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HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIF. • FREE Thursday May 24, 2018 Vol XXIX Issue 21 northcoastjournal.com

15 The cat box dox 22 Chef swap 24 Clucking clowns


2 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 24, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com


Contents 5 8 11

Mailbox Poem

36

Crescent City is One Enormous Cosmic Tidepool

37 44 44 45 45

Franchise in Anti-hero’s Clothing

Guest Views A Real Answer to the Single-Payer Debate

13

Filmland

Week in Weed

ROADS ARE TEARING UP TRUCKS!

Workshops & Classes Free Will Astrology Cartoons Sudoku & Crossword Classifieds

Hold My Oreo

15 16

NCJ Daily On The Cover

HOW’S YOUR RIDE DOING?

The Fights for the Fourth and the Fifth

22

Table Talk New Tricks

24

Front Row Thesis Festival Time

25

The Setlist Art, Motion and Sound

26

Music & More!

TIME TO SEE LEON’S CAR CARE?

Live Entertainment Grid

30 31

Calendar Home & Garden Service Directory

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ST ASIAN RESTAURANT BEST ERY BEST BAR BEST BARTENDER BBQ BEST BLOODY MARY BEST EAKFAST BEST BREWERY BEST RGER BEST COFFEE HOUSE BEST FFEE ROASTER BEST MARKET T DIVE BAR BEST DONUT BEST IN SOHUM BEST FISH & CHIPS ST FOOD TRUCK BEST FRENCH S BEST FRIED PICKLE BEST ART LERY BEST BEER FESTIVAL BEST P SITE BEST CLUB DJ BEST FOOD TIVAL BEST GOLF COURSE BEST TORIC BUILDING BEST KARAOKE ST LOCAL ARTIST BEST LOCAL UTHOR BEST MUSICIAN BEST OO ARTIST BEST ACUPUNCTURE

Hear ye... Hear ye... Hear ye...

W

ho amongst us shall be crowned? It is up to all who dwell in the County of Humboldt. The most humble subjects at North Coast Journal will soon be taking nominations for the best in the land. That is the question posed by NCJ’s 2018 Best of Humboldt Readers Poll: Who treats you like royalty? Which people, places, and things shall be deemed the best?

Nominations begin on May 1st, so consider your options now, and prepare yourself to...

Hail

to the

Best!

Here’s how Best of Humboldt works:  : May 1 - May 30. You nominate your favorite person, place or business in each category.

 :

BEST ASIAN RESTAURANT BEST BAKERY BEST BAR BEST BARTENDER BEST BBQ BEST BLOODY MARY BEST BREAKFAST BEST BREWERY BEST BURGER BEST COFFEE HOUSE BEST COFFEE ROASTER BEST DELI/MEAT MARKET BEST DIVE BAR BEST DONUT BEST EATS IN SOHUM BEST FISH & CHIPS BEST FOOD TRUCK BEST FRENCH FRIES BEST FRIED PICKLE BEST ART GALLERY BEST BEER FESTIVAL BEST CAMP SITE BEST CLUB DJ BEST FOOD FESTIVAL BEST GOLF COURSE BEST HISTORIC BUILDING BEST KARAOKE BEST LOCAL ARTIST BEST LOCAL AUTHOR BEST MUSICIAN BEST TATTOO ARTIST BEST ACUPUNCTURE BEST ANTIQUE STORE BEST

June 4 - June 30. We do the math and find the top three nominees. Then you vote for your favorite out of those three.

So how do we make sure there’s no cheating or robo-voting? You’ll have to make an account and confirm your email, but it’s super quick and easy, we promise! This year’s system has been redesigned to be easier to use than ever. Once your account is up and running, you can nominate and vote once a day. Vote for as many or as few categories as you like. All hail to the best!

4 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 24, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com


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Mailbox

MINI-EXCAVATOR SERVICE

Vote Madrone! Editor: How my dad got the name Stephen SunGnome Madrone is a favorite family story. His last name had already been changed when his mother was remarried, so my parents decided on a new family name: Madrone. Chosen for its far reaching branches and deep roots, Madrone could not be more fitting for our family. And SunGnome? When my sister was 4, playing hide and seek, my dad popped up from behind a stump, making her laugh and squeal, “You’re like a sun gnome!” It stuck. She kept calling him a sun gnome and soon so was everyone else. He loved that nickname from his spunky little daughter and made it his middle name. Some might think these names weird but, for me, they speak to the kind of parent my dad is and the family values he holds. So there you have it! Amber Madrone, McKinleyville Editor: When there was a slight possibility to keep Sinclair Media from devouring some of our local airwaves, I called our supervisors to see if they would express concern to the FCC about this sale/ takeover by this mega media giant. I actually spoke with Mr. Sundberg. He commented how he had received calls from other people regarding this issue, yet he was totally clueless and what was worse, he was dismissive. I was basically ignored. Then, most recently, up comes the Mercer-Fraser proposal. What a totally stupid, irresponsible, dangerous plan!! And Sundberg has no claim to its withdrawal. With all the water woes we are witness to just about everywhere, every day, who is crazy enough to want to risk our amazing supplies? There is no amount of money to replace our Mad and Trinity rivers. A change is clearly needed. Vote for Steve Madrone! Kathryn Travers, Eureka Editor: For over 20 years, Steve Madrone’s family and mine shared the miracles of birth, the joys of weddings and the sorrows of death. Steve, his wife and children have contributed amazing work and advocacy in Humboldt County. Throughout those years my career with underprivileged youth, fish habitat and trails allowed me to witness his tireless

efforts to create the Hammond Trail and restore salmon in the Mattole. Steve is able to cut through red tape and political divides to find creative and collaborative solutions to the issues that threaten our community. He’s never been beholden to corporations or outside influences. The endorsements and contributions in this race show who represents the working people and who represents the powerful and elite. Steve has proven time and again that he does not cave to pressure, can’t be bought and will never stop speaking on behalf of those who have no voice. Phil Heidrick, McKinleyville Editor: What a privilege to be able to vote for a candidate I can truly support, and who I believe really will have the best interests of Humboldt County people at heart. Steve Madrone has the ideas, skills and vision to serve the Fifth District and people all over the county. He brings a real concern for people to the job of supervisor, with intelligent and well thought-out perspectives on issues from schools to elder housing, from protection of water and natural resources to approaches to cannabis that will serve all of us, not can justwe big putbusiness. "please!" Madrone has the expertise to help us navigate economic, social and environmental challenges, and he has the integrity to treat all sides fairly and even-handedly. How great that someone of Steve Madrone’s caliber is willing to devote himself to work for all of us. He has my vote. Brenda Cooper, Trinidad Editor: Watershed health should be a core issue in the Fifth District, which has four of our region’s “six rivers” running through it. Thus the lack of understanding of basic principles of watershed function revealed in Supervisor Ryan Sundberg’s statement that a hash lab project on the Mad River was not a threat to public health because it would be located 2 feet outside the flood plain, is startling. Our region is a leader in pioneering the science of watershed restoration. Our scientists and restoration specialists act as consultants to governments and NGO groups all over the world. Steve Madrone has had hands-on involvement in watershed restoration since its beginnings here in Humboldt and understands

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Please Nominate Your Favorite Humboldt County Collective

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Continued on next page »

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 24, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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HAPPY HOUR

Continued from previous page

MOn-FRi 2:30-6pm

May 24, 2018 • Volume XXIX Issue 21 North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com

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ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2018 Publisher Judy Hodgson judy@northcoastjournal.com General Manager Chuck Leishman chuck@northcoastjournal.com News Editor Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com Arts & Features Editor Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com Assistant Editor/Staff Writer Kimberly Wear kim@northcoastjournal.com Staff Writer Linda Stansberry linda@northcoastjournal.com Calendar Editor Kali Cozyris calendar@northcoastjournal.com Contributing Writers John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Wendy Chan, Barry Evans, Gabrielle Gopinath, Collin Yeo Art Director/Production Manager Holly Harvey holly@northcoastjournal.com Graphic Design/Production Miles Eggleston, Carolyn Fernandez, Jacqueline Langeland, Amy Waldrip, Jonathan Webster ncjads@northcoastjournal.com Creative Services Manager Lynn Leishman lynn@northcoastjournal.com Advertising Manager Melissa Sanderson melissa@northcoastjournal.com Advertising Linus Lorenzen linus@northcoastjournal.com Tyler Tibbles tyler@northcoastjournal.com Kyle Windham kyle@northcoastjournal.com Social Media Coordinator Sam Armanino sam@northcoastjournal.com Classified Advertising Mark Boyd classified@northcoastjournal.com Office Manager Annie Kimball annie@northcoastjournal.com Bookkeeper Deborah Henry billing@northcoastjournal.com

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The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 21,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 450 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

the importance of watersheds to our health and economy. We need a supervisor with his experience, knowledge and commitment. If you live in the Fifth District, please get out and vote for Steve Madrone on June 5. Emelia Berol, McKinleyville Editor: In the 1950s and 60s, when I grew up, scouting was in its heyday and a big part of the lives of my brothers, cousins and friends. It was a big factor in building the character and skills in the ethical and productive men they became. And becoming an Eagle Scout was a big deal then. The percentage of boys involved was large, and very few were able to meet its requirements. So this one of the many accomplishments in Steve Madrone’s resume means a lot to me. It shows in his broad vision, knowledge and curiosity; his large and close family; his deep concern for fairness, community and the future of this planet; and in his energy to work hard and fight for what he thinks is right. I think he is the best prepared of any candidate I have ever seen for Humboldt County supervisor. Joyce King, McKinleyville

About Those Endorsements Editor: I like to look at who is endorsing candidates to help me decide who to vote for, but in my district’s board of supervisors race, three major Native American tribes are endorsing non-Native American Steve Madrone, and Democrats Huffman, McGuire, and Wood, are endorsing non-Democrat Ryan Sundberg. I’d suggest people read the op-ed piece in the Times-Standard (“Incumbents Endorsing Incumbents,” April 26), which explains how our representatives in Congress, Assembly and state Senate ignore the endorsements of our local Democratic central committee to endorse incumbents. Four years ago, Huffman endorsed incumbent Ryan Sundberg even before the filing date for candidates closed. The article says a staff member told the writer that Huffman makes his choice not as our representative or based on party platform, but as an individual who works with the incumbent. I hope that voters realize that these powerful-looking, out-of-county endorsers aren’t looking at what is best for us locally. Jean Browning, McKinelyville


‘Crocodile Tears’ Editor: There are many ways unscrupulous politicians will misguide their constituents. One nefarious way is through appointments. Many local officials have the authority to appoint members to powerful committees, such as the planning commission — appointees whose predilections they know full-well in advance of the selection. These nominees often have well-established track records. Like those who’ve supported big-money development projects, the interests of the average constituent and the environment be damned. Said official then cries crocodile tears to the citizenry about how “they” were never in support of said project, glossing over the fact that it was their appointee who voted for and, often, advocated for others to also vote for a developer’s project. I’d much rather live under an honest politician with whom I disagreed than the sort who duplicitously feigns concern while surreptitiously maneuvering to smooth the way for that which he or she now claims to oppose. Richard Salzman, Arcata

Vote Sundberg! Editor: I am writing to express my support of Ryan Sundberg in the upcoming election. Ryan is respectful, kind, practical, hardworking and accessible. I have worked with Ryan during his two terms as Fifth District supervisor on projects that focus on improving the lives of the most vulnerable people in our community, including children, people living in poverty and families in crisis. Ryan cares about the health and safety of all of the people in our district, and has the knowledge and skills to make meaningful change. I am consistently impressed with Ryan’s honesty, his ability to bring together people with a variety of views to work toward a common good, his steady optimism and his steadfastness in his pursuit of positive outcomes for our community. We need more politicians like Ryan: people who work across political divides, tell the truth, stay positive, serve with humility and care about real people. Keep up the good work, Ryan! Hillarie Beyer, McKinleyville Editor: The purpose of this letter is to encourage all of you to get out and vote Tuesday, June 5. More specifically, I would encourage Continued on next page »

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Mailbox Continued from previous page

you to re-elect Fifth District Supervisor Ryan Sundberg. Having known Ryan for almost 35 years, I have found him to be honest, trustworthy, intelligent and most capable to achieve goals for the benefit of our county. As a member of the Humboldt County Fish and Game Citizens Advisory Committee, I have seen first-hand Ryan’s commitment to his constituents through his attention to detail and thoughtful responses to issues that have been brought before him. I believe that Ryan Sundberg’s experience and perspective is what Humboldt County needs to stay the course and to lead us into the next decade. Loren Furber, McKinleyville Editor: I have to laugh when I see obtuse political statements like the other guy’s beholden to his big donors but I am not beholden to my big donors. The other guy can’t be trusted but you can trust me. So what I look at when I decide who to vote for is who’s getting the job

done on a constant basis, who runs a positive campaign and who I have the trust factor in. Although I think both the candidates have good qualities, the choice is clear to me as it should be to you that Ryan Sundberg is more then just a cut above. His remarkable efforts as a freshman California Coastal Commissioner saved Humboldt County’s oyster industry. He is someone to be admired and I ask you to vote for him for Fifth District supervisor. Kevin Collins, McKinleyville Editor: I am writing to encourage the citizens of Humboldt County to re-elect Ryan Sundberg as District 5 supervisor. I’ve known Ryan and his family for 40 years. He’s a man with integrity and he has the best interests of all his constituents in his heart. He knows the problems existing in Humboldt County and he is not afraid to tackle them. He’s approachable and will listen to your concerns. He’s also representing Humboldt

8 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 24, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

Crescent City is One Enormous Cosmic Tidepool Nature raves in Crescent City The rain beats a drumroll on the earth The ocean eats the coast The wind tears the great trees limb from limb The waves hammer the seastacks into sand The human presence clings like a limpet to a rock, crying please, please let me stay — Cecelia Holland

County on the coastal commission and on the EPA Local Advisory Commission. He takes time to know the issues impacting our region and he is willing to listen to both sides before making a decision. A vote for Ryan Sundberg is a vote for the future of Humboldt County. Lisa Spellenberg, McKinleyville

Editor: As a longtime business owner and resident of the Fifth District, I urge everyone to support Ryan Sundberg for supervisor. Ryan grew up in Humboldt County, attended local schools and graduated with a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Humboldt State University. Ryan and his wife Kim, who was also born and raised here, have chosen to stay and raise their daughter Sofie in the Fifth District. It has been very difficult to watch supporters of his opponent sling exaggeratons, half-truths and outright lies about Ryan while Ryan continues to campaign honorably, demonstrating his commitment to resident and community interests. Clearly Madrone attracts and caters to individuals comfortable with dirty tactics — tactics Ryan has consistently choses not to use. We should not, and cannot, trust anyone else to represent our district. Please join me in voting for Ryan Sundberg as Fifth District supervisor on June 5. Wes Green Jr., McKinleyville


Editor: Clear differences do make a difference. Sungnome Madrone says that Senate Bill 562 (the Healthy California Act) advocacy group knows what the bill would cost Californians. He has said that Supervisor Sundberg is uninformed because Sundberg said at this time he did not have enough information and did not know how it would be funded. Fact: The state Assembly where this funding assessment must be done has tabled S.B. 562 and will bring it back next legislative session. Although you might support the concept, you cannot be a conscientious decision-maker without knowing all the facts. Good governance requires assessing clear differences. Vote for Sundberg in the Fifth District. Wayne Palmer, McKinleyville

work on solutions to local problems. Ryan is hands-on and knows how to get things done! Please join me in voting for Ryan Sundberg. Mike Pigg, McKinleyville Editor: In these days of candidates offering false promises to get elected, it’s

refreshing to see an incumbent who has proven he delivers! Ryan Sundberg consistently delivers to his constituents, throughout his tenure as Fifth District supervisor. From his tireless advocacy to build the McKinleyville Sheriff Substation, where we have 11 deputies serving our district, when we had only two before, to work on the coastal com-

mission and EPA Advisory Committee, Sundberg delivered, keeping our streets and environment safe and clean. His opponent, on the other hand, makes promises of fresh ideas, yet offers no solutions as to how to implement them. Sound familiar? Sundberg has proven he delivers results. From making Continued on next page »

Editor: I know someone who has done remarkable service to our community, someone who doesn’t try to take credit for others’ hard work, someone who is humble and takes little credit for all the good he actually does. It’s refreshing to see someone act like a neighbor, friend, role model. I know someone who is an elected official who acts like a statesman, not a short-sighted politician. I know someone whose agenda is to serve his community. I will vote for that person in the Fifth District election. I will vote for Ryan Sundberg. Carol Palmer, McKinleyville Editor: I have lived in McKinleyville all my life. I have been a dairyman and farmer all my life, too. The soil, water and air are most important to me. Without them, good milk can’t exist. This community is lucky to be blessed with quality air, water and soil. We are also blessed to have someone helping to protect them, someone who is protecting our kids, schools and community values, too. For these reasons and more, I urge everyone to join me and vote to re-elect Ryan Sundberg for Fifth District supervisor. Bruno Pialorsi, McKinleyville Editor: I strongly support Fifth District Supervisor Ryan Sundberg for re-election in 2018. Ryan is responsive to community concerns and is a strong advocate for Humboldt County. I have reached out to Ryan on several occasions and he is always willing to discuss concerns and northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 24, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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Mailbox Continued from previous page

McKinleyville’s Central Avenue wider and safer, to organizing and participating in neighborhood trash patrols, Sundberg’s hard work and dedication to serving all of the citizens of the Fifth District has proven he’s more than deserving of our continued support! Trent Shumard, McKinleyville

Vote Bass! Editor: Experience counts! Virginia Bass has demonstrated an ability to secure broad-based support for many economic and social programs as Fourth District supervisor. Her accomplishments and experience have been recognized by the California State Association of Counties (CSAC), where she currently serves at first vice president. CSAC is the preeminent state organization for advocacy of public policy in California. It is comprised of elected supervisors from all 58 California counties. For 2019, Virginia has been selected to assume the presidency of CSAC. Along with that position comes access to the highest levels of state government — up to and including the office of the governor of California. It would be the first time since the 1940s that a Humboldt County supervisor would be CSAC president! Virginia will represent all interests to state officials. At this time in our local history, we must take advantage of this opportunity. Vote Virginia Bass for Fourth District supervisor. Joel Canzoneri, Blue Lake

Burkhart, Madrone, Paz Dominguez! Editor: I have been dismayed by the misappropriation, mishandling, misplaced funds and corruption in this county, along with the “appointments” made for big money donors. We have grassroots progressive candidates running who do not have the big pockets of their opponents but we do have our voices! I applaud the humanity, science and logic of Dani Burkhart running for Fourth District, Steve Madrone running for Fifth District and the common sense and balls of Karen Paz Dominguez running for auditor-controller, who has found some serious problems within the department. We need people with the courage to fight for the people, and not just relax

and rake in the money. They also have the heart to support Senate Bill 562 because they know healthcare is a human right and not a commodity; the county should get out of the healthcare business! They are endorsed by Our Revolution Humboldt and Humboldt Progressive Democrats. Pat Kanzler, Eureka

Vote Paz Dominguez! Editor: Karen Paz Dominguez, that name has been thrown around in fury and spite, but do you know Karen? I have had the privilege of knowing Karen. I watch a strong, intelligent and compassionate woman who has taken on the world of numbers and accountability; and the world of wife and motherhood with integrity, honor and love. Karen will and does speak up against wrongdoing and injustice. She is strong and outspoken and, unfortunately, many are not comfortable with that. But those are the reasons I admire her. She is honest and hardworking and expects the same from those she works with. Karen is ready and willing to go as hard as needed to do the best for Humboldt. This is her home and community. So before you read the smears that are being thrown around … wonder why they would want to smear her. Vote Karen Paz Dominguez June 5! Erin Taylor, Eureka

Write a Letter! Please make your letter no more than 300 words and include your full name, place of residence and phone number (we won’t print your number). Send it to letters@northcoastjournal.com. The weekly deadline to be considered for the upcoming edition is 10 a.m. Monday.

Write an Election Letter! The Journal will be publishing letters related to local elections through May 31, meaning you have until 10 a.m. Monday, May 28 to get your opinion on the Humboldt County Board of Supervisors races, or any others, in print. Election letters must be no longer than 150 words — and we’ll only run one per writer per week. We’ll fit as many as we can into the print edition and run others online. Get writin’. l


Guest Views

A Real Answer to the Single-Payer Debate By Patty Harvey

views@northcoastjournal.com

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e pay taxes and local fees for water, sewage, garbage and protection, for essential services and infrastructure — an expected, rational cost for the common good. But there is one area of overlooked expense, one fraught with irrationality and inequity; namely, the literally millions of our local dollars going to buy health plans, including some high-level “Cadillac” policies for employees of our various civic institutions, city councils and service districts. Employees who enjoy these plans benefit from employer-subsidized low premiums and a golden medical safety net. Either they are not aware, or choose to ignore, the less visible costs they and all of us pay in addition to premiums to fill a growing deficit. The burgeoning medical need of some 12 million uninsured and underinsured has to be factored into our personal costs, which burden the economic well-being of our state. At the other end of the spectrum, all Californians are also paying for high-priced, lifetime healthcare plans for our lawmakers, both state and federal. We in the middle are left to scramble for our own health security. We don’t have to continue to do this. Healthcare costs in California, according to Assemblyman Jim Wood’s recent Select Committee report on healthcare, are now at a whopping $400 billion a year and expected to reach half a trillion dollars in a decade under our current system. All civic and business institutions, not to mention families and individuals, stagger under the burden of escalating medical and insurance costs. Our own North Coast Co-op, for example, reports a devastating $1 million-plus healthcare price tag this fiscal year, the McKinleyville Community Services District’s health insurance costs are more than $700,000 and even little Willow Creek struggles with a more than $90,000 annual insurance cost, to mention a few. Most of these institutions are eager to do something about it. Today, the main access to health security is offered through private, for-profit insurance companies. But when it comes to public service groups that serve the common good and whose mission statements promise “fiscal responsibility” to constituents, buying into such corporate profiteering defeats that promise. Surely

our leaders would like to do better, if they could find a way to use that money to improve our service instead of servicing insurance company coffers. There is a way. The Healthy California Act, Senate Bill 562, proposes to change the way Californians pay for their healthcare services. A single-payer system would obviate the need for multiple payers (namely, insurance companies) who waste some 30 to 50 percent of our healthcare dollars on administrative and advertising costs, duplicative and opaque paperwork, obscene CEO salaries and bonuses, and huge profits to delight their stockholders, according to a University of Massachusetts report. (Aetna CEO Mark Bertolini’s salary in 2017 hit $160,000 per day and last year that company took in more than $2.2 billion, according to SEC filings.) Not to mention the lawyers and policy wonks hired to deny and restrict payments. Your healthcare is the last of their concerns. Instead, under S.B. 562, healthcare providers would be paid from a state-monitored, publicly transparent, nonprofit trust fund absorbing all state and federal healthcare monies that now serve our system. That single fund would be dedicated to paying all medical and hospital bills (federal waivers needed for this are currently mandated by the Affordable Care Act, as specifically indicated by Assemblyman Wood’s Select Committee on Healthcare, even as Wood, himself, denies their accessibility). Cutting out the middlemen who collect profits and charge us to pay our bills would save the state some $37 billion, reducing the cost of universal care to $331 billion. California already collects $225 billion from federal and state subsidies that would be transferred to the single-payer, nonprofit trust fund from which all medical bills would be paid. The additional approximately $106 billion could be garnered through small increments of payroll and sales taxes (for details, Google, “SB 562 Pollin report”). Immediate protest can be heard loud and clear: “But we don’t want any more taxes!” To that, please consider: What if you never had to pay another medical bill, healthcare insurance premium, co-pay, deductible, out-of-pocket or out-ofnetwork fee? And you could go for any treatment by any doctor, clinic or hospital,

regardless of employment or lack thereof, age, gender, marital status or pre-existing conditions? Surely that’s worth a fewcents-on-the-dollar sales tax. Unfortunately, S.B. 562 now languishes in the Assembly Rules Committee, unilaterally sequestered by Speaker Anthony Rendon. Our own assemblyman, Jim Wood, abides that imprisonment. He claims to support the concept of universal healthcare coverage, but “just not by this bill.” Why? There is the niggling question of the more than $500,000 in campaign donations Wood has received from the healthcare industry, according to the National Institute of Money in Politics, donations he insists have no effect on his politics. Revealingly, however, he does want corporate insurers to play a role in his idea of universal coverage, a death-knell to the single-payer concept. Until we get money out of politics, the taint of cash poisons every word from a politician’s mouth, all claims to the contrary notwithstanding. A coalition of single-payer supporters is being created on the North Coast, represented by civic institutions that speak for all of us to show our legislators that we are united in a desire for single-payer healthcare. The city councils of Trinidad, Arcata, Eureka and Blue Lake as well as the community services districts of Manila, Willow Creek and Redway all suffer the crippling cost of healthcare premiums. They understand the financial relief they would enjoy by jettisoning this insurance burden. Accordingly, they have all signed a formal resolution to support movement of S.B. 562 into law. There are, however, some arenas that have so far been ambivalent about entertaining real debate on this issue; specifically, the Fortuna and Ferndale city councils, the McKinleyville Community Services District and our own Humboldt County Board of Supervisors. (Witness the BOS discussion here: https://youtu.be/8qesUqbcYPQ). Certainly these community leaders have immediate pressures and issues to wrestle. How much more easily might they contend with those issues given the added financial flexibility and freedom of being relieved of health insurance costs? Yes, people are afraid of change, but moving to a single-payer system is not reinventing the wheel. We have the instructive example of nearly every other industrialized democracy around the world that enjoys some form of single-payer healthcare. No one from another country has ever expressed the desire to trade for our non-system, as they spend half what we do on healthcare yet have better health outcomes. No one in these countries goes broke or homeless or dies from lack of medical care. California is the fifth

largest economy in the world. To suggest we “can’t afford” healthcare strains credibility. The reality is, we can’t afford not to. In the 1960s, the doctors of Saskatchewan screamed bloody murder at the idea of such a healthcare revolution. They even went on strike. As of today, they have been enjoying their single-payer system for almost 50 years. The latest from Canada was an article about how doctors in Toronto were offered a hefty pay raise: they refused, saying, “We already make plenty of money, please use the funds to improve the details of our public system” (BBC News, March 8, Why Quebec Doctors Have Rejected a Pay Raise). So the real crisis before us is public understanding. The powers that be need to hear that we do understand what’s at stake and we want them to do something about it. We don’t have money for big political contributions but we do have our voices. That’s where you come in. Every citizen of this district who cares about how their taxes and service fees are spent and envisions an equitable, universal, nonprofit solution to our current healthcare crisis should invite Fortuna, Ferndale, McKinleyville and the board of supervisors to free themselves from the chains of corporate health insurance by joining the 70 percent of Californians who want a single-payer system. Please contact and encourage the following groups to learn about, discuss and vote to move S.B. 562 forward in the Assembly: Ferndale City Council, (707) 786-4224 or cityclerk@ci.ferndale.ca.us Fortuna City Council, (707) 725-1409 McKinleyville CSD, (707) 839-3251 or mcsd@mckinleyvillecsd.com Humboldt County Board of Supervisors, (707) 476-2396 Assemblyman Jim Wood, (707) 445-7014, (916) 319-2002 or email him directly from his website Even better, go to their regular meetings where you will be allowed a three-minute public comment and a chance to stand up for the best county and state we can be. With your help, it can be done. l Patty Harvey lives in Willow Creek, is a retired teacher and current director of Health Care for All-Humboldt. She has been a Humboldt County resident off and on for more than five decades. Have something you want to get off your chest? Think you can help guide and inform public discourse? Then the North Coast Journal wants to hear from you. Contact us at editor@northcoastjournal. com to pitch your column ideas.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 24, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

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12 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 24, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

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Week in Weed

Hold My Oreo By Thadeus Greenson

newsroom@northcoastjournal.com

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ith little fanfare, the state of California released its revised cannabis industry regulations last week. The updated regs are largely seen as a baby step between the initial rules released late last year and what will become the final regulations later this year. The latter are largely considered shrug-worthy. “The first step that Neil Armstrong took on the moon, everybody noticed, but by step No. 43, nobody really cared anymore,” cracked California Growers Association Executive Director Hezekiah Allen in an interview with Marijuana Business Daily. What is noteworthy about the new rules from the Bureau of Cannabis Control, the Department of Food and Agriculture and the Department of Public Health is that they allow companies with medical licenses to continue to do business with those holding only adult-use, recreational licenses rather than requiring a separation, which would have been a huge disruption to the industry. Of special interest to Humboldt County is a provision requiring that if a product is branded as being from a specific county, 100 percent of the cannabis used in it must be from said county. The new regulations also outlaw what industry folks refer to as the “ice cream truck” delivery model, in which someone can load up a delivery truck with all kinds of cannabis products to have on hand as orders are placed online and a delivery driver cruises through town. Instead, delivery drivers now must receive orders and stock their vehicles at a brick-and-mortar location before making the rounds. There are some other tweaks — like allowing multiple license holders in a single facility to use the same break rooms and bathrooms — that are generally considered to be industry-friendly. But the big changes remain down the pipeline. Most notably, there’s the looming July 1 deadline, after which all cannabis products sold legally in California must pass stringent laboratory tests for potency, molds and pesticides, with products that fail testing facing the possibility of being destroyed. There’s an open question as to what will happen to the products left in dispensaries’ inventories that haven’t undergone lab testing. Many dispensaries stockpiled products prior to the new state regulations coming into effect Jan. 1 and

are now lobbying the state to allow them to have those same products — all grown and produced prior to the new regulations taking effect — lab tested to see if they are suitable for sale under the new paradigm, but state regulators have yet to decide the issue. Chris Walsh, an industry analyst and editorial vice president of MJBizDaily, meanwhile, reported at the Marijuana Business Conference in New Orleans this month that legal cannabis sales in the United States are expected to increase 50 percent this year, jumping to between $8 billion and $10 billion. And, he added, there’s an employment surge accompanying all these sales, with the industry now employing as many as 160,000 full-time workers — roughly six times the number of coal miners as are currently working in the country. And for those keeping score at home, the United States now has more full-time employees in the cannabis sector than employed librarians or kindergarten teachers. But Walsh didn’t stop there in his quest to quantify the economic power of the budding cannabis industry. Instead, he noted that cannabis sales revenue was nearly nine times that of Oreo cookies and almost on par with that of Netflix subscriptions. And Walsh prognosticates that with the addition of 2018 recreational sales in California, cannabis could surpass McDonald’s U.S. sales figures this year. Let’s break this down a bit. According to a 2017 survey by Statista, 5.64 million respondents said they had eaten eight or more 36-cookie packages of Oreos within the last 30 days, which averages out to at least 9.6 cookies a day. In 2017, according to Tech Crunch, Netflix subscribers in the United States watched more than 500 million hours of content a week, or a daily average of about an hour and 23 minutes apiece. McDonald’s, meanwhile, boasts of selling 75 hamburgers a second. What’s this all mean? Well, it appears if there’s one thing Americans may love more than artificial snack foods, binge watching television series and gorging on fast food, it might just be getting high AF. l Thadeus Greenson is the Journal’s news editor. Reach him at 442-1400, extension 321, or thad@northcoastjournal.com. Follow him on Twitter @thadeusgreenson. northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 24, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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14 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 24, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com


From NCJ Daily

Business Owner Doxxed Over Art Box Flap

I

n the week since she stood before the Eureka City Council to lament the brightly painted utility box out in front of her business, Molly Green has received a lot of backlash, some from thousands of miles away. The rift began when Green showed up at her business near Fifth and G streets in Eureka — SCRUB Spa and Event Venue — to find that, without her advance knowledge or approval, the utility box out front had been painted with a bright, whimsical mural titled “Cat Food” that featured a variety of food-shaped felines. A few days later, Green voiced her displeasure to the Eureka City Council, calling the mural a “really large, ugly, poorly done eyesore” and threatening to campaign vigorously against each of the councilmembers unless they did something to make the mural go away. The Lost Coast Outpost ran a story headlined “Outraged Eureka Business Owner Convinces City to Cover Cat Painting Right Meow” about Green’s heated council comments a couple of days later, detailing her frustration and the city’s subsequent move to paint over and replace the mural.  The post ended up on the front page of Reddit, an American social news aggregation and discussion website, with a note revealing all of Green’s personal contact information. During an interview with the Journal, she played a voicemail from New York in which an unidentified man refers to

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her as a “cunt,” “a moron” and “uptight.” “Congratulations, now everyone in every fucking state knows what a piece of shit you are from California to New York,” he said. In regard to the public backlash, Green wanted to clarify her position. “I absolutely am a supporter of local art,” she said. “Yes, I was angry but I don’t think people realize the emotion it takes to get up there and stand up for yourself. Our city officials should be supporting business as well as try to grow the arts community.” The Box Art project, which is making over utility boxes throughout the city with bright murals by a variety of artists, is part of the city’s Strategic Arts Plan put in place in 2017. The plan focuses on 35 projects designed to improve exposure of, access to and respect for arts and culture in the community by paying local artists to paint murals throughout town, including on utility boxes. “We want to add a little sunshine to Eureka,” said Community Development Services Director Rob Holmlund. The Box Art project featured a competitive selection process open to individual artists, or community groups with a designated lead artist, who have “the vision and skills required to complete the project to the highest standards of innovation and technical expertise.” The city’s Arts and Culture Commission reviewed the submitted proposals and selected artists

Open Season on Urchins: The California Fish and Game Commission has adopted emergency regulations aimed at reducing purple sea urchin populations off the North Coast, which have exploded in recent years in a “perfect storm” of factors contributing to the collapse of northern California kelp forests and the widespread starvation of the region’s red abalone. The new regulations allow a daily bag limit of 20 gallons of urchin. READ MORE ONLINE. POSTED 05.19.18

northcoastjournal.com/ncjdaily

northcoastjournal

The now blank canvas that is the utility box near Fifth and G streets in Eureka, where the mural “Cat Food” once greeted passersby. Photo by Sam Armanino were linked with a sponsor, given $500 and assigned a utility box to paint. While the city did some extensive public outreach with stakeholder interviews, a focus group, a community meeting and an online survey, it seems it didn’t approach neighboring businesses to review design concepts, leaving some upset.

McKenny Steps Down: Embattled Humboldt County Planning Commissioner Kevin McKenny has resigned his post after revelations that he has been cited for violating state and federal environmental laws on a property he owns in Eureka. Humboldt County Fourth District Supervisor Virginia Bass, who appointed McKenny to the commission in 2014, announced his resignation as a number of local environmental groups called for his ouster. READ MORE ONLINE. POSTED 05.18.18

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“It seemed disrespectful as business owners for us not to have more input,” said Janeen Hess, owner of the Grind Café on Fifth Street, adding that she’s mulling whether to ask the city to have the box near her business repainted. — Kaitlyn Bryson POSTED: 05.22.18. READ THE FULL STORY ONLINE

Village to Council: A controversial large-scale student housing project will go before the Arcata City Council next month without a planning commission recommendation after commissioners split 2-2 recently on whether to recommend general plan and zoning amendments needed for the proposed development. The Village project aims to build a three- and four-story complex with 200 housing units to accommodate some 700 Humboldt State University students. READ MORE ONLINE. POSTED 05.17.18

northcoastjournal

Digitally Speaking:

They Said It:

Comment of the Week:

The number of Rutabaga hopefuls left standing after Queen Empoweress Metalana was crowned 2018 Rutabaga Queen on May 19 to reign over the upcoming Kinetic Grand Championship. See a photo slideshow of the festivities at www.northcoastjournal.com. POSTED 05.21.18

“I think what it does is symbolically tell whoever owns the gun that you have to have control of it.”

“RIP Curley! Thanks for all the laughs and fun times.”

— Arcata City Councilmember Paul Pitino on a proposed ordinance that would require gun owners to keep their weapons safely secured when left unattended at their homes or businesses. The issue will come back before the council at a future meeting. READ MORE ONLINE. POSTED 05.22.18

newsletters

— Monica Christes commenting on the Journal’s Facebook page on a post about the May 10 death of Robert “Curley” Tait, a Ferndale institution best known for running Curley’s Bar and Grill on Main Street. Tait was 85. POSTED 05.21.18

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 24, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

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On the Cover

HUMBOLDT COUNTY FOURTH & FIFTH DISTRICT SUPERVISORS ELECTION PREVIEW

CANDIDATES AT A GLANCE Virginia Bass Age? 56 Where did you grow up? Eureka How long have you lived in Humboldt County? 20,594 days (my whole life) Can you please provide a brief education history? I graduated from Eureka High School in 1980 and graduated from Humboldt State University cum laude with a degree in business administration. Can you please provide a brief work history? I spent 31 years working in and operating my family’s restaurant, OH’s Townhouse. I then worked for Eli Lilly as a pharmaceutical sales representative. I specialized in the neuroscience division, which is where I realized my interest in issues of mental health. I was a council person and mayor of Eureka prior to being elected Fourth District supervisor in 2010. What is your current occupation? Humboldt County Fourth District supervisor What do you consider the three most important endorsements you have received to date in your campaign for county supervisor? Congressman Jared Huffman, state Sen. Mike McGuire and the Humboldt Deputy Sheriff’s Organization. What is your favorite movie? A tie

The Race to Rep the County Seat Two challengers and an incumbent make their cases to represent the Fourth District By Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com

H

umboldt County’s Fourth Supervisorial District stands apart from the rest. First and foremost, it’s the most urban district in the 4,000 square miles that make up Humboldt County and it encompasses the city of Eureka, where most county services are located and many of the county’s most entrenched problems — from homelessness to drug addiction — are most visible. Three candidates are currently vying to represent the district for the next four

years. There’s former Eureka Mayor Virginia Bass, who has held the seat since 2010 and is working to fend off two challengers: environmental consultant Dani Burkhart and educator and community organizer Mary Ann Lyons. While Bass has campaigned on her experience and track record, the challengers argue they would bring fresh perspective and new ideas to the board. The Journal reached out to each by email, asking them to answer a few questions central to the campaign and to fill out a questionnaire giving voters a sense of

16  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 24, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

where they come from, who they are and how they see the world. Check out what they had to say below and make sure to vote June 5. North Coast Journal: What are the two biggest challenges facing the Fourth District and what are your plans to address them? Virginia Bass: If I have to list just two, I would choose public safety and housing. But let’s be honest here, you really can’t separate the challenges our community faces as they are interrelated. Public safety concerns, including issues surrounding homelessness, mental health and addiction, can be better addressed when people have some place to live. I will continue to bring people together to work toward common goals. I brought a group together from the city of Eureka, the county, public safety and other stakeholders, which met every Thursday at 8 a.m. to talk about ways to effectively address homelessness. One of the outcomes was the formation of the Mobile Intervention Services Team (MIST), which pairs law enforcement with mental health workers.

between The Incredible Mr. Limpet and Silence of the Lambs. What is your favorite book? Little Women What magazine do you read most regularly? Time If your campaign had a theme song, what would it be? “Unstoppable” by Rascal Flatts (Olympic Version) Who is your favorite fictional politician? Jefferson Smith (Mr. Smith Goes to Washington) Who is your favorite real life politician? It’s a tie between former Humboldt County Supervisors Jimmy Smith and O.H. Bass.

I approached the housing authority and asked it to look at changing the HUD Section-8 voucher process. Formerly only person-based, a portion will be project-based and can be dedicated to individual projects, which makes projects more competitive for funding. I have also put a spotlight on issues of mental health and addiction. We can’t keep turning a blind eye toward issues and hope they magically go away. Dani Burkhart: First, I believe the housing crisis and drug addiction are two of the larger challenges facing the Fourth District. These are multi-faceted issues that will take diverse solutions. I believe the answers we are seeking to many of our issues will come as a result of building a resilient economy and community. Potential solutions include: a sanctioned and monitored shelter with toilet and trash facilities, life and job skills training, addressing development of housing units and living wage jobs. The Fourth District needs an expansion in access for mental health and addiction care — there are not enough beds in programs for those who need them and virtually no programs for teens or


Dogs or cats? Cats (although I love dogs, too). What is your favorite hobby? Cooking/ eating What would your superpower be and how would you use it? I would be able to “travel” to the future so that I could bring back and apply all of the solutions to the challenges our community faces, resulting in a community where issues of homelessness, mental health, addiction (I could go on and on) become distant memories.

Dani Burkhart Age? 31 City of residence? Eureka Where did you grow up? I was born in Arcadia, the place Arcata is frequently mistaken for, and I grew up in Elk (Mendocino County) before transferring to HSU as a student. How long have you lived in Humboldt County? Just slightly under a decade. Can you please provide a brief education history? College of the Redwoods Fort Bragg, received AA in transfer studies, focused on math and natural sciences, was a tutor and made honor roll. Humboldt State University, bachelor’s of science in environmental science — energy and climate studies with a minor in economics.

dual-diagnosis folks facing addiction. If we can create avenues for breaking the cycle of poverty and addiction, then we create community resiliency which benefits all of our residents. Mary Ann Lyons: First, homelessness. Very often this is confused with the criminal element in the Old Town area. I feel we need stricter measures to deal with the blight of crimes in our county seat. But the actual issue of homelessness is a deeper problem not confined to just the Fourth District. For example, we have more than 1,000 K-12 students who qualify for McKinney-Vento funds due to unstable housing in Humboldt County. This speaks to an incredible lack of affordable housing, the very slow results at the county level over the past eight years to address the lack of coordination between homeless service groups and services, and the lack of teamwork between the cities and county to resolve these issues. Second, the Fourth District is lacking updated infrastructure. This includes poor roads upkeep, brownfield remediation, housing remediation, lack of affordable housing and reliable internet service. While

Can you please provide a brief work history? Out of high school, I went to work in several restaurants and hotels in the Mendocino area while attending CR in Fort Bragg, usually two or three part-time jobs concurrently. As a student at CR, I worked as a tutor and note-taker for students with learning disabilities, in addition to holding supervisorial positions in hospitality. As a student at HSU, I worked as a research assistant for Humboldt Energy Independence Fund and in the Depot on campus as a student coordinator. I have also worked in retail, customer service, telemarketing, the cannabis industry and nonprofits. Continued on next page »

we have received small grants from the EPA to clean up toxic waste sites from past industries, it is not enough. We need to focus on adjusting building codes for our unique area. We need to concentrate on reaching out to business industries like AT&T to follow through on their broken promises and modernize our technologies. NCJ: What is county government’s largest flaw in responding to residents’ needs and how do you plan to fix it? Bass: I would say that response times, communication and follow up are areas where we can improve. The size of government and the multiple departments people have to navigate through can be a contributing factor to slow or insufficient response times when people have questions or concerns. As an example, a person may call regarding a nuisance property in their neighborhood. As a supervisor I reach out to all the potential departments and other agencies to see what courses of action can remedy the situation. Providing a comprehensive Continued on next page »

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 24, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

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On the Cover Continued from previous page

What is your current occupation? I am an environmental planning consultant, I focus mainly on establishing land-use entitlements, filing the correct paperwork for those entitlements and balancing those with agency policies at the city, county and state levels of government. What do you consider the three most important endorsements you have received to date in your campaign for county supervisor? Our Revolution of Humboldt, Homeless Voices of Humboldt and the entire list of citizen endorsers at www.dani4supervisor.com/endorsements. Every endorsement is important to me and I look forward to earning more of them. What is your favorite movie? The Nightmare Before Christmas or Frida, depending on my mood. What is your favorite book? Hard to pick this one, I have so many favorites! Fahrenheit 451, The Handmaid’s Tale, The War on Peace, A Severe Mercy.

If your campaign had a theme song, what would it be? “What About Us” by Pink

Mary Ann Lyons

Who is your favorite fictional politician? Leslie Knope from Parks and Recreation

Age? Old enough to know better City of residence? Eureka

Who is your favorite real-life politician? Love him or not, Bernie Sanders is one of the few who makes a visible effort on behalf of all of us to govern for the masses, not just a privileged few. My favorite politician that I have met in person is state Sen. Mike McGuire for his dedication to his district and his attitude toward public service.

Where did you grow up? Mostly California

Dogs or cats? Dogs What is your favorite hobby? Cooking/ baking What would your superpower be and how would you use it? I’d love to be an empath/mind-reader so I can more quickly get to the heart of a situation and work to resolve it.

What magazine do you read most regularly? The Economist and Sunset Magazine

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response can often take a bit of time and the actual plan of action to remedy the situation could be complicated and take a long time from start to finish. I now calendar dates for follow up as well as send myself email reminders through delayed delivery so that I can keep people apprised of progress regarding the issue in question. Sometimes unrealistic expectations are set and people are not happy with the outcome, so clear communication is important. The sheer amount of emails we receive also plays a part in delay as some end up routed to spam and don’t get discovered as soon as needed. Burkhart: I believe part of the problem is in the accessibility of our government for normal, working folks. In order to participate in the public discussion, one must take off work to attend the board of supervisors meetings, which is not an option for everyone. Public comments received by email are rarely included in the discussion of the agenda item during the public meeting. We need meetings that are accessible to those who wish to participate in our governance by offering alternative days/times on regular rotation, and making sure we include all public comment in the discussion. I believe another part of the problem lies with the reception public commenters receive at the meetings from our board

18  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 24, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

of supervisors. At best, we see polite interest, at worst we have seen language that is unprofessional and is derisive of the commenter. The most recent example can be seen about two hours into Tuesday May 8’s board meeting where Chair Sundberg interacts with constituent [and Journal Publisher] Judy Hodgson. Our electeds need to lead with appropriate behavior in chambers, even if they don’t agree with the speaker, while also reminding their colleagues of that responsibility when they are out of line. Lyons: There is a consistent lack of communication between the county government and its residents. This is also apparent in interactions with the county government and local city governments. It has been evidenced in civil grand jury reports surrounding our growing homelessness issue. Most local residents are not fully aware of what is happening with county funds and how decisions are arrived upon. For example, Measure Z funds are by application only. I feel that there was a lack of effort at the county level to explain the process fully using local media outlets, as well as other proactive approaches to allow for a transparent application process. The supervisors’ meetings feel inaccessible to many. They are held at the county seat which imposes a hardship for distant community members.

How long have you lived in Humboldt County? A couple decades Can you please provide a brief education history? Still learning … but officially, I am proud alumna from Humboldt State with a master’s degree in education and BA in anthropology. Can you please provide a brief work history? At this time, I am a teacher for K-8th grade students throughout Humboldt County. I spent 13-plus years working for the community at our local food co-op. I worked in every department. I served as the United Food and Commercial Workers shop steward for my fellow co-workers as well as serving on the board of directors as an employee representative. Through the years, I have worked in the social services field as an Aid to Families with Dependent Children worker, court advocate and counselor in a shelter for battered women.

We need outreach coordinators for districts that provide avenues for constituents to share their thoughts and ideas to the supervisor they hired to represent them. I propose to create such positions. I also propose to create social media avenues of engagement that reflect a positive approachability between supervisors and their constituents. NCJ: Why are you the right person to represent the Fourth District for the next four years? Bass: Essentially the board of supervisors runs a $377 million company serving the needs of 136,000 citizens over 4,000 square miles. Having an understanding of systems and processes is helpful in moving forward when addressing some of the harder issues facing our community. It’s great to have ideas but making them reality takes an in-depth understanding of how to move things through the process to completion. I have a proven track record of getting things done. While I’ve certainly amassed the experience and knowledge to do the job, I bring more to the table than just that. Working 31 years in my family’s restaurant instilled in me the importance of listening to your customers and doing your best to meet their expectations. Today my customers are the citizens of


What is your current occupation? As I stated above, I am a teacher. I provide individualized education plans for each of my students.

Taking the Fifth

What do you consider the three most important endorsements you have received to date in your campaign for county supervisor? Central Labor Council, United Food and Clothing Workers, my community, friends and family. (They are the most important endorsement. It is their belief in the need for change and their confidence in my ability to be their voice that has led me to this moment.) What is your favorite movie? The Dark Crystal What is your favorite book? The Complete Works of Shakespeare

Who is your favorite real-life politician? Barack Obama

What magazine do you read most regularly? The Smithsonian

Dogs or cats? My cat would kill me if I said dogs. That’s like choosing between my children. Impossible.

If your campaign had a theme song, what would it be? Roar by Katy Perry

What is your favorite hobby? Reading at the beach.

Who is your favorite fictional politician? I don’t have one. Recent national politics has ruined that for me.

What would your superpower be and how would you use it? Fishes and loaves. To be able to end hunger by feeding the world.

this community. While policy is certainly a big part of what I do, at the core, my job is about people. I’m solution-oriented and strive to find answers to help real people solve real problems. I’m accessible and have an established practice of talking to anyone, especially people who do not agree with me as long as the conversation is respectful. I believe we have more in common than what divides us. Burkhart: I am the right person for this job if you believe it is time for fresh ideas and new faces in our local governance. If you would like someone in office who listens without judgment, makes evidence/ data-based decisions and does their research thoroughly, I’m your candidate. If you are ready for someone to step up and be accountable, leading our community away from insolvency and into a sustainable and resilient future, then I’m ready for the job. I believe we are all ready for representatives who actually represent the whole of the community rather than select interest groups. We are ready to stand together and face our problems head on, being part of solutions and building the community we need to thrive as a whole. We are ready for a community where our most vulnerable citizens are cared for instead of shamed for their circumstances. I’m ready to bring

my experience, passion and integrity to work for those goals. I’m your candidate if you believe we are ready to get to work, together. Lyons: I am applying for the job of county supervisor for the Fourth District and am asking its citizens to hire me by voting for me. I feel that the Fourth District is searching for a person who represents the diverse population and needs of our area. I am a well-known community member with a proven track record of standing up for the rights and dignity of others. I have spent my life working toward justice and equality. Whether helping a patron learn about healthy food while they heal, marching together with my neighbors, supporting local issues or teaching my students the meaning of human rights for all — I stand as an advocate for the members of District Four as well as the county at large. I am well educated, believe in inclusive dialogue and have the personality to stand up for the voiceless. I am ready for the job. Let’s turn this election up! l For more on the candidates, visit their websites at www.bass4supervisor.com, www.dani4supervisor.com and www. maryannlyons.com. And watch the candidates spar in a forum at www. pbs.org or listen at www.khsu.org.

T

his is a cordial announcement to my patients that I am still practicing and accepting new patients in my dental practice.

As the race turns a bit nasty, the candidates weigh in on the issues By Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com

T

he race to represent Humboldt County’s sprawling Fifth Supervisorial District is in full swing, with accusations and hard feelings aplenty. The campaign pits two-term incumbent and California Costal Commissioner Ryan Sundberg against longtime Humboldt County resident and Mattole Salmon Group Executive Director Steve Madrone. On the campaign trail, Sundberg has largely touted his experience and track record as Madrone has countered that it’s time for fresh ideas, a more balanced board and a new approach. While Madrone has repeatedly questioned whether Sundberg has a conflict of interest on cannabis issues, having accepted a swath of campaign donations from the industry, Sundberg has fired back in recent weeks alleging that Madrone is misinformed on the issues or deliberately misleading voters. The hostilities seem to have peaked in a recent article by the Lost Coast Outpost, in which Sundberg accused Madrone of being “racist” in comments critical of a long-planned freeway interchange project south of Trinidad being championed by the Trinidad Rancheria, of which Sundberg is a member. Madrone, Sundberg charged, had not spoken with the Rancheria about the project yet has been quick to condemn it. (Madrone has been endorsed by Karuk and Yurok tribes, while the Hoopa Valley Tribe issued a rare co-endorsement of both candidates.) With a host of serious issues staring down the Fifth District — which includes McKinleyville north to the county line, and

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northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 24, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

19


On the Cover Continued from previous page

the eastern stretches of the county, including Hoopa, Willow Creek and Weitchpec — the Journal asked the candidates to answer a few questions via email to tout their plans and to fill out a questionnaire giving voters a sense of where they come from, who they are and how they see the world. Check out what they had to say below and make sure to vote June 5. North Coast Journal: What are the two biggest challenges facing the Fifth District and what are your plans to address them? Steve Madrone: Economic development affects all issues but has been inadequately tended. It is fundamental to affordable housing, recreational and job opportunities for youth and the underemployed, cleaning up our beaches, funding a self-sustaining community forest, contributing to social programs, enhancing tourism, diversifying transportation, reducing crime and increasing safety. This is why I have an economic development plan for the Fifth District. This plan includes redesigning the existing Vista Point with access off Airport Road for travelers heading north as well as south. We can use an undeveloped county parcel south of Vista Point to create a “Vista Point Park.” A visitor center would be built using grant funds, encouraging more visitors to pull off the highway for this priceless, sweeping ocean view. Increased visitation could lead to a build out of the Airport Business Park east of Vista Point, as well as to more visitor services and lodging in McKinleyville. Together with building the Town Center, this would lead to more jobs and increased sales. The cannabis economy must not dominate our communities or be concentrated among a few large producers. We need to protect the small farmers, reward good land stewardship and support a broadbased, small farmer, high quality industry. Ryan Sundberg: Public safety and cannabis are two of the largest issues facing the Fifth District. Four years ago, public safety was the largest issue and I have worked hard to address this. Working together we passed Measure Z and now have staffed the sheriff’s substation in McKinleyville and opened one in Willow Creek. Prior to this new funding, all of the Fifth District was served by only two deputies who responded out of Eureka. We now have 12 in McKinleyville and seven in Willow Creek, along with resident deputies in rural communities. Seventy percent of Humboldt County voted in favor of Proposition 64. We had a tough choice: Do we set our own rules for

20  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 24, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

cannabis or do we let the state set them for us? I supported establishing our own rules and we began the task of developing an ordinance to address the land use rules. We already had thousands of illegal cultivation sites throughout the county causing significant environmental damage. My goal is to get rid of the illegal grows and clean up the sites and require that all new operations meet strict environmental standards and the requirements of all state agencies. I am working to see that communities have a say in projects near them. NCJ: What is county government’s largest flaw in responding to residents’ needs and how do you plan to fix it? Madrone: The board of supervisors is unbalanced, too narrowly focused on the agenda of the well-connected few. Therefore, it fails to consider a wider scope of possibilities when making decisions, wasting time, money and energy. Examples include the Mercer-Fraser cannabis refineries, the cannabis ordinances that concentrate rather than distribute wealth, the public defender fiasco and appointees to commissions that facilitate sweetheart deals. Forward thinking and planning, involving all stakeholders, are essential to efficiently run our county. We must be creative in dealing with homelessness and drug addiction recovery programs. We must collaborate with Neighborhood Watch and pay attention to community needs. We must vigorously support single payer, universal healthcare legislation in Sacramento, because universal healthcare would reduce the county’s employee medical costs, increase access to primary care providers and improve mental health and addiction services, resulting in reduced crime and enhanced safety for all. Indoor commercial cannabis growing must be curtailed in houses and apartments, where it reduces our stock of affordable housing. Nuisance generator grows that light-pollute night skies should be disallowed. Overall, the board of supervisors and planning commission need to do a better job of listening to the public and being respectful of dissenting opinions. Sundberg: I believe the most significant challenge is to get input from the hardworking families that do not attend meetings and speak at hearings. When there are controversial issues, we get significant input from those directly involved, yet the people who go about their everyday activities are not aware of things that could affect them. I am increasing my use of social media to outreach with both my


CANDIDATES AT A GLANCE Dogs or cats? Both

Steve Madrone

What is your favorite hobby? Backpacking and gardening

Age? 65

What would your superpower be and how would you use it? The ability to manifest “affordable housing” and create jobs!

City of residence? Greater Trinidad area Where did you grow up? In Iowa until 4 and Orange County until 20, and Humboldt County since then.

Ryan Sundberg

How long have you lived in Humboldt County? 45 years Can you please provide a brief education history? Bachelor of science in natural resources from Humboldt State University in 1975; master in science in watershed management from HSU in 2011. Can you please provide a brief work history? Part owner of NRG Inc. doing watershed restoration 1977 to 1980; founding member and surveyor with the Mattole watershed groups 1979 to 1983; director, manager and coordinator of Natural Resources Services of Redwood Community Action Agency 1983 to 2006 building the Hammond Trail and restoring watersheds; owner Madrone Enterprises doing watershed consulting and contracting 2006 to 2017; executive director for Mattole Salmon Group 2011 to 2018; forestry and watershed lecturer at HSU 2011 to 2018. What is your current occupation? Executive director for the Mattole Salmon Group and lecturer in forestry and watershed management at HSU. What do you consider the three most

personal pages and community groups like the McKinleyville Community Watch. This is not the answer but it is a start. My goal is to continue to work in each of our local communities to hear the voice of the people who do not show up at public hearings. I think our second challenge is to act quickly to address problems. Most of the money we have to spend is limited in its uses and has to be spent in very restricted ways, and many of our needs are outside the limits on those funds. By supporting and passing measures like Measure Z, we have been able to fund public safety increases to offset the funds that the state took away. I believe the answer in the future is working directly with our local residents to find solutions to local needs. NCJ: Why are you the right person to represent the Fifth District for the next four years? Madrone: I have skills honed over 45 years in sustainable, appropriate develop-

Age? 43 City of residence? McKinleyville important endorsements you have received to date in your campaign for county supervisor? The Humboldt County Central Democratic Committee, the Central Labor Council and most of the Humboldt County unions and three local tribes, including the Yurok, Karuk and Hoopa. What is your favorite movie? Avatar What is your favorite book? Two Peoples, One Place What magazine do you read most regularly? National Geographic If your campaign had a theme song, what would it be? “The Times They Are a Changin’,” by Bob Dylan

Where did you grow up? McKinleyville How long have you lived in Humboldt County? My whole life Can you please provide a brief education history? McKinleyville High School, general studies and computer science at College of the Redwoods and a bachelor of science in business administration from Humboldt State University. Can you please provide a brief work history? Food Mart, LP at the Airport, Mck Carwash, Hometown Sportswear, Cher-Ae Heights Casino, Farmers Insurance.

What is you favorite movie? Full Metal Jacket What is your favorite book? Good Night Moon What magazine do you read most regularly? Golf Magazine If your campaign had a theme song, what would it be? “Hall of Fame” Who is your favorite fictional politician? Don’t have one Who is your favorite real-life politician? Former Supervisor Jimmy Smith

What is your current occupation? Fifth District supervisor

Dogs or cats? (Candidate did not respond.)

Who is your favorite real-life politician? Bernie Sanders

What do you consider the three most important endorsements you have received to date in your campaign for Supervisor? Congressman Huffman, state Sen. McGuire and Assemblyman Wood

What would your superpower be and how would you use it? I would be Captain Fix it, and my superpower would be to eliminate all poverty, illegal drugs and their effects on individuals and families.

ment that marries economic growth with ecological restoration, bringing stakeholders together to create a livable community, including clean water, popular trails and healthy forests and salmon. I will appoint people who represent the diversity and interests of all of the community to the McMAC and planning commission. I will maintain regular office hours in the Trinity Valley to expedite appropriate light industrial, forestry and agricultural development. I will open discussion of Trinidad’s traffic and development needs to the entire community, rather than a narrow constituency. The Humboldt County Democratic Party has endorsed my candidacy because it believes I have the background and policies to best serve the Fifth District. The Yurok, Hoopa Valley and Karuk tribes have endorsed me, as have many labor unions acting on behalf of working families. I will encourage vibrant light industrial zones to attract and retain innovative entrepreneurs. I will support educational

and recreational youth programs, as well as apprenticeships in the trades. Creative possibilities for our district include opening a tiny housing fabrication operation in the eastern valley, and establishing a McKinleyville Town Center offering walkable, work-live opportunities, and senior and affordable housing. Sundberg: I was raised in McKinleyville and my family has been here for generations. My wife, daughter and I live in McKinleyville. One of the most important things to learn to be effective as a supervisor is how to build coalitions, partnerships and working relationships based on mutual respect. I believe that those relationships give me the ability to help solve problems for the Fifth District. Whether it be road repairs or statewide issues, I have developed the ability to call on people who are able to directly solve a problem. The other thing I know is that I will promise what I can deliver and in election season candidates make many promises

that sound good but have no reality in being deliverable. I have a very good working relationship based on mutual respect with my fellow board members and working cooperatively has been very successful at accomplishing goals. An individual supervisor has very little power because you need to have the support of your fellow supervisors, which I am proud to say I do. My position as the North Coast California Coastal Commissioner gives me the ability to address coastal issues that affect our entire region. Because of my good relationships, I was able to save more than 70 jobs in our local oyster industry, which was nearly shut down. I believe my hard work saved Coastal Seafoods’ oyster operations in Humboldt Bay. l

Who is your favorite fictional politician? Mr. Smith goes to Washington, Frank Capra 1939

What is your favorite hobby? Basketball

For more information on the candidates, visit their webpages at www. votemadrone.com and www.sundberg4supervisor.com. And watch the candidates spar in a forum at www. pbs.org or listen at www.khsu.org.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 24, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

21


Table Talk

New Tricks

Five Eleven’s chef on the line at Kyoto By Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com

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What’s your food crush? We’re looking for the best kept food secrets in Humboldt. Email us your tip and we’ll check it out!

NCJ HUM PLATE

jennifer@northcoastjournal.com

@northcoastjournal 22 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 24, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

n the wake of a lunch rush, prep at Masaki’s Kyoto Japanese Restaurant starts anew. Pop music plays as the staff slingshots back and forth behind the counter in the narrow galley kitchen, cold rolling station on one side, gas range and grill at the other and a beefcake calendar open to a shirtless man with star stickers over his nipples on the wall between them. If there is a uniform in this open kitchen, it’s a black T-shirt and a smirk. Somebody calls over an Enrique Iglesias ballad in a swooning voice, “He’s got the voice of an angel!” They play a lot of Enrique. A few Old Town blocks away, the restaurant Five Eleven is still closed for renovation following a March 9 kitchen fire that left major smoke damage. Which is partly why its head chef Josh Wiley is working as a temporary line cook in Kyoto’s kitchen. Owner Jeni Masaki, finally off her feet for a minute, pours herself a beer at the register. She says it’s not so unusual for local restaurant staff to move around or for the owners to help each other out, passing around resumes, sharing hard-won knowledge and commiserating. “Most of the restaurant owners, we all meet at Cash and Carry and gripe with each other,” Masaki says with a sigh. “That’s what I love about it … I don’t feel like we’re in competition with them — we’re a community of artists and food lovers.” She says Wiley “didn’t care about the money. He just said, ‘Hey, I’m really bored and I need to work.” Her husband, Eric, who ran the restaurant as head chef before leaving to become a Humboldt County Sheriff ’s deputy, texted Wiley looking for resumes to fill a spot on the line. Wiley says, “I was like, ‘I can give you a month or something until you find somebody.’ … I just wanted to learn some new skills and have someplace to go every day.” Without work, he says, “I get all dark and twisted and nobody likes that guy.” Kyoto seems to have spared him that fate and he’s happy starting at the bottom with a cuisine he admits to knowing little about and doing what he’s told. Japanese cooking is a world apart

from the French and Italian styles Wiley does at Five Eleven but Masaki knew his knife skills would be more than solid and he’d need no training on breaking down proteins, like whole fish. Plus, she says, “It’s all about the presentation and that’s one thing he knows how to do.” John Klemm, who’s sporting a shirt that reads “Make Sushi Great Again,” has been teaching Wiley to roll sushi for the past three weeks. “He’s doing all right,” says Klemm with a nod. “He still puts too much rice in his rolls but he’s fast.” Kyoto has a stable crew, says Masaki. “Rolling sushi, knife skills — it’s not your run of the mill kitchen job.” Training a newbie on the very basics takes about two months. Mind you, that’s a whole lot faster than the traditional Japanese system, under which a trainee works for five years before he — almost never she — gets to make the rice. Evangeline Ruiz started at Kyoto 19 years ago, shortly after immigrating from the Philippines. Back then it was still owned by Kyoko Clark and there were no female sushi rollers. Ruiz’s climb up the ladder to day manager and sushi chef came as she filled in for successively more skilled positions, which seems to be the American version of apprenticeship. “I tried quitting,” says Ruiz with a laugh, “but I thought, ‘I’m gonna miss rolling, I’m gonna miss making sashimi.’” She might miss this crew, too. She narrows her eyes and shoots a grin over the counter at them. “They’re all right.” “She’s a fucking genius,” says Masaki, scrolling through photos on her phone of Ruiz’s sashimi roses and composed plates of butsugiri. As Ruiz clocks out, nighttime manager Kris Swan clocks in, taking up his post at the grill and whipping up a vat of tempura batter. He was new to Japanese food when he came over from Cafe Nooner two years ago and recalls the learning curve was steep. “It’s a completely different style of cooking,” he says. And Kyoto’s lineup of specials changes nightly. “The freedom to create stuff,” he says, “is amazing.” Swan says working with Wiley has been “surprisingly good,” adding, “Normally when you’re trying to teach


Josh Wiley puts together a sushi roll in Masaki’s Kyoto Japanese Restaurant. Photo by Jennifer Fumiko Cahill

an old dog new tricks, it’s not easy. But he came in like, ‘I don’t know shit. Teach me.’” And there’s plenty to learn. The flavor profile is new for Wiley, as is memorizing the extensive menu and, of course, rolling. “I wouldn’t say I’m even proficient at it yet.” Still, he says the Kyoto crew is easier on him than he is on new recruits in his own kitchen. “It’s hard to be tough on the old man,” he says. Working in front of customers is a change, too, especially in such a tight space. “I prefer intimate,” quips Klemm. An order comes in and Wiley spreads the rice out on a mat, retouching here and there. Then he lines up the nori, small planks of tuna and avocado before tucking it in and rolling the wooden mat forward and squeezing it carefully in his tattooed fingers. Wiley points at Klemm with a wry smile, saying, “He’s actually good at this. I’m not.” Klemm huffs and rolls up a bamboo mat before unrolling and re-rolling it, pressing both ends flush against his

hands. He drapes it in thinly sliced avocado and cuts it with practiced ease and speed, and plates each piece in a curved line before reaching for a flower garnish. It’s unlikely sushi will show up on the menu at Five Eleven when it reopens in a couple of weeks but some flavors and ingredients might find their way into Wiley’s refurbished kitchen since he says, as a chef, you’re always incorporating your experiences into your food wherever you go. “Getting out of your comfort zone and doing something you’re not good at and working at it — it’s kind of good for you,” says Wiley. Before Wiley can answer what specifically he’ll be taking with him from Kyoto, Swan interjects: “Enrique!” Wiley shakes his head. “Yeah,” he says, chuckling. “Enrique.” l Jennifer Fumiko Cahill is the arts and features editor at the Journal. Reach her at 442-1400, extension 320, or Jennifer@northcoastjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @JFumikoCahill. northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 24, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

23


Front Row

Thesis Festival Time Crossing the Vortex at Dell’Arte By Pat Bitton

frontrow@northcoastjournal.com Chase Perkins, Gabriela Haught and Jacob Timmons in The Hempen.

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ay is always an exciting month at Dell’Arte. It’s when the multinational class of graduating students stages its final ensemble creations — the culmination of the school’s three-year MFA program. Each of this year’s thesis pieces has been written, performed and directed by the students and brings together Dell’Arte’s signature theater of place with their own cultural backgrounds. It’s a heady mix and produces some thought-provoking work. This year’s productions more than meet those standards, combining fun with philosophical challenges across a broad landscape of fantasy and culturally relevant content. Here’s just a taste of what you can expect from each of the approximately 45-minute long performances: The Hempen Jig takes us on a strange voyage with a trio of pirates who seem to have lost half their minds as well as half their ship. What remains of the skeletal vessel includes a large barrel, the alcoholic contents of which seem to have been fully absorbed by the crew. A stray hunk of stale bread becomes the centerpiece of an elaborate and fantastical tea party, while a mysterious sea monster snakes out of the depths to join the fun. Lanny (a wonderfully exuberant Gabriela Haught) falls madly in love with the monster’s tentacle, names it Felicity and gives it flowers. But Jib (Chase Perkins, resplendently reptilian as he pole-dances up and down the mast in fur and shimmering blue) and Captain (Jacob Timmons, the essence of discom-

Photo by Tushar Mathew

bobulation and somewhat disadvantaged by having two hooks for hands) attempt to slay the beast and save them all from a watery grave. Will love or life triumph? And will the captain go down with his ship? Cluck, Boom, Bloom explores the potential impact of the biological clock on the world of a rotund red hen (Gaia Mencagli in her most absurdist performance yet), an agile, spirited but often disappointed sparkly pink sperm (the always energetic and smile-inducing Fay Steddum), and a cryptic mouse-like creature (an enigmatic but clearly friendly Matilda Lindström). Egg laying is clearly coming to an end for the flatulent, popcorn-loving hen — a good egg is followed by a bad egg and then … no egg at all? What will the sperm do then? The hen wants to lay (and eat popcorn) and the sperm wants to fertilize, but what does the mouse creature want? Opinions varied widely among the audience members I quizzed — take along an inquiring mind. This piece raises questions about what fertility means, how we value it, how much it can be controlled and how much is simply a randomized luck of the draw — not to mention the morality of chickens as food-production machines. Singularity is billed as an “Afro-futuristic drama” that takes place on a far-off planet populated by the descendants of an African diaspora from Earth. The scenery and staging clearly draw heavily on 2001: A Space Odyssey but with strong African overtones, as an exiled warrior (Isaiah Alexander in a tightly drawn portrayal of a powerful

24 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 24, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

mentor/defender) joins forces with his former protegée (an energetic and dynamic Natashia Marshall). In their battle against a threatened alien invasion, they must draw on the wisdom of their ancestors, as well as their advanced technological skills. But can they muster the strength to make the ultimate sacrifice that may save their world? There’s an interesting level of allegory with today’s historical/political environment that brought to my mind that prescient last line from The Nice’s seminal 1968 recording of Leonard Bernstein’s classic: “America is pregnant with promise and anticipation/ but is murdered by the hand of the inevitable.” #Anomie is a social justice fable for the #MeToo era. It’s staged as a look back at 2018 from some indeterminate time in the future and narrated as an open-mic session by a detached guitarist/emcee (a haunted and monotonal Andre LaRocque). The play is a brutally honest examination of what can happen when social justice warrior John (David Powell in an over-the-top performance that recalls Sir Ian McKellen at his most self-mocking pomposity) forgets that those he believes he is trying to help are real people with real feelings and real lives. The object (victim?) of his campaign, the closeted Craig (a nuanced, controlled, yet ultimately tragic portrayal by Jeremy Webb) tries in vain to communicate to John that he is not ready to be the poster child for a prototypical men’s liberation movement, while co-emcee and proponent of women’s rights Olive (a sympathetic, protective Elizabeth Hedlund) attempts in vain to ex-

plain to John the selfishness of his actions. Also featured in this year’s thesis festival is Let Me Out!, an immersive memory experience that will play to select audiences on May 22-23 at 8 p.m. and May 26-27 at 2 p.m. Check www.northcoastjournal.com for more on this unique marriage of theater and role-playing games, in which audience members will be invited to leave the real world behind and step into an imaginative playground where the boundary between audience and performer does not exist and everyone has a role to play. Crossing The Vortex: Thesis Festival 2018 runs Thursday through Sunday, May 24-27 at 8 p.m. The Hempen Jig and Cluck, Boom, Bloom! play on Thursday and Saturday. #Anomie and Singularity play on Friday and Sunday. All performances are all pay-what-you-can, with reservations highly encouraged. Call 668-5663 or visit www. dellarte.com. For information on attending Let Me Out! visit www.facebook.com/ letmeoutplay.

Continuing

Chicago brings criminal celebrity and fringe-shaking numbers to the Ferndale Repertory Theatre in Ferndale on Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m. through June 2, with Sunday matinees at 2 p.m. through June 3. For more information, call 786-5483 or visit www.ferndalerep.com. A lush and engaging production of New Orleans drama (human and supernatural) The House that Will Not Stand plays at Redwood Curtain Theatre on Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights at 8 p.m. through May 26. Call 443-7688 or visit www.redwoodcurtain.org. Adding another weekend after canceled performances last week, the rocking Hedwig and the Angry Inch plays at the North Coast Repertory Theatre on Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m. through June 16 and also Thursday, June 14, with Sunday matinees at 2 p.m. Call 442-NCRT or visit www.ncrt.net. l


Setlist

This Summer Discover

Art, Motion and Sound

Dinner starts at 3:30pm on weekdays

By Collin Yeo

music@northcoastjournal.com

Carla dal Forno plays the Miniplex at 8:30 p.m. on Monday, May 28. YouTube

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t’s Memorial Day weekend and the sweet days of Kinetic Madness await all you lucky kiddies by the bay. I’ll be in another bay area missing the sculptured fun but making up for it by celebrating the 97th birthday of a very special lady. So I wish you all a spectacular time behind the magical veil of the redwood curtain and will see you out on the town on the bookend nights of this sacred pre-summer holiday. Have fun, be safe and if those two things conflict, then lean a little more on the fun.

Thursday Jazz pianist and Grammy-nominated composer Pascal Le Boeuf presents his work at The Sanctuary tonight at 7:30 p.m. ($20, $10 students). Joining him for a recital of his newest piece “Ritual Being” is the Friction Quartet, featuring Arcata High alum Otis Harriel and that’s just right.

Friday There’s a nice pre-race Kinetic kick-off party tonight at the Outer Space at 8 p.m. ($4). It’s all brass music, baby, featuring the marching meters of Bandamonium and LOUD neighbors. Come get a piece of it. An hour later there are two shows, one in Eureka and one in Redway, perfectly showcasing the aesthetics of their respective citizens. At the Mateel you will find the island reggae tones of Hawaii’s J Boog with similarly aligned acts I-Octane and Westafa ($40, $30 advance). Meanwhile up at The Siren’s Song, artist Jullia Finkelstein will be doing live paintings while The Bored Again entertains with solo punk stylings and “trash slam poet” Wil Gibson spits something stinky over the greasy grooves of Hollow Down. Come on out and get a little paint or somethin’ on ya ($5).

Saturday While the mighty moving statues of the

Kinetic Grand Championship make their revolutions from pavement to sand in the fog-belt, you can find yourself far from one madding crowd and deep into another scene down in Redway as KMUD celebrates its 31st anniversary with its annual block party at noon (free, but donations to the station are welcome). Acts like That Captain, Ari & Ruby and Back to the Hill share the stage with many more at a birthday party that lasts past the gloaming. Downriver in Ferndale at 5 p.m., string band The Ukelaliens are throwing a CD release party, benefit show and goulash dinner at the Our Savior’s Lutheran Church (price TBA). Copies of the album will be available to those who donate to The River Life Foundation. And finally tonight at Humbrews, it’s Soul Party #12, with the usual suspects Red, Jay Morg, Tanasa and special guest DJ Rascue at 9 p.m. ($5). Come cut a rug or parquet floor or whatever with the best vinyl twisters in town.

Sunday The Outer Space presents an evening of performance art, stop motion animation and interactive illustrated storytelling. 7 p.m. ($5). Artist and local treasure Violet Crabtree brings a new panel-animated musical adventure to the stage with her group The Comix Trip. Genderqueer artist Llano River Blue’s sci-fi web series Chenille Stems & the Dream Machine will have a screening and Llano’s band The Sweet Trade will play some tunes. Finally, local artist, model and daring demimonde Ms. Adeveve Glitterstorm will perform some hyper-mutant futuresong version of the beguine or something. Come find out.

Monday Australia and Canada are in the house tonight at the Miniplex. Melbourne’s Carla dal Forno with her detached, deadpan but heavy vocals snake through tight songs of

concentric darkness and flashbangs. She is touring in support of her debut solo album You Know What It’s Like and will likely put on a great show. Opening up from Toronto is Tess Roby, who haunts the magnetic tape reels of the 1980’s dream machines at 8:30 p.m. ($10).

HAPPY HOUR AT THE BAR M-F 2:30-6PM TELEVISED BASEBALL$• BIG SCREEN TV TVs $

2 Coors Light 2.50 Sliders $ 3 Microbrews 2.50 Street Tacos $ 5 house margaritas or shots of Jameson $

Tuesday

Band O’ Loko plays some real hot surf rock numbers near the freshwater breaks at the Mad River Brewery at 6 p.m. (free). Catch the warm rays of May and ride the wave of sweet spring eventide.

SUPER

Wednesday There are a couple of fun ones tonight at 7 p.m. to appeal to a wide spectrum of tastes with distortion-driven sweetmeats, low-end chunks and sweet, old twang. Local metalhead Sam Bryson celebrates his birthday at The Siren’s Song as his band Dullahan gets in on the fun with Oakland metal legends Necrot. Burning Hash and DMT share the smoke as well ($7). And at the Outer Space, touring solo bass powerhouse CJ Boyd hits the deep notes while dusty swingers Opossum Sun Trail play a post-tour set with guest drum maestro Tavan Anderson from White Manna whacking the sun spurs and goat skins. Rainbow night-tripper mister moonbeam walks and whistles through the stardust valley to a Neverland-endless heaven of a dreaming Patsy Cline. ● Full show listings in the Journal’s Music and More grid, the Calendar and online. Bands and promoters, send your gig info, preferably with a high-res photo or two, to music@northcoastjournal.com. Collin Yeo wishes that all public utility boxes were covered with kitschy kitties and ice cream cones, but he understands that we just can’t have nice things in an anodyne gray world. He lives in Arcata.

HAPPY HOUR FRIDAY 4pm

3

$

WELL DRINKS, PINTS, HOUSE WINE

3

$

5

$

OFF SPECIALTY COCKTAILS

COSMOPOLITANS, MOSCOW MULES, MARGARITAS

LATE NIGHT HAPPY HOUR Sun-Thurs 9-11pm • Fri & Sat 10-12pm EARLY BIRD HAPPY HOUR Sun-Thurs 5-6pm Bar Specials • Small Plates $5

OPEN SUN-THURS 5-9:30 FRI & SAT 5-10 707.826.0860

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 24, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

25


THE ORIGINAL • SINCE 2002

Live Entertainment Grid

Music & More VENUE

MAY SALE $

10 OFF

ANY HOODIE, CREWNECK, OR JACKET $

5 OFF

ANY HAT OR BEANIE (707) 822-3090 987 H ST, Arcata

(707) 476-0400 Bayshore Mall

www.humboldtclothing.com

THUR 5/24

ARCATA THEATRE LOUNGE 1036 G St. 822-3731 BLONDIES FOOD AND DRINK 420 E. California Ave., Arcata 822-3453

Open Mic 7pm Free

BLUE LAKE CASINO WAVE LOUNGE 777 Casino Way, 668-9770

Karaoke w/KJ Leonard 8pm Free

CAFE MOKKA 495 J St., Arcata 822-2228

ARCATA & NORTH FRI 5/25

SAT 5/26

SUN 5/27

M-T-W 5/28-30

Stargate (1994) (film) 8pm $5

Flow 2018 (fashion show) 8pm $30, $20 students/seniors

Coco (2017) (film) 6pm $5

[W] Sci-Fi Night: Sci-Fi Night The Eye Creatures (1965) 6pm Free w/$5 food/bev purchase

Sleepwalkers (rock) 8pm Free

Jazz Jam 5:30pm Free

[W] Simply B (solo looping) TBA

Kinetik: Latin Nights 9pm Free Wave: Miracle Show (Grateful Dead) 9pm Free

Jimi Jeff and the Gypsy Band (funk, blues, R&B) 9pm Free

Karaoke w/KJ Leonard 8pm Free

Chubritza (Eastern European) 8pm Free

Balkan Bellows (Eastern European) 8pm Free

CENTRAL STATION SPORTS BAR 1631 Central Ave., McKinleyville, 839-2013

Karaoke w/Rock Star 9pm Free

CHER-AE HEIGHTS CASINO FIREWATER LOUNGE 677-3611 27 Scenic Drive, Trinidad

Claire Bent & Citizen Funk (soul, funk) 9pm Free

CLAM BEACH TAVERN 839-0545 4611 Central Ave., McKinleyville

Legends of the Mind (blues, jazz) 6pm Free

[M] 8-Ball Tournament [W] Karaoke w/Rock Star 9pm Free 707 (’70s funk, ’80s rock) 9pm Free

Kindred Spirits (bluegrass) 10pm Free

Anna Hamilton (blues) 6pm Free

E&O LANES 1417 Glendale Dr., Blue Lake 825-9160

Kingpin Comedy: Keith Carey (standup) $15, $12 advance

THE GRIFFIN 937 10th St., Arcata 825-1755

Loose Joints (DJ music) 9pm Free

HUMBOLDT BREWS 856 10th St., Arcata 826-2739

Wailing Souls, Irie Rockers (Motown, reggae) 10pm $20

Elevated American fare & craft cocktails

Karaoke w/DJ Marv 8pm Free [W] Pool Tournament & Game Night 7pm Free

[W] Salsa Dancing with DJ Pachanguero 8:30pm Free

Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

Soul Party #12 9pm $5

May Special! Buy 3 Get 1 Free Sale ends May 31st

Check our website and sign up for our weekly workshops and classes.

SAVE 10%

With this coupon (Exp. 5/30/18) Not valid with any other offers

100 MOONSTONE BEACH RD. TRINIDAD • 677-1616 moonstonegrill.com

26 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 24, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

millerfarmsnursery.com 1828 Central Ave. • McKinleyville Mon-Sat 8:30-5:30 • 839-1571 Sun 10-4 • Nursery Only

Grow With Us!

We will be closed Monday, May 28th in observance of Memorial Day.


Arcata • Blue Lake •McKinleyville • Trinidad • Willow Creek VENUE

THUR 5/24

THE JAM 915 H St., Arcata 822-4766

FRI 5/25 Club Triangle - Friday I’m in Love 10pm $5

Eureka and South on next page

SAT 5/26 Rockers Saturdays (roots reggae, dub) 10pm $10

LARRUPIN 677-0230 1658 Patricks Point Dr., Trinidad

Blue Lotus Jazz 6pm Free

LOGGER BAR 668-5000 510 Railroad Ave., Blue Lake

Bike Event TBA

Dynasty One (reggae) 9pm Free

Live Music 6pm Free

Delta Nationals (Vintage American) 6pm Free

MAD RIVER BREWING CO. Bob Dylan Birthday Bash (11 101 Taylor Way, Blue Lake 668-4151 acts) 5pm All Ages Free THE MINIPLEX 401 I St., Arcata 630-5000

SUN 5/27

M-T-W 5/28-30

Deep Groove Society 9pm $5

[T] Open Mic. 6-9 pm; Dancehall at the Jam 10pm TBA [W] Jazz at the Jam 6pm Free, Whomp Whomp 10pm $5

Tim Randles (jazz piano) 6pm Free

[W] Aber Miller (jazz) 6pm Free

Potluck Dinner 6pm [T] Band O’ Loko (surf rock) 6pm Free [W] Eric Leadbetter (folk, rock, blues ) 6pm Free Karaoke 9pm Free

NORTHTOWN COFFEE 1603 G St., Arcata 633-6187

Open Mic 7pm Free

THE SANCTUARY 1301 J St., Arcata 822-0898 SIDELINES 732 Ninth St., Arcata 822-0919 SIX RIVERS BREWERY 839-7580 1300 Central Ave., McKinleyville TOBY & JACKS 764 Ninth St., Arcata 822-4198

[M] Carla Dal Forno, Tess Roby (pop)8:30pm $10 [T] Sonido Pachanguero (salsa/cumbia) 9pm Free [T] Spoken Word Open Mic 6pm Free

OCEAN GROVE COCKTAIL LOUNGE 480 Patrick’s Point Drive., Trinidad 677-3543 REDWOOD CURTAIN BREWERY 550 South G St., Arcata 826-7224

The Only Alibi You’ll Ever Need!

Open Daily 8am - 2am

[M] Rudelion DanceHall Mondayz 8pm $5 Foxtrot (jazzy rock) 8pm Free

Blase & The Stellar Jays (rock, soul) 8pm Free

[M] Open Bluegrass Jam 7pm

Pascal Le Boeuf and the Friction Quartet (jazz) 7pm $20 DJ Music 10pm

DJ Music 10pm TBA

DJ Tim Stubbs 10pm TBA

After Work Sessions with DJ D’Vinity 4-7pm Free

DJ J Dub 2pm, The Jim Lahman Band (rock, blues, funk) 9pm Free DJ Music 10pm Free

Trivia Night 8pm

[M] Karaoke w/DJ Marv 8:30pm [W] Reggae w/Iron Fyah 10pm Free

744 9th St. on the Arcata Plaza 822-3731 www.thealibi.com

Breakfast Served all day Coffee & Espresso Lunch & Specialty Dishes

MIDDLE OF G ST. ARCATA PLAZA 707.826.7578

Sun - Thurs 8 am - 3 pm Fri. & Sat. 7 am - 3pm northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 24, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

27


Live Entertainment Grid

20% OFF our TEPPANYAKI menu

lunch time special only every day from 11 am - 3 pm reservations recommended

one f street, eureka ca  • 707.443.7489

Music & More VENUE

THUR 5/24

BEAR RIVER CASINO RESORT 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta 733-9644 BRASS RAIL BAR & GRILL 3188 Redwood Drive, Redway 923-3188

The

Always Sourcing The Freshest Sustainable Seafood Full Bar Private dining room seats up to 50 for your party or event!

316 E st • OLD TOWN EUREKA • 443-7187 D I N N E R : M O N D AY- S A T U R D A Y 5 - 9 pm

Arcata and North on previous page

Eureka • Fernbridge • Ferndale • Fortuna • Garberville • Loleta • Redway FRI 5/25

SAT 5/26

707 Band (’70s funk, ’80s rock) 9pm Free

The Mojo Rockers (blues, classic rock) 9pm Free

Pool Tourney 8pm

CECIL’S NEW ORLEANS BISTRO 773 Redwood Drive, Garberville 923-7007

SUN 5/27

M-T-W 5/28-30

Savannah Rose (folk, country) 8pm Free

[T] Karaoke 9pm [W] Open Mic/Jam Session 7pm Free

Jimmy D Jazz Quartet (jazz favorites) 7:30pm Free

EUREKA INN PALM LOUNGE 518 Seventh St., 497-6093

[T] Karaoke w/DJ Marv 7pm $5 Bike Nite at the Movies: I Ride and Hells Angels on Wheels (films) 7pm $8 both

EUREKA THEATER 612 F St., 442-2970

Sea Grill

EUREKA & SOUTH

GALLAGHER’S IRISH PUB 139 Second St., Eureka 442-1177

Seabury Gould and Evan Morden (Irish/Celtic) 6pm Free

LOST COAST BREWERY TAP ROOM 267-9651 1600 Sunset Drive, Eureka

Pints for Non Profits Redwood Empire BMX 5-8pm J Boog w/I-Octane and Westafa (reggae) 9pm $40 All ages

MATEEL COMMUNITY CENTER 50 Rusk Ln., Redway, 923-3368 OLD TOWN COFFEE & CHOC. 211 F St., Eureka 445-8600

Open Mic w/Mike Anderson 6:30pm Free

Improv Jam 7-9pm Free

Hillbilly Gospel Jam 2-4pm Free

PACIFIC BAR & GRILL, THE RED LION INN 1929 Fourth St., Eureka 445-0844 PEARL LOUNGE Reggae Thursdays w/DJ D’Vinity, 507 Second St., Eureka 444-2017 Selecta Arms 9:30pm Free

[W] Karaoke w/DJ Marv 6-9pm All ages Selecta Arms (hip-hop, reggae hits) 10pm Free

DJ D’Vinity (hip-hop, top 40) 10pm Free

NOW LEASING SUNSET TERRACE APARTMENTS

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707.444.2919 www.kkramer.com 28 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 24, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

A Caribbean Bistro

613 3rd St, Eureka (707) 798-6300 www.atasteofbim.org

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everything for the

Modern Child

J Boog w/I-Octane and Westafa play Mateel Community Center on Friday, May 25 at 9 p.m. ($40).

VENUE PHATSY KLINE’S PARLOR LOUNGE 139 Second St., Eureka THE SIREN’S SONG TAVERN 325 Second St., Eureka 442-8778 THE SPEAKEASY 411 Opera Alley, Eureka 444-2244 STONE JUNCTION BAR 923-2562 744 Redway Dr., Garberville

THUR 5/24

FRI 5/25

Laidback Lounge (DJ music) 6pm Free Vinyl Tap Listening Party 7pm Free

Crested Hens (Celtic, Irish) 7:30pm Free Hollow Down ft. Wil Gibson and The Bored Again 9pm $5 The Ghost Trio (jazz trio) 9pm Free

Upstate Thursdays 9pm Free

TIP TOP CLUB 443-5696 6269 Loma Ave., Eureka

Friday Night Function (DJ music) 9pm Free before 10pm

VICTORIAN INN RESTAURANT 400 Ocean Ave., Ferndale 786-4950

Jeffrey Smoller (solo guitar) 6pm Free

VISTA DEL MAR 91 Commercial St., Eureka 443-3770

SAT 5/26

Soul Hum (DJ music funk, soul) 10pm Sexy Saturdays w/Masta Shredda 9pm Free before 10pm

SUN 5/27

tween sizes 7-14

M-T-W 5/28-30 [T] Phat Tuesdays (live music) 7pm Free [W] Live Jazz 7pm Free, Comedy 9pm Free [T] C.H.E.W. (punk) 7:30pm $5 [W] Necrot, Dullahan, Burning Hash, DMT (death metal) 7pm $7 [T] The Opera Alley Cats (jazz) 7:30pm Free [M] Pool Tournament 8:30pm $10 buy-in

[M] Adamas (jazz ballads) 6pm Free [T] Tuesday Blues w/Humboldt’s veteran blues artists on rotation 7pm Free [W] Karaoke Nights 9pm Free

330 2nd St. Eureka CA 707.798.6326

Select Your Savings! 15% Off

15% Off

15% Off

20% Off

Steaks & Seafood

Pizzas & Calzones

Daily Specials

Lunches M-Sat 11-3

limit one item per person, per day

Open Every Day For Lunch & Dinner 773 8th St. Arcata & 305 F St. Eureka

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 24, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

29


Calendar May 24 –31, 2018

24 Thursday ART

Figure Drawing Group. 7-9 p.m. Cheri Blackerby Gallery, 272 C St., Eureka. Chip in for the live model and hone your artistic skills. Go into the courtyard on C Street to the room on the right. $5. 442-0309.

DANCE Redwood Fusion Partner Dance. 7-10 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. Contemporary partner dance with an improvised, lead-follow approach. A 7 p.m. lesson, 8 p.m. dancing. $5, first time free. www. redwoodraks.com.

MUSIC Star Wars: The Last Jedi

Submitted

Submitted

Settle in for a night of summer movie fun against the backdrop of Sequoia Park’s redwoods as Humboldt-Del Norte Film Commission’s free Movies in the Park series kicks off Saturday, May 26 with Star Wars: The Last Jedi (2017). Music by DJ Dub Cowboy and cartoons at 7 p.m. Movie at dusk (around 8:45 p.m.). Snacks available.

See what the talented students at Arcata Arts Institute have stitched together when they present Flow 2018, the school’s annual fashion showcase featuring a runway full of their creations on Saturday, May 26, 8 p.m. at Arcata Theatre Lounge ($30, $20 students/seniors).

Southern Trinity Area Rescue is a majority volunteer emergency medical service for southern Trinity County and eastern Humboldt County. Turn out and help out by enjoying a great meal, auction and raffle at the STAR Gourmet Feast & Silent Auction Benefit, Friday, May 25 at 6 p.m. at Ruth Lake Community Hall ($18, $10 ages 12-16, $5 ages 6-11, free for 5 and under).

Pascal Le Boeuf and the Friction Quartet. 7-10 p.m. The Sanctuary, 1301 J St., Arcata. The Grammy-nominated pianist and composer collaborates with a hybrid ensemble comprised of the San Francisco-based Friction Quartet (including Arcata High graduate Otis Harriel) and his own jazz group. $20. music@sanctuaryarcata.org. 822-0898.

THEATER Crossing the Vortex: The 2018 Thesis Festival. 8 p.m. Dell’Arte’s Carlo Theatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. Five new works by this year’s graduating MFA class, including explorations of Afro-futurism, immersive theatre, clown theatre and mask performance. Reserve tickets by phone or online. Pay what you can. www.dellarte.com. 668-5663. The House that Will Not Stand. 8 p.m. Redwood Curtain Theatre, 220 First St., Eureka. Set in 1836 New Orleans, this drama centers on Beatrice, a free woman of color, plus jealousy, murder and voodoo. $10-$22.

FOR KIDS Trinidad Library Toddler Storytime. 10-11 a.m. Trinidad Library, 380 Janis Court. Stories with the little ones. Free. trihuml@co.humboldt.ca.us. 677-0227. Young Discoverers. 10:30 a.m.-noon. Redwood Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. A unique drop-off program for children ages 3-5. Stories, music, crafts, yoga and snacks. $8, $6 members. redwooddiscoverymuseum@gmail.com. www.discovery-museum.org. 443-9694.

GARDEN FIle

Savannah Rose. Submitted

Glory Days

Go Muddin’

It rolls, floats and treks around just once a year, but the planning, prepping and giddy anticipation of this Memorial Day weekend juggernaut goes on year-round. The Kinetic Grand Championship, the art/engineering mashup marvel that covers sea, sand, mud and land is here, May 25-28, and dedicated teams are going for the glory, glory. Hallelujah. This year, the Kinetic fun extends over four days with the addition of the Kinetic Thrills Pageantry Party on Friday, May 25 from 6 to 10 p.m. at the Arcata Community Center (free). You can get a sneak peek of the teams while they entertain you with song, dance, skits and stories. If you behave accordingly (i.e. show up, have fun), organizers may bring it back next year. Rest up from the extra day of revelry and head to the Arcata Plaza on Saturday, May 26 from 9 a.m. to watch racers take laps around the plaza testing brakes and priming for the noon-ish kickoff when the Rutabaga Queens send them on their merry way. Teams then head to Manila on State Route 255 for the first leg of the race, crossing June’s Dunes before seeing how they fare on Deadman’s Drop at 1 p.m. Wrap up the day with the racers at Halvorsen Park for the Finish Line Party, 1 p.m. (Rutabaga time) to dark. Sunday, May 27 racers climb back on their horses (or lobsters or chickens or dragons) and cross the bay to climb Loleta Hill, then descend into Fernbridge on Monday, May 28 to cross the finish line in Ferndale. And all along the way, they’ll be exemplifying the words of race founder Hobart Brown: “Adults having fun so children will want to grow up.” For a complete schedule of events, check www.kineticgrandchampionship.com.

Celebrate community radio and good times with KMUD at the station’s annual Block Party, Saturday, May 26, from noon to 9 p.m. (free, donations gladly accepted). Join the folks at the KMUD studio for a lively day of music, food, drinks and dancing. Plus the station’s biggest music sale. Organizers have dusted off stacks of vinyl and CD treasures waiting for you to rifle through and take home. There’s plenty of live music, too. Enjoy a healthy dose of bluegrass, folk, rock and reggae performed by local musicians like Ari and Ruby, Savannah Rose, BeTH isBell, Thornbirds, Rebecca Wudarski, Sleepwalker, TransAm Mullet, That Captain and Back to the Hill (for the complete music lineup, visit www.kmud.org). And bring some extra cash for the variety of vendors on hand — arts and crafts, plants, food and drink. There’s plenty to keep the kids happy at this family-friendly event, especially in the Kids Zone, with face painting, trash art (with Lolo Trash), hula hoop lessons, chalk drawing and more. Head to Redway, have a great time and help support listener-sponsored community radio. Proceeds go to operating the nonprofit’s station.

—Kali Cozyris

30 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 24, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

Eureka Rhododendron Chapter’s Mini-Show. 6 p.m. Eureka Woman’s Club, 1531 J St. Potluck at 6 p.m. Show at 7 p.m. Non-members please call ahead for reservations. www.eurekawomansclub.org. 443-1291.

MEETINGS

—Kali Cozyris

Toastmasters. Fourth Thursday of every month, noon. Redwood Sciences Laboratory, 1700 Bayview St., Arcata. Give and receive feedback and learn to speak with confidence. Second and fourth Thursdays. Visitors welcome.

ETC Humboldt Cribbage Club. 6:15 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Play cards. 444-3161. Standard Magic Tournament. 6-10 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Put your deck to the test. $5. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline.com. 497-6358.

25 Friday ART

A Call to Yarns Knitting Group. 12-1 p.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh St. Knit. Chat. Relax. Free. 822-5954.

DANCE Baile Terapia. 7-8 p.m. The MGC, 2280 Newburg Road, Fortuna. Paso a Paso hosts dance therapy. Free. www. ervmgc.com. 725-3300. World Dance. 7:30 p.m. St. Alban’s Episcopal Church, 1675 Chester Ave., Arcata. Humboldt Folk Dancers sponsor


teaching and easy dances until 8:30 p.m. followed by request dancing. $3. www.stalbansarcata.org.

com/event/jacqueline-suskin-edge-continent-volume-one-forest. 822-2834.

LECTURE

THEATER

Home on the Range. 7 p.m. Trinidad Museum, 400 Janis Court. Jerry Rohde rounds up stories of ranches in the Bald Hills, Showers Pass, Bull Creek and other historic parts of cow country. Free.

MOVIES Stargate (1994). 8 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Scholars discover a gateway to the infinity of the cosmos. $5. www.arcatatheatre.com. Bike Nite at the Movies. 7 p.m. Eureka Theater, 612 F St. Doors at 6:15 p.m. I Ride at 7 p.m. Hells Angels on Wheels at 9 p.m. Cocktails, beer and wine available, as well as soft drinks, popcorn and concessions. 21 and over. $8 for both films. 442-2970.

MUSIC Happy Hour at The Gazebo. Fourth Friday of every month, 4-7 p.m. Old Town Gazebo, Second and F streets, Eureka. Family friendly concert featuring local bands, drinks and food. Free. J Boog. 9 p.m.-midnight. Mateel Community Center, 59 Rusk Lane, Redway. The Grammy-nominated island reggae artist performs with special guests I-Octane and Westafa. Doors at 8 p.m. All ages. $40, $30 advance. media@mateel. org. mateel.org/may-25th-j-boog-with-special-guests-ioctane-westafa/. 923-3368.

SPOKEN WORD Jacqueline Suskin. 7-9 p.m. Northtown Books, 957 H St., Arcata. The poet returns to Humboldt Country with a book inspired by it: The Edge of the Continent. Free. info@northtownbooks.com. www.northtownbooks.

Crossing the Vortex: The 2018 Thesis Festival. 8 p.m. Dell’Arte’s Carlo Theatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. See May 24 listing. Hedwig & the Angry Inch. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. Glam-rock muscial tale of a genderqueer East German rock-and-roll singer. Recommended for mature audiences only. $16 - $18. Chicago. 8 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theatre, 447 Main St. Award-winning musical about notoriety, celebrity and passion. Appropriate for ages 16+. $18, $16 students/ seniors. www.ferndalerep.org. The House that Will Not Stand. 8 p.m. Redwood Curtain Theatre, 220 First St., Eureka. See May 24 listing. Improv Jam. 7-9 p.m. Old Town Coffee & Chocolates, 211 F St., Eureka. A night of improv for audience and players. All ages. Free. thevaulteureka@gmail.com. www.thevaulteureka.com. 497-9039.

EVENTS

Friday Night Market. 5 p.m. Clarke Plaza, Old Town, Eureka. A night farmer’s market with live music, farmers, local artists, beer/wine/distillery features and more. Kinetic Thrills Pageantry Party. 6-10 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. Mingle with racers as they pick up their registration packets, debut their pageantry, eat, drink and share tales of yore. Free. Mental Health Matters Barbecue. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Veterans Park, 100 Kimtu Road, Willow Creek. Enjoy sun, fun and food. Bring a dish to share. Hamburgers, hot dogs and a vegetarian option provided. Free. 441-3783.

STAR Gourmet Feast and Silent Auction Benefit. 6 p.m. Ruth Lake Community Hall, 591 Van Duzen Road, Mad River. Southern Trinity Area Rescue’s annual dinner and silent auction includes roast pork, roast beef, fish, oysters and more. Silent auction and Dutch raffle for kids. $18, $10 for ages 12-16, $5 for ages 6-11, free for 5 and under.

FOR KIDS

Family Storytime. 10:30-11 a.m. Fortuna Library, 753 14th St. A rotating group of storytellers entertain children ages 2-6 and parents at Fortuna Library. Free. www.humlib. org. 725-3460. Movie Night. Last Friday of every month, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Bethel Church, 2734 Hubbard Lane, Eureka. Moms and dads take the night off. Children ages 4-18 welcome for a movie, popcorn, drink and treat. (760) 285-0806. Redwood Empire BMX - BMX Practice/Racing. 5-6 p.m. Redwood Empire BMX, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. Learn good sportsmanship and safety for kids of all ages. Friday and Sunday practices followed by racing. $2 practice, $5 ribbon race, $8 medal race, $11 trophy race. redwoodempirebmx1992@gmail.com. 845-0094.

FOOD Fish Fry Fundraiser. 6:30 p.m. Arcata Portuguese Hall, 1285 11th St. For the Arcata Portuguese Holy Ghost Celebration. $25 per person, $20 each for two or more. Southern Humboldt Farmers Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Garberville Town Square, Church Street. Local produce, pasture-raised meats, baked goods, plants starts, crafts and more. Live music and food vendors. sohumfm@yahoo. com. (559) 246-2246.

COMEDY

Kingpin Comedy: Keith Carey. 8:30-10:45 p.m. E&O Lanes, 1417 Glendale Dr, Blue Lake. With fellow Los Angeles come-

dian Nicole Becannon and locals Evan Vest and Laurel Pear. Kim Hodges hosts. $15, $12 advance. eo.kingpincomedy@ gmail.com. (559)940-9440

ETC Drop-in Volunteering. 1-6 p.m. SCRAP Humboldt, 101 H St., Suite D, Arcata. Lend your hand organizing and helping the environment at the creative reuse nonprofit. Free. volunteer@SCRAPhumboldt.org. www.scraphumboldt. org. 822-2452. Solidarity Fridays. 5-6 p.m. County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka. Join Veterans for Peace and the North Coast People’s Alliance for a peaceful protest on the courthouse lawn. www.northcoastpeoplesalliance.org.

26 Saturday DANCE

The Dancing Princesses. 3:30 p.m. Arkley Center for the Performing Arts, 412 G St., Eureka. Trinity Ballet Academy of Mckinleyville’s 19th annual recital features famous “princess” selections from various classical ballets. Doors open at 2:30 p.m. 839-1816.

MOVIES Movies in the Park: Star Wars: The Last Jedi (2017). 7 p.m. Sequoia Park, 3414 W St., Eureka. Find a place on the lawn for blankets and lawn chairs. Music by DJ Dub Cowboy at 7 p.m. with Loony Tunes cartoons. Feature film at dusk, around 8:45 p.m. Popcorn, candy and refreshments available. Free.

MUSIC The Ukelaliens. 5 p.m. Our Savior’s Lutheran Church, 425 Shaw Ave., Ferndale. Humboldt performance string Continued on next page »

Home & Garden

Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

MEMORIAL DAY SALE!

WE PAY THE SALES TAX! some exclusions apply

Save up to

250

$

on Flexsteel power reclining sofas.

LEARN TO ROW DAY - Saturday, June 2 A free opportunity to experience rowing in a racing shell. Sign up at www.hbra.org

Junior and Adult rowing lessons are held throughout the summer. See website for the next dates. Individual sculling lessons are available by appointment.

HUMBOLDT BAY ROWING ASSOCIATION www.hbra.org • RowHumboldtBay@gmail.com

2nd & A • Facing the Bay • Old Town Eureka Mon-Sat 10-5:30, Sun 11-5 • 445-3161 northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 24, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

31


Calendar Continued from previous page

band celebrates its first CD at this benefit for River Life Foundation. Includes goulash dinner. TBA.

THEATER Crossing the Vortex: The 2018 Thesis Festival. 8 p.m. Dell’Arte’s Carlo Theatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. See May 24 listing. Hedwig & the Angry Inch. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. See May 25 listing. Chicago. 8 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theatre, 447 Main St. See May 25 listing. The House that Will Not Stand. 8 p.m. Redwood Curtain Theatre, 220 First St., Eureka. See May 24 listing.

EVENTS Arcata Portuguese Holy Ghost Celebration. Arcata Portuguese Hall, 1285 11th St. Dinner, dancing, livestock auction on Saturday. Parade at 10 a.m., lunch and dancing on Sunday. Flow 2018. 8 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. The annual fashion showcase for the Arcata Arts Institute. www.arcatatheatre.com. Kinetic Grand Championship. Locations throughout Humboldt County. The annual 42-mile, human-powered, all-terrain, art-vehicle race for glory. This year, four days of glory with an added event at the Arcata Community Center May 25. Free. www.kineticgrandchampionship.com. KMUD’s Annual Block Party. 12-9 p.m. KMUD Studio, 1144 Redway Dr., Redway. Live bands, craft vendors, food and refreshments, music sale and kids’ activities.No dogs. Music schedule online. Free. allison@kmud.org. www. kmud.org. 923-2513. Memorial Day Weekend Open House. Briceland

Vineyards, 5959 Briceland Road, Redway. Oysters, pate, local cheeses, vegan and gluten-free options. www. bricelandvineyards.com. Vegan Potluck Brunch and Benefit For Humboldt Wildlife Care Center. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Humboldt Area Foundation, 363 Indianola Road, Bayside. Benefiting Humboldt Wildlife Care Center. Bring place setting and either a vegan potato dish, protein, bread, pastry, fruit or juices that serve 8 to 10. Tofu scramble and coffee provided. $7 suggested. vegsocietyhumboldt@gmail.com. 616-7855.

FOR KIDS Story Time with Kathy Frye. Fourth Saturday of every month, 11-11:30 a.m. Rio Dell Library, 715 Wildwood Ave. Featuring puppets and more designed for children ages 0-5. Free. riohuml@co.humboldt.ca.us. www.facebook. com/RioDellLibrary. 764-3333. Storytime and Crafts. 11:30 a.m. Blue Lake Library, 111 Greenwood Ave. Storytime followed by crafts at noon. Now with a Spanish and English Storytime every 1st and 3rd Saturday. Free. blkhuml@co.Humboldt.ca.us. 668-4207.

FOOD Arcata Plaza Farmers Market. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Local produce, plants, food vendors and live music. CalFresh EBT cards welcome at all NCGA markets, Market Match available. Pancake Breakfast. 7:30-11:30 a.m. Humboldt Grange Hall, 5845 Humboldt Hill Road, Eureka. Pancakes or biscuits and gravy, ham or sausage (patties or links), eggs and more. $5, $3 kids 6-10, free for kids under 6. www.facebook.com/humboldt.grange.

HOLIDAY EVENTS Memorial Day Presentation. 11:30 a.m. Myrtle Grove

Home & Garden

32 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 24, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

Memorial Cemetery, 900 Myrtle Avenue, Eureka. Presentation of colors and the laying of a memorial wreath by the Redwood Veterans Honor Guard. Free.

OUTDOORS Arcata Marsh Tour. 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 569 S. G St. Meet a trained guide for a 90-minute walk focusing on the ecology of the marsh. With leader Barbara Reisman. Free. 826-2359. Audubon Society Arcata Marsh Bird Walk. 8:30-11 a.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary, South I Street. Bring your binoculars and meet in the parking lot at the end of South I Street (Klopp Lake) in Arcata, rain or shine. Walk leader is Chet Ogan. Free. www.rras.org/calendar. BioBlitz and Restoration. 9:30-11:30 a.m. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. Join Friends of the Dunes in a smartphone-powered intensive one-day study of biodiversity in a specific location. Bring your smartphone with the iNaturalist app already downloaded. Free. info@friendsofthedunes. org. 444-1397. Seabird Walk on Elk Head. 8:30-11:30 a.m. Elk Head Parking Lot, Stagecoach Road, Trinidad. Search the rocky shoreline for shorebirds (oystercatchers, turnstones, tattlers) and the offshore rocks for nesting seabirds (murres, cormorants, guillemots) with leader Gary Lester. Bring a spotting scope if you have one. Free. garys.lester@gmail.com. 839-3373.

ETC Women’s Peace Vigil. 12-1 p.m. County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka. Dress in warm clothing and bring your own chair. No perfume, please. Free. 269-7044.

Yu-Gi-Oh! Standard League. 1-4 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Bring your decks and claim your prizes. $5. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline.com. 497-6358.

27 Sunday ART

Trinidad Artisans Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Saunder’s Plaza, 353 Main St., Trinidad. Next to Murphy’s Market. Featuring local art and crafts, live music and barbecue. Free admission.

MOVIES Coco (2017). 6 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. A young Mexican boy who wants to be a musician travels to the colorful Land of the Dead. $5. www.arcatatheatre.com.

MUSIC Bayside Grange Music Project. 5-9 p.m. Bayside Community Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. From 5-7 p.m. anyone playing any instrument with any ability is invited; 7-9 p.m. people with wind instruments for Bandemonium. Donations. gregg@ relevantmusic.org. www.relevantmusic.org/ Bayside. 499-8516. The Comix Trip, Dream Machine, The Sweet Trade, Ms. Glitterstorm. 7-10 p.m. Outer Space, 1100 M St., Arcata. Local comic book artist Violet Crabtree’s live performance art project. Musicians back her up with live sound effects and songs. $5. breakfastalldaycollective@gmail.com.


THEATER

FOOD

FOOD

Crossing the Vortex: The 2018 Thesis Festival. 8 p.m. Dell’Arte’s Carlo Theatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. See May 24 listing. Hedwig & the Angry Inch. 2 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. See May 25 listing. Chicago. 2 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theatre, 447 Main St. See May 25 listing.

Food Not Bombs. 4 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Free, hot food for everyone. Mostly vegan and organic and always delicious.

One-Log Farmers Market. 1-5:30 p.m. One-Log House, 705 U.S. Highway 101, Garberville. On the lawn. 672-5224.

SPORTS

Memorial Day Parade & Remembrance. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Ferndale Main Street, Main Street. Ferndale veterans and other organizations march from the Veterans Memorial Building down Main Street to Ferndale Cemetery for a memorial service. Refreshments at the Vets building follow. info@visitferndale.com. 786-4477. Memorial Day Service. 11 a.m. Arcata Veterans Hall, 1425 J St. Speakers, veterans groups, Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, Mad River Community Honor Guard and more. Refreshments served.

EVENTS Arcata Portuguese Holy Ghost Celebration. Arcata Portuguese Hall, 1285 11th St. See May 26 listing. Kinetic Grand Championship. Locations throughout Humboldt County. See May 26 listing. Memorial Day Weekend Open House and. Briceland Vineyards, 5959 Briceland Road, Redway. See May 26 listing. Trinidad Memorial Lighthouse Ceremony. 2-2:45 p.m. Trinidad Memorial Lighthouse, Trinity Street. Honoring those lost or buried at sea, and whose names are engraved on the memorial plaques. Free. tcc@trinidadcivicclub.org. sites.google.com/trinidadcivicclub.org/ trinidadcivicclub. Trinidad Town Hall: 677-0223.

FOR KIDS Lego Club. 12:30-2 p.m. Redwood Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. Lego fun for younger and older kids featuring Duplos and more complex pieces. Free with museum admission. redwooddiscoverymuseum@gmail. com. www.discovery-museum.org. 443-9694. Redwood Empire BMX - BMX Practice/Racing. 1-2:30 p.m. Redwood Empire BMX, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. See May 25 listing.

O’Reilly Auto Parts Night At The Races. 5:30 p.m. Redwood Acres Racetrack, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. Featuring North State Modifieds, Late Models off. Gates at 5 p.m. $16, $13 senior/military, $3 kids 6-12, free for kids 5 and under.

ETC Pokémon Trade and Play. 3-5 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Bring your cards to play or learn. Free. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline. com. 497-6358.

28 Monday MUSIC

Humboldt Harmonaires. 7-9:30 p.m. First Congregational United Church of Christ, 900 Hodgson St., Eureka. Sing fourpart men’s a cappella barbershop harmony, no experience needed. All voice levels and ages welcome. Free. singfourpart@gmail.com. 445-3939. McKinleyville Community Choir Practice. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Grace Good Shepherd Church, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. All choral voices are welcome with a particular call for male voices. Opportunities for solos and ensemble groups. $50 registration fee w/scholarships available. 839-2276.

EVENTS Kinetic Grand Championship. Locations throughout Humboldt County. See May 26 listing.

HOLIDAY EVENTS

MEETINGS Volunteer Orientation. 2:30 p.m. Food for People, 307 W. 14th St., Eureka. Learn to pack and sort food, work with clients, collect donations and cook. panderson@ foodforpeople.org.

OUTDOORS Hike and Historic Tour of Trinidad Head Lighthouse. 10 a.m.-noon. Trinidad Head, Trinidad State Beach. Join the Trinidad Coastal Land Trust for an interpretive hike and a behind-the-scenes tour. Reservations required. carol@trinidadcoastallandtrust.org. 677-2501.

29 Tuesday DANCE

Let’s Dance. 7-9:30 p.m. Humboldt Grange Hall, 5845 Humboldt Hill Road, Eureka. Let’s dance to live music.

Tonight dance to Fake News with Sonny & Steve. $5. www.facebook.com/humboldt.grange. 725-5323.

FOR KIDS Playgroup. 10-11:30 a.m. Redwood Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. Come to the museum for stories, crafts and snacks. Free for children age 0-5 and their caregivers. Free. redwooddiscoverymuseum@gmail.com. www. discovery-museum.org. 443-9694.

FOOD Miranda Farmers’ Market. 2-6 p.m. Miranda Market, 6685 Avenue of the Giants. Fresh produce, herbs and teas, eggs, plants and more. sohumfm@yahoo.com. 943-3025. Shelter Cove Farmers’ Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Mario’s Marina Bar, 533 Machi Road, Shelter Cove. Fresh fruits and vegetables, flowers, and premium plant starts. sohumfm@ yahoo.com. 986-7229.

OUTDOORS Slower-Speed Arcata Marsh Tour. Last Tuesday of every month, 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 569 S. G St. A tour for attendees with mobility issues and those unable to keep up on regular walks. Meet at the first I Street parking lot (in from Samoa) of the Arcata Marsh. Free. 822-3475.

ETC Bingo. 6 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Speed bingo, early and regular games. Doors open at 5 p.m. Games $1-$10. Board Game Night. 6-9 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Choose from a large variety of games or bring your own. All ages. Free. www.nugamesonline.com. 497-6358. Continued on page 35 »

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Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

Calendar Continued from page 33

Ferndale Cribbage. 10 a.m. Our Savior’s Lutheran Church, 425 Shaw Ave., Ferndale. Cards and pegs. Pokémon Trade and Play. 3-6 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. See May 27 listing.

30 Wednesday BOOKS

Jacqueline Suskin: Poetry Workshop. 5-7 p.m. The Sanctuary, 1301 J St., Arcata. The Los Angeles-based poet teaches a oneday workshop. Open to all. $5. 822-0898.

MOVIES Sci-Fi Pint & Fry Night: The Eye Creatures (1965). 6 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Car headlights help a teen save the world from flying-saucer aliens. Free w/$5 min. food or beverage purchase. www.arcatatheatre.com.

MUSIC CJ Boyd, Opossum Sun Trail, mister moonbeam. 7-10 p.m. Outer Space, 1100 M St., Arcata. Bassist, post twang and one-man band. $5.

FOR KIDS Redwood Empire BMX - BMX Practice/Racing. 5-6:30 p.m. Redwood Empire BMX, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. See May 25 listing. Storytime. 11-11:30 a.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh St. Stories, songs, rhymes — something for everyone, especially preschoolers. Free. 822-5954. 1 p.m. McKinleyville Library, 1606 Pickett Road. Liz Cappiello reads stories to children and their parents. Free.

MEETINGS Humboldt Bay Harbor Working Group. Noon. Samoa Cookhouse, 908 Vance Ave. Presentation: “Plans for the Eureka Forest Products Dock,” part of a series on the development of the Port of Humboldt Bay. RSVP. No-host lunch $16, $12. Charles. Bean@Yahoo.com. www.samoacookhouse.net. 441-1974. KHSU Community Advisory Board Meeting. 6:30-8 p.m. Gist Hall 218, Humboldt State University. The purpose of the meeting is to obtain public input regarding any aspect of KHSU’s programming and operations. 826-4807.

OUTDOORS Wheel-In Wednesday. 7 a.m. Arcata Co-op, 811 I St. Join the Bike Month Humboldt Coalition for group commute rides from Arcata to Eureka every Wednesday in May. Free. 441-5574.

ETC Casual Magic. 4-9 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Bring your decks and connect with the local Magic community. Beginners welcome. Door prizes and drawings. $5. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline.com. 497-6358. Community Board Game Night. Last Wednesday, Thursday of every month, 6-9 p.m. Bayside Community Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. Play your favorite games or learn new ones with North Coast Role Playing. Free. oss1ncrp@northcoast.com. www.baysidegrange.org. 444-2288.

31 Thursday ART

Figure Drawing Group. 7-9 p.m. Cheri Blackerby Gallery, 272 C St., Eureka. See May 24 listing.

DANCE Redwood Fusion Partner Dance. 7-10 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. See May 24 listing.

MUSIC Free Salamander Exhibit, Cheer Accident, Faun Fables. 6-11 p.m. Mattole Valley Community Center, 29230 Mattole Road, Petrolia. Avant rock/theatre/metal from Oakland,

experimental rock from Chicago and psychedelic folk from Cotati. Sliding, no one turned away. danrath@mac.com. (510) 459-7320.

EVENTS Ocean Day Volunteer Training. 5:30-7:30 p.m. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. All-day training to help school kids learn about coastal environments, pick up trash, pull invasive plants and create aerial art on Kids Ocean Day, June 7. Call to sign up. Free. info@ friendsofthedunes.org. 444-1397.

FOR KIDS Trinidad Library Toddler Storytime. 10-11 a.m. Trinidad Library, 380 Janis Court. See May 24 listing. Young Discoverers. 10:30 a.m.-noon. Redwood Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. See May 24 listing.

SPORTS Humboldt Crabs Fan Fest. 5-8 p.m. Arcata Ball Park, Ninth and F streets. Join the Crabs for a sneak preview of the new team and mingle with your fellow Crabs fans before the season is officially underway. $5, includes hot dog, bag of chips and a beverage. NBA Finals 2018. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. TBA. Check www.arcatatheater.com. Free w/ $5 min. food or beverage purchase. www.arcatatheatre.com.

FOOD • ART • COMMUNITY

ETC Community Board Game Night. Last Wednesday, Thursday of every month, 6-9 p.m. Bayside Community Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. See May 30 listing. Humboldt Cribbage Club. 6:15 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. See May 24 listing. Knit, Knit, Sip. 5:30-7:30 p.m. SCRAP Humboldt, 101 H St., Suite D, Arcata. Bring your favorite beverage and learn how to cast on, knit stitch, purl stitch, and cast off while you sip. $5. education@scraphumboldt.org. www.scraphumboldt.org. 822-2452. Standard Magic Tournament. 6-10 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. See May 24 listing.

Heads Up … The Humboldt Branch of Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom is seeking donations of paperback books in good condition for its annual Fourth of July Book Sale benefiting the Edilith Eckart Memorial Peace Scholarship. Call 822-5711. The Humboldt Local Agency Formation Commission is accepting applications to serve on the commission as an alternate public member. Visit www.humboldtlafco. org or call 445-7508. Deadline is May 25. 350 Humboldt calls on local artists for its logo contest with a $100 prize for the winning design. Help visualize a future powered by sun, wind and waves. Email your design to 350humboldt@gmail.com by June 1. For style tips, Google the visual guide for 350.org. Artists are invited to submit up to three works of art inspired by the redwoods for a juried show. Deadline is June 7. Call 442- 0278 or visit www.humboldtarts.org. The California Department of Fish and Wildlife Dove Banding Program seeks volunteers. More information at www.wildlife.ca.gov/Science-Institute. Humboldt Bay Fire seeks residents within the city of Eureka and the greater Eureka area to join the HBF Steering Committee. Letters of interest can be mailed, dropped off or emailed to Humboldt Bay Fire, Attn: Deputy Chief Bill Reynolds, 533 C St., Eureka, CA 95501, or wreynolds@hbfire.org. Call 441-4000. Tri County Independent Living seeks trail volunteers to visit trails to identify future accessibility signage needs. Call 445-8404 or email Charlie@tilinet.org. l

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Open Daily 11:30am - 8:30pm. Closed Thursdays for private events. 707-786-5921 553 Main St., Ferndale WWW.TUYASFERNDALE.COM northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 24, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

35


Filmland

Franchise in Anti-hero’s Clothing

Deadpool 2 plays outsider, Book Club is one By John J. Bennett

filmland@northcoastjournal.com

Reviews

DEADPOOL 2. We live in a weird, expanding world of sequels. Defined by diminishing returns, they have also become a certainty: Anything that generates revenue on a certain scale will be quickly followed by as many follow-ups as the market will bear. This newly risen reality can be exciting (more of a good thing, and all that) but it can also be just as deflating, dispiriting and exhausting — just like actual reality. As the calendar fills with new tent poles and next installments of old ones, one can start to lose a sense of the horizon, to feel as though there may soon only be franchises ever onward, a soulless, artless binary drumming us all into homogeneity and complacence, like the ad infinitum pattern of suburb/strip-mall/suburb that has become the American Midwest. As much as I enjoyed Deadpool (2016) and this, its even-better sequel, I can’t help but include them as part of the problem. These movies, with their self-awareness and ostensible rule-flouting, are presented as agents of disruption, a force working against the crass commercialism of the modern movie marketplace. And I bought into it at first, seeing Deadpool as I was supposed to: like a good little consumer. The violence, coarse talk and nerd-bait humor worked like a charm, and I celebrated the fact that a movie like it could punch through, succeeding in spite of its obstacles. But there really aren’t any obstacles. The notion of disruption is a fallacy, a marketing ploy as much at play in Silicon Valley fun-time think-tanks as it is in Hollywood marketing meetings. It’s a device by which vast, many-tendrilled industrial gorgons can recast themselves, or parts thereof, as agents of change or adversaries, thereby infiltrating a part of the market to which they might not have had access. It’s not disruption, it’s deception. I still prefer Deadpool movies to almost any of the other self-righteous superhero stuff; I’ve just come to see them as part of the same entity. And that entity is sucking the life out of a beautiful and important artform, even as it presents these movies as an offsetting influence.

Perhaps more to the point, Deadpool 2 finds our (anti) hero Deadpool/Wade Wilson (Ryan Reynolds) firmly established as a doer of good deeds by way of hideous violence. He has traveled the globe, dispatching his brand of justice by killing big rooms full of bad guys by various, creative means. Of course, his increased profile presents a significant risk and soon enough the violence visits him at home. Lost in the aftermath of tragedy, fruitlessly attempting to end his own life, Deadpool just wallows in it, at least until Colossus (voiced by Stefan Kapicic) lovingly shakes him by the lapels and recruits him as a reluctant X-Men trainee. The new day job brings Deadpool into contact with a troubled mutant kid named Russell, who prefers the moniker Firefist (Julian Dennison) and has had just about enough of the abuse he’s suffered while confined in an orphanage/conversion center for uniquely abled kids. This in turn brings about a conflict with Cable (Josh Brolin), a semi-robotic super-soldier from the future who harbors a serious beef with young Russell. Deadpool, alive with new purpose, assembles a team to do battle with Cable, spearheaded by the immensely compelling Domino (Zazie Beetz). Rhett Reese and Paul Wernick return as screenwriters, this time sharing credit with Reynolds, and their comfort with this character and the world he inhabits shows through in a script even more self-assured, smarter and funnier than the first. The plot is tighter, the jokes are elevated and the voices of the characters are firmly in place. This story also has a sense of risk, of higher stakes, that was absent in the original. And director David Leitch (Atomic Blonde, 2017) strips away some of the airier elements, delivering almost nonstop action as satisfying in the close-up fighting as it is in the over-the-top, comic book, throwing-buses-around sequences. It’s all good fun, served with a sense of kindness and excitement (thanks in large part to Reynolds’ performance in a role he seems born for) in equal measure to its large-scale mayhem. The vast majority of the audience will see it for that, enjoy it immensely and hopefully not worry too much about

36 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 24, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

Sending thoughts and prayers to everyone blaming doors, girls and trench coats for school shootings. Deadpool 2

the movie’s role in the corporatization and commodification of cinema. R. 113M. BROAD-

men fight in the Great War. Starring Nathalie Baye, Laura Smet and Iris Bry. R. 134M.

WAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK, MINOR.

MINOR.

BOOK CLUB is of a type of movie that is easily dismissed and that’s a problem. (I’m guilty of it too, so let’s all remain calm.) At a glance, it seems like an easy cash in, a quasi-vanity project for very prominent actors to draw their similarly-aged audience into the theater. That’s not an entirely misplaced notion, except that the movie business is jiggered against these very actors — how many major releases with four female leads over 60 do you remember seeing recently or ever? By that standard alone we should probably all go buy tickets to Book Club. Fortunately, it’s also a well-observed story about women in a stage of life that is no longer as late as it used to be. And, of course, Candice Bergen, Jane Fonda, Diane Keaton and Mary Steenburgen are consummate pros; they’ve been in this game for a minute and their work hasn’t suffered for it. Their supporting male counterparts aren’t too bad either. PG13. 97M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK. —John J. Bennett

REVENGE. A woman (Matilda Anna Ingrid Lutz) turns the tables on her rapey would-be murderers in a bloody exploitation action horror movie. R. 108M. MINOR. SOLO: A STAR WARS STORY. Prequel with Alden Ehrenreich growing into the vest and Donald Glover serving cape looks as Lando. PG13. 135M. BROADWAY,

For showtimes, see listings at www. northcoastjournal.com or call: Broadway Cinema 443-3456; Fortuna Theatre 7252121; Mill Creek Cinema 839-3456; Minor Theatre 822-3456; Richards’ Goat Miniplex 630-5000.

FORTUNA, MILL CREEK, MINOR.

Continuing

AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR. Seriousness suffocates the best of this parade of characters in seriousness in this massive supermovie. PG13. 149M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK.

LIFE OF THE PARTY. Melissa McCarthy plays a middle-aged mom going back to college with her daughter in this funny movie that’s still too conventional for her talents. PG13. 105M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK. OVERBOARD. Anna Faris and Eugenio Derbez in a gender-swapped 1980s comedy remake about revenge-conning a wealthy jackass into fake marriage. PG13. 112M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA.

A QUIET PLACE. This effective horror about a family surviving amid creatures that hunt by sound achieves emotional authenticity about trauma and isolation. PG13. BROADWAY.

Previews

GREASE (1978). John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John in a musical that is not as OK for the kids as you remember. PG13. 110M.

RBG. Documentary about Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the Supreme Court justice in the fly collar. PG. 97M. MINIPLEX. SHOW DOGS. Ludacris voices a police Rottweiler undercover at a dog show. PG.

BROADWAY.

BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK.

THE GUARDIANS. French film about women working a family farm while the

— Jennifer Fumiko Cahill ●


Workshops & Classes

List your class – just $4 per line per issue! Deadline: Friday, 5pm. Place your online ad at classified.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Arts & Crafts

Food & Drink

INTUITIVE READINGS by donation 541−324−3855 (S−0524)

NOTARY − Tuesday, July 10 8am−6pm. CR Main Campus. Call CR Community Education at 707−476− 4500. (V−0524)

TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres. www.tarotofbecoming.com (707) 442−4240 carolyn@tarotofbecoming.com (S−0531)

SECURITY GUARD TRAINING & CPR − June 4 −25, Mon. Tues. Wed. 1pm − 5pm. Call CR Community Education at 707−476−4500. (V−0524)

Sports & Recreation BECOME A RIVER GUIDE Guide School June 10−15 (800) 429−0090 michael@redwoods−rivers.com https://redwoods−rivers.com/

Summer Fun/Arts

GLASS BLOWING − June 13 − Produce and Artistic Paperweight, June 20 − Craft a Drinking − June 27 Simple Vessel. 5:30pm − 7:30pm. Call CR Commu− nity Education at 707−476−4500. (A−0524)

FERMENTING FOODS 101− − June 5 − 26, Tuesdays, 5:30pm − 7:30pm. Humboldt Herbals classroom space. Call CR Community Education at 707−476− 4500. (V−0524)

Communication

CRAFTING BEE CAMP− B*CRAFTY, B*FRIEND, B*YOURSELF! Perfect for kids 5−12. Three weekly summer sessions, June 18, July 2 & 9. Amazing activ− ities including Felting, Ceramics, Letterboxing & Upcycled Crafts! $40/day $150/week CGCS Campus 1897 "S" Arcata. TEXT (707) 601−9901

FOODWISE whole. plant based. kitchen. Cooking classes, Nutritional education, Sunday meal prep www.foodwisekitchen.com (F−0705)

Therapy & Support

SPANISH Instruction/Tutoring Marcia 845−1910 (C−0712)

Dance/Music/Theater/Film DANCE WITH DEBBIE: Remember the innocence of dancing when you were little? Remember moving to the music and just feeling the joy of dancing? That’s what we work on recapturing. We are your ballroom dance experts, offering group and private lessons to all levels of dancers. (707) 464−3638, debbie@dancewithdebbie.biz (D−0531) GUITAR/PIANO LESSONS. All ages, beginning & intermediate. Seabury Gould (707)845−8167. (DMT−0531) REDWOOD RAKS WORLD DANCE STUDIO, OLD CREAMERY IN ARCATA. Belly Dance, Swing, Tango, Hip Hop, Zumba, African, Samba, Capoeira and more for all ages. (707) 616−6876 www.redwoodraks.com (DMT−0405) STEEL DRUM CLASSES. Weekly Beginning Class: Fri’s. 10:30a.m.−11:30a.m., Level 2 Beginners Class Fri’s. 11:30a.m.−12:30 p.m. Beginners Mon’s 7:00p.m.− 8:00p.m. Pan Arts Network 1049 Samoa Blvd. Suite C (707) 407−8998. panartsnetwork.com (DMT−0531)

Fitness NORTH COAST FENCING ACADEMY. Fencing (with swords!). Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout. New classes begin the first Mon. of every month. Ages 8 to 80+ Email: northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com or text, or call Justin at 707 601−1657. 1459 M Street, Arcata, northcoastfencing.tripod.com (F−0531) SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids & adults, child care, fitness gym & more. Tae Kwon Do Mon−Fri 5−6 p.m., 6−7 p.m., Sat 10−11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825−0182. (F−0531) ZUMBA WITH MARLA JOY. Elevate, Motivate, Celebrate another day of living. Exercise in Disguise. Now is the time to start, don’t wait. All ability levels are welcome. Every Mon. and Thurs. at Bayside Grange 6−7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. (707) 845−4307 marlajoy.zumba.com (F−0531)

50 and Better

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS. We can help 24/7, call toll free 1−844 442−0711. (T−0531)

OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE (OLLI). Offers dynamic classes for people age 50 and over. Call 826−5880 or visit www.humboldt.edu/olli to register for classes (O−0531)

FREE DEPRESSION SUPPORT GROUP. Feeling hopeless? Free, non−religious, drop−in peer group for people experiencing depression/anxiety. UMCJH 144 Central Ave, McK 839−5691 (T−0809)

Spiritual

SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATION− SHIPS? Confidential help is available. 707−825− 0920, saahumboldt@yahoo.com (TS−0405)

HUMBOLDT UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST FELLOW− SHIP. We are here to change lives with our love. Services at 9am and 11am on Sunday. Child care is provided at 9am. Childrens religious education is at 11am. 24 Fellowship Way, off Jacoby Creek Rd., Bayside. (707) 822−3793, www.huuf.org. (S−0426) KDK ARCATA BUDDHIST GROUP. Practice Tibetan Meditation on Loving−Kindness and Compassion in the Kagyu tradition, followed by a study group. Sun’s., 6 p.m., Community Yoga Center 890 G St., Arcata. Contact Lama Nyugu (707) 442−7068. Fierro_roman@yahoo.com. www.kdkarcatagroup.org (S−0531) KRIYA PRANAYAM YOGIC BREATHING WORK− SHOP WITH TOBIN RANGDROL, May 27 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Arcata. $45. The Kryia Pranayam practice happens as a flow of waves, increasing in power, and culminating in moments of profound silence and simplicity. The holds, locks, and compressions invigorate the organs, move stagnant energy, increase breath capacity, and induce clear meditative states. Visit middlewaymethod.com for information and registration. (S−0424) SELF−CARE FOR LOW BACK PAIN: PART I − Posi− tions of Comfort and Reset Activation. June 10 from 10−noon. $30. With Somatic Educator Tobin Rangdrol. The first in a series of three half−day workshops for people experiencing low back pain, disc degeneration or herniation, sciatica, SI joint pain (sacroiliac joint), etc. Open to people with pain, and therapists who help people with pain. Info and registration at middlewaymethod.com. (S−0607) SOTO ZEN MEDITATION Sunday programs and weekday meditation in Arcata locations; Wed evenings in Eureka, arcatazengroup.org Beginners welcome, call for orientation. (707) 826−1701 (S−0426)

SMOKING POT? WANT TO STOP? www.marijuana −anonymous.org (T−0629)

Vocational COMMUNITY AND SOCIAL SERVICES TRAINING− June 12 − August 16, Tues./Thurs. 8:30am − 12:30pm. Contact the Job Market at (707) 441−4627 for scholarship opportunities. Call CR Community Education at 707−476−4500. (V−0524) FREE AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE CLASS Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education at 707 476−4520 for more information or come to class to register. (V−0607) FREE BEGINNING COMPUTER CLASS Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education at 707 476−4520 for more information or come to class to register. (V−0607) FREE CLASS TO PREPARE FOR THE GED OR HISET Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education at 707 476−4520 for more information or come to class to register. (V−0607) FREE ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE (ESL) CLASSES Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education at 707 476−4520 for more information or come to class to register.(V−0607) FREE LIVING SKILLS CLASSES FOR ADULTS WITH DISABILITIES Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education at 707 476−4520 for more information or come to class to register. (V−0607) LOAN SIGNING − Monday, July 9 5:30pm− 9:30pm. CR Main Campus. Must have or be in the process of obtaining a California State Notary Public Commission. Call CR Community Education at 707− 476−4500. (V−0524)

TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING − June 25 − August 6. Mandatory Informational Meetings May 22nd, May 24th, May 29th or May 31st 5:30pm − 7:30pm. 525 D St. Eureka CA. *Only need to attend one meeting. Call CR Community Education at 707−476−4500. (V−0524)

Wellness & Bodywork AYURVEDIC SELF−CARE, COOKING, MASSAGE & PRACTITIONER PROGRAMS W/TRACI WEBB "Ayurvedic Self−Care Immersion": May 26−27, $200 (serves as prereq. for practitioner program), 9− Month "Ayurvedic Living Program" for Self−Healing & 18−Month "Ayurvedic Practitioner Program" Starts June 5, Learn Nutrition, Herbs, Psychology, Self−Care, Aromatherapy, more (Early SAVE$). "Ayurvedic Cooking Immersion: Anti−Inflammatory Foods" June 27−July 1, "Ayurvedic Massage Program" July 11−Aug 5 ($200 OFF by 5/27), Register: www.ayurvedicliving.com or Call (707) 601−9025 (W−0524) DANDELION HERBAL CENTER CLASSES WITH JANE BOTHWELL. Beginning with Herbs. Sept 26 − Nov 14, 2018, 8 Wed. evenings. Learn medicine making, herbal first aid, and herbs for common imbalances. 10−Month Herbal Studies Program. Feb − Nov 2019. meets one weekend per month with three camping trips. Learn in−depth material medica, plant identification, flower essences, wild foods, formulations and harvesting. Springtime in Tuscany: An Herbal Journey. May 25 − June 5, 2019, 2018. Immerse yourself fully in the healing tradi− tions, art, architecture and of course the food of an authentic Tuscan villa! Register online www.dandelionherb.com or call (707) 442−8157. (W−0830) SET YOURSELF FREE! − June 7 − July 19, Thursdays 5:30pm − 7:30pm. CR Garberville Site. Call CR Community Education at 707−476−4500. (W−0524) YOGA FOR ALL − May 29 − August 14, Tuesdays, 1:30pm − 2:30pm. CR Main Campus Theater. Call CR Community Education at 707−476−4500. (W−0524)

YOUR CLASS HERE

Arts & Crafts Computer Fitness Kids & Teens Lectures Dance & Music

Theatre & Film Spiritual Support Therapy Wellness Bodywork

442-1400 × 314 classified@ northcoastjournal.com

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 24, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

37


Legal Notices NOTICE OF PROPERTY TAX DELINQUENCY AND IMPENDING DEFAULT Revenue and Taxation Code Section 3351, 3352 I, John Bartholomew, Humboldt County Tax Collector, State of California, certify as follows: That at close of business on June 30, 2018 by operation of law, any real property (unless previously tax-defaulted and not redeemed) that have any delinquent taxes, assessments, or other charges levied for the fiscal year 201718, and/or any delinquent supplemental taxes levied prior to the fiscal year 2017-18 shall be declared tax-defaulted. That unless the tax defaulted property is completely redeemed through payment of all unpaid amounts, together with penalties and fees prescribed by law or an installment plan is initiated and maintained; the property may be sold subsequently at a tax sale to satisfy the tax lien. That a detailed list of all properties remaining tax-defaulted at the close of business on June 30, 2018, and not redeemed prior to being submitted for publication, shall be published on or before September 8, 2018 That information concerning redemption or the initiation of an installment plan of redemption of tax-defaulted property will be furnished, upon request, by John Bartholomew, Humboldt County Tax Collector at 825 5th Street, Room 125, Eureka, California 95501 (707)476-2450. I certify or (declare), under penalty of perjury, that the foregoing is true and correct.

John Bartholomew Humboldt County Tax Collector Executed at Eureka, Humboldt County, California, on May 21st, 2018. Published in the North Coast Journal on May 24th, May 31st and June 7th, 2018.

NOTICE OF IMPENDING POWER TO SELL TAX-DEFAULTED PROPERTY Revenue and Taxation Code Section 3361, 3362 Pursuant to Revenue and Taxation Code 3691 and 3692.4, the following conditions will, by operation of law, subject real property to the Tax Collector’s power to sell. 1) All property for which property taxes and assessments have been in default for five or more years. Note: The power to sell schedule for nonresidential commercial property is three or more years of tax-defaulted status, unless the county adopts, by ordinance or resolution, the five-year tax default schedule. 2) All property that has a nuisance abatement lien recorded against it and for which property taxes and assessments have been in default for three or more years. 3) Any property that has been identified and requested for purchase by a city, county, city and county or nonprofit organization to serve the public benefit by providing housing or services directly related to low-income persons and for which property taxes and assessments have been in default for three or more years. The parcels listed herein meet one or more of the criteria listed above and thus, will become subject to the Tax Collector’s power to sell on July 1, 2018, at 12:01 a.m., by operation of law. The Tax Collector’s power to sell will arise unless the property is either redeemed or made subject to an installment plan of redemption initiated as provided by law prior to close of business on the last business day in June. The right to an installment plan terminates on the last business day in June, and after that date the entire balance due must be paid in full to prevent sale of the property at public auction. The right of redemption survives the property becoming subject to the power to sell, but it terminates at close of business on the last business day prior to the date of the sale by the Tax Collector. All information concerning redemption or the initiation of an installment plan of redemption will be furnished, upon request, by John Bartholomew, Humboldt County Tax Collector, 825 5th Street, Room 125, Eureka, CA 95501, (707)476-2450. The amount to redeem, including all penalties and fees, as of June 2018, is shown opposite the assessment/parcel number and next to the name of the assessee.

PARCEL NUMBERING SYSTEM EXPLANATION The Assessor’s Parcel/Assessment Number (APN/ASMT), when used to describe property in this list, refers to the Assessor’s map book, the map page, the block on the map, if applicable, and the individual parcel on the map page or in the block. The Assessor’s maps and further explanation of the parcel numbering system are available in the Assessor’s office.

PROPERTY TAX DEFAULTED ON JULY 1, 2006, FOR TAXES, ASSESSMENTS AND OTHER CHARGES FOR FISCAL TAX YEAR 2005-2006: Assessor’s Assessment No. 109-291-017-000

Assessee’s Name & Property Address Bennett, Christine A 485 Humboldt Loop Rd, Shelter Cove

Amount to Redeem By June 2018 $31,204.26

PROPERTY TAX DEFAULTED ON JULY 1, 2009, FOR TAXES, ASSESSMENTS AND OTHER CHARGES FOR FISCAL TAX YEAR 2008-2009: Assessor’s Assessment No. 109-341-027-000

Assessee’s Name & Property Address Pirzadeh, Dara 36 Willow Glen Rd, Shelter Cove

Fair, Anthony 220-291-002-000 5148 Blue Slide Creek Rd, Redway

Amount to Redeem By June 2018

211-092-017-000 218-141-008-000 316-071-004-000 316-171-013-000 316-172-016-000 316-191-014-000 510-391-008-000

Assessor’s Assessment No.

$990.93 001-111-010-000 $12,282.04 001-173-003-000

Amount to Redeem By June 2018

002-113-002-000

011-191-016-000

Assessee’s Name & Property Address

Hefner, William V/ ACME Revocable Trust $1,616.25 3415 Jay Lane, Eureka

PROPERTY TAX DEFAULTED ON JULY 1, 2011, FOR TAXES, ASSESSMENTS AND OTHER CHARGES FOR FISCAL TAX YEAR 2010-2011: Assessor’s Assessment No.

Assessee’s Name & Property Address

Amount to Redeem By June 2018

Gierek, Sheryle N/ Kiskila, Bertine Nelson, 008-142-003-000 Donald/ Nelson Nick Jr/ Toroni, Lois $3,089.48 3522 Cottage St, Eureka 009-182-001-000

Pimentel, Elias A/ Pimentel Rita J Pimentel Property Revocable Trust 427 W Harris St, Eureka

$18,268.23

206-311-014-000

Bowen, Jennifer 7323 St Hwy 36, Carlotta

$890.91

223-101-001-000

Zachary, Mark L 27874 Dyerville Loop Rd, Garberville

$26,604.31

522-391-038-000

Woodard, Melvin 391 Sunset Pl, Willow Creek

$4,287.89

Assessor’s Assessment No.

Assessee’s Name & Property Address

McDaniel, Darrell A 280 Dolphin Dr, Shelter Cove 204-111-005-000 Patton, Kelly No Situs, Hydesville Patton, Kelly 204-111-006-000 No Situs, Hydesville Patton, Kelly 204-241-008-000 No Situs, Hydesville Kelly 204-251-008-000 Patton, 4106 Fisher Rd, Hydesville Kelly 204-251-011-000 Patton, No Situs, Hydesville 204-251-012-000 Patton, Kelly No Situs, Hydesville 109-351-054-000

38 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 24, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

002-113-003-000 004-071-015-000 005-022-003-000 005-072-011-000 007-093-009-000 009-211-013-000 010-092-021-000 010-201-004-000 011-183-005-000 012-193-011-000

PROPERTY TAX DEFAULTED ON JULY 1, 2012, FOR TAXES, ASSESSMENTS AND OTHER CHARGES FOR FISCAL TAX YEAR 2011-2012: Amount to Redeem By June 2018

018-341-003-000 021-144-002-000 021-173-002-000 025-074-002-000

$35,394.91 $2,177.76 $4,234.98 $1,983.98 $17,064.51 $835.40 $776.80

$5,209.87 $20,381.68 $10,213.18 $3,490.95 $9,528.56 $31,634.97 $2,753.17

PROPERTY TAX DEFAULTED ON JULY 1, 2013, FOR TAXES, ASSESSMENTS AND OTHER CHARGES FOR FISCAL TAX YEAR 2012-2013.

PROPERTY TAX DEFAULTED ON JULY 1, 2010, FOR TAXES, ASSESSMENTS AND OTHER CHARGES FOR FISCAL TAX YEAR 2009-2010: Assessor’s Assessment No.

Pogue, James M 760 Sequoia Rd, McCann Goodell, William R 5615 Island Mt Rd, Garberville R & F Investment Properties LLC No Situs, Willow Creek Creaghe, Mark R No Situs, Willow Creek McManus, Andrea E No Situs, Willow Creek Silva, Michael W No Situs, Willow Creek Burns, Kenneth I & Lynne 1830 S Gwin Rd, McKinleyville

031-083-017-000 040-263-020-000 052-071-003-000 052-203-001-000 053-073-004-000 053-094-004-000

Assessee’s Name & Property Address Olsen, Cindy 418 6th St, Eureka Thompson, Ray & Darline/ Annis, Jean/ Bannister, Coleman R/ Linden, Amy/ Millis, Jack B/ Millis, Tom/ Thompson, Ethel 1134 3rd St, Eureka Moody, Ralph C No Situs, Eureka Moody, Ralph C No Situs, Eureka Rogers, Claudette/ Starritt Ramona/ Brownthunder, Simone 1627 Pine St, Eureka Cavallin, Brent E 1024 I St, Eureka Riese Carol A & Michael D 1813 H St, Eureka Evenson, Darrell Jr 3534 Broadway, Eureka Pimentel, Elias A & Rita A 3513 Spring St, Eureka Zimpelman, Christopher B 3320 Williams St, Eureka Cookman, Donald E 2214 E St, Eureka White, Cheri 1137 Harris St, Eureka Hanacek, James J/ Sharon Manchas Trust 1714 Henderson St, Eureka Thompson, Raymond F & Darline M 1154 Vista Dr, Eureka Good Wine LLC 937 10th St, Arcata Finigan, Brian J & Thonson, Melisa 1251 9th St, Arcata Hudson, Yuhan, Jrinde, Daihan, Yurou & Li, Jini 430 Railroad Ave, Blue Lake Daniels, Marcus G & Leah M 393 Main St, Ferndale Black, John & Amy No Situs, Fortuna Scroggins, Jim Heirs or Devisees of 216 Ogle Ave, Rio Dell Killfoil, Suni 28 W Painter St, Rio Dell Burns, Michael W 502 4th Ave, Rio Dell Velasquez, Shirley M 540 2nd Ave, Rio Dell

Amount to Redeem By June 2018 $3,028.83

$7,969.76

$165.76 $165.76 $2,229.00 $5,970.57 $16,783.04 $16,618.04 $10,614.62 $18,426.43 $9,723.00 $14,525.58 $7,490.93 $10,543.89 $52,569.93 $4,248.97 $37,418.65 $31,406.02 $12,398.43 $12,725.39 $13,767.23 $5,264.58 $4,870.05


Smith, William F & Margaret T Smith, David E 077-073-002-000 133 Oakridge Dr, Redway 108-012-009-000 Doricko, Eric P 12023 Wilder Ridge Rd, Honeydew Bruce/ Sanford, Jack 108-171-022-000 Picton, 492 Machi Rd, Shelter Cove Kalman, Fredrick J II 109-032-024-000 508 Beach Rd, Shelter Cove Morrison, Peter 109-071-002-000 1088 Puma Dr, Shelter Cove Coreen 109-071-030-000 Rose, 32 Puma Dr, Shelter Cove Coreen K 109-071-031-000 Rose, 1867 Telegraph Creek Rd, Shelter Cove 109-081-015-000 Stornetta, Kyle 534 Wolverine Way, Shelter Cove Wilson, Jared 109-091-035-00 633 Muskrat Cir, Shelter Cove 109-131-001-000 Devito, Sean 232 Wolverine Way, Shelter Cove Devito, Sean 109-131-010-000 90 Racoon Ct, Shelter Cove Devito, Sean 109-131-069-000 326 Wolverine Way, Shelter Cove Green, Gordon & Acosta-Green, Febelyn 109-131-071-000 No Situs, Shelter Cove Auburn Sky LLC 109-141-009-000 1414 Telegraph Creek Rd, Shelter Cove Amy 109-191-012-000 Barker, 94 Eileen Rd, Shelter Cove David & Potter Winter 109-201-022-000 Hand, 211 Beach Rd, Shelter Cove Hibbert, Michael P/ Hannah I & Matthew J 109-221-011-000 490 Telegraph Creek Rd, Shelter Cove Clifford & Saralynn D 109-221-018-000 Golob, 146 Horseshoe Ct, Shelter Cove Leonard H & Emilia D 109-271-005-000 Pengson, 122 Cedarwood Ct, Shelter Cove Kathy P 109-271-050-000 Salazar, No Situs, Shelter Cove Joe 109-302-033-000 Moorhead, 124 Spring Rd, Shelter Cove 109-331-010-000 Kalman, Fredrick J II 132 Telegraph Creek Rd, Shelter Cove Camilli, Steve R Jr & Michelle M 006-065-006-000 1717 R St, Eureka Kalman, Fredrick J II 109-331-011-000 No Situs, Shelter Cove 109-341-030-000 Millwood, Delbert & Kathy 80 Willow Glen Rd, Shelter Cove Salvatore R 109-351-050-000 Tuzzolino, 226 Dolphin Dr, Shelter Cove Salvatore R 109-351-051-000 Tuzzolino, 244 Dolphin Dr, Shelter Cove Salvatore R 109-351-052-000 Tuzzolino, 258 Dolphin Dr, Shelter Cove 110-021-053-000 Stanciu, Victor & Teodora 3176 Toth Rd, Shelter Cove Moon, Steven V, Christina D, Heather M 110-071-009-000 & Joseph M 3 Maplehill Ct, Shelter Cove 110-081-027-000 Johnson, Dallerie J 167 Pepperwood Dr, Shelter Cove 110-101-024-000 Barton, Maria, Jerry L & Christopher M 698 Willow Glen Rd, Shelter Cove Melido Inc 110-131-033-000 117 Parsons Rd, Shelter Cove 110-231-057-000 Shaw, Michael E 760 Blueridge Rd, Shelter Cove De-Martin, Laura M 110-251-007-000 1602 Toth Rd, Shelter Cove

$1,056.24

110-251-009-000

$3,297.09

110-251-013-000

$24,656.36

110-251-028-000

$4,899.10

110-251-040-000

$3,603.88

111-011-035-000

$4,234.07

111-031-012-000

$2,602.95 $2,274.92 $3,121.54 $2,372.17 $3,845.08 $4,380.92 $2,711.16

111-063-032-000 111-071-018-000 111-071-019-000 111-102-016-000 111-111-038-000 111-112-016-000 111-161-025-000

$10,154.67 $6,050.76

201-125-019-000

$2,517.60

202-102-025-000

$2,532.89

202-102-027-000

$2,791.82

202-350-007-000

$2,350.05

205-212-027-000

$1,281.18

205-212-038-000

$9,525.66

205-271-020-000

$2,938.19

206-211-020-000

$11,725.88

208-221-007-000

$2,938.19

212-291-032-000

$2,468.89

212-291-033-000

$5,368.25

215-172-036-000

$4,842.68

216-023-010-000

$3,964.06

216-026-016-000

$1,121.60

011-183-013-000

$3,044.98 $2,170.39

018-322-015-000 216-291-050-000

$1,853.11

217-401-003-000

$4,073.43

223-181-039-000

$2,940.72

300-201-023-000

$4,482.68

303-091-067-000

De-Martin, Laura M 1574 Toth Rd, Shelter Cove Behin, Bahram 1465 Toth Rd, Shelter Cove Ochoa, Leonel & Cueva Ester 1613 Toth Rd, Shelter Cove Schwartz, Bryan D 614 Blueridge Rd, Shelter Cove Williams, Tyreace T & Aysel A 622 Upper Pacific Dr, Shelter Cove De-Martin, Laura M 8642 Shelter Cove Rd, Shelter Cove Fagundes, Anthony E & Laura S Tarrant, Russell V & Sharon K D 426 Parkview Rd, Shelter Cove Demarco, Margaret E 145 Du Luard Dr, Shelter Cove Demarco, Margaret E 151 Du Luard Dr, Shelter Cove Formby, George M W 204 Nob Hill Rd, Shelter Cove Rocha, Joseph M 216 Redwood Rd, Shelter Cove Lanco Enterprises Inc No Situs, Shelter Cove Holland, Kenneth L 244 Landis Rd, Shelter Cove Lennon, Dorothy/ Dorothy L Lennon A Trust 629 S Fortuna Blvd, Fortuna Carroll, Mary L No Situs, Fortuna Carroll, Lionel R & Mary L No Situs, Fortuna Killfoil, Suni M No Situs, Fortuna Velasquez, Juan P & Shirley M 672 South Rd, Scotia Velasquez, Juan P & Shirley M 656 South Rd, Scotia Combs, Stephen K No Situs, Scotia Setzer, John & Donna 6683 St Hwy 36, Carlotta Jones, Jack E No Situs, Bridgeville Bowman, Kenneth D No Situs, Miranda Bowman, Kenneth D & Donna M No Situs, Miranda Mullaney, Travis No Situs, Whitethorn Contreras, James C No Situs, Garberville Davis, Michael W 8694 Bell Springs Rd, Garberville Tripp, Robert W No Situs, Eureka McDermott, Abraham 4283 D St, Eureka Barber, Todd D/ Grant, Norman Sr Drummond, Bridgette M L 151 Fifth St, Alderpoint Iordanova, Vessela B & Moghadam, Matin T No Situs, Blocksburg Morgan, Katharina L 549 Timber Ln, Garberville Long, Juanita 4486 Campton Rd, Eureka Hunt, Jamie S No Situs, Eureka

$4,482.68 $3,550.51 $2,648.38 $2,620.96 $3,167.92 $3,469.83 $8,015.31 $5,588.44 $5,260.98 $3,805.59 $5,717.73 $2,749.38 $6,840.13 $3,372.64 $1,192.17 $1,340.58 $5,681.75 $4,765.45 $1,355.01 $2,227.15 $11,892.66 $9,488.28 $1,122.09 $3,612.63 $33,022.93 $12,926.17 $8,310.89 $368.88 $1,007.08 $5,648.32

Jamie S 303-091-098-000 Hunt, No Situs, Eureka Forster-Gill Inc 303-151-002-000 No Situs, Eureka 303-151-003-000 Forster-Gill Inc No Situs, Eureka Inc 303-151-004-000 Forster-Gill No Situs, Eureka 303-191-048-000 Forster-Gill No Situs, Eureka 305-251-022-000 Lyons, Kimberly/ Martin, Catherine 6130 Pryor St, Eureka 306-151-006-000 Golden, Bret 2175 Stanford Dr, Eureka Delgado, Matthew 314-311-019-000 284 Barrys Rd, Kneeland Ochoa, Aaron G 316-233-014-000 No Situs, Blue Lake Newman, Coy N & Linda L 401-246-013-000 2288 Lindstrom Ave, Samoa 403-111-009-000 Wardynski, Matthew J & Jill 123 Dana Ln, Eureka Charity A 505-331-046-000 Walker, 2050 Frederick Ave, Arcata Ian R 508-341-039-000 Kramer, 1830 McKinleyville Ave, McKinleyville Jeffery W 509-051-023-000 Matthews, 1293 Azalea Rd, McKinleyville Adams Homeowners Assoc Inc 509-112-023-000 Red No Situs, McKinleyville Osha 510-142-049-000 Reynolds, 2296 Walnut Ave, McKinleyville Incorporated 516-271-003-000 Guderth 7841 West End Rd, Arcata Ryan & Driscoll Grace 517-231-053-000 Walrod, 437 Westgate Dr, Trinidad Homer G & Carolyn N 520-022-003-000 Howell, 121530 St Hwy 101, Orick Don 520-081-002-000 Dixon, 114 Lundblade St, Orick John 522-311-047-000 Klinchock, 111 Fireway Ln, Willow Creek Gault, Alta E/ Alta E Gault Rev Trust of 2008 529-171-043-000 No Situs, Orleans Trent, Christopher W/ Christopher W 533-063-012-000 Trent Living Trust No Situs, Weitchpec Peters, Christopher H 533-063-022-000 No Situs, Weitchpec Kelley, Richard N & Patricia G 534-142-003-000 No Situs Brendan 534-196-003-000 Mainville, No Situs Trainor, Richard T/ Weir, Deborah A/ Richard T Trainor & Deborah A Weir Rev 223-023-004-000 Trust No Situs, Garberville 404-022-002-000 Faust, Nina L & Alnakhlawi, Mohamad M 3202 Greenwood Heights Dr 509-171-029-000 Klein, Collin & Rhonda H 1825 Bartow Rd, McKinleyville

$19,752.32 $42,998.79 $21,657.44 $21,657.44 $15,847.70 $8,751.72 $25,688.21 $17,328.87 $13,394.82 $31,441.40 $15,058.24 $21,338.17 $6,448.55 $9,806.04 $105.00 $4,337.44 $28,067.37 $19,848.14 $2,700.51 $677.30 $16,189.13 $381.22 $512.12 $199.04 $781.07 $676.40 $3,341.31 $3,054.54 $743.63

I certify or (declare), under penalty of perjury, that the foregoing is true and correct.

$29,018.12 $3,693.52 $8,118.31 $1,297.36

John Bartholomew Humboldt County Tax Collector Executed at Eureka, Humboldt County, California, on May 21st, 2018. Published in the North Coast Journal on May 24th, May 31st, & June 7th, 2018.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 24, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

39


Legal Notices NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF Betty Wynoia Ross CASE NO. PR180104 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of Betty Wynoia Ross A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner Richard Ross In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition for probate requests that Richard Ross be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. A HEARING on the petition will be held on June 7, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 6. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person inter− ested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Bradford C Floyd, Esq. Floyd Law Firm 819 Seventh Street Eureka, CA 95521 707−445−9754 Filed: May 8, 2018 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of JOSEPH HERMAN KENNERSON, AKA JOSEPH KENNERSON A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner MELVA PARIS In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition for probate requests that MELVA PARIS be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the dece− dent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for exami− nation in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on May 24, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 6. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person inter− ested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Leon A Karjola 722 Fifth Street, Suite C Eureka, CA 95501 707−445−0804 Filed: May 2, 2018 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF MICHAEL D LANDING, aka MICHAEL DALE LANDING CASE NO. PR180114

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of MICHAEL D LANDING, aka MICHAEL DALE LANDING A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner MATHEW LANDING In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition for probate requests that MATHEW LANDING be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on June 14, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 6. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− 5/17, 5/24, 5/31 (18−134) fornia law. NOTICE OF PETITION TO YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by ADMINISTER ESTATE OF the court. If you are a person inter− JOSEPH HERMAN KENNERSON, ested in the estate, you may file AKA JOSEPH KENNERSON CASE with the court a Request for Special NO. PR180096 Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, an inventory and appraisal of estate contingent creditors and persons assets or of any petition or account who may otherwise be interested in as provided in Probate Code section the will or estate, or both, of 1250. A Request for Special Notice JOSEPH HERMAN KENNERSON, AKA form is available from the court JOSEPH KENNERSON clerk. 5/10, 5/17, 5/24 (18−127) A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: filed by Petitioner MELVA PARIS James D. Poovey 83955 In the Superior Court of California, 937 Sixth Street County of Humboldt. The petition Eureka, CA 95501 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 24, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com for probate requests that MELVA 707−443−6744 PARIS be appointed as personal Filed: May 16, 2018 representative to administer the SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA estate of the decedent. COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

40

as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: James D. Poovey 83955 937 Sixth Street Eureka, CA 95501 707−443−6744 Filed: May 16, 2018 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 5/24, 5/31, 6/7 (18−149)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF JACQUELINE ANNE KESINGER aka JACQUE ANNE KESINGER aka JACQUE KESINGER CASE NO. PR180099 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of JACQUELINE ANNE KESINGER aka JACQUE ANNE KESINGER aka JACQUE KESINGER A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner Julie M Brimm In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition for probate requests that Julie M Brimm be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the dece− dent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for exami− nation in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on May 31, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 6. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person inter− ested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of

under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person inter− ested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Bradford C Floyd, Esq. Floyd Law Firm 819 Seventh Street Eureka, CA 95521 707−445−9754 Filed: May 1, 2018 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 5/10, 5/17, 5/24 (18−128)

Title Order No. 95519150 Trustee Sale No. 82620 Loan No. 399127413 APN 210-221-023 -000 NOTICE OF TRUSTEES SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 7/7/2016. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 6/12/2018 at 11:00 AM, CALI− FORNIA TD SPECIALISTS as the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded on 7/18/2016 as Instrument No. 2016 −013439 in book N/A, page N/A of official records in the Office of the Recorder of Humboldt County, Cali− fornia, executed by: TRAIAN JIKOVSKI, AN UNMARRIED MAN , as Trustor RACHEL OANH BUU TO, TRUSTEE OF THE RACHEL OANH TO LIVING TRUST DATED 3/28/2007 , as Beneficiary WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States, by cash, a cashiers check drawn by a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state). At: Outside the front entrance to the County Courthouse located at 825 5th Street, Eureka, CA 95501, NOTICE OF TRUSTEES SALE continued all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County, California described the land therein: As more fully described in said Deed of Trust The property heretofore described is being sold as is. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 42300 STATE HIGHWAY 36 BRIDGEVILLE, CA 95526 VACANT LAND. DIRECTIONS MAY BE OBTAINED BY WRITTEN REQUEST SUBMITTED TO THE BENEFICIARY WITHIN 10 DAYS AFTER THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE AT THE FOLLOWING ADDRESS: BENEFICIARY, C/O CALI− FORNIA TD SPECIALISTS, ATTN: PATRICIO S. INCE, 8190 EAST KAISER

real property described above is purported to be: 42300 STATE HIGHWAY 36 BRIDGEVILLE, CA 95526 VACANT LAND. DIRECTIONS MAY BE OBTAINED BY WRITTEN REQUEST SUBMITTED TO THE BENEFICIARY WITHIN 10 DAYS AFTER THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE AT THE FOLLOWING ADDRESS: BENEFICIARY, C/O CALI− FORNIA TD SPECIALISTS, ATTN: PATRICIO S. INCE, 8190 EAST KAISER BLVD., ANAHEIM, CA 92808.. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to−wit $280,074.77 (Estimated). Accrued interest and additional advances, if any, will increase this figure prior to sale. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election of Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located and more than three months have elapsed since such recordation. DATE: 5/7/2018 CALI− FORNIA TD SPECIALIST, as Trustee 8190 EAST KAISER BLVD., ANAHEIM HILLS, CA 92808 PHONE: 714−283− 2180 FOR TRUSTEE SALE INFORMA− TION LOG ON TO: www.stoxposting.com CALL: 844− 477−7869 PATRICIO S. INCE, VICE PRESIDENT CALIFORNIA TD SPECIALIST IS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should under− stand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the prop− erty. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorders office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this infor− mation. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed or trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be


aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed or trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 844−477−7869, or visit this internet Web site www.stoxposting.com, using the file number assigned to this case T.S.# 82620. Information about post− ponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. CALI− FORNIA TD SPECIALISTS Attn: Teri Snyder 8190 East Kaiser Blvd. Anaheim Hills, CA 92808 5/17, 5/24, 5/31 (18−.132)

SUMMONS (Citation Judicial) CASE NUMBER: RG17849745 -------NOTICE TO Defendant: Estate of Thomas Allen Vitale and DOES 1−10 You are being sued by Plaintiff: Heidi Monteverde Notice: You have been sued. The court may decide against you without you being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more infor− mation at the California Courts Online Self−Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the court− house nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for free waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal require− ments. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the Cali− fornia Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self−Help Center(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/self− help), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in civil case. The

services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the Cali− fornia Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self−Help Center(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/self− help), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Alameda Superior Court 1225 Fallon Street Oakland, CA 94612 The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: Jeff D. Feinberg 2000 Broadway Street Redwood City, CA 94612 Date: February 16, 2017 clerk, by Chad Finke, Deputy 5/17, 5/24, 5/31, 6/7 (18−137)

NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC AUCTION Notice is hereby given that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property pursuant to Sections 21700 −21716 of the Business & Professions Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, Section 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the Civil Code. The undersigned will sell at a public auction by competitive bidding on the 8th of June 2018, at noon, on the premises where said property has been stored and which are located at South Bay Mini−Storage, 2031 Eich Road, Eureka, County of Humboldt, State of California, as follows. Items to be sold include but are not limited to the following: Unit 323 Joseph Conn − furniture, misc boxes Unit#236 Llawona L Haney − boom box, clothes, boxes Unit#428 Bambi Moon − doll house, clothes, kids toys Unit#705 John A Brown − furniture, building materials, misc boxes Unit#731 John A Brown − tools, belt sander, building materials Unit#756 Todd C Davis − shop vac, boxes, building materials Unit#825 John A Brown − boxes, cooler, construction items Unit#854 Gene C Rozsypal − old school desk, weather station, boxes Purchases must be paid for at the time of purchase in cash only. All purchased items are sold "as is" and must be removed from the premises within 24 hours. Sale subject to cancellation in the event of a settlement between owner and obligated party. Bring a flashlight and padlock(s) Dated this 24th of May and 31st of May. CA BOND NO. 0336118 (18−146)

Continued on next page »

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00312

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00264

The following person is doing Busi− ness as FRESH + FRUITY AND MORE

The following person is doing Busi− ness as FRESH & FRUITY AND MORE

Humboldt 3300 Broadway St #430 Eureka, CA 95501 2300 Cochran Rd McKinleyville, CA 95519

Humboldt 3300 Broadway Street Eureka, CA 95501 2300 Cochran Road McKinleyville, CA 95519

La Patria Mariscos and Grill Restaurant CA C3902379 1718 4th St Eureka, CA 95501

Siclari Ayala 2300 Cochran Road McKinleyville, CA 95519 Adrian Ayala 2300 Cochran Road McKinleyville, CA 95519

The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Siclari Ayala, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 17, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by se, Humboldt County Clerk 5/24, 5/31, 6/7, 6/14 (18−145)

The business is conducted by a Married Couple. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Siclari Ayala, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 30, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by sm, Humboldt County Clerk

NOTICE OF REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATION Redwoods Rural Health Center (RRHC) is seeking a qualified architectural firm for the RRHC Medical and Dental Clinic Renovation & Expansion Project. To obtain the Request for Qualification documentation, please contact Construction Project Manager Terri Klemetson at terrik@ rrhc.org or 707-923-7520. Responses to the RFQ shall be received by mail no later than Tuesday, June 12th by 5:00 p.m.

PUBLIC NOTICE FOR GUESTS OF BLUE LAKE CASINO HOTEL Effective June 5th, 2018 the Blue Lake Casino Hotel will no longer accept the $1 and $5 metal tokens in exchange for cash. Due to the tokens no longer being in circulation they will no longer hold value after June 5th, 2018. If you have any in your possession and would like to exchange them for cash, please do so by the June 5th, 2018 deadline.

5/3, 5/10, 5/17, 5/24 (18−122)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00313 The following person is doing Busi− ness as UNIVERSITY OF METAPHYSICAL SCIENCES/HUMBOLDT Humboldt 4779 Valley East Blvd., Suite 2 Arcata, CA 95521 P.O. Box 4505 Arcata, CA 95518

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00249 The following person is doing Busi− ness as GET AROUND HUMBOLDT Humboldt 1034 H Street Arcata, CA 95521

Wisdom of the Heart Church CA P.O. Box 4505 Arcata, CA 95518

Marnie J Cooper 2034 Buttermilk Lane Arcata, CA 95521 Raymond Moore III 1128 3drd Street #B Eureka, CA 95501

The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Christine Breese, CEO This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 17, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by sm, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by a General Partnership. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Marnie J Cooper, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 24, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by sm, Humboldt County Clerk

5/24, 5/31, 6/7, 6/14 (18−147)

5/3, 5/10, 5/17, 5/24 (18−120)

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CITY OF FORTUNA NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN and you are hereby notified the City of Fortuna will hold a Public Hearing on Monday, June 4, 2018 in the Council Chambers, City Hall, 621 11th Street, Fortuna, California, at 6:00 p.m. for the following purpose: CONSIDERATION AND ADOPTION OF A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF FORTUNA ADOPTING THE ANNUAL OPERATING BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2018-19 All interested parties and members of the public are invited to attend and be heard at the hearing. A copy of the Agenda and full staff report for these items will be available at the front counter or www. friendlyfortuna.com Siana Emmons City Clerk Dated: May 14, 2018

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING} CITY OF FORTUNA NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN and you are hereby notified the City of Fortuna will hold a Public Hearing on Monday, June 4, 2018 in the Council Chambers, City Hall, 621 11th Street, Fortuna, California, at 6:00 p.m. for the following purpose:

CONSIDERATION AND ADOPTION OF THE 2018-2023 FIVEYEAR CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM (CIP) All interested parties and members of the public are invited to attend and be heard at the hearing. A copy of the draft CIP will be available at the front counter or www.friendlyfortuna.com Siana Emmons, City Clerk Dated: May 14, 2018

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 24, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

41


Legal Notices

Continued from previous page

NOTICE INVITING BIDS 1. Notice is hereby given that the Governing Board of the Garfield School District (“District”), of the County of Humboldt, State of California, will receive sealed bids for the Garfield HVAC Project: Remove Five (5) aged 80% AFUE propane furnaces and replace them in kind with 94% AFUE propane furnaces (“Project”) up to, but not later than, 3:00 p.m., on Friday, June 15, 2018, and will thereafter publicly open and read aloud the bids. All bids shall be received at the office of the Greenway Partners, located at 1385 8th Street, in Arcata, California 95521. 2. Each bid shall be completed on the Bid Proposal Form included in the Contract Documents, and must conform and be fully responsive to this invitation, the plans and specifications and all other Contract Documents. Copies of the Contract Documents are available for examination at the office of the Garfield School District, County of Humboldt, California, and may be obtained by licensed contractors for free. Electronic copies of the Contract Documents can also be obtained from the Humboldt Builders Exchange (http://www.humbx.com/) or by emailing the Project Engineer (Nathan Sanger at sanger@greenwaypartners.net). 3. Each bid shall be accompanied by cash, a cashier’s or certified check, or a bidder’s bond executed by a surety licensed to do business in the State of California as a surety, made payable to the District, in an amount not less than ten percent (10%) of the maximum amount of the bid. The check or bid bond shall be given as a guarantee that the bidder to whom the contract is awarded will execute the Contract Documents and will provide the required payment and performance bonds and insurance certificates within ten (10) days after the notification of the award of the Contract. 4. The successful bidder shall comply with the provisions of the Labor Code pertaining to payment of the generally prevailing rate of wages and apprenticeships or other training programs. The Department of Industrial Relations has made available the general prevailing rate of per diem wages in the locality in which the work is to be performed for each craft, classification or type of worker needed to execute the Contract, including employer payments for health and welfare, pension, vacation, apprenticeship and similar purposes. Copies of these prevailing rates are available to any interested party upon request and are online at http:// www.dir.ca.gov/DLSR. The Contractor and all Subcontractors shall pay not less than the specified rates to all workers employed by them in the execution of the Contract. It is the Contractor’s responsibility to determine any rate change. 5. The schedule of per diem wages is based upon a working day of eight hours. The rate for holiday and overtime work shall be at least time and one half. 6. The substitution of appropriate securities in lieu of retention amounts from progress payments in accordance with Public Contract Code §22300 is permitted. 7. Pursuant to Public Contract Code §4104, each bid shall include the name and location of the place of business of each subcontractor who shall perform work or service or fabricate or install work for the contactor in excess of one-half of one percent (1/2 of 1%) of the bid price. The bid shall describe the type of the work to be performed by each listed subcontractor. 8. Minority, women, and disabled veteran contractors are encouraged to submit bids. This bid is not subject to Disabled Veteran Business Enterprise requirements. 9. The project is subject to compliance monitoring and enforcement by the California Department of Industrial Relations. In accordance with SB 854, all bidders, contractors and subcontractors working at the site shall be duly registered with the Department of Industrial Relations at time of bid opening and at all relevant times. Proof of registration shall be provided as to all such contractors prior to the commencement of any work. 10. Each bidder shall possess at the time the bid is awarded the following classification(s) of California State Contractor’s license: Class B (General Building Contractor) or a Class C-20 HVAC Contractor’s License. 11. A non-mandatory bidders’ conference will be held on Thursday, May 31, 2018, at 3:00 p.m. for the purpose of acquainting all prospective bidders with the Contract Documents and the Project site.

NCJDAILY No longer just a weekly.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00240

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00289

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00211

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00239

The following person is doing Busi− ness as SNABBLE

The following person is doing Busi− ness as ADAM’S TRANSPORTING

The following person is doing Busi− ness as HUMBOLDT KINE FARMS

The following person is doing Busi− ness as HAIR STOP

Humboldt 1035 J St., Suite 2 Eureka, CA 95501

Humboldt 344 Glenwood Lane McKinleyville, CA 95519

Humboldt 2500 Barber Creek Rd Hydesville, CA 95547

Michael J Blair 1035 J St, Apt 2 Eureka, CA 95501

Adam K Smith 344 Glenwood Lane McKinleyville, CA 95519

Azure Terra LLC CA 201629910414 2500 Barber Creek Rd Hydesville, CA 95547

Humboldt 4001 West End Road Arcata, CA 95521 649 Grotzman Road Arcata, CA 95521

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Michael J. Blair, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 20, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by se, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Adam K. Smith, Owner/Operator This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 9, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

5/17, 5/24, 5/31, 6/7 (18−139)

5/17, 5/24, 5/31, 6/7 (18−135)

5/10, 5/17, 5/24, 5/31 (18−129)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00250

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00263

The following person is doing Busi− ness as JANE COOPER COLLECTION

The following person is doing Busi− ness as NATTY DOG HOT DOGS

Humboldt 1034 H Street Arcata, CA 95521

Humboldt 3824 Jacobs Ave Spc 25 Eureka, CA 95501

Marnie J Cooper 2034 Buttermilk Lane Arcata, CA 95521

Eric S Riccio 3824 Jacobs Ave Spc 25 Eureka, CA 95501

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Marnie J Cooper, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 24, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by sm, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Eric S Riccio, Business Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 30, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by sm, Humboldt County Clerk

5/3, 5/10, 5/17, 5/24 (18−121)

5/3, 5/10, 5/17, 5/24 (18−123)

LEGALS? 442-1400 ×314

northcoastjournal.com/NCJDaily

42

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for N

ew

The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Eric Walz, Managing Member This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 12, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

classified@north coastjournal.com

s! NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 24, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

County Public Notices Fictitious Business Petition to Administer Estate Trustee Sale Other Public Notices

Shari A Sprague 649 Grotzman Road Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Shari A Sprague, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 20, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by sm, Humboldt County Clerk 5/17, 5/24, 5/31, 6/7 (18−133)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00238

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00261

The following person is doing Busi− ness as LOCAL WORM GUY

The following person is doing Busi− ness as THE WILLOW CREEK WASH

Humboldt 2990 Fieldbrook Rd McKinleyville, CA 95519

Humboldt 55 Country Club Dr Willow Creek, CA 95573 PO Box 1021 Willow Creek, CA 95573

Lloyd L Barker IV 1054 Sun Rd McKinleyville, CA 95519 Stacey C Barker 1054 Sun Rd McKinleyville, CA 95519

Anthony A Phillips 375 Hwy 96 #21 Willow Creek, CA 95573

The business is conducted by a Married Couple. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Lloyd L. Barker IV, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 19, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by kl, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Anthony Allen Phillips, Owner/ Operator This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 30, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by se, Humboldt County Clerk

5/17, 5/24, 5/31, 6/7 (18−136)

5/3, 5/10, 5/17, 5/24 (18−116)

Let’s Be Friends


ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Micklah Franny White CASE NO. CV180344 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00288 The following person is doing Busi− ness as MOTHER MOON FARMS Humboldt 1661 Johnson Lane McKinleyville, CA 95519 Jassmine D Stancliff 1661 Johnson Lane McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Jassmine Stancliff, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 9, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by sm, Humboldt County Clerk 5/17, 5/24, 5/31, 6/7 (18−138)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00316 The following person is doing Busi− ness as HOUSE OF HUMBOLDT Humboldt 520 2nd St. Eureka, CA 95501 1228 La Pointe Rd Eureka, CA 95503

SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: Micklah Franny White TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Micklah Franny White for a decree changing names as follows: Present name Micklah Franny White to Proposed Name Mickela Xiwhnay White

5/3, 5/10, 5/17, 5/24 (18−117)

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 19, 2018 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: April 23, 2018 Filed: April 23, 2018 /s/ Kelly L. Neel Judge of the Superior Court 5/3, 5/10, 5/17, 5/24 (18−118)

Zach R Zinsmann 1228 La Pointe Rd Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Zach Zinsmann, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 16, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by sm, Humboldt County Clerk 5/24, 5/31, 6/7, 6/14 (18−150)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Micklah Franny White CASE NO. CV180344 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: Micklah Franny White

includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 20, 2018 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: April 20, 2018 Filed: April 20, 2018 /s/ William P. Barry Judge of the Superior Court

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Stella Grace Caughey CASE NO. CV180294 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: Stella Grace Caughey TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Stella Grace Caughey for a decree changing names as follows: Present name Stella Grace Caughey to Proposed Name Stella Grace Joy THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 20, 2018 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Chris Allen Burdic CASE NO. CV180329 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: Chris Allen Burdic TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Chris Allen Burdic for a decree changing names as follows: Present name Chris Allen Burdic to Proposed Name Chris Allen Beam THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 18, 2018 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: April 23, 2018 Filed: April 23, 2018 /s/ Kelly L. Neel Judge of the Superior Court 5/3, 5/10, 5/17, 5/24 (18−115)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME THOMAS JOHN STRATTON CASE NO. CV180028 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: THOMAS JOHN STRATTON TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: THOMAS JOHN STRATTON for a decree changing names as follows: Present name THOMAS JOHN STRATTON

825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: THOMAS JOHN STRATTON TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: THOMAS JOHN STRATTON for a decree changing names as follows: Present name THOMAS JOHN STRATTON to Proposed Name THOMAS JOHN NICHOLSON STRATTON THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 5, 2018 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: April 17, 2018 Filed: April 17, 2018 /s/ William P Barry Judge of the Superior Court 5/10, 5/17, 5/24, 5/31 (18−130)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Janet Lester CASE NO. CV180278 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: Janet Lester TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: Janet Lester

tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 29, 2018 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: April 2, 2018 Filed: April 2, 2018 /s/ Kelly L. Neel Judge of the Superior Court 5/3, 5/10, 5/17, 5/24 (18−124)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Dip Lei Shum CASE NO. CV180332 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: Dip Lei Shum TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Dip Lei Shum for a decree changing names as follows: Present name Dip Lei Shum to Proposed Name Jenny Diplei Chan

follows: Present name Dip Lei Shum to Proposed Name Jenny Diplei Chan THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 8, 2018 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: April 20, 2018 Filed: April 20, 2018 /s/ William P Barry Judge of the Superior Court 5/3, 5/10, 5/17, 5/24 (18−119)

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matterOF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE appear before this court at the CITY OF FORTUNA hearing indicated below to show IS HEREBY GIVEN, cause,NOTICE if any, why the petition for and you are hereby notified the City of Fortuna will hold a Public Hearing on Monday, June 4, 2018 in the Council change of name should not be Chambers, City Hall, 621 11th to Street, Fortuna, California, at 6:00 p.m. The granted. Any person objecting of this hearing is for the consideration and adoption of the folthepurpose name changes described above lowing must file aresolutions: written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− 2018-12 tion atRESOLUTION least two court days before the matter is scheduledOF to be heard A RESOLUTION THE COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF FORTUNA andESTABLISHING must appear atAthe hearing to SCHEDULE OF FEES AND CHARGES FOR BUILDING, show cause why the petition should COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT, WATER & WASTEWATER, AND WATER & notWASTE be granted. no written objec− WATERIf LABORATORY FEES WITHIN THE CITY OF FORTUNA FOR tion is timely filed, the court may FISCAL YEAR 2018-2019 grant the petition without a All interested parties and members of the public are invited to attend hearing. and beOFheard at the hearing. A copy of the Draft Fee Resolutions for this NOTICE HEARING Date: itemJune will8,be2018 available at the front counter of City Hall. Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 Siana L. Emmons SUPERIOR Build to edge COURT of the document CityareClerk Margins just a safe area OF CALIFORNIA, Dated: 14, 2018 COUNTY OFMay HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: April 20, 2018 Filed: April 20, 2018 /s/ William P Barry Judge of the Superior Court

for a decree changing names as follows: Present name Felix Abelardo Oliveros to Proposed Name Felix Abelardo Lester THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter 5/3, 5/10, 5/17, 5/24 (18−119) appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may Devouring Humboldt’s best kept food secrets. grant the petition without a northcoastjournal.com/HumPlate hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 29, 2018 Have a tip? Email jennifer@northcoastjournal.com Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 24, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: April 2, 2018

NCJ HUM

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43


Astrology

Cartoons

Free Will Astrology Week of May 24, 2018 By Rob Brezsny

Homework: Each of us has a secret ignorance. Can you guess what yours is? What could you do about it?

freewillastrology@freewillastrology.com ARIES (March 21-April 19): A critic described Leonardo da Vinci’s painting the “Mona Lisa” as “the most visited, most written about, most sung about, most parodied work of art in the world.” It hasn’t been sold recently, but is estimated to be worth hundreds of millions of dollars. Today it’s kept in the world-renowned Louvre museum in Paris, where it’s viewed by millions of art-lovers. But for years after its creator’s death, it enjoyed little fanfare while hanging in the bathroom of the French King Francois. I’d love to see a similar evolution in your own efforts, Aries: a rise from humble placement and modest appreciation to a more interesting fate and greater approval. The astrological omens suggest that you have more power than usual to make this happen in the coming weeks and months. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): These days, many films use CGI, computer generated imagery. The technology is sophisticated and efficient. But in the early days of its use, producing such realistic fantasies was painstaking and time-intensive. For example, Steven Spielberg’s 1993 film Jurassic Park featured four minutes of CGI that required a year to create. I hope that in the coming weeks, you will summon equivalent levels of oldschool tenacity and persistence and attention to detail as you devote yourself to a valuable task that you love. Your passion needs an infusion of discipline. Don’t be shy about grunting. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): On Feb. 17, 1869, Russian chemist Dmitri Mendeleyev had an appointment with a local cheese-making company to provide his expert consultation. But he never made it. A blast of inspiration overtook him soon after he awoke, and he stayed home to tend to the blessed intrusion. He spent that day as well as the next two perfecting his vision of the periodic table of the elements, which he had researched and thought about for a long time. Science was forever transformed by Mendeleyev’s breakthrough. I doubt your epiphanies in the coming weeks will have a similar power to remake the whole world, Gemini. But they could very well remake your world. When they arrive, honor them. Feed them. Give them enough room to show you everything they’ve got. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Ninety-five percent of your fears have little or no objective validity. Some are delusions generated by the neurotic parts of your imagination. Others are delusions you’ve absorbed from the neurotic spew of other people’s imaginations. What I’ve just told you is both bad news and good news. On the one hand, it’s a damn shame you feel so much irrational and unfounded anxiety. On the other hand, hearing my assertion that so much of it is irrational and unfounded might mobilize you to free yourself from its grip. I’m pleased to inform you that the coming weeks will be an excellent time to wage a campaign to do just that. June can and should be Fighting for Your Freedom from Fear Month. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): During the next four weeks, I’ll celebrate if you search for and locate experiences that will heal the part of your heart that’s still a bit broken. My sleep at night will be extra deep and my dreams extra sweet if I know you’re drumming up practical support for your feisty ideals. I’ll literally jump for joy if you hunt down new teachings that will ultimately ensure you start making a daring dream come true in 2019. And my soul will soar if you gravitate toward the mind-expanding kind of hedonism rather than the mind-shrinking variety. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Everyone has a unique fate that’s interesting enough to write a book about. Each of us has at least one epic story to tell that would make people cry and laugh and adjust their thoughts about the meaning of life. What would your saga be like? Think about what’s unfolding right now, because I bet that would be a ripe place to start your meditations. The core themes of your destiny are currently on vivid display,

with new plot twists taking your drama in novel directions. Want to get started? Compose the first two sentences of your memoir. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “Dear Oracle: I find myself in the weird position of trying to decide between doing the good thing and doing the right thing. If I opt to emphasize sympathy and kindness, I may look like an eager-to-please wimp with shaky principles. But if I push hard for justice and truth, I may seem rude and insensitive. Why is it so challenging to have integrity? – Vexed Libra.” Dear Libra: My advice is to avoid the all-or-nothing approach. Be willing to be half-good and half-right. Sometimes the highest forms of integrity require you to accept imperfect solutions. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You have waited long enough to retaliate against your adversaries. It’s high time to stop simmering with frustration and resentment. Take direct action! I suggest you arrange to have a box of elephant poop shipped to their addresses. You can order it here: tinyurl.com/ElephantManure. JUST KIDDING! I misled you with the preceding statements. It would in fact be a mistake for you to express such vulgar revenge. Here’s the truth: Now is an excellent time to seek retribution against those who have opposed you, but the best ways to do that would be by proving them wrong, surpassing their accomplishments, and totally forgiving them. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Marketing experts say that motivating a person to say yes to a big question is more likely if you first build momentum by asking them smaller questions to which it’s easy to say yes. I encourage you to adopt this slant for your own purposes in the coming weeks. It’s prime time to extend invitations and make requests that you’ve been waiting for the right moment to risk. People whom you need on your side will, I suspect, be more receptive than usual — and with good reasons — but you may still have to be smoothly strategic in your approach. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): I bet you’ll be offered at least one valuable gift, and possibly more. But I’m concerned that you may not recognize them for their true nature. So I’ve created an exercise to enhance your ability to identify and claim these gifts-in-disguise. Please ruminate on the following concepts: 1. a pain that can heal; 2. a shadow that illuminates; 3. an unknown or anonymous ally; 4. a secret that nurtures intimacy; 5. a power akin to underground lightning; 6. an invigorating boost disguised as tough love. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): When I was a kid attending elementary schools in the American Midwest, recess was a core part of my educational experience. For 45 minutes each day, we were excused from our studies so we could indulge in freeform play — outdoors, if the weather was nice, or else in the gymnasium. But in recent years, schools in the U.S. have shrunk the time allotted for recess. Many schools have eliminated it altogether. Don’t they understand this is harmful to the social, emotional and physical health of their students? In any case, Aquarius, I hope you move in the opposite direction during the coming weeks. You need more than your usual quota of time away from the grind. More fun and games, please! More messing around and merriment! More recess! PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): For many years, actor Mel Blanc provided the voice for Bugs Bunny, a cartoon character who regularly chowed down on raw carrots. But Blanc himself did not like raw carrots. In a related matter, actor John Wayne, who pretended to be a cowboy and horseman in many movies, did not like horses. And according to his leading ladies, charismatic macho film hunk Harrison Ford is not even close to being an expert kisser. What about you, Pisces? Is your public image in alignment with your true self? If there are discrepancies, the coming weeks will be an excellent time to make corrections.

44 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 24, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

@ncj_of_humboldt


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WAGES 1. Millennial’s “I don’t care” 8. Network with a studio offering tours to those with an Atlanta CityPASS 11. Freak (out) 14. Beehive and others 15. Stimpy’s TV pal 16. Shakespeare’s “Much ____ About Nothing” 17. ____ rifle 18. Wow 19. “Skedaddle!” 20. “Days of Heaven” director Terrence 21. 31-Down’s role in “Pulp Fiction” 22. Suvari of “American Beauty” 23. They can get the blood flowing 24. “Which came first?” option 25. He “piled upon the whale’s white hump the sum of all the general rage & hate

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felt by his whole race” 26. Go up the river? 28. Wyoming Senator Mike 30. Mystique 34. Mad. in Manhattan 35. Spike’s role in “Do the Right Thing” 38. Comment from someone just getting by 40. Butcher’s offerings 41. Take one’s sweet time 42. Marx’s “____ Kapital” 43. Dreaded letters for a procrastinator? 44. Young on film 45. Singer Redding 47. Company credited with running the first TV ad featuring a gay couple, 1994 49. JDate user 51. Bleeped person 56. “Private Benjamin” star 57. Put the kibosh on 58. Alpine climber’s tool

59. Pop star Rita whose last name is the title of her 2012 debut album 60. GPS recommendation: Abbr. 61. Hummus and baba ghanouj flavorers 62. Mastermind game piece 63. Green machine 64. Most goofy 65. Chemistry suffix 66. “____ I?” 67. States with conviction

7. Jet that began regular service between New York and Europe in 1977 8. Barack’s brother-in-law 9. Enya and Yanni, for two 10. Pentagon-to-Lincoln Memorial dir. 11. From left to right, what’s being accomplished in 32-, 6-, 9- and 11-Down 12. Menzel who voices Elsa in “Frozen” 13. Scored in the 80s 21. It may be trending 22. Its TV ads once featured a Native DOWN American woman 1. Collides with force saying “You call it 2. Attacks corn, we call it maize” 3. Window alternative 27. “____ been 4. A thing for Duke wondering ...” Ellington? 5. Chemical extractions 29. “Hardly!” 30. Helping hand 6. Car model first 31. Quentin directed her produced in in “Pulp Fiction” Wolfsburg, Germany 32. Flower with a in 1979

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS TO RACISM M K E C A I L N T S R O B Y E A E Y C M U S E G R O C O C O R A N N F E Y

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horrible smell? 33. Like chinchillas and llamas 36. “Don’t give ____ second thought” 37. Mind reading, for short 39. First U.S. state alphabetically: Abbr. 40. Grumpy ____ 42. New York Times colleague of Kristof and Krugman 46. “Like?” 47. “Fingers crossed” 48. O of the Yeah Yeah Yeahs 50. Sworn ____ 52. Rouen’s Gustave Flaubert Bridge spans it 53. Less nutty 54. What dinosaurs don’t do anymore 55. Chills, so to speak 60. Butt 61. Carrere of “Wayne’s World”

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HOME CAREGIVERS PT/FT Non−medical caregivers to assist elderly in their homes. Top hourly wages. (707) 362−8045.

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AMERICAN STAR PRIVATE SECURITY Is Now Hiring. Clean record. Drivers license required. Must own vehicle. Apply at 922 E Street, Suite A, Eureka (707) 476−9262.

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CROSSWORD by David Levinson Wilk

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WEEKEND COMMUNITY HERBALIST Experienced herbalist − happy, self−moti− vated disposition − Excel− lent customer service skills. Schedule is Fri−Sat. Email resume to emailus@humbol dtherbals.com 707/442− 3541. www.humboldtherbals.com

PARK MAINTENANCE WORKER I

Part Time, $11.00 – 13.38/hr.

Park maintenance, upkeep parks, landscaped areas, public buildings, associated equipment and structures; routine gardening work; CDL is required. Must be at least 18 years of age. Job description and application available at friendlyfortuna.com or City of Fortuna, 621 11th Street, 725-7600. Applications must be received by 4 pm on Friday, June 1, 2018.

YUROK TRIBE JOB OPENINGS For information www.yuroktribe.org, hr@yuroktribe.nsn.us or 707-482-1350 #0857 Webmaster

RG/FT KLAMATH $21.84-28.39 5/25/18

#0936 JOM Tutor

RG/PT EUREKA/HOOPA $12.68-20.69 5/25/18

#0959 Accountant

RG/FT KLAMATH $45,576-72,068 5/25/18

#0975 Administrative Assistant Council RG/FT KLAMATH $14.22 6/1/18

#0983 Computer Technician I

EDUCATION: EQUAL OPPORTUNITY TITLE IX For jobs in educa− tion in all school districts in Humboldt County, including teaching, instructional aides, coaches, office staff, custo− dians, bus drivers, and many more. Go to our website at www.humboldt.k12.ca.us and click on Employment Opportunities. Applications and job flyers may be picked up at the Personnel Office, Humboldt County Office of Education 901 Myrtle Ave, Eureka, or accessed online. For more information call 445−7039.

Hiring? Post your job opportunities in the Journal.

RG/FT WEITCHPEC $17.75-23.06 5/25/18

#0993 Construction Manager-Fisheries RG/FT WEAVERVILLE $29.19-37.93 5/25/18

#0995 Head Start Teacher Aide RG/FT EUREKA $13.01/14.60 5/25/18

#0996 Forester

RG/FT KLAMATH $24.12-31.35 5/25/18

#1003 Battalion Fire Chief

RG/FT WEITCHPEC $24.12/$31.33 5/25/18

#1004 Crisis Worker Victim Advocate RG/FT WEITCHPEC $15.91/17.75 5/25/18

#1006 Language Specialist III

RG/FT WEITCHPEC $17.75-23.06 5/25/18

#1007 Case Manager Court RG/FT KLAMATH $17.75 5/25/18

#1009 YIHA Executive Director RG/FT KLAMATH DOE 6/1/18

#1010 YIHA Fiscal Director RG/FT KLAMATH DOE 6/1/18

#1016 Assistant to Deputy Director RG/FT KLAMATH OPEN UNTIL FILLED

#1017 Fish Technician II

TEMP/PT WEAVERVILLE $14.22 5/23/18 442-1400 x314 classified @northcoast journal.com

#1018 Planner II or III Transportation RG/FT KLAMATH $19.72/21.84 DOE 6/8/18

#1019 Environmental Specialist RG/FT KLAMATH $19.72-25.63 6/4/18

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 24, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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K’ima:w Medical Center

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 

           default

an entity of the Hoopa Valley Tribe, is seeking applicants for the following positions: WE ARE LOOKING FOR AN ENERGETIC PROJECT ENVIRON− MENTAL SCIENTIST OR ENGINEER to support stormwater and environmental remediation projects in Humboldt County and else− where. For more information about our company and the position visit our website at: www.ekiconsult.com

“Healthy mind, body and spirit for generations of our American Indian Community.” Join our dynamic team and support the UIHS vision!

This week’s featured jobs:

Human Resources Director – Arcata

Humboldt Area Foundation is now accepting applications for a

Program Assistant for Grants This is an hourly, full time (40 hours/week) position based in Bayside, CA. Compensation is $15.00-$17.00 DOE, and includes health, retirement benefits, and paid holidays and sick time. This position will be responsible for assisting with administrative tasks that support the Foundation’s grant programs and is required to work within structured deadlines and under the direction of multiple staff members. Essential functions include providing customer service support to grant applicants; providing back-end administrative support for online grant application process and processing online application results; preparing letters and reports; data entry; and supporting other grant making staff by assisting with tasks such as scheduling, travel arrangements, filing, database management, bulk mailings, and expense reports. The ideal candidate will have a high school diploma or GED and experience working in an administrative or clerical position; has experience using equipment such as computers, phones, and printers; has proficiency with executing intermediate level functions with the Microsoft Office suite; performs data entry quickly and with a high level of accuracy; is able to maintain confidentiality, professional work standards, and has experience working with the public in a welcoming, helpful, and gracious manner; has good written and verbal communication skills, including knowledge of professional phone and written correspondence etiquette; is self-motivated, able to take direction from multiple staff members, and has the desire and ability to be a collaborative team participant; is adaptable, growth-oriented, and deadline driven; and is able to establish and maintain working relationships with individuals from diverse backgrounds, and has demonstrated sensitivity to cross-cultural perspectives and experiences. Please visit our website for application procedures and the complete job announcement, including preferred qualifications at www.hafoundation.org/About-Us/Employment-Opportunities. For more information, contact Amy Jester at (707) 442-2993. Please submit your resume and cover letter to admin@hafoundation.org

Deadline: Sunday, June 3, 2018

This person is responsible for directing the UIHS Human Resources Section including the areas of recruitment, compensation, compliance, employee relations, in accordance with organization policies, applicable laws, and regulations.

BEHAVIORAL HEALTH OFFICE SPECIALIST COMMUNITY HEALTH REPRESENTATIVE (CHR) DIABETES NURSE EDUCATOR-CASE MANAGER/COORDINATOR DIABETES PROGRAM MANAGER PHYSICIAN DENTAL HYGIENIST (STAFF OR CONTRACTED) RN (MEDICATION-ASSISTED TREATMENT) RN CARE MANAGER SUBSTANCE ABUSE COUNSELOR (MEDICATION-ASSISTED TREATMENT) MENTAL HEALTH CLINICIAN (MEDICATIONASSISTED TREATMENT) MENTAL HEALTH CLINICIAN (LMFT OR LCSW) For an application, job description, and additional information, contact: K’ima:w Medical Center, Human Resources, PO Box 1288, Hoopa, CA, 95546 or call 530-625-4261 or email: hr.kmc@kimaw.org for a job description and application. Resume and CV are not accepted without a signed application.

Clinical Laboratory Manager – Arcata

Supervises and coordinates activities of lab workers engaged in performing chemical and waived testing for the clinic laboratory. Responsible for quality control and lab operations for all sites.

Human Resources Coordinator – Arcata

The Human resources Coordinator assists the Human Resources Director with all functions within Human Resources section. This includes but not limited to, the establishment of an in-house employee and management training system that addresses company needs and employee assessments.

Registered Dental Assistant– Arcata

This is a Full time position. We are seeking an exceptional, energetic and motivated RDA, to join our dental healthcare team! This person will work directly with the dentist and the dental healthcare team, to provide quality oral healthcare to patients.

Behavioral Health Counselor – Arcata

Provide direct services to UIHS clients, through individual, group, child and family counseling. Address mental health issues, including trauma, stress, anxiety, depression, substance abuse, grief and loss and disrupted family dynamics.

“Healthy mind, body and spirit for generations of our American Indian Community.” Join our dynamic team and support the UIHS vision!

United Indian Health Services, Inc. is seeking a

Chief Medical Officer The CMO is the lead clinician in charge of all aspects of patient care services provided by United Indian Health Services, Inc. The leadership role monitors clinical performance to ensure services and operations are in compliance with all UIHS policies and procedures, and applicable laws and regulations. They will also be responsible for implementing, reviewing and developing Clinical protocols, performance objectives, productivity benchmarks, compliance measures, provider workflow planning and provider scheduling.

Visit our website www.uihs.org to see all of our opportunities and print out an application. Email application, cover letter and resume to UIHS-Recruiting@crihb.org

Visit our website unitedindianhealthservices.org/ jobs/ to see all of our opportunities and print out an application. Email application, cover letter and resume to UIHS-Recruiting@crihb.org

Serving the Native American Community since 1970. In accordance with PL 93-638 American Indian Preference shall be given.

Serving the Native American Community since 1970. In accordance with PL 93-638 American Indian Preference shall be given.

46 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 24, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com


sequoiapersonnel.com

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The Hoopa Valley Tribe is accepting applications to fill the following vacant position

2930 E St., Eureka, CA 95501

(707) 445.9641

Accounting Assistant • Optician Administrative Coordinator • CPA Sales/Marketing • Job Coach • Planner Overhead Door Installer • Lead Cook Social Worker • Production Laborers Class B Driver • General Laborers Car Lot Attendant • HR Assistant default

STORE MANAGER Hoopa Shopping Center, Regular, F/T, Salary: DOE. Effectively develops and directs implementation of strategies which achieve corporate goals. Effectively supervises, directs and manages all phases of the store operations. Achieves the Hoopa Shopping Center’s goals and objectives. Minimum Requirements: Must have a minimum of 2-3 years in a management position. Must have 7-10 years in the Grocery Store Business. Must have prior supervisory experience. Must have a current Food Handlers certificate. English language proficiency, both speaking and reading. Deadline: OPEN UNTIL FILLED This position is classified as safety-sensitive.

JOIN OUR TEAM OF END-OF-LIFE CARE SPECIALISTS! FULL-TIME, BENEFITED POSITIONS

Hospice House Clinical Administrator Responsible for all patient care activities in our in-patient unit, including staff supervision, compliance, and budget oversight. Must possess a current RN license, 2 years nursing experience, and management experience.

Float Nurse Sign-on bonus offered! Provides a variety of types of nursing care for hospice patients to help cover absences of regularly scheduled staff. Must have a current California RN license, and at least 1 year of experience.

Nurse Practitioner Provides direct medical care to hospice patients at the patient’s place of residence and in the Ida Emmerson Hospice House. Must have a current California Nurse Practitioner license, be a graduate of an accredited nursing program, and have at least 4 years of experience.

PART-TIME POSITIONS

Social Worker Assesses and responds to the psychosocial, financial, and legal concerns of hospice patients and family. Must have a master degree in Social Work (MSW) and two years of social work experience in the health care field. Works as-needed. Visit www.hospiceofhumboldt.org or call 707-445-8443 for more information.

For job descriptions and employment applications, contact the Human Resources/Insurance Department, Hoopa Valley Tribe, P.O. Box 218, Hoopa, CA 95546. Call (530) 625-9200 Ext. 20 or email hr2@hoopainsurance.com. The Tribe’s Alcohol & Drug Policy and TERO Ordinance Apply.

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CURRENT JOB OPENINGS Interested applicants are encouraged to visit and apply online at www.SHCHD.org or in person at 733 Cedar Street, Garberville (707)923-3921

ASSISTANT CLINIC MANAGER – REGISTERED NURSE Full-Time position. Current California RN license and BLS certification required. Work closely with the Clinic Manger in providing leadership and management within the Rural Health Clinic. 8-hour shifts in our outpatient Rural Health Clinic. Amazing growth potential.

ER/ ACUTE NURSE MANAGER Full Time Position. Critical Access ER/Acute Department Nursing Manager; 4-bed Emergency room & 9-bed Acute care unit, seeking a Nurse Manager to provide leadership, administrative responsibility and oversight of the ER and Acute care departments. Current California RN license required. BSN, PALS, & ACLS required. Minimum 2 years ER experience required. Minimum 1 year Management Experience strongly preferred.

LICENSED VOCATIONAL NURSE default

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ASSISTANT TEACHER, Arcata Assist teacher in implementation & supervision of activities for preschool children. Min of 6-12 ECE units & 6 months exp. working w/children. P/T (yr round) 25 hrs/wk $11.13-$12.27/hr First Review: 05/25/2018

CLASSROOM ASSISTANTS, Eureka Assist staff in day-to-day operation of the classroom for a Toddler program. 6-12 ECE units pref. or enrolled in ECE classes & have 6 months exp. working w/children. Two P/T positions open (yr round) 20 & 28 hrs/wk $11.13-$12.27/hr Open Until Filled

SUBSTITUTES-Humboldt and Del Norte County Intermittent (on-call) work filling in for Classroom Assistant, Assistant Teachers, Cooks/Assistant Cooks or occasional childcare for parent meetings. Req. exp. working w/children or cooking. $11.13/hr. No benefits. Submit Sched of Availability form w/app. Submit applications to: Northcoast Children’s Services 1266 9th Street, Arcata, CA 95521 For addtl info & application please call 707- 822-7206 or visit our website at www.ncsheadstart.org

Full Time position. Current LVN license and CPR certification required. Work 12-hour shifts in our 8-bed skilled nursing facility. 2 LVN positions available to start ASAP.

ER/ACUTE CARE REGISTERED NURSE Full-Time, 12-hour shift, 3 days/week. Current California RN License, BLS, ACLS, & PALS certification required. Work 12-hour shifts in our critical access acute care & emergency room. Willing to train the right New RN Graduate.

CERTIFIED NURSE ASSISTANT Full Time, Part Time, or Per Diem Positions. Direct Patient Care, activities with the residents/ patients. Must possess CNA Certificate and CPR Certification.

CT TECHNOLOGIST Per Diem Positions. Current AART, California licensure, and BLS required. Minimum 1 year imaging technologist experience in an acute care facility or clinic, preferred. Proficiency in CT and On-call required. Brand new GE Revolution Evo 770, 64-slice, low dose CT. New hires qualify for benefits as soon as they begin employment!

***NHSC QUALIFYING FACILITY / NURSE CORPS LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAM*** Candidates are eligible for NHSC Nurse Corps Loan Repayment which pays up to 85% of unpaid nursing education debt for registered nurses (RNs) in exchange for two years of service at our clinic location. Visit NHSC.HRSA.GOV to learn more about the program SHCHD wages start at $15.50 per hour featuring an exceptional benefits package, including an employee discount program for services offered at SHCHD.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 24, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

47


Employment default

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Come join Mad River Community Hospital and enjoy the satisfaction of working with a team.

“Healthy mind, body and spirit for generations of our American Indian Community.” Join our dynamic team and support the UIHS vision!

United Indian Health Services, Inc. is seeking a

Corporate Compliance Officer The CCO’s principal duties include planning, implementing, and monitoring the Corporate Compliance Program. The coordination of compliance audit activities and communication of expectations and reporting results, are some of the key functions of this position. The CCO reports directly to the Board of Directors and works closely with the Chief Executive Officer and department directors. Visit our website unitedindianhealthservices.org/jobs/ to see all of our opportunities and print out an application. Email application, cover letter and resume to UIHS-Recruiting@crihb.org Serving the Native American Community since 1970. In accordance with PL 93-638 American Indian Preference shall be given.

Yes, you can be happy at work…here. If you have to work, why not do so with some of the best in the business. We are looking to hire FT Occupational Therapist, Speech Therapist Home Health, FT Biller, Home Health Social Worker, Phlebotomist and other positions. Look on our web site for openings: www.madriverhospital.com

LOOKING FOR AN EMPLOYER COMMITTED TO YOUR CAREER AND WELL−BEING? ARE YOU A PART−TIME LVN/RN LOOKING FOR SUPPLEMENTAL HOURS? Crestwood Behavioral Health Center is looking for Full−time, Part−time & On−call LPTs/LVNs to join our dynamic Team. Full−time benefits include medical, dental and vision plans; 401(K); sick & vacation time; scholarships; & lots of career−furthering training. $500 SIGN−ON BONUS, please inquire for details! Apply at: 2370 Buhne Street, Eureka 707−442−5721 http://crestwoodbehavioralhealth.com/location/eurekaca/

Join the

ResolutionCare                    

We are looking for an enthusiastic, reliable, flexible, team player looking to learn, create and provide outstanding food to our guests. Do not need to have kitchen experience only a willingness to learn! Visit www.gyppo.com/family to see if your core values and our core values align. If so, scroll to the bottom of the page to down− load an application. Application can then be emailed to family@gyppo.com. Please include a resume. Cheers! www.gyppo.com

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team!

COMBO KITCHEN POSITION The Gyppo Ale Mill, Humboldt’s newest brewery with taproom and beer garden is looking for some individuals to join our family. Located in beautiful Shelter Cove, next to the campground and on the 9th hole of the golf course the brewery has already become a community center that is popular with locals and tourist alike.

SUMMER CAMP POSITIONS

Co-Coordinators, Adult & Peer Counselors Please submit your applications!

Summer Camp II – June 25-29, 2018 Summer Camp I – July 9-13, 2018 Co-Coordinators position closes 5/16 Adult Counselors position closes 5/24 Peer Counselors positons closes 5/31 Co-Coordinators must submit a Letter of Interest (LOI). Adult & Peer Counselors will be required to submit an application Applications can be obtained and submitted at UIHS-Recruiting@crihb.org, calling (707) 825-5070 or on the UIHS website www.unitedindianhealthservices.org. In accordance with PL 93-638 American Indian Preference shall be given.

48 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 24, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

Humboldt County Office of Education

Anticipated Opening:

Early Literacy/ HCOE Foundation Administrative Assistant

FT, M-F, 7.5 Hrs./Day, 11 Mo., $16.30-$23.05/Hr. DOE. Qualifications: Graduation from high school & completion of AA/AS degree & 3 yrs. of related exp. Education may be waived with at least 5 yrs of related experience as a secretary, event manager, volunteer recruiter or admin assistant to a lead manager. Experience in event coordination, volunteer recruitment & public relations & public speaking skills desirable. Eligible for H&W, PERS retirement. Applications available at HCOE or online: www.hcoe.org/pers/appinfo.php Reply to: PERSONNEL, HCOE, 901 Myrtle Ave., Eureka, CA 95501 Deadline 6/13/18, 4 p.m.

Hiring? Post your job opportunities in the Journal. 442-1400 ×314 classified@northcoastjournal.com


Marketplace Auctions

PUBLIC AUCTION Thurs. May 31st 4:15 pm Disney collectibles, estate furniture & misc.

Info & Pictures at WWW.CARLJOHNSONCO.COM Preview Weds. 11 am - 5 pm & Thurs. 11 am to Sale Time

THE COSTUME BOX Costume Rental & Sales Makeup*Masks*Wigs Costume Thrift Boutique Open Mon−Fri 1−5:30 Sat 11−5 202 T St. Eureka 707−443−5200

ď †ď Œď ď “ď ˆď ‚ď ď ƒď ‹ ď ?ď Ąď šď€ ď Šď łď€  ď Śď Ľď Ąď ´ď ľď ˛ď Šď Žď §ď€ ď€  ď ´ď ¨ď Ľď€ ď‚’ď€śď€°ď łď€Ą

3950 Jacobs Ave. Eureka • 443-4851

Clothing

116 W. Wabash 443-3259 Mon. 1-6 Weds.-Sat. 1-6

ď‚“ď ƒď Źď Żď ´ď ¨ď Ľď łď€ ď ˇď Šď ´ď ¨ď€ ď “ď Żď ľď Źď‚”

Miscellaneous

Musicians & Instructors

LOST PARAKEETS − HUMBOLDT HILL My two parakeets escaped from their cage and flew out the front door. Tweety is female with a green body and yellow head and has a band on her leg from Petco. Albatraoz is female and has a yellow body with green in her wings. If found please contact 707−497−7312

DISTRIBUTION DRIVERS

707.442.1400

• Transportation to and from Adult Day Center

Now Accepting Patients

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ď ‹ď Žď ‰ď †ď …ď€ ď “ď ˆď ď ’ď ?ď …ď Žď ‰ď Žď ‡ Apartment Loans

CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING Services available. Call Julie 839−1518.

Computer & Internet

(707) 445-3027

CalBRE: #01144618, NMLS: #323296

GAS FIREPLACES

WWW.CARLJOHNSONCO.COM 3950 Jacobs Ave. Eureka

707-443-4851

ď ď ’ď ƒď ď ”ď ď€şď€ ď ď Źď Źď€ ď •ď Žď ¤ď Ľď ˛ď€ ď ˆď Ľď Ąď śď Ľď Ž ď ď ˛ď Łď Ąď ´ď Ąď€ ď ?ď Źď Ąď şď Ąď€Źď€ ď€¸ď€˛ď€ľď€­ď€ˇď€ˇď€śď€° ď …ď •ď ’ď …ď ‹ď ď€şď€ ď Œď Šď ´ď ´ď Źď Ľď€ ď Šď Ąď °ď Ąď Ž Ä†Ä—Ä›ÄŠÄžÇŻÄ˜Ä?ĆėĕnjēnjÄ?ĎēČĘ ͚Ͳ͚͸ͳ͸nj͚Ͳʹʹ

Bob@HumboldtMortgage.net

2037 Harrison Ave., Eureka

Â?‹˜‡•ČˆŽƒ†‡•ČˆŠ‡ƒ”• ”‹Â?Â?‡”•Čˆ—•–‘Â?”†‡”• ‹…Â?Â’ƒÂ?†”‘’ÂˆÂˆÇŁ

ď ˆď Ľď Žď ¤ď Ľď ˛ď łď Żď Žď€ ď ƒď Ľď Žď ´ď Ľď ˛ď€Źď€ ď€ˇď€šď€¸ď€­ď€śď€°ď€°ď€ł

50 GLORIOUS YEARS since 1964

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Macintosh Computer Consulting for Business and Individuals Troubleshooting Hardware/Memory Upgrades Setup Assistance/Training Purchase Advice

2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. Although we have been in busi− ness for 25 years, we do not carry a contractors license. Call 845−3087

ď ‰ď Žď€ ď ˆď ?ď ?ď …ď€ ď “ď …ď ’ď –ď ‰ď ƒď …ď “ ď —ď Ľď€ ď Ąď ˛ď Ľď€ ď ¨ď Ľď ˛ď Ľď€ ď Śď Żď ˛ď€ ď šď Żď ľ ď ’ď Ľď §ď Šď łď ´ď Ľď ˛ď Ľď ¤ď€ ď Žď ľď ˛ď łď Ľď€ ď łď ľď °ď °ď Żď ˛ď ´ ď ?ď Ľď ˛ď łď Żď Žď Ąď Źď€ ď ƒď Ąď ˛ď Ľ

METAL ROOFING Skyline RooďŹ ngÂŽ

WWW.CARLJOHNSONCO.COM 3950 Jacobs Ave. Eureka

707-443-4851

Body, Mind & Spirit HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./ Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing profes− sionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822−2111 default

Done Making Babies?

Consider Vasectomy‌ Twenty-minute, in-office procedure In on Friday, back to work on Monday Friendly office with soothing music to calm you

ď ď łď łď Šď łď ´ď Ąď Žď Łď Ľď€ ď ˇď Šď ´ď ¨ď€ ď ¤ď Ąď Šď Źď šď€  ď Ąď Łď ´ď Šď śď Šď ´ď Šď Ľď ł ď ’ď Ľď łď °ď Šď ´ď Ľď€ ď Łď Ąď ˛ď Ľď€ ď€Śď€ ď ­ď ľď Łď ¨ď€  ď ­ď Żď ˛ď Ľ ď ‰ď Žď łď ľď ˛ď Ľď ¤ď€ ď€Śď€ ď ‚ď Żď Žď ¤ď Ľď ¤ ď “ď Ľď ˛ď śď Šď Žď §ď€ ď Žď Żď ˛ď ´ď ¨ď Ľď ˛ď Žď€ ď ƒď Ąď Źď Šď Śď Żď ˛ď Žď Šď Ąď€ ď€  ď Śď Żď ˛ď€ ď Żď śď Ľď ˛ď€ ď€˛ď€°ď€ ď šď Ľď Ąď ˛ď łď€Ą

ď ”ď Żď Źď Źď€ ď Śď ˛ď Ľď Ľď€ ď€ąď€­ď€¸ď€ˇď€ˇď€­ď€šď€śď€´ď€­ď€˛ď€°ď€°ď€ą

REASONABLE RATES Decking, Fencing, Siding, Power Washing, Doors, Windows Honest & Reliable, Retired Contractor (707) 382−8655 sagehomerepair@gmail.com

707-822-4866

3800 Janes Rd, Arcata www.adhcmadriver.org

ď Œď Šď §ď ¨ď ´ď€ ď ˆď Żď ľď łď Ľď Ťď Ľď Ľď °ď Šď Žď §

ď€

Contact Melissa

melissa@northcoastjournal.com

• Socialization/ Companionship

Other Professionals

Home Repair

Must be personable, have a reliable vehicle, clean driving record and insurance. News box repair skills a plus.

• Physical, Speech & Occupational Therapy

ROCK CHIP? Windshield repair is our specialty. For emergency service CALL GLASWELDER 442−GLAS (4527), humboldtwindshieldrepair.com

707-826-1806

Arcata • Fortuna/Ferndale Willow Creek/Hoopa

• Nutritious Hot Meals

Auto Service

macsmist@gmail.com

Wednesday afternoon/ Thursday morning routes in

• Recreational Activities

Call for more information

ELECTRONICS & GAMES HALF PRICE SALE DREAM QUEST THRIFT STORE May 24−30. Daily Bonus Sales, Senior Discount Tuesdays, Spin’n’Win Wednes− days, New Sale Thursdays, Friday Frenzy & Secret Sale Saturdays. Where your shopping dollars support local youth! (530) 629−3006.

IS SEEKING

• Nursing Care

Cleaning

Merchandise

THE NORTH COAST JOURNAL

WRITING CONSULTANT/EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. (707) 443−8373. www.ZevLev.com

BRADLEY DEAN ENTERTAINMENT Singer Songwriter. Old rock, Country, Blues. Private Parties, Bars, Gatherings of all kinds. (707) 832−7419.

CIRCUS NATURE PRESENTS A. O’KAY CLOWN & NANINATURE Juggling Jesters & Wizards of Play Performances for all ages. Magical Adventures with circus games and toys, Festivals, Events & Parties (707) 499−5628 www.circusnature.com

Performing Vasectomies & Tubal Ligations for Over 35 Years Tim Paik-Nicely, MD 2505 Lucas Street, Suite B, Eureka, CA 95501 (707) 442-0400

YOUR AD

HERE

442-1400 Ă—305 classified@ northcoastjournal.com

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 24, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

49


Real Estate default

HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS. Opening soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedroom Apts. Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $20,900, 2 pers. $23,900; 3 pers. $26,900; 4 pers. $29,850; 5 pers. $32,250; 6 pers. $34,650; 7 pers. $37,050; 8 pers. $39,450 Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922 Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Bldg. 9 Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104

 DON~RN~LVN Actively Interviewing Licensed Nurses in Fort Bragg, California We require a nurse with strong clinical assessment and interpersonal skills. This is a great opportunity to work in a high-quality, nursing facility. Multiple Shifts and Extensive Benefits Package.

707-964-6333 or terriem@SOHCFTB.com

■ McKinleyville

Ripple Creek TRINITY ALPSCabins WILDERNESS AREA Getaway in beautifully furnished cabins on the Upper Trinity River. Hike, bike, fish or just relax in seclusion. OPEN YEAR ROUND www.ripplecreekcabins.com

SOUTH FACING YARD WITH A BIG DECK! This Heartwood home has 5 skylights, a Lopi woodstove on a brick hearth, tile countertops, and some hardwood flooring. Built in 1991, there are 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, and approximately 1421 sq ft. There is also an in-house laundry room and the sale includes the washer and dryer. Nice floor plan for entertaining with French doors off the dining area leading out to the deck. Seller would like to sell the home in its current condition. Call for a private showing. MLS# 250622

$309,000

New Price!

(530) 266-3505 (530) 531-5315

Let’s Be Friends

YOUR LISTINGS HERE

Realtor Ads • Acreage for Sale & Rent Commercial Property for Sale & Rent • Vacation Rentals

call 442-1400 ×319 or email melissa@northcoastjournal.com

50 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 24, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

Sylvia Garlick #00814886 • Broker GRI/Owner 1629 Central Ave. • McKinleyville • 707-839-1521 • mingtreesylvia@yahoo.com ■ Great

Income Property!

GREAT INVESTMENT ARCATA HOUSE, QUIET NEIGHBORHOOD. Great income property in Humboldt County. It has 5 bedrooms (2 are masters) 3 full baths, double garage. Built in 1963. Totally redone 2016. Plumbing & electrical updated. Thermo windows & new roof, etc. Near hospital, schools and shopping. If you are ready to move up on the ladder, this could be a good start. Good rental history. Currently occupied/great renters. No maintenance needed. Owner finance possible with a large 1/2 down. 707-677-3125 whizzedgeez@gmail.com

$398,000


Katherine Fergus

Charlie Tripodi

Kyla Tripodi

Owner/ Land Agent

Owner/Broker

Realtor

Realtor

Realtor

BRE #01930997

BRE #01956733

BRE #01919487

BRE #02044086

BRE #01332697

707.834.7979

707.601.1331

707.362.6504

530.784.3581

707.476.0435

MYERS FLAT - ELK PRAIRIE VINEYARD - $1,650,000

REDUCE

D PRICE

!

±160 Acres w/ water, PG&E, lg flats, greenhouse. Interim permit for 24,500 sf OD. NEW LIS

TING!

PETROLIA - LAND/PROPERTY - $650,000

±80 acres w/privacy, creek, river views, gardens, shed, outbuilding. Interim for 11400 sf OD.

LARABEE VALLEY - HOME ON ACREAGE - $250,000 ±16 Acre turn-key homestead w/ well, outbuildings, greenhouses & equipment. Interim for 5K ML.

SHOWERS PASS - LAND/PROPERTY - $479,000

ORLEANS-LAND/PROPERTY-$800,000

±120 Acres w/ 2 creeks, well, 2 cabins, timber. Interim for 18,634 sf od & app for additional 10k sf.

NEW LIS

TING!

±12 Acres w/ Creek, DFW 1600, 3/1 home, garden sites, PG&E. Interim permit for 11,244 sf

MAD RIVER - LAND/PROPERTY - $1,350,000

±80 Ac on river w/ house, water, flats, outbuildings, cabin, roads, power. Interim for 48,000 sf OD & 5,500 sf ML.

KETTENPOM - LAND/PROPERTY - $699,000

BENBOW - LAND/PROPERTY - $529,000

STAMPED PERMIT for 1,480 sf OD, 8,520 sf ML & 315 sf nursery on 20 ac. Springs, pond, water storage.

591 KNOX COVE - MCKINLEYVILLE - $949,000

3/2 home w/creek access, pond, well, outbuildings, paved roads, PG&E. Cultivation permit app for 15K sf.

Brand new 3000 sf 4 bed 3 bath custom home on flat ¾ acre ocean view lot in Knox Cove subdivision.

SALMON CREEK - LAND/PROPERTY - $879,000

±40 Acres w/2 ponds, creek, oak, meadows, craftsman cottage, cabin. Interim permit for 13,340 ML.

TRINIDAD - HOME ON ACREAGE - $875,000

±118 Acre w/permits in Trinity Co. 2/1 home, barn, outbuildings, spring, creek, well, meadows, PG&E.

WILLOW CREEK-LAND/PROPERTY-$675,000

±40 Acres w/privacy, springs, pond, cabin, garden sites, shop. Interim for 18,180 sf outdoor.

Hailey Rohan

MAD RIVER - LAND/PROPERTY - $1,200,000

Established ±20 acre vineyard w/ 3 homes, winery, cellar, tasting room, mature grapes & olive trees.

HARRIS - LAND/PROPERTY - $295,000

Tyla Miller

NEW LIS

TING!

±30 Acres off grid w/ springs, Luffenholtz creek, trails, custom redwood home & ocean views.

MYERS FLAT - LAND/PROPERTY - $599,000

±80 Ac w/PG&E, timber, garden sites, outbuildings, cabin. Interim permit for 19,600 sf outdoor.

ISLAND MOUNTAIN - LAND/PROPERTY - $1,475,000 ±803 Acres w/ 6 Mil BF timber, 2 springs, seasonal creek, orchard, PG&E, easy road access.

MAD RIVER - LAND/PROPERTY - $750,000

REDUCE

D PRICE

!

±40 Private acres w /timber, creek, pond, custom home. Interim for 4,040 sf ML & 7,650 sf OD.

102 MARIGOLD LN, WILLOW CREEK - $525,000

Rental income property w/3 homes on 3 Acres. Public utilities, close to town, private, tenants in place.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 24, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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Redwood Laboratory Better serving our community, we are open to everyone

High Deductible? No Insurance? No Problem. We offer fairer prices than any lab in the area. We send your results to your doctors immediately or on the same day. No extra charge!

Fear of Needles?

With the most experienced staff in the area, you have minimal chance of an extra stick. And we’re friendly, come to the professionals you can trust!

Need Electronic results sent to your Doctor?

We send electronically to most practices in the area, we have ability to send results to any doctor in the Humboldt County area. Please ask your Doctor to accept our electronic results – so you don’t need to suffer from high prices and painful visits.

Remember,the laboratory you choose is up to you!

Open Monday - Friday, 7:30am - 4:30pm

Affiliated with Redwood Urgent Care

2440 23rd Street, Eureka, CA

707-798-6214

redwoodlaboratory.com

North Coast Journal 5-24-18 Edition  

The Fights for the Fourth and the Fifth

North Coast Journal 5-24-18 Edition  

The Fights for the Fourth and the Fifth

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