__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

Humboldt County, CA | FREE Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021 Vol. XXXII Issue 8 northcoastjournal.com

The NCJ Quarantine

PET PHOTO CONTEST

5 Humboldt’s strain 18 Walk it off


2

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com


CONTENTS 4 Mailbox 4 Poem

May I remember to not know

5 News

Humboldt’s COVID-19 Mutation and What it Means

Feb. 25, 2021 • Volume XXXII Issue 8 North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2021

6 News

PUBLISHER

9 NCJ Daily Online 10 On The Cover

GENERAL MANAGER

15 On the Table

Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com

One Year Ago

The NCJ Quarantine Pet Photo Contest Under the Table

17 It’s Personal

Saving the Discovery Museum

18 Trophy Case

Forward Movement

Judy Hodgson judy@northcoastjournal.com Melissa Sanderson melissa@northcoastjournal.com NEWS EDITOR

ARTS & FEATURES EDITOR

Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com DIGITAL EDITOR

Kimberly Wear kim@northcoastjournal.com

Humboldt Area Foundation Thanks Our Donors

STAFF WRITER

Special Insert

Kali Cozyris calendar@northcoastjournal.com

19 Fishing the North Coast Now or Never for Coastal Steelhead Season

20 Calendar 22 Home & Garden Service Directory

23 Screens

Ruthless and Rootless

24 Workshops & Classes 25 North Coast Night Lights Dark Skies of the North Coast

29 Sudoku & Crossword 30 Classifieds

Iridian Casarez iridian@northcoastjournal.com CALENDAR EDITOR

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Wendy Chan, Barry Evans, Rod Kausen, Mike Kelly, Kenny Priest PRODUCTION MANAGER

Holly Harvey holly@northcoastjournal.com ART DIRECTOR

Jonathan Webster jonathan@northcoastjournal.com GRAPHIC DESIGN/PRODUCTION

Heidi Bazán Beltrán, Dave Brown, Miles Eggleston ncjads@northcoastjournal.com ADVERTISING MANAGER

Kyle Windham kyle@northcoastjournal.com MEDIA ADVISOR

John Harper john@northcoastjournal.com SENIOR ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE

Bryan Walker bryan@northcoastjournal.com MARKETING SPECIALIST

Kara Scofield kara@northcoastjournal.com CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

Mark Boyd classified@northcoastjournal.com BOOKKEEPER

Deborah Henry billing@northcoastjournal.com OFFICE MANAGER

Michelle Dickinson michelle@northcoastjournal.com MAIL/OFFICE

The view from a Humboldt County hillside in the summer of 2020. Read more on page 25. Photo by David Wilson

On the Cover Illustrations by Dave Brown/Shutterstock

310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 707 442-1400 FAX:  707 442-1401 www.northcoastjournal.com Press Releases newsroom@northcoastjournal.com Letters to the Editor letters@northcoastjournal.com Events/A&E calendar@northcoastjournal.com Music music@northcoastjournal.com Classified/Workshops classified@northcoastjournal.com CIRCULATION VERIFICATION C O U N C I L

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 21,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 450 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

3


MAILBOX

May I remember to not know Circle upon circle spiral over spiral each day turns and the moon follows her cycle and the earth rotates unfolding a life. This dawn light this October air this April sun are all familiar, but not quite. The familiar tempts me to not look because I think I already see. The ordinary tempts me to not wonder because I think I already know. The simple tempts me to not listen because I think I already hear. But this blush moment of being which cradles me like home is at once a vast horizon of unknowing. May I remember not to know as the days unspool one upon another so alike I overlook their singular amazement. — Julie Doerner

Terry Torgerson

Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

WE CARE FOR YOUR PETS

MYRTLE AVENUE VETERINARY HOSPITAL

OFFICE HOURS MON-FRI 8 AM - 6 PM SAT 8AM - 12PM VACCINE CLINIC SAT 12-1 PHONE 707 443 8686

4

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

In Praise of Bennett Editor: The movie review by John J. Bennett about the Hoover/FBI assassination of Black Panther leader Fred Hampton I found to be exceptionally well written (“Tragedy of the Inside Man,” Feb. 18). He gives us a little look into what our very recent COVID life weirdness has been as far as being unable to enjoy gatherings for music or movies. And it resonates with Black Lives Matter and reminds me of the late 1960s and the Bay Area student strikes and anti-war movement and the Panthers in Oakland and the Brown Berets. Nostalgia for a time filled with some horrible things, yet still a time with hope for sanity and a brighter future that would never have included a creature like our recent failed “leader.” I look forward to being able to see the movie (in a theater?), and thank you for writing it. Robert Fornes, McKinleyville

‘Rush to Judge’ Editor: I feel compelled to respond the letter written by Michael H. Morris in last week’s NCJ responding to my letter of the previous week (Mailbox, Feb. 18). Michael doesn’t fully understand what I said, but first, let me agree with him that an immediate temporary fix to the CRV mess is a stay of the law while those idiots in Sacra-

mento on both sides of the aisle get their acts together. I also agree with Michael on “smoke ads.” Take their money, both tobacco and pot. I don’t buy either of them. By way of disclosure, I used to smoke both but saw the error of my ways. Michael in his letter equates recyclables with garbage and why China wouldn’t want our garbage. However, recyclables are not garbage. Garbage has no value and goes to the landfill. Recyclables have value and are used as “raw materials” for making new beer cans and newsprint as oppose to mining and logging. As for the FDA and the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, I didn’t propose the FDA rush to judgment but rush to judge. I write this letter on Saturday, Feb. 20, 2021, more than the two weeks after the FDA said they’d get to it. Bill Connors, Eureka

Correction The North Coast Journal inadvertently ran the same crossword puzzle in the Feb. 11, 2021, and Feb. 18, 2021, editions. This week’s edition includes answers to both the Feb. 4 and Feb. 18 puzzles (see page 29). The Journal regrets the error and hopes it did not leave anyone puzzled.

Write a Letter! Please make your letter no more than 300 words and include your full name, place of residence and phone number (we won’t print your number). Send it to letters@northcoastjournal.com. The deadline to have a letter considered for the upcoming edition is 10 a.m. Monday. l


NEWS

Humboldt’s COVID-19 Mutation and What it Means By Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com

W

hen Humboldt County Public Health announced Feb. 18 that a new, never-seen-before mutation of the COVID-19 virus had been discovered locally, the news sounded alarming. And it is. But not for the reasons most initially feared. Due to vigilance and some luck, the virus variant’s spread was limited to a single assisted living facility, meaning it never entered the broader community, where its tendrils of transmission could have webbed. Instead, it was kept isolated and is believed to have died out, relegated to a blip in virus history. But the variant is also now one blip among many that combine to present a growing body of evidence that COVID-19 continues to mutate, to change, looking for ways, as viruses do, to become more infectious and effective, which in turn raises questions about the long-term effectiveness of vaccinations. Since June, the local Public Health laboratory has been partnering with the Chan Zuckerberg Biohub, a nonprofit collaboration based in the Bay Area that’s doing genomic sequencing of the COVID-19 virus, sending the biohub positive local samples that contain a robust enough amount of

Email us Here:

virus to be sequenced. Late last year, Public Health Laboratory Manager Jeremy Corrigan told the Journal the partnership would help Public Health find links between case clusters to better understand local transmission patterns and also identify mutations. But he said the samples had to be packaged up in batches to be shipped to the biohub, which was fielding samples from all over, so it would take some time to get sequencing results back. And that’s why Humboldt County is just now learning of this new variant, which has now been found in 16 local cases, all of them tracing back to samples taken at Granada Rehabilitation and Wellness, an 87-bed skilled nursing facility that was the site of a deadly and pervasive outbreak that began Nov. 25 and ultimately infected 100 people with 13 resident deaths. Public Health Officer Ian Hoffman said Feb. 18 there is evidence to suggest the mutation made the virus more infectious, which may have contributed to its devastating impacts at Granada. The surface of the coronavirus is spotted with proteins — known as spike proteins — that are made up of chains more than 1,200 amino acids. The virus infects Continued on next page »

press releases:

newsroom@northcoastjournal.com

letters to the editor:

letters@northcoastjournal.com

events/a&e:

calendar@northcoastjournal.com

music:

music@northcoastjournal.com

sales:

display@northcoastjournal.com

classified/workshops:

classified@northcoastjournal.com

Get listed today for

FREE

Place a free classified ad in the North Coast Trader You may submit a free classified ad online at thetrader707.com/free-classified-ads Or submit your ad by snail mail, phone or email to 310 F St. Eureka CA 95501, (707) 442-1400 ads@thetrader707.com

YO U R G LISTIN

HERE

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

5


NEWS

NEWS

Continued from previous page

humans when the tip of one of these spike proteins attaches to the surface of a human cell and transfers its genes into the human body, which then replicate and spread. Changes — or mutations, which can happen any time a virus is transmitted and replicates — to any of these amino acids have the ability to alter the virus’ behavior. And numerous mutations have been detected, with varying impacts. The New York Times recently ran a story about scientists studying seven virus variants found in different parts of the country that all feature the same mutation, a change to the 677th amino acid, in a way that is feared to make the virus more effective in entering human cells. Then there’s the variant in the 452nd amino acid — known as the L452r Variant or the California Variant — that’s become a dominant variant throughout the state and has been found in at least 14 Humboldt County cases. (Scientists still haven’t determined whether this variant is any more or less contagious.) There’s also what’s been dubbed the B.1.1.7 variant that was first identified in the U.K. and has since spread to 62 countries, with some studies suggesting it may be 40 percent more transmissible than the standard variety. This variant includes changes to the 501st amino acid, as well as a constellation of other mutations, the combination of which is believed to be responsible for the increased transmissibility. Humboldt County’s virus mutation is similar — containing changes to the 501st amino acid — but distinct from the others, according to Hoffman. The mutation is believed to affect the spike protein’s tip, allowing it to bind more easily and tightly to cells, potentially making it more contagious than the standard coronavirus. “Given some of the laboratory studies that have been done around 501y mutations, it is highly suggested that it is stickier and can bind more to the receptors that allow the virus to enter the cells,” Hoffman said, adding that could be part of the reason the Granada outbreak spread so quickly and effectively. Imagine it like walking through a field of burs. There are times of year when the tiny hooks covering the little seeds aren’t fully formed and you might end up with just a few on your pants. But when those hooks or little teeth are fully developed, they can come to coat your pant legs and shoe laces. The spike proteins are similar and it’s believed the mutation to the 501st amino acid is akin to developing those burs, making it more likely any human cells that come into contact with the virus will become infected. But in Humboldt County’s case, this virus mutation occurred in a relatively

6

controlled setting — a skilled nursing facility — and didn’t find a host to carry it to the broader community. In a Feb. 18 press release announcing the finding, Chan Zuckerberg Biohub Senior Biosecurity Fellow Patrick Ayscue said that’s “remarkable.” “It’s really a credit to the hard work of local Public Health and their partners,” he said in a release. As Hoffman stressed in a media availability, there appears to be no ongoing risk associated with the newly discovered variant, as in the months since the Granada outbreak it has not been detected in any other Humboldt County samples. The discovery does, however, add to a growing body of evidence indicating the virus is continuing to grow and change, sometimes in unexpected ways. “The coronavirus reproduces inside our body and makes millions of new viruses,” Hoffman said. “Every time it makes a copy of itself, there’s a potential that it can make a mistake in that replication of the genetic code. Those sorts of mistakes can sometimes confer advantages to the genetics of the virus.” Hoffman stressed that the tools needed to combat virus mutations are the same as those needed to combat the original virus: masking, hand washing, physical distancing and avoiding the intermixing of households. Slowing the virus’ spread reduces chances for it to mutate and change, eliminating its opportunities to grow more contagious and effective. And, Hoffman said, that goes for people who have already been vaccinated, too, as a lot remains unknown about whether the vaccine prevents people from transmitting the virus or how long it remains effective. While it is so far believed currently approved vaccines will be similarly affective against currently identified virus mutations and variants, more study is needed to be sure and there’s certainly no knowing whether they would be effective against future mutations and variations. In the final question of the Feb. 18 media availability, the Times-Standard asked Hoffman if it’s likely COVID-19 — and its continued mutations — will be “here to stay” and vaccinations will require yearly boosters to protect against mutations and remain effective. “Time will tell and studies will tell,” Hoffman said, “but I think that’s probably likely. l Thadeus Greenson (he/him) is the Journal’s news editor. Reach him at 442-1400, extension 321, or thad@ northcoastjournal.com. Follow him on Twitter @thadeusgreenson.

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

One Year Ago

Humboldt marks anniversary of first COVID-19 case By Kimberly Wear kim@northcoastjournal.com

O

ne year ago on Feb. 20, the news came: Humboldt had its first confirmed case of COVID-19, which at the time had yet to be detected almost anywhere else in the nation. The individual, who had recently returned from China, recovered after seeking treatment for flu-like symptoms at St. Joseph Hospital. When the test came back positive, Humboldt became the first rural county in the United States to have a confirmed case, according to the New York Times. For hospital staff, it was a monumental moment. “That’s when it was like, ‘OK, this can actually happen here,’” St. Joseph emergency room charge nurse Kristen Beddow told the Journal in December. Exactly a month would pass before a second case, also connected to travel, was recorded. Soon, the first cases of community spread were identified. In late March of 2020, Humboldt County was placed under a local shelterin-place order that shuttered all but essential businesses, sent students home to continue their educations under now familiar distance learning and brought life as most people knew it to an abrupt halt. “We have to be proactive about limiting existing spread if it is here, or to slow it when it arrives on our doorstep if it’s not already here,” then County Health Officer Teresa Frankovich said at the time. “It’s critically important. We need to protect both our most vulnerable populations and our healthcare system.” Meanwhile, county officials worked quickly to prepare. Frankovich and her team expanded Public Health’s ranks of contact tracing investigators to 30, established a 100-bed alternative care site and a testing facility in partnership with the state at Redwood Acres Fairgrounds and expanded the availability of personal protective equipment locally. The Humboldt County Public Health Laboratory grew its testing capacity 10fold in a matter of months. At the same time, local hospitals

planned to accommodate surges, ordering new ventilators, renting others and planning to convert operating rooms into intensive care units. While a slow relaxing of restrictions began by May, the cases continued and a COVID-19 outbreak at Alder Bay Assisted Living brought the county’s first death. Her name was Ida Adelia Newell, a lifelong Humboldt County resident with colorful connections to her community. She died May 17 at the age of 97. Three others would follow. Another outbreak at the Granada Rehabilitation and Wellness Center led to 13 deaths, with 100 Granada residents and staff members testing positive. Public Health this week announced that a never-before-seen variant of the virus, which appears to have been limited to the Granada outbreak, has been identified by genomic testing and it may have been more contagious. As of Feb. 23, Humboldt County had confirmed 3,136 cases, with 133 hospitalizations and 33 COVID-19 related deaths. There’s also been the economic toll. Food pantries have been overwhelmed as people lined up for distanced drivethrough food box distributions, longtime local businesses have closed and Humboldt residents applied for unemployment benefits in unprecedented numbers. Overall, when it came to COVID case counts, the region fared far better than its Bay Area and Southern California counterparts for much of 2020 until November, when, amid colder weather and the holiday season, Humboldt joined most of the state in the purple, or “widespread,” risk tier. Except for a brief repass to the less restrictive red tier in January, that’s where the community remained until Tuesday, when the state moved Humboldt, Marin, San Mateo, Shasta and Yolo counties back down to the “substantial” risk zone, meaning some businesses can reopen for indoor service, including restaurants, gyms, movie theaters and places of worship.


North Coast Journal

At the one-year mark, there are some signs things are moving in a better direction. The second to last week of February saw 85 COVID cases confirmed — the county’s lowest number since mid-November — which represents a continued decrease from January, when the county was confirming 200-plus new cases a week. And vaccinations are underway for certain priority groups, including those age 70 and older, healthcare workers and school staff. As of Feb. 23, 26,278 vaccine doses — including both first and second injections — had been given to Humboldt County residents, according to a state database, roughly 12 percent of the total number needed to fully vaccinate the entire adult population locally. County Health Officer Ian Hoffman told the board of supervisors Feb. 23 he was optimistic about where the county was headed and that the move to the red tier was “likely to stick.” “We feel this is a much better position than we were in January when we made it into the red tier,” he said, noting that at the time case counts were very high overall and county just made it into the less restrictive tier by the smallest of margins. Now, Hoffman said, those data sets are trending in a positive direction although hospitalizations rates remain high overall, which may be because Humboldt is “still seeing the tail end of the surge.” But, as he also noted in a recent media availability, Hoffman said testing is down, a trend mirrored across the state and the nation, something likely attributed, at least in part, to people “getting tired of

the pandemic.” On Feb. 23, he echoed the same call for people to continue regular testing, saying it was an important tool in controlling the virus’ spread, preventing another surge and staving off a return to a more restrictive risk tier, especially as businesses and more schools prepared to open and youth sports ready to gear up. “We really want to encourage people to utilize that test,” Hoffman said, noting the most common form of transmission continues to be “from someone you know,” whether it is a member of the household or from gatherings. While vaccine deliveries have been delayed by severe weather across the country and a national shortfall continues, Hoffman said the situation is expected to improve in the coming weeks and, depending on vaccine supply, the region could hit a point by spring or summer when there is no longer a line for a shot. “We are making good headway,” Hoffman said. He also took some time to recognize that one year has passed since news of the spread of the virus came to the world’s collective attention, bringing about profound changes to our daily lives. “We all came together to avert disaster,” Hoffman said. “To protect lives and to protect our community.” l Kimberly Wear (she/her) is the Journal’s digital editor. Reach her at 442-1400, extension 323, or kim@ northcoastjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @kimberly_wear. northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

7


Here to Help

Here to Hire

Lend Us a Hand

100 Sign on Bonus $

Start training for a long lasting career

Good News: The Sun Valley Group is hiring across the supply chain, including in Distribution and Fulfillment Centers. Knowing many people are eager to get back to work, The Sun Valley Group has expedited hiring to get people working quickly. What does that mean for a person looking for a new opportunity with a thriving company? It means he or she can apply in person or send us your resume at Jobs@tsvg.com, and get hired and begin working in as little as 24 hours. Everyone’s health, safety and wellbeing is our highest priority.

Open Positions: Warehouse Packing

Shipping & Receiving Forklift Driver General Labor

Flower Picking Flower Bunching Electrical Controls

START WORKING TODAY • WEEKLY PAY • PART TIME • WEEKENDS • FULL TIME • BONUS OPPORTUNITIES

The Sun Valley Group is committed to a diverse and inclusive workplace. The Sun Valley Group is an equal opportunity employer and does not discriminate on the basis of race, national origin, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, protected veteran status, disability, age, or other legally protected status.

The Sun Valley Group — 3160 Upper Bay Road — Arcata, CA 95521 Phone 707-825-5707 — Jobs@tsvg.com

Humboldt Country Strong – For Over 40 Years 8

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com


FROM

DAILY ONLINE

Humboldt Goes Red, Records 33rd COVID Death

F

or the first time since January, Humboldt returned to the red or “substantial” COVID-19 risk tier on Feb. 23, allowing some businesses to reopen for indoor service, including restaurants, gyms, movie theaters and places of worship, at reduced capacity. Other businesses — like retail outlets — can expand operations. The state data shows the county with a seven-day average test-positive rate of 2.7 percent and a daily case rate of 6.3 per 100,000, compared to California overall, which has a 4.8 positivity rate and 15.2 cases per 100,000. The new regulations were set to take effect at midnight Feb. 23. Earlier the same day, the county reported its 33rd COVID-19 death, of a resident in their 80s, as well as a new hospitalization. The county’s Joint Information Center reported Feb. 19 that the state Department of Public Health had released updated guidelines for youth and adult recreational sports, which allow some to resume with safety measures in place in counties with case relates below an average of 14 new confirmed daily cases per 100,000 residents. The measures are slated to take effect Feb. 26 and Public Health indicated it would be releasing additional

Make us a part of your daily life

For the news as it develops and all you need to understand politics, people and art on the North Coast, follow us online.

information and guidelines before then. Vaccination efforts, meanwhile, continue to move slowly forward, with residents over the age of 75, healthcare workers, teachers and first responders currently eligible to receive their shots. In a press release yesterday, the Joint Information Center reported that the county is planning three large vaccination clinics this week to administer 2,500 doses — including 1,000 first doses and 1,500 second doses. The clinics remain by invitation only and local officials urge residents to complete a vaccination interest form — available on the county’s website or by calling 441-5000 — to be notified when they are eligible. To date, Humboldt County has confirmed 3,136 cases, with 133 hospitalizations and 33 confirmed COVID-19 related deaths. The county dashboard lists 2,975 people as having “recovered” from the virus locally, though that just means they are no longer contagious and does not account for long-term health impacts, which local healthcare workers have told the Journal can be substantial, even in previously healthy patients. The county’s test positivity rate has gone from 3.6 percent in November, to 7.3 percent in December, to 9.9 percent in Jan-

Still Sliding: U.S. Highway 101 at Last Chance Grade, the plagued stretch of coastal roadway south of Crescent City, was repeatedly closed due to an active landslide last week. As the Journal went to press Feb. 23, the slide had stabilized enough to reopen the artery to one-way, controlled traffic, with motorists advised to expect one-hour delays. POSTED 02.22.21

northcoastjournal.com/ncjdaily

Digitally Speaking The number of stars in the so-called Winter Circle, a ringed array or asterism, that can currently be seen rising in the east and setting in the west on the North Coast. POSTED 02.22.21

Black Joy in the Friendly City

northcoastjournal

Elizabeth Smith sings during a Black History Month celebration in Fortuna on Feb. 21 attended by a few dozen people and organized by Adrianne Wohlfeil. POSTED 02.22.21 Photo by Melissa Sanderson

uary. Through the first 23 days of February, the test-positivity rate sits at 6.9 percent. County Health Officer Ian Hoffman told the board of supervisors Feb. 23 that he was optimistic about where the county was headed and that the move to the red tier was “likely to stick.” “We feel this is a much better position than we were in January when we made it into the red tier,” he said, noting that at

Eureka Schools to Open: The Eureka City Schools Board of Trustees voted Feb. 18 to open for in-person instruction by March 1 for pre-school through eighth grade, with families having the option to continue distance learning. Superintendent Fred Van Vleck indicated the district would also look to bring back its high school students when COVID-19 conditions improve. POSTED 02.19.21

ncj_of_humboldt

ncjournal

the time case counts were very high overall and the county made it into the less restrictive tier by the smallest of margins. Now, Hoffman said, those data sets are trending in a positive direction although hospitalizations rates remain high overall, which may be because Humboldt is “still seeing the tail end of the surge.” — Kimberly Wear POSTED 02.23.21 Read the full story online. Arcata Caps Vacation Rentals: The Arcata City Council voted Feb. 17 to cap the number of short-term vacation rental units within city limits at 100 and require owners to obtain permits. The regulations, which passed unanimously with Mayor Sofia Pereira recusing herself, are aimed at protecting neighborhoods from quality-of-life impacts and protecting the city’s limited housing stock. POSTED 02.18.21

northcoastjournal

newsletters

They Said It

Comment of the Week

“I think this is a very special opportunity that I get to be a part of. There’s so much knowledge to share, especially during a pandemic.”

“I was worried it was going into a landfill. Good News!”

— Centro del Pueblo volunteer Karina Coronado on the organization’s Comida Del Pueblo program, which will provide herbs and vegetables for micro-gardening, spaces in community gardens and outdoor skill-share classes where people can pass on their gardening knowledge. POSTED 02.21.21

Tobi Monreal-Washington commenting on a Journal Facebook post about the Harper Motors Carousel that for decades has sat alongside U.S. Highway 101 finding a new home with the Bear River Band of the Rohnerville Rancheria. POSTED 02.18.21

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

9


ON THE COVER

The NCJ Quarantine Pet Photo Contest By Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com

B

efore we dive into the flurry of fur that is the NCJ Quarantine Pet Photo Contest, let’s get a few things straight. First, all of the critters entered were, of course, very good boys and girls deserving of many treats and belly rubs, especially for carrying us through our isolation from other humans, sometimes by dragging us outdoors and offering constant companionship indoors. All animals were given equal consideration, whether they were pampered purebreds or raised in a barn. Photos from Journal staff members were disqualified from competition, despite my family’s parakeet Blueberry being an obvious winner. I mean come on — she was photographed under a tiny, paper cocktail umbrella. That cruel miscarriage of justice aside, the competition was fair. There were allegations of cuteness-enhancing supplements and filters, but I think we can all

agree Mr. Pickles has learned his lesson. Full disclosure, the Journal’s pair of judges struggled to reach consensus, overwhelmed as we were with the brain-frying sweetness of sleeping puppies and impossibly chonky cats. Am I proud of how we handled the pressure of ranking tiny bunnies and baby goats? Perhaps not. There were disagreements, yelling matches, tearyeyed entreaties and what I’m told are “bullying intimidation tactics.” Sadly, there were no bribery attempts, which makes me wonder whether you pet parents out there really want this. Nevertheless, while our working relationships may be irreparably damaged, we have fought our way to a group of top contenders and winners in four adorable categories: Cats, Dogs, Farm Friends and Small Critters. Behold their majesty and squee before them, these cuddly defenders of our sanity, these champions of quarantine cuteness.

Dogs

“Oslo Perez” “Humboldt Hill Hooligans” by Nanci Bryant

“Neville Doing Neville” by Jodi Smith “Sleeping on the Job” by Sarah Finestone

Sponsored by: “Watching Over Each Other” by Denise Martin

“Alvin” by Stan Hart

Runners-up:

W in ne r

“S ha rin g Sin k Du tie s” y by D. Mo lof sk

← “Our dog came home from the shelter March 21, 2020 and became our Covid Hero Dog. He even found a way to keep us company while we do dishes.”

“Social Distancing With Brawndo” by Angela DeMocko “Happy Birthday!” by Adele Andersen

“Luna and Oscar” by Dave Grant

10

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com


“Sherlock Bones and Zephyr” by Raven Coit

Offering Pet and Livestock Food Since 1947 Monday through Friday 9-5 Saturday 10-5

“Pandemic Puppy” by Morgan Barker “A Boy and His Binkie!” by Renee Lindsay

400 Branscomb Road Laytonville, CA 95454 707 984 6711 • longvalleyfeed.com Long Valley Feed & Supply

Monda

Vet Supplies • Treats & Toys Erosion & Pasture Seed Hay & Grain

Vet Su Hay

Special Orders Welcome

this Mention get d n a d A

Spec

Many Organic Choices

on se purcha

Ma

10%yoouff r

“Relaxed” by Clancy DeSmet

More power, from a place you can trust. “Up to Snow Good” by Sabrina Manzo “Still Fits!” by Miri Alley

“Quarantine Got Me Like” by Celia Willson “Lola” by Rhonda Richards

“Hanging at the Beach” by Zoe Huber

“Kitty with Brennan” by Mo Burke

The new, more powerful 2021 Subaru Crosstrek.® Newly redesigned, with 20% more horsepower available in the new SUBARU BOXER® engine. And you can drive with confidence. Subaru is Kelley Blue Book’s Most Trusted Brand for six years running.*

Vehicle shown with accessory equipment.

“Charlie Chuckles” by Isobel Crosswhite

Get 0% APR Financing for 63 months on new 2021 Ascent, Outback, Legacy and Impreza models now through March 1, 2021. • Standard Symmetrical All-Wheel Drive + 33 MPG hwy4 • A 2020 IIHS Top Safety Pick+ ® Multimedia with • Standard STARLINK StandardSUBARU Symmetrical All-Wheel Drive ® Apple Android Auto™ integration 10 + 27 CarPlay MPG hwyand • Smartphone-Enabled ® Remote Engine Start with Standard EyeSight Driver Assist Technology15 Climate Control available26 Built-in Wi-Fi24 and Remote Engine Start capability26 3 rows of flexible seating for 7 or 8 passengers

“Lacey” by Av Stefan “Snow Day” by Kelsey Cather

“Shelter Buddies” by Tom Hjerpe

0% financing for 63 months

• Standard Symmetrical All-Wheel Drive + 35 MPG hwy2 • A 2020 IIHS Top Safety Pick+ LIMITED XT ® Multimedia with • •Standard SUBARU STARLINK 260-hp direct-injection turbocharged SUBARU an 11.6-inch touchscreen BOXER® engine • •Standard 10-way power adjustable driver’s seat SUBARU STARLINK® 11.6-inch Multimedia Plus heated front seats •with Power moonroof

OUTBACK

• Heated steering wheel • DriverFocus® Distraction Mitigation System

0% financing for 63 months

McCrea Subaru 1406 5th Street Eureka • 442-1741 www.mccreasubaru.com

“Splashing Out of the Water!” by Mike Allison

0% financing for 63 months. Monthly payment of $15.87 per $1,000 borrowed on approved credit. All advertised prices excludes government fees and taxes, any financing charges, and any emission testing charge. On approved credit. Ad expires 3-1-2021

Continued on next page » northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

11


ON THE COVER Continued from previous page

C at s

“Frank and Beans”

← “Speedy loves napping on me but when I’m busy with school, he just plops down wherever.”

Runners-up:

W in ne r

“Daisy Lick” by Inma Thompson

“Time for Yoga!” by Sarah Morgan

“N ap pin g on my Note s” by Go wn Va ng

“I Know I’m Pretty!” by Debra Woodman “Nolina by the Sea” by Jane Cipra

“Ava and Malorie” by Emily White “Afternoon Winter Sun” by Terri Bonow

“Best Friends” by Ann Voss “Laughing Cat” by Tom Hjerpe

“Fearless” by Breon Hole

“Foster Kittens in Recline” by Dyani Bishop “Cute Pentecost” by Lisa Fanucchi

“Jolene” by Tainá Del Negri

“Spring Cleaning” by Kristal Waters

“Yin and Yang Kittens” by Phoebe and Betsy Rogers

“Flint” by Shea Lyons

“Duckling Sitter for Hire!” by Yesi Vides

“Max” by Carolyn Allen

“Winter Warmth” by Catherine Cox

12

“TC” by Brent Critch

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com


S m a ll Cri t te rs ← “8-dayold Holland Lop bunnies.”

“Frank the Cat” by Isobel Crosswhite

W in ne r

“B ab y Bu ns” by Th om mi e Ha sk ins-M ou ntain

Runners-up:

“Slug Crossing” by Tim Daniels

“Bug” by Catherine Scott “Honey Bee Poppy Break” by Breon Hole

“They Call Me Bunny Bojangles” by Yesi Vides

“Yin-yang of Kittens” by Suzanne Komili

“Go Baby Go” by Grace Lovell

“Pandemic Prayers” by Victoria Brooks

“Hanging Out While Stuck Inside” by Madelyn Fazio

“Lizards in Garden” by Biomorphic Light

“The Golden with the Golden Curls” by Jenny Hayden

“Flower Bird” by Inma Thompson

Continued on next page » northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

13


ON THE COVER Continued from previous page

Sea to Plate since ’88

Tues. - Sat. 5-9pm

“Chicken Hugs” by Phoebe and Betsy Rogers

Fa rm F ri e n d s

Always sourcing the freshest seafood from near and far

DELIVERY NOW AVAILABLE PLEASE CALL AFTER 3 PM TO PLACE YOUR ORDER FOR PICK UP OR DELIVERY OFFERING 20% DISCOUNT ON ALL TAKE OUT ENTRÉES Menu on our website or Eureka Sea Grill on Facebook

316 E st • OLD TOWN EUREKA • 443-7187

WWW.SEAGRILLEUREKA.COM

Of the 5 lines in the middle, could you please clump the first 3 separate from the last 2, just to delineate the 2 items?

Call in to place your pick up order today

everyday from 11 am - 3 pm

“Passing Through” by Ann Farley

W in ne r Runners-up:

“B ab y Go at s” by Da ve Gr ant ↑ “Hi... are you my mama?”

“Hello Chick!” by Thommie HaskinsMountain

One F Street, eureka Ca  • 707.443.7489 “Alpacas” by Dave Grant

“What’re You Looking At” by Kaitlin Mottershead

“The Duchess Of Sussex” by Halla Kramer “Faith” by Suzanne Huber

“All My Ducks in a Row” by Carrie Tully “Foster Duck” by Teresa Mondragon “Keep Calm and Duckling On” by Phoebe and Betsy Rogers

“Mini Me” by Teresa Mondragon

14

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

“Baby Zuchinni and Baby Four” by Yesi Vides


ON THE TABLE

Under the Table

California allows people to sell home-cooked meals. Humboldt does not. By Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com

A

year ago, the Especiales Meals and Catering Facebook page was flush with photos of stacked tamales and rows of enchiladas in foil trays. Co-owner Sherrie Bazan was taking business classes at College of the Redwoods, securing a business license and hunting around for a food truck and a commercial kitchen. And in the meantime, a couple times a month she was cooking up batches of Mexican food at home and selling it through Facebook. It was nothing new for the former head cook at South Bay School District. She had a food handler’s certificate and had cooked for fundraisers for her son’s football team for years with no problems. Around Christmas, especially, a day’s tamale sales might top out around $1,600. Other days she might bring in $500 gross. But a couple months into it, Bazan says, someone posted a comment asking if she was licensed. Soon after, she got a call from the Humboldt County Department of Health and Human Services telling her the business wasn’t legal. She was let off with a warning but told there’d be a fine next time. “I didn’t even know you weren’t supposed to do that,” says Bazan, who’d seen similar businesses operating above board elsewhere in California. She shut it down. California passed Assembly Bill 626 in 2018, allowing licensed home microenterprise businesses to prepare and sell perishable meals direct to customers, with the stated intention of helping home cooks and professionals profit from their skills without the prohibitive expenses of a traditional restaurant. During the pandemic, both amateurs and laid-off restaurant workers around the state have taken advantage of the option. However, the law leaves counties and cities to determine whether they’ll authorize such operations. Humboldt County has opted not to allow these home food businesses, which means (with the exception of those operating on tribal lands) folks regularly selling home-

cooked meals on social media and elsewhere are operating under the table. Humboldt does permit home-based cottage food operations in two classes: Class A businesses can sell directly to customers and those with a Class B permit can sell to third-party retailers. Both are limited to “certain non-potentially hazardous foods, meaning low risk foods that do not require temperature control to limit pathogenic microorganism growth or toxin formation,” explains DHHS spokesperson Christine Messinger. For example, bread and preserves are fine, but lasagna, which would be dangerous if left unheated or unrefrigerated, isn’t. Along with registering with the Department of Environmental Health and getting a business license, a Class A business also has to follow a self-certification checklist of California Health and Safety Code rules. These include taking a food handling course; keeping all equipment and surfaces sanitized; keeping the work area free of insects, rodents, smoking, children under 12 and pets; and not simultaneously using the kitchen for cooking for yourself or your family. That lasagna — involving handling raw meat and dairy, and safe refrigeration and cooking temperatures — carries greater risk of food-borne illness like listeria and E. coli, for which restaurants and commercial kitchens are subject to regulations and inspections. According to Messinger, the county’s decision to nix home kitchen operations is grounded in concern over consumer safety. “The numerous CalCode exemptions related to Home Kitchen Operations do not afford the same oversight and protection to our community,” Messinger writes in an email to the Journal. “Thus permitting and oversight of this program would create a true public health risk.” It’s a decision she says is backed by

Shutterstock

the Health Officers of California and the Humboldt County Board of Supervisors, among others. Running an illegal home kitchen is hardly Humboldt’s most perilous black market venture but there are risks. According to Messinger, “Continuing to operate is a misdemeanor punishable by a fine of not less than $25 or more than $1,000 [per day], or by imprisonment for not more than six months, or by both fine and imprisonment.” In 2020, only two operations were shut down by the DEH, Catering by Cap and another without a business name. For a few weeks, Razel Tarantino was delivering ramen kits: boxes of noodles, broth and toppings to be assembled at home. He says he only planned to sell to his friends on Instagram, just small batches cooked in an apartment kitchen, but word got out. He’d been working in restaurant kitchens for years and, after 10 months of unemployment, the money helped a little and “cooking for people itself felt good.” Other friends from the industry, he says, had been boxing up batches of food to sell on Instagram, too. Tarantino admits his setup was not ideal. Aside from the equipment and limited scale, “With roommates coming in and out, it’s not an environment I can control.” He says he didn’t feel comfortable operating without a license but a break-in sealed the end of the enterprise. “It got trashed and I got very disheartened and felt it was a sign. … I’m hoping to do it again soon but just making sure I can do it in a safe environment,” he says. “If I’m gonna do it, I may as well do it properly.” For now, he’s found a couple restaurant gigs in Arcata to keep him afloat.

Commercial kitchens are in short supply in Humboldt. There are none to be had at Redwood Acres at the moment and all the solo spaces at Arcata’s Foodworks Culinary Center — even the ones with only sinks — are taken. Foodworks might have a few hours in a shared space for you if you’re good to work only nights and weekends. Bazan was looking at a space for Especiales at Redwood Acres just as the county was moving in its testing center and hospital surge facility, but even that would have required investing in a new range hood, which typically costs about $20,000. Seemingly against all odds, she recently found a commercial kitchen at the Mountain View Village apartments in Fortuna. It’s $850 per month and it’s a hike to get food to her established Eureka clientele but, she says, “I know that it’s going to be worth it.” Finding a truck is the next challenge for Bazan, who’s also expanding her menu to include Puerto Rican picadillo, Cuban ropa vieja and Salvadoran pupusas. “I kind of want to do a twist with other Latin food,” she says, adding she’s looking to pull in some Asian-influenced dishes from members of her family. In that way, Especiales will still feel like home cooking even if its cooked in a commercial kitchen and served from a food truck. “When you’re cooking all together,” she says, “you get something different.” l Jennifer Fumiko Cahill (she/her) is the arts and features editor at the Journal. Reach her at 442-1400, extension 320, or jennifer@northcoastjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @JFumikoCahill.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

15


Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

RECRUITING HICAP VOLUNTEER COUNSELORS What is HICAP?

2021 Nissan Kicks

HICAP is the Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program, a program of the Area One Agency on Aging. Registered HICAP volunteer counselors help senior and disabled Medicare beneficiaries understand their Medicare and health insurance benefits and choices. HICAP volunteers advocate for Medicare beneficiaries regarding problems with Medicare or a Medicare provider. Volunteers counsel individual clients on a variety of Medicare and insurance issues and inform low-income Medicare beneficiaries about programs that can help pay for Medicare costs. HICAP provides free training to become a registered HICAP Counselor with the California Department of Aging. It takes just 24 hours of initial training and 10 hours of counseling observation time to become a certified HICAP Counselor. Volunteer counselors must provide a minimum of 40 hours per year of client counseling to maintain certification. HICAP pays for volunteer mileage and ongoing training. Call HICAP to learn about this opportunity to assist older adults.

Call 444-3000 for more information.

16

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com


IT’S PERSONAL

Perilous Plunge participants take the leap for the Redwood Discovery Museum in 2017. File

Saving the Discovery Museum By Iridian Casarez

iridian@northcoastjournal.com

W

ednesday afternoon was their scheduled weekly supervised visit with their mom; every week they’d come into the same room with the same books and toys, while I sat on an office chair at the door jotting down notes. Before I became a staff writer at the Journal, I worked with Humboldt County youth at an afterschool program, a summer camp and at the foster care agency. Some of my job included monitoring supervised visits like these. “Mom played with daughter. Mom engaged in a conversation with her son and asked him about school. Mom brought snacks. Mom read a book to them.” But today the little girl was tired of being enclosed in the same room. She let out a massive sigh and asked her mom if they could go next door to the Redwood Discovery Museum. Her mom looked at me since I was supervising and, of course, I said yes. I was just as tired of sitting in the same spot. The girl jumped up and rushed toward the door, hopping and asking her mom if they could play in the interactive science museum’s water tank. She was excited to head into the vast space filled with toys and hands-on exhibits, and I couldn’t blame her. When parents and kids are stuck in a tiny room week after week, their interactions become limited and bounded by the same four walls. The supervised visits at the Redwood Discovery Museum were so different, more engaging and playful. I’d watch families try to figure out museum exhibits together, cranking levers to see what happens, riding the stationary bike until it created enough energy to power the stoplight. I learned about the museum when my partner Jeff was offered a job as a Pal Camp counselor in 2016. Since then he’s continued to work for the Redwood Discovery Museum and it’s become a part of my life. I’ve worked a couple shifts there when it was short-staffed and I’ve

volunteered at fundraisers and events, as well as the occasional supervised foster agency visit. I’ve always thought how lucky Humboldt County is to have it as a rare indoor space where kids can play and learn about science and boost their confidence all in one. In a presentation about the Redwood Discovery Museum, there’s a slide titled “The Power of Play” that reads, “Play provides a singular opportunity to build the executive functioning that underlies adaptive behaviors at home; improve language and math skills in school; build the safe, stable and nurturing relationships that buffer against toxic stress; and build social-emotional resilience.” When you walk into the museum’s play area you see a grocery store set up with all kinds of toy fruits and vegetables, canned goods and other grocery items meticulously organized into specific categories. If you walk farther into the museum, there are interactive exhibits that teach kids about gravity, physics and energy. It’s like a fun introduction to STEM activities, something I wasn’t exposed to until I was probably in middle school. And every day the museum is open, especially on rainy days, kids are interacting with other kids, which helps them develop social skills. It’s a wonderful, fascinating space. The Redwood Discovery Museum also tables at events like Family Makers Night, the Math Fair and the Fish Fair in Hoopa. That was Jeff’s job when summer camp was over. As the outreach specialist, he’d have a table covered with different science-based activities for kids to try, like a kit to make fossils at home, popsicle catapults, stomp rockets. The 25-year-old museum also hosts one of the many First Five Humboldt playgroups, where parents connect with other parents and get support and kids meet other kids. And, of course, the aforementioned Pal Camp that’s been around for 70 years — there are grandparents and counselors who were once campers, directors

who were once counselors. One summer when I was working at the museum, a woman who’d brought her grandchild told me that as she was cleaning out her garage, she found a clay handprint her daughters made at the Redwood Discovery Museum when they were younger. She was delighted to see that the museum was still around to bring her grandkid. My family moved around a lot when I was younger, so I don’t have many ties or memories of a single place that I could go back to. So it’s phenomenal to see that the museum has been around for so long to be an intergenerational experience for this one family. But the museum and all its programs are in jeopardy. Much like other small businesses, the COVID-19 pandemic has had a devastating impact on the museum’s budget. With the closing of interactive museums and shelter-in-place orders, people canceled their memberships and all special events and fundraisers were canceled. Eventually, with a COVID-19 protocol plan in place, the museum was able to open summer Pal Camp outdoors only but it was different and felt strange. According to the Redwood Discovery Museum’s executive director Grace Hamaker, the museum has seen revenue decline more than 37 percent in the last year. It was Jeff’s first year as camp director, which meant that he and Hamaker oversaw all the preparations for COVID-19 protocols and had to make sure that the staff were equipped with personal protective equipment and that everyone followed all the social distancing guidelines while trying to give campers a full Pal Camp summer experience. I could see the devastation on Jeff’s face when he came home, sometimes wondering if the kids were having fun. Campers had to stay 6 feet away from their friends and couldn’t share anything. The year went without weekly sleepovers

and potluck dinners, trips to Freshwater Park, games of capture the flag or morning flagpole, where the entire camp would come together to sing camp songs and welcome the day. To me, Pal Camp had lost its adventurous feel and become more of a glorified outdoor daycare. The only reassurance I was able to give Jeff was that at least the kids were able to be outside and see some of their friends — I’d then think about the kids who didn’t have the same opportunity or a space like that. The museum currently provides science kits for parents to pick up and has opened a preschool for a limited number of children. Hamaker told me that the preschoolers are learning about plant root systems and using pipettes for science projects. It’s bringing in revenue until it can reopen to the public but it’s still struggling. I’m asking you to help save the Redwood Discovery Museum. With its annual Perilous Plunge fundraiser — one of its biggest revenue sources — coming up, I’m asking you to sponsor the museum, support a plunger or simply donate whatever you can to help keep the museum open. If the Redwood Discovery Museum doesn’t survive this pandemic, there’ll be one less safe space for Humboldt County families, for the foster kids that visit their parents in the same room week after week, for the summer and spring break camps, for the parents who bring their toddlers to playgroups, for parents who get support at the playgroups and for staff members who want to be a positive person in a child’s life. And that’s too important to let go. Humboldt County kids need to learn and have fun. It’s too important and it needs your help. l Iridian Casarez (she/her) is a Journal staff writer. Reach her at 442-1400, extension 317, or iridian@ northcoastjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @IridianCasarez.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

17


TROPHY CASE

341 West Harris St., Eureka 707 445-3138

poletskis.com

Forward Movement A recipe for health By Rod Kausen

trophycase@northcoastjournal.com Shutterstock

• Servicing Humboldt County for over 40 years • Largest in stock new & used inventory • Competitive price guarantee • Delivery and Service after the sale

“LARGEST BRAND SELECTION IN THE COUNTY”

18

I

have spent every spring since seventh grade involved in track and field, well over 50 years — a life of studying forward movement through running, teaching, clinics, clinician and graduate study — a lifetime study of coaching. We are all aware of the benefits of forward movement including heart strength, muscle strength, chronic disease control, and blood pressure and weight control. Some people with disabilities cannot walk but movement of any sort is beneficial. For most people, walking can be accomplished safely during a pandemic. It can be done almost anywhere. You can listen to music, you can walk safely with friends or it can be a great way to mediate quietly. It isn’t running. One foot is always touching the ground and almost everyone at almost any fitness level can benefit from starting a walking regimen. Most of us already walk quite a few steps daily, so here are some things to consider to make the most of them. Walking with improper technique radically reduces the effectiveness of your time and can cause other problems. Good walking includes staying upright, arms just slightly crossing in front of you, hands no further back than hips on the downward swing, not swinging the body from side to side. Lift your heels a little bit higher than you usually do (think about stepping higher than the opposite ankle sometimes) for a nice, full-body movement. Walking at a brisk pace has more benefit than walking slower but there are still benefits either way. The idea is stick with it, setting realistic goals. Try 10,000 steps

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

a day or maybe 45 minutes as a standard goal. Can you do three 15 minutes walks instead of one 45-minute walk? You can but the aerobic (steady higher heartbeat benefits) will not be as strong. Older people often shuffle along with short strides and lots of arm movement. This is often due to a life of using primarily the calf and quadriceps when walking. The hamstrings lose strength as they are underutilized. Concentrate sometimes on the hamstrings to keep things in balance. One trick is pinching your glutes. Concentrating on pinching the cheeks will show you the difference in the muscles used. Hamstring extensions are, of course, a great supplement, too. I could sometimes pick a potential track athlete out on campus by observing them walking in the halls. Toe walkers, bouncing off the balls of their feet, are exercising all day long. I would approach a kid like that and talk about events such as long jump or high jump. Think about using your toes a little more for calf strength. Think about walking on the moon, with a little spring. Another thing I believe in is uphill running and walking. Some experts caution against it but I have never understood why. It is easier on the shins, it’s harder work and more aerobic. If you come downhill softly (almost like you are sneaking up on someone) it will protect your knees and shins. Running or walking uphill efficiently means that you keep your body parallel to the ground and barely lean into the hill. When you lean in, you compromise form and rely on the back instead of the hips and legs. Also, when on

the hills, make sure you do some backward walking, pulling yourself up the hill with the hamstrings, not the quads or calves. Try to reach way back with your steps and pull. It’s great exercise and you will feel it. Remember, no noise on the downhill. Throw in some power walking now and then, faster than comfortable. Power walking is like race walking, using your entire body and arms to move you forward. It is hard but different from running. If you have ever seen a walking race it looks silly but is a great overall body exercise. This does require some twisting but the movement is forward. And again, one foot always touches the ground. When walking for exercise, time the walk in minutes instead of worrying about mileage. It’s easier psychologically. An example routine would be 15 minutes the first day, then 20 and 25. Then drop back to 20 minutes again, then 25, then 30. Keep this routine until you reach your time goal, say 45 minutes. Here’s a good beginning recipe for a walking routine: Just start walking in a good pair of shoes concentrating on form. Add minutes moderately. Toss in a generous amount of hills. Heat it up occasionally with race walking. One part extra bounce. Maybe adding some lunges or a little running for some extra spice. Add a pinch of cheeks. l Rod Kausen (he/him) is a retired teacher and coach.


FISHING THE NORTH COAST

Now or Never for Coastal Steelhead Season By Kenny Priest

fishing@northcoastjournal.com

Parker Lowe, of Yuba City, holds a wild steelhead he caught and released Feb. 20 while fishing the Smith River with guide Andy Martin of Wild Rivers Fishing. He was using a pearl-pink Corky and roe. Photo courtesy of Wild Rivers Fishing

R

iver conditions are trending toward perfection this week and it’s pretty much now or never for the 2021 winter steelhead season. In what has been called one of the toughest seasons anyone can remember, if the next week or so doesn’t produce some quality fishing, it’s likely the season will go down as a bust. There are plenty of theories about why the steelhead haven’t returned in big numbers but nobody knows for sure. With a little more than a month left in the season, there is time for a resurgence. And if there was ever a time, it would be this week. Conditions on just about every coastal river are — or soon will be — pristine. We’ve had a few “Miracle Marches” in the past and it’s looking like we’re going to need another.

Weather ahead “We’ll have a few opportunities for light rain in the next few days,” said Kathleen Zontos of Eureka’s National Weather Service Office. “The six-day rainfall total, which goes through Monday, is showing less than a tenth of an inch of rain. There is a chance for some rain on Sunday and Monday, but there’s quite a bit of uncertainty right now. If the high pressure moves, we could see some rain. But right now, it looks like most of it will land more to the north. The Chetco is showing a slight increase in flows starting on Monday, March 1. If we do get some rain, it will likely have little impact on the river flows.”

The Rivers: Smith River

The Smith is dropping quickly and is clear, running right around 6,000 cubic feet per second Tuesday. According to guide Mike Coopman, the fishing has been really tough. “We’re getting one to three bites per day,” said Coopman. “There just doesn’t seem to be a bunch of fish around right now. The fish we are catching have been on the small side, running 5 or 6 pounds. I’m hoping we see some fish show up like they did last year in March.”

Chetco/Elk/Sixes

“Despite perfect green water, the Chetco is fishing slow after the latest series of storms, with steelhead few and far between,” said Andy Martin of Wild Rivers Fishing. “Half a dozen boats managed just a handful of steelhead on Monday, even though conditions were good. Plunkers had even fewer fish. Spawned out steelhead should appear in the slower runs as the water drops but steelhead fishing likely will continue to taper off in the next few weeks. The Elk and Sixes also have been slow, but have a few steelhead around. The Rogue River is the best bet, with fair fishing.”

Eel River (main stem)

Running at 8,000 cfs as of Tuesday, the main Eel is starting to get a green tint but is still big. Flows are predicted to be around 5,000 cfs by the weekend. It should be in prime condition next week.

Eel River (South Fork)

The South Fork dropped down to a fishable level Tuesday, as flows were right around 2,000 cfs on the Miranda gauge. That’s still a little pushy but the color is good. Fishing is still tough, with boats reporting up to a couple fish per trip. Lots of zeros, as well. River conditions should be good through the weekend.

Van Duzen

The Van Duzen was running right around 1,000 cfs Tuesday and is starting to get some nice color. Flows are predicted to be down to 550 cfs by the weekend and could be a good option.

Mad River

The Mad was still high and off color as of Tuesday. Flows were 3,200 cfs and predicted to be down to 1,700 by Saturday. According to Justin Kelly of RMI Outdoors, it won’t likely turn green until either Tuesday or Wednesday of next week. Most of the fish being caught are coming just below the hatchery by the liners. l Read the complete fishing roundup at www.northcoastjournal.com. Kenny Priest (he/him) operates Fishing the North Coast, a fishing guide service out of Humboldt specializing in salmon and steelhead. Find it on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube and www.fishingthenorthcoast. com. For up-to-date fishing reports and North Coast river information, email kenny@fishingthenorthcoast.com

1001 Main St. in Fortuna

707.725.6734

www.eelvalleyappliance.com

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

19


Calendar Feb. 25 – March 4, 2021

Virtual Meditation & Mindfulness Class. 5-6 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Join on Zoom at the Abbey of the Redwoods for a one-hour class with three group meditations, guidance and Q&A. Suitable for all levels. Free. mindfullymatt@ gmail.com. us02web.zoom.us/j/86371764436?pwd=a1hJaVBoRC93cHd0ckcwQ1lFd2ltZz09.

26 Friday ART

File

The Sand Flesas. Submitted

Samantha Williams-Gray. Submitted

Wondering what’s up with the Perilous Plunge this year? As with most things, it’s happening online, providing the same wacky (if not as wet) good fun as always while raising much needed funds for Redwood Discovery Museum and its uber valuable hands-on education for kids. See what the crazy and creative plungers have concocted this year as they post photos and videos of their dips, plunges, swims and more — to say nothing of their costumes — during the Perilous (Pvost a) Plunge on Saturday, Feb. 27. Visit www.discovery-museum.org/perilous-plunge. html or visit www.facebook.com/redwooddiscoverymuseum for all the fun.

Raise a glass to the good work Trinidad Coastal Land Trust does in the name of outdoor conservation at TCLT’s Virtual Toast to the Coast on Saturday, Feb. 27 from 4 to 8:30 p.m. Yet another annual event going virtual this year, the Toast offers delicious food, art and music just like in years past, but modified for our times. Reserve your to-go crab dinner and a bottle of local wine, and enjoy an evening of music by The Sandfleas, live painting by Matt Beard, a benefit auction and a video on the Trinidad Coastal Land Trust — all from the comfort of your home ($40 dinner, $20 bottle of wine). Register at www.trinidadcoastallandtrust.org for dinner pick-up time at the Trinidad Town Hall (4 to 7p.m). Masks and physical distancing are required during pick-up.

Cooperation Humboldt and The Ink People have partnered this year to bring you the fourth Artists Dismantling Capitalism Symposium online from Feb. 26-28. The symposium features 17 sessions covering a variety of topics from theater to music cooperatives to solidarity economics, spirituality and more. It also marks the virtual launch of the public art show Just Imagine. While the event is free, $5-$100 donations are encouraged to help cover costs and pay artists. A food drive will gather non-perishable items for Cooperation Humboldt’s Little Free Pantry network. Head to www.cooperationhumboldt.com/ dismantle-capitalism for more on the symposium’s complete schedule and how to link up.

MUSIC

Register online and watch live. www.bit.ly/NCRDVirtualJuniorRanger.

25 Thursday ART

Disrupt Exhibition. Virtual World, Online. View the exhibition online. www.redwoodart.us. Hindsight 20/20. Virtual World, Online. A virtual exhibition that invites the community to reflect on the extraordinary year behind us. www.inkpeople.org/tuxford-gallery-shows/hindsight-2020. Redwood Art Association 2021 New Year Exhibition. Virtual World, Online. Virtual gallery exhibit in honor of Roy Grieshaber, who served as RAA Director for 15 years. www.redwoodart.us/.

DANCE Dances of Brazil. 5:30 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. Learn Brazilian dances with instructors Rocío Cristal and María Vanderhorst. All levels. Limited to five people. Register online. $15. talavera.rocio@ gmail.com.

LECTURE Conversations on Hemingway. Virtual World, Online. Tuesday and Thursday night events discussion of the author’s work and life with upcoming Hemingway documentary filmmakers, writers and scholars. Zoom link and schedule online. www.KEET.org. Dr. Nina Ellis-Hervey. 4-5 p.m. Virtual World, Online. As part of Black Liberation Month, the African American Center for Academic Excellence presents a lecture by Nina Ellis-Hervey. Zoom link online. Free. aacae@humboldt. edu. www.aacae.humboldt.edu/black-history-month. 826-4588. Klamath Mountains Winter Webinar Series. 7 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Series sharing stories of how geology, climate, fire and water help create the biological abundance of the Klamath Mountains. Register online. $69 for the 10-part series, $10 per class. www.backcountrypress.com/ klamath/webinar-series/.

20

James Zeller Hosts the J St. Regulars Radio Hour. 7-8 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Tune in for a heartwarming versions of classics in many genres and original tunes. Via Facebook and Instagram @creative.sanctuary. Free, donations encouraged. music@sanctuaryarcata.org. www.facebook.com/thesanctuaryarcata. (646) 245-6865. Quarantine Sing-a-long. Ongoing, 7 p.m. Virtual World, Online. A Facebook group to join if you like fun group singing. Song of the day posted at 3 p.m., sing starts at 7 p.m. Free. www.facebook.com/groups/quarantinesingalong.

SPOKEN WORD The Writers Lounge via Zoom. 7:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. A writing workshop geared toward stand-up and comedy. Zoom Room: 857 4217 6054. Password: writers. Join Zoom Meeting www.us02web.zoom.us/j/85742176054?pwd=dWp4UGVqaUVYQ0wzekVnZkZ0VlMzZz09.

MEETINGS Salmon Information Meeting. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Virtual World, Online. The California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s annual public meeting on sport and commercial ocean salmon fisheries, and spawning escapement. Details and instructions for attendance online. www.wildlife.ca.gov/Fishing/Ocean/ Regulations/Salmon/preseason. Virtual Whiteness Accountability Space. Noon-1 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Community members who identify as white are invited to weekly conversations led by white facilitator from equity arcata. Email for the Zoom link. equityarcata@ gmail.com.

OUTDOORS

Virtual Bowl For Kids’ Sake 38: Comic Book Bonanza. Virtual World, Online. A month of challenges featuring online bowling, bowling at home, comic art contest, trivia, costume contest and lip syncing battles. Tune in to Facebook Live every Friday, for prizes, team updates and more. www. facebook.com/bbbsofthenorthcoast.

Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. California State Parks’ North Coast Redwoods District is broadcasting programs featuring tall trees and rugged seas from state parks via Facebook. Free. www.facebook.com/NorthCoastRedwoods. Mad River Steelhead Derby. 6 a.m. Virtual World, Online. The three biggest hatchery steelhead win cash and prizes from sponsors and partners. Register at Bucksport, RMI Outdoors or online. Derby fees: adult $35, youth $20. www.ncgasa.org.

FOR KIDS

ETC

Family Literacy Party with Music Together. 10 a.m. Virtual World, Online. Humboldt Literacy Project continues its series with North Coast Music Together, reading, dancing and singing along. Lyric sheets available online, curbside at the Eureka Library or by mail (call to request). On Zoom at www. us02web.zoom.us/j/84856860818. Meeting ID: 848 5686 0818. www.humboldtliteracy.org/musictogether. 445-3655. Fortuna Library Recorded Readings. Virtual World, Online. Hosted by the Fortuna Branch Library on its Facebook page, www.facebook.com/HumCoLibraryFortuna. Virtual Junior Rangers. 11:30 a.m. Virtual World, Online. North Coast Redwoods District of California State Parks offers kids’ programs and activities about coast redwoods, marine protected areas and more, plus Junior Ranger badges.

English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. This class offers pronunciation, speaking, reading, writing, vocabulary, verb conjugations and common expressions. All levels welcome. Join anytime. Free. www.englishexpressempowered.com. KEET What’s on Your Bucket List?. 7:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Six-part series featuring 12 local people acting out their bucket list adventures. On KEET Ch. 13. Restorative Movement. 10:30-11:30 a.m. & 1:30-2:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. SoHum Health presents classes focused on strength and mobility (Tuesday), and on relaxation and breath work (Thursday). Contact instructor Ann Constantino for online orientation. Free. annconstantino@gmail.com. www.sohumhealth.org. 923-3921.

EVENTS

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

Disrupt Exhibition. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing. Hindsight 20/20. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing. Redwood Art Association 2021 New Year Exhibition. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing.

LECTURE 12 Steps to Anti-Oppression. Virtual World, Online. Reg Flowers explores internalized oppression through the lens of 12-step recovery. Part of ADC 2021: Artists Creating a Post-Capitalist World. Free. ruthiengelke@gmail.com. www.cooperationhumboldt.com/dismantle-capitalism/. (210) 364-7024.

MUSIC James Zeller Hosts the J St. Regulars Radio Hour. 7-8 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing. King Maxwell Quarantine Funk #9. 9-11 p.m. Virtual World, Online. King Maxwell spins funk, soul, electro, disco, roller skating jams and boogie, and adds vocoder flavor. Free. arcatasoulpartycrew@gmail.com. www.youtube.com/ watch?v=pssTRy5HLAk. Quarantine Sing-a-long. Ongoing, 7 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing. Shelter n Play. 6 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Public group on Facebook made up of locals. Open mic for all skill levels, all styles, everyone’s welcome to watch or perform. Sign-ups Wednesdays at noon. www.facebook.com/ groups/224856781967115. Trinity Alps Chamber Music Festival “Classical Crossover”. 7 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Featuring classical and jazz music by violinist Mads Tolling and Trinity County native, pianist Ben Harper. Register to attend at www. TrinityAlpsCMF.org. Pay-what-you-can.

EVENTS Artists Dismantling Capitalism Opening with Only Skin Deep. 6-8 p.m. Virtual World, Online. A multi-faceted look into the important role art and culture plays in creating a solidarity economy followed by “Only Skin Deep,” a curated dance performance. Free. coophumed@gmail. com. cooperationhumboldt.com/dismantle-capitalism/. The Curiosity Hour: Weekly Double Dose of Weird with Veve Decay. 8 p.m. Virtual World, Online. An evening of strange tales, live chats and parlor games hosted by Altar Ego: Curious Art & Fashion Design. www.facebook.com/ events/939880849742122. Artists Dismantling Capitalism Symposium. Virtual World, Online. The fourth annual symposium features 17 online sessions facilitated by artists, community members and others. Sessions focus on theater, music cooperatives, decolonizing the body, hip hop, solidarity economics, spirituality and more, plus a food drive and a public art project. Register online. Free. www.cooperationhumboldt. com/dismantle-capitalism. Virtual Bowl For Kids’ Sake 38: Comic Book Bonanza. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing.

FOR KIDS School-age Storytime. 11 a.m. Virtual World, Online. Hosted by the Arcata Branch Library via Zoom. To sign up, email sparsons@co.humboldt.ca.us or call 822-5954.


MEETINGS Mugs and Virtual Hugs. 8:30-10 a.m. Mugs and Virtual Hugs - Virtual Caregiver Support Group for caregivers of a loved one in Del Norte County via Zoom. Free gift of mug and hot beverage of your choice when you RSVP for this group with Erin at exm@redwoodcrc.org. Free. exm@ redwoodcrc.org. www.redwoodcrc.org. 443-9747.

OUTDOORS Critical Mass. Last Friday of every month, 6-7 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Community bike ride through town 6-feet apart with masks. Free. www.instagram.com/ criticalmass_arcata. Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing. Mad River Steelhead Derby. 6 a.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing.

ETC A Call to Yarns. Noon-1 p.m. Virtual World, Online. A weekly Zoom meetup for knitters and crocheters. Sign up using the Google form for an email inviation. Free. sparsons@co.humboldt.ca.us. www.forms.gle/CkdbZSbjbckZQej89. 822-5954. English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing. HSU Credential Programs Informational Sessions. 4:305:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. HSU’s School of Education hosts an information night via Zoom. Register at www. education.humboldt.edu. Free. education@humboldt.edu. humboldtstate.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZIvc-mspjkvG9Plqoyt60rcws5vYFZcyORo. Tabata. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. SoHum Health presents online classes with short, high intensity cardio workouts. Contact instructor Stephanie Finch by email for a link to the class. Free. sfinch40@gmail.com. www. sohumhealth.com.

27 Saturday ART

Disrupt Exhibition. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing. Hindsight 20/20. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing. Redwood Art Association 2021 New Year Exhibition. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing. The Role of Art in Black Liberation. 3-4 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Mo Desir discusses non-mainstream Black artists and Black Liberation, and leads participants in a writing workshop. Part of ADC 2021: Artists Creating a Post-Capitalist World. Free. ruthiengelke@gmail.com. www.cooperationhumboldt.com/dismantle-capitalism/. (210) 364-7024.

BOOKS Reading in Place - An Online Reading Group. 1 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Sign up online for a Zoom meeting invite and the week’s reading for discussion. www.forms.gle/ zKymPvcDFDG7BJEP9.

LECTURE Art, Electoral Politics and the Solidarity Economy Framework. 4:30-5:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Shambe Jones (Cooperation Jackson), Leslie Castellano (Synapsis) and David Cobb (Cooperation Humboldt) explore the intersection of art, political education and electoral politics. Part of ADC 2021: Artists Creating a Post-Capitalist World. Free. ruthiengelke@gmail.com. www.cooperationhumboldt. com/dismantle-capitalism/. (210) 364-7024.

MOVIES Robo-Cat Productions Presents: One Stormy Night. 5-7:15 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Two hours of scary

tales to warm you up on a cold winter’s night. Free. robocatproductions@gmail.com. www.facebook.com/ events/812147876001563/. 267-4771.

line. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation.org. www. northcoastgrowersassociation.org. 441-9999.

MUSIC

Envisioning Your Ecovillage. 1:30-2:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. An update on local efforts to create an art-themed ecovillage. Participants conceptualize through sound or visuals. Bring your artistic practice and/or writing materials. Part of ADC 2021: Artists Creating a Post-Capitalist World. Free. ruthiengelke@gmail.com. www.cooperationhumboldt.com/dismantle-capitalism/. (210) 364-7024.

EmRArt with James Zeller. 2-4 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Cross-platform entertainment from remote locations. James Zeller plays jazz from Arcata, and Emily Reinhart lays charcoal on birch wood in Eureka. Watch via Facebook (www.facebook.com/EmRArt) or by YouTube. Free. emily@emilyreinhart.com. www.youtube.com/channel/ UClclGc_-RErDvHWjNBsbhIQ. Labor/Organization in Music. 1:30-2:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. A panel discusses collectivism in music, labor organization and how music exists as a commodity under capitalism. Part of ADC 2021: Artists Creating a Post-Capitalist World. Free. ruthiengelke@gmail.com. www.cooperationhumboldt.com/dismantle-capitalism/. (210) 364-7024. Quarantine Sing-a-long. Ongoing, 7 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing.

MEETINGS

OUTDOORS Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing. Mad River Steelhead Derby. 6 a.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing.

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing.

28 Sunday ART

Artfully Moving Beyond Colonial Capitalism. 1:30-2:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Explore identity, colonial capitalism and personal accountability through expressive arts with Samantha Williams-Gray. Have paper, oil pastels or crayons, a notebook and pen. Part of ADC 2021: Artists Creating a Post-Capitalist World. Free. ruthiengelke@gmail. com. www.cooperationhumboldt.com/dismantle-capitalism/. (210) 364-7024. Disrupt Exhibition. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing. Hindsight 20/20. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing. Migration is Beautiful. Noon-1 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Join Denise Hernandez and Julio Perdido from Centro del Pueblo. Part of ADC 2021: Artists Creating a Post-Capitalist Continued on next page »

THEATER Dell’Arte Spring Workshop - Grand Guignol. 2-5 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Workshop primer on “theatre of laughter and terror” from scripts to effects and techniques with Michael Fields and Debbie McMahon. Sign up online. www.dellarte.com/. Towards a Regenerative Theatre. 3-4 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Zuzka Sabata, Cate Hatfield and Ruthi Engelke lead a discussion using both the regenerative and extractive economy visual models. Part of ADC 2021: Artists Creating a Post-Capitalist World. Free. ruthiengelke@gmail. com. cooperationhumboldt.com/dismantle-capitalism/. 2103647024.

EVENTS Perilous (Post a) Plunge. Virtual World, Online. Registered plungers gather donations for the 20th annual fundraiser then, as a team or as individuals, create a video or take a picture of themselves plunging and submit it by email. director@discovery-museum.org. www.discovery-museum. org/perilous-plunge.html. Arcata Liberation March. Noon-1 p.m. D Street Neighborhood Center, 1301 D St., Arcata. Meet at D Street Community Park. Please wear white during this silent demonstration (without speakers). Part of HC Black Music and Arts Association’s Harambee Liberation Month activities. Club Triangle Streaming Saturdays. Virtual World, Online. Weekly online queer variety show. Submissions accepted daily. Post your art on social media and tag @ clubtriangle. #coronoshebettadont. Free. www.facebook. com/clubtriangl . Artists Dismantling Capitalism Symposium. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 26 listing. Virtual Bowl For Kids’ Sake 38: Comic Book Bonanza. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing. TCLT’s Virtual Toast to the Coast. 4-8:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. To-go crab dinner available at Trinidad Town Hall, online music by The Sandfleas, live painting by Matt Beard, a benefit auction and video on the Trinidad Coastal Land Trust. $40 for dinner, $20 for a bottle of wine. www. trinidadcoastallandtrust.org.

FOR KIDS Preschool Storytime. 11 a.m. Virtual World, Online. Hosted by the Arcata Branch Library via Zoom. To sign up, email sparsons@co.humboldt.ca.us or call 822-5954.

FOOD Arcata Plaza Winter Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Every Saturday, rain or shine, Humboldt County farmers gather on the plaza to share their bounty. Current COVID safety guidelines onnorthcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

21


CALENDAR Continued from previous page

World. Free. ruthiengelke@gmail.com. www.cooperationhumboldt.com/dismantle-capitalism/. (210) 364-7024. Redwood Art Association 2021 New Year Exhibition. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing.

COMEDY Sunday Service Comedy Open Mic: ZOOM. 5 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Virtual stage-time with Pastor Paula for aspiring comics working out sets and trying to land jokes. Five-minute sets. Join the show at www.us02web.zoom. us/j/82295455754. Zoom room: 822 9545 5754. Password: comedy.

LECTURE Why the Solidarity Economy Needs Artists and Artists Need a Solidarity Economy. 3-4 p.m. Virtual World, Online. David Ferris of the Highlander Center, Nati Linares of the New Economy Coalition and Ruthi Engelke and Marina Lo-

pez of Cooperation Humboldt discuss solidarity economy. Part of ADC 2021: Artists Creating a Post-Capitalist World. Free. ruthiengelke@gmail.com. www.cooperationhumboldt.com/dismantle-capitalism/. (210) 364-7024.

MUSIC Art & Music - EmRArt with the Paula Jones Band. 2-3 p.m. A weekly collaboration of art and music -- covers and original songs alongside live art production. This session is live featuring The Paula Jones Band. Hosted by The Sanctuary. On Facebook and YouTube. Free. emily@emilyreinhart. com. youtube.com/channel/UClclGc_-RErDvHWjNBsbhIQ. Hip Hop Standpoint in this Social Political War. 1:302:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. A conversation guided by Kwame Braxton and Charlie Braxton about the political climate’s influence on hip hop. Q&A. Part of ADC 2021: Artists Creating a Post-Capitalist World. Free. ruthiengelke@gmail. com. www.cooperationhumboldt.com/dismantle-capital-

HOME & GARDEN

ism/. (210) 364-7024. Quarantine Sing-a-long. Ongoing, 7 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing.

EVENTS Artists Dismantling Capitalism Symposium. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 26 listing. Virtual Bowl For Kids’ Sake 38: Comic Book Bonanza. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing.

FOR KIDS Try Out Girl Scouts: Be Your Own Boss. 4-5 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Zoom in with your girl(s) virtually to try out hands-on and fun activities as they explore ways to be their own boss. Visit http://norcal.gs/explore-gs. smetteauer@ gsnorcal.org. norcal.gs/explore-gs.

FOOD

2 Tuesday

ART

COMEDY Savage Henry’s BigFish Open Mic via Zoom. 9 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Enjoy or participate in some stand-up openmic Zoom style. Five-minute sets. Zoom: www.us02web. zoom.us/j/86421967992 Password: comedy.

ETC

LECTURE

English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing.

Conversations on Hemingway. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing.

Disrupt Exhibition. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing. Redwood Art Association 2021 New Year Exhibition. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing.

BOOKS equity arcata’s Community Book Club. First Monday of every month, 4-6 p.m. Virtual World, Online. The group will be discussing adrienne marie brown’s book, Emergent Strategy: Shaping Change, Changing Worlds. On Zoom. Register online. www.equityarcata.com.

MUSIC Daniel Nickerson Hosts the J Street Regulars Radio Hour. 7-8 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Artists give a onehour program to connect, send healing music, educate on American music history, celebrate artists of color and more. Free, donations encouraged. music@sanctuaryarcata.org. www.facebook.com/thesanctuaryarcata. James Zeller Hosts the J St. Regulars Radio Hour. 7-8 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing. Quarantine Sing-a-long. Ongoing, 7 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing.

EVENTS Virtual Bowl For Kids’ Sake 38: Comic Book Bonanza. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing.

MUSIC

FOR KIDS

James Zeller Hosts the J St. Regulars Radio Hour. 7-8 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing. Quarantine Sing-a-long. Ongoing, 7 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing.

Tuesday Storytime with Ms. Tamara. Virtual World, Online. Posted every Tuesday on Arcata Library’s Facebook page, www.facebook.com/HumCoLibraryArcata.

EVENTS

Local Homesharing Info Session. 1-1:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. If you have a spare bedroom and could use extra income or help around the house, Northcoast Homeshare (a program of Area 1 Agency on Aging) can connect you with a compatible housemate. Join the weekly 30-minute Zoom informational session. Free. homeshare@a1aa.org. zoom.us/j/2673010045?pwd=eTJvajJXaWR4eEMwOUErQlpGZHBJZz09. 442-3763 ext. 213.

Virtual Bowl For Kids’ Sake 38: Comic Book Bonanza. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing.

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing. Tabata. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 26 listing.

OUTDOORS

ART

22

ETC

Disrupt Exhibition. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing. Redwood Art Association 2021 New Year Exhibition. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing.

1 Monday

CALIFORNIA BLACK “CLARO” WALNUT BEAUTIFUL LIVE EDGE BOARDS

Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing. Mad River Steelhead Derby. 6 a.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing.

Food Not Bombs. 4 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Free, hot food for everyone. Mostly vegan and organic and always delicious. Free. Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing. Mad River Steelhead Derby. 6 a.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing.

NEW SHIPMENT JUST ARRIVED!

OUTDOORS

MEETINGS

OUTDOORS

YOUR SOURCE FOR THE FINEST HARDWOODS & WOOD WORKING SUPPLIES

5301 Boyd Rd., Arcata Just off Giuntoli Lane at Hwy 299 www.almquistlumber.com (707) 825-8880

Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing. Mad River Steelhead Derby. 6 a.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing.

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing. Restorative Movement. 10:30-11:30 a.m. & 1:30-2:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing. Virtual Yoga: Gentle Vinyasa Flow. 5-6:15 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Join online at the Abbey of the Redwoods for a mellow practice. Suitable for all levels but previous


SCREENS yoga experience is helpful due to the limitations of online instruction. Free. mindfullymatt@gmail.com. www. facebook.com/abbeyoftheredwoods.

3 Wednesday

ART

Disrupt Exhibition. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing. Redwood Art Association 2021 New Year Exhibition. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing.

BOOKS On the Same Page Book Club. 5:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Online book club that meets on the first Wednesday of the month on Zoom. Sign up using the Google form at www.forms.gle/bAsjdQ7hKGqEgJKj7.

MUSIC James Zeller Hosts the J St. Regulars Radio Hour. 7-8 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing. Quarantine Sing-a-long. Ongoing, 7 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing.

EVENTS The Curiosity Hour: Weekly Double Dose of Weird with Veve Decay. 8 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 26 listing. Virtual Bowl For Kids’ Sake 38: Comic Book Bonanza. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing.

FOR KIDS Preschool Storytime. 11 a.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 27 listing.

OUTDOORS Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing. Mad River Steelhead Derby. 6 a.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing.

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 25 listing. Reel Genius Virtual Trivia. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Create a team via Facetime, Skype, Messenger, Hangouts etc., order some food and brews from the Madrone and play while dining outdoors, or enjoying takeout at home. Invite link will be posted prior to the event. www. facebook.com/events/657139721581557. Tabata. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 26 listing. Weekly Check-in with Rep. Huffman. Noon. Virtual World, Online. Rep. Jared Huffman (D-San Rafael) will hold Facebook Live check-ins to engage with his constituents on the latest updates regarding the novel coronavirus pandemic and to answer questions about the federal response. More information at www.huffman.house. gov/coronavirus. Free. www.facebook.com/rephuffman.

Heads Up …

Coast Central Credit Union offers scholarships to all graduating high school seniors in Humboldt, Del Norte and Trinity counties and attending Humboldt State University, Chico State University, College of the Redwoods or Shasta College for at least the first two years. Deadline is March 15. Applications at www.coastccu.org/community/ college-scholarships. Entries sought for 2021 Student Bird Art and Student Nature Writing Contests. Information about the two contests is available at www.godwitdays.org. Entries will be collected online until Friday, March 26. Dream Quest offers scholarships for students going to a two- or four-year college or vocational school. Apply by April 15. Email office@dqwc.org or visit www.dqwc.org.

Graduating seniors at Humboldt County high schools who plan to major or minor in music or music education at an accredited college next fall may apply for Scotia Band’s 2021 Sewell Lufkin Memorial Scholarship ($500) until April 16. The application form is available at www.scotiaband2. org/Scotia_Band_Scholarship.html. The Humboldt-Del Norte County Medical Society’s Humboldt-Del Norte PreMedical Education Task Force offers two $1,000 Future Physician scholarships to students planning on attending medical school. Application at www.hafoundation.org/Grants-Scholarships/Scholarships-Apply-Now. Teen Court is looking for an artist to create a new image for a T-shirt design. Artists do not need to be a youth or connected to Teen Court, but youth are encouraged. For questions or to send samples of your work, email: hcteencourt@bgcredwoods.org. The Media Maker’s Night film festival is looking for video submissions that are 10 minutes or less that explore these themes: a story about you, community or anything inspired by/incorporating the North Coast. Also accepting a general submissions: documentaries, short films, dance videos, music pieces, experimental media, trailers or any creative video. For more info, visit www.accesshumboldt. net/media-makers-night. The city of Eureka has open seats on several boards and commissions. To see what seats are available and how to apply, call the City Clerk at 441-4175, or go to www. ci.eureka.ca.gov. The city of Arcata has open seats on the Historic Landmarks, Transactions and Use Tax Oversight, Transportation Safety, Wetlands and Creeks, Parks and Recreation and Energy committees. To apply, visit www.cityofarcata.org or call 822-5953. Cooperation Humboldt invites artists, social change workers and those who imagine a better tomorrow to participate in “Just Imagine,” an ongoing public art show. Submit a piece by filling out the form and uploading electronic files of photos, videos, text or audio to www.forms. gle/jdQJfrAdu7Z1ULcz5. Email coophumed@gmail.com. The Humboldt Branch of Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom is seeking applications for its Edilith Eckart Memorial Peace Scholarship supporting projects that promote peace and social justice locally or globally. Grants range from $150-$500. Applications online at www. wilpfhumboldt.wordpress.com/scholarship-information are due April 1. Submit online or mail to: WILPF at P.O. Box 867, Arcata, CA 95518. Call 822-5711. The city of Arcata is offering curbside pickup and free delivery to all residents who purchase a compost bin. Backyard compost bins are available for $25 by emailing the Environmental Services Department at eservices@ cityofarcata.org or by calling 822-8184. The city of Arcata is seeking community members for the Planning Commission. Applications may be dropped off, in a sealed envelope labeled “City Manager’s Office,” at the city’s drop boxes in the city hall parking lot and next to the USPS mailbox outside city hall. Visit www.cityofarcata. org or call 822-5953. The Humboldt Arts Council is distributing CARES Act relief-funded grants to aid local arts organizations serving socially vulnerable populations not eligible for direct CARES Act grants. Details and application at www.humboldtarts.org/cares-act-grant-application. The county of Humboldt is seeking additional applicants for the 2020/2021 Humboldt County Civil Grand Jury. Visit www.humboldt.courts.ca.gov or call 269-1245. Interested parties may also complete, download and email an application to: GrandJuryApps@humboldtcourt.ca.gov. The Arcata Police Department is looking for Volunteer Patrol members. Contact Administrative Sgt. Brian Hoffman at 822-2428. l

Maintaining social distance while judging you. I Care a Lot

Ruthless and Rootless I Care a Lot and Nomadland By John J. Bennett

screens@northcoastjournal.com I CARE A LOT. There has been a movement afoot, particularly in the last 20 years or so, among creators and critics in advocacy of the unlikable protagonist. And it makes sense: From a storytelling standpoint, exploring the vague borders of personality in order to subvert the dominant hero/villain paradigm can be a deeply satisfying thought exercise. In terms of modern/feminist/progressive criticism, flouting the convention of pleasantness as a measure of worth serves as part of the greater work of widening the lens of acceptability and validity through which we view art, whether it be “serious” or “popular” (although part of the same work lies in removing that distinction). Philosophically, I’m all for it. I tend toward the dark places anyway and I admire the challenge of creating a compellingly nasty character/narrative. But there’s the rub. The work has to be compelling, the character (or characters) realized enough that we care about them, or at least want to see what they get up to in spite of our aversion. It is a delicate balance worth striving for and, ostensibly, the aim of J Blakeson’s I Care a Lot, which never quite pulls it off. Marla Grayson (Rosamund Pike), she of the perfect haircut, great clothes and

mirthless smile, would be the unlikable protagonist in question. A grifter and, from the evidence presented, something of a sociopath, Marla is uninterested in not being rich; she tells us this much in an unnecessary bit of opening narration. And so, making use of her innate avarice, her skill as a manipulator and the cooperation of a like-minded doctor (Alicia Witt) and care-home administrator (Damian Young), as well as a seemingly unwitting, well-intentioned judge (Isiah Whitlock Jr.), she conspires to force elderly people out of their homes under the false flag of her role as a court-appointed guardian. She then dissolves their assets, separates them from any family members who might get wise and, one assumes, literally laughs all the way to the bank. Along with her partner in life and crime Fran (Eiza González), Marla has built a thriving enterprise and amassed a small fortune, but it isn’t enough. So when Jennifer Peterson (Dianne Wiest), a recent retiree with significant wealth and no inconvenient hangers-on, appears on her radar, she becomes an obvious target. And when Jennifer’s holdings turn out to be much more titillating than bank accounts, Marla Continued on next page »

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

23


SCREENS Continued from previous page

finds it positively delicious. But of course nothing is quite so simple, and Jennifer turns out to be connected to a self-described “very dangerous man” (Peter Dinklage) who is deeply concerned both about her welfare and the purloined assets formerly in her possession. And so follows an increasingly implausible, unfortunately shallow cat and mouse game played, on both sides, by people it is basically impossible to like. I Care a Lot is undeniably stylish and better put-together than it could be, but that minor elevation serves more to suggest what might have been than to actually add to what is. The scenario is strong and the cast admirably committed to it, but as the “real-life” implications of a con artist caught by a murderer start to unfold, the verisimilitude of the movie falls apart. It is neither gritty nor cartoonish enough to justify its minor mistakes nor the suspensions of disbelief and leaps of logic necessary to stick with the story. Further, it is never as nasty as it and its characters would pretend to be. Annoyingly unlikable? Sure. Frustratingly promising? Definitely. R. 158M. NETFLIX. NOMADLAND. There is some small, simple poetry in the idea that this, the latest from Chloé Zhao (The Rider, 2017; Marvel’s Eternals, TBD) would be perhaps the most talked-about, awards-contending movie of 2020. That’s partly because it is an artful work of small, simple poetry itself, but also because it is about a uniquely American strain of isolation: a social disease bred and broadcast by the centralization of wealth, the destabilization of community and the lack of institutional support available to many of those in need. And there is something appropriate in its timeless, prescient vision of loneliness, as well as the fact that now, a year or more after it was screened at festivals, it has been unceremoniously released on one of the least noisy streaming services. As to the work itself, Nomadland is as good as everyone has been saying. It comes from a deceptively simple school of character-based verité, relying on the small stuff of lives lived for its drama and raising them up with careful focus and painstaking technique. The movie presents itself as almost formless, and it is a testament to Zhao’s light touch and visual sense, both as a director and editor, as well as to Frances McDormand’s devastating, sweet, often very funny performance, that the story feels warm and lived in, instead of meandering or distant. R. 107M. HULU. l John J. Bennett (he/him) is a movie nerd who loves a good car chase.

24

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES List your class – just $4 per line per issue! Deadline: Friday, 5pm. Place your online ad at classified.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Dance/Music/Theater/Film GUITAR/PIANO LESSONS. All ages, beginning & intermediate. Seabury Gould (707) 845−8167. (DMT −1230)

Fitness SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids & adults, child care, fitness gym & more. Tae Kwon Do Mon−Fri 5−6 p.m., 6−7 p.m., Sat 10−11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825−0182. (F−1230)

50 and Better OLLI ONLINE CLASSES: Shelter in place but stay connected with OLLI. Get more information or register @HSUOLLI (O−1230) ONE POT: THE SIMPLE, ELEGANT SOLUTION TO COOKING WITH LOUISA ROGERS. Get tips for how to design a user−friendly kitchen, what foods to have on hand, which tools to keep (and avoid!), and secrets for quick stews, soups, stir−fries and salads. Recipes included. Thurs., March 11 from 1−3 p.m. OLLI Members $20. Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0225) THE AMAZING STORY OF YOUTHS TODAY WITH DAVID MARSHAK. Learn how youths are actively changing the world for better right now and why and how our conventional understanding of adolescence is profoundly in error. Tues., March 9 & 16 from 10 a.m.−12 p.m. OLLI Members $30. Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli (O −0225) THE KLAMATH MOUNTAINS: A GEOLOGIC HISTORY WITH MARK BAILEY. Explore the complexity and wonder of the long and continuing geologic history of the Klamath Mountains, from an ancient sea to the modern−day peaks and valleys of our close and mysterious neighbor. Wed., March 10 from 3−5 p.m. OLLI Members $15. Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/ olli (O−0225)

Spiritual EVOLUTIONARY TAROT Ongoing Zoom classes, private mentorships and readings. Carolyn Ayres. 442−4240 www.tarotofbecoming.com carolyn@tarotofbecoming.com (S−1230) SOTO ZEN MEDITATION Sunday programs and weekday meditation in Arcata locations; Wed evenings in Eureka, arcatazengroup.org Beginners welcome, call for orientation. (707) 826−1701 (S−1230)

Therapy & Support ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS. We can help 24/7, call toll free 1−844 442−0711. (T−1230)

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATION− SHIPS? Confidential help is available. 707−825− 0920, saahumboldt@yahoo.com (T−1230)

Vocational 40−HOUR WILDLAND FIRE SCHOOL − DEL NORTE CAMPUS MAR 15−19, 2021 VISIT: https://www.red woods.edu/communityed/Detail/ArtMID/17724/ ArticleID/3722/Wildland−Fire−School or call College of the Redwoods at (707)476−4500 (V− 0225) ADDITIONAL ONLINE CLASSES − Are you looking for an online class? College of the Redwoods Community Education and Ed2GO have partnered to offer a variety of short term and career courses in an online format Visit: https://www.redwoods.e du/communityed/Detail/ArtMID/17724/ArticleI− D/4916/Additional−Online−Classes or call College of the Redwoods at (707)476−4500 (V−0225) FREE AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE CLASS visit https://www.redwoods.edu/adulted or Call College of the Redwoods at 707−476−4520 for more information and to register. (V−0325) FREE BEGINNING LITERACY WITH ESL CLASS visit https://www.redwoods.edu/adulted or Call College of the Redwoods at 707−476−4520 for more information and to register. (V−0325) FREE COMPUTER SKILLS CLASS visit https://www.redwoods.edu/adulted or Call College of the Redwoods at 707−476−4520 for more information and to register. (V−0325) FREE ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE CLASS visit https://www.redwoods.edu/adulted or Call College of the Redwoods at 707−476−4520 for more information and to register. (V−0325) FREE GED/HISET PREPARATION CLASSES visit https://www.redwoods.edu/adulted or Call College of the Redwoods at 707−476−4520 for more information and to register. (V−0325) FREE LIVING SKILLS FOR ADULTS WITH DISABILI− TIES visit https://www.redwoods.edu/adulted or Classes Call College of the Redwoods at 707−476− 4520 for more information and to register. (V− 0325) FREE WORKPLACE SKILLS CLASSES visit https://www.redwoods.edu/adulted or Call College of the Redwoods 707−476−4520 for more information and to register. (V−0401) FRONT OFFICE RECEPTIONIST Apr 5 − Jun 25, 2021 Visit: https://www.redwoods.edu/communityed/ Detail/ArtMID/17724/ArticleID/5110/Medical− Billing−and−Coding−Specialist or call College of the Redwoods at (707)476−4500 (V−0225)

INCIDENT SAFETY AWARENESS FOR HIRED VENDORS Dates Available in March & April Visit: https://www.redwoods.edu/communityed/Detail /ArtMID/17724/ArticleID/5088/Incident−Safety− Awareness−for−Hired−Vendors or call College of the Redwoods at (707)476−4500 (V−0225) MEDICAL OFFICE RECEPTIONIST Apr 5 − Jul 30, 2021 Visit: https://www.redwoods.edu/communit yed/Detail/ArtMID/17724/ArticleID/5110/Medical −Billing−and−Coding−Specialist or call College of the Redwoods at (707)476−4500 (V−0225) NOTARY − MAIN CAMPUS April 13, 2021 Visit: https://www.redwoods.edu/communityed/Detail /ArtMID/17724/ArticleID/3692/Notary or call College of the Redwoods at (707)476−4500 (V− 0225) PHARMACY TECHNICIAN Mar 13 − Aug 7, 2021 Visit: https://www.redwoods.edu/communityed/ Detail/ArtMID/17724/ArticleID/3704/Pharmacy− Technician or call College of the Redwoods at (707)476−4500 (V−0225) REAL ESTATE CORRESPONDENCE Become a Real Estate Agent. Start Anytime! Visit: https://www. redwoods.edu/communityed/Real−Estate or call College of the Redwoods at (707)476−4500 (V− 0225) SPANISH FOR EMTS & PARAMEDICS May 17 − Jul 8, 2021 Visit: https://www.redwoods.edu/commun ityed/Detail/ArtMID/17724/ArticleID/5286/S− panish−for−EMTs−Paramedics or call College of the Redwoods at (707)476−4500 (V−0225)

Wellness & Bodywork AYURVEDIC HERBALIST/PRACTITIONER TRAINING W/TRACI WEBB & GUESTS. Starts March 2 online @ Ayurvedic Living School. Learn to Heal Yourself & Others Naturally w/Herbs, Foods, Lifestyle, Make Your Own Medicines. Includes Weekly Class, Monthly Clinic, Internship, Bimonthly Moon Meditations & Peer Support Circles, 1−on−1 Support Sessions, 3−Day Constitu− tional & Imbalance Assessment Immersion, Self− Care Immersion, Group Detox, Medicine Making. Launch a career good for you and the planet! Details & Reg: www.ayurvedicliving.com Email: info@ayurvedicliving.com DANDELION HERBAL CENTER CLASSES WITH JANE BOTHWELL. 10−Month Herbal Studies Program. Feb − Nov 2021. Meets one weekend per month with three camping trips. Learn in−depth material medica, plant identification, flower essences, wild foods, formulations and harvesting. Register online www.dandelionherb.com or call (707) 442−8157. INTRODUCTION TO ATTITUDINAL HEALING WORKSHOP VIA ZOOM. Begins March 4th. Pre registration required. Space limited. Contact Pat Cowan (707)599−4406 or email mylifecoach@suddenlink.net

YOUR CLASS HERE

442-1400 ×314

northcoastjournal.com


NORTH COAST NIGHT LIGHTS

LEGAL NOTICES NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF DONALD KEITH DICKSON CASE NO. PR2100028

A sky full of wonders. Photo by David Wilson

Dark Skies of the North Coast By David Wilson

ncnightlights@northcoastjournal.com

T

his time of year sees its share of gray skies, a seemingly endless woolen rain blanket drawn across the heavens — the gray that won’t go away. Rain patters the skylight as I type and I dream of summertime ... On a warm, clear night, it’s not uncommon for people to drive a few minutes out of town to enjoy our dark skies. Night is no reason to stay in, for how else would one see the stars? It is said, and I’ve experienced it, that spending time in the forests is rejuvenating; time spent beneath the stars is similarly rewarding. To go out at night and look deep into the cosmos is to find your place in the universe. How many poems, songs, works of art and prayers has the night sky inspired? Rural California’s North Coast region is blessed with an abundance of dark skies, as the relentless growth of the country’s population centers hasn’t yet impacted our nighttime surroundings with their formidable glows. Yet even in the hills, one may see in many of our vistas flares of light dotting the landscape from distant towns or remote industries. Is encroachment of light on the sky and the destruction of our view of the stars inevitable? No. It’s not inevitable. There are many ways for individuals, communities and agencies to minimize the amount of light that spills into their surroundings, onto our neighbors and into the sky from cities,

businesses and homes. Some communities have taken it upon themselves to preserve the night sky. In Arizona, Flagstaff boasts of becoming the world’s first “International Dark-Sky City” in 2001, as recognized by the International Dark-Sky Association (www.darksky.org). Using light fixtures that prevent the spill of light into the sky or onto one’s neighbors’ properties and using warmer color temperature lighting are among the simplest techniques used to greatly reduce city glow into the sky. Even people who never look at the sky can be happier without unnecessary glare intruding on their bedrooms from their neighbors’ unshielded lighting. Visit Flagstaff’s Dark Sky page for lots of information on how the city did it and why: www.flagstaffdarkskies.org. While California’s North Coast doesn’t contain any locations officially designated as Dark Sky sites by the International Dark-Sky Association, our remote location nevertheless provides many richly star-studded areas. Let us hope that as we grow and develop our region, we can do so in a way that preserves the beauty of, and our connection to, the night sky. l To keep abreast of David Wilson’s (he/ him) photography or purchase a print, visit www.mindscapefx.com or follow him on Instagram at @david_wilson_mfx and on Twitter @davidwilson_mfx.

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of DONALD KEITH DICKSON A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner CAROL CAMP− BELL In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition for probate requests that CAROL CAMPBELL be appointed as personal representative to admin− ister the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the dece− dent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for exami− nation in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on March 11, 2021 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 6.

attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Jocelyn M. Godinho, Esq. Law Office of Hjerpe & Godinho, LLP 350 E Street, 1st Floor Eureka, CA 95501 (707) 442−7262 Filed: February 8, 2021 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 2/18, 2/25, 3/4 (21−047)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF KAREN ANN JANDEBEUR CASE NO. PR2100027

unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an Continued onfiles next » interested person an page objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on March 4, 2021 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Room: 6. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. PETITIONER: Kara−Lee Hughes 209 Sonoma Street Eureka, CA 95501 (707) 616−4238 Filed: February 4, 2021 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of KAREN ANN JANDEBEUR A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner KARA−LEE HUGHES In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition for probate requests that KARA−LEE HUGHES be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or For information on how to appear consented to the proposed action.) remotely for your hearing, please The independent administration visit https://www.humboldt.courts. authority will be granted unless an ca.gov/ interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of 2/11, 2/18, 2/25 (21−042) cause why the court should not the petition, you should appear at grant the authority. the hearing and state your objec− A HEARING on the petition will be tions or file written objections with held on March 4, 2021 at 2:00 p.m. the court before the hearing. Your at the Superior Court of California, NOTICE TO BIDDERS appearance may be in person or by County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth your attorney. Street, Eureka, in Room: 6.1. Notice is hereby given that the Humboldt County IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a Office ofof Education (“HCOE”), will receive sealed bids IF YOU OBJECT to the granting contingent creditor of the dece− the petition, you should at dent, you must file your claim with forappear the purchase of paper for various public agencies the hearing and state your objec− County, potentially including, but not the court and mail a copy to the in Humboldt tions or file with Humboldt County Office of Educapersonal representative appointed limited to:written Collegeobjections of the Redwoods, thetion, court before theSchools, hearing.Cities Yourof Arcata, Eureka, Fortuna, and Rio Dell, by the court within the later of Eureka City appearance may be in person or by either (1) four months from the andattorney. various Humboldt County School Districts. your date of first issuance of letters to a 2. ARE Bids Awill be received IF YOU CREDITOR or aup to, but not later than, 4:00 p.m., on March general personal representative, as 29th, 2021,creditor and will of thereafter publicly open and read aloud the bids. All bids contingent the dece− defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− dent, file via yourin-person, claim with fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days shallyou be must received mail or electronically at the HCOE Office, theAttn: courtHana andHanawalt, mail a copy the Ave., Eureka, CA, purchasing@hcoe.org. from the date of mailing or 901toMyrtle personal representative appointed on the Bid Proposal Form included in the personal delivery to you of a notice 3. Each bid shall be completed byContract the courtDocuments, within the later of conform and be fully responsive to this under section 9052 of the California and must either (1) four months from the Probate Code. Other California invitation, the plans and specifications and all other Contract Documents. date of first issuance of letters to a statutes and legal authority may 4. No bid may be withdrawn for a period of sixty (60) days after the general personal representative, as affect your rights as a creditor. You date set for the 58(b) opening for Cali− bids except as provided by Public Contract defined in section of the may want to consult with an CodeProbate §§5100 Code, et seq.orHCOE fornia (2) 60reserves days the right to reject any and all bids and attorney knowledgeable in Cali− from the date mailing or or irregularities in the bidding. fornia law. to waive anyofinformalities personal delivery to you of aOFFICE noticeOF EDUCATION YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept HUMBOLDT COUNTY underBy: section of the California by the court. If you are a person Hana 9052 Hanawalt Probate Code.February, Other California interested in the estate, you may DATED: 17th, 2021 statutes and legal authority may file with the court a Request for affect your rights as a creditor. You Special Notice (form DE−154) of the may want to consult with an filing of an inventory and appraisal northcoastjournal.com Thursday, Feb. attorney• knowledgeable in 25, Cali−2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL of estate assets or of any petition fornia law. or account as provided in Probate YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept Code section 1250. A Request for by the court. If you are a person Special Notice form is available

25


LEGAL NOTICES PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND JUDICIAL FORFEITURE On February 4th, 2021, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture from Dick Smith Lane in Fortuna, California, in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11359 of the Health and Safety Code of California. The seized property is described as: $40,261.00 in U.S. Currency. Control Number 21−F−13 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any corre− spondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney. If your claim is not timely filed, the Humboldt County District Attorney will declare the property described in this notice to be forfeited to the State and it will be disposed of as provided in Health and Safety Code Section 11489. 2/18/, 2/25, 3/4 (21−052)

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND JUDICIAL FORFEITURE On December 2nd, 2020, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture from Riverwalk Drive, in Fortuna, California, in connection with controlled substance viola− tions, to wit, Section 11369 (A)(3)(D) of the Health and Safety Code of California. The seized property is described as: $47,071.00 in U.S. Currency. Control Number 20−F−47 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the prop− erty in any correspondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney. 2/18, 2/25, 3/4 (21−049)

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND JUDICIAL FORFEITURE On December 3rd, 2020, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture from Fifth Street, in Alderpoint, California, in connec− tion with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11359 of the Health and Safety Code of Cali− fornia. The seized property is described as: $75,275.00 in U.S. Currency. Control Number 20−F−51 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the prop− erty in any correspondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney. 2/1/, 2/25, 3/4 (21−050)

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND JUDICIAL FORFEITURE

water, California, in connection with controlled substance viola− tions, to wit, Section 11379 of the Health and Safety Code of Cali− fornia. The seized property is described as: $279,985.00 in U.S. Currency. Control Number 21−F−11 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the prop− erty in any correspondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney. 2/18, 2/25, 3/4 (21−051)

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE On February 5th, 2021, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11351 of the Health and Safety Code of California from Fernbridge Drive, Fortuna, California. The seized property is described as: $6,415.00 in US currency and Control Number 21−F−12 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any correspon− dence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney. If your claim is not timely filed, the Humboldt County District Attorney will declare the property described in this notice to be forfeited to the State and it will be disposed of as provided in Health and Safety Code Section 11489. 2/18, 2/25, 3/4 (21−070)

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE On November 4th, 2020, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11370.1 of the Health and Safety Code of California from Telescope Road, in Hoopa, Cali− fornia. The seized property is described as: $5,160.00 US currency and Control Number 20−F−45 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any correspondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney. 2/18, 2/25, 3/4 (21−054)

SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE On December 15th, 2020, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11351 of the Health and Safety Code of California from Noe Ave in Eureka, California. The seized property is described as: $5,960.00 US currency and Control Number 20−F−50 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any correspon− dence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney. 2/18, 2/25, 3/4 (21−058)

On December 14th, 2020, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11359 of the Health and Safety Code of California from Munson Court in Eureka, California. The seized property is described as: $22,000.00 US currency and Control Number 21−F−02 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any corre− spondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney.

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE

On November 22nd, 2020, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11359(B) of the Health and Safety Code of California from US 101 in Orick, California. The seized property is described as: $10,000.00 US currency and Control Number 21−F−01 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any corre− spondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney.

On January 20th, 2021, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11351 of the Health and Safety Code of California from Palomino Lane in Arcata, California. The seized prop− erty is described as: $4,980.00 in US currency and Control Number 21−F− 07 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any correspondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney.

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE

On December 23rd, 2020, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11378 of the Health and Safety Code of California from the intersection of H and Russ Streets in Eureka, California. The seized property is described as: $19,666.00 US currency and Control Number 21 −F−03 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any correspon− dence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney.

On November 24th, 2020, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11351 of the Health and Safety Code of California from 7th and G Streets in Eureka, California. The seized property is described as: $3,700.00 US currency and Control Number 20−F−46 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any corre− spondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney.

2/18, 2/25, 3/4 (21−062)

2/18, 2/25, 3/4 (21−055)

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE

On December 28th, 2020, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11351 of the Health and Safety Code of California from 3500 Broadway Street in Eureka, California. The seized property is described as: $2,715.00 US currency and Control Number 21−F−05 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any correspondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney.

On November 11th, 2020, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11359 of the Health and Safety Code of California from US− 101 & Sprowl Creek Road in Humboldt County, California. The seized property is described as: $26,217.00 US currency and Control Number 20−F−49 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any corre− spondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney. 2/18, 2/25, 3/4 (21−057)

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE On December 28th, 2020, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11351 of the Health and Safety Code of California from 4827 Valley West Boulevard in Arcata, California. The seized property is described as: $3,912.00 US currency and Control Number 21−F−04 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any correspondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney.

On January 14th, 2021, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task 2/18, 2/25, 3/4 (21−061) Force seized property for forfeiture 2/18, 2/25, 3/4 (21−063) PUBLISHED NOTICE OF from Pigeon Point Road, in Fresh− PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL water, California, in connection SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE with controlled substance viola− FORFEITURE On December 15th, 2020, Agents tions, to wit, Section 11379 of the On November 22nd, 2020, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Health and Safety Code of Cali− from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for fornia. The seized property is Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with described as: $279,985.00 in U.S. forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to Currency. Control Number 21−F−11 controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11351 of the Health and has been assigned to this case. Use NORTH COAST 25, 2021 from • northcoastjournal.com wit, Section 11359(B) of the Health Safety CodeFeb. of California Noe this number to identify theJOURNAL prop− • Thursday, and Safety Code of California from Ave in Eureka, California. The seized erty in any correspondence with US 101 in Orick, California. The property is described as: $5,960.00 the Office of the Humboldt County seized property is described as: US currency and Control Number District Attorney.

26

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE

2/18, 2/25, 3/4 (21−060)

2/18, 2/25, 3/4 (21−064)

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE On February 4th, 2021, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11351 of the Health and Safety Code of California from Highway 101, Cali− fornia. The seized property is described as: $10,061.00 in US currency and Control Number 21−F− 08 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any correspondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney. 2/18, 2/25, 3/4 (21−067)

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE On January 20th, 2021, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11351 of the Health and Safety Code of California from Palomino Lane in Arcata, California. The seized prop− erty is described as: $4,980.00 in US

2/18, 2/25, 3/4 (21−066)

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE On January 21st, 2021, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11358 of the Health and Safety Code of California from R Street, Eureka, California. The seized property is described as: $28,000.00 in US currency and Control Number 21−F− 10 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any correspondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney.

On June 21st, 2020, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11352 of the Health and Safety Code of California from C Avenue in Mckinleyville, California. The seized property is described as: $6,155.00 US currency and Control Number 20−F−28 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any correspon− dence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney. 2/18, 2/25, 3/4 (21−059)

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE On November 27th, 2020, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11359 of the Health and Safety Code of California from US− 101 & Sunset Blvd in Arcata, Cali− fornia. The seized property is described as: $3,898.00 US currency and Control Number 20−F−48 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any correspondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney. 2/18, 2/25, 3/4 (21−056)

2/18, 2/25, 3/4 (21−069)

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE On January 23rd, 2021, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11352 of the Health and Safety Code of California from Redwood Drive, Garberville, California. The seized property is described as: $22,560.00 in US currency and Control Number 21−F−09 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any correspon− dence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney.

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE On September 8th, 2020, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11351 of the Health and Safety Code of California from Glen Street, in Eureka, California. The seized property is described as: $7,539.00 US currency and Control Number 20−F−44 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any corre− spondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney. 2/18, 2/25, 3/4 (21−053)

2/18, 2/25, 3/4 (21−068)

PUBLIC SALE PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE On January 6th, 2021, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11378 of the Health and Safety Code of California from John Hill Road in Eureka, California. The seized prop− erty is described as: $7,990.00 in US currency and Control Number 21−F− 06 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any correspondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney. 2/18, 2/25, 3/4 (21−065)

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE On June 21st, 2020, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11352 of the Health and Safety Code of California from C Avenue in Mckinleyville, California. The seized property is described as: $6,155.00 US currency and Control Number 20−F−28 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property pursuant to Sections 21700−21716 of the Business & Professions Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, Section 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the civil Code. The undersigned will sell at auction by competitive bidding on the 10th of March, 2021, at 9:00 AM, on the premises where said property has been stored and which are located at Rainbow Self Storage. The following spaces are located at 4055 Broadway Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt. Sarah Boyd, Space # 5250 The following spaces are located at 639 W. Clark Street Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Tamar Shirley, Space # 2801 (Held In Co. Unit) Yeni Lopez, Space # 3211 The following spaces are located at


The following spaces are located at 639 W. Clark Street Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Tamar Shirley, Space # 2801 (Held In Co. Unit) Yeni Lopez, Space # 3211 The following spaces are located at 3618 Jacobs Avenue Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Robert Reilly, Space # 1509 (Held in Co. Unit) Joseph Horwitz, Space # 1753 The following spaces are located at 105 Indianola Avenue Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Toinette Watson, Space # 219 Christopher Vandiver, Space # 230 Terre Leveton, Space # 420 Jedidiah Martin, Space # 607 Chanse Zimmer−Wilder, Space # 823 Alfreda Marshall, Space # 838 Items to be sold include, but are not limited to: Household furniture, office equip− ment, household appliances, exer− cise equipment, TVs, VCR, microwave, bikes, books, misc. tools, misc. camping equipment, misc. stereo equip. misc. yard tools, misc. sports equipment, misc. kids toys, misc. fishing gear, misc. computer components, and misc. boxes and bags contents unknown. Anyone interested in attending Rainbow Self Storage auctions must pre−qualify. For details call 707−443 −1451. Purchases must be paid for at the time of the sale in cash only. All pre −qualified Bidders must sign in at 4055 Broadway Eureka CA. prior to 9:00 A.M. on the day of the auction, no exceptions. All purchased items are sold as is, where is and must be removed at time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation for any reason whatsoever. Auctioneer: Kim Santsche, Employee for Rainbow Self− Storage, 707−443−1451, Bond # 40083246.

To: The People of the State of Cali− fornia To: CHRISTOPHER CARR, Father of Minor By order of the court, you are hereby advised that you may appear before the Judge Gregory Elvine−Kreis, presiding in Depart− ment 6 of the Humboldt County Superior Court on February 25, 2021 at 8:30 a.m. then and there to show cause, if any you have, why Aliyah Lynn Marie Carr should not be declared free from your custody and control for the purpose of freeing her for step−parent adop− tion. The following information concerns your rights and procedures which relate to this proceeding for the termination of parental custody and control of Aliyah Lynn Marie Carr, as set forth in California civil Code Section 237.5. The court shall consider whether the interest of the minor child requires the appointment of counsel. If the court finds the inter− ests of the minor do not require such protection, the court shall not appoint counsel to represent the minor. If the court finds the inter− ests of the minor require the repre− sentation of counsel, counsel shall be appointed whether or not the minor is able to afford counsel. The minor shall not be present in court, unless the minor so requests or the court so orders. If a parent appears without counsel and is unable to afford counsel, the court must appoint counsel for the parent, unless such representation is knowingly and intelligently waived. The same counsel shall not be appointed to represent both the minor and her parent. The public defender or private counsel may be appointed as counsel, pursuant to Family Code Section 7860, et seq. Private counsel appointed under the provi− sions of Family Code Section 7863 shall receive a reasonable sum for compensation and expenses, the amount of which shall be deter− mined by the Court. Such amount shall be paid by the real parties in interest, other than the minor, in such proportions as the court deems just. However, if the court finds any of the real parties in interest are unable to afford counsel, the amount shall be paid out of the general fund of the court.

Continued on next page »

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00109

WHO HAS ASKED AND FOR WHAT INTENT:

The following person is doing Busi− ness as MRS. O’S ORIGINALS

Do you have personal property over $500? For all kinds of reasons, I have no intent on letting that signature stand. Deborah LG− Fischer 759 Rigby Ave. Apt 15, Rio Dell, CA 95562 764−1774

Humboldt 6 Upper Redwood Creek Road Blue Lake, CA 95525 PO Box 483 Willow Creek, CA 95573 Lisa A OHanen 6 Upper Redwood Creek Road Blue Lake, CA 95525 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Lisa A OHanen, Owner This January 22, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 2/11, 2/18, 2/25, 3/4 (21−045)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00086 The following person is doing Busi− ness as HAROLD THE HANDYMAN Humboldt 3 Fenwick Ave Samoa, CA 95564 PO Box 115 Samoa, CA 95564 Harold G Breit 3 Fenwick Ave Samoa, CA 95564

CITATION TO CHRISTOPHER CARR Free Minor From Parental Custody and Control

The court may continue the proceeding for not more than thirty (30) days as necessary to appoint counsel to become acquainted with the case.

In the Matter of the Petition of TRISTA KILLINGSWORTH, formerly Anderson, to Declare Aliyah Lynn Marie Carr, a minor, Free from the custody and Control of Christopher Carr.

Dated: January 14, 2021 Kim M Bartleson, Clerk of the Supe− rior Court Kimberlyn S., Deputy

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Harold Breit, Owner This February 2, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

2/4, 2/11, 2/18, 2/25 (21−033)

2/18, 2/25, 3/4, 3/11 (21−046)

2/25, 3/4 (21−074)

SUMMONS (Citation to Parent) CASE NUMBER: AD2100003 SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLT

To: The People of the State of Cali− fornia To: CHRISTOPHER CARR, Father of Minor By order of the court, you are hereby advised that you may appear before the Judge Gregory Elvine−Kreis, presiding in Depart− ment 6 of the Humboldt County Superior Court on February 25, 2021 at 8:30 a.m. then and there to show

LEGALS ? 442-1400 ×314

classified@nor th coastjournal.com

County Public Notices Fictitious Business Petition to Administer Estate Trustee Sale Other Public Notices

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00012 The following person is doing Busi− ness as HUMBOLDT REDWOODS INN Humboldt 987 Redwood Dr PO Box 98 Garberville, CA 95542 Mark Scown 987 Redwood Dr PO box 98 Garberville, CA 95542 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Mark Scown This January 7, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 2/4, 2/11, 2/18, 2/25 (21−035)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00115 The following person is doing Busi− ness as HUMBOLDT HORIZONS Humboldt 3259 Matthew Lane Fortuna, CA 95540 Humboldt Horizons LLC CA 202103710340 3259 Matthew Lane Fortuna, CA 95540

BLUE LAKE RANCHERIA TRIBAL JUSTICE CENTER NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) (40 CFR § 1500-1508) to assist the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) to comply with 42 U.S.C. § 4371 et. seq. The EA documents the environmental review for the proposed development of a multi-purpose Justice Center and Transportation/O.E.S. Complex to be constructed on trust lands within the boundaries of the Blue Lake Rancheria. The purpose of the EA is to investigate and outline the potential environmental effects associated with the development of the facility. The Bureau of Justice Assistance, Office of Justice Programs (OJP), as Lead Agency, will use this EA to determine if the approval of the development of the multi-purpose Tribal Court Facility would result in significant effects to the environment. The purpose of the EA is to satisfy the environmental review process of NEPA as set forth by the U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice to document the need for the Blue Lake Rancheria to develop and administer the types of services that would be made available at the Blue Lake Rancheria Justice Center. The document provides a detailed description of the Proposed Action and an analysis of the potential environmental consequences associated with development of the proposed project. Also included is a discussion and analysis of project alternatives, impact avoidance, and mitigation measures. These mitigation measures are incorporated into the Environmental Consequences section of the EA and summarized in Table 4. Proposed is the construction of a BLR Multi-Purpose Justice Center and Transportation/O.E.S. complex on a portion of a 33.47-acre parcel with an affected area of 2.8 acres of tribally-owned trust lands within the boundaries of the Blue Lake Rancheria, Humboldt County, California. The U.S. Department of the Interior, through the Bureau of Indian Affairs, has been designated by federal law as the “Trustee” of all Indian lands. The BIA does not weigh in nor administer trust land within control of the Tribe and for Tribal purposes except in the approval of leases. Leases are not proposed under this action. By being aligned with the other tribal and non-tribal social service, health, and administrative entities, the Justice Center is a projected twostory, 10,750 square foot facility that will house the Rancheria’s Police Department, Tribal Court, Emergency Services, and Tribal staff. The Justice Center’s first floor will include a reception area, Tribal library, Elders Meal Program kitchen, dining hall, Emergency Operations Center, Tribal Court, and Police Department. The second floor of the facility will house Tribal administration offices. The proposed Transportation/O.E.S. complex consists of a 4,338 square foot building that will house a Tribal Transportation Office and Garage as well as the Fire Department. Both buildings are on the same lot. The proposed project involves construction of two new buildings and equipment purchase by the Blue Lake Rancheria Tribe on Tribal Trust Lands using grant funds received, in part, from the US Department of Justice, the annual continuing appropriations under the Tribal Transportation Program (TTP), and additional funds will be provided by the Tribe. The complete draft EA, provided by LACO Associates can be found at: www.bluelakerancheria-nsn.gov/publicnotifications/

The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on February 2, 2021 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Eddie Adams, CEO, Owner This February 16, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk 2/18, 2/25, 3/4, 3/11 (21−072)

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

27


LEGAL NOTICES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00105

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00056

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00077

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00016

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00081

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00125

The following person is doing Busi− ness as THE MAGIC TEA HOUSE

The following person is doing Busi− ness as GREENDALE FARM

The following person is doing Busi− ness as SUBSTANCE

The following person is doing Busi− ness as REDWOOD REMEDY

The following person is doing Busi− ness as MODERN VIRAGO

The following person is doing Busi− ness as JMT CONSULTING

Humboldt 1109 Boss Road McKinleyville, CA 95519

Humboldt 20335 State Highway 36 Carlotta, CA 95528

Humboldt 4701 West End Road Arcata, CA 95521

Humboldt 2329 Plunkett Rd Bayside, CA 95524

Humboldt 1314 B Street, Unit B Eureka, CA 95501

Humboldt 1894 McFarlan Street Eureka, CA 95501

Zoe E Huber 1109 Boss Road McKinleyville, CA 95519

20305 State Highway 36 Carlotta, CA 95528

PO Box 4807 Arcata, CA 95518

Monica A Ahumada 2329 Plunkett Rd Bayside, CA 95524

Harlee M Keller 1314 B Street, Unit B Eureka, CA 95501

PO Box 113 Cutten, CA 95534

Clyde B Jones 1109 Boss Road McKinleyville, CA 95519

Catalyst Unlimited, Inc CA C3748442 20305 State Highway 36 Carlotta, CA 95528

Royal Key, LLC California 201719210149 4701 West End Road Arcata, CA 95521

The business is conducted by a Married Couple. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Zoe E Huber, Owner This February 5, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 2/25, 3/4, 3/11, 3/18 (21−072)

The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Ronald H Kennedy, CEO This January 22, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Josh Vert, Member This January 29, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on January 7, 2021 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Monica Ahumada, Owner This January 12, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on February 1, 2021 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Harlee M Keller, Owner This February 1, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk

1/21, 1/28, 2/4, 2/11 (21−020)

2/25, 3/4, 3/11, 3/18 (21−077)

2/11, 2/18, 2/25, 3/4 (21−041)

2/4, 2/11, 2/18, 2/25 (21−034)

Get listed today for

FREE

Place a free classified ad in the North Coast Trader You may submit a free classified ad online at thetrader707.com/ free-classified-ads

YO U R G LISTIN

HERE

Or submit your ad by snail mail, phone or email to 310 F St. Eureka CA 95501, (707) 442-1400 ads@thetrader707.com All *fields are required. First Name*: Last Name*: Phone*: E-mail Address*: Ad Text*:

Category*: (Categories: For Sale, For Trade, Wanted to Buy, Wanted to Trade, Lost, Found, Garage Sale, Community Announcement, Personal)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00065

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00121

The following person is doing Busi− ness as MEADOWOOD MUSIC

The following person is doing Busi− ness as PEACHES & PEARLS

Humboldt 2194 Meadowood Lane Eureka, CA 95503

Humboldt 2450 Wood Street Eureka, CA 95501

Stefan J Vaughan 2194 Meadowood Lane Eureka, CA 95503

Meghan L Riley 2450 Wood Street Eureka, CA 95501

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Stefan J Vaughan This January 26, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Meghan Riley, Owner This February 17, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

2/4, 2/11, 2/18, 2/25 (21−032)

2/25, 3/4, 3/11, 3/18 (21−073)

LEGALS? 442-1400 × 314 Free Ad Terms and Conditions: Limited to 1 Box size with text only, 50 words/300 characters. Free ads will run weekly based on space available. Free ads will run for one issue and must be submitted weekly to be eligible for each issue printed. Ads that are submitted that do not run in print are not guaranteed to run in the following printed issue.  Free Ads will not be accepted past deadline.

28

TO PLACE A BUSINESS DISPLAY AD: Call: (707) 496-2950 Email: ads@thetrader707.com Deadline: Noon Thursday the week before publication.

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

Jolene M Thrash 1894 McFarlan Street Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Jolene Thrash, Owner This February 19, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk 2/25, 3/4, 3/11, 3/18 (21−076)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00088 The following person is doing Busi− ness as ZUMBIDO GIFTS Humboldt 410 E Street Eureka, CA 95501 Samantha F Bartlett 1720 Ocean Drive McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on January 25, 2021 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Samantha Bartlett, Owner This February 3, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 2/25, 3/4, 3/11, 3/18 (21−079)

Submit your Calendar Events ONLINE or by E-MAIL @ northcoastjournal.com / calendar@northcoastjournal.com PRINT DEADLINE: Noon Thursday, the week before publication


CROSSWORDS 4

5

7

17

27

29 32

33

34

35

41

42

43

44

48

47 51

36

38

40

50

52

53

54 58

59

61

65

66

67

68

69

70

62

ATTACK AD 30. “Am ____ brother’s keeper?” 31. His novel “The Three Musketeers” should be banned from libraries!! 37. Easter egg coloring 38. Friend ____ friend 39. He was absolutely O.J. Simpson’s worst lawyer!! 47. ____-Cat (winter vehicle) 48. Bother 49. Like a steak that’s “still mooing” 50. Her folk rock music cannot be more painful to listen to!! 56. Bill, the Science Guy 57. Down the road 58. Je ne sais quoi 60. “Yours truly” alternative 61. Smear campaign commercial ... or this puzzle’s theme

65. 10-time NBA AllStar Kevin 66. ____ gow (gambling game played with dominoes) 67. Sharpen 68. French impressionism pioneer Alfred 69. “____ the Force, Luke” 70. Baby ____

11. Brand of probiotic yogurt 12. Best-selling PC game released in 2000 13. Joan of Arc’s crime 18. ____ Lipa (2018 Best New Artist) 21. Swivel around 22. Wasabi-coated snack 23. Sick 24. Chart type DOWN 1. Not yet on the sched. 26. Hear here! 2. Lead-in to X, Y or Z 28. Chris Christie or Kamala Harris, for 3. “____ be my short pleasure!” 32. Novelist Rand 4. Winner of four 33. Homer’s TV neighbor Indianapolis 500s 5. Wilson of “The Office” 34. Homer’s outburst 35. Area 51 sighting 6. Behind bars 36. Bryn ____ College 7. Squid squirt 8. Pre-Columbian Mexican 39. Noted ChineseAmerican fashion 9. Modify, as the designer Constitution 40. Hangs around 10. Stiller’s longtime 41. Bring in wife and comedy 42. Nutritional fig. partner

I D T A G

L I A E O N I N G

D E G A V R S O I L E E G O F R E A T E S O D I N S

L I B E R A L A R T S

64

43. Many Beethoven pieces 44. Bond creator Fleming 45. “Don’t just give up!” 46. Slice of pizza? 47. They may be dressed for dinner 51. Former Massachusetts governor ____ Patrick 52. “Goodnight” girl of song 53. Number with all its letters in alphabetical order 54. ____ patootie 55. British pop star Rita 59. Sore 61. “The Simpsons” shopkeeper 62. “Rock and Roll, Hoochie ____” (1974 hit) 63. & 64. Narc’s grp.

© Puzzles by Pappocom

S O O N E R S T A T E

9

D U D S

L E S I D O U D E L U N B E B O T S E N O F E N P R D C R I M E A K R O N N O L I E

7 6

3 7 5 1 6 3

www.sudoku.com

C O H E N

63

VERY EASY #26

8 4 5 4 8 9 9 8 7 2 9 4 5 6 1 2 8 2 1 9 6 5 1 6 7 4 3 5

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

27

29

30

31

32

37

36 40

43

46

52

58

53

54

F R E A R G N

35

44

55

56

59

60

64

65

57 61

62

63

66

68

69

70

71

72

73

67

ANSWERS NEXT WEEK!

69. Something that may be found in a belt 70. Flub 71. Dr. with Grammys 72. Cowboys, at times 73. Org. concerned with cyber threats

Bowler Junior 38. “Seinfeld” uncle 39. Company that launched Pong 42. 1970s heartthrob Garrett 43. Spanish 101 verb 45. Leaned on kids to spill the beans? 48. Junk ____ 49. Suffix with market or musket 50. With 63-Across, a fast-food employee’s classic query ... or this puzzle’s theme 58. Portia de Rossi, to 56-Down 59. Home of 60% of the world’s people 60. Screenplay structure 62. Gasteyer of “Mean Girls” 63. See 50-Across 67. Put (down) 68. Below zero: Abbr.

DOWN

1. Bay Area research sch. 2. Sweet companion? 3. “Waiter, there’s a fly ____ soup!” 4. Dietary restriction 5. Staples of annual reports 6. Gathering of lei people? 7. Mideast leader 8. Years in the Roman Empire 9. Hoda of “Today” 10. “Be with you soon” 11. Less specific 12. Take ____ the chin 13. Light beige

14. Pillow cover 22. Back muscle, for short 23. One-eighty 26. “Wake Me Up Before You GoGo” duo 27. “I could ____ horse!” 28. Diana with a record-setting swim around Manhattan in 1975 29. Manhattan, por ejemplo 30. Attachment to a fishing rod 31. Epic ____ 32. Lab noise? 33. Utah resort town 34. Passion 35. British city after which the Big Apple is named 40. Change the color of again 41. “Do or do not.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS TO FILL IN THE BLANK

C A A D N O

34

49

51

1. Taking advantage of 6. Plumbing problem 10. Northeastern octet 15. McGregor with the Twitter handle @ TheNotoriousMMA 16. “... on second thought, pass” 17. “As I’d’ve expected!” 18. ____ cum laude 19. “You ____ kiddin’!” 20. Prefix with phobia 21. Motto that translates to “Out of many, the actress who played Punky Brewster”? 24. “I figured it out!” 25. Wide shoe spec 26. Made tons and tons of food in a wok? 36. Scarecrow material 37. 12-time NFL Pro

B A R I U M

33

47

48

ACROSS

A T A S T E

14

38

42

41

45

50

13

25

28

39

12

23

24 26

11

FRIES

ANSWERS NEXT WEEK!

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS TO ARSON S A L M A I H E A R B A D L I G A R B U R N I T E N A N T E A S Y A A S U P S J T S T A A I R D A T F I R I N R U N E A L G H E R E I L L N Y Y S K

46

56

55

60

1. “The freakin’ weekend is here!” 5. Big seller of camping gear 8. Jet popular in the 1960s and ‘70s 14. Texas politico O’Rourke 15. Texas politico Richards 16. Don who won an Oscar for “Cocoon” 17. His performances on TV’s ‘NewsRadio’ and Comedy Central roasts are atrocious!! 19. Fastball, in baseball 20. Fish sometimes served tartare 21. Stirring time? 22. Backup singer for Gladys Knight 25. Her political activism is terrible!! 27. Peace Nobelist Wiesel 29. ____ de cologne

45

49

57

ACROSS

1

13

30

37 39

12

26

28

31

11

21 25

24

10

19

18

23

9

16

20 22

8

15

14

CROSSWORD by David Levinson Wilk

6

T R I I L U R I V E N G E R T O R O R E B A T P I T A A B N B E L I A I L L I N O I R L I S S A S H

S L A V A O L

E S T A N E P I R O F S A E V

I N N T P E D

H A V E

3 4 7

T O O L E Y R E G R E E C E R A N E R P D F E A S Y A E B L A N K P I L L A E E R M M I E D S O D

1 2

A I D A N

N O M O

D I B S

There ____ try”: Yoda 43. Observer 44. Unit of bacon 46. Egyptian ____ (spotted cat breed) 47. NBA official 50. One may have ‘50s decor 51. Old enough 52. Lightbulb units 53. They’re often under fire 54. Part of TNT 55. Lake in the Sierra Nevada range 56. See 58-Across 57. Goes to great heights 58. Bubble-blowing tool 61. Banks on a runway 63. ____-Mart 64. “There ____ God!” 65. Make public 66. Emmitt Smith’s 175, for short

© Puzzles by Pappocom

I E N T I C S

I N A R U G

www.sudoku.com

3

CROSSWORD by David Levinson Wilk

2

©2021 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

1

Current Crossword & Sudoku Puzzles for Feb. 25.

©2021 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

Omitted Feb. 11 Crossword & Sudoku Puzzles.

6 5 6 2 3

4

1

7 9

4 5

8

6

MEDIUM #26

1 8 6 3 7 2 1 5 9 4

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

29


EMPLOYMENT default

Opportunities AMERICAN STAR PRIVATE SECURITY Is now hiring. Clean record. Driver’s license required. Must own vehicle. Apply at 922 E Street, Suite A, Eureka (707) 476−9262 ESSENTIAL CAREGIVERS Needed to help Elderly Visiting Angels 707−442−8001

Hiring? 442-1400 ×314

northcoastjournal.com

SoHum Health is HIRING Interested applicants are encouraged to visit and apply online at www.SHCHD.org or in person at 733 Cedar Street, Garberville (707) 923-3921

NOW HIRING! Are you passionate about making a difference in your community? Are you tired of mundane cubicle jobs and want to join a friendly, devoted community with limitless potential? Join the Humboldt County Education Community. Many diverse positions to choose from with great benefits, retirement packages, and solid pay. Learn more and apply today at hcoe.org/jobs Find what you’re looking for in education!

K’ima:w Medical Center

an entity of the Hoopa Valley Tribe, is seeking applicants for the following positions:

PHARMACIST FT/REGULAR DEADLINE TO APPLY IS 5PM MARCH 3, 2021. SOBER LIVING OPERATIONS CASE MANAGER FT/REGULAR OPEN UNTIL FILLED. MEDICAL SECRETARY FT/REGULAR OPEN UNTIL FILLED. CERTIFIED MEDICAL ASSISTANT FT/REGULAR OPEN UNTIL FILLED. MAT MANAGER FT/REGULAR GRANT FUNDED OPEN UNTIL FILLED. LAB TECHNOLOGIST FT/REGULAR OPEN UNTIL FILLED. GRANTS COMPLIANCE OFFICER FT/REGULAR OPEN UNTIL FILLED. CERTIFIED DATA ENTRY CODER TECHNICIAN FT/REGULAR DEADLINE TO APPLY IS 5PM, FEBRUARY 29, 2021. MEDICAL DIRECTOR FT/REGULAR OPEN UNTIL FILLED. HOUSEKEEPER FT/REGULAR TEMPORARY ( UP TO 6 MONTHS) DEADLINE TO APPLY IS JANUARY 29, 2021 ACCOUNTANT FT/REGULAR OPEN UNTIL FILLED. MENTAL HEALTH CLINICIAN FT/REGULAR OPEN UNTIL FILLED. RN CARE MANAGER FT/REGULAR OPEN UNTIL FILLED.

CURRENT JOB OPENINGS INFECTION PREVENTION / EMPLOYEE HEALTH

Full Time Position. Position includes, but is not limited to, infection monitoring and reporting, infection risk assessment and prevention, policy and procedure development, staff education, and outbreak management. Employee Health role includes new employee and annual health assessments, immunization programs, exposure management, and safe patient handling programs. Must be able to communicate clearly, verbally and in writing to interface with employees, medical staff, and state, local, and federal health departments and programs. BSN preferred. Certification in Infection Control (CIC) preferred, but willing to train the right candidate.

LICENSED VOCATIONAL NURSE – CLINIC & HOME VISITS

Hospital position with cross-training for Skilled Nursing Facility, ER/Acute wing. Current California LVN license and BLS certification required. Work 8 or 10-hour shifts.

NURSING ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

Part-Time – The Nursing Administrative Assistant acts as an assistant to the Chief Nursing Officer by performing various assigned functions including executive and clerical duties that require the ability to work independently and to maintain compliance with regulatory and licensing agencies. The Nursing Administrative assistant also manages the email, schedules, and records of the Chief Nursing officer. High school diploma or GED required, knowledge of medical terminology required, 1-2 years experience in the medical field required.

ER/ACUTE CARE REGISTERED NURSE

Full-Time – The ER/Acute Care Registered Nurse performs all responsibilities of the RN position; schedule flexibility is a requirement, including both day and night shifts. Current RN license and BLS/ACLS required.

VISITING REGISTERED NURSE – CLINIC AND HOME HEALTH

Full Time Position, 5 days a week, Monday-Friday. The Visiting RN works 8-hour shifts in our outpatient Rural Health Clinic and at patient homes. Must be eligible to drive a company car and hold a California Driver’s License. Current RN license and BLS/ACLS required. New hires qualify for benefits as soon as they begin employment! SHCHD minimum wage start at $15.50 per hour featuring an exceptional benefits package, including an employee discount program for services offered at SHCHD.

For an application, job description, and additional information, contact: K’ima:w Medical Center, Human Resources, PO Box 1288, Hoopa, CA, 95546 or call 530-625-4261 or email: hr.kmc@kimaw.org for a job description and application. You can also check our website listings for details at kimaw.org. Resume and CV are not accepted without a signed application.

30

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

@northcoastjournal

Let’s Be Friends

is now accepting applications for a

Grant Assistant This full-time position in Bayside, CA, offers $15$16/hour, plus health and retirement benefits, paid vacation, holiday and sick time, and other generous benefits. Remote work is required (until COVID restrictions allow return to office) and some evening/weekend work hours are required. The grant assistant will perform administrative, logistical, and customer service tasks that support the daily functions of the Foundation’s grants and community based programs and initiatives, while ensuring applications and related review systems are updated and user friendly. Responsibilities also include providing customer service support to grant applicants and review committees, and tending to community relationships in order to create a more equitable, accessible and evolving grants program. The ideal candidate will focus on attention to detail, cultural humility, respect for sensitive information and confidentiality, and have an ability to complete tasks with minimal oversight and a high level of independence. You’re able to take direction from multiple staff members, prioritize workloads, provide excellent customer service, propose solutions, communicate effectively, and work collaboratively across the organization. A successful candidate will possess effective and efficient time management skills, with the ability to handle multiple responsibilities simultaneously, and adapt readily to shifting priorities based on changing community and organizational needs. A minimum of one year full-time experience working in an administrative role that has provided the necessary knowledge, abilities, and skills applicable to this position is required. Please visit www.hafoundation.org/jobs for application procedures and the complete job announcement, including all desired qualifications. For questions, contact Amy Bruce at amyb@ hafoundation.org or (707) 442-5424, ext. 305. Please submit your resume and cover letter to jobs@hafoundation.org.

Position is open until filled, but priority consideration given to those who apply by 5 p.m. Friday, March 5, 2021


Continued on next page » default

The Hoopa Valley Tribe is accepting applications to fill the following vacant positions:

SR. GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTANT

Fiscal Department, Reg. F/T, Salary: DOE Minimum Qualifications: Must have a BA in Accounting or related field and a minimum of five years of related experience and or training. Must have a minimum of one year of bank reconciliation experience. A minimum of one year of experience working in accounting software preferably in Abila MIP Accounting. Must have supervisory experience. DEADLINE: OPEN UNTIL FILLED

HUMAN RESOURCES DIRECTOR Human Resources Department, Reg. F/T, Salary: $70,000-$80,000/yr. DOE. Minimum Qualifications: Must have a Bachelor’s Degree (B.A.) from a four year college or university; and one to two years of specific experience and/or training related to personnel management; or equivalent combination of education and experience. Must have a valid CA Driver’s License and be insurable. DEADLINE: OPEN UNTIL FILLED

POLICE OFFICER

Hoopa Tribal Police Department, Regular, F/T, Salary: $26.91/hr. Minimum Requirements: Must possess a High School Diploma or GED. Must possess a Basic Academy Certificate from a California P.O.S.T. approved academy. Must possess and maintain firearms qualifications. Must have a Valid CA Driver’s License and be insurable. Must successfully pass a Title 30A Employment Background and a California Police Officer Standards and Training (P.O.S.T.) background check. DEADLINE: OPEN UNTIL FILLED

SERGEANT

Hoopa Tribal Police Department, Regular, F/T, Salary: $34.13/hr. Minimum Qualifications: High School Diploma or GED; three (3) years of related experience and/or training. Must possess a valid P.O.S.T. Law Enforcement Academy Certificate. Must possess a P.O.S.T. Intermediate Certification or completion of a P.O.S.T. Supervisory Course; OR able to obtain within 1 year of hire. Must successfully pass a Title 30A Employment Background and a California Police Officer Standards and Training (P.O.S.T.) background check. Possess valid CPR/First Aid Certificates. Valid CA Driver’s License and be insurable. DEADLINE: OPEN UNTIL FILLED For job descriptions and employment applications, contact the Human Resources/ Insurance Department, Hoopa Valley Tribe, P.O. Box 218, Hoopa, CA 95546. Call (530) 625-9200 Ext. 20 or email hr2@ hoopainsurance.com. The Tribe’s Alcohol & Drug Policy and TERO Ordinance Apply.

The Hoopa Valley Tribe is accepting applications to fill the following vacant position

NUTRITION CONSULTANT

Area 1 Agency on Aging is hiring a contract position for a Nutrition Consultant approximately 12-16 hours per month with flexible hours.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:

Must be a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist/ Registered Dietitian with food service and community experience. Must possess a current Commission on Dietetic Registration certification. A certified food manager’s certificate is preferred by not required. Experience with Older Americans Act Nutrition Programs preferred. Excellent oral and written communication skills. Ability to travel independently in Humboldt and Del Norte counties to visit nutrition sites

POSITION RESPONSIBILITIES:

Conduct annual nutrition program monitoring, of Area Agency on Aging (AAA) Older Americans Act funded contracted nutrition service providers. Assure compliance and follow-up on any corrective action plan required of a nutrition contractor. Physically inspect central kitchen sites annually. Physically inspect non-food preparation nutrition sites every other year. Submit monitoring and inspection reports to AAA staff and nutrition service providers, ensuring compliance with: Older Americans Act Title III-C Nutrition Program Standards and all state and federal Title III-C regulations. California Retail Food Code (CRFC) and local health department regarding safe and sanitary preparation of meals. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requirements. Provide input in the development and revision of AAA senior nutrition policies and standards. Provide technical assistance to AAA staff and nutrition services providers and respond in writing to their written requests for direction, guidance and interpretation of regulations. Assist in developing and evaluating the AAA Senior Nutrition Request for Proposal process and contract applications for compliance with AAA requirements

COMPENSATION:

The contract will be negotiated depending on experience for a maximum of number of hours per fiscal year. Valid certified food manager’s certificate, professional liability insurance, and driver’s license required.

TO APPLY:

Contact Maggie Kraft, Executive Director, Area 1 Agency on Aging, at 707-442-3763 for more information. Letter of interest with resume and copy of current Commission on Dietetic Registration certification may be emailed to mkraft@a1aa.org.

Open until filled.

Academic Advisor/ Student Services Coordinator Hoopa Higher Education Department, Regular, F/T, Salary: $21.00-23.00/hr. DOE. Utilizes leadership, program development, advocacy, and collaborative methods or respond to identified student needs and promote student success rates among program participants while enhancing community partnerships that alleviate barriers to learning. Minimum Qualifications: Bachelor’s degree (B.A.) in Education or related field from a four-year college or university and one year of academic advising is required. A combination of education, training and experience in vocational education or experience in a related field may be considered in lieu of requirements. An understanding of Native American cultural heritage is preferred. Must have a valid CA Driver’s License and be insurable, must be CPR certified or be willing to obtain. Title 30A background check required. DEADLINE: February 23, 2021

Emergency Services Coordinator Office of Emergency Services, Regular, F/T, Salary: $38,000.00-$41,600.00 per year. Assists with management of the OES Department; funding for department activities relies upon application and management of grants; manages components of the multi-hazard mitigation plan and emergency operations plan. Minimum Qualifications: Bachelor’s degree in biological sciences, communications, journalism, natural resources management, leadership, or business; and, 5 years’ experience in tribal, state, or federal program management in a leadership position. IN LIEU of degree requirement, at least 5 years’ experience in emergency management or services in a professional paid or volunteer organization (police, fire, EMS, non-government such CERT, Red Cross, VOAD) in a supervisory or team leader capacity. Must have a valid CA Driver’s License and be insurable. Title 30A background check required. DEADLINE: February 24, 2021

Social Worker Child & Family Services Department, Temporary, F/T, Salary: $22.00-23.00/hr. Coordinates and implements various activities of the Indian Child and Family Services program, and performs case management and/or advocate role for program clients. Minimum Qualifications: Bachelor’s degree from a 4-year university in psychology, behavioral sciences, social services or related field; knowledge of federal, state, tribal and local laws, regulations, statutes, and ordinances; knowledge of Indian Child Welfare Act; and, must be knowledgeable in state and tribal procedures for placement of Indian children. Must have a valid CA Driver’s License and be insurable. Title 30A background check required. DEADLINE: February 24, 2021 These positions are classified safety-sensitive. For complete job descriptions, minimum qualifications and employment applications, contact the Human Resources/ Insurance Department, Hoopa Valley Tribe, P.O. Box 218, Hoopa, CA 95546. Call (530) 625-9200, or email hr1@ hoopainsurance.com or hr2@hoopainsurance.com. The Tribe’s Alcohol & Drug Policy and TERO Ordinance apply.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

31


EMPLOYMENT default

default

YUROK TRIBE

For a list of current job openings and descriptions log onto www.yuroktribe.org or Join us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/ yuroktribehumanresources for more information call (707) 482-1350 extension 1376

The Hoopa Valley Tribe is accepting applications to fill the following vacant position

 Changing Tides Family Services increases the health and success of children, youth, families, and individuals

Intensive Care Coordinator $18.86/hour (part-time)

Clinician/Bilingual Clinician Wage dependent on qualifications $23.24-$29.45 (full-time)

default

We are operating under strict COVID-19 safety protocols including daily health screenings, required masks, and increased hand washing and cleaning practices per the Reopening Plan certified by Humboldt County.

Chief Operating Officer Administration Department, Regular, F/T, Salary: DOE. Directs, administers, and coordinates operations of the Tribe in support of policies, goals, and objectives established by the Tribal Council; drives strategic planning processes and assists in defining organizational objectives to ensure achievement of goals of the Tribal Council; and, supervises overall tribal operations as delegated by the Tribal Chairman. Minimum Qualifications: Seven or more years’ experience in a role leading operations; Masters’ degree in business or equivalent field preferred; equivalent combination of education and experience considered. Must have a valid CA Driver’s License and be insurable. Title 30A background check required. DEADLINE: March 12, 2021

We are an Equal Opportunity Employer. Mentor providers needed now, Make a difference today! As a mentor with us, adults with special needs live in your home and you mentor them towards a better life. You even earn 1400-4800/mo from the comfort and safety of your home while receiving professional support from our team.

2259 Myrtle Ave., Eureka, CA 95501 (707) 444-8293    default



 

For more information call Sharon at 442-2500 x16 or visit us at mentorswanted.com Find us on Facebook or visit mentorswanted.com to learn more.

 

default



 

 

           

   

32

                     

Program Manager Hoopa Higher Education Department, Regular, grantfunded, F/T, Salary: $55,440.00-60,440.00 annually, DOE. Under direction from the Tribe’s Education Director, performs oversight, staff supervision, plans, coordinates, and implements all instructional and grant compliance components of the Hoopa Higher Education programs, Hoopa Career and Technical Education Program, CR Klamath-Trinity instructional site, and future programs and services. Minimum Qualifications: Bachelor’s degree in education, social science, social work, business administration or related field is required (Master’s degree is preferred); applicants with other education may be considered if possessing more than 20 years of leadership experience in related education and human services fields; possess at least 5 years of social work experience, with at least 2 years in a leadership or management role of same (less supervisory experience considered with documented management trainings); an understanding of Native American cultural heritage; knowledge and experience with community resources; experience working with Tribal governments and federal agencies, including regulations for grant management; knowledge of program management, including budgeting, program evaluation, and supervision; communicate both orally and in writing; and, computer literacy of commonly used office software, including databases and GPRA reporting. Must have a valid CA Driver’s License and be insurable. Title 30A background check required. DEADLINE: March 9, 2021 These positions are classified safety-sensitive. For complete job descriptions, minimum qualifications and employment applications, contact the Human Resources/ Insurance Department, Hoopa Valley Tribe, P.O. Box 218, Hoopa, CA 95546. Call (530) 625-9200, or email hr1@ hoopainsurance.com or hr2@hoopainsurance.com. The Tribe’s Alcohol & Drug Policy and TERO Ordinance apply.

Get listed today for

FREE

Place a free classified ad in the North Coast Trader You may submit a free classified ad online at thetrader707.com/free-classified-ads or submit your ad by snail mail, phone or email to 310 F St. Eureka CA 95501, (707) 442-1400, ads@thetrader707.com

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com


Continued on next page » default

default

CITY OF FORTUNA

sequoiapersonnel.com 436 Harris St, Eureka, CA 95503

TREATMENT PLANT MECHANIC

(707) 445.9641

$41,544  $50,545 PER YEAR  FULLTIME.

Water Division Ops Mgr • Biologist Front Office Clerk • CPA Onsite Managers • Controller General Laborers • Medical Scribe Warehouse Laborers Retail McKinleyville

City of Fortuna. Under the general supervision of the Chief Plant Operator, maintains, repairs, services, and installs machinery and equipment used in water and wastewater treatment systems; and performs related work as assigned. Complete job description and applications are available at City of Fortuna, 621 11th Street, or friendlyfortuna.com. Application must be

default

  

received by 4pm on Tuesday, March 16, 2021. default

CITY OF FORTUNA

STREET MAINTENANCE WORKER II

TEACHERS, Eureka/Fortuna Responsible for development & implementation of classroom activities—providing support & supervision for a toddler prog. Must have 12 core in ECE/CD (w/ 3 units in Infant/Toddler Development or Curriculum), meet Associate Teacher Level on the Child Development Permit Matrix, & have one-yr. exp. teaching in a toddler setting. P/T positions, 28 hrs./wk. M-F $14.78$15.52/hr. Open Until Filled.

TEAM TEACHER, Arcata Responsible for the development & implementation of classroom activities for toddler children. Must have 12 core in ECE/ CD (w/ 3 units in Infant/Toddler Development or Curriculum), meet Associate Teacher level on Child Development Permit Matrix, & have one-yr. exp. teaching in a toddler setting. F/T 37.5 hrs./ wk. M-F. $15.08-$15.83/hr. Open Until Filled.

TEMPORARY TEACHER, McKinleyville Responsible for the development & implementation of classroom activities—providing support & supervision for a toddler prog. Must have 12 core in ECE/CD (w/ 3 units in Infant/ Toddler Development or Curriculum), meet Associate Teacher Level on Child Development Permit Matrix & have one-yr. exp. teaching in a toddler setting. Temp. F/T 36 hrs./wk. M-F $14.78$15.52/hr. Open Until Filled.

ASSISTANT TEACHER, Arcata Assist teacher in the implementation & supervision of activities for toddler children. Min. of 6-12 ECE units & 6 months’ exp. working w/ children. P/T 25 hrs./wk. M-Fri (7:30am-12:30pm) $14.00-14.62/hr. Open Until Filled Submit applications to: Northcoast Children’s Services 1266 9th Street, Arcata, CA 95521 For additional info & application please call 707- 822-7206 or visit our website at www.ncsheadstart.org

$33,487  $40,742 PER YEAR, FULLTIME.

Under the general supervision of the Lead Streets Worker and General Services Superintendent, to perform a variety of unskilled and semiskilled work assignments in the maintenance, repair, and construction of City streets and storm drains; to learn basic equipment operation assignments; and to do related work as required. Complete job description and applications are available at City of Fortuna, 621 11th Street, or friendlyfortuna.com. Application must be received by 4pm on Friday, March 5, 2021. default



        







 

is now accepting applications for a

Donor Relations & Development Director This is an exempt, full-time position based in Bayside or Crescent City, CA. Compensation is $73k-$82k, plus health and retirement benefits, paid vacation, holiday and sick time as well as other generous benefits. Remote work required until COVID restrictions allow return to office, some evening/weekend work. This values-driven, engaging, entrepreneurial director will care for and maintain relationships with regional donors, create and implement a strategic donor cultivation and development plan, and foster a world-class donor experience. The director will provide expertise, direction and support to regional donors, including planned giving, new fund and legacy creation. The ideal candidate will meet with and provide technical assistance for individuals and their legal and financial advisors to develop planned gifts such as bequests. Meanwhile, your expertise will keep the foundation informed on legislative, legal, accounting, investment, and technology is-sues and opportunities as they affect current and prospective donor engagement. The director will possess excellent written and verbal communication skills, presentation skills, and listening skills for diverse audiences, and demonstrate a commitment to racial, economic, and social justice and respect for cross-cultural perspectives and experiences. A successful candidate is expected to have a Bachelor’s degree and eight (8) years of progressively responsible work experience developing long-term customer/client/donor relationships, leading to the knowledge, skills, and abilities as described above. Preferred qualifications include a Master’s Degree and/ or 10+ years demonstrated experience in donor relations, stewardship, and service offerings. Please visit www.hafoundation.org/jobs for application procedures and the complete job announcement, including all desired qualifications. For questions, contact Amy Bruce at amyb@ hafoundation.org or (707) 442-5424, ext. 305. Please submit your resume and cover letter to jobs@hafoundation.org.

Deadline to apply for this positions 5 pm Friday, March 5, 2021.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

33


EMPLOYMENT

REAL ESTATE CITY OF FORTUNA

POLICE SERGEANT $55,247 – $67,217 PER YEAR FULL-TIME.

City of Fortuna. Under the general direction of the Patrol Commander or the Chief of Police, to assign, supervise, and perform law enforcement, implement crime prevention strategies, monitor and ensure good community relations, and supervise crime investigation activities; to be responsible for patrol functions on an assigned shift; to perform responsible staff or administrative functions, overseeing assigned areas; and to do related work as required. Complete job description and applications are available at City of Fortuna, 621 11th Street, or friendlyfortuna.com. OPEN UNTIL FILLED

default

HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS. Opening soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedroom Apts. Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $24,500, 2 pers. $28,000; 3 pers. $31,500; 4 pers. $34,950; 5 pers. $37,750; 6 pers. $40,550; 7 pers. $43,350; 8 pers. $46,150 Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922 Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Bldg. 9 Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104

Miscellaneous 4G LTE HOME INTERNET NOW AVAILABLE! Get GotW3 with lightning fast speeds plus take your service with you when you travel! As low as $109.99/mo! 1− 888−519−0171 (AAN CAN) HEARING AIDS!! Buy one/get one FREE! High−quality rechargeable Nano hearing aids priced 90% less than competi− tors. Nearly invisible! 45−day money back guarantee! 1−833− 585−1117 (AAN CAN)

FLASHBACK

SAVE BIG ON HOME INSUR− ANCE! Compare 20 A−rated insurances companies. Get a quote within minutes. Average savings of $444/year! Call 844− 712−6153! (M−F 8am−8pm Central) (AAN CAN) SAVE YOUR HOME! Are you behind paying your MORT− GAGE? Denied a Loan Modifica− tion? Is the bank threatening foreclosure? CALL Homeowners Relief Line NOW for Help 1−855− 439−5853 Mon−Fri : 8:00 am to 8:00 pm Sat: 8:00 am to 1:00 pm(all times Pacific) (AAN CAN) DISH TV $64.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Promo Expires 7/21/21. 1−855−380−250

34

CLOSING SALE EVERYTHING EXCEPT LEATHER AND JEWELRY

116 W. Wabash • 443-3259

Hours 2:00-5:30

OVER $10K IN DEBT? Be debt free in 24−48 months. Pay a frac− tion of what you owe. A+ BBB rated. Call National Debt Relief 877−590−1202. (AAN CAN) HUGHESNET SATELLITE INTERNET − Finally, no hard data limits! Call Today for speeds up to 25mbps as low as $59.99/mo! $75 gift card, terms apply. 1−844− 416−7147 (AAN CAN)

What’s New

50% OFF

“Clothes with Soul”

575,000

$

ENJOY THE OUTDOORS IN YOUR OWN PRIVATE GETAWAY! and it’s only minutes from town! Spacious 3 bedroom, 2 bath home and a gardener’s dream. Mature landscaping with several fruit trees. Also plenty of room for farm animals. Garage has been converted to a large rec room with a woodstove. The new exterior paint makes the home very inviting. $575,000 MLS# 257919

Sylvia Garlick #00814886 • Broker GRI/Owner 1629 Central Ave. • McKinleyville • 707-839-1521 • mingtreesylvia@yahoo.com

MARKETPLACE default

MARKETPLACE

■ Fernbridge

335 E Street, Eureka 445-8079 Open Wed, Thu. & Fri.

BECOME A PUBLISHED AUTHOR! We edit, print and distribute your work interna− tionally. We do the work... You reap the Rewards! Call for a FREE Author’s Submission Kit: 844−511 −1836. (AAN CAN) DONATE YOUR CAR TO CHARITY. Receive maximum value of write off for your taxes. Running or not! All conditions accepted. Free pickup. Call for details. 855−978−0215 (AAN CAN)

Auto Service ROCK CHIP? Windshield repair is our specialty. For emergency service CALL GLASWELDER 442−GLAS (4527) humboldtwindshield repair.com

Home Repair 2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. Although we have been in business for 25 years, we do not carry a contractors license. Call 845−3087

Musicians & Instructors

default

BRADLEY DEAN ENTERTAINMENT Singer Songwriter. Old rock, Country, Blues, Private Parties, Bars. Gatherings of all kinds. (707) 832−7419

        

Cleaning

default

CIRCUS NATURE PRESENTS A. O’KAY CLOWN & NANINATURE Juggling Jesters & Wizards of Play Performances for all ages. Magical Adventures with circus games and toys. Festivals, Events & Parties. (707) 499−5628 www.circusnature.com

  

WRITING CONSULTANT/EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. (707) 443−8373. www.ZevLev.com

More Options

CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING Services available. Call Julie 839−1518.

Computer & Internet

CLEARANCE SALE: JACKETS & SCARVES 1/2 OFF PLUS: BUY ANY JACKET AT HALF PRICE & GET A FREE SCARF Dream Quest Thrift Store, where your shopping dollars help local youth realize their dreams. February 25− March 3 Plus: Senior Discount Tuesdays & Spin’n’Win Wednesdays! (530) 629−3006.

50 GLORIOUS YEARS  Bob@HumboldtMortgage.net

(707) 445-3027 2037 Harrison Ave., Eureka

DO YOU OWE OVER $10,000 TO THE IRS OR STATE IN BACK TAXES? Our firm works to reduce the tax bill or zero it out completely FAST. Let us help! Call 855−955−0702. (Hours: Mon −Fri 7am−5pm PST)

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

Macintosh Computer Consulting for Business and Individuals Troubleshooting Hardware/Memory Upgrades Setup Assistance/Training Purchase Advice 707-826-1806 macsmist@gmail.com



Your Business Here YOUR AD HERE

Other Professionals

    

   

 

442-1400 ×314 northcoastjournal.com HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./ Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing profes− sionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822−2111


Charlie Tripodi Owner/ Land Agent

Owner/Broker

Kyla Nored

Barbara Davenport

BRE #01930997

Associate Broker

Realtor

Realtor

Realtor

Realtor

707.834.7979

BRE# 01066670

BRE #01927104

BRE #02109531

BRE # 02084041

BRE #01956733

707.798.9301

707.499.0917

916.798.2107

707.601.1331

BRE #01332697

707.476.0435

707.498.6364

Bernie Garrigan

Dacota Huzzen

FORTUNA – LAND/PROPERTY – $895,000

MCCANN – HOME ON ACREAGE – $569,000

±24 Acres with development/subdivision potential! Property features public utility access with hillside views of Fortuna, Eel River, & Fernbridge. Plenty of space to develop or build your dream home!

One of a kind ±136 acre parcel on the Eel River! Property features power, river access, a 3/2 mobile home, and a 2/1 home in need of repair.

DINSMORE - CULTIVATION PROPERTY - $749,000 ±40 Acres. Turn key operation permitted for 2021 and ready to go. Residence, processing shed, 3 greenhouses, tank storage, and rain catchment reservoir. Interim and provisional permits for 8,250 sq ft of outdoor. Approx. 4,000 ft elevation. OMC.

Mike Willcutt

Katherine Fergus

WILLOW CREEK – LAND/PROPERTY – $42,500 ±0.247 Acre lot available in Big Foot Subdivision in sunny Willow Creek! Has community water and power at the property line.

FIELDS LANDING – LAND/PROPERTY – $130,000

MIRANDA – HOME ON ACREAGE - $525,000

Undeveloped ±3.8 acre parcel with excellent sunset and bay views! Property is wooded, sloping, and has community water and sewer at parcel’s edge. Don’t miss your opportunity to build your dream home in this desirable neighborhood!

±13 Acre woodland escape conveniently located just minutes from the beautiful Eel River, this wooded parcel features a 3/1 home, 8k sq. ft. shop, hobby shack, PG&E, 2 wells, end of the road privacy, and walking paths throughout.

WEAVERVILLE – LAND/PROPERTY – $109,000

JUNCTION CITY – LAND/PROPERTY – $125,000

±40 Acres close to Weaverville with beautiful views just waiting for you! Property features power close by and buildable flats.

±23 Flat acres 10 mins from Weaverville, features a year round creek, Highway 299 frontage, and motivated Sellers!

WEITCHPEC – LAND/PROPERTY – $115,000

BRIDGEVILLE – LAND/PROPERTY - $299,000

Amazing views, huge trees, clean air, and privacy! This ± 46 acre parcel above the Klamath River is paradise found for a logger or hunter homesteader.

±40 Acre mountain hideaway just off hwy 36 featuring southern exposure, end of the road privacy, creek, springs, building site, and cabin & outbuilding in need of some TLC.

NEW LIS

TING!

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

35


N THE HUMBOLDT COUNTY COLLECTIVE

IS NOW CARRYING

SHERBINSKIS' Indoor & Sungrown Flower

M

YR

TL

E

AV

E.

Behind American Foot Comfort

BEST PRICES IN HUMBOLDT

1670 Myrtle Ave. Ste. B Eureka CA | 707.442.2420 | M-F 10am-6pm, Sat + Sun 11am-5pm

License No. C10-0000011-LIC


Photo by Jeff Schwartz

Thank You Donors!

Humboldt Area Foundation would like to acknowledge and thank all who made donations to the Foundation and its associated funds between July 1, 2019 and June 30, 2020. Your generosity is what makes our communities and diverse region stronger and more resilient. Last year, our generous donors supported programs that connected children with technology as school went online, helped child care facilities keep their doors open, assisted communities recover from wildfires, and more. All of this is possible because the donors listed here believe in the power of community. Thank you.

hafoundation.org

Abbey, Richard W Abbott, Paul A. & Su Abels, Paul & Margaret Abramovich, Abe & Bernice Adams, James & Linda Adams, Ronald & Darlene Adriano, Gabriel & Anita Agajanian, Gary Aichele, Roland Albee & Buck Albert, George Albin, Chet Aldern, Jared Aldinger, Sally Alizoti, Taba Allen, Roberta Allsbrooks, Cindy Alvernaz, Suzanne Amazon Smile Amer Memorial Endowment Fund America’s Charities Anagnostou Investments II, LLC Anagnostou, Kitsy Andersen, Janice Anderson, Grant Anderson, Patricia L Andre, Mark Andreas, Hans

Andree Wagner Peace Angel Fund Angello, Daniel & Joyce Ann Marie Martin-Woolley Memorial Fund Appleton, Cam & Lisa Arcata High 50’s Fund Arcata High Class of 1954 Aronson, Peter Astrin, John Ataue, Tharake & Nesha Avant, Donald & Lujean Avcollie, Beatrice J Ayers, Robert Bacchetti, Larry & Mary Backcountry Press Bailey, Phyllis Baker, James Banducci, Maggie Barkley, Allen & Barbara Barnes, Michael & Marci Barratt, Barbara Barsanti, James N Bartlett, Marilynn Bartolomeu, Emilia Bateman, Janis Bateman, Rayma Baum, Nick Bauriedel, Bill & Marilyn

Bayfront Restaurant LLC Bean, Gregory & Lynne Becker, Don & Kay Bednar, Julia Beede, Bob Benham, Dorain Benner Mini Storage Benoit, Richard & Susan Benson, James Berg, Foundation Christine & Jalmer Berg, Rusty Berman, Joan R Berry, George & Melinda Berti, Elsie Berti, Steve Bess, Thomas R. & K. Christine Bethune, Lisa & Thom Betty Kwan Chinn Homeless Foundation Beugler, John Bianchi, Dorothy Biehn, Mary Bird, Gary & Andrea Bireley, Brandon Biteman, Patricia Black, Eric Black, Robert & Patricia Blackberry, Diane

Blacksmith, Byrean J Blatt, Beverly Blue Lake Education Foundation Blumenfeld, Regina N BMD - Building Material Distributors, Inc. Board, Jeffrey Bobbitt, Jeff & Mary Bode Executive Property Management Boggs, Catherine I Bonales, Veronica Bond, Ken Bongiovanni, Keith Botzler, Richard & Sally Bourassa, Dennis & Carolyn Bourne, Heidi Boyd, James & Nancy Boyd, Milton J Bradley, Stephen Bradshaw, Scott & Lucinda Brady, Gerard J Brady, Joan Brantly, Donna Brattain Family Student Enrichment Fund Brattain Family Trust Donor List, continued »

For more information on how to donate, please call our Donor Engagement team at 707-442-2993. hafoundation.org • Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021 • SPECIAL INSERT TO THE NORTH COAST JOURNAL

1


2019-2020 Donor List Continued from previous page Bravo, Larry & I. Lee Breitkreuz, Paul T Brenner, Jerold Bridenbaugh, Nancy & John Bright Funds Brogden, Penny Lee Brohmer, Stephen & K Bronchetti, Tom Bronkall, Allison Brosler, Harvey & Donna Brown, James & Janet Brown, John & Josie Bruce Cameron Memorial Bruce, Amy J Bruce, Richard M. Brugaletta, Claudia Brunsing, Patty Brusca, James Brusca, Joe Bugbee, Marie Bundros, Gregory & Teri-Huber Bundy, Terrice Burchell-Henson, Laura Burgess, Stephen Burke, Rayner C. & Winifred W. Burly Redwood Stickers Buschmann, James Busey, Lois L Buwalda, Larry & Peggy CA Land Surveyors As Cabasaan, Reann Cade, Linda Caldwell, Wayne & Donna Call, John Campbell, James Canning, Timothy Cantrell, Annette Capobianco, Gina M Carl & Ellen Wright Memorial Fund Carlisle, Anne S Carlson, Patricia M Carlson, William Carnam, Neal J. & Barbara Carranza Family Fund (Endowed) Carranza Family Fund (Expendable) Carrillo, Michelle Carson, John & Caroline Carter, Patricia Castellano, Valen Catching, Ben & Midge Cavanagh, Pamela Ford Center for Spiritual Living

2

CEO’s Discretionary Grant Fund Chabolla & Luna, Luis & Chris Chabolla, Tom Chadwick, William Chambers, Becky Charles, Don & Molly Charlotte Tropp Memo Chase, Shawn Cherney, Roberta M Chesbro, Wesley & Cindy Cheyne, Bernadette Chiara, Annette Chris Cringle’s Saw & Chain Christen, Bernard & Claire Christensen, Loa Christian, Michael & Donvieve Udell Christopherson Fund Ciarabellini, Talia R Cissna, Timothy & Sharon City Ambulance of Eureka City of Eureka Clark, Gregg & Diane Clark, James & Donna Clark, Thomas J Class of 1956 - Arcata Cleary, Patrick & Cat Koshen Clem, Marcella Clohessy, Tamara Cloney, Don E. Cloney, Patrick & Renee Close, Wally & Sandra Club Latinos Unidos Coast Central Credit Cobb, Luther Cohan, Peter & Diane Colby, Karen Beacom Coldwell Banker Cutten Realty Cole, Donn & Judy Cole, Wendell & Barb College of the Redwoods Colombini, Donald Combined Jewish Philanthropies Community Education Coalition Community Foundation of Greater Chattanooga Community Foundation of Mendocino County, Inc. Community Leadership Fund Compliant Farms Conaway, Lawrence Conner, Jeri

Connick, Thomas Connor, Caroline Conrad, Maya Coonen, Gail CO-OP North Coast Cooper, Al & Jacque Cooper, Curt Cooper, Curt & Sarah Coos-Curry Electric Corbett, John & Joan Correll, Nancy & Richard Duning Cory, Sarah Cottrell, Gloria County of Humboldt Crain, James P Crandell, John & Joan Creative Sustainability Fund Crichton, Bill & Marge Crichton, Irene Croker, Leah Cross, Kathleen Crossan, Tom & Joan Crothers, Neal & Suzanne Cruz, James & Collee CSU Emeritus and Retired Faculty Association Cultural Heritage Fund Curry, James & Amy Curry, Jamie B Curtis, Jennifer Daily Grind Dal Porto, Michael & Joan Dalby, John & Susan Dalianes, Athan & Marguerite Danco Builders Davidson, Liz Davis, Francesca Davis, Michael & Ann Davis, Ralph & Jeanne Sapunor DCI Builders Dean, Don DeCou, Kristin & Robert Dehority, Michael & Sonya Jackson Del Norte Academic Excellence Fund Del Norte County She DeLashmutt, Wade & Sabrina Delgrande, Mike & Jerry Delikat, Stephen & Roxanne DeMartini, James & Cynthia Demello, McAuley, McReynolds & Holland LLP

Denman, Garth & Lorna Dens, Benoit & Katherine Dental Angel Fund Destabelle, Anne & Ray Dewees, Christopher & Christine Dexter, James Diamond, Thomas J DiGirolamo, Richard Dillon, Lorraine & Mike Metro Jr. Dittmer, Stephanie Dixon, Judy Dobkin, Donn Dolfini, Walter Don & Bettie Albright Endowment Fund Donicht, Ken & Alma Donor Circle Fund Donovan, Susan Dorothy Coeur Memorial Fund Dostal, Michelle J Downs, Deborah A Dr. Richard J. Wolf Memorial Fund Drake, Jake A Drake, Wendy Dronkers, Sara & Mike Drop in the Button Too Fund Dublish Heights Ranch LLC Dunn, Jon & Sheryl Dunsmore, Christopher B Dupuy, Ron Dutton, Patricia Dwelley, Charles & Sally Dwight, Philip & Virginia Dytewski, Robert & Karli Dzur, Dianne Eaton, Norman Eckert, David Eckert, Linda A Edward Jones Egan, Dorothy Memorial Egbert, Douglas & Patricia Eggleston, Sharon Ehlers, Charles & Ba EHS -1950 “Lunch Bun Eklund, Brian Eklund, Dorothy E Eklund, Gene & Diane Elferdink & Hardin, James & Joy Elizabeth Florence Gupton Memorial Fund Ellinwood & Webb, George & Andrea

SPECIAL INSERT TO THE NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021 • hafoundation.org

Ellis, Mark Ellis, Zhao Z Emmerson Fund Engel, Richard A England, Rob Ephland, Mark Epsilon Pi Chapter, Ervin, Kim Escarda, Kay Estate of Billie H. Johnson Estate of Guy C. Kulstad Estate of Manuel C. Kaster Estate of Marilyn Gail Jenkins Estate of Richard D. Hess Estate of Ron Duffy Estate of Valera Vierra Estate of Verla D. Lindstrom Estate of William & Evelyn Condon Eureka Natural Foods Eureka Women’s Golf Association Evans, Victoria S Eyton, Jack Fahning, Brett & Hilary Farley, Michele Fattig, Todd R Faulk, Daniel Felkins, Julie Fern Wymore Enke Fund Fidelity Charitable Fields, Amy Fine, Larry Finigan, Dave First Church of the Nazarene First Presbyterian C Fishermans Restaurant Fiske, Colin Fitzgerald, Denise Fleek, Jack Foote & Werren, Willard & Janet Footprint Foundation, Inc. Footprint Fund Forbes & Associates Forsyth, Jon & Cynthia Fortuna Sunrise Rotary Paul Harris Memorial Scholarship Fund Four Star Realty Fox, Stephen Frachon, Gabriel Fraenkel Gallery, In Frank, Ruthmarie Fredrickson, Leo & Louise

Humboldt Area Foundation’s affiliate, the Wild Rivers Community Foundation, proudly supported the Brookings Harbor High School Knowledge Bowl team. Freedman, Teri Freeman, Harry & Gail Freeman, Juan & Lynn Frey, Galen & Sally Friel, Merldene Friends of the Langlois Frink, Elizabeth Frolking, Chris & Margaret Nulsen Frost, Verne & Nancy Frugoni, Corinne E. Fulkerson & Evans, Julie & Lynn Fullbright, Carl D Fuller, Anne Funk, Irene E Gai, John & Gail Galatioto, Jeannine Gale & Nielsen Gale, Jeanne Galliani, Susan M Ganion, Jana Gardner, Margaret G. Garlick, Donald & Sylvia Garlick, Jason Garvie, Sylvia Gaskins, Kenneth Gast, Thea Gath, Michael & Jo Ann Geldin, Joel Geldin, Rhonda Geldin, Stacey Gelinas & James, Inc Genger, Margot George Owen Knapp Memorial Fund George, Laura Lee GHD Giacone, Michael Gibson, Ava Gilbert, William & Gudrun Giles F. Horney, Jr. Fund Ginsburg, Paul & Cindi Girard, Kirk & Catherine Givins, Patsy

Glass, Greg & Jolynn Glasser, Michael Gleave, Charles & Marla Gleave, Lynda D Glover, Ray & Koken, Glyndon “Sign” & Ruth Smith Endowment Fund Goff, John & Louise Gold, Robert “Rupert” Goldstein, Michael Gompertz, Steven & Deborah Fitzgerald Gonzalez, James & Ronda Goode, Barry & Erica Gooding, John Goodyear, Charles “G Goosby, Zuretti & Brenda Gordon Elwood Foundation Gordon, Susan Gosselin, Paul & Melanie Grant, Zane & Nita Grantmaker’s Fund Gray, Scot Gray, Walter Green Diamond Resource Green, Victor Greenberg, Karuna Grieshaber, Roy Griffith, Fred & Tina Grisham, Donna & Kelly Grounds, Gary & Victoria Joyce Gunderson, Larry & Suzan Gunderson, Todd & Ann Guzman, Andrew Hackett, Emma Hadley Memorial Fund HAF - Deferred Maintenance Reserve HAF - Strategic Program Reserve HAF - Technology Reserve HAF Opportunity Fund Hagood, William & Carmen Hales, Geoff

Hall, Lois Hamilton, Bruce & Catherine Hamilton, Jon Hampton, Andrew Hampton, Chuck Han Medical Corporation Hanks, Gary Hannaford, Irene H Hanover, Ronald & Audrey Hans Olsen Trust Hansell, B. & W. Hansen Family Trust, Hansen, Deborah Hansen, Susan Hansis, Richard Hanson, Rory & JoAnn Hapgood, Mark & Claudia Hare, William & Elea Harkins Living Trust Harling, Will Harper-Lawson, Elizabeth Harris, Jeanne Sadow Harris, Mark & Anne Hartline, Anne Harvey, Howard & Patty Harvey, John & Rita Harvey, Paulsen Hastings, Catherine Hauser Scott, Dana Haux, Sandra Hawley, James Hayfork Rotary Foundation Heard, Bart & Wendy Heberer, Craig F Hecht, Peter & Pat Helen Davis Memorial Fund Helen M. Anderson Trust Hendricks, Dennis & Kathi Hendry, Jim Hendry, Susan Henisch, Bridget Ann Hersh Dunaetz Enterprises Hess Memorial Fund Hill, Jane


Hillemeier, Dave Hinman, Judith A Historical Sites of Arcata Inc. Hitchcock, Joe Bob & Lily Hoffman, Amber Hoffman, Barbara J Hoffman, Jantz Holcomb, Robert & Larayne Hollowell, Charles Homan, John & Katrin Homeless Student Advocacy Group Fund (DONAG) Hong, May Hooper, William & Gale Hoopes, Bill & Chris Hoover, Lisa D Hops in Humboldt Hoss, Joan House & Garden, Inc. House, Leland & Chris Houston, Joyce Howe, Lee Howell, Annie & David Howes, Rosemary & Penelope Klabunde Hubbard, Lotus Hubbard, Robert & Deborah Huff, Christina Hughes, Rees & Amy Hui, Jonathan & Christine Humboldt Area Foundation Humboldt Association of Realtors, Inc. Humboldt Association of Tennis Humboldt Botanical Garden Foundation Humboldt Business Challenge Humboldt County Fair Association Humboldt Health Foundation (ULSO) Humboldt Hoo Hoo Club #63 Humboldt Library Foundation Humboldt Lyme Awareness Group Fund Humboldt Senior Resource Center Humboldt State University Humboldt Unitarian Universalist Fellowship Humphrey, Rachel Hunt, Cindi A Hunt, Dean A. & Dana Hunt, Richard & Carolyn

Hunter, Hunter & Hunt Hurst, Jeanette Hussey Financial Consulting Group Ihara, Nancy R Immanuel Lutheran Church Ingebritson Discretionary Fund Ingraham, George Irvine, Jack & Margaret Itano, David G J.L.F. Construction, Jack Montoya Memorial Fund for the Preservation of Native American Culture Jackson, Michael Jackson, Nancy Jacobson & Long, Paul & Jeannette Jacoby, John & Marge Jager, Frank & Sara Janssen Family Fund Jansson, Erik Jarvis, Milo Jayne, Ward & Carol Jester, Amy Jill Irvine Memorial John E. Ford-Ranch Account John Ellis and Linda S. Burman Memorial Fund John G Atkins Foundation Inc John G. Atkins Found Johnson, Anita Johnson, Gail & Delores Johnson, Jim & Marie Johnson, Kay Jones, Denise M Jordan, Charlie Joseph, Shrujal Joy, Marla Kahn, Andy Ka’m-t’em Scholarship (endowed) Kasper, William & Kathy Katz, David & Annie Kavich Memorial Fund Kay, Rena Keehn Family Trust Fund Keehn, Mary Keig, Leslie Keller, Roz Kelley, Danny Kelsey, Harvey & Susan Kelso, Margaret Kennedy Fund

Kern, Jennifer Kessler, Bruce & Pam Kilburn, Steven Kilgore, William B, MD Kinetic Koffee Co. Inc. King, Ann King, George & Karin King, Paul & Ana Kingsbury Mobile Home Park King-Smith, Ann Kinzer, David & Robin Kirkpatrick, Robert & Mary Kitchen, Michael R & Jonna Kiwanis Club of Henderson Center Scholarship Fund Kizziar, John & Shel Klay, Anna Klein, Dorothy B Kline, David Kline, Mary K Kloor, James Knapp, Richard S Knight & Lovie, Anny & Karen Koch, Raymond Kokatat, Inc. Koonce, Greg Korb, L R Kosek & Fischer, Ingrid & Kevin Kramer Investment Co Kramer, Steven & Sharon Krause & Mishkin, Andreas & Jennifer Krenek, Thomas Kudrna, Donald & Joy Kulstad, John & Patricia Thomas Kuttner, Cynthia L.K. Hollenbeak Logging Co. Inc. Lacitignola, Julie Laden, Amy Ladika, Courtney Ladika, James LaForge, Richard & Kathy Lagrander, Lynette S Lamberson, R. Lane, Stephanie Langs, Teri Lapotre, Philippe & LaRocca, Antoinette Larsen, Vera Laurence & Elaine Allen Memorial Fund Laursen, Richard & Carol Law Office of Harlan B. Kistler

Supporting frontline healthcare workers was one of the main goals of the COVID-19 Regional Response Fund, which supported individuals and organizations in Humboldt, Trinity, Del Norte and Curry counties. Leclair, Mary M Lee, Alison Lee, Chris Lee, David & Robin Lee, Frederick & Linda Leeper, Joseph & Louise Lehman, Pete & Carol Leigh, Alissa B Lengyel, Nancy Leo D. Sears Memorial Endowment Fund Leonardo Logging & Construction Lerma, Julia Les & Frances Alexan Les & Mid Westfall E Lesnansky, Patricia Levin Foundation Levin, Elliott L Levine, Rae & Lewis, Bobby & Rose Lewis, Celia M Lewis, Victoria A Lindgren, Janet Lindsay & Glaseroff, Ann & Alan Lindsey, Joselyn Lindstrom, Ralph Lipper, Bryna Lisle, Thomas & Lorinda Littlefield, Rick & Betty Livasy, Colin & Linda Lobato, Kathryn Lochtie, Byrd A. Lochtie, David & Gin Lois Nipkau Revocable Trust Love, Helen & Bill Lovio, Frank & Sheila Lozensky, Gary Lucas, Dianne Luh, Join Lundblade, Charlene Lundblade, Ron Lurtz & Gleye, Thomas & Linda

Lusch, Jennifer Ly, Michael Ly, Nhuanh Lyman, Cindy Lynch, Ann Lynch, Patrick & Laurie Lyons, John & Carol Maahs, Judy MacDonald, Lain & Denise Dowdall MacGregor, Barbara Mack, Dolphine Mack, Herschel Macleod, Donald I Mad River Storage Center Madaras, Barbara Madej, Mary Ann Mahoney, Ellen Mallahan & Bazard, Mary & David Malloy, Brian & Aimee Mandell, Linnea Manges Family Revocable Trust Manka, Ray & Sherry Manoli, Thomas Manos, Tina Marak, Louis B Marian Coffman Larson Fund Marilyn Jenkins Memorial Fund Marinaccio, Joyce Markin, Valerie B Marks, Frederic Marks, Sheila Marquez, Elizabeth Martin, George & C. Patricia Martin, Pam J Martinez, Jimena Mason, Stephen Masterson, Carol Ann Mastroni, John Mather, Joyce Mathews, Essie Matsen Insurance Brokers

Mattole Valley Women Mauney, Pamela May, Susan McBeth, J. & Jackie McBroome, William & Delores A McCaddon, Peggy J. McClain, Kathleen McCollister, Dennis & Laurinda McCollum, Stephen & Christin McCrea, Brian McCrigler, Leslie T McCrone, Alistair & Judith McCulloch, Claire McCullough, Claire McDougall, Scott & Susan McGarry, Maureen McGee, Gerry McGowan, Marc McGrath, Richard & Mary McIntosh-Mangham McKenna, Lynn, Mark, & Brian McLean Foundation McLean, Barbara McLean, Maegan McMillan, Brenda McQueen, Ronald & Donna Meckel John & Traver Barbara Traver Meek, Louise Melzer, Janine Mendelsohn, Pam Menefee, Leone Lloyd Meridian Group R.E.M. Inc Mesloh, Lettie Messer, Richard A Meyer, Ben Meyer, Keytra MiaBo Foundation Endowed Fund Mid Klamath Watershed MikkiMoves Real Estate Miller, Candace Miller, Carolyn

Miller, Connie Miller, David & Rita Miller, Donald & Kat Miller-Wolf, Lorraine B Millsap, Sarah Milunich, Sandra Minette & Francis B. Mathews Memorial Endowment Fund Minor Theatre Group LLC Miranda, Margaret Mitchel, Dena Mitchell, Sheryl & Wally Mitchell, Sylvia Mitchell, Wally & Sheryl Mondragon, Martin J Montague, John & Jessica Montgomery, Jennifer Moore, David & Clair Moore, Dina Moore, Jack E Moore, Jillian Moore, Thomas L Morden, Alan G Morgan Stanley Morrill, Don Morris, Lisa Morris, Steven Morris-DeMotte Heritage Fund Morrison, Patricia A Morrisson, Margaret Moser, Steve Mossman, Archie & Sue Lee Mountjoy, Robert & Jan Mueller, Carolyn & James Carley Mueller, Steven Mullen, Doris M Munsee, Jean Murayama, Janice Murphy, John & Donna Murphy’s Markets, Inc Murray, Dick & Mary Murray, Edward Murray, John & Peggy My Choice Foundation Naef, Weston Native Cultures Fund Nealis Fund Neighbor, Fred & Joy Neighbors, Keith Nelson, Denver & Judith Nelson, John Nelson, Marvin Nelson, Sharon

Nesbitt Family fund Nesset, Mary Nethery, Mary Network For Good Newton, Thomas & Karen Nichols, John & Henryetta Nickols, Sue Nicole Quigley Memorial Fund for Dance & Youth Activities Nieboer, Nancy & Geo Nielsen, Rebecca Nocon, Catalina Noderer, Evelyn Hanson Nordstrom, Burt & Christine North Coast Economic Investment Fund North Coast Grantmaking Partnership North, Keath & Joyce Northcoast Circle of Change Fund Northcoast Regional Land Trust Northern Counties Logging Interpretive Association Fund Northwestern Mutual O’Brien, Noreen O’Connell-Mangham, J O’Connor, Susan Offenbacher, Mark Offenbacher, Mark & June Offield, Sammi O’Keefe, Lawrence Oldfather, Felicia G Olesen, G.L. & Bonnie Olinger, Martin F Olofson, Robert & Vo Olsgard, Edward & McKeegan, Michele Olson, Larry O’Meara, Steve & Sharon Openshaw, Jenis Operating Fund Operating Reserve Account Orlic, Ivan Otis, Brooks & Carol Ozaki, Vicki Pace, Jenifer PacifiCorp Padilla, Arthur & Claudia Page & Test, Marilyn & James Paik-Nicely Ohana Legacy Fund Paik-Nicely, Tim & Marylyn Donor List, continued »

hafoundation.org • Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021 • SPECIAL INSERT TO THE NORTH COAST JOURNAL

3


2019-2020 Donor List Continued from previous page Pajerski, Fred Parakilas, Janice & Baker, Roy Parker, Amanda Parks, William Parlato, Karen Partain, Betty Pass-Through Fund Paul M. Hertzmann, Inc. Pavlicek, Jackie Pavlich, Thelma Peaker, James Pearce, Roland & Denice Pedrazzini Private C Pedrazzini, Charles & Anna Pegolotti, James Peloso, Vincent & Krukonis, Debbi Penn, Andrea A Pennekamp, Marianne People’s Real Estate of Humboldt Pepper, Frederick Perrett Community Fund Perrett, Tom Perrett, Tom & Stephanie Perricelli, Eugene & Claire Peters, Thomas & Barbara Petersen, Bonnie J Petersen, John A Peterson, Charles & Karen Pettey, Laurie Pfingstel, Jim & Pat Piccinini, Pamela Picl, Laurin Pierce, Christina Pifferini, Jason Pilkington, Corin & Sarah Pimentel, John Pinochi, Joe & Mona Platis, Chris Pomerantz, Janet Porritt, John & Jenny Bank Porteous, Edward & Rebecca Porteous, Julie Porzillo, Lenora Powell, Charles Powell, Glenn Powell, Mary Powell, Michael & Marna Premier Financial Group Premier Foundation Fund (endowed) Premier Foundation Fund (expendable) Preston, Dale

4

Price, Michael & Ella Prior, Robert Prior, Robert D. Quinby, Lewis & Lucy Quintrell, Don & Nancy R. Baird & Jane Rumi Racy, Stepney Rael & Falkenthal, Dennis & Carol Rail, Nick & Lisa Rana, Meenal Rankin, Cinda L. Rasmussen, Lila Read, Sharon Malm Redd, Sharon Redwood Capital Bank Redwood Coast Region Redwood Curtain Brew Redwood Regional Rotary Disaster Relief Super Fund Reformed Druids of North America Regenstreif & Clarke, Allan & Adele Regli, Michael & Sally Reis, Antonio Reis, Blythe Renner, Michael & Mary Lou Ressler, Susan Rice, Jennifer L Richardson, Michael Rische & MacConnie, Carol & Sue Rizza, Jim & Francene Roberts, Jackie Robertson, Wendy Rohde, Jerry & Gisel Romero, Laura Ron & Jan Ross Family Fund Rooney Fund Rose, Judith Rosenwald, Joyce A Rosso, Henry David & Susan Clay Rotary Club of Arcata Rotary Club of Fortuna/A. Baird Scholarship Fund Rotary Club of Fortuna/Ben McWhorter Scholarship Fund Rotary Club of Fortuna/Bill Jamieson Scholarship Fund Rotary Club of Fortuna/Collis Mahan Scholarship Fund Rotary Club of Fortuna/D.

Hazelton Scholarship Fund Rotary Club of Fortuna/Dwight O’Dell Scholarship Fund Rotary Club of Fortuna/General Scholarship Fund Rotary Club of Fortuna/Jim Hunt Scholarship Fund Rotary Club of Fortuna/John Kassis Scholarship Fund Rotary Club of Fortuna/Max Goble Scholarship Fund Rotary Club of Fortuna/O. Harbers Scholarship Fund Rotary Club of Fortuna/P. Newell Scholarship Fund Rotary Club of Fortuna/Ray Stewart Scholarship Fund Rotary Club of Fortuna/S. Hazelton Scholarship Fund Rotary Club of Fortuna/Tom Cooke Scholarship Fund Rotary Club of Fortuna/Zeke Van Deventer Scholarship Fund Rothman, Rande & Sam Rothman, Roberta Rovai, Linda A RSD Charitable & Educational Foundation Rubin & Devons, Jerryl & Amanda Rubin-Devons Family Fund Rudnansky, Richard R Rumiano, R. Baird & Jane Russ, Brenna Russ, Jim Russ, Linda Ruth, Carolyn Ryan, David & Kimberley Rydz, Thomas Sacred Heart Parish Sage Ag, Inc. Salmon, Cory Salvos Fund Sanctuary Forest Sanctuary Forest - Forest Conservation Fund Sanders, Jim & Charlene Santi, Jean Sarchett, Michelle Schaad, Christy Schafer, John & Nhu-Quynh Schallert, Thomas & Teresa Schapiro, Sherman Scher, Les

Schimps, Erich Franz Schneider, Pamela Schroeder, Roger Schuiteman, Michelle Schulz, Daniel R Schulz, Paul Schulze-Kronenberg M Schwab Charitable Fund Scott, Mary G Scuri & Simon, Anita & James Sebring, Diane Seely, Mary J Seemann, Hank Seferino (Sef) Raul Segura, Carole Selvage, John R. & Leslie Serros, Arthur Seventh Generation F Sewell, Jack & Amy Shaffer, Mark & Margaret Shahon, Laurie Shanahan, Mary Sharpe, Chip & Celestine Armenta Shattuck, Nicole Shewmaker, David & Alicia Shields, Eric & Karene SHN Consulting Engineer SI of Humboldt Bay Sides, William & Gayle Silicon Valley Community Foundation Silicon Valley Nelson Fund Silva, John Silvey, Bruce & Leslie Silvey, Bruce E Simon, Dick & Susan Simovich, Elizabeth Sinkhorn, Emily Siren’s Song Tavern Sirovy, George Six Rivers Masonic L Six Rivers Running C Sizoo, Robert & Sue Turner SL Consulting Services Slyter, Jason Smith, Warren & Joan Smukler, Orleen Clough Smullin Foundation Smullin, Sharon Snell, Dorene Snyder, Susan Society of the Transfiguration Somerville Family Expendable Fund

SPECIAL INSERT TO THE NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021 • hafoundation.org

Somerville, D & Betsy Fund Soroptimist-Eureka South Fork High School Associated Student Body South Fork/Big Flat Endowment Fund Southern Humboldt Community Health Care District Sperling, Monica Spicer, Janet Spinas, George H Spini, Ben & Pat Spruance, Preston St. Joseph Health Humboldt County St. Joseph Hospital - RN Professional Practice Council Staats, Jenny Stechman & Brannon, Derek & Mary Stefanik, Trish Stella Navis Endowment Fund (NAVIS) Stella Navis Expendable Fund (NAVI2) Stephenson, Jim & Susan Stephenson, Nancy Sterling F. Paddock Memorial Fund Sternin, Nicole Steven, Robert J Stewart, Peggy Stillman, Alexandra Stiverson, Carly Stockhoff, Joan Stockly, Dale & Cindy Stockwell, Christina Stoffer, Ken & Judith Stokely, Carson & Lily Stokes, DK Stokes, Emma Stokes, Kusum Stoltz, Joseph Stone, Kathleen Stone, Melvin Stoob, John Strahan, Debra Strand, Casey Strande, Michael R Stricker, Alex Stromstad, Glen & Corinne Stuart, Patti-Jeanne Stumpf, Kenneth & Margaret

Sullivan, Karen & John Pound Sullivan, Lawrence & Rebecca Sunny Brae Animal Clinic Swanstrom, Matthew Sweaney, Betty Peugh Sweetheart Motors, LLC Syvertson, Janice & Peggy Taijala, Marion M Tam, Patrick & Sandra Tanner & Hofstetter, Taplin, Frances H Target Corporation C/O CyberGrants, LLC TCE Walk Improving Health Through Collaboration Fund TD AMERITRADE Ted Loring Angel Endowment Fund Tempas, Fred & Joan Terence, Erica Teurfs, Colin Tharp, Jamila & Michelle Hastings The Mitchel Family Thomas, Melinda Thompson, William Ho Thurmond, Mark & Audrey Tides Foundation Tiferet Center, Inc. Tinel, Nicolas Tipton, Felines H Tollefson, Trevor Tom & Marilynn Bartlett Stand Down Fund (endowed) Tomlin, Bill Toste, Colleen Traphagen, Martha Trepiak, Tom & Lisa Trinidad Coastal Land Trust Trinity Alps Unified School District Trinity County School Trinity Diesel Trinity Outdoor Premier Properties Inc. Triska, John W Truttman, Raymond & Donna Tschogl, Donald & Marcia Tucker, Roy & Marilyn Tulley, Beth Saunders Turner, David & Gail Turner, Eileen Turner, Loren Turner, Randy & Heather Turner, Ronald & Jan

Turner, Ronald & Nancy Turner, Sara M Tyburczy, Joseph United Congregational Christian Church of Eureka United Methodist – Crescent City United Way - California Capital Region Upatising, Benjavan Urban, Daniel & Michelle Urueta, Brenda Uyeki, Amy Uyeki, Edwin Uyeki, Terry Van Duzer, Bert & Joan Van Duzer, Diana Van Duzer, Theodore Van Emmerik, Otto Van Gemert, Jeff Van Zee, Gordon & Michael Vandermolen, John & Leslie Vanguard Charitable Vanni, Barbara A Vegliano, David A Vejvoda, Craig Venturini, Diane Vesper Society Vietor Trust, Vera P Virnoche, Mary Vocality Community Vodden, Teri H Voyles, David & Michelle Vrem, Rick & Sandy Wagner, Joyce K Wagstaff, Ed & Leslie Walker, Donald & Trudi Waller, George Warren Memorial Endowment Fund Warren, Ronald Warze, Geri Waterfront Progeny, Inc. Watson & A. Alte, E Webb, Edward M & Jud Weidemann, Jefferson Weiss, Susan Wells Fargo Advisors Wells, Lynne Wells, Tim & Cherie Welty, Roberta & Mary Jo Weisgerber Wennerholm, Don West, Craig & Carol

West, Joyce M Westbrook, Bev Wheeler, Grace White, Douglas B. White, Judy White, Paul Whitehead, Eldon G Whitworth, Christoph Wickizer, Christopher & Ethel Wiedemann, Jeffrey Wieland, Lawrence & Ann Wiksten, Lina Wilcox, Cindy Wilcox, Katelyn Wild Rivers Community Foundation Wildberries Marketplace Willcutt, Mary William and Ruby Ken Willows, Julie Wilson, Doris B Wilson, Wayne & Mary Wines, Michael & Eli Wingate, James Winzler, Lura Ann Wold, Geoffrey & Mary Wold, Patricia A Wold, Sharon A Wolff, Len & Robin Wood, Elvina Wood, Larry Wood, Mary Wood, William Worel, Kathrine Yanke, Katy & Michael Yarbrough, Paul & B Yee, Elizabeth A. Yi, John Yolton & Tredo, John & Carol Yost, Maureen Young, Bruce Young, Joseph B YourCause, LLC Youth & Family Fund Zibilich, George & Marilyn Ziegler, Amy Zielinski, William & Melissa Zoellick, James & Rose Gale Zottola, Gina Zwerdling Law Firm Zystro, Jared & Lisa

Profile for North Coast Journal

North Coast Journal 02-25-2021 Edition  

The NCJ Quarantine Pet Photo Contest

North Coast Journal 02-25-2021 Edition  

The NCJ Quarantine Pet Photo Contest

Profile for ncjournal