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Humboldt County, CA | FREE Thursday, April 1, 2021 Vol. XXXII Issue 13 northcoastjournal.com

SATURDAY MORNING SHOTS

Inside Mad River Community Hospital’s mass vaccination clinic BY LINDA STANSBERRY

4 The Journal gets a new owner 8 Have you seen McKinley? 20 Fishing buddies


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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 1, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com


Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

CONTENTS 4

NCJ Update

6 7

Mailbox Poem

8

News

Journal Changes Ownership

What Remains Looking for McKinley

11 NCJ Daily Online 12 On The Cover

Saturday Morning Shots

16 NCJ Home Cooking

Contest Winners 19 On the Table Under One Roof

20 Get Out!

Small Fish Finds a Fishing Buddy

21 Fishing the North Coast Tough Steelhead Season Comes to a Close

23 Calendar 24 Home & Garden Service Directory

29 Screens

Shooting his Shot

30 Sudoku & Crossword 30 Field Notes

God, the Multiverse and You

31 31 38 38

Workshops & Classes Cartoon Free Will Astrology Classifieds

April 1, 2021 • Volume XXXII Issue 13 North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2021

PUBLISHER

Melissa Sanderson melissa@northcoastjournal.com NEWS EDITOR

Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com ARTS & FEATURES EDITOR

A World Without Violence

Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com DIGITAL EDITOR

Kimberly Wear kim@northcoastjournal.com STAFF WRITER

Iridian Casarez iridian@northcoastjournal.com CALENDAR EDITOR

Kali Cozyris calendar@northcoastjournal.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Wendy Chan, Barry Evans, Rod Kausen, Mike Kelly, Kenny Priest PRODUCTION MANAGER

Holly Harvey holly@northcoastjournal.com ART DIRECTOR

Jonathan Webster jonathan@northcoastjournal.com GRAPHIC DESIGN/PRODUCTION

Heidi Bazán Beltrán, Dave Brown, Miles Eggleston ncjads@northcoastjournal.com ADVERTISING MANAGER

Kyle Windham kyle@northcoastjournal.com MEDIA ADVISOR

John Harper john@northcoastjournal.com SENIOR ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE

Bryan Walker bryan@northcoastjournal.com MARKETING SPECIALIST

Kara Scofield kara@northcoastjournal.com CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

Mark Boyd classified@northcoastjournal.com BOOKKEEPER

Deborah Henry billing@northcoastjournal.com

APRIL is SEXUAL ASSAULT AWARENESS MONTH

The North Coast Rape Crisis Team

Is here this month & always providing 24-hour services and support

OFFICE MANAGER

Michelle Dickinson michelle@northcoastjournal.com MAIL/OFFICE

Some fresh herring eggs Yeng Thao shared on a Crescent City fishing trip. Read more on page 20. Courtesy of Kitty Truong

On the Cover Photos by Mark McKenna

310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 707 442-1400 FAX: 707 442-1401 www.northcoastjournal.com Press Releases newsroom@northcoastjournal.com Letters to the Editor letters@northcoastjournal.com Events/A&E calendar@northcoastjournal.com Music music@northcoastjournal.com Classified/Workshops classified@northcoastjournal.com CIRCULATION VERIFICATION C O U N C I L

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 15,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 450 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

Humboldt: 707 445 2881 Del Norte: 707 465 2851 www.ncrct.org Humboldt Instagram: ncrcthumboldt Del Norte Instagram: dn_ncrct or visit our Facebook Page

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 1, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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APPLY TODAY! NOW HIRING WE HAVE IMMEDIATE OPENINGS IN OUR MAINTENANCE DEPARTMENT MILLWRIGHTS ELECTRICIANS OILERS FABRICATORS Humboldt Sawmill Company continues to expand our Scotia, CA Operations! We are an essential business and offer secure employment, family-level wages, company paid medical, dental, and vision benefits, 401K plus much more. We have Immediate job placement available for the right people! Call 707-620-2940 or visit www.getredwood.com/Careers to apply now! Equal Opportunity Employer, Valuing Diversity of our Workforce and Offering a Drug Free Workplace

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UPDATE

North Coast Journal Changes Ownership

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he North Coast Journal Inc. — a media company that includes the 15,000-circulation weekly newspaper and website, plus nearly a dozen publications serving Humboldt County, California — has been sold. The buyer, Melissa Sanderson, 37, took over as president and publisher March 31. She has worked for the company since 2014, first as sales manager and the past three years as general manager. The sellers are two long-time friends and business partners, Judy Hodgson and Carolyn Fernandez, who purchased the newly established monthly newspaper in June of 1990, converted it to a weekly in 1998 and launched a string of successful, hyper-local publications. Those include the Insider, a quarterly tourism magazine; the annual Menu of Menus and Wedding Guide; and more recently, the bi-monthly North Coast Trader, a classified paper that reaches six coastal counties in California and Oregon. One Journal publication launched in 2017, the Humboldt Cannabis Magazine, is distributed twice a year to dispensaries throughout California. Over the past three decades, the Journal has won dozens of major awards from the California Newspaper Publishers Association and the Association of Alternative Newsmedia for writing and reporting, design and photography, as well as numerous freedom-of-information awards. The newspaper has been recognized numerous times by the Society of Professional Journalists and the League of Women Voters. While preparing this press release, Hodgson and Fernandez realized they actually had been working together for 45

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 1, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

Clockwise from top, former Journal owners Carolyn Fernandez and Judy Hodgson, new owner Melissa Sanderson and her husband Chris. Submitted years. Hodgson wrote a column, “Fieldbrook Footnotes,” for the Union weekly newspaper in Arcata beginning in 1976 while attending Humboldt State University (HSU). She graduated in 1978, joined the staff as a reporter and from 1983 to 1988, served as editor. Fernandez joined the Union in 1976 as a graphic artist, later becoming head of the production department. Both left in 1988 after a change in ownership and, in 1989, worked together again at an advertising agency before purchasing the Journal. The paper was immediately rebranded and redesigned from a quarter-fold into the magazine tabloid format that exists today. The two now-septuagenarians had been searching to find just the right “next owner” of the Journal for more than two decades. “We are super happy to sell to one of our great employees and a fourth-generation Humboldt County woman half our age,” Hodgson said. (Fortunans may recognize Sanderson’s maiden name of Huber and the Senestraro branch of the family.) Sanderson has been in publishing since grade school. She made copies and distributed the Fortuna Spartan to all the classrooms in fifth grade. At Fortuna Union High School, where she “majored in at least four sports” as well as FFA, she was ad manager for the Husky Howler and wrote a sports column for Fortuna’s weekly newspaper, the Humboldt Beacon. After graduation, she attended both College of the Redwoods and HSU at the same time. She married her husband, Chris Sanderson, and landed her first professional job in the marketing department of the new Bear River Casino in 2005. She

was an account rep for the Times-Standard and then managed a radio station until joining the Journal in 2014. Most new owners of a news media company hope to reassure readers and say they will not change a thing, and then things do, which is what happened at the Union in 1988, according to Hodgson and Fernandez. But Sanderson said she really means it. “We have strength throughout the company — in sales, design and production, and support staff,” she said, but particularly in the award-winning editorial department. “It’s a great publication. We have a strong mission statement. We do really good journalism for this community and I want to keep that going.” Sanderson said her strengths are on the business side of publishing, with a focus on marketing and digital, and she is confident in the Journal’s future. While there were some layoffs and furloughs last year due to the pandemic, the Journal is back up to 21 employees. Circulation, which dipped from 21,000 to 12,000 when many businesses closed and tourism shut down, is back to 15,000. Sanderson said she is grateful for the federal Paycheck Protection Program loan that helped the company retain employees during the pandemic. Her plans for 2021 are “to concentrate on growing the Journal, for sure, and help other local businesses” recover and grow. The Journal’s glossy publications, including the Insider magazine, were suspended during the pandemic. They are expected to return to newsstands this year. l


northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 1, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

MAILBOX

The ‘Cruelty to Urban Voters Act’

ve ’ e w s on i t a e At rou ed er ov c y got

QUALITY & RELIABLE REPAIRS

ALL MAJOR INSURANCE ACCEPTED LOANER CARS MOBILE ESTIMATING LIFETIME PAINT GUARANTEE

AT TWO LOCATIONS!

What Remains You find out what’s a poem the Hard way some times

Editor: In Georgia, the GOP controlled state Legislature just passed a new more restrictive election law tailored to deter Democrat voters. Among other things, it makes it illegal to hand out water to individuals while they’re standing in line on Election Day, regardless of the heat. The GOP knows that traditionally the longest lines are in the urban districts, which tend to be predominantly black and vote heavily Democratic. If such a restriction were placed on individuals prohibiting them from passing out water to pets while waiting in line at a vaccination event, it would be considered cruelty to animals. So what might one say appropriately about the Georgia law? Perhaps rename it the “Cruelty to Urban Voters Act” in honor of how little the state legislature actually cares about its voters in the urban districts. Sherman Schapiro, Eureka

A scrap of line you threw away two days Ago and now look at you bent over the dumpster at the waist

Write a Letter!

Ground-nesting birds A nervous harbor bell A bumper sticker that reads: This too shall pass – As we overtake the Last thing we lost.

Please make your letter no more than 300 words and include your full name, place of residence and phone number (we won’t print your number). Send it to letters@northcoastjournal.com. The weekly deadline to be considered for the upcoming edition is 10 a.m. Monday. l

Sneaking a bite of pizza while you Think no one can see you It’s not everyday that the end of the world is announced one terrible loss at a time Mental hygiene they used to say As a joke On the billboards along the Parkway Nobody laughed that anyone knows Now its just okay, are you saying I’m not essential Or are you saying that You don’t even want to be friends Breaking up is Never cut and dry. Industrial hygiene, by the way, is a weapon Not a joke. Every law is obeyed in the end, over time – Or have we forgotten the news of the day. Track those lights across the sky into the dawn of This was never dreamed, but Feared all the same.

As we set sail With whatever remains — Monte Merrick

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Looking for McKinley

Where is the statue? Only the Timken Foundation knows By Kimberly Wear kim@northcoastjournal.com

T

wo years have passed since the statue of President William McKinley was taken off his pedestal on the Arcata Plaza in a quiet pre-dawn operation and, since that morning, the bronze work has remained out of public view. After being placed on a cushion of tires in the back of a flatbed truck for the 2,600-mile trip due east to McKinley’s longtime Ohio home back in March of 2019, barely a trickle of information has been forthcoming from the Timken Foundation of Canton, the official procurer of noted artist Haig Patigian’s sculpture. “The statue has been relocated to Ohio and the foundation has restored it at its own expense,” Executive Director Mark Scheffler said in statement this week, responding to Journal questions about the statue. “It is currently in storage in a secure location. It will be moved to the Canton area for public benefit once a suitable location has been identified. We do not plan on having further comment.” One of the few public glimpses of the McKinley statue since it left Humboldt County was an article with photographs done by an Ohio art conservation center, detailing the extensive restoration process that Scheffler mentioned. And the pictures showed a marked transformation. Gone is the patina — cast by time and decades in the North Coast’s elements — as are the vivid sea-green splotches left by an apparent acid attack that occurred just a few months before the sculpture’s departure. After the statue was returned to its original tannish coloring, a coffee-brown wax layer was applied to protect the bronze work underneath. But the art conservation center recently took down the piece about McKinley’s September 2019 makeover, as well as accompanying social media posts, after the Journal asked for permission to use some of the photographs in a story as the anniversary of the statue’s removal from the Arcata Plaza approached. Originally, the director wrote back to say he would “have to check with the responsible entity for permission to release

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 1, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

images.” But within two days, the page’s link resulted in a “404: page Not Found” message. Why? It’s not clear. Neither Scheffler nor the art conservancy responded to Journal questions about the article being taken down. But suffice to say, McKinley looks quite different than he did back in February of 2018, when the Arcata City Council made the decision on the statue’s disposition — the culmination of more than a decade of efforts by removal advocates who viewed McKinley’s likeness sitting court in the town’s center as a vestige of American imperialism and genocide. The last push gained momentum in late 2017 as a national conversation swirled around what should be done with historic monuments to once honored figures with legacies now seen by many as symbols of colonialism, white supremacy and slavery. As Arcata wrestled with that question, some deemed the 1906 statue of the nation’s 25th president, which survived the Great San Francisco earthquake and stood on its plaza perch for more than 100 years, simply part of the city’s history — for better or worse. But most felt the statue should go. In the end, another year would pass before the Arcata City Council sat down in February of 2019 to make the final call on McKinley’s future. On the table were four offers to take the statue off the city’s hands. One was from a resident who offered to assist with the costs of moving the nearly 9-foot sculpture to a local private or public site, with the Eureka Veterans Hall expressing interest. Another was from the owner of the Fountainhead Auto Museum and Wedgewood Resort in Fairbanks, Alaska, whose wife grew up in town, with the offer to pay all relocation coasts and to come retrieve the statue. A third was from a person described in the city’s staff report as “an anonymous donor,” who would pay all of the city’s costs to move the statue to the East Coast where it would join a private collection with other works by Patigian, as well as pieces related to McKinley’s presidency.


The last was a pitch from the mayor of Canton, Ohio, who had put together a working group — which included the Timken Foundation — to find a way to bring the statue to the city where the Civil War veteran is buried at the McKinley National Monument, which is located near the McKinley Presidential Library and Museum. “We promise that the statue will be displayed in a manner most befitting President McKinley, the grandeur of the statue, its history in Arcata and our appreciate to the city of Arcata,” Canton Mayor Thomas Bernabei wrote in a letter, saying the city’s offer would meet Arcata’s “stated desire that this beautiful statue find a public home where it will be well-maintained, appreciated and honored.” He offered $15,000 to reimburse Arcata for removal costs — coincidentally the exact amount Arcata rancher George Zehnder paid when he commissioned Patigian to create the statue as a gift to his adopted city in remembrance of the president felled by an assassin’s bullet in 1901. The council decided to take Canton up on its offer, with then Councilmember Michael Winkler — who originally voted against its removal — saying the public had made clear both at the ballot box and via input that McKinley no longer had a place in Arcata, or even Humboldt County. “I think that Canton, Ohio, is the most appropriate place for it to go,” he said. With his fellow council members in agreement, the direction was given to remove the statue as quickly and safely as possible. Eight days later, McKinley came down and by March 8, 2019, the Timken Foundation had signed a purchase agreement. City Manager Karen Diemer said she hasn’t heard any additional news since being notified of the statue’s safe arrival in Ohio. As to why ownership was transferred to the foundation rather than the city, she said her understanding is that “was always the arrangement,” with the foundation handling all the paperwork and logistics for transporting the statue. “They did do quite a bit of work,” Diemer said. The mayor’s office in Canton referred all queries about the statue to the foundation and did not respond to follow-up questions about the arrangement. So what is the Timken Foundation of Canton? It’s a private nonprofit founded in 1934 by the children of Henry Timken — a carriage maker who created a spring that produced a smoother ride in 1877 and designed a tapered roller bearing in the 1890s that improved the vehicles’ performance.

Both became intensely popular — and profitable. By 1899, he and his sons had founded The Timken Roller Bearing and Axle Co., which evolved into the present day Timken Co. and TimkenSteel, businesses with global reaches in the markets of steel and bearings, which continue to serve as major economic drivers in Canton. Since its inception, the Timken Foundation of Canton has given hundreds of millions of dollars to myriad causes across the world and in its own backyard, including $13 million in 2018 alone, according to tax records. But the foundation appears to eschew publicity. There’s no website outlining the Timken family legacy and the foundation’s history, or any social media accounts touting its charitable works. Instead, most of the information available online about the foundation comes from tax records, news articles and mentions in press releases of grant recipients. “We don’t generally seek recognition,” Ward J. “Tim” Timken Jr., a foundation trustee, told the Canton Repository in 2017, speaking generally about his family’s long history of civic engagement. “We do it to give back to the communities. We were taught to be low-key. We don’t flash around town in Lamborghinis and Ferraris.” While there appears to be no final decision at this point about where the statue will again be put on display, the city of Arcata’s agreement with the foundation stipulates a place in “visibility of the public” for “community benefit” somewhere in Canton, with one of the locations previously batted about being the Stark County Courthouse, where McKinley once practiced law. If for some reason a public placement is not possible, the agreement provides Arcata a first right of refusal to purchase the statue back for the price of $15,000, which seems unlikely considering the previous course of events that led to the statue’s removal in the first place. So, at least for now, it appears McKinley’s status remains much like that of former Vice President Dick Cheney in the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks: He’s residing somewhere at an undisclosed but secure location until a suitable placement is found. l Kimberly Wear (she/her) is the digital editor at the Journal. Reach her at 442-1400, extension 323, or kim@ northcoastjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @kimberly_wear. northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 1, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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UNLEASH YOUR CALLING

WANTED: Volunteers who want to make a difference Long Term Care Ombudsmen Volunteer Program Become a highly trained advocate for residents living in Skilled Nursing Homes and Residential Care Facilities for the Elderly. Ombudsman advocate for residents of long term care facilities in Humboldt and Del Norte counties; we empower those who are unable to protect their own rights, we assist those who are unable to speak for themselves and we educate the community about the rights of the elderly. Ombudsman are State-certified volunteers trained to objectively investigate complaints and solve problems for residents. The Ombudsman makes regular visits to the long term care facilities to monitor the quality of care provided to these residents. When necessary we work closely with regulatory agencies and local law enforcement agencies. We ask that volunteers commit to visiting their assigned facilities a minimum of twice per month for the Skilled Nursing facilities and minimally once per month for the Assisted Living facilities. The schedule is set by the volunteer. There is mandated 36 hour classroom/ home study training along with an additional 10 hours working in the facility with a senior Volunteer.

Make A Difference!

Call 707-269-1330 for more information

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 1, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com


FROM

DAILY ONLINE

Task Force Seizes 5K Fentanyl Pills After Overdose Reports

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he Humboldt County Drug Task Force reported March 30 that it had made a handful of arrests and seized more than 5,000 counterfeit Percocet pills containing fentanyl after a weeks-long investigation initiated after multiple fentanyl overdoses were reported in the Hoopa Valley. According to a press release, the investigation started March 5 when a Humboldt County Sheriff’s deputy working in the Trinity Valley reported to the task force a potential overdose death attributed to pills known on the street as “perc30,” which were allegedly being sold by Christian “Punky” Colegrove, 23, and a 17 year old. A little more than a week later, a 13 year old reportedly overdosed after taking the same pills but was revived when responding officers used Narcan. The investigation reportedly led to Anthony Dion Medina, 24, of Eureka, who was allegedly picking up “large quantities” of pills in the San Jose area and then selling them in Humboldt County. After a surveillance operation, task force agents reported observing Medina returning from

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a trip to San Jose along State Route 299 when he stopped in Willow Creek to meet Colegrove and Warren “Pops” Sloan, 23. Agents contacted the men and served a seach warrant on Medina’s vehicle and reported finding a total of 5,002 “perc30” fentanyl pills. A passenger and an infant were also in Medina’s vehicle, according to the press release. When agents served a search warrant at Medina’s residence in Eureka, they reported finding a number of firearms — including a 9 mm “ghost gun” with a 30-round magazine drum — and more than 8 grams of cocaine. Local officials have become increasingly concerned about fentanyl locally, as it has been linked to an increasing number of overdose deaths, following a national trend. After being found in one overdose victim locally in each 2016, 2017 and 2018, the coroner’s office found fentanyl in at least seven of the county’s 46 overdose deaths in 2019. “Something changed,” Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office Lt. Sam Williams told the Journal last year. “It’s a marked difference.”

More COVID-19 Deaths: Two more Humboldt County residents — both in their 80s — died after being diagnosed with COVID-19 this week, bringing the county’s death toll to 36. Amid declining case numbers and the steady ramping up of vaccination efforts, the deaths offer a sobering reminder that the pandemic remains far from over. Posted 03.29.21

northcoastjournal.com/ncjdaily

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Fentanyl is considered to be especially dangerous because of its potency. According to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency, a lethal dose of heroin is generally considered to be roughly 30 Fentanyl pills, firearms and cocaine seized after a weeks-long Humboldt milligrams, while County Drug Task Force investigation. Submitted a 3-milligram dose of fention on suspicion of loitering with intent tanyl — which looks like a few grains of to purchase drugs, while Colegrove was salt — is enough to kill an average adult taken into custody on active warrants. male. That potency makes it attractive for Medina and his passenger were arrested drug traffickers, officials say, as a tiny bit on suspicion of possessing and transportcan be used to stretch illicit street drugs ing a controlled substance for sale, child or counterfeit pharmaceuticals. But if the endangerment and conspiracy. drug isn’t blended sparingly, thoroughly The task force asks anyone with inforand evenly, it can prove deadly. mation related to this investigation to call Read more about local officials’ concerns about fentanyl in the Journal’s Feb. 267-9976. 6, 2020, cover story “Third Wave.” — Thadeus Greenson Sloan was issued a misdemeanor citaPosted 03.30.21 Read the full story online.

Unemployment Woes: The state of California’s unemployment trust fund, beleaguered by a pandemic and rampant fraud, has run out of money, which economists attribute to an outdated tax system that has gone largely untouched for the last four decades. So far, the state has borrowed $21.2 billion to keep benefits flowing. Read more at www.northcoastjournal.com. Posted 03.30.21

ncj_of_humboldt

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Volunteers Needed: Expecting a steep increase in the number of vaccine doses being allocated to Humboldt County in the coming weeks, officials are seeking local volunteers to give the vaccination effort a shot in the arm, so to speak. To find out how to help, email eoclogistics@co.humboldt.ca.us or call 3682504 for more information. Posted 03.29.21

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newsletters

Digitally Speaking

They Said It

Comment of the Week

The amount in millions of dollars that Humboldt County has spent on the local COVID-19 response to date, from building testing capacity and communications infrastructure to the vaccination rollout. Posted 03.29.21

“Growing public food in common space is an important step toward our goal to return Humboldt County to the regenerative, life-sustaining food forest and ecological haven that it once was.”

“Expecting officers to refrain from using dehumanizing and violent rhetoric regarding the public they are sworn to serve and protect is not an unrealistic expectation.”

­— Cooperation Humboldt Food Team Anchor Tamara McFarland, announcing the consecration ceremony for the Arcata Community Health and Wellness Garden (11th and F streets) as a sanctuary for all people. Posted 03.26.21

­— Robyn Moreno commenting on the Journal’s Facebook page on a post about a story headlined “Abhorrent” in last week’s Journal about the Eureka Police Department’s text messaging scandal. Read more at www.northcoastjournal.com. Posted 03.25.21 northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 1, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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ON THE COVER

Saturday Morning Shots

RN’s Tina Wood, left, and Tina Morais load does of Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine into syringes on March 28 at the Pacific Union School campus in Arcata. The clinic was aiming to vaccinate 1,500 people.

Inside Mad River Community Hospital’s mass vaccination clinic By Linda Stansberry

newsroom@northcoastjournal.com

Photos by Mark McKenna

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he vaccine clinic starts at 9 a.m. By 8:45 a.m. the lines stretch from the breezeway of Pacific Union School’s main building in Arcata all the way through the parking lot, then the adjacent parking lot, to Janes Road. A young woman with blonde hair stands just inside the school’s fence, her arms crossed against the early spring chill. The morning is overcast, the sky the color of cement. A slightly harried-looking volunteer wearing a white Rotarian shirt is directing traffic at the en-

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trance, helping people with mobility issues pull around to the back of the building, where staff with the Area 1 Agency on Aging wait to assist. A small boy wearing a Mario costume clings to his mother’s hand. The mood in the crowd is subdued, anticipatory, its masked participants not talking to one another but watching the action at the front of the line where, in the grade school’s breezeway, staff with Mad River Community Hospital bustle back and forth. There is an atmosphere of excitement mixed with slight disbelief.

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 1, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

For many, today is the day they’ve been thinking about for more than a year, the day they can take that first necessary step toward to pre-pandemic life. Dennis Chase, 68, and his daughter Sara Gossi, 41, both of Fortuna, stand in the shorter “second shot” line, waiting for their chance to get to the front and receive their second and final jab of the Pfizer vaccine. They were alerted to the Mad River vaccination clinic by Gossi’s inlaws. Chase is a rancher, Gossi a grocery store worker.

“The first time I was nervous,” Gossi says. “I’ve heard you can get sick. A friend got sick afterward. But this time, no problem.” Next to them, Leena Dallasheh, an associate professorat Humboldt State University, says she got her first shot at a College of the Redwoods clinic. “I’m really happy to be finally getting the shot,” she says, saying there was some confusion about whether she and her colleagues were eligible but it was resolved. At the head of the line, Jacqueline


More power, from a place you can trust.

Jennifer Price put a Band-Aid over the injection site of one of an expected 1,500 people to get a COVID-19 vaccine at Pacific Union School in Arcata on March 28. Martin and hospital staff are walking back and forth between the waiting crowd and a row of copy machines sitting on folding tables in the breezeway. Martin, quality team specialist and IT point of care trainer at Mad River, answers questions as she buzzes down the line, handing out clipboards with registration paperwork, taking IDs and insurance cards to copy. “If I have an appointment, do I have to stand in this line?” asks one person. “No,” she replies. “If you have an appointment, your dose is reserved. You can come back later if you need to.” “I have my mom’s insurance card, is that OK?” asks a college-aged young man. No problem, Martin says. “I don’t have any insurance,” says another young man. “That’s OK,” Martin says. By the end of the day, Martin and the other 44 hospital staff members will have helped administer 1,484 doses of Pfizer and Moderna vaccines, with Martin ensuring patient information makes it into the California Immunization Registry (CAIR) database. “I’m so happy,” says one young woman as she reaches the front of the line. She’s wearing a shirt with the slogan, “Let’s Stay Home,” written on it. Martin directs her down the breezeway, past the folding tables, past the empty classrooms, around to the back of the

building to the school gym, where David Neal, Mad River’s chief nursing officer is bouncing slightly on the balls of his feet, greeting each person as they walk through the door. The Rolling Stones plays on a Bluetooth speaker beside him. Behind him are seven folding tables with colored pieces of paper taped to their edges. A staff member sits at each waiting to process paperwork. “Hi there! Pink one,” says Neal, glancing at the woman’s paperwork. He points to the first table, where a pink piece of a paper has the words Pfizer 1 on it. The staff member at the table waves the woman to her, eyes smiling above her mask. The grade school gym is full of people, some sitting at tables with their sleeves rolled up as nurses administer the vaccine, others on the bleachers and folding chairs waiting for the required 15 minutes to pass before they can leave. A nurse walks through the waiting crowd, checking in to make sure no one is having an adverse reaction. There is a low buzz of conversation from the nurses and their charges, but the voice that rings out above all in the large space is Neal’s. “Hello, hello,” he says, ushering in a husband and wife duo. “You two can go in together. How long have you been married? I like to ask the husband first, to see if he knows.” Continued on next page »

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ON THE COVER Continued from previous page

Mad River Community Hospital Staff scramble to scan IDs of people waiting to get the COVID-19 vaccine at the Pacific Union School in Arcata on March 28.

The pair laughs and go to where a woman at the “Pink Two” table is waving. “This is my 10th Saturday in a row,” says Neal, whose responsibilities include coordinating with the county and St. Joseph Healthcare, as well as a local pharmacy, to allocate, distribute and store doses of the vaccine. He says the staff have been “just amazing.” “We’ve all been working six-day work weeks since January,” says Neal. “I don’t mind. It’s the right thing to do for the community. It’s what got us into the orange zone.” Of the 49,378 vaccine doses that had been administered in Humboldt County as the Journal went to press March 30, Mad River was responsible for giving 12,433 of them, roughly 25 percent, mostly through Saturday clinics. While the vaccines come to the hospital free of charge and insurance companies offer modest reimbursements for administering them, Martin said they don’t cover the full costs, even with all management level employees essentially donating their Saturdays to the cause. It’s 9:15 and the blonde woman who was at the back of the line at the beginning of the morning has now reached the gym. Behind her are the child dressed as Mario and his mother. “Mario’s in the house,” says Neal. “Hey, Mario!” Mad River was the first healthcare facility in the county to administer the vaccine. Neal received a call from county health officer Ian Hoffman on Dec. 15 alerting him to the availability of some Pfizer vaccine. “I said, ‘Let’s do it today,’” recalls Neal. “My staff looked at me like I had a forked tongue.” But by the end of the day, the hospital had administered 12 doses to hospital staff. They rolled on from there, using the county’s database and their own network of clinics to sign up patients as they became eligible through the state’s tiered system. Pacific Union School responded to an MOU for a mass vaccination site, offering its gym, which Neal calls “ideal.” The

gym, which sits next door to the hospital, has been equipped with a wifi booster to help staff enter patient information into the CAIR system as swiftly as possible. The most challenging aspect, Neil says, was figuring out reimbursement through various insurance providers. (The federal government pays for the vaccine but individual insurance policies cover the injections.) Working shoulder to shoulder with Neal is Jordan Patterson, the hospital’s human resources and clinic manager. Patterson has worked at Mad River since she was 15 and says she “wouldn’t miss a Saturday even if [she] had to,” but is concerned about a looming deadline: On April 1, Blue Shield will officially take charge of the state’s vaccination process in a third and final wave of counties, including Humboldt. The insurance company will require real-time entry of patient information into the CAIR system, which Patterson and others are concerned will slow the process significantly, especially in rural areas with technology gaps and laggy wifi. “Everyone will have to have a computer,” says Patterson, referring to the nurses and staff administering the doses. “I think it will bring our allocation down to a third.” Neal and Patterson take a beat to coo over a chihuahua tucked into a woman’s front pack carrier. Neal waves her to “Pink 3.” It’s 10:30 and the line through the school parking lot has overflowed onto the sidewalk, curling back on itself against the fence of the clinic driveway next door. An elderly man sits patiently in his car reading a book as he waits for a volunteer to come escort him up the steps. Neal, Patterson and the rest of the staff will be here until 3 p.m. Neal expects he will be hoarse by the end of the day. “I’m the orchestra leader,” he says, clearly beaming beneath his mask. Another couple comes through the door and Neal asks how long they’ve been married. The man says 21 years. His wife contradicts him, saying no, 22 years. Neal laughs at the mischief he’s caused. Just outside the door, the hospital’s


MEDICARE QUESTIONS? County Readies to Ramp Up Vax Efforts As the Journal went to press March 30, the official tally held that Humboldt County residents had received a total of 49,378 doses of COVID-19 vaccine, with 14 percent of the population fully vaccinated and another almost 10 percent having received a first dose. According to an analysis by the Washington Post, those numbers trail the national average (15 percent of the population fully vaccinated with another 14 percent partially vaccinated) and state (15 percent fully vaccinated, with another 15 percent having received a first dose). Local officials have said repeatedly that supply remains the limiting factor in local vaccination efforts, and that doses are being administered almost as quickly as the state is delivering them. When deliveries ramp up, so will vaccination numbers, they say. And there’s some reason to hope that may be coming soon. In anticipation of increased supply, the state has announced it is expanding the pools of those eligible for vaccinations, with residents age 50 and older becoming eligible April 1 and everyone age 16 and older being cleared to receive their shots beginning April 15. But that’s a massive pool of people and officials have also cautioned it will take weeks, if not months, to get everyone vaccinated who wants to be. And to a huge extent, supply will determine how quickly the process moves. California is expected to receive 2.5 million vaccine doses a week this week and next, and move to 3 million doses a week by mid-April — significant increases over the 1.8 million weekly doses the state is currently receiving. In anticipation of receiving more vaccine doses locally, the Humboldt County Joint Information Center issued a call for volunteers March 29, looking for people to both put shots in arms and fill support roles should supply reach the point where

CEO, Doug Shaw, stands next to yet another folding table, taking clipboards as patients pass through and wiping them down with disinfectant. “This is a record,” Shaw says of the day’s turnout. Prior to using the school gym, the hospital was doing daily clinics. It worked at streamlining the process to be as efficient as possible, writing special software to assist staff. “We pride ourselves for doing it differently. Once we got it down, we didn’t stop.”

HICAP Counselors can help

the county can hold massive vaccination clinics. But to date, that hasn’t been needed, and the reality is that far more people have been eligible to receive vaccines than there have been doses and appointments available. But rollout of vaccination efforts has been uneven, leading to some frustrations. While Mad River Community Hospital continues to hold large-scale vaccination clinics on Saturdays, St. Joseph Health paused its efforts in anticipation of Blue Shield taking over state allocation duties this month. And while some providers like Redwood Rural Health Centers in Southern Humboldt and Open Door Community Health Centers have expanded the pool of eligible patients beyond the county’s guidelines in an effort to get vaccinations in arms, patients of other providers who meet the county’s criteria — which are based on who’s at greatest risk of exposure or critical illness — have been unable to get appointments. In a March 30 media availability, Humboldt County Health Officer Ian Hoffman said that with tens of thousands of local residents expected to become newly eligible for vaccinations in the coming weeks, he’s directed local providers to focus on prioritizing older residents and those aged 16 through 64 with underlying medical conditions that make them high risk. “You always keep focus on those highrisk folks and then open it up to lower (risk people) if we can’t fill the clinics,” he said. In an availability last week, Nurse Practitioner Lindsey Mendez, who is a member of the county’s vaccine task force, stressed that while some residents may prefer a certain vaccine or clinic, Public Health’s recommendation is simple. “If you are offered a vaccine, we recommend that you take it,” she said. Officials are still urging residents to register to receive the vaccine at www. humboldt.gov (or call 441-5000) and contact their primary healthcare provider.

HICAP is the Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program, a program of the Area One Agency on Aging. Registered HICAP volunteer counselors help senior and disabled Medicare beneficiaries understand their Medicare and health insurance benefits and choices. HICAP volunteers advocate for Medicare beneficiaries regarding problems with Medicare or a Medicare provider. Volunteers counsel individual clients on a variety of Medicare and insurance issues and inform low-income Medicare beneficiaries about programs that can help pay for Medicare costs. • Need Help Applying for Medicare? • Have questions about existing coverage? • Need help signing up for a my Medicare account? “The production of this document was supported, in part, by grant number CFDA 93.924 from the US Administration for Community Living (ACL), DHHS, Washington, DC. 20201. Grantees undertaking projects under government sponsorship are encouraged to express freely their findings and conclusions. Points of view or opinions do not, therefore, necessarily represent official Administration of Community Living policy.” Its contents are solely the responsibility of A1AA/HICAP and do not necessarily represent the official views of ACL.”

Call 444-3000 | 1-800-434-0222 for more information.

­— ­Thadeus Greenson

As Shaw speaks, a man sitting backward on a rolling walker pushes himself the final few feet to the door. Neal greets him, assists him in getting turned around and to a waiting staff member. “We have a passion for this,” says Shaw. “We’re going to open up this county.” l Linda Stansberry (she/her) is a freelance writer and journalist who lives in Eureka. You can find her work at www.lindastansberry.com. northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 1, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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Free Online Workshops on Thursdays @ 6:30 PM Presented by Word Humboldt April 1st - Reggie Edmonds - poet, educator, and cultural curator will present Hemingway & Social Justice. th April 8 - Poetry Slam with Word Humboldt

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Tiffany Bullman’s cream puffs. Submitted

What’s your food crush? We’re looking for the best kept food secrets in Humboldt. Email us your tip and we’ll check it out!

NCJ WHAT’S GOOD email jennifer@northcoastjournal.com

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 1, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

NCJ Home Cooking Recipe Contest Winners

T

he NCJ Home Cooking Recipe Contest, sponsored by Eureka Natural Foods and Delish on 5th, was a potluck of submissions from cheesecake to chili, pancakes to pierogi. And now the results are in. Sponsor Eureka Natural Foods gave in to its sweet tooth, choosing Tiffany Bullman’s delicate cream puffs filled with whipped cream and topped with chocolate ganache. As for the Readers Winner, the voters went wild for Laurel North’s Wild Foraged Feast of greens and flowers from Humboldt’s forests and fields, paired with her nettle and mint tea. Here they are for you to snip, save and sample for yourself. Still hungry? Peruse all the entries at www.northcoastjournal.com/ homecooking. Our compliments to the chefs!

Cream Puffs by Tiffany Bullman Whipped cream filling: 2 cups heavy whipping cream ½ cup powdered sugar ½ teaspoon vanilla Whip the ingredients on high speed with a standing mixer until the whipped cream is stiff and fluffy. Ganache: Equal parts chocolate chips or chunks of semisweet chocolate and heavy cream Melt together in a double boiler. Pate a choux: 6 tablespoons butter ¾ cup water


HUMBOLDT

BAY BISTRO

Spinach Snow pea tendrils and young leaves Bok choy Nasturtium leaves Dill weed Wild greens: Redwood sorrel Young plantain leaves Vetch Yellow oxalis Miner’s lettuce Wild rocket arugula Garden flowers: Calendula Borage Lavender Rosemary Johnny jump up Geranium Plum Wild flowers: Pink purslane Redwood violet Pickleweed ice plant Wild onion Yellow oxalis

Laurel North’s foraged feast. Submitted

1 cup all-purpose flour 1/8 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon sugar 4 eggs Preheat the oven to 450 F. In a 2-quart pot, combine the butter and water. On a piece of wax or parchment paper, sift together the flour, salt and sugar. Bring the water and butter to a rolling boil, remove from heat and dump the flour mixture in all at once. Stir with a wooden spoon or paddle to incorporate. Return the saucepan to high heat and cook, stirring, for about 1 minute. The mixture will form a ball and coat the pan with a thin film. Transfer the mixture to a mixing bowl or standing mixer equipped with the paddle attachment. Mix the dough on low speed for a minute or so to release some of the heat. Add the eggs one at a time, completely incorporating each one before adding the next. Beat until the dough gets thick and ribbon-y. The dough will seem like a slippery mess at first but it will come together. Fit a pastry bag with a round No. 5 tip and fill with the warm dough. Line a heavy cookie sheet with parchment paper. Pipe 1 ½-inch or 2-inch mounds about 2 inches apart on a cookie sheet lined with parchment paper. Bake for 10 to 15 minutes, until golden and puffed. Reduce heat to 350 F and bake for another 10 minutes, or until they are golden brown and there are no

droplets of moisture in the crevices. Turn off oven and leave the choux to dry for another 10 minutes. Use when cool, or freeze, wrapped in a plastic bag, for 2 to 3 months. Cut the top of the baked dough puffs off. Using a pastry bag, fill the bottom half with whipped cream. Put the top back on and either dust with powdered sugar or top with ganache. You can spoon the ganache over the cream puffs or drizzle it on with a pastry bag.

Winter Foraged Feast by Laurel North Enjoy a salad made with edible greens and flowers harvested from the garden, dunes and forest with a tangy cilantro-lemon vinaigrette. Crusty Brio bread and a warm cup of nettle and mint tea complement this festive salad. Making a salad with garden and wild plants will be a unique creation and experience. I found numerous plants in Samoa on a wonderful bike ride. Throughout the seasons our redwood forest always surprises me with the offerings, colors and beauty.

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Have fun collecting the native plants and flowers. Be sure to identify them with a reference guide (and don’t choose anything that’s been treated with pesticides). Gently wash and dry all greens and flowers. Remove stems and use the nicest leaves and flowers from each plant. Arrange on a platter or wide bowl, cover and refrigerate.

Cilantro Lemon Vinaigrette cup olive oil 2 tablespoons water 2 cloves garlic ½ cup cilantro leaves ¼ teaspoon salt ½ cup fresh lemon juice 1 tablespoon honey

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AND PICK UP EASTER TRUFFLES OR CALL TO RESERVE YOURS BEFORE THEY ARE GONE!

Puree all ingredients till smooth and store refrigerated.

Nettle and Mint Tea

Stinging nettle and garden mint leaves make a delicious soothing winter tea. Pick stinging nettle leaves with care and gloves. ½ cup stinging nettle leaves, chopped. ¼ cup mint leaves, chopped 4 cups water Honey, to taste, if desired. Wash, dry and chop the nettle and mint. Place in a teapot with strainer. Add boiling water and brew for 7 minutes. Relax and enjoy! l

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502 Henderson 211 FSt. Street 211 F Street 442-1522 445-8600 Eureka / 445-8600

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 1, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com


ON THE TABLE

Under One Roof

Sea to Plate since ’88

Tues. - Sat. 5-9pm

Northtown Coffee, Egghead and Patches’ Pastries partner up

DELIVERY NOW AVAILABLE PLEASE CALL AFTER 3 PM TO PLACE YOUR ORDER FOR PICK UP OR DELIVERY

INDOOR DINING

NOW SERVING AT 25% CAPACITY (CDC TIER PERMITTING)

By Jennifer Fumiko Cahill

Menu on our website or Eureka Sea Grill on Facebook

jennifer@northcoastjournal.com

T

he canopies over the patio at Northtown Coffee flutter above a half dozen people having a late Monday breakfast. Sunshine slants onto picnic tables where diners in beanies and sunglasses hunker over to-go cups, blueberry crumble bars and biscuit and egg sandwiches wrapped in checkered paper. Inside, a red and yellow menu board hangs emblazoned with the Egghead menu — a handful of grab-and-go sandwiches with eggs, pork belly, greens, some with maple butter — and its logo, a cracked egg with glasses, drooling a little yolk. Beside the pair of glass cake stands packed with coffee cake and the covered tray of cookies is a stack of cards for Patches’ Pastries. But this is still Northtown Coffee, right? The 22-year-old coffee joint has done more than adapt to COVID-19, it’s evolved into a three-part partnership, with owner Serg Mihaylo running the central coffee business and maintaining the building and utilities, and Egghead and Patches’ Pastries sharing the space under a profit-sharing plan rather than renting from or strictly working for Northtown. So far, the scheme, built upon experimenting with pop-up Egghead brunches at the café, has been mutually beneficial, bringing in customers and helping a pair of budding businesses get their start. Kevin Dikes wears a white chef coat and glasses that bear a notable resemblance to the ones on the aforementioned cartoon egg. His biscuit sandwiches are a process — the pork belly takes three days from brining, to rub, to slow cooking confit-style, submerged in its own fat, and pressing it under a sheet pan with a brick on top. It’s worth it. The flavor of the meat and the richness of the fat are amplified and yield to biting as easily as the creamy egg yolk and the biscuit, a bready rectangle that holds up under the meat, eggs and translucent threads of onion jam. Raised in Arcata, Dikes served as head chef at Embassy Suites in San Francisco but his appreciation for biscuits and low-andslow cooking comes partly from his years working at Husk in Charleston, South Carolina. After returning to Humboldt, he tried pop-up dinners at Humboldt Bay Social Club but the pandemic put the kibosh on indoor dining. Northtown Coffee had space for

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patio brunches and, after a few months Kevin Dikes, Patch Fraga and Serg Mihaylo at the counter at of Sundays, Mihaylo Northtown Coffee. Photo by Jennifer Fumiko Cahill invited him to take over the kitchen. Instead of renting a portion of the space “would have been not affordable for me, or becoming an employee of Northtown, at least at this state.” The profit-sharing arDikes pays his way by sharing the profits rangement also offers him freedom to manfrom his food. The point of sale system, age the budget for higher quality ingredients while unchanged on the customer side, sorts like vanilla bean and room to experiment. It all the items according to which business makes a difference with items like the Porthey came from — down to the paintings tuguese rice pudding, for which he drew on by local artists on the walls — and the share his godmother and grandmother’s recipes, of profits comes out of the weekly total. “I adding his own flourishes like the touch of don’t owe anything at the end of the month orange. The pudding is luxuriously thick, not and the better I do the better he does,” overly sweet and a good reminder that milk Dikes says. It also means he’s free of the is its own legitimate flavor. The perfectly daunting initial overhead costs of getting cooked rice holds its shape but breaks at the a restaurant — even a truck can run tens press of your tongue. of thousands — up and running. “It’s very That the pudding gets his grandmother’s beneficial to a startup coming into a space.” seal of approval, along with other PortuIt also gives him room to spend a little more guese locals, is important to Fraga, who on ingredients, like eggs from Foggy Bottom seems at home with Northtown’s spirit of Boys farm and Rumiano cheese. Between community inclusion. That extends to being that and shopping for inexpensive seasonal upfront about Patches’ being a trans-owned ingredients at the farmers market, he’s able business, both in solidarity with the LGBTQ to get the bulk of his inventory from local community and to expand non-LGBTQ peoproducers. ple’s ideas about who transgender people “I was looking to partner with people are. “You like that cookie? It was baked by a with energy,” says Mihaylo, who wanted trans person,” he says with a light chuckle. to pool resources and make the most of In the back of the café, the wall once the space. He bought the shop in 2013 and covered with event fliers is now mostly bare updated the kitchen with a new ventilation but for a couple notices and some thumb system two years ago, allowing Northtown tacks. It’s a reminder of Northtown’s life beto do some real cooking. “It’s really a COVID fore the pandemic as a hangout and a stage kind of opportunity — because of COVID, for spoken word, comedy and music open all these entrepreneurs were born … and mic events. Mihaylo looks forward to getting there was all this retail space.” So he looked back to that role. But for now, he is focused at his community network and found Dikes on the connections between his customers, through mutual friends. “We just realized his partners and the surrounding businesses. there was a lot more opportunity working “We all kind of pitch in on that to keep it all together,” he says. rolling,” he says of the expenses and labor Patch Fraga was working as a barista in the café. And he’s proud to have a core at Northtown and looking into running a business that can help launch newer ones. cottage food business, but he had concerns “We don’t have to build three businesses from the ground up,” says Mihaylo. “The about water quality at the ranch where he overhead has been built — it’s the house was living. Once he saw the opportunity that coffee built.” l to make a home for his bakery in the café’s shared kitchen, he jumped at it. “It seemed Jennifer Fumiko Cahill (she/her) is the like the perfect storm,” he says. A graduate arts and features editor at the Journal. of the Oregon Culinary Institute, Fraga says, Reach her at 442-1400, extension 320, or “At culinary school you learn to work in a jennifer@northcoastjournal.com. Follow small space so Northtown is a fit.” her on Twitter @JFumikoCahill. Like Dikes, Fraga says a stand-alone shop

Dear Humboldt,

Tell us your food crush! Yours always, NCJ jennifer@northcoastjournal.com

NCJ WHAT’S GOOD

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 1, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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GET OUT

Small Fish Finds a Fishing Buddy By Kitty Truong

getout@northcoastjournal.com

A

1001 Main St. in Fortuna

707.725.6734

www.eelvalleyappliance.com

20

fter spending a month of my summer running off to Samoa Beach every chance I got to practice casting my line, fishing alone lost its luster. I had so many questions and theories building up in my head, I felt like I was going to burst if I couldn’t talk about it. I wanted to find someone I could share this learning experience with and decided to post on my Instagram asking if any of my friends would be interested in fishing together. As time slowly passed, my anxiety started welling up. Will my friends in their early 20s bother with this “old man” sport? Will they have the time between school and their part-time gigs? My heart leapt when I saw a single reply. Ava Mark was a friend I’d met as a freshman at Humboldt State University and lost touch with when she moved to China to study for a year. She let me know she was back in Humboldt and just starting to pick up fishing, too. And she offered to tag along next time I went out. The rest is history. Mark has been there for many of my first successful catches — from squealing and wrangling a slippery monkey face eel together to flinching and fighting a flopping, spiny rockfish. We collaborate on recipe ideas for our catches, tag team scouting new fishing sites and — the best part — cheer each other on when things get tough, which is often in this sport. I couldn’t have asked the universe for a better fishing buddy. Shortly after I found my footing and started my adventures with Mark, I was picking up some hooks at Pacific Outfitters when someone mentioned they knew a guy named Yeng who was “a pro” and “the guy” to learn angling from. I thought it was just some person trying to hype up his buddy and didn’t pay much mind the first time, but then his name popped up again chatting with people while picking up more gear. Legend has it, Yeng Thao is an incredibly skilled fisherman who knows all the techniques for any kind of fishing,

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 1, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

whether it be salt or freshwaAva Mark (left), Kitty Truong and their big fishing brother Yeng Thao. ter, where all Courtesy of Kitty Truong the best local fishing spots are and even has about the same species they have fished crabbing, clamming and foraging skills. He their entire lives or a new species they sounded like some grandmaster of nature I want to catch. To become at least a good had to meet. The last person who brought fisherman you have to be willing to learn him up told me Thao had his own local the life history of a fish. You have to enjoy fishing Facebook group and encouraged learning about their habits, what makes me to join. Shortly after I joined the Humthe gears in their brain tick. Put yourself boldt County Surf and Jetty group online, I in their fin.” His goals as a fisherman have started posting a lot of my technical quesevolved over the years, he says. “I used to tions and noticed Thao regularly providing be all about catching fish, the biggest one, extremely thorough answers, including the most number of fish, out-fish the guy links to how-to videos. I jumped on the next to me. But now it’s about the joy of opportunity to meet him one day when I seeing other people catch fish because I saw someone ask if anyone was willing to know how it feels, so I know the look on teach them how to toss a fishing net and their face is genuine.” Thao offered a lesson near Stone Lagoon. Since meeting Thao, he has become a I had imagined some kind of big, burly kind of big fishing-and-foraging brother to dude in his late 30s, skin tan and cracked Mark and me, and we take the liberty of from the sun and salt water — maybe bugging him plenty with all our questions gruff with a big beard. But at Stone Laand fishing memes. goon, Mark and I met a calm, soft-spoken Fishing is an ancient, universal activity 25 year old just a few inches taller than that knows no boundaries in age, demome . However, right from the start it was graphics or culture, and can bring people obvious the rumors were true. He was together in the name of the most primal incredibly knowledgeable about the area, form of bonding: eating. As disconnected and was reading the tides and even the and divided as we may feel during this seabirds’ movements to see if there were pandemic and in this political climate, I any fish around. Thao, who’s Hmong, grew find solace in witnessing time and time up fishing with his father and the rest of again, not only the selfless kindness our his family. He recently graduated from Humboldt community, but also how many HSU as a wildlife major and he’s a far more people are willing to share a helping hand adventurous eater than me — he will pick to lift me up as an angler, an advocate and sea snails off rocks and eat them right a cook. then and there. The same goes for fresh fish eggs found on eel grass. He says as The ocean doesn’t care who you are long as it’s deemed safe for consumption, — what only matters are your skills and he’ll eat it. respect for it. Because of this, it has led Thao was very thoughtful and clear me to meet all kinds of people I’m proud when explaining how to set up and toss to call my friends. I hope the rest of 2021 a net, and very patient with us newbies. will bring tight lines, good eats and good “You’ll eventually learn to see the patpeople. l terns. Nature has a lot of patterns if you watch it long enough,” he told us. “The Kitty Truong (she/her) is a dedicated best fishermen would tell you that they foodie who’s always looking to catch her are constantly learning. Whether learning meals sustainably.


FISHING THE NORTH COAST

Tough Steelhead Season Comes to a Close

341 West Harris St., Eureka 707 445-3138

poletskis.com

By Kenny Priest

fishing@northcoastjournal.com

O

ne of the toughest and most frustrating steelhead seasons in many years close March 31. From the Chetco south to the South Fork Eel River, and all the rivers in between, the fish just never showed up in numbers we’re accustomed to. No one knows for certain what caused the decline but it’s safe to say we’ll all be holding our collective breath when next season rolls around. Now, as the calendar nears April, it’s time to change gears and look toward the next angling opportunity. The rockfish and Pacific halibut openers are right around the corner, and ocean salmon season will be coming in late June. It’s also time to start thinking about spring salmon on the Klamath (hopefully) and the lower Rogue rivers. There are redtails to be had from all the local beaches and the lagoons are full of trout. Steelhead season has been a real downer and I for one am ready to put this season in the rearview mirror.

Upcoming meetings The Pacific Fishery Management Council (PFMC) and its advisory bodies will meet April 6 to April 9 and April 12 to April 15 by webinar only to address issues related to groundfish, salmon, Pacific halibut, coastal pelagic species and administrative matters. One of the key agenda items is to adopt final management measures for 2021 ocean salmon fisheries. Also on the agenda are the 2021 Klamath River Basin quotas of adult Klamath River fall Chinook. For more information, visit www.pcouncil. org/documents/2021/03/april-2021-meeting-notice-and-detailed-agenda.pdf/. The California Fish and Game Commission meeting will be held via webinar and teleconference on April 14 starting at 9 a.m. to adopt and discuss changes to the upcoming sport fishing seasons. The meeting will be live streamed for viewing and listening purposes only. On the agenda is status review of Upper Klamath-Trinity rivers spring Chinook salmon and North-

ern California Ana Gonzalez, of Point Reyes Station, landed a nice winter steelhead summer steelhead. Saturday on the lower Eel River. Conditions were perfect over Proposed changes the weekend and the lower Eel will continue to be a good option to the Klamath through April. Photo courtesy of Kenny Priest/Fishing the North Coast Guide Service River Basin sport fishing will also and the Chetco all close to fishing on be discussed. For a complete agenda and March 31. comment submission, and viewing information, visit www.nrm.dfg.ca.gov/FileHanChetco/Rogue dler.ashx?DocumentID=190629&inline. According to Martin, steelhead fishing remained good on the Chetco right up to the March 31 closure. “The most consistent When the ocean’s been calm, the fishing of the season was in March, after redtail perch action has been decent along the crowds left, and the few boats still the beaches. There are some spots that fishing had decent numbers every day,” are typically better than others but you said Martin. “The bulk of the run came in can catch them just about anywhere this during high water periods, and big numtime of the year. Reportedly, the beaches bers of downrunners were caught late in are full of sand crabs, which is the one of the season. Spring salmon fishing has been the top choices for bait. Conditions look slow on the Rogue River. Just a handful of fishable for the weekend, with waves in springers have been caught so far. Fishing the 4- to 6-foot range and wind 5 to 10 usually improves in April and early May. knots. Black rockfish and the occasional With low catches, pressure is light.” lingcod are being caught on the north Eel River (main stem) jetty. Fishing has been slower on the south The main stem is in perfect shape, side. Five to 6-inch Gulp jerk shads are a running at 3,200 cubic feet per second as popular bait as well as smaller swimbaits. of Tuesday. The few boats still fishing were Egg sinkers or banana weights rigged with averaging two or three fish per day, mostly a herring also work well. downers along with some half-pounders. The main stem Eel, from its mouth to the South Fork, is open to fishing all year. From “Lingcod fishing busted wide open out April 1 through Sept. 30, only artificial lures of Brookings on Sunday, as calm weather with barbless hooks may be used. allowed boats of all sizes to get out and find easy limits of lings and rockfish,” said l Andy Martin with Brookings Fishing Charters. “The lingcod fishing has been better Read the complete fishing roundup at than normal, with charter boats getting www.northcoastjournal.com. limits of lings while targeting rockfish with light gear. Another round of nice weather Kenny Priest (he/him) operates is expected this weekend. The best fishing Fishing the North Coast, a fishing guide is Bird Island north, with limits coming service out of Humboldt specializing from 30 to 60 feet.” in salmon and steelhead. Find it on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube and www.fishingthenorthcoast.com. For up-to-date fishing reports and North Reminder: The South Fork Eel, Van Coast river information, email kenny@ Duzen, Mattole, Mad, Redwood Creek, fishingthenorthcoast.com.

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northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 1, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

21


Murphy’s

welcomes back youth baseball programs McKinleyville Little League (MLL) is excited to be starting our 2021 season. The kids are more excited than ever to get started, after missing a full year of baseball due to COVID the excitement you see on their faces when they show up to the ball park is priceless. MLL has been working hard off season, getting all protocols in place so that we can get the kids outside playing a game they love with their friends. I’m happy to work with so many wonderful volunteers that have stepped up to work hard to get these kids

back on the field! I am a firm believer that anything is possible with hard work. It is time for these kids to get back to their normal lives, I couldn’t be more proud of the McKinleyville Little League program for doing what is best for the kids in our community. Courtesy of Rachelle Hicks, McKinleyville Little League

“I’m so happy to be playing this year, last year was my sadest of coaching after all my years” Courtesy of Carlos Avelar, 48 Year Veteran Coach

Sunny Brae • Glendale • Trinidad • Cutten • Westwood

22

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 1, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com


Calendar April 1 –8, 2021 1 Thursday

ART

Guest Artist Sanford Pyron. Old Town Art Gallery, 233 F Street, Eureka. The painter shows his work in April. Redwood Art Association 2021 New Year Exhibition. Virtual World, Online. Virtual gallery exhibit in honor of Roy Grieshaber, who served as RAA Director for 15 years. www.redwoodart.us/. Shutterstock

Although a bit windy, these spring days have been fine. Gardeners are in their yards pushing bulbs and seeds into the ground coaxing the colors of spring. Need an inexpensive source for your seeds and starts? Want to help others make their gardens grow? Stop by the Plant and Seed Exchange on Saturday, April 3 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Redwood Community Action Agency (free, donations appreciated). The event is COVID compliant. Please wear your mask and mind the one-way flow of foot traffic and social distancing.

DANCE Dances of Brazil. 5:30 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. Learn Brazilian dances with instructors Rocío Cristal and María Vanderhorst. All levels. Limited to five people. Register online. $15. talavera.rocio@gmail.com.

MUSIC James Zeller Hosts the J St. Regulars Radio Hour. 7-8 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Tune in for a heartwarming versions of classics in many genres and original tunes. Via Facebook and Instagram @creative.sanctuary. Free, donations encouraged. music@sanctuaryarcata.org. www.facebook.com/ thesanctuaryarcata. (646) 245-6865.

SPOKEN WORD Taking the Hemingway Out of Hemingway: Poetry, Social Justice, and the ‘Great American Novelist’. 6:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Workshops led by Word Humboldt on how to write poetry using simple methods while simultaneously striving for equity and social justice. The workshops are in support of the new PBS series by Ken Burns and Lynn Novick, Hemingway, which premiers April 5-7 at 8 p.m. on KEET-TV. Sign-up at https://forms.gle/ m35PWwEChpjVgQmf7. Free.

Courtesy of Humboldt County Historical Society

Humboldt’s history is on tap for this month’s Humboldt County Historical Society Program, Mercantile Brewing in Humboldt County, happening Saturday, April 3 at 2:30 p.m. via Zoom. Presented by Michael Berry, this journey back in time chronicles every commercial brewery known to have operated in Humboldt County from 1854 to the present day — and shows how early brewers struggled in a competitive market. There are limited slots. Sign up for the lecture by 5 p.m. April 2 at www.humboldthistory.org/libraryprogram.

The Writers Lounge via Zoom. 7:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. A writing workshop geared toward stand-up and comedy. Zoom Room: 857 4217 6054. Password: writers. Join Zoom Meeting www.us02web.zoom.us/j/85742176054?pwd=dWp4UGVqaUVYQ0wzekVnZkZ0VlMzZz09.

THEATER

Restorative Movement. 10:30-11:30 a.m. & 1:30-2:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. SoHum Health presents classes focused on strength and mobility (Tuesday), and on relaxation and breath work (Thursday). Contact instructor Ann Constantino for online orientation. Free. annconstantino@ gmail.com. www.sohumhealth.org. 923-3921.

A Call to Yarns. Noon-1 p.m. Virtual World, Online. A weekly Zoom meetup for knitters and crocheters. Sign up using the Google form for an email inviation. Free. sparsons@co.humboldt.ca.us. www.forms.gle/CkdbZSbjbckZQej89. 822-5954.

Virtual Meditation & Mindfulness Class. 5-6 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Join on Zoom at the Abbey of the Redwoods for a one-hour class with three group meditations, guidance and Q&A. Suitable for all levels. Free. mindfullymatt@ gmail.com. us02web.zoom.us/j/86371764436?pwd=a1hJaVBoRC93cHd0ckcwQ1lFd2ltZz09.

2 Friday

ART

Virtual Whiteness Accountability Space. Noon-1 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Community members who identify as white are invited to weekly conversations led by white facilitator from equity arcata. Email for the Zoom link. equityarcata@gmail.com.

OUTDOORS Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. California State Parks’ North Coast Redwoods District is broadcasting programs featuring tall trees and rugged seas from state parks via Facebook. Free. www.facebook.com/NorthCoastRedwoods.

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. This class offers pronunciation, speaking, reading, writing, vocabulary, verb conjugations

Tabata. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. SoHum Health presents online classes with short, high intensity cardio workouts. Contact instructor Stephanie Finch by email for a link to the class. Free. sfinch40@gmail.com. www.sohumhealth.com.

3 Saturday

Guest Artist Sanford Pyron. Old Town Art Gallery, 233 F Street, Eureka. See April 1 listing.

BOOKS

Redwood Art Association 2021 New Year Exhibition. Virtual World, Online. See April 1 listing. Studio Space. KEET TV, Channel 13, Humboldt. This 13-week series hosted by Kati Texas and David Ferney features 26 local artists including potters Peggy Loudon and Conrad Calimpong, animator Steven Vander Meer, Native carver Alme Allen, copper sculptor Scott Hemphill, printmaker Lynn Jones, painter Leslie Price and others.

MUSIC James Zeller Hosts the J St. Regulars Radio Hour. 7-8 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See April 1 listing.

Cold Case: A Murder Mystery Radio Show. 7 p.m. See April 1 listing.

MEETINGS

English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See April 1 listing.

ART

FOR KIDS Feathers and Fur Program at the NHM. 3:30-5 p.m. Virtual World, Online. The HSU Natural History Museum’s weekly after school science enrichment program explores the world of birds and mammals including identification, activities, games and Kahoots quizzes. For ages 7-11. Via Zoom. $40 whole program, $25 each program. www.humboldt.edu/natmus.

ETC

Friday Night Art Demonstrations. 7 p.m. Virtual World, Online. North Coast Chapter of the California Native Plant Society’s online presentations each Friday night in April. No previous art experience necessary. Check website for the schedule and access. www.northcoastcnps.org/index. php/wildflower-show-2021/art-share.

Shelter n Play. 6 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Public group on Facebook made up of locals. Open mic for all skill levels, all styles, everyone’s welcome to watch or perform. Sign-ups Wednesdays at noon. www.facebook.com/ groups/224856781967115.

Virtual Junior Rangers. 11:30 a.m. Virtual World, Online. North Coast Redwoods District of California State Parks offers kids’ programs and activities about coast redwoods, marine protected areas and more, plus Junior Ranger badges. Register online and watch live. www.bit.ly/NCRDVirtualJuniorRanger.

The future is electric but Where Will We Charge our Electric Cars? Three HSU grads discuss that and more Monday, April 5 from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Online. Join EV researchers Chih-Wei Hsu, Anh Bui and Derek Ichien to learn how charger access can be maximized for the public and what that might look like for Humboldt County. Presented by 350 Humboldt. Register at their Facebook page or visit: www.actionnetwork.org/events/electric-cars-could-help-save-theworld-but-where-will-we-charge-them/.

p.m. Virtual World, Online. See April 1 listing.

Cold Case: A Murder Mystery Radio Show. 7 p.m. Tune in to Cold Case, an original murder mystery radio play by Isabelle Unsinger and performed by the Eureka High School Players. Broadcast on KZZH 96.7 on April 1; on KLGE 94.1 on April 2; and on KHUM 104.3 on April 3 at 7 p.m. vossn@ eurekacityschools.org. www.941lounge.com/. 476-1735.

Fortuna Library Recorded Readings. Virtual World, Online. Hosted by the Fortuna Branch Library on its Facebook page, www.facebook.com/HumCoLibraryFortuna.

Derek Ichien. Submitted

and common expressions. All levels welcome. Join anytime. Free. www.englishexpressempowered.com.

THEATER The Living Newspaper. 8 p.m. Virtual World, Online. The Department of Theatre, Film and Dance at Humboldt State University in cooperation with Dell’Arte International School of Physical Theatre presents an original production based on current events. Streamed online. theatre. humboldt.edu.

EVENTS Access Humboldt’s Media Maker’s Night. 5:30-8 p.m. Virtual event for media makers and curious community members to network and get involved with Access Humboldt. Join Zoom meeting: www.us02web.zoom.us/j/5118868501. Meeting ID: 511 886 8501. Free. Monique@Accesshumboldt. net. www.accesshumboldt.net/media-makers-night. The Curiosity Hour: Weekly Double Dose of Weird with Veve Decay. 8 p.m. Virtual World, Online. An evening of strange tales, live chats and parlor games hosted by Altar Ego: Curious Art & Fashion Design. www.facebook.com/ events/939880849742122.

FOR KIDS School-age Storytime. 11 a.m. Virtual World, Online. Hosted by the Arcata Branch Library via Zoom. To sign up, email sparsons@co.humboldt.ca.us or call 822-5954.

FOOD Mateel Drive Through Dinners. Mateel Community Center, 59 Rusk Lane, Redway. Weekly meals prepared by local chefs. Drive into the lower parking lot to pick up orders and exit out the back gate. Limited table seating is available on the hillside. www.mateel.org.

Guest Artist Sanford Pyron. Old Town Art Gallery, 233 F Street, Eureka. See April 1 listing. Redwood Art Association 2021 New Year Exhibition. Virtual World, Online. See April 1 listing. Reading in Place - An Online Reading Group. 1 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Sign up online for a Zoom meeting invite and the week’s reading for discussion. www.forms. gle/zKymPvcDFDG7BJEP9.

LECTURE Humboldt County Historical Society Program. 2:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Join Michael Berry for a presentation on Humboldt County breweries, past and present. Sign up using the Google Form: www.forms.gle/ RgLa2ngJKqBH2vPx5 to receive an email with the Zoom meeting invite. Deadline to sign up is 5 p.m., April 2. humboldtgov.org/library.

MUSIC EmRArt with James Zeller. 2-4 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Cross-platform entertainment from remote locations. James Zeller plays jazz from Arcata, and Emily Reinhart lays charcoal on birch wood in Eureka. Watch via Facebook (www.facebook.com/EmRArt) or by YouTube. Free. emily@emilyreinhart.com. www.youtube.com/channel/ UClclGc_-RErDvHWjNBsbhIQ.

THEATER Cold Case: A Murder Mystery Radio Show. 7 p.m. See April 1 listing.

EVENTS Club Triangle Streaming Saturdays. Virtual World, Online. Weekly online queer variety show. Submissions accepted daily. Post your art on social media and tag @ clubtriangle. #coronoshebettadont. Free. www.facebook. com/clubtriangl .

FOR KIDS Preschool Storytime. 11 a.m. Virtual World, Online. Hosted by the Arcata Branch Library via Zoom. To sign up, email sparsons@co.humboldt.ca.us or call 822-5954.

FOOD Arcata Plaza Farmers Market. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Every Saturday Humboldt County farmers bring their non-GMO bounty, rain or shine. EBT accepted and Market Match is offered. Information and COVID rules online. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation.org. www.northcoastgrowersassociation. org. 441-9999.

GARDEN Plant and Seed Exchange. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Redwood Community Action Agency, 904 G St., Eureka. Seasonal veggie starts, herbs, perennials, seeds and more. No cost for starts or seeds but donations are encouraged. Only 10 masked people at a time. Free. 269-2071.

OUTDOORS Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30

Continued on next page »

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 1, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

23


Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

CALENDAR

HOME & GARDEN

Continued from previous page

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THE COUNTIES LARGEST POWER EQUIPMENT DEALER FEATURING THESE TOP OF THE LINE BRAND NAMES

OUTDOORS April Trash Bash. 9-10:30 a.m. 1000 Vigo St., Eureka. Join the city of Eureka and PacOut Green Team for their bi-monthly clean-up with special COVID-19 precautions. Wearing a mask is required at the beginning and end of cleanups. www.facebook.com/events/422289032381364. Arcata Marsh Bird Walk. 8:30-11 a.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary, South I Street. Join leader Jude Power, bring your binoculars and have a great morning birding. Reservations are required and space is limited. Visit www. rras.org for COVID-19 participation guidelines. Sign up by emailing name and phone number to shrikethree@gmail. com by 6 p.m. the day before the preferred walk. Free. shrikethree@gmail.com. www.rras.org/home.aspx. Hike and Bike Day: Newton B. Drury Scenic Parkway. First Saturday of every month. Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park Visitors Center, Newton B. Drury Scenic Parkway, Orick. Walk, hike, ride or skate along 10 miles of forest road the first Saturday of each month through May, when the parkway closes to motorized vehicles. Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See April 1 listing.

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See April 1 listing.

4 Sunday

ART

Guest Artist Sanford Pyron. Old Town Art Gallery, 233 F Street, Eureka. See April 1 listing.

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 1, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com


CALENDAR Continued from page 25

Redwood Art Association 2021 New Year Exhibition. Virtual World, Online. See April 1 listing.

more. Free, donations encouraged. music@sanctuaryarcata.org. www.facebook.com/thesanctuaryarcata.

COMEDY

James Zeller Hosts the J St. Regulars Radio Hour. 7-8 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See April 1 listing.

Sunday Service Comedy Open Mic: Zoom. 5 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Virtual stage-time with Pastor Paula for aspiring comics working out sets and trying to land jokes. Five-minute sets. Join the show at www.us02web. zoom.us/j/82295455754. Zoom room: 822 9545 5754. Password: comedy.

FOOD Food Not Bombs. 4 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Free, hot food for everyone. Mostly vegan and organic and always delicious. Free.

SPOKEN WORD Poet Laureate Reading. 2 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Eureka Poet Laureate David Holper reads work written both just before and during the pandemic live via Zoom and Public Access Channel 8, which will re-broadcast the event. Zoom link: www.zoom.us/j/96412364716. Free.

FOR KIDS

OUTDOORS

Tuesday Storytime with Ms. Tamara. Virtual World, Online. Posted every Tuesday on Arcata Library’s Facebook page, www.facebook.com/HumCoLibraryArcata.

Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See April 1 listing.

MEETINGS

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See April 1 listing.

5 Monday

ART

Guest Artist Sanford Pyron. Old Town Art Gallery, 233 F Street, Eureka. See April 1 listing. Redwood Art Association 2021 New Year Exhibition. Virtual World, Online. See April 1 listing.

BOOKS Equity Arcata’s Community Book Club. First Monday of every month, 4-6 p.m. Virtual World, Online. The group will be discussing Adrienne Marie Brown’s book, Emergent Strategy: Shaping Change, Changing Worlds. On Zoom. Register online. www.equityarcata.com.

LECTURE Where Will We Charge our Electric Cars? 7-8:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Electric vehicle researchers Chih-Wei Hsu, Anh Bui and Derek Ichien discuss local solutions for access to public chargers in California. Free. 350humboldt@gmail.com. actionnetwork.org/events/ electric-cars-could-help-save-the-world-but-where-willwe-charge-them/. 672-5039.

MUSIC James Zeller Hosts the J St. Regulars Radio Hour. 7-8 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See April 1 listing.

OUTDOORS Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See April 1 listing.

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See April 1 listing. Tabata. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See April 2 listing.

6 Tuesday

ART

Guest Artist Sanford Pyron. Old Town Art Gallery, 233 F Street, Eureka. See April 1 listing. Redwood Art Association 2021 New Year Exhibition. Virtual World, Online. See April 1 listing.

COMEDY Savage Henry’s BigFish Open Mic via Zoom. 9 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Enjoy or participate in some stand-up open-mic Zoom style. Five-minute sets. Zoom: www. us02web.zoom.us/j/86421967992 Password: comedy.

MUSIC Daniel Nickerson Hosts the J Street Regulars Radio Hour. 7-8 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Artists give a onehour program to connect, send healing music, educate on American music history, celebrate artists of color and

Local Homesharing Info Session. 1-1:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. If you have a spare bedroom and could use extra income or help around the house, Northcoast Homeshare (a program of Area 1 Agency on Aging) can connect you with a compatible housemate. Join the weekly 30-minute Zoom informational session. Free. homeshare@a1aa.org. zoom.us/j/2673010045?pwd=eTJvajJXaWR4eEMwOUErQlpGZHBJZz09. 442-3763 ext. 213.

OUTDOORS Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See April 1 listing.

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See April 1 listing. Restorative Movement. 10:30-11:30 a.m. & 1:30-2:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See April 1 listing. Virtual Yoga: Gentle Vinyasa Flow. 5-6:15 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Join online at the Abbey of the Redwoods for a mellow practice. Suitable for all levels but previous yoga experience is helpful due to the limitations of online instruction. Free. mindfullymatt@gmail.com. www. facebook.com/abbeyoftheredwoods.

7 Wednesday

ART

Guest Artist Sanford Pyron. Old Town Art Gallery, 233 F Street, Eureka. See April 1 listing. Redwood Art Association 2021 New Year Exhibition. Virtual World, Online. See April 1 listing.

BOOKS On the Same Page Book Club. 5:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Online book club that meets on the first Wednesday of the month on Zoom. Sign up using the Google form at www.forms.gle/bAsjdQ7hKGqEgJKj7.

MUSIC James Zeller Hosts the J St. Regulars Radio Hour. 7-8 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See April 1 listing.

EVENTS The Curiosity Hour: Weekly Double Dose of Weird with Veve Decay. 8 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See April 2 listing.

FOR KIDS Preschool Storytime. 11 a.m. Virtual World, Online. See April 3 listing.

OUTDOORS Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See April 1 listing.

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See April 1 listing. Reel Genius Virtual Trivia. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Create a team via Facetime, Skype, Messenger, Hangouts etc., order some food and brews from the Madrone and play while dining outdoors, or enjoying takeout

Continued on next page » northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 1, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

27


CALENDAR Continued from previous page at home. Invite link will be posted prior to the event. www. facebook.com/events/657139721581557. Tabata. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See April 2 listing.

NOW TAKING RESERVATIONS HAPPY HOUR: 4pm-5:30pm Daily $2 Pints | $2 off of Coctails

708 9th Street, Arcata • On the Plaza within Hotel Arcata HOURS: 4pm-8 pm Daily (707) 822-1414 • (707) 599-2909 • info@tomoarcata.com

Now on DoorDash

Weekly Check-in with Rep. Huffman. Noon. Virtual World, Online. Rep. Jared Huffman (D-San Rafael) will hold Facebook Live check-ins to engage with his constituents on the latest updates regarding the novel coronavirus pandemic and to answer questions about the federal response. More information at www. huffman.house.gov/coronavirus. Free. www.facebook. com/rephuffman.

8 Thursday

ART

Guest Artist Sanford Pyron. Old Town Art Gallery, 233 F Street, Eureka. See April 1 listing. Redwood Art Association 2021 New Year Exhibition. Virtual World, Online. See April 1 listing.

DANCE Dances of Brazil. 5:30 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. See April 1 listing.

MUSIC James Zeller Hosts the J St. Regulars Radio Hour. 7-8 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See April 1 listing.

SPOKEN WORD Taking the Hemingway Out of Hemingway: Poetry, Social Justice, and the ‘Great American Novelist’. 6:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See April 1 listing. The Writers Lounge via Zoom. 7:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See April 1 listing.

FOR KIDS Fortuna Library Recorded Readings. Virtual World, Online. See April 1 listing. Virtual Junior Rangers. 11:30 a.m. Virtual World, Online. See April 1 listing.

MEETINGS Virtual Whiteness Accountability Space. Noon-1 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See April 1 listing.

OUTDOORS Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See April 1 listing.

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See April 1 listing.

North Group, Redwood Chapter, Sierra Club is offering camp scholarships for children to attend two overnight camps in Petrolia this summer. Application deadline is April 5. Completed forms may be mailed to Sue Leskiw, 155 Kara Ln., McKinleyville, CA, 95519 or scanned and e-mailed to sueleskiw1@gmail.com. To obtain an application form, e-mail Sue or call 442-5444. Dream Quest offers scholarships for students going to a two- or four-year college or vocational school. Apply by April 15. Email office@dqwc.org or visit www.dqwc.org. Graduating seniors at Humboldt County high schools who plan to major or minor in music or music education at an accredited college next fall may apply for Scotia Band’s 2021 Sewell Lufkin Memorial Scholarship ($500) until April 16. The application form is available at www.scotiaband2. org/Scotia_Band_Scholarship.html. The Humboldt-Del Norte County Medical Society’s Humboldt-Del Norte PreMedical Education Task Force offers two $1,000 Future Physician scholarships to students planning on attending medical school. Application at www.hafoundation.org/Grants-Scholarships/Scholarships-Apply-Now. The city of Eureka has open seats on several boards and commissions. To see what seats are available and how to apply, call the City Clerk at 441-4175, or go to www. ci.eureka.ca.gov. The city of Arcata has open seats on the Historic Landmarks, Transactions and Use Tax Oversight, Transportation Safety, Wetlands and Creeks, Parks and Recreation and Energy committees. To apply, visit www.cityofarcata.org or call 822-5953. The city of Arcata is offering curbside pickup and free delivery to all residents who purchase a compost bin. Backyard compost bins are available for $25 by emailing the Environmental Services Department at eservices@ cityofarcata.org or by calling 822-8184.

Heads Up …

The Humboldt Arts Council is distributing CARES Act relief-funded grants to aid local arts organizations serving socially vulnerable populations not eligible for direct CARES Act grants. Details and application at www.humboldtarts.org/cares-act-grant-application.

The 2021 Congressional Art Competition is accepting digital submissions from high school students in California’s Second Congressional District. The winning artwork will be exhibited in the U.S. Capitol Building for one year.

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 1, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

Godwit Days and Redwood Region Audubon Society seek donations of new or gently used goods, as well as services, for an online auction benefitting Godwit Days. Donation deadline is May 1. Contact Alex Stillman at alexnacv@gmail.com or 845-3900 to donate to Godwit Days or Gary Friedrichsen at gary@jacobycreek.net or 496-6581 to donate to RRAS. Contact Sue Leskiw at sueleskiw1@gmail. com for general info.

Virtual Meditation & Mindfulness Class. 5-6 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See April 1 listing.

Soroptimist International of Arcata offers scholarships to graduating seniors in the Northern Humboldt Union High School District. Applications are available by contacting counselors at Arcata and McKinleyville high schools. Applications due Wednesday, April 7. For more info, call 822-9494.

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The City of Arcata seeks applicants for the Economic Development Committee. Email applications to citymgr@ cityofarcata.org, fax to 822-8081 or drop off in a sealed envelope labeled “City Manager’s Office” at the City Hall drop boxes. For more information visit www.cityofarcata. org or call 822-5953.

The city of Arcata is seeking community members for the Planning Commission. Applications may be dropped off, in a sealed envelope labeled “City Manager’s Office,” at the city’s drop boxes in the city hall parking lot and next to the USPS mailbox outside city hall. Visit www.cityofarcata. org or call 822-5953.

Restorative Movement. 10:30-11:30 a.m. & 1:30-2:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See April 1 listing.

@northcoastjournal

The winning student will receive two round-trip tickets to Washington, D.C. and eligibility for a scholarship. All participants will receive a certificate of recognition. Online submission (no mail) by April 23. See instructions at www. huffman.house.gov/helping-you/art-competition.

The county of Humboldt is seeking additional applicants for the 2020/2021 Humboldt County Civil Grand Jury. Visit www.humboldt.courts.ca.gov or call 269-1245. Interested parties may also complete, download and email an application to: GrandJuryApps@humboldtcourt.ca.gov. The Arcata Police Department is looking for Volunteer Patrol members. Contact Administrative Sgt. Brian Hoffman at 822-2428. ●

Let’s Be Friends


SCREENS

Shooting His Shot Boogie and Bad Trip By John J. Bennett

screens@northcoastjournal.com

BOOGIE. Eddie Huang remains always on his hustle. The child of a sometimes troubled but ultimately fruitful marriage of immigrant entrepreneurs (Chinese by way of Taiwan), he grew up in the restaurant business, went on to a successful academic career, became a lawyer, lost that gig, started a clothing line, allegedly sold weed, opened a well-regarded restaurant (now permanently closed) and a less well-regarded one (also closed), wrote a memoir that became a successful TV sitcom (Fresh Off the Boat), distanced himself from the series for creative differences and has now written and directed a loosely autobiographical movie. I’m told he also maintains a formidable social media presence, among other ventures. So busy! It would not necessarily be obtuse to ask what, if any, qualifications Huang might have to write and direct a feature with major distribution, even one with a modest budget and no major stars in the cast. But that should be seen as a good thing, even if the movie isn’t all that great (which it isn’t). Boogie was announced (and presumably shot) pre-plague but it should be counted among the modest projects — a comforting number of which speak with previously woefully unheard voices — that have risen to prominence in the last year. This has been, of course, largely a product of the tent-poles taking a breather until they can reap their accustomed profits in theaters. But their absence also serves to highlight the fact that these movies are being made at all, let alone released (either in theaters or via streaming services) to audiences at large. For an old-timer like me, it harkens back to the indie-boom (he typed wistfully) of the 1990s and even the new Hollywood of the late ’60s and ’70s. Sure, technology has made these projects less financially risky, but even 10 years ago (five?) would a movie like this have been given a shot? Seems doubtful. All of which is to say I support Huang’s efforts and his movie, even if I cannot fully recommend it. While technically proficient, with its own faintly sterilized aesthetic and version of New York City in place, it plays like a first effort, which I don’t intend as a damning criticism. It just may not be, like its protagonist, ready for the big show.

That protagonist, Alfred “Boogie” Chin (Taylor Takahashi), is an NYC basketball phenom. His father (Perry Yung), recently a guest of the state, has focused his energies on securing Alfred a college scholarship and a chance at the NBA. In service of that goal, Alfred has transferred to a prep school with a basketball program that, while struggling, will put him up against some of the other biggest talents in the city and, hopefully, attract the attention of Division-I scouts. Mrs. Chin (Pamelyn Chee), frustrated by her husband’s disregard for the family’s more immediate needs, simultaneously pursues other avenues for her son. Boogie, meanwhile, contends with the vagaries of new love, reining in his ego and the tumult at home. All of which is well and good, fertile enough ground from which a compelling story might grow. But Boogie suffers from both immaturity and growing pains: Some of the actors, while raw and capable, clearly need a director who knows how to help them act for a camera. The lack of experience on both sides only serves to magnify the small discomforts and lapses in timing of people visibly acting. Narratively, Huang seems to want to combine the verisimilitude of the NYC street movies, by which he was clearly influenced, with a sort of numbed accessibility. The intent is admirable but he hasn’t adequately mastered the form to bring it to life on screen, which could also be said for the basketball sequences; promise abounds, but the maker has yet to embrace smallness and silence in service of tension and depth. R. 89M. STREAMING. BAD TRIP. No. 1 on the Netflix Top 10 doesn’t mean much, quantifiably. It would suggest, however, whatever takes that spot is being seen by people — like a lot of people. And so we have to assume millions (maybe?) of us watched Bad Trip. I say us because I certainly did and it made me laugh. One would think (as I did) the Jackass road movie formula had come and gone, but in the hands of Eric André — whose confrontational comedy I call borderline psychedelic in a restricted-breath, reality-is-terrifying, trust-no-one kind of way — it takes on new life. Chris (André) and his best friend Bud (Lil

That vaccinated feeling. Boogie

Rel Howery) set off on a road-trip to New York from Florida, leaving behind dead-end jobs so Chris can profess his love to high school crush Maria (Michaela Conlin). They are pursued by Bud’s feloniously inclined sister Trina (Tiffany Haddish), recently escaped from prison, whose car they have borrowed without asking. The hook,

though, is that this storyline plays against the backdrop of innocent bystanders made participants in a series of (sometimes admittedly disgusting and low-brow) pranks. Somehow it works. R. 84M. NETFLIX. ● John J. Bennett (he/him) is a movie nerd who loves a good car chase.

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1. Fend (off) 5. ____ Juice (California-based smoothie chain) 10. Booking.com booking 14. Grad 15. Whatsoever 16. Zen garden accessory 17. Malek of “Bohemian Rhapsody” 18. Trailer follower 19. Genesis spot 20. *Comics debut of 3/12/51 23. High-____ monitor 24. Writer Gogol 27. *”To Kill a Mockingbird” lawyer 31. *Longtime reality cooking show with a pitchfork in its logo 33. Regret 34. “Peachy!” 36. One blowing off steam? 37. “May ____ excused?”

38. City by the Bay, informally 40. Chart-topper 41. Novelist Whitehead with two Pulitzer Prizes for fiction 43. End of many URLs 44. Brian in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame 45. *”Q: Why did the toilet paper roll down the hill? A: To get to the bottom,” e.g. 46. *Very cheap, as merchandise 49. Dublin’s St. ____ Church, dating from 1793 53. “Supposing ...” 54. Feature of Zoom or Google Meet ... or what the answers to each of the asterisked clues all feature 59. Puzzle with a start

7. Connoisseur 8. Thin Russian pancakes 9. Bad thing to spring 10. Sapling 11. “Tubular!” 12. Mike’s candy partner 13. Ballpoint ____ 21. Cornish game ____ 22. “Watch What Happens Live” host Andy 25. 1950s tennis champion Gibson 26. “Fighting” Big Ten team 27. Actor Robert of “Spenser: For Hire” 28. Give a break from DOWN the game 1. Caution 29. “Get what I’m 2. Jai ____ talkin’ about?” 3. Jamaica exports 30. Dearie 4. Composer 32. New Jersey’s ____ Shostakovich Hall University 5. Film actor whose last 35. Chain with Popcorn name sounds like a Nuggets film festival 36. Noted work 6. Physics 101 subject in which many

and a finish 62. Counterpart to digital 63. ____ grease 64. Laughfest 65. Not up ____ (below standard) 66. Ones steeped in tradition in England? 67. Things exchanged between brides and grooms 68. Photo-sharing app, familiarly 69. Four-time Grammy winner for Best New Age Album

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different positions are discussed 38. More in need of a massage 39. Director Reiner 42. Raspberry or lemon desserts 47. Snitch (on) 48. Swing one’s hips 50. Three more than quadri51. Alphabetically first member of the Baseball Hall of Fame 52. Sounds like a broken record 55. Go ____ great length 56. Yoked animals 57. Big name in skin care 58. Arizona city or landform 59. Orthopedist’s scan, briefly 60. Assistance 61. Wild place HARD #27

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LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS TO ZOOM C A P N A R E A L I Z Z I S P F R I I S A E S O C H O Y E S A S T O Z O O M F R E S P I R D I E T S E S A

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God, the Multiverse and You

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“Our Universe has not been fine-tuned for life: life has been fine-tuned to our Universe.” — Klaas Landsman, The Challenge Of Chance

T

Not only can you mess with the physical constants of our universe, you can also tinker with the number of dimensions of time and space to emphasize, apparently, the unlikelihood of our existence. Creative Commons via Wikipedia

he fine-tuning of many of the “constants of nature” is offered as evidence for both the existence of God and of an infinity of universes beyond our own, aka the multiverse. It’s pretty weird both theists and physicists cite the same argument, both looking to support ideas that are neither provable nor scientific. Here, I’ll try to show that the fine-tuning argument is spurious and has no bearing on your or my beliefs about God and/or the multiverse. The constants of nature — there are currently between 19 and 25, depending on whose system you follow — are the foundations upon which everything depends: matter, time, space, life, right down to the existence of intelligent beings who probe them. They include well-known ones, such as the strength of gravity, and arcane ones such as: Plank’s constant (the “quantum” of quantum mechanics); the cosmological constant (the energy density of otherwise empty space); and so on. The fine-tuning argument claims values of these constants are really finicky; if they were other than what they actually are, we wouldn’t be here. In some cases, neither would the universe. So, goes the argument, either God must have had a hand in creating it all, or our universe — out of an infinity of them — happens to have just the right constants. Take, for example, the fine-structure constant, upon which the strength of the electromagnetic force depends. It’s approximately (not exactly, as was once thought) equal to 1/137. If it were just a tad different, either the element carbon wouldn’t be present in the universe or stars (stellar fusion) wouldn’t happen, depending on whether you decrease or increase its value. No carbon, no life (probably); no stars, no life (for sure). The same applies to the other constants — adjust them a bit up or down, and atoms won’t form or the

universe won’t survive for more than a few thousand years. In particular, the conditions for life, at least as we know it, won’t be present. So the universe itself and our presence in it is really, really unlikely. Do you see the flaw in this reasoning? How can we know what’s likely or unlikely? We have exactly one universe in our sample. To say something is “unlikely,” we need to know what “likely” is — presumably by checking a few other universes to see what their constants are, then decide if our universe is likely or not. Theoretical physicist Sabine Hossenfelder likens it to seeing a pencil balanced on its tip — we’d look at it and say, “Wow! What are the odds?” Because we’ve seen many other pencils lying flat, we know a pencil balanced on its tip is an anomaly. Since we can’t observe other universes to be able to say, “Wow!” we can’t say anything about the likelihood of our own universe. It’s just the way it is. If you’re thinking “anthropic principle” at this point, you’re ahead of the game. The principle, in its weak form, says that the universe must be the way it is because we’re here to observe it. So — back to fine-tuning — this universe has to have the physical constants necessary to accommodate conscious life, otherwise we wouldn’t be here to observe it. (That’s known formally as a “logical truism,” or, less formally, “Duh!”) Finally, I should mention that there’s a wildly speculative, not to say narcissistic, strong form of the anthropic principle that says, in essence, that our being here means that the universe was somehow compelled to produce intelligent life. However, I understand you need to be chemically high to wrap your brain around that one. ● Barry Evans (he/him, barryevans9@ yahoo.com) notes that while the universe may allow for intelligent life, it’s hardly optimal — we’re here by the skin of our teeth!


WORKSHOPS & CLASSES

CARTOONS

List your class – just $4 per line per issue! Deadline: Friday, 5pm. Place your online ad at classified.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Dance/Music/Theater/Film GUITAR/PIANO LESSONS. All ages, beginning & intermediate. Seabury Gould (707) 845−8167. (DMT −1230)

Fitness SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids & adults, child care, fitness gym & more. Tae Kwon Do Mon−Fri 5−6 p.m., 6−7 p.m., Sat 10−11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825−0182. (F−1230)

50 and Better ARMCHAIR TRIFECTA: AROUND HUMBOLDT BAY WITH JERRY ROHDE. Let’s look at the largest wannabe lagoon on the California coast−− Humboldt Bay. We’ll fire up our armchairs and take a two−hour cruise around the shoreline. Sat., April 17 from 1−3 p.m. OLLI Members only $15. Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli (O −0401) OLLI ONLINE CLASSES: Shelter in place but stay connected with OLLI. Get more information or register @HSUOLLI (O−1230) OLLI ONLINE: BALLET FOR ADULTS WITH NANCY CALL. Learn the basic foundation steps including stretching, strengthening and floor work. Mon. & Wed., April 19−May 26 from 9:30−11 a.m. OLLI Members $145. Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0401) OLLI ONLINE: BALLET FOR ADULTS: INTERMEDI− ATES WITH NANCY CALL. Appreciate the wonderful benefits of musicality, flexibility, strength, coordination, and balance. More ballet steps and complex combinations will be taught. Tues. & Thurs., April 13−May 20 from 10:30−noon. OLLI Members $145. Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0401) WHY POETRY? WITH BONNIE SHAND. Discuss what motivates poets to write poetry and individ− uals to read it. Poets attending the class can read examples of their work and talk about what moved them to create it. Tues., April 13−27 1−3 p.m. OLLI Members only $35. Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0401)

Spiritual EVOLUTIONARY TAROT Ongoing Zoom classes, private mentorships and readings. Carolyn Ayres. 442−4240 www.tarotofbecoming.com carolyn@tarotofbecoming.com (S−1230) SOTO ZEN MEDITATION Sunday programs and weekday meditation in Arcata locations; Wed evenings in Eureka, arcatazengroup.org Beginners welcome, call for orientation. (707) 826−1701 (S−1230)

Therapy & Support ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS. We can help 24/7, call toll free 1−844 442−0711. (T−1230)

SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATION− SHIPS? Confidential help is available. 707−825− 0920, saahumboldt@yahoo.com (T−1230) SMART RECOVERY MEETINGS 707 267 7868 rebtarcata@yahoo.com

Vocational ADDITIONAL ONLINE CLASSES − Are you looking for an online class? College of the Redwoods Community Education and Ed2GO have partnered to offer a variety of short term and career courses in an online format Visit: https://www.redwoods.e du/communityed/Detail/ArtMID/17724/ArticleI− D/4916/Additional−Online−Classes or call College of the Redwoods at (707)476−4500 (V−0401) FREE WORKPLACE SKILLS CLASSES visit https://www.redwoods.edu/adulted or Call College of the Redwoods 707−476−4520 for more information and to register. (V−0401) FRONT OFFICE RECEPTIONIST Apr 5 − Jun 25, 2021 Visit: https://www.redwoods.edu/communityed/ Detail/ArtMID/17724/ArticleID/5110/Medical− Billing−and−Coding−Specialist or call College of the Redwoods at (707)476−4500 (V−0401) MEDICAL OFFICE RECEPTIONIST Apr 5 − Jul 30, 2021 Visit: https://www.redwoods.edu/communit yed/Detail/ArtMID/17724/ArticleID/5110/Medical −Billing−and−Coding−Specialist or call College of the Redwoods at (707)476−4500 (V−0401) NOTARY Online instruction with Certification Exam, Apr 13, 2021 Visit: https://www.redwoods.ed u/communityed/Detail/ArtMID/17724/ArticleID/ 3692/Notary or call College of the Redwoods at (707)476−4500 (V−0401) REAL ESTATE CORRESPONDENCE Become a Real Estate Agent. Start Anytime! Visit: https://www. redwoods.edu/communityed/Real−Estate or call College of the Redwoods at (707)476−4500 (V− 0401) SPANISH FOR EMTS & PARAMEDICS May 17 − Jul 8, 2021 Visit: https://www.redwoods.edu/commun ityed/Detail/ArtMID/17724/ArticleID/5286/S− panish−for−EMTs−Paramedics or call College of the Redwoods at (707)476−4500 (V−0401)

Wellness & Bodywork DANDELION HERBAL CENTER CLASSES WITH JANE BOTHWELL. Beginning with Herbs. Sept 15 − Nov 3, 2021, 8 Wed. evenings. Learn medicine making, herbal first aid, and herbs for common imbalances. 10−Month Herbal Studies Program. Feb − Nov 2022. Meets one weekend per month with three camping trips. Learn in−depth material medica, plant identification, flower essences, wild foods, formulations and harvesting. Register online www.dandelionherb.com or call (707) 442−8157. (W−0429)

Get listed today for

FREE

Place a free classified ad in the North Coast Trader You may submit a free classified ad online at thetrader707.com/ free-classified-ads

YO U R G LISTIN

HERE

Or submit your ad by snail mail, phone or email to 310 F St. Eureka CA 95501, (707) 442-1400 ads@thetrader707.com All *fields are required. First Name*: Last Name*: Phone*: E-mail Address*: Ad Text*:

Category*: (Categories: For Sale, For Trade, Wanted to Buy, Wanted to Trade, Lost, Found, Garage Sale, Community Announcement, Personal)

Free Ad Terms and Conditions: Limited to 1 Box size with text only, 50 words/300 characters. Free ads will run weekly based on space available. Free ads will run for one issue and must be submitted weekly to be eligible for each issue printed. Ads that are submitted that do not run in print are not guaranteed to run in the following printed issue.  Free Ads will not be accepted past deadline.

TO PLACE A BUSINESS DISPLAY AD: Call: (707) 496-2950 Email: ads@thetrader707.com Deadline: Noon Thursday the week before publication.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 1, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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LEGAL NOTICES NOTICE OF RIGHT TO CLAIM EXCESS PROCEEDS FROM THE SALE OF TAX-DEFAULTED PROPERTY Made pursuant to Section 4676, Revenue and Taxation Code Excess proceeds have resulted from the sale of tax defaulted property listed on this notice on March 1st, 2021. Parties of interest, as defined by California Revenue and Taxation Code section 4675, are entitled to claim the excess proceeds. All claims must be in writing and must contain sufficient information and proof to establish a claimant’s right to all or any part of the excess proceeds. Claims filed with the county more than one year after recordation of the Tax Collector’s deed to the purchaser on March 24th, 2021 cannot be considered. Assessment No.

Address/Location

033-311-001-000

151 County Road 287 Rd, Garberville $7,482.50

033-311-002-000

219 Oakcrest Dr, Garberville

$20,117.08

052-202-006-000

851 Rio Dell Ave Rio Dell

$11,316.30

109-033-018-000

444 Ridge Rd, Shelter Cove

$165.81

109-042-011-000

356 Beach Rd, Shelter Cove

$168.41

109-081-021-000

446 Wolverine Way, Shelter Cove

$948.72

109-081-053-000

172 Puma Dr, Shelter Cove

$2,227.29

109-091-005-000

370 Puma Dr, Shelter Cove

$2,999.43

109-131-018-000

182 Wolverine Way, Shelter Cove

$1,707.98

109-131-026-000

105 Wolverine Way, Shelter Cove

$521.20

109-131-069-000

326 Wolverine Way, Shelter Cove

$2,252.39

109-141-009-000

1414 Telegraph Creek Rd, Shelter $2,091.58 Cove

109-141-023-000

1393 Telegraph Creek Rd, Shelter $2,339.89 Cove

109-161-012-000

65 Red Crest Ct, Shelter Cove

$4,528.34

109-161-038-000

51 Whale Pnt, Shelter Cove

$34,526.76

109-192-029-000

299 Spring Rd, Shelter Cove

$150.59

109-193-001-000

432 Spring Rd, Shelter Cove

$597.18

109-251-046-000

352 Telegraph Creek Rd, Shelter Cove $511.70

109-281-037-000

No Situs

109-291-002-000

341 Humboldt Loop Rd, Shelter Cove $1,229.39

109-302-047-000

14 Spring Rd, Shelter Cove

$458.06

109-321-004-000

7875 Shelter Cove Rd, Shelter Cove

$1,647.76

109-331-038-000

141 Telegraph Creek Rd, Shelter Cove $763.27

110-041-018-000

146 Toth Rd, Shelter Cove

$497.79

110-051-015-000

2963 Toth Rd, Shelter Cove

$189.84

110-131-041-000

596 Hillside Dr, Shelter Cove

$2,159.28

110-151-001-000

9 Carson St, Shelter Cove

$219.36

110-181-004-000

889 Hillside Dr, Shelter Cove

$1,134.82

110-181-008-000

921 Hillside Dr, Shelter Cove

$153.89

110-191-002-000

39 Hemlock Rd, Shelter Cove

$1,299.73

110-231-057-000

760 Blueridge Rd, Shelter Cove

$222.84

110-251-023-000

495 Blueridge Rd, Shelter Cove

$860.45

110-251-026-000

1585 Toth Rd, Shelter Cove

$631.12

110-251-040-000

614 Blueridge Rd, Shelter Cove

$518.41

110-251-046-000

530 Blueridge Rd, Shelter Cove

$623.17

110-261-042-000

96 Forest Rd, Shelter Cove

$757.87

110-291-023-000

141 Combs Rd, Shelter Cove

$1,765.33

110-301-025-000

60 Gale Pt, Shelter Cove

$2,017.94

111-031-001-000

8484 Shelter Cove Rd, Shelter Cove $617.66

111-031-017-000

8710 Shelter Cove Rd, Shelter Cove

111-031-046-000

8445 Shelter Cove Rd, Shelter Cove $636.28

111-063-032-000

426 Parkview Rd, Shelter Cove

32

Excess Proceeds

$175.40

$634.56 $1,132.84

111-141-009-000

9343 Shelter Cove Rd, Shelter Cove

$150.82

111-141-016-000

50 Buckhorn Ct, Shelter Cove

$192.06

111-142-026-000

158 Parkview Rd, Shelter Cove

$713.70

111-211-044-000

259 Cove Point West, Shelter Cove

$18,841.99

201-151-001-000

No Situs

$7,371.60

202-102-025-000

No Situs

$51,429.24

207-161-002-000

No Situs

$708.55

207-161-010-000

No Situs

$1,183.55

216-391-008-000

2650 Rancho Sequoia Dr, Alderpoint $22,377.12

217-163-001-000

No Situs

$32,808.56

221-071-003-000

7447 Thomas Rd, Miranda

$149,318.07

317-054-006-000

No Situs

$161,627.56

511-131-058-000

1625 Letz Ln, McKinleyville

$89,058.42

525-251-003-000

No Situs

$65,170.43

525-261-007-000

No Situs

$18,443.93

526-291-010-000

No Situs

$21,919.26

Claim forms and information regarding filing procedures may be obtained at the Humboldt County Tax Collector’s Office, 825 5th Street, Room 125, Eureka, CA 95501 or by calling (707) 476-2450 or toll free (877) 448-6829 between 8:30 am-Noon and 1:00pm-5:00pm, Monday through Friday. I certify (or declare), under penalty of perjury, that the foregoing is true and correct.

John Bartholomew, Humboldt County Tax Collector State of California Executed at Eureka, Humboldt County, California, on March 23rd, 2021 Published in North Coast Journal on March 25th, April 1st, and 8th, 2021.

LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT THE UNDERSIGNED INTENDS TO SELL THE PERSONAL PROPERTY DESCRIBED BELOW TO ENFORCE A LIEN IMPOSED ON SAID PROPERTY UNDER THE California Self Service storage facility Act Bus& Prof Code sb21700−21716. The undersigned will be sold at public sale by competitive bidding on the 16th day of April at11 am, on the premises where said property has been stored and which is located at 804 S. Fortuna Blvd, Fortuna, County of Humboldt, State of California. The following units will be sold for cash unless paid for by tenant prior to auction. Samantha Blevins D210 Gilbert Torres D219 / H204 Misty Boquet G204 Amber Souza D218 Shannon Fortress A114 Anthony Toste A207 Casey Williams A212 Nicole Melendrez C227 Joyce Retzoloff C244 Maria Mena−Macias D214 Deborah Ramirez G203 4/1, 4/8 (21−120)

L4E4 2G ALS? -1 4 0 0 × 3 1 4

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 1, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF GLORIA KATHLEEN THOMPSON CASE NO. PR2100031 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of GLORIA KATHLEEN THOMPSON A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner LINDA DIANE THOMPSON In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition for probate requests that LINDA DIANE THOMPSON be appointed as personal representative to admin− ister the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the dece− dent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for exami− nation in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not

obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on May 20, 2021 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 6. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Amy H. Ruggles 1555 River Park Drive, Suite 108 Sacramento, CA 95815 (916) 920−5983 Filed: March 4, 2021 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 3/18, 3/25, 4/1 (21−092)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF RICHARD K. MILLER, a/k/a RICHARD KING MILLER CASE NO. PR2100069 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of RICHARD K. MILLER, a/k/a RICHARD KING MILLER A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner PATRICIA ATWOOD In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition for probate requests that PATRICIA ATWOOD be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the dece− dent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for exami− nation in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative

representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the dece− dent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for exami− nation in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on April 22, 2021 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 6. Effective Monday, May 18, 2020, Humboldt Superior Court will resume Probate calendars using remote video and phone confer− encing. You have been served with a Notice of Hearing of a Petition pursuant to which a court hearing has been scheduled. Due to the COVID−19 pandemic, if you wish to appear at the court hearing, you must do so remotely. Instructions to appear remotely are set forth on the Court’s website: www.humboldt.courts.ca.gov. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: James D. Poovey 937 6th Street Eureka, CA 95501 (707) 443−6744 Filed: March 15, 2021 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 3/25, 4/1, 4/8 (21−099)


Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: James D. Poovey 937 6th Street Eureka, CA 95501 (707) 443−6744 Filed: March 15, 2021 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 3/25, 4/1, 4/8 (21−099)

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE APN: 507-461-070 COMPLIANCE WITH CALIFORNIA CIVIL CODE SECTION 2923.3 WAS NOT REQUIRED BECAUSE THE LOAN IS SECURED BY COMMER− CIAL PROPERTY. YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED MAY 14, 2019. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings bank speci− fied in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state, will be held by the duly appointed trustee, as shown below, all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to satisfy the obligation secured by said Deed of Trust. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incor− rectness of the property address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. TRUSTOR: Humboldt Health Care, LLC, a California limited liability company DULY APPOINTED TRUSTEE: Harland Law Firm LLP DEED OF TRUST RECORDED: May 16, 2019 INSTRUMENT NUMBER: 2019− 008489 of the Official Records of the Recorder of Humboldt County, California DATE OF SALE: April 16th, 2021 at 11:00 A.M. PLACE OF SALE: Front entrance to the County Courthouse, 825 5th Street, Eureka, CA 95501 THE COMMON DESIGNATION OF THE PROPERTY IS PURPORTED TO BE: 45 Ericson Court, Arcata, CA 95521, Industrial Land. Directions to the property may be obtained by pursuant to a written request submitted to Harland Law Firm LLP, 212 G Street, Suite 201, Eureka, CA 95501, within 10 days from the first publication of this notice. See Exhibit "A" attached hereto and made a part hereof for the Legal Description. Amount of unpaid balance and other charges as of March 9, 2021:

pursuant to a written request submitted to Harland Law Firm LLP, 212 G Street, Suite 201, Eureka, CA 95501, within 10 days from the first publication of this notice.

sale.

See Exhibit "A" attached hereto and made a part hereof for the Legal Description.

Harland Law Firm LLP

Amount of unpaid balance and other charges as of March 9, 2021: $3,688,688.20. Beneficiary may elect to open bidding at a lesser amount. The total amount secured by said instrument as of the time of initial publication of this notice is stated above, which includes the total amount of the unpaid balance (including accrued and unpaid interest) and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of initial publication of this notice. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should under− stand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to fee and clear ownership of the prop− erty. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this infor− mation. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call the trustee’s information line at (707) 444−9281. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information. The best way to verify postponement infor− mation is to attend the scheduled sale. DATED: This 9th day of March, 2021 in the city of Eureka, and the county of Humboldt, California. Harland Law Firm LLP John S. Lopez, Attorney, Trustee for Beneficiary RWR Real Estate Holdings, LLC

DATED: This 9th day of March, 2021 in the city of Eureka, and the county of Humboldt, California.

John S. Lopez, Attorney, Trustee for Beneficiary RWR Real Estate Holdings, LLC Exhibit "A" Legal Description That real property situate in the County of Humboldt, State of Cali− fornia, described as follows: PARCEL ONE Parcel 4 of Parcel Map No. 3074 for the City of Arcata, filed in Book 28 of Parcel Maps, Page 95, Humboldt County Records. EXCEPTING therefrom the following described parcel: BEGINNING at the Southeast corner of Parcel 4 of Parcel Map No. 3074 for the City of Arcata, filed in Book 28 of Parcel; Maps, Page 95, Humboldt County Records; thence North 1 degree 29 minutes 00 seconds East, along the East line of said parcel, 72.43 feet to an angle point in said East line; thence continuing along said East line, North 6 degrees 07 minutes 34 seconds East, 51.07 feet; thence North 83 degrees 52 minutes 26 seconds West, 194.49 feet to the West line of said Parcel 4; thence South 9 degrees 46 minutes 47 seconds West, along said West line, 140.55 feet to the Southwest corner of said Parcel 4; thence South 88 degrees 31 minutes East, along said South line, 210.00 feet to point of beginning. PARCEL TWO A non−exclusive easement for ingress, egress and public utility purposes over that 60 foot wide strip of land and cul−de−sac desig− nated Parcel "A" on Parcel Map No. 2782 in Book 25 of Parcel Maps, Page 54, Humboldt County Records. APN: 507−461−070 Property Address: 45 Ericson Court, Arcata, CA 95521 3/18, 3/25, 4/1 (21−085) 3/18, 3/25, 4/1 (21−085)

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE APN: 522-201-001 & 522-491-016 COMPLIANCE WITH CALIFORNIA CIVIL CODE SECTION 2923.3 WAS NOT REQUIRED BECAUSE THE LOAN IS SECURED BY VACANT/ INDUSTRIAL LAND. YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED MAY 14, 2019. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings bank speci− fied in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state, will be held by the duly appointed trustee, as shown below, all right, title and interest

A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings bank speci− fied in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state, will be held by the duly appointed trustee, as shown below, all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to satisfy the obligation secured by said Deed of Trust. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incor− rectness of the property address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. TRUSTOR: Humboldt Health Care, LLC, a California limited liability company

you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should under− stand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to fee and clear ownership of the prop− erty. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this infor− mation. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property.

pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be Continued onyou next made available to andpage to the» public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call the trustee’s information line at (707) 444−9281. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information. The best way to verify postponement infor− mation is to attend the scheduled sale. DATED: This 9th day of March, 2021 in the city of Eureka, and the county of Humboldt, California. Harland Law Firm LLP John S. Lopez, Attorney, Trustee for Beneficiary RWR Real Estate Holdings, LLC

NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of Exhibit "A" sale may be postponed one or Legal Description more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, DEED OF TRUST RECORDED: May 16, That real property situate in the pursuant to Section 2924g of the 2019 County of Humboldt, State of Cali− California Civil Code. The law fornia, described as follows: requires that information about INSTRUMENT NUMBER: 2019− trustee sale postponements be 008490 of the Official Records of PARCEL ONE made available to you and to the the Recorder of Humboldt County, BEGINNING at the Southeast public, as a courtesy to those not California corner of Section 29, Township 7 present at the sale. If you wish to North, Range 5 East, Humboldt Base learn whether your sale date has DATE OF SALE: April 16th, 2021 at NORTHWEST CALIFORNIA INTEGRATED RESOURCE and Meridian; according to the been postponed, and, if applicable, 11:00 A.M. Official(NCIP) Plat of said land; thence the rescheduled time and date for MANAGEMENT PLAN North 89 degrees 31 minutes 52 the sale of this property, you may PLACE OF SALE: Front entrance to NOTICE information FOR VIRTUAL OUTREACH MEETINGS seconds West along the South line call the trustee’s line PUBLIC at the County Courthouse, 825 5th Section 29, 638.76 to the (707) 444−9281. Information about Street, Eureka, CA 95501 The Bureau of Land Management’ sof(BLM) Redding and feet Arcata Field Easterly Right of Way lineplanning of State postponements that areearly very stages short of the Offices are beginning resource management Highway 96, as shown in Book 17 of in duration or that occur close in THE COMMON DESIGNATION OF process will revisesale andmay update management direction set forth Maps, Page 42, Humboldt County time to thethat scheduled not current THE PROPERTY IS PURPORTED TO in their respective current management plans and environmental Records; thence North 26 degrees immediately be reflected in resource the BE: 130 Flower McNeil Rd., Willow impact statement record decisions. 10The original04NCIP planning minutes seconds West,effort along telephone information. The of best Creek, CA 95573, Vacant Land/ Right of Way line, 110 feet,that way to verify postponement infor− duesaid Industrial Land. Directions to the began in 2016 but was terminated to the catastrophic wildfires more orarea. less,This to the centerline of mation is toa attend the portion scheduled property may be obtained by covered significant of the planning effort is a restart Willow Creek; thence Northeasterly sale. pursuant to a written request of that same planning effort. To gather public input at this stage, the along the centerline of Willow submitted to Harland Law Firm LLP, BLM isThis hosting fourofvirtual and a virtual Creekmeetings to the confluence withopen the DATED: 9th day March,public 2021 outreach 212 G Street, Suite 201, Eureka, CA thatand provides opportunities to Trinity River and at the low water mark in house the citywebsite of Eureka, the project information 95501, within 10 days from the first of the Trinity River; thence Easterly county of Humboldt, publication of this notice. provide comments. California. to the intersection of the East line TheLaw web-based available public Marchof Sectionto29the with the from centerline Harland Firm LLPvirtual open house isof See Exhibit "A" attached hereto and 29 to April 30, 2021. Website visitors the will Trinity be ableRiver, to view information said intersection made a part hereof for the Legal beingmaps, the Northwest of that about the planning process, view interactive and submitcorner comments. John S. Lopez, Attorney, Description. property described in Book 1724, Trustee Beneficiary Theforvirtual open house website is available at: Page 452, Humboldt County RWR Real Estate Holdings, LLC Amount of unpaid balance and Records; thence South 0 degrees 4 https://www.virtualpublicmeeting.com/ncip-pre-scoping-home other charges as of March 9, 2021: minutes 55 seconds East, along the Exhibit "A" $2,460,752.63. The BLM will also host a series of live virtual outreach East linepublic of Section 29 tomeetings. the point Legal Description The meetings will include a presentation, question and answer session, of beginning. Beneficiary may elect to open andreal anproperty opportunity to in provide comment.THEREFROM Please notethat that atThat situate the publicEXCEPTING bidding at a lesser amount. granted to John by County of Humboldt, State tendees must register foroftheCali− meetingsportion in advance at the BLM’McKay s project Deed recorded August 9, 1901 in fornia, described The total amount secured by said website below. as follows: Book 76 of Deeds, Page 131, instrument as of the time of initial April 13, 2021 – 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM PDT Humboldt County Records. PARCEL ONE publication of this notice is stated ALSO EXCEPTING THEREFROM that BEGINNING the–Southeast above, which includes the total April 15,at2021 4:00 PM to 6:00 PM PDT portion granted to Catherine corner of Section 29, Township 7 amount of the unpaid balance 19, 2021 – 9:00 AM toBase 11:00 AM Garrett PDT by Deed recorded North,April Range 5 East, Humboldt (including accrued and unpaid September 10, 1901 in Book 76 of and Meridian; according interest) and reasonable estimated April 21, 2021 – 5:00 to PMthe to 7:00 PM PDT Deeds, Page 236, Humboldt County Official Plat of said land; thence costs, expenses and advances at the accepted 30, 2021, through the virtual open Records. NorthComments 89 degreeswill 31 be minutes 52 until April time of initial publication of this seconds along South line notice. house West website, bythe providing verbal comments during a public outreach PARCEL TWO of meeting, Section 29, 638.76the feet to the through BLM project website below, or by U.S. mail. To subBEGINNING the Bureau Northwest Easterly Right of Way linemail, of State NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If mit comments via U.S. please address them toatNCIP, of Land corner of Section 33, Township 7 Highway 96, as shown in Book 17 of you are considering bidding on this Management, Redding Field Office, 6640North, Lockheed Dr.,5 Redding, CA 96002. Range East, Humboldt Base Maps, Page 42, Humboldt County property lien, you should under− Meridian, to the to Records; thence North degrees stand that there are risks involved Meeting dates and26times are subjectand to change. Foraccording project updates, Official Platplease of saidvisit land; 10 register minutesfor 04 the seconds West,oralong in bidding at a trustee auction. You meetings, to submit comments, thethence project South along said Section line, 128.0 said Right of Way line, 110 feet, will be bidding on a lien, not on the website at: https://eplanning.blm.gov/eplanning-ui/project/2012803/510 feet; thence South 47 degrees East, more or less, to the centerline of property itself. Placing the highest 118.8 feet; thence South 65 degrees Willow Creek; thence Northeasterly bid at a trustee auction does not East, 467.3 feet; thence South 54 along the centerline of Willow automatically entitle you to fee • Thursday, 2021 • NORTH JOURNAL degreesCOAST East, 235.0 feet; thence Creek to the confluenceApril with1,the and clear ownership of northcoastjournal.com the prop− South 68 degrees East, 277.2 feet; Trinity River at the low water mark erty. You should also be aware that thence South 78 degrees East, 127.4 of the Trinity River; thence Easterly the lien being auctioned off may be feet thence South 65 degrees East, to the intersection of the East line a junior lien. If you are the highest DULY APPOINTED TRUSTEE: Harland Law Firm LLP

33


That real property situate in the County of Humboldt, State of Cali− fornia, described as follows:

Section line to the point of begin− ning.

LEGAL PARCEL ONE NOTICES BEGINNING at the Southeast corner of Section 29, Township 7 North, Range 5 East, Humboldt Base and Meridian; according to the Official Plat of said land; thence North 89 degrees 31 minutes 52 seconds West along the South line of Section 29, 638.76 feet to the Easterly Right of Way line of State Highway 96, as shown in Book 17 of Maps, Page 42, Humboldt County Records; thence North 26 degrees 10 minutes 04 seconds West, along said Right of Way line, 110 feet, more or less, to the centerline of Willow Creek; thence Northeasterly along the centerline of Willow Creek to the confluence with the Trinity River at the low water mark of the Trinity River; thence Easterly to the intersection of the East line of Section 29 with the centerline of the Trinity River, said intersection being the Northwest corner of that property described in Book 1724, Page 452, Humboldt County Records; thence South 0 degrees 4 minutes 55 seconds East, along the East line of Section 29 to the point of beginning. EXCEPTING THEREFROM that portion granted to John McKay by Deed recorded August 9, 1901 in Book 76 of Deeds, Page 131, Humboldt County Records. ALSO EXCEPTING THEREFROM that portion granted to Catherine Garrett by Deed recorded September 10, 1901 in Book 76 of Deeds, Page 236, Humboldt County Records.

PARCEL THREE ALSO the right to take water from and make improvements on certain springs located approximately 20 feet, more or less, to the Northeast of said property on property held by Maurice A. Flower of April 9, 1953, being the date of the Deed from him to Manan Coffman, recorded April 14, 1953 in Book 246, Page 357, Humboldt County Official Records. APN: 522−201−001 & 522−491−016 Property Address: 130 Flower McNeil Rd., Willow Creek, CA 95573 3/18, 3/25, 4/1 (21−086

PUBLIC SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property pursuant to Sections 21700−21716 of the Business & Professions Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, Section 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the civil Code. The undersigned will sell at auction by competitive bidding on the 14th of April, 2021, at 9:00 AM, on the premises where said property has been stored and which are located at Rainbow Self Storage. The following spaces are located at 4055 Broadway Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt. Wyatt Mancillas, Space # 5121 Sarah Boyd, Space # 5250 Reid Grotewold, Space # 5413

PARCEL TWO BEGINNING at the Northwest corner of Section 33, Township 7 North, Range 5 East, Humboldt Base and Meridian, according to the Official Plat of said land; thence South along said Section line, 128.0 feet; thence South 47 degrees East, 118.8 feet; thence South 65 degrees East, 467.3 feet; thence South 54 degrees East, 235.0 feet; thence South 68 degrees East, 277.2 feet; thence South 78 degrees East, 127.4 feet thence South 65 degrees East, 226.4 feet; thence South 70 degrees East, 183.5 feet; thence South 82 degrees East, 252.9 feet’ thence North 2 degrees 17.7 minutes West, 1143.4 feet; thence North 43 degrees 04 minutes West, approximately 650 feet to the center of the Trinity River; thence Westerly along the center of said river to the West line of Section 28, Township 7 North, Range 5 East, Humboldt Base and Meridian; thence South along said Section line to the point of begin− ning.

The following spaces are located at 639 W. Clark Street Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units.

PARCEL THREE ALSO the right to take water from and make improvements on certain springs located approximately 20 feet, more or less, to the Northeast of said property on property held County Public of Notices by Maurice A. Flower April 9, Fictitious 1953, being the dateBusiness of the Deed from him to Petition Manan Coffman, to recordedAdminister April 14, 1953Estate in Book 246, Page 357, Humboldt County Official Trustee Sale Records. Other Public Notices APN: 522−201−001 & 522−491−016 Property Address: 130 Flower 442-1400 ×314 McNeil Rd., Willow Creek, CA 95573

The following spaces are located at 105 Indianola Avenue Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units.

The following spaces are located at 3618 Jacobs Avenue Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Thomas Prince, Space # 1228 Cazzmirr Middleton, Space # 1383 Robert Reilly, Space # 1509 (Held in Co. Unit) Delancey Dunn, Space # 1596 David Cuevas, Space # 1621 Shane Bovencamp, Space # 1673 Erin Claybon, Space # 1717 Joseph Horwitz, Space # 1753

The following spaces are located at 1641 Holly Drive McKinleyville, CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Alexander Claybon, Space # 2101 George Brenard, Space # 2108 Courtney Looney, Space # 7114 Teresa Olan, Space # 7212 (Held in Co. Unit) Angela Blackthorne, Space # 9103 Whitney Owsley, Space # 9106 Grace Taloff, Space # 9130 The following spaces are located at 2394 Central Avenue McKinleyville CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Stephen Sloan, Space # 9244 Joshua Millberry−Davis, Space # 9519 The following spaces are located at 180 F Street Arcata CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immedi− ately following the sale of the above units. Gabriel Thorn−Hauswirth, Space # 4220 Deavon Coleman, Space # 4364 Colin Hulse, Space # 4436 Christy Coan, Space # 4521 Myer Gold, Space # 4732 Corey Hill, Space # 4748 Kristen Price, Space # 6174 The following spaces are located at 940 G Street Arcata CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immedi− ately following the sale of the above units. Sean O’Connell, Space # 6302 Beau Quinter, Space # 6315 Lisa Cosco, Space # 6351 Ricky Krause, Space # 6354 Daniel Yates, Space # 6362 Timothy McManus Jr., Space # 6422 Neil Flynn, Space # 6436 Jennie Seipp, Space # 6478 Items to be sold include, but are not limited to: Household furniture, office equip− ment, household appliances, exer− cise equipment, TVs, VCR, microwave, bikes, books, misc. tools, misc. camping equipment, misc. stereo equip. misc. yard tools, misc. sports equipment, misc. kids toys, misc. fishing gear, misc. computer components, and misc. boxes and bags contents unknown.

Anyone interested in attending Rainbow Self Storage auctions must pre−qualify. For details call 707−443 −1451. Purchases must be paid for at the John Moschetti, Space # 114 time of the sale in cash only. All pre Toinette Watson, Space # 219 −qualified Bidders must sign in at Alek McConnell, Space # 250 4055 Broadway Eureka CA. prior to Kathryn Vadas, Space # 300 9:00 A.M. on the day of the auction, Barbara Azbill, Space # 421 no exceptions. All purchased items Monique Edwards, Space # 547 are sold as is, where is and must be Clarence Bailey, Space # 724 removed at time of sale. Sale is Claudia Vargas, Space # 749 subject to cancellation for any Dylan Young, Space # 767 reason whatsoever. David Dearinger, Space # 797 3/18, 3/25, 4/1 (21−086 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 1, 2021 Space • northcoastjournal.com Auctioneer: Kim Santsche, Chanse Zimmer−Wilder, # 823 Employee for Rainbow Self− Alfreda Marshall, Space # 838 Storage, 707−443−1451, Bond # 40083246. The following spaces are located at

LEG A L S?

34

Troy O’Hanen, Space # 2303 David Bailey, Space # 2605 Tamar Shirley, Space # 2801 (Held In Co. Unit) Yeni Lopez, Space # 3211 Jeremy Hackney, Space # 3529

Alek McConnell, Space # 250 Kathryn Vadas, Space # 300 Barbara Azbill, Space # 421 Monique Edwards, Space # 547 Clarence Bailey, Space # 724 Claudia Vargas, Space # 749 Dylan Young, Space # 767 David Dearinger, Space # 797 Chanse Zimmer−Wilder, Space # 823 Alfreda Marshall, Space # 838

−qualified Bidders must sign in at 4055 Broadway Eureka CA. prior to 9:00 A.M. on the day of the auction, no exceptions. All purchased items are sold as is, where is and must be removed at time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation for any reason whatsoever. Auctioneer: Kim Santsche, Employee for Rainbow Self− Storage, 707−443−1451, Bond # 40083246.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00207

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00225

The following person is doing Busi− ness as LA PATRIA MARISCOS AND GRILL RESTAURANT

The following person is doing Busi− ness as TRIAD CONTRACTING AND ENGI− NEERING

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00202

Humboldt 6690 Fields Landing Dr Fields Landing, CA 95537

Humboldt 4040 Broadway Eureka, CA 95503

The following person is doing Busi− ness as ANADA

2300 Cochran Rd McKinleyville, CA 95519

PO Box 6247 Eureka, CA 95502

La Patria Mariscos and Grill Restaurant CA C3902379 6690 Fields Landing Dr Fields Landing, CA 95537

Triad, Inc. CA C4694500 4040 Broadway Eureka, CA 95503

4/1, 4/8 (21−098)

Humboldt 56 Wagon Jack Ln Arcata, CA 95521 Elin R Kronberg 56 Wagon Jack Ln Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Elin R Kronberg, Owner This March 16, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Siclari Ayala, Owner This March 16, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk

The following person is doing Busi− ness as FELLOW FARMERS ENVIRON− MENTAL Humboldt 3611 Little Larabee Creek Rd Bridgeville, CA 95526 1928 Central Ave #108 McKinleyville, CA 95519 Mika Z Cook 3611 Little Larabee Creek Rd Bridgeville, CA 95526

4/1, 4/8, 4/15, 4/22 (21−116)

3/25, 4/1, 4/8, 4/15 (21−097)

3/25, 4/1, 4/8, 4/15 (21−105)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00142

The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Jordan M Zizza, President/CFO This March 25, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00179 The following person is doing Busi− ness as CUTTEN MINI STORAGE Humboldt 2341 Fern Street Eureka, CA 95503

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00173 The following person is doing Busi− ness as RCM HOME & YARD SERVICES − RELIABLE CLEANING & MAINTE− NANCE Humboldt 1234 Allard Ave Eureka, CA 95503

4048 Campton Road Eureka, CA 95503 Cutten Enterprises, LLC CA 202102610241 4048 Campton Road Eureka, CA 95503

Marlaine Rechelluul 1234 Allard Ave Eureka, CA 95503 Chad E Rechelluul 1234 Allard Ave Eureka, CA 95503

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on February 24, 2021 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Mika Cook, Owner This February 25, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Melissa R. Sutton, Manager, Owner This March 11, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by a General Partnership. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Marlaine Rechelluul, Owner This March 10, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

3/18, 3/25, 4/1, 4/8 (21−090)

3/25, 4/1, 4/8, 4/15 (21−095)

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00219

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00169

The following person is doing Busi− ness as FITZ IT RIGHT PLUMBING BY ED THE PLUMBER

The following person is doing Busi− ness as SISTERS CLOTHING COLLECTIVE

OBITUARIES

Humboldt 328 2nd St Eureka, CA 95501

Humboldt 724 A St Eureka, CA 95501

Jennifer L Bessette 2355 16th St Eureka, CA 95501

PO Box 3772 Eureka, CA 95502 724 A St Eureka, CA 95501

Willow G Hendry 25 Wisteria Ln Eureka, CA 95503

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Clarence E Bailey, Owner/Oper− ator This March 19, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by a General Partnership. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Jennifer Bessette, Co−Owner This March 8, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

3/25, 4/1, 4/8, 4/15 (21−104)

3/18, 3/25, 4/1, 4/8 (21−088)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00223

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00167

The following person is doing Busi− ness as ZIGGYS AUTO BODY & PAINT

The following person is doing Busi− ness as CORNERSTONE REALTY

Humboldt 183 Mayfair St Willow Creek, CA 95573

Humboldt 1131 Main Street Fortuna, CA 95540

PO Box 1063 Willow Creek, CA 95573

Cornerstone Realty Properties Inc. CA 4704286 1131 Main Street Fortuna, CA 95540

Guy A Ziegenbein 184 Shady Ln Willow Creek, CA 95573 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Guy Ziegenbein, Owner This March 24, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Kimberly Brown, Chief Executive Officer This March 8, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

4/1, 4/8, 4/15, 4/22 (21−111)

3/18, 3/25, 4/1, 4/8 (21−087)

@northcoastjournal

Carol Davis June 17, 1944 - March 13, 2021 Carol Davis was born in Los Angeles on June 17, 1944 and settled into the loving arms of Ray and Lorene Davis. She passed away quietly at home on March 13, 2021 in the care of her loving children. A lively child and a curious teen, Carol’s parents had religion and music in abundance, so she grew playing piano and singing for the choir and church gatherings. When Aunt Martha, a socialite from Florida with a literary bent, came to visit she brought trunks of dress-up clothes, hats, shoes, a Ouji board and vitamins. The seeds of destiny are born in the child. If there is a thru line to this special life, it is music. If there is a subtext, it is food. If there is a purpose, it is the happiness and welfare of children. In 1962, Carol graduated high school and moved to Los Angeles to attend a Southern Baptist Bible College. While there, she realized she could also put her choir-trained voice to use in gay bars and brothels. Her repertoire expanded with her horizons. Nobody quite remember exactly when she appeared in Arcata. Sometime in the early mid sixties, she left LA to take a job as a stage manager in Ashland Oregon. The fog was heavy in the trees and Humboldt was the most beautiful place she had ever seen. Arcata had a little college with a theater department and when she went to see about it, they were doing Theater of the Absurd. She passed up the job and stayed, studied under a fabulous theater faculty and with student actors and technicians pushing the envelope of the theatrical and the political, It was a heady time to be engaged in the arts. In 1968 she and scene designing grad student David Brune married out at Rothrock’s with an after party held at the Pin Room which was always tolerant of hippies. The couple set off to Purdue in Indiana then to New Orleans following David’s work, of course, he being the one with the graduate degree. New Orleans suited Carol; she bore two swell babies there, explored its music and food scenes, and continued to return whenever possible. Carol came back to Arcata without David and with two little ones: Catlin, a toddler, and Stuart, a babe in arms. They lived in a little apartment at Rothrock’s at first until she got work and on her feet when they moved to a little duplex on Grotzman Lane. The kids went to Centering School and then to St Mary’s for some discipline and the simplicity of the uniform. All children took to Carol. She was an early cocktail waitress at the Jambalaya and often burst into a song or two after hours to inspire the clean up. She worked for a time a Plaza Design, pitched in at the Minor Theater Corp and took other jobs that were like mini play productions – a project to be organized, accomplished, and put away. She was utterly reliable and never left a mess behind. Then she met Pat Conlin, her Irishman, and he liked her, and the kids liked him, so they became a family, sealed the match in 1977 at the Vet’s Hall, and what a party that was — the music, the food, the universal delight. It was time for steady regular work, and Carol hired on with the Child Care Council where she applied her organizational talents to the well-being of children. Starting in the resource

unit, supporting the work of providers in the field, she later moved on to the abuse prevention unit, and worked directly with families. She was a dedicated, hard-working advocate for families and their kids, finding resources and options, being present in that way she had, so you knew she had all her attention directed at your problem. This work required great tenacity and heart. Carol had plenty of both. Co-workers from this time recall her generosity and warmth, the great food and fun which made their difficult work more manageable, but also her insistent curiosity and willingness to ask the tough questions, while holding everyone to an ethical client focus. All through these decades they catered gatherings large and small for all manner of group events. The non-profit fundraising world relied on her good food prepared with little fuss, on time and at reasonable cost. She did much of the work from home, but could command any kitchen, keeping the volunteer help happily doing her bidding. She fed children at summer camps, worked memorials and reunions, workshops and anniversary parties. There was no job of work that offended her, and she never needed to advertise. In about 1980 the Davis-Conlins bought a piece of land up above West End and started building a house. And what a house; it grew and evolved, opened up and out into garden and forest. Catlin remembers coming home late one night to find Pat with saws out, cutting in a new emergency window. Carol’s design sense was spot-on and her working man indefatigable. From this power center Carol began to research her origins and the practicality of opening a food business down town. The birth family quest was successful, and she discovered, after years of searching, the slew of family she always expected to find. Sister Sue became especially close. This work answered lots of nagging questions and brought new avenues of affection to her. And by the end she knew a great deal, both good and bad, about adoption law. The Pacific Rim Noodle House opened on I street between 10th and 11th and for a decade cooked up really good affordable take-out food, and employed and trained a steady stream of young foodies. Everyone hoped new owners would keep it going, but without Carol’s energy and connections, it was lost to food history. In retirement, she still entertained and liked nothing so much as keeping the pot stirred and the conversation flowing. A great hostess is having a great time, and nobody had more fun than Carol. It radiated from her and was irresistible. Pat died in 2016 and his absence was hard for her to carry, but she did. She bought a new hat and walked to town for some shopping and to meet and greet her many friends. When she couldn’t drive safely, she stopped, and gradually her world grew close around her. Her memories like her voice remained strong. Even as she lay dying (did you catch that, Aunt Martha?) those qualities of her character – curiosity, warmth, directness – remained. If she was vague it was only about things that didn’t matter. If frustrated, it resolved into acceptance. When visited in her dying bed by a musician friend, she sang with him – Swing Low and If I Only Had a Heart and Summertime. He went to cheer her and she made him glad. To quote the poet: “Our grand orchestra of liberation has dwindled to a funeral march, but with Sister Carol’s voice and a tambourine gone ahead of us, wherever we’re going, they’ll know some serious jubilation is coming.” Sometimes a person comes to a town with no agenda, just a good heart and a pocketful of talents, and she makes the place different by her steady presence among us. Carol was like the beating heart of Arcata for about fifty years. This was her great gift to our time in our town. And the place is better for it. Catlin and Stu hope to be able to celebrate Carol’s birthday June 12th at the Vet’s Hall in Arcata with her friends and good food and music. We’ll let you know what to bring.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 1, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

35


Eureka, CA 95501 Grant D Pingtree 2904 T St Eureka, CA 95501

LEGAL NOTICES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00198

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00227

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00205

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00208

The following person is doing Busi− ness as SEASIDE SCHOOLHOUSE/ REDWOOD FOREST BATHING/ REDWOOD FOREST THERAPY

The following person is doing Busi− ness as ELYSIAN ESTHETICS

The following person is doing Busi− ness as 4−EVER FADED BARBER SHOP

The following person is doing Busi− ness as RITA’S ARCATA

Humboldt 1100 Main Street, Ste D2 Fortuna, CA 95540

Humboldt 3131 F St Eureka, CA 95501

Humboldt 855 8th St, Suite 3 Arcata, CA 95521

2690 Campton Heights Drive Fortuna, CA 95540

2523 Albee St Apt B Eureka, CA 95501

2323 Harris Eureka, CA 95503

Jessi A Shinn 2690 Campton Heights Drive Fortuna, CA 95540

Christian R.B. Reynolds 2523 Albee St Apt B Eureka, CA 95501

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Jessi A. Shinn, Owner This March 26, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Christian Reynolds, Owner This March 16, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Edward Fregoso, Owner This March 16, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

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4/1, 4/8, 4/15, 4/22 (21−113)

Humboldt 1770 Market Ave McKinleyville, CA 95519 Scarlet Z Ibis−Roley 1770 Market Ave McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on May 1, 2015 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Scarlet Ibis−Roley, Sole Propri− etor This March 15, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

4/1, 4/8, 4/15, 4/22 (21−112)

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We Print Obituaries Submit information via email to classified@northcoastjournal.com, or by mail or in person. Please submit photos in JPG or PDF format, or original photos can be scanned at our office. The North Coast Journal prints each Thursday, 52 times a year. Deadline for obituary information is at 5 p.m. on the Sunday prior to publication date.

3/25, 4/1, 4/8, 4/15 (21−103)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00195 The following person is doing Busi− ness as IMBUE HERBALS Humboldt 1006 Villa Way Arcata, CA 95521 Kristin B Aalders 1006 Villa Way Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Kristin Brianne Aalders, Owner This March 15, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 3/25, 4/1, 4/8, 4/15 (21−106)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00168 The following person is doing Busi− ness as THINK LIKE NATURE

310 F STREET, EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 442-1400 FAX (707) 442-1401

36

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 1, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

Humboldt 2904 T St Eureka, CA 95501 Grant D Pingtree 2904 T St Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on March 8, 2021 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Grant Pingtree, Owner This March 8, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 3/18, 3/25, 4/1, 4/8 (21−089)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00203 The following person is doing Busi− ness as ALL PHASE PROPERTY MAINTE− NANCE Humboldt 3006 Girard Ct Eureka, CA 95503 Jesse A Quinionez 3006 Girard Ct Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Jesse Quinionez, Owner This March 16, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk 3/25, 4/1, 4/8, 4/15 (21−102)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00204 The following person is doing Busi− ness as WES GREEN COMPANY Humboldt 6360 West End Road Arcata, CA 95521 Mad River Hardwood Company, Inc. CA C0725994 6360 West End Road Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on February 22, 2021 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars

transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on February 22, 2021 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Wesley E. Green, Jr., President This March 16, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk 3/25, 4/1, 4/8, 4/15 (21−096)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00163 The following person is doing Busi− ness as T & H CONSTRUCTION Humboldt 2900 Arthur Road McKinleyville, CA 95519 Z & H Company LLC CA 201711710024 2900 Arthur Road McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on March 1, 2021 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s James Curtis Hinds, Authorized Member This March 5, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 3/18, 3/25, 4/1, 4/8 (21−091)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. CV2100330 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: JESSICA ELIZABETH−MARIE CRAB− TREE for a decree changing names as follows: Present name AUTUMN BLAKELEIGH−LOUISE CRETCHER to Proposed Name AUTUMN BLAKELEIGH−LOUISE CRABTREE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: April 23, 2021


must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: April 23, 2021 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts. ca.gov/ Date: March 9, 2021 Filed: March 11, 2021 /s/ Kelly L. Neel Judge of the Superior Court 3/18, 3/25, 4/1, 4/8 (21−094)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. CV2100354 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: DAVID JAMES BEAVER for a decree changing names as follows: Present name DAVID JAMES BEAVER to Proposed Name DAVID JAMES PERRIER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: April 30, 2021 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts. ca.gov/ Date: March 15, 2021 Filed: March 16, 2021 /s/ Kelly L. Neel Judge of the Superior Court 3/25, 4/1, 4/8, 4/15 (21−100)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. CV2100392 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: KIMBERLY ELIZABETH GRAY for a decree changing names as follows: Present name KIMBERLY ELIZABETH GRAY KIMBERLY ELIZABETH COOPER to Proposed Name

OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: KIMBERLY ELIZABETH GRAY for a decree changing names as follows: Present name KIMBERLY ELIZABETH GRAY KIMBERLY ELIZABETH COOPER to Proposed Name KIMBERLY ELIZABETH GRAY KIMBERLY ELIZABETH GRAY THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 7, 2021 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts. ca.gov/ Date: March 23, 2021 Filed: March 24, 2021 /s/ Kelly L. Neel Judge of the Superior Court 4/1, 4/8, 4/15, 4/22 (21−117)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF CHARLES W. SMITH a/k/a CHARLES WAYNE SMITH CASE NO. PR2100080 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of CHARLES W. SMITH a/k/a CHARLES WAYNE SMITH A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner BRENDA D. SMITH In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition for probate requests that BRENDA D. SMITH be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the dece− dent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for exami− nation in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on April 29, 2021 at 2:00 p.m. at

representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on April 29, 2021 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 6.

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Effective Monday, May 18, 2020, Humboldt Superior Court will resume Probate calendars using remote video and phone confer− encing. You have been served with Notice of Petition to Administer Estate pursuant to which a court hearing has been scheduled. Due to the COVID−19 pandemic, if you wish to appear at the court hearing, you must do so remotely. Instructions to appear remotely are set forth on the Court’s website: www.humboldt.courts.ca.gov. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: James D. Poovey 937 6th Street Eureka, CA 95501 707−443−6744 Filed: March 25, 2021 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 4/1, 4/8, 4/15 (21−118)

LEG AL S ? County Public Notices Fictitious Business Petition to Administer Estate Trustee Sale Other Public Notices

442-1400 ×314

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ASTROLOGY

EMPLOYMENT

Free Will Astrology Week of April 1, 2021 By Rob Brezsny

Homework: Send the secrets you could only tell a stranger. FreeWillAstrology.com

freewillastrology@freewillastrology.com ARIES (March 21-April 19): Playwright August Strindberg (1849–1912) was a maverick innovator who loved to experiment with plot and language. One of his stories takes place in a dream and the hero is the Christ-like daughter of a Vedic god. He once said that he felt “an immense need to become a savage and create a new world.” Given your current astrological potentials, Aries, I suspect that might be an apt motto for you right now. APRIL FOOL! I half-lied. There’s no need for you to become a savage. In fact, it’s better if you don’t. But the coming weeks will definitely be a good time to start creating a new world. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Who says all Tauruses are gentle, risk-avoidant, sensible, and reliable? Taurus author Mary MacLane (1861–1929), known as the “Wild Woman of Butte, Montana,” authored shocking, scandalous books. In I Await the Devil’s Coming, she testified, “I am not good. I am not virtuous. I am not generous. I am merely a creature of intense passionate feeling. I feel—everything. It is my genius. It burns me like fire.” Can I convince you, Taurus, to make her your role model for the coming weeks? APRIL FOOL! I don’t think you should be EXACTLY like MacLane. Please leave out the part about “I am not good. I am not virtuous. I am not generous,” as well as the “I await the devil’s coming” part. But yes, do be a creature of intensely passionate feeling. Let your feelings be your genius, burning in you like a fire. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Poet Emily Dickinson had a good sense of humor, so she was probably making a wry joke when she wrote, “The lovely flowers embarrass me. They make me regret I am not a bee.” But who knows? Maybe Emily was being a bit sincere, too. In any case, I advise you to make a list of all the things you regret not being—all the qualities and assets you wish you had, but don’t. It’s a favorable time to wallow in remorse. APRIL FOOL! I was totally lying! In fact, I hope you will do the reverse: Engage in an orgy of self-appreciation, celebrating yourself for being exactly who you are. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Provocation specialist Lydia Lunch is a singer and poet who’s skilled at generating interesting mischief. She testifies, “My daily existence is a battlecade of extreme fluctuations where chaos clobbers apathy, which beats the s--- out of depression which follows irritability which slams into anger which eclipses ecstasy which slips through my fingers far too often.” In the coming weeks, Cancerian, I recommend you adopt her melodramatic approach to living the intense life. APRIL FOOL! I lied. Please don’t be like Lydia Lunch in the near future. On the contrary: Cultivate regal elegance, sovereign poise, and dynamic equanimity. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In 1692, a Swedish man named Thiess of Kaltenbrun was put on trial for being a werewolf. He claimed to be a noble werewolf, however. He said he regularly went down to Hell to do holy combat against the Devil. I suggest you make him your inspirational role model in the coming weeks. Be as weird as you need to be in order to fight for what’s good and right. APRIL FOOL! I half-lied. What I really meant to say was: Be as weird as you need to be to fight for what’s good and right, but without turning into a werewolf, zombie, vampire, or other supernatural monster. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): ❝I want to hear raucous music, to brush against bodies, to drink fiery Benedictine,” wrote author Anais Nin. “Beautiful women and handsome men arouse fierce desires in me. I want to dance. I want drugs. I want to know perverse people, to be intimate with them. I want to bite into life.❞ All that sounds like perfect counsel for you to consider right now, dear Virgo! APRIL FOOL! I lied. Nin’s exuberant testimony might be an interesting perspective to flirt with—if the COVID-19 virus had been completely tamed. But it hasn’t. So I must instead suggest that you find ways to express this lively, unruly energy in safe and sublimated ways.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Here are affirmations that will serve you well in the coming days. 1. “I am willing to make mistakes if someone else is willing to learn from them.” 2. “I am grateful that I’m not as judgmental as all the shortsighted, self-righteous people.” 3. “I assume full responsibility for my actions, except those that are someone else’s fault.” 4. “A good scapegoat is as welcome as a solution to the problem.” APRIL FOOL! All the preceding affirmations are total bunk! Don’t you dare use them. Use these instead: 1. “I enjoy taking responsibility for my actions.” 2. “Rather than indulging in the reflex to blame, I turn my attention to fixing the problem.” 3. “No one can make me feel something I don’t want to feel.” 4. “I’m free from believing in the images people have of me.” SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): According to author Kahlil Gibran, “If we were all to sit in a circle and confess our sins, we would laugh at each other for lack of originality.” But I challenge you Scorpios to refute that theory in the coming days. For the sake of your sanity and health, you need to commit highly original sins—the more, the better. APRIL FOOL! I lied. Save your novel, imaginative sinning for later. The truth is that now is an excellent time to explore the joyous and healthy practice of being extremely virtuous. Imitate author Susan Sontag: “My idolatry: I’ve lusted after goodness. Wanting it here, now, absolutely, increasingly.” SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): The coming months would be a great time to start your own university and then award yourself a PhD in Drugless Healing or Mathematical Reincarnation or Political Metaphysics—or any other subject you’d like to be considered an expert in. Hey, why not give yourself three PhDs and call yourself a Professor Emeritus? APRIL FOOL! I’m just joking. The coming months will indeed be an extremely favorable time to advance your education, but with real learning, not fake credentials. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): After his Nirvana bandmate Kurt Cobain committed suicide, Capricorn drummer Dave Grohl was depressed for months. To cheer himself up, he wrote and recorded an album’s worth of songs, playing almost all the instruments himself: drums, lead guitar, rhythm guitar, bass, and vocals. I think you should try a similar spectacularly heroic solo task in the coming weeks. APRIL FOOL! I lied. Here’s my true and actual advice: Now is a time when you should gather all the support and help and cooperation you can possibly garner for an interesting project. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Argentine poet Alejandra Pizarnik told her psychoanalyst León Ostrov that if she were going to steal something, it would be “the façade of a certain collapsed house in a little town called Fontenay-aux-Roses [near Paris].” What was so special about this façade? Its windows were made of “magical” lilac-colored glass that was “like a beautiful dream.” In accordance with astrological omens, I invite you, too, to decide what marvel you would steal—and then go steal it! APRIL FOOL! I half-lied. Yes, definitely decide what you would steal—it’s important to give your imagination permission to be outrageous—but don’t actually steal it. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): I’ve never understood the appeal of singer-songwriter Morrissey, especially since he began endorsing bigoted far-right politicians. However, I want to recommend that you adopt the attitude he once expressed in a letter to a friend. “It was a terrible blow to hear that you actually worked,” he wrote. “It’s so old-fashioned to work. I’d much rather lounge about the house all day looking fascinating.” Be like that in the coming weeks, Pisces! APRIL FOOL! I lied. In fact, you’d be making a silly mistake to lie around the house looking fascinating. It’s a highly favorable time for you to find ways to work harder and smarter. l

NORTH COAST COAST JOURNAL JOURNAL • Thursday, • Thursday, April April 1, 2021 1, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com • northcoastjournal.com 38NORTH 2

Opportunities

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AMERICAN STAR PRIVATE SECURITY Is now hiring. Clean record. Driver’s license required. Must own vehicle. Apply at 922 E Street, Suite A, Eureka (707) 476−9262

Hiring?

442-1400 ×314 northcoastjournal.com ESSENTIAL CAREGIVERS Needed to help Elderly Visiting Angels 707−442−8001

The Hoopa Valley Tribe is accepting applications to fill the following vacant positions:

SECURITY OFFICER/TRAINEE

Police Department, Regular, F/T, Salary: $18.00/hr. Under general supervision, position patrols Tribal properties to assist with the deterrence of criminal activity, performs resource patrol, and provides assistance with patrols; examines doors, windows, and gates; reports irregularities; maintains logs; and, uses radio to contact dispatcher. DEADLINE: April 12, 2021

PROGRAM MANAGER

BUILDING INSPECTOR TRAINEE − PART TIME $19.18 − $21.70/hr Performs inspections and plan checks; assists with building and zoning code enforcement; and other related duties as assigned. (707)825−2128 https://www. cityofarcata.org/

SPECIAL PROJECTS CONSTRUCTION INSPECTOR $26.774/hr − $29.554/hr Performs inspections & record keeping for special construction projects; other related duties as assigned. https://www.cityofarcata.o rg/ default

Hoopa Higher Education Department, Regular, grantfunded, F/T, Salary: $55,440.00-60,440.00 annually, DOE. Performs oversight, staff supervision, plans, coordinates, and implements all instructional and grant compliance components of the Hoopa Higher Education programs, Hoopa Career and Technical Education Program, and CR Klamath-Trinity instructional site. OPEN UNTIL FILLED

FISHERIES MANAGEMENT DIVISION LEAD

Fisheries Department, Regular, F/T, Salary: $65,535.00118,316.00 DOE. Leads the division; oversees subordinate staff of biologists and technicians; studies basic principles of animal life such as origin, relationship, development, anatomy, and functions; collaborates with department staff and other agencies (Tribal, federal, and state agencies); and manages 2-3 subordinate supervisors who supervise 6-10 employees. OPEN UNTIL FILLED

POLICE OFFICER

Hoopa Tribal Police Department, Regular, F/T, Salary: $26.91/hr. Performs a wide variety of peace officer duties involving the protection of life and property, enforcement of laws and Tribal Ordinances, criminal investigation, crime prevention and suppression, case preparation and testimony, and providing information and assistance to the public. OPEN UNTIL FILLED

SERGEANT

NOW HIRING! Are you passionate about making a difference in your community? Are you tired of mundane cubicle jobs and want to join a friendly, devoted community with limitless potential? Join the Humboldt County Education Community. Many diverse positions to choose from with great benefits, retirement packages, and solid pay. Learn more and apply today at hcoe.org/jobs Find what you’re looking for in education!

Hoopa Tribal Police Department, Regular, F/T, Salary: $34.13/hr. Under general supervision of the Chief of Police or his authorized designee shall perform a wide variety of peace officer duties involving the protection of life and property; and, additional requirements are listed in the job description. OPEN UNTIL FILLED These positions are classified safety-sensitive. Obtain position description for minimum qualifications. For complete job descriptions, minimum qualifications and employment applications, contact the Human Resources/Insurance Department, Hoopa Valley Tribe, P.O. Box 218, Hoopa, CA 95546. Call (530) 6259200, or email hr1@hoopainsurance.com or hr2@ hoopainsurance.com. The Tribe’s Alcohol & Drug Policy and TERO Ordinance apply.


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OUR MISSION

Changing Tides Family Services increases the health and success of children, youth, families, and individuals

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Redwood Coast Regional Center Be a part of a great team!

SOCIAL WORKER (Service Coordinator)

HR Manager

FT in Eureka, CA. Advocating & coord. services for Adults w/dev & intellectual disabilities. Requires BA w/exp in human services or related field. Sal range starts $3665/mo. Exc. bene.

Intensive Care Coordinator

Visit www.redwoodcoastrc.org for more info & required docs.

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Clinician/Bilingual Clinician

Wage dependent on qualifications $ 23.24-$29.45/hr (full-time)

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Child Care Case Manager 15.71/hr (full-time)

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Family Services Specialist/ Bilingual Family Services Specialist Wage dependent on qualifications $ 16.59-$17.09/hr (full-time)

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Mental Health Support Specialist 18.30/hr (part-time)

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We are operating under strict COVID-19 safety protocols including daily health screenings, required masks, and increased hand washing and cleaning practices per the Reopening Plan certified by Humboldt County. We are an Equal Opportunity Employer.

2259 Myrtle Ave., Eureka, CA 95501 (707) 444-8293 www.changingtidesfs.org Hablamos español @changingtidesfamilyservices

NOW HIRING WE HAVE IMMEDIATE OPENINGS IN OUR MAINTENANCE DEPARTMENT MILLWRIGHTS ELECTRICIANS OILERS FABRICATORS Humboldt Sawmill Company continues to expand our Scotia, CA Operations! We are an essential business and offer secure employment, family-level wages, company paid medical, dental, and vision benefits, 401K plus much more. We have Immediate job placement available for the right people!

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Place a free classified ad in the North Coast Trader You may submit a free classified ad online at thetrader707.com/free-classified-ads Or submit your ad by snail mail, phone or email to 310 F St. Eureka CA 95501, (707) 442-1400 ads@thetrader707.com Free Ad Terms and Conditions: Limited to 1 Box size with text only, 50 words/300 characters. Free ads will run weekly based on space available. Free ads will run for one issue and must be submitted weekly to be eligible for each issue printed. Ads that are submitted that do not run in print are not guaranteed to run in the following printed issue.  Free Ads will not be accepted past deadline.

YO U R G LISTIN

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Call 707-620-2940 or visit www.getredwood.com/Careers to apply now! Equal Opportunity Employer, Valuing Diversity of our Workforce and Offering a Drug Free Workplace

NYLEX.net, Inc. is accepting applications for the full time position of

Network Support Technician Experience preferred, but excellent opportunity for new graduates/motivated individuals. Prefer applicants be familiar with: • current Microsoft desktop and server operating systems • setting up and configuring server hardware • firewalls and VPN protocols • backup and recovery software and methodologies • virtualization technologies such as VMWare or Hyper-V • Network diagnosis testing tools and commands • TCP/IP networking, routing, switching, wireless • Must be able to lift/move 40lbs, hold valid driver’s license, and available for occasional after hours/ weekend projects. Compensation: Starting pay based on experience, 100% employer paid health, dental and vision, life, paid holidays, gym membership, and 8 hours paid time off earned each month. Send resume: elizabeth@nylex.net Questions: 707-443-4944

The Hoopa Valley Tribe is accepting applications to fill the following vacant positions:

MILL LABORER

HFI Department, Regular, Seasonal, F/T, Salary: $14.00/hr. Operates a chainsaw to buck logs to specific length, operates a chop saw, operates a pressure washer, pulls boards off sawmill and stacks lumber, and operates a forklift. DEADLINE: April 15, 2021

SHOVEL LOADER OPERATOR

HFI Department, Regular, Seasonal, F/T, Salary: DOE. Operates a shovel loader, performs daily maintenance, loads a logging trucks to meet production standards, decks logs in a safe manner, and observes all safety precautions for self and co-workers. OPEN UNTIL FILLED

HOOK TENDER

HFI Department, Regular, Seasonal, F/T, Salary: DOE. Observes all safety precautions for self and co-workers; layout roads for yarder logging; rigging tail hold trees; cut guy stumps; and lay guidelines in a safe manner. OPEN UNTIL FILLED

CHOKER SETTER

HFI Department, Regular, Seasonal, F/T, Salary: DOE. Observes all safety precautions for self and co-workers; sets chokers; and, chooses layouts such as roads for CATS and turns for logs. OPEN UNTIL FILLED These positions are classified safety-sensitive. Obtain position description for minimum qualifications. For complete job descriptions, minimum qualifications and employment applications, contact the Human Resources/Insurance Department, Hoopa Valley Tribe, P.O. Box 218, Hoopa, CA 95546. Call (530) 6259200, or email hr1@hoopainsurance.com or hr2@ hoopainsurance.com. The Tribe’s Alcohol & Drug Policy and TERO Ordinance apply.

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EMPLOYMENT default

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NOW HIRING! CURRENT OPENINGS:

   Email resume to restif.com or visit restif.com/employment for more information

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Tri-County Independent Living (TCIL) is a community-based, non-residential, nonprofit, multicultural organization providing services to persons with disabilities to enhance independence.

DURABLE MEDICAL EQUIPMENT Lending Library Manager Do you have experience with a disability, your own, or someone close to you? Are you motivated to support people with disabilities to have access to the equipment that supports their independence? Tri-County Independent Living has established sites in Willow Creek and Crescent City to acquire, store and lend durable medical equipment to people with disabilities in those communities. These positions offer part-time flexible hours, competitive pay as well as an opportunity to provide a needed, positive service to your community.

REQUIREMENTS Computer skills including Google Suites, Excel, and Word, as well as database entry. Valid CA drivers’ license and a clean DMV record.



Humboldt County Office of Education

Computer Systems Technician Information Technology Permanent Salary: Range 35, $15.01-$21.23 Description: https://hcoe.org/jobdescriptions/computer-systems-technician/ Qualifications: Not less than one (1) year of college and a minimum of one (1) year of experience in an information processing environment involving desktop computing and telecommunication technical support or a minimum of two years of computing and telecommunication technical support experience. Experience with Microsoft Active Directory networks highly desriable. The successful candidate will be required to pass a fingerprint clearance with the Department of Justice and show proof of eligibility to work in the United States. Application Procedure:Classified Application Form (available online at: https://hcoe.org/jobs/) Cover Letter Stating reasons for application and summarizing candidate’s qualifications. Resume. 3-5 Current Letters of recommendation. Return your Application packet to: PERSONNEL Humboldt County Office of Education 901 Myrtle Avenue Eureka, CA 95501

Excellent communication skills, both written and verbal.

APPLY BY: APRIL 1, 2021 4:00PM

Strong customer service skills.

The Humboldt County Office of Education supports the principles of Equal Opportunity Employment

APPLICATION PROCESS Visit www.tilinet.org to download the TCIL application, review the full job description and details on the application requirements. Only complete applications will be accepted.

OPEN UNTIL FILLED People with Disabilities strongly encouraged to apply. Alternative format will be provided upon request. EOE.

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 1, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

Hiring? Post your job opportunities in the Journal. 442-1400 ×314 classified@northcoastjournal.com

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                  

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Bridgeville Community Center

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Permanent 30 hours per week with sick and vacation benefits. Salary negotiable. Bachelor’s degree in social work or related field preferred. Two years minimum relevant non-profit work experience required; may be considered in lieu of education.

General Responsibilities: • Interaction and communication with the Board of Directors in order to fulfill BCC mission and strategy. • Ongoing development, administration and communication for funding resources such as grants, fundraising programs, government funding. • Effective and organized administration of operations, including staff and volunteers. • Financial management, including budgets and reporting. Must have working knowledge of QuickBooks for Nonprofits. • Excellent written and verbal communication skills, computer skills. • Establish and maintain rapport with diverse community clientele and complementary organizations. Contact BCC at (707) 777-1775 for a complete job description and application. Position available immediately.


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  

CITY OF FORTUNA

YUROK TRIBE

FACILITY CUSTODIAN

For a list of current job openings and descriptions log onto www.yuroktribe.org or Join us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/ yuroktribehumanresources for more information call (707) 482-1350 extension 1376

ACCOUNTING/FISCAL SPECIALIST, Arcata Duties include assisting w/ fiscal & general ledger analysis; assist w/ prep for annual audits & federal/state monitoring. Assist w/payroll & accounts payable. Require 3 yrs. business related exp. Bachelor’s degree in Business Administration or Finance/Accounting preferred, but not reQ. F/T, starting 32 hrs./wk. $19.52-$20.50/hr. First Review Date: March 31st, 2021

PART TIME, $15.81 – 19.24/HR.

Under general supervision of the Director of Parks and Recreation and/or their designee, to perform a variety of custodial assignments for the upkeep of City facilities, equipment and grounds; and to perform related work as required. Must be at least 18 years of age and maintain a valid California Driver’s License throughout employment. Full job description and application available at friendlyfortuna.com or City of Fortuna, 621 11th Street, 725-7600. Applications must be received by 4 pm on Friday, April 9, 2021.

Let’s Be Friends

TEMPORARY CENTER DIRECTOR, McKinleyville Responsibilities include overall management of an Early Head start prog. AA/BA in Child Development or related field prefer. Must have 1 course in Infant Toddler coursework. Temp F/T 40 hrs./wk. M-Fri. $17.53-$19.33/hr. Open Until Filled

TEACHERS, Eureka/Fortuna Responsible for developing & implementing classroom activities—supporting & supervising a toddler program. Must have 12 core in ECE/ CD (w/ 3 units in Infant/Toddler Development or Curriculum), meet Associate Teacher Level on the Child Development Permit Matrix, & have one-yr. exp. teaching in a toddler setting. P/T positions, 28 hrs./wk. M-F $14.78-$15.52/hr. Open Until Filled

TEAM TEACHER, Arcata Responsible for developing & implementing classroom activities for toddlers. Must have 12 core in ECE/CD (w/ 3 units in Infant/Toddler Development or Curriculum), meet Associate Teacher level on Child Development Permit Matrix, & have one-yr. exp. teaching in a toddler setting. F/T 37.5 hrs./wk. M-F. $15.08-$15.83/hr. Open Until Filled.

TEMPORARY TEACHER, McKinleyville Responsible for the development & implementation of classroom activities—providing support & supervision for a toddler program. Have 12 core in ECE/CD (w/ 3 units in Infant/Toddler Development or Curriculum), meet Associate Teacher Level on Child Development Permit Matrix & have one-yr. exp. teaching in a toddler setting. Temp. F/T 36 hrs./wk. M-F $14.78-$15.52/hr. Open Until Filled.

ASSISTANT TEACHERS, Arcata/ McKinleyville/Trinidad Assist teacher in the implementation & supervision of activities for preschool children. Min. of 6-12 ECE units & 6 months’ exp. working w/ children. P/T positions available, 25 hrs./wk. M-Fri $14.00-$14.62/hr. Open Until Filled. Submit applications to: Northcoast Children’s Services 1266 9th Street, Arcata, CA 95521 For addtl info & application please call 707- 822-7206 or visit our website at www.ncsheadstart.org

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K’ima:w Medical Center

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CITY OF FORTUNA

an entity of the Hoopa Valley Tribe, is seeking applicants for the following positions:

POLICE DISPATCHER

PATIENT BENEFITS CLERK – FT/ REGULAR PATIENT BENEFITS COORDINATOR - FT/ REGULAR ACCOUNTANT FT/REGULAR PHYSICIAN FT/REGULAR SOBER LIVING OPERATIONS CASE MANAGER FT/REGULAR ACCOUNTANT FT/TEMPORARY CERTIFIED MEDICAL ASSISTANT FT/REGULAR MAT MANAGER FT/REGULAR GRANT FUNDED LAB TECHNOLOGIST FT/REGULAR CERTIFIED DATA ENTRY CODER TECHNICIAN FT/REGULAR DEADLINE TO APPLY IS 5PM, APRIL1, 2021. MEDICAL DIRECTOR FT/REGULAR HOUSEKEEPER FT/REGULAR TEMPORARY (UP TO 6 MONTHS) DEADLINE TO APPLY IS APRIL 1, 2021 MENTAL HEALTH CLINICIAN FT/REGULAR RN CARE MANAGER FT/REGULAR SECURITY GUARD ON-CALL ALL POSITIONS OPEN UNTIL FILLED, UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED For an application, job description, and additional information, contact: K’ima:w Medical Center, Human Resources, PO Box 1288, Hoopa, CA, 95546 or call 530-625-4261 or email: hr.kmc@kimaw.org for a job description and application. You can also check our website listings for details at kimaw.org. Resume and CV are not accepted without a signed application.

@northcoastjournal

FULL TIME, $43,663$53,122 PER YEAR.

Under general supervision of the Police Dispatch Supervisor and on-duty Watch Commander. Dispatchers answer and process both incoming emergency and non-emergency requests, performs all other functions involved with 9-1-1 public safety dispatching, assists with clerical duties within the Police Department, and performs other related duties as assigned. Must be at least 18 and have current CDL. Pre-employment physical and background check required. Full job description and required application available at City of Fortuna, 621 11th Street or www.friendlyfortuna.com.  default

CITY OF FORTUNA

RECREATION PROGRAM LEADER PART-TIME $14.00 - $16.37 PER HOUR, PART TIME. Under the general supervision of a Recreation Program Supervisor, to plan, direct, and conduct an assigned recreation program for the City’s Parks and Recreation Department; to perform a variety of assignments for the City’s Parks and Recreation Department; and to do related work as required. Complete job description and required application available at friendlyfortuna.com or City of Fortuna, 621 11th Street, 725-7600. Application Deadline: Open until filled

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 1, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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WRITING CONSULTANT/EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. (707) 443−8373. www.ZevLev.com default

What’s New

CLOSING SALE EVERYTHING

Auto Service ROCK CHIP? Windshield repair is our specialty. For emergency service CALL GLASWELDER 442−GLAS (4527) humboldtwindshield repair.com

Computer & Internet

Ripple Creek TRINITY ALPSCabins MAC & PC REPAIRS + MORE Let us be a one−stop−shop for all of your technology needs. We offer high quality repairs and fast turnaround times. (707) 308−1660 service@humboldttech.net https://humboldttech.net

335 E Street, Eureka 445-8079 Open Wed, Thu. & Fri.

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WILDERNESS AREA Getaway in beautifully furnished cabins on the Upper Trinity River. Hike, bike, fish or just relax in seclusion.

OPEN YEAR ROUND www.ripplecreekcabins.com

(530) 266-3505

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HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS. Opening soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedroom Apts. Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $24,500, 2 pers. $28,000; 3 pers. $31,500; 4 pers. $34,950; 5 pers. $37,750; 6 pers. $40,550; 7 pers. $43,350; 8 pers. $46,150 Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922 Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Bldg. 9 Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104

YOUR AD

HERE

442-1400 ×319

melissa@ northcoastjournal.com

Macintosh Computer Consulting for Business and Individuals Troubleshooting Hardware/Memory Upgrades Setup Assistance/Training Purchase Advice 707-826-1806 macsmist@gmail.com

Home Repair 2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. Although we have been in business for 25 years, we do not carry a contractors license. Call 845−3087

Musicians & Instructors BRADLEY DEAN ENTERTAINMENT Singer Songwriter. Old rock, Country, Blues, Private Parties, Bars. Gatherings of all kinds. (707) 832−7419

MARKETPLACE Other Professionals CIRCUS NATURE PRESENTS A. O’KAY CLOWN & NANINATURE Juggling Jesters & Wizards of Play Performances for all ages. Magical Adventures with circus games and toys. Festivals, Events & Parties. (707) 499−5628 www.circusnature.com

  

CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING Services available. Call Julie 839−1518.

  

Your Business Here YOUR AD HERE

442-1400 ×314

northcoastjournal.com

HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./ Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing profes− sionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822−2111 default

Done Making Babies?

Consider Vasectomy… default

 

Twenty-minute, in-office procedure

      

 

 

ONLINE or by E-MAIL @ northcoastjournal.com / calendar@northcoastjournal.com PRINT DEADLINE: Noon Thursday, the week before publication

Friendly office with soothing music to calm you





Submit your Calendar Events

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 1, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT

In on Friday, back to work on Monday

 

Cleaning

50% OFF

EXCEPT LEATHER AND JEWELRY

Lodging

Performing Vasectomies & Tubal Ligations for Over 35 Years Tim Paik-Nicely, MD 2505 Lucas Street, Suite B, Eureka, CA 95501 (707) 442-0400 ’



YOUR AD HERE

442-1400 ×314 northcoastjournal.com


Charlie Tripodi Owner/ Land Agent

Owner/Broker

Kyla Nored

Barbara Davenport

BRE# 01930997

707.834.7979

BRE# 01332697

707.476.0435

HAWKINS BAR – LAND/PROPERTY - $129,000

TING!

NEW LIS

!

RICE

ED P

C REDU

Bernie Garrigan

Dacota Huzzen

Mike Willcutt

Associate Broker

Realtor

Realtor

Realtor

Realtor

Realtor

BRE# 01066670

BRE# 01927104

BRE# 02109531

BRE# 02084041

BRE# 01956733

BRE# 02070276

707.498.6364

707.798.9301

707.499.0917

916.798.2107

707.601.1331

707.601.6702

Ashlee Cook

MIRANDA – HOME ON ACREAGE - $499,000

±1.45 Acres along the Trinity River featuring river views, a flat building site, PG&E lines through the property, community water hookups, and a community river access point.

±13 Acre woodland escape conveniently located just minutes from the beautiful Eel River, this wooded parcel features a 3/1 home, 8k sq. ft. shop, hobby shack, PG&E, 2 wells, end of the road privacy, and walking paths throughout

DINSMORE - CULTIVATION PROPERTY - $699,000

FIELDS LANDING – LAND/PROPERTY – $127,500

±40 Acres. Turn key operation permitted for 2021 and ready to go. Residence, processing shed, 3 greenhouses, tank storage, and rain catchment reservoir. Interim and provisional permits for 8,250 sq ft of outdoor. Approx. 4,000 ft elevation. OMC.

Undeveloped ±3.8 acre parcel with excellent sunset and bay views! Property is wooded, sloping, and has community water and sewer at parcel’s edge. Don’t miss your opportunity to build your dream home in this desirable neighborhood!

BRIDGEVILLE – LAND/PROPERTY - $299,000

FORTUNA – LAND/PROPERTY – $895,000

±40 Acre mountain hideaway just off hwy 36 featuring southern exposure, end of the road privacy, creek, springs, building site, and cabin & outbuilding in need of some TLC.

±24 Acres with development/subdivision potential! Property features public utility access with hillside views of Fortuna, Eel River, & Fernbridge. Plenty of space to develop or build your dream home! MOTIVATED SELLER! Bring all offers!

LARABEE – HOME ON ACREAGE - $699,000

MAD RIVER – LAND/PROPERTY – $329,000

±19.18 Acre river retreat in beautiful So Hum! Features a 2/2 home, shop, PG&E, open meadows, mature orchard, Eel River frontage with boat and fishing access, and end of the road privacy!

±55 Acres in Humboldt near the County line. Property features a small cabin, barn, year round spring, meadows, and oak woodlands. Elevation at approximately 4,000’.

WEITCHPEC – LAND/PROPERTY – $115,000

CUTTEN – LAND/PROPERTY – $450,000

Amazing views, huge trees, clean air, and privacy! This ± 46 acre parcel above the Klamath River is paradise found for a logger or hunter homesteader.

Katherine Fergus

REDUCE

D PRICE

!

±9.25 Acres in Cutten/Ridgewood area! Property has redwoods, open meadows, a skid road, and the potential to subdivide.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 1, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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N THE HUMBOLDT COUNTY COLLECTIVE

IS PROUD TO CARRY

AND MANY MORE! M

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AV

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BEST PRICES IN HUMBOLDT

1670 Myrtle Ave. Ste. B Eureka CA | 707.442.2420 | M-F 10am-6pm, Sat + Sun 11am-5pm

License No. C10-0000011-LIC

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North Coast Journal 04-01-2021 Edition