prioritize projects to meet deadlines. Strong computer skills and the ability to take direction needed. Position available in Arcata For online application please visit:

EUREKA CAMPUS Controller Full-time, 12 Months / Year Annual Salary Range: $92,315.48 - $133,722.81 Close Date: June 18, 2018 More information about the position is available through our website. https://employment.redwoods.edu College of the Redwoods 707-476-4140 hr@redwoods.edu College of the Redwoods is an EO Employer

The North Coast Journal is seeking

DISTRIBUTION DRIVERS

opendoorhealth.com

Hoopa Shopping Center, Regular, F/T, Salary: DOE. Effectively develops and directs implementation of strategies which achieve corporate goals. Effectively supervises, directs and manages all phases of the store operations. Achieves the Hoopa Shopping Center’s goals and objectives. Minimum Requirements: Must have a minimum of 2-3 years in a management position. Must have 7-10 years in the Grocery Store Business. Must have prior supervisory experience. Must have a current Food Handlers certificate. English language proficiency, both speaking and reading. Deadline: OPEN UNTIL FILLED This position is classified as safety-sensitive. For job descriptions and employment applications, contact the Human Resources/Insurance Department, Hoopa Valley Tribe, P.O. Box 218, Hoopa, CA 95546. Call (530) 625-9200 Ext. 20 or email hr2@hoopainsurance.com. The Tribe’s Alcohol & Drug Policy and TERO Ordinance Apply.

LOOKING FOR AN EMPLOYER COMMITTED TO YOUR CAREER AND WELL−BEING? ARE YOU A PART−TIME LVN/RN LOOKING FOR SUPPLEMENTAL HOURS? Crestwood Behavioral Health Center is looking for Full−time, Part−time & On−call LPTs/LVNs to join our dynamic Team. Full−time benefits include medical, dental and vision plans; 401(K); sick & vacation time; scholarships; & lots of career−furthering training. $500 SIGN−ON BONUS, please inquire for details! Apply at: 2370 Buhne Street, Eureka 707−442−5721 http://crestwoodbehavioralhealth.com/location/eurekaca/

50 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 14, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

Wednesday afternoon/ Thursday morning routes in

Arcata • Fortuna/Ferndale Willow Creek/Hoopa Must be personable, have a reliable vehicle, clean driving record and insurance. News box repair skills a plus.

Contact Melissa

707.442.1400 • melissa@northcoastjournal.com


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445-9641 • 2930 E Street Eureka, CA 95501

www.sequoiapersonnel.com

Humboldt County Office of Education Anticipated Opening

K’ima:w Medical Center

Budget & Accounting Analyst FT, M-F, 7.5 Hrs./Day, $3727.81$5268.33/Mo., $22.94-$32.42/Hr. DOE. Qualifications: BA in Accounting, Business Management or related field & 5 yrs. of increasingly responsible experience in school business functions or comparable experience in accounting & financial record keeping required. Eligible for H&W, PERS retirement. Applications available at HCOE or online: www.hcoe.org/pers/appinfo.php Reply to: PERSONNEL, HCOE, 901 Myrtle Ave., Eureka, CA 95501 Deadline 6/15/18, 4 p.m.

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open door Community Health Centers NOW SEEKING:

Specialty Behavioral Health Clinician (LCSW/LMFT/Psy.D/Ph.D). Substance Abuse Treatment experience required. Position available at North Country Clinic, Arcata.

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For provider recruiter contact please visit:

opendoorhealth.com default

                

PHYSICIAN DENTAL HYGIENIST (STAFF OR CONTRACTED) RN CARE MANAGER SUBSTANCE ABUSE COUNSELOR (MEDICATION-ASSISTED TREATMENT) MENTAL HEALTH CLINICIAN (MEDICATIONASSISTED TREATMENT) MENTAL HEALTH CLINICIAN For an application, job description, and additional information, contact: K’ima:w Medical Center, Human Resources, PO Box 1288, Hoopa, CA, 95546 or call 530-625-4261 or email: hr.kmc@kimaw.org for a job description and application. Resume and CV are not accepted without a signed application. default

     

an entity of the Hoopa Valley Tribe, is seeking applicants for the following positions:

North Coast Co-op is looking for a

Finance Controller to join our team. We are looking for hard working, fun people with a passion for food, community and sustainability. Because we know quality benefits play a vital role in promoting the health and well-being of our employees and their families, we offer: • Competitive pay • Medical, dental, vision and life insurance • Employee Assistance Program • 15% discount on all products • Training • Paid time off • Holiday pay • 401(k) with a 5% match • A number of other perks that you won’t find at other places (free food, buying club, membership) For a full job description, please visit http:// northcoast.coop/about_us/careers/current_ openings.php To apply online, please visit http://northcoast. coop/about_us/careers/job_application/ Salary–$65-85k/yr.

HSU Dining Services invites applicants for the following full-time positions:

DINING MANAGER $18.18–$25.45 per hour DOE

CONVENIENCE STORE SUPERVISOR II $14.20–$19.88 per hour DOE

COOK II $14.20–$19.88 per hour DOE We offer an excellent benefits package including health, dental, and vision insurance; paid vacation, holidays, and sick leave; and CalPERS retirement. For job descriptions and application procedure visit: http://tinyurl.com/zlg4llo Deadline: Friday, June 22, 2018. These positions are open until filled.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, June 14, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

51


W E

WE WANT YOUR TRADE PAID FOR OR NOT!

G O O D

W A N T Y O U R T R A D E S P U S H P U L L

Sé Habla Español

2010 Chevrolet Impala LS

6,995

I N W E W A N T

P U L L D R A G T H E M I N

7,995

2007 Toyota Camry LE

9,995

2016 Kia Rio LX

10,995

$

76,775 miles #729914

13,995

2014 Chevrolet Malibu LT

14,995

$

36,507 miles #286399

15,995

2015 Chevrolet Volt

16,995

$

29,453 miles #290260

2017 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT

19,995

19,995

$

25,995

2017 GMC Acadia SLE

27,995

$

$

34,995

2017 Cadillac CTS 2.0

37,995

$

$

34,355 miles #M03535

412 miles #136293

13,995

$

15,995

2015 Dodge Journey SXT

15,995

$

49,762 miles #064174

66,320 miles #700967

2013 Kia Sportage EX

2015 Honda CR-V EX

16,995

18,995

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$

59,630 miles #410946

C R E D I T B A D

2015 Lexus IS 250

24,995

24,995

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12,534 miles #034623

28,995

W E L C O M E G O O D

52,276 miles #702055

2016 Honda Accord EX-L

2013 Chevrolet Silverado 1500

I S

82,020 miles #200237

$

C R E D I T E V E R Y O N E

26,691 miles #060047

2016 Toyota 4Runner SR5 Sport

31,995

$

AWD 20,422 miles #264904

108,000 miles #246133

2016 Toyota Tacoma Doubler Cab TRD Off-Road

2014 Toyota Prius Plug-In Hybrid

25,684 miles #558078

29,908 miles #583817

2010 Chevrolet Camaro LT

44,659 miles #739958

35,976 miles #110103

$

2012 Toyota Tundra LTD 4x4

12,995

75,842 miles #231837

$

32,426 miles #237640

$

2017 Nissan Rogue SV AWD

2016 Hyundai Elantra SE

C R E D I T E V E R Y O N E

8,995

$

90,258 miles #505838

31,087 miles #667306

$

2015 Toyota Corolla S Plus

8,995

B A D

2013 Chevrolet Sonic LT Hatchback

$

82,408 miles #053919

$

2011 Toyota Prius Three

2009 Nissan Altima 2.5

$

142,999 miles #191334

Y O U R T R A D E S P U S H

2005 Hyundai Tucson

$

D R A G T H E M

C R E D I T

$

Crew Cab LT 71,046 Miles #130709

41,420 miles #329562

2012 Chevrolet Silverado 2500 HD

I S

2017 GMC Yukon XL SLT

38,995

49,995

$

$

Z71 Off-Road Pkg Crew Cab LTZ 91,527 Miles #208293

22,385 miles #323161

W E L C O M E

1900 Central Ave., McKinleyville 707-839-5454

See our INVENTORY ONLINE:

www.mckinleyvillechevrolet.com

WE BUY CARS

52 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 14, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

All advertised prices excludes government fees and taxes, any finance charges, and any emission testing charge. On approved credit. Ad exp. 6-30-18

Hours: 9:00-6:00 & 11-4 Monday–Saturday

Mon-Fri

Sunday

Parts & Service 8-5


SUM ME R K ICKO FF

HOT DEALS COOL PRICES

1989 CHEVY CORVETTE 6-SPEED, GREAT CONDITION! UNDER 30K ORIGINAL MILES, THIS CAR IS FAST!! #30817

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Sale!

2015 CHEVY SILVERADO 2500 HIGH COUNTRY 4X4 DURAMAX 6.6L DIESEL TURBO V8, LOADED WITH FEATURES! #16618 ONLY $52,995

2016 FORD EXPEDITION EL XLT 4X4 SUV 3RD-ROW, ONE-OWNER, BACK-UP CAM, EXTRA CLEAN! #17318 ONLY $30,995

A PA RT I A L LI ST OF OU R CU R R E NT I N V E NTORY OF CA RS, T RU C KS, SU Vs & VA N S SUVS & VANS

CARS

TRUCKS

2014 VW Touareg Diesel, 29mpg, NICE! #11218 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $30,995 2010 Subaru Impreza WRX STI Wagon 6-Spd! #19218 . . . . . . . . . . . . $28,995 2011 BMW M3 Convertible Hardtop #15118 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $27,995 2013 Ford Mustang 5.0 6 Spd Manual #48017. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $24,995 2016 Dodge Charger SXT AWD, 30mpg #22617. . . . . . . . . . . . . . $21,995 2016 Ford Mustang Convertible #37917 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $18,995 2016 Honda Civic 40 MPG, Nice! #04718 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17,995 2011 Dodge Charger AWD V8, 370 HP #39417 . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16,995 2015 Honda Civic Great Gas Saver! #19818 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15,995 2005 Chevy Cruze Diesel, 46mpg! #14318 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,995 2001 Chevy Corvette Glass Roof, NICE! #34117. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,995 2011 Mini Cooper Turbo Moonroof #17018 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $13,995 2012 Honda Civic SI 6-speed Manual #13618 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $13,995 2012 Toyota Prius Plug-In Hybrid 51 MPG! #08618 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $13,995

2015 Chevy Silverado 2500 4x4 Lifted NICE!! #19118 . . . . . $58,995 2015 Chevy Silverado 2500HD 4x4 Diesel LOADED! #16618. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $52,995 2014 Ram 2500 Laramie 4x4 Diesel Turbo #21018. $50,995 2011 GMC Sierra 2500HD SLE 4x4 Z71 Duramax #02918 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $39,995 2012 Ram 3500 ST 4x4 Diesel Turbo #20718. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $35,995 2016 GMC Canyon 4x4 Crew Cab Loaded! #07717. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $35,995 2014 Ford F-150 XLT 4x4 EcoBoost CrewCab #23817 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32,995 2016 Ram 1500 4x4 EcoDiesel, Crew Cab #06918. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32,995 2013 Ram 2500 Tradesman 4x4 HEMI Crew Cab #40617. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $29,995 2014 Toyota Tundra 4x4 Crew Cab #17618 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $28,995 2016 Ram 1500 Express 4x4 Crew, BU Camera #37317 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $28,995 2017 Ram 1500 4x4 Crew Cab, BU Cam. #38117 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $28,995 2014 Ram 1500 Lonestar 4x4 Crew Cab #33917. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $27,995 2013 Ram 1500 SLT 4x4 Quad Cab #05418 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $22,995 2013 Ford F-150 XL 4x4 EcoBoost, Crew Cab #44117. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $21,995

1998 Chevy Corvette Leather, Black Matte #27017. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $13,995 2012 Kia Forte Koup 6 Spd Manual, Moonroof #14118 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $11,995 2015 Chevy Spark 5 Spd, 38 MPG! #09918 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10,995 2011 Chevy Cruze Turbo Great Gas Saver! #08718 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10,995 2011 Nissan Leaf Electric, Nav! #06118 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9,995 2013 Ford Fiesta SE 5 Spd Manual #37217 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,995

2005 Ram 2500 ST 4x4 Leather, 6 Speed #12618 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $18,995 2012 Ford F-150 XLT 4x4 Super Cab 5.0L #38917. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17,995 2008 Toyota Tundra V6, Campershell #04018 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,995 2004 Chevrolet Colorado Z71 Crew Cab #19518 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,995 2005 GMC Sierra 1500 SLE 4x4 Z71 Ex-Cab #49917 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $11,995 2000 Ford F-150 XLT 4x4 Lifted, Ex-Cab #09518 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $11,995

2017 Ford Explorer AWD 3rd Row, LIKE NEW! #14718 . . . . . . . . . . . . 2016 Toyota Sequoia 4x4 3rd Row Seating #10118. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2013 Audi Q7 3.0 TDI AWD Diesel, 3rd Row #08818 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2014 Ford Explorer 3rd-Row, Like New! #12818 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2015 Toyota Highlander LE 3rd Row, AWD! #14918 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2016 Chevy Traverse AWD 3rd Row! #04218 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2016 Nissan Pathfinder 4x4 3rd Row! #02118 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2016 Subaru Forester 6 Spd Manual #34017 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2011 Nissan Pathfinder AWD 3rd Row Seating! #36717 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2016 Ford Escape SE AWD Like New! #07617 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2010 Audi Q7 3rd Row, Navigation #42517. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2011 Chevy Traverse 3rd Row, Loaded! #46517 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2011 Nissan Armada 3rd Row #17118 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

$35,995 $34,995 $27,995 $27,995 $26,995 $23,995 $22,995 $21,995 $19,995 $18,995 $18,995 $17,995 $15,995

2016 Jeep Compass 4x4 Like New! #18318 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15,995 2009 Subaru Forester AWD Leather! #07018 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $13,995 2007 Honda CR-V AWD Leather! #40917 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $13,995 2008 Buick Enclave 3rd Row, Leather! #09818 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,995 2013 Kia Soul+ Back-Up Cam #10418 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,995 2009 Lexus RX 350 Navigation #13718 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,995

V I E W OU R I N V E NTORY ON LI N E AT

ROYSAUTOCENTER.COM

You gotta see the boys at Roy’s!

5th & Broadway Eureka

707-443-3008

Like us on facebook!

2 Locations to Ser ve Yo u !

facebook.com/roysautocenter All vehicles subject to prior sale. All prices plus tax, license, smog & documentation. Prices good through 6/19/18.

5th & A Street Eureka

707-443-7697

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, June 14, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

53


Marketplace

Real Estate

Art & Collectibles

Computer & Internet

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WRITING CONSULTANT/EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. (707) 443−8373. www.ZevLev.com

METAL ROOFING

Macintosh Computer Consulting for Business and Individuals Troubleshooting Hardware/Memory Upgrades Setup Assistance/Training Purchase Advice 707-826-1806 macsmist@gmail.com

Clothing

Home Repair

FLASHBACK

2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. Although we have been in busi− ness for 25 years, we do not carry a contractors license. Call 845−3087

Nu-WaveÂŽ Corrugated

June is featuring the ’50s!

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HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS. Opening soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedroom Apts. Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $20,900, 2 pers. $23,900; 3 pers. $26,900; 4 pers. $29,850; 5 pers. $32,250; 6 pers. $34,650; 7 pers. $37,050; 8 pers. $39,450 Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922 Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Bldg. 9 Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104

Please vote for us!

best real estate office

Home & garden improvement experts on page 24.

And Best Real Estate Agent JOSHUA COOK

442-1400 Ă—319 melissa@ northcoastjournal.com

northcoastjournal.com/BOH18

WWW.CARLJOHNSONCO.COM 3950 Jacobs Ave. Eureka

707-443-4851

116 W. Wabash 443-3259 Mon. 1-6 Weds.-Sat. 1-6

GAS FIREPLACES

“Clothes with Soul�

REASONABLE RATES Decking, Fencing, Siding, Power Washing, Doors, Windows Honest & Reliable, Retired Contractor (707) 382−8655 sagehomerepair@gmail.com

Miscellaneous SEER Fortunes Told. Reasonable 707−382−8332

WWW.CARLJOHNSONCO.COM 3950 Jacobs Ave. Eureka

707-443-4851

Auto Service LOST PARAKEET − HUMBOLDT HILL On Sunday, May 30, my parakeet escaped from her cage and flew out the front door. Tweety is female with a green body and yellow head and has a band on her leg from Petco. CONTACT 707−497−7312

ROCK CHIP? Windshield repair is our specialty. For emergency service CALL GLASWELDER 442−GLAS (4527), humboldtwindshieldrepair.com

Musicians & Instructors BRADLEY DEAN ENTERTAINMENT Singer Songwriter. Old rock, Country, Blues. Private Parties, Bars, Gatherings of all kinds. (707) 832−7419.

Cleaning

Marketplace Other Professionals CIRCUS NATURE PRESENTS A. O’KAY CLOWN & NANINATURE Juggling Jesters & Wizards of Play Performances for all ages. Magical Adventures with circus games and toys, Festivals, Events & Parties (707) 499−5628 www.circusnature.com

Dishes, Glasses & Cups All Half Off!

PLUS DAILY BONUS SALES • Senior Discount Tuesdays • Spin’n’Win Wednesdays • New Sale Thursdays • Friday Frenzy • Secret Sale Saturdays Where your shopping dollars support local youth!

(530) 629-3006

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ď ‰ď Žď€ ď ˆď ?ď ?ď …ď€ ď “ď …ď ’ď –ď ‰ď ƒď …ď “ ď —ď Ľď€ ď Ąď ˛ď Ľď€ ď ¨ď Ľď ˛ď Ľď€ ď Śď Żď ˛ď€ ď šď Żď ľ ď ’ď Ľď §ď Šď łď ´ď Ľď ˛ď Ľď ¤ď€ ď Žď ľď ˛ď łď Ľď€ ď łď ľď °ď °ď Żď ˛ď ´ ď ?ď Ľď ˛ď łď Żď Žď Ąď Źď€ ď ƒď Ąď ˛ď Ľ ď Œď Šď §ď ¨ď ´ď€ ď ˆď Żď ľď łď Ľď Ťď Ľď Ľď °ď Šď Žď § ď ď łď łď Šď łď ´ď Ąď Žď Łď Ľď€ ď ˇď Šď ´ď ¨ď€ ď ¤ď Ąď Šď Źď šď€  ď Ąď Łď ´ď Šď śď Šď ´ď Šď Ľď ł ď ’ď Ľď łď °ď Šď ´ď Ľď€ ď Łď Ąď ˛ď Ľď€ ď€Śď€ ď ­ď ľď Łď ¨ď€  ď ­ď Żď ˛ď Ľ ď ‰ď Žď łď ľď ˛ď Ľď ¤ď€ ď€Śď€ ď ‚ď Żď Žď ¤ď Ľď ¤

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Dream Quest Thrift Store June 14-20

Body, Mind & Spirit

CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING Services available. Call Julie 839−1518.

Hiring? Post your job opportunities in the Journal. 442-1400 Ă—314 classified@northcoastjournal.com

54 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 14, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

ď ‹ď Žď ‰ď †ď …ď€ ď “ď ˆď ď ’ď ?ď …ď Žď ‰ď Žď ‡ Â?‹˜‡•ČˆŽƒ†‡•ČˆŠ‡ƒ”• ”‹Â?Â?‡”•Čˆ—•–‘Â?”†‡”• ‹…Â?Â’ƒÂ?†”‘’ÂˆÂˆÇŁ

ď ď ’ď ƒď ď ”ď ď€şď€ ď ď Źď Źď€ ď •ď Žď ¤ď Ľď ˛ď€ ď ˆď Ľď Ąď śď Ľď Ž ď ď ˛ď Łď Ąď ´ď Ąď€ ď ?ď Źď Ąď şď Ąď€Źď€ ď€¸ď€˛ď€ľď€­ď€ˇď€ˇď€śď€° ď …ď •ď ’ď …ď ‹ď ď€şď€ ď Œď Šď ´ď ´ď Źď Ľď€ ď Šď Ąď °ď Ąď Ž ď ˆď Ľď Žď ¤ď Ľď ˛ď łď Żď Žď€ ď ƒď Ľď Žď ´ď Ľď ˛ď€Źď€ ď€ˇď€šď€¸ď€­ď€śď€°ď€°ď€ł

Ä†Ä—Ä›ÄŠÄžÇŻÄ˜Ä?ĆėĕnjēnjÄ?ĎēČĘ ͚Ͳ͚͸ͳ͸nj͚Ͳʹʹ

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442-1400 Ă—305 northcoastjournal.com

ď “ď Ľď ˛ď śď Šď Žď §ď€ ď Žď Żď ˛ď ´ď ¨ď Ľď ˛ď Žď€ ď ƒď Ąď Źď Šď Śď Żď ˛ď Žď Šď Ąď€ ď€  ď Śď Żď ˛ď€ ď Żď śď Ľď ˛ď€ ď€˛ď€°ď€ ď šď Ľď Ąď ˛ď łď€Ą

HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./ Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing profes− sionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822−2111 default

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Consider Vasectomy‌ Twenty-minute, in-office procedure In on Friday, back to work on Monday Friendly office with soothing music to calm you

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ď ”ď Żď Źď Źď€ ď Śď ˛ď Ľď Ľď€ ď€ąď€­ď€¸ď€ˇď€ˇď€­ď€šď€śď€´ď€­ď€˛ď€°ď€°ď€ą

Let’s Be Friends

Performing Vasectomies & Tubal Ligations for Over 35 Years Tim Paik-Nicely, MD 2505 Lucas Street, Suite B, Eureka, CA 95501 (707) 442-0400

YOUR AD HERE

442-1400 Ă—314 northcoastjournal.com


Kyla Tripodi

Owner/ Land Agent

Owner/Broker

Realtor

Realtor

Realtor

BRE #01930997

BRE #01956733

BRE #01919487

BRE #02044086

BRE #01332697

707.834.7979

707.601.1331

707.362.6504

530.784.3581

707.476.0435 NEW LIS

TING!

Katherine Fergus

Charlie Tripodi

NEW LIS

TING!

1322 SUNNY LANE, EUREKA - $390,000

Willow Creek New 4,500 sf building zoned C - 2 w/ hwy 299 frontage, 2 addresses, ADA compliant. OMC. carry!

NEW LIS

TING!

1437 3RD STREET, EUREKA - $379,000

TING!

REDUCE

D PRICE

ISLAND MOUNTAIN RD - LAND/PROPERTY - $449,000 REDUCE

D PRICE

2/1 home on ±118 Acres w/PG&E, spring, creek, well, barn & more! Permits for 15k ML. BACK ON

THE MARK

ET

D PRICE

!

HARRIS - LAND/PROPERTY - $295,000

±40 Acres w/privacy, springs, pond, cabin, garden sites, shop. Interim for 16,650 sf outdoor.

591 KNOX COVE - MCKINLEYVILLE - $949,000 Brand new 3000 sf 4 bed 3 bath custom home on flat ¾ acre ocean view lot in Knox Cove subdivision.

BENBOW - LAND/PROPERTY - $529,000

STAMPED PERMIT for 1,480 sf OD, 8,520 sf ML & 315 sf nursery on 20 ac. Springs, pond, water storage, process shed.

3202 GREENWOOD HEIGHTS - $579,000

3 bed/3 bath custom home on 3.5 acres w/ vaulted ceilings, fireplace, garage, paved driveway, shop.

TRINIDAD - HOME ON ACREAGE - $875,000

±30 Acres off grid w/ springs, Luffenholtz creek, trails, custom redwood home & ocean views. Off grid with hydroelectric.

!

BERRY SUMMIT - LAND/PROPERTY - $229,000 ±28 Acres w/developed building sites, paved county road access, views. Power on adj parcel. OWC.

±110 Acres w/ Eel River Frontage, access to swimming holes, rolling meadows. Range Land zoning.

MAD RIVER-HOME ON ACREAGE-$995,000

REDUCE

1320 sf commercial building w/ 4 offices, kitchen, ADA bath, ADA ramp entrance, parking lot.

2/1 home w/ wrap around deck, in ground pool, pool house, landscaped gardens, garage/loft space. NEW LIS

Hailey Rohan

WILLOW CREEK - COMMERCIAL BUILDING - $1,500,000

Unique 2 story 3/2 home surrounded by greenbelt w/ creek, bunk house, jacuzzi, outdoor shower & more!

130 FLAMETREE, HAWKINS BAR - $285,000

Tyla Miller

!

210 PANTHER RD, WILLOW CREEK - $259,000

REDUCE

D PRICE

!

3/2 home on 1.9 acres, fully fenced w/river views. Detached garage & outbuildings.

WILLOW CREEK - LAND/PROPERTY - $849,500 STAMPED PERMIT for 10,000 sf ML. ±5 Acres w/ solar, PG&E, public water, ADA process shed.

BERRY SUMMIT - HOME ON ACREAGE - $599,000

REDUCE

D PRICE

!

2/2 home on ±130 Acres w/ pool, deck, garage, screened in patio, spring & Redwood Creek access.

3311 GLENWOOD ST, EUREKA - $237,000 2 bed 2 bath home w/ concrete countertops, lots of windows, bonus room, large fully fenced yard, shed.

SALYER - LAND/PROPERTY - $229,000

REDUCE

D PRICE

!

±71 Acres w/ timber, flats, creek headwaters, well, septic, outbuildings, 3-acre conversion.

102 MARIGOLD LN, WILLOW CREEK - $525,000

Rental income property w/3 homes on 3 Acres. Public utilities, close to town, private, tenants in place.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, June 14, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

55


b e Th

& t F ather's da s e f r e t s y o y de est

Visit us!

als !

JUNE 16 & 17 SPECIALS Spend $35 get a free pre-roll

10% off in-house eighths

10% off first time members

Huge Edible Blowout! through the month of June

Stock up on all your favorite snacks and sweets. All edibles between 10% and 30% off. Be sure to grab some Soul Sugar: 10mg Single Serve Snacks in sweet & savory flavors just $1.50 each (while supplies last)

THE HUMBOLDT CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION

707-822-9330 • 6th & I St., Arcata M-Th 10am-7pm • Fri 10am-8pm • Sat 11am-8pm • Sun 11am-6pm

North Coast Journal 6-14-18 Edition  

'Highway Robbery'

North Coast Journal 6-14-18 Edition  

'Highway Robbery'

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