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Humboldt County, CA | FREE Thursday, Feb. 18, 2021 Vol. XXXII Issue 7 northcoastjournal.com

Triple Homicide Leaves Loleta ‘Heartbroken’ 6 A respite from the elements 15 Nightshift innovation 23 Bringing down a Panther

BY NCJ STAFF

p. 10


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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 18, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com


CONTENTS 4 4

Mailbox Poem Elegy for Jolie

6

News Third Street Refuge

9

NCJ Daily Online 10 On The Cover

15

PUBLISHER

Judy Hodgson judy@northcoastjournal.com GENERAL MANAGER

On the Table

NEWS EDITOR

16 Home & Garden Service Directory

It’s Personal Living Tiny in Turbulent Times

18

ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2021

Triple Homicide Leaves Loleta ‘Heartbroken’ Night Shift

17

Feb. 18, 2021 • Volume XXXII Issue 7 North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com

Get Out! Lagoon Challenge

19 Fishing the North Coast Another Low Return for Klamath Kings in 2020

20 Calendar

Melissa Sanderson melissa@northcoastjournal.com Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com ARTS & FEATURES EDITOR

Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com DIGITAL EDITOR

Kimberly Wear kim@northcoastjournal.com STAFF WRITER

Iridian Casarez iridian@northcoastjournal.com CALENDAR EDITOR

Kali Cozyris calendar@northcoastjournal.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Wendy Chan, Barry Evans, Rod Kausen, Mike Kelly, Kenny Priest PRODUCTION MANAGER

22 Cartoon

Holly Harvey holly@northcoastjournal.com

23 Screens

ART DIRECTOR

Tragedy of the Inside Man

24 Workshops & Classes 25 Field Notes Warrior Women (Part 2)

25 Sudoku & Crossword 30 Free Will Astrology 30 Classifieds

Jonathan Webster jonathan@northcoastjournal.com GRAPHIC DESIGN/PRODUCTION

Heidi Bazán Beltrán, Dave Brown, Miles Eggleston ncjads@northcoastjournal.com ADVERTISING MANAGER

Kyle Windham kyle@northcoastjournal.com

LET’S SHOW SOME

LOVE

TO OUR LOCAL SHELTERS!

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Limited to stock on hand. See store for details and list of shelters to choose from

Pet SIT, STAY, HOME : Quarantine Photo Contest

You may find staying at home during quarantine boring or frustrating but your pets love it! You’re finally home with them all day to keep them entertained and to snuggle — and they’ve never been happier. So if you’re trying to think of something to do, grab your pet and take some photos. We want to see how you and your pets are passing the time in quarantine.

Send the Journal your photo with your pet! Submissions will be accepted from Monday, Feb. 1 through Sunday, Feb. 14, 2021 on our website, or email contests@northcoastjournal.com. One entry per household, per category. Categories are: •Dogs •Cats •Farm Friends • Small Critters

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RECRUITING HICAP VOLUNTEER COUNSELORS What is HICAP?

MEDIA ADVISOR

John Harper john@northcoastjournal.com SENIOR ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE

Bryan Walker bryan@northcoastjournal.com MARKETING SPECIALIST

Kara Scofield kara@northcoastjournal.com CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

Mark Boyd classified@northcoastjournal.com BOOKKEEPER

Deborah Henry billing@northcoastjournal.com OFFICE MANAGER

Michelle Dickinson michelle@northcoastjournal.com MAIL/OFFICE

Let’s get small. Read more on page 17. Photo by Annie Kassof

On the Cover Photo courtesy of Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office. Photo illustration by Jonathan Webster

310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 707 442-1400 FAX: 707 442-1401 www.northcoastjournal.com Press Releases newsroom@northcoastjournal.com Letters to the Editor letters@northcoastjournal.com Events/A&E calendar@northcoastjournal.com Music music@northcoastjournal.com Classified/Workshops classified@northcoastjournal.com CIRCULATION VERIFICATION C O U N C I L

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 21,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 450 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

HICAP is the Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program, a program of the Area One Agency on Aging. Registered HICAP volunteer counselors help senior and disabled Medicare beneficiaries understand their Medicare and health insurance benefits and choices. HICAP volunteers advocate for Medicare beneficiaries regarding problems with Medicare or a Medicare provider. Volunteers counsel individual clients on a variety of Medicare and insurance issues and inform low-income Medicare beneficiaries about programs that can help pay for Medicare costs. HICAP provides free training to become a registered HICAP Counselor with the California Department of Aging. It takes just 24 hours of initial training and 10 hours of counseling observation time to become a certified HICAP Counselor. Volunteer counselors must provide a minimum of 40 hours per year of client counseling to maintain certification. HICAP pays for volunteer mileage and ongoing training. Call HICAP to learn about this opportunity to assist older adults.

Call 444-3000 for more information. northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 18, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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Elegy for Jolie For twenty foolish years I walked right past them, on my way through the woods to the river, assuming I was seeing all there was to be seen. Then one early spring, in the cool, deep wet of the redwood forest, Jolie came to visit. She opened my eyes to hidden wonder along the trail: Tiny lilies, no bigger than my thumbnail! Dozens of them! Three yellow-green pointed petals striped with purple-brown, each one a masterpiece of flowering camouflage painted by an artist devoted to detail! They had been there all along, as I walked by unaware, a visitor in this place I call home, a transplant from another woods a continent away. Another dozen years I searched for green shoots coming up through red duff of the forest floor, as freshling ferns unfurled their softness and trillium trembled underground, awakening from a seven-year slumber to the quiet life of blooming among huckleberries. And there they were, in the gently growing light: Little gems! Miniature marvels! I crouched down to delight in their delicate presence, giving thanks for seeing what I hadn’t seen before.

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Jolie told us their distasteful name: fetid adder’s tongue, as if to say they had nothing good to say, a slander of their spicy, unripe smell, not a fragrance, no nose-pleaser. But this isn’t a tended garden, rather a resilient patch of third-growth trees remembering ancient ancestors, the wise old towering ones. The young now stand watch between the house I built on the bluff and the wild free-flowing river below, the sound of water churning through my winter meditations and springtime dreams. Back before annihilation, people called Nongatl walked these woods from village to village. What did they call the clever flower that would hide from white people’s eyes, blending into the February forest? But it wasn’t February for them, and their ancient word for early-spring-moon-time is likely lost, never again to roll off a human tongue, but be whispered by spirits that don’t forget names. Growing old and wise, I take my glasses to see fine features on each flowering face, elegant lines invisible to aging eyes, like gossamer strands of my small granddaughter’s hair, and baby-down on her unfurrowed brow. She hasn’t heard the words cancer or tragedy. Her tender eyes take in the wonder of the walk as I point out big things: tall trees, hills, clouds, and small things: soft moss, dew drops on new leaves, spiders in their sticky webs spun hopefully across the trail. I didn’t cry when I heard Jolie fell ill and swiftly died. She hadn’t visited in years, and I’d wept over many graves, but it was sad, and I was sad. Though she was younger than me, the photos showed her long hair gone silver, while mine’s still forest brown with streaks of grey, so I blend into the landscape, after thirty-two circles round the sun, walking this trail, finding hidden things.

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On a February visit, I’ll take my granddaughter there, bend over her and whisper Rivka, look! What do you see? She’ll peer into the dark puzzle of mossy branches, and when she sees them, go down into an agile squat, and with her two-year-old tongue softly say flowers, and her grandma will answer fetid adder’s tongue. (It makes no sense to me and won’t make sense to her.) Then, since they are so many, and come back after they die, I’ll tell her we can pick them, and when her small fingers reach out, I’ll turn aside to hide my stream of tears.

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 18, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

— Rabbi Naomi Steinberg

CRV, the FDA and Inhaling Combustibles Editor: I also am much bothered by the CRV situation here (“Taxed,” Jan. 28). I’ve contacted CalRecycle and various representatives. The response is to file a complaint about the markets I purchase beverages at so they can be fined for not having a CRV redemption system set up. This is B.S. If anything, the bottlers should be paying for setting up such systems. I’d just as soon see an immediate temporary stay of the law. In his letter, Bill Conners wants to blame the problem ultimately on the Chinese (Mailbox, Feb. 11). The “collapsing value of the materials” is not China’s fault. So they don’t want to take our garbage anymore; why don’t we deal with our own garbage ourselves? The “collapsing value of the materials” is because you, Bill, won’t buy them. You’d think our entrepreneurial capitalist free-market system could come up with a profitable way to deal with all these supposedly recyclable resources. On another note, there’s a reason the FDA goes through a process, sometimes time-consuming, for approving the use of new drugs. I’m guessing you, Bill, would be one of the first to sue if some hurriedly approved medicine resulted in irreversible impotence; and you would certainly be quick to blame the Biden administration for rushing approval of such a drug. I was mostly amused to see that first big Lucky Strike ad in the Journal a couple issues ago. I thought, “Wow, this ought to kick the hornet’s nest,” and looked forward to the subsequent letter deluge. I’m very much anti-smoking, myself, and grateful for all the “smoke-free” zones. I don’t necessarily like seeing a big, full-page ad for cigarettes but, then, that’s not going to make me go out, buy a pack and take up the habit. It’s pretty well established that smoking is kind of bad for your health. Now it’s up to you to make a choice. I’m not a big fan of all the marijuana, cannabis or medicinal weed ads, either. I personally think inhaling smoke from combustion is inherently bad for the lungs, at least. Take their money. Michael H. Morris, Eureka

‘Overlooked’ Editor: The service HACHR provides seems incredibly inadequate (“Point of Contention,” Feb. 4). I feel a lot more sympathy for the neighbors in close proximity to that organization than the addicts who play by their own rules anyway. It seems more control and responsibility are warranted. I don’t claim to know the ins and outs of how to deal with all the problems associated with this problem, but I do know this: The problem is far reaching. I frequent a beach on the bay across from Eureka proper and subsequently find myself picking up a lot of garbage. This actually happens in most places I go with my dogs (people are such slobs), but what is different are all the needles. Some get swept over by the tides or weather from Eureka. Many are left there by people indulging themselves while drinking, smoking cigarettes (leaving mounds of butts or plastic filters) and shooting up. These people do not care a wit about the crap they leave behind. It and they disgust me! HACHR’s facility on Third street is not a world of its own. It is part of a neighborhood that seems to be overlooked.


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The Value of a ‘Diversified Education’ Editor: I haven’t learned enough yet to have an opinion on whether pursuing polytechnic status would be a good choice for Humboldt State University (“The Polytechnic Push,” Feb. 11). I do want to contribute this to the conversation: I graduated from HSU in 1988 with a degree in environmental resources engineering and a minor in English. Over the years, on more than one occasion, I’ve been told the reason I was offered a technical job was because the English minor on my résumé made me stand out from other qualified candidates. At HSU, I also benefited greatly from meeting general education requirements through excellent courses in music, speech communication, religious studies and foreign language offered by thriving, solidly supported non-STEM departments. This diversified education made me who I am today. In addition, HSU’s geographic isolation obligates the university to provide

a wide range of majors for the benefit of students of limited economic means from our community who don’t have the choice of moving hundreds of miles away to study. While I greatly value my STEM education from Humboldt State University, I hope HSU’s leaders will consider the inherent value of diverse academic offerings as they plan the university’s future. Richard Engel, Arcata

Correction: A story in the Feb. 11, 2021, edition of the North Coast Journal headlined “The Polytechnic Push” inaccurately identified the recently retired California State University chancellor as the system’s leader when Chancellor Joseph Castro took over the position in January. The Journal regrets the error.

Write a Letter! Please make your letter no more than 300 words and include your full name, place of residence and phone number (we won’t print your number). Send it to letters@northcoastjournal.com. The deadline to have a letter considered for the upcoming edition is 10 a.m. Monday. l northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 18, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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NEWS

Third Street Refuge

How the end of a local nurse’s AirBnB dream became something bigger By Linda Stansberry

newsroom@northcoastjournal.com

I

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6

t’s 42 degrees and a bitter, spitty rain is tapping the sidewalks. Trees bend in the wind next to the Humboldt County Library, where a couple sits under a blue tarp draped over two shopping carts. A storm front is moving in, bringing days of cold weather and winds up to 30 miles per hour. But inside the 160-year-old Victorian that was William and Sarah Carson’s first home in Eureka, it is warm. A fire burns in the hearth, a small dog named P.J. wiggles with excitement as tenants come in the front door and, in a back room, a woman recovering from chemotherapy sits propped against green silk pillows on a palatial bed. The newest resident of the Sarah Carson House did not want her name or diagnosis shared but was eager to talk about what the home meant to her. Her grandmother died in a hospital, she says, pausing to wipe her eyes. She was a caregiver to her mother, who died shortly before she herself got ill. “I was tremendously aggrieved to get sick when I was still processing the death of my mom,” she says. “I have been ill for a year. All the care homes were developing COVID-19 cases. I couldn’t go home … it was cold and dark there and I needed a caregiver.” Through chance she got connected with Mark Tari, a registered nurse and most recent owner 1521 Third St., once a bed-and-breakfast, now an ad hoc rooming house for aftercare patients who are indigent or can’t stay in their own homes. “He said to me, ‘When you’re well enough, you come and stay with me.’” Which is how she joined Mark, P.J. and the other tenants in the purple and pink Victorian to recuperate while she

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 18, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

recovered her strength. Tari bought Markeith “Red” Perry (left), Mark Tari and “P.J.” in front of Eureka’s Sarah the house in Carson House, which Tari purchased in 2019. 2019 with the Photo by Linda Stansberry intention of operating it as a vacation rental. The previous owner than 15 minutes at a time, he went to the Samantha Summers had run a successemergency room. In March of 2019 he was ful AirBnB there for several years, but diagnosed with cancer — he had a tumor crime and nuisance behavior issues in the “the size of a fist.” He started treatment immediate neighborhood led to guest but his living conditions made the brutal complaints and a decline in business. Tari, effects of chemotherapy and radiation a former monk with the Alexian Brothers, even worse. bought the house and business togeth“I was living in my van but I didn’t er, and made a success of it for several realize I was homeless,” Perry says. He met months. Then COVID-19 hit and he was Tari, who offered him a room. He credits unable to keep renting rooms through the the stability of having a place to stay, as travel website. His work with Resolution well as the community he became part of Care, a local palliative support program, at the house, as a major part of his recovshowed him there was an unmet need ery from cancer. In September of 2020 PET in the region. People with chronic or scans showed his tumor had shrunk to the terminal illnesses were being treated at size of a fingertip. the hospital, but once released, they often Perry still lives at the house, doing carhad nowhere safe to go. He says indigent pentry work and trying to get his incense patients were especially vulnerable. Many business going out of the old carriage were eligible for aftercare or end-of-life house in the back. (He is also developing care, but did not have stable living situaa line of sauces.) He, Tari and a steady tions. group of volunteers are restoring the “I figured I’d be making a house payhouse to its original glory, repairing some ment anyway,” Tari says. of the façade and applying a fresh coat of One of his first guests was Markeith paint. Tari himself lives in a trailer to free “Red” Perry, former owner of Red’s up rooms for guests and also to reduce Caribbean Cuisine in King Salmon, more the potential of COVID-19 exposure to recently of St. Louis, Missouri. Perry vulnerable patients. His time as a monk relocated back to Eureka to be closer to gave him a framework for communal living his daughter who lived in the area. He that his guests now practice, taking care had been working as a roofer in St. Louis of the common chores including sanitizing and had developed a persistent pain in common areas. his shoulder. He assumed it was an injury Just off of the kitchen, the old smoking from his job but when over-the-counter room where William Carson made the painkillers stopped working for more deals that would seal his title as a lumber


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baron (and bring in the fortune that would build his next home, the Carson Mansion) has been completely gutted. When renovations are done, it will be an end-of-life room for people receiving hospice care. Since many medical visits are being done remotely, Tari is looking into designing a software package that will help patients with unstable housing situations receive telehealth services. Like most new nonprofit organizations (the Sarah Carson House became a formal 501c3 in 2020), the endeavor has suffered growing pains. Long-term funding is a persistent question. One room is being rented to a traveling doctor, who does not treat the residents. But paying rent would be a barrier to access for many who Tari wants to help. He and his son, who serves as vice president on the nonprofit’s board, are drafting a business plan. Summers, the former owner of the house, is board president. Some of the stated goals in the plan include providing individual and family support during loss, palliative and end-oflife care for the homeless, and “helping those who feel lost in the system find the right path for assistance.” They also plan to continue to provide meals to the home-

less. Tari says he and Perry were serving 250 hot meals a week to homeless people on their street out of the old Victorian’s kitchen at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. “These people, they need help,” Tari says. “If you can’t change the world, change your little corner, right?” To date, the Sarah Carson House has hosted just three palliative care patients but Tari hopes to expand services once the organization finds its footing. Due to California hospitality laws, current guests can only stay for three weeks at a time. His newest guest welcomes the respite. Before coming to the house, she had bounced in and out of the hospital. She hopes this time, with the opportunity to truly rest, the treatment will have a chance to take. “This place was a godsend,” she says, adjusting the pillow behind her head. “I have people around me, other survivors, that are able to help me if I need help. I feel like a really lucky person.” l Linda Stansberry (she/her) is a writer and journalist who lives in Eureka. You can find more of her work at www.lindastansberry.com.

WANTED: Volunteers who want to make a difference Long Term Care Ombudsmen Volunteer Program Become a highly trained advocate for residents living in Skilled Nursing Homes and Residential Care Facilities for the Elderly. Ombudsman advocate for residents of long term care facilities in Humboldt and Del Norte counties; we empower those who are unable to protect their own rights, we assist those who are unable to speak for themselves and we educate the community about the rights of the elderly. Ombudsman are State-certified volunteers trained to objectively investigate complaints and solve problems for residents. The Ombudsman makes regular visits to the long term care facilities to monitor the quality of care provided to these residents. When necessary we work closely with regulatory agencies and local law enforcement agencies. We ask that volunteers commit to visiting their assigned facilities a minimum of twice per month for the Skilled Nursing facilities and minimally once per month for the Assisted Living facilities. The schedule is set by the volunteer. There is mandated 36 hour classroom/ home study training along with an additional 10 hours working in the facility with a senior Volunteer.

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northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 18, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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Humboldt Country Strong – For Over 40 Years 8

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 18, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com


FROM

DAILY ONLINE

Slip, Sliding Away

HumCo Hopes for Red

H

umboldt County’s COVID-19 case surge has slowed some, leaving hope that the county could receive a less restrictive designation from the state when it next updates risk tiers Feb. 23. Public Health reported no new confirmed COVID-19 cases Feb. 16 for the first time in a daily report since October, leaving the county’s cumulative tally at 3,025. However, the report included only 50 samples due to laboratory closures and reporting delays over the holiday weekend. When state updated its COVID risk tier assignments Feb. 16, Humboldt County remains in the most restrictive purple “widespread” tier with most of the rest of the state. However, Public Health reported that Humboldt County’s recent data would meet the red “substantial” risk tier metrics if it continues for another week, which could trigger the loosening of some restrictions next week. The state data shows Humboldt County having recorded an average of 8.2 new COVID-19 cases per day per 100,000 residents with a seven-day average test positivity rate of 4.2 percent, though the state’s data lags more than a week behind local numbers. The state as a whole reported averaging 24.2 new cases per day per 100,000 residents with an average test positivity rate of 6.5 percent.

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Vaccination efforts, meanwhile, continue to move slowly forward, with residents over the age of 75, healthcare workers, teachers and first responders currently eligible to receive their shots. In a press release yesterday, Public Health urged any local residents 75 and older who haven’t been contacted by their primary care provider or who don’t have one to call the Joint Information Center at 441-5000 to schedule a COVD-19 vaccination.   Public Health reported Feb. 12 that it was slated to receive 3,550 additional vaccine doses the following week. The county said it planned to use 2,000 of them as second doses, urging anyone who’s second vaccine dose is due within five days but hasn’t been contacted to schedule an appointment to call the Joint Information Center at 441-5000. Regardless of who’s administering vaccines, the county reminds residents that clinics are by appointment or invitation only at this point, based on the state’s prioritization schedule, and walk-ups will not be accommodated. Residents are urged to continue to follow COVID safety guidelines as vaccinations roll out, which could take months. To date, Humboldt County has confirmed 3,025 cases, with 125 hospitalizations and 32 confirmed COVID-19 related deaths. As of Feb. 16, 15 Humboldt

Phoenix Direct: The California Redwood Coast Humboldt County Airport announced Feb. 11 that it will begin offering daily non-stop flights to and from Phoenix Sky Harbor Airport beginning June 3. Daily flights will depart Phoenix at 10:25 a.m. and arrive in Humboldt at 12:55 p.m., and head back from ACV at 3:25 p.m. to arrive in Phoenix at 5:50 p.m. POSTED 02.11.21

northcoastjournal.com/ncjdaily

Digitally Speaking The percentage of local Latinx residents vaccinated for COVID-19 as of Feb. 9, which trailed far behind the roughly 13 percent of the overall population vaccinated. Health Officer Ian Hoffman said there are a number of reasons for the disparity, which Public Health is working to address. POSTED 02.12.21

northcoastjournal

U.S. Highway 101 was closed at the persistently troubling Last Chance Grade south of Crescent City on Feb. 13, then again Feb. 14, and again Feb. 15, due to an active landslide. The roadway was opened to one-way, controlled traffic Feb. 16 as the Journal went to press but, with more rain in the forecast this week, motorists are advised to check latest conditions prior to travel. POSTED 02.15.21 Caltrans

County residents are currently hospitalized, according to the county’s dashboard, including four under intensive care. Humboldt County’s ICU capacity is listed at 21.4 percent. The county dashboard lists 2,845 people as having “recovered” from the virus locally, though that just means they are no longer contagious and does not account for long-term health impacts, which local

Time to Double Mask: In a Feb. 11 media availability, Humboldt County Health Officer Ian Hoffman echoed comments from infectious disease expert Anthony Fauci and new recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control, saying people should double mask — wearing a medical procedure mask underneath a cloth one — to maximize fit and slow the spread of COVID-19. POSTED 02.14.21

ncj_of_humboldt

ncjournal

healthcare workers have told the Journal can be substantial, even in previously healthy patients. The county’s test positivity rate has gone from 3.6 percent in November, to 7.3 percent in December, to 9.9 percent in January. Through the first 16 days of February, the test-positivity rate sits at 7.4 percent. — Thadeus Greenson POSTED 02.16.21

State Shifts Vax Priorities: Californians with high-risk medical conditions will now qualify for COVID-19 vaccines beginning March 15, the state’s health secretary announced Feb. 12, reversing course from prior guidelines. The change adds 4 million to 6 million people to the now 19 million residents slated to be eligible for vaccinations next month, though the state is not expected to have enough doses to meet that demand. POSTED 02.12.21

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newsletters

They Said It

Comment of the Week

“This vote was not an absolution of Donald Trump. His crimes are undeniable. That will go down in history, along with the senators who betrayed their oath and refused to stand up to the man who incited a violent attack against all of us and our democracy.”

“Good news for the county. Hope it keeps the charm and character of the old business.”

­— North Coast Rep. Jared Huffman on the Senate’s 57-43 vote to convict former President Donald Trump on a single article of impeachment for inciting an insurrection, which fell short of the two-thirds majority needed. POSTED 02.13.21

­— Patty Ohman commenting on the Journal’s Facebook page on a story about Ferndale native Guy Fieri purchasing the building that houses the Victorian Village’s iconic butcher shop and sandwich stop, Ferndale Meat Co. POSTED 02.11.21

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 18, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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ON THE COVER

Nikki Dion Metcalf, Margarett Lee Moon and Shelly Autumn Mae Moon (left to right) were fatally shot the morning of Feb 10 in their home on the Bear River Band of the Rohnerville Rancheria Reservation, leaving a community in mourning. Facebook

Triple Homicide Leaves Loleta ‘Heartbroken’ By NCJ Staff

newsroom@northcoastjournal.com

T

he 18-year-old Loleta man accused of fatally shooting three people — including a 16-yearold girl — at a home on the Bear River Band of the Rohnerville Rancheria Reservation the morning of Feb. 10 was known to the victims and a “guest in their house,” Humboldt County Sheriff William Honsal told the Journal. Deputies were called to the house in the 200 block of Carroll Road a little after 8 a.m., when a juvenile in the home called 911 to report a shooting. They arrived to find two people dead and a third with “serious injuries” who later died at a local hospital. Two children — 11 and 13, according to Honsal — were found uninjured in the home.

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The victims were later identified as Nikki Dion Metcalf and Margarett Lee Moon, both 40, and Moon’s 16-year-old daughter, Shelly Autumn Mae Moon. Moon and Metcalf had become engaged to be married on Christmas Eve, according to a post on Moon’s Facebook page. Honsal said the suspect — Mauricio Eduardo Johnson — was a “friend” of the family and had a relationship with Shelly, though Honsal said their “exact relationship” remains under investigation. But he said Johnson had been given permission to be inside the house by “at least one of the residents” and the family knew he was in the house prior to the shootings. Detectives, Honsal said, continue to investigate a possible motive for what’s

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 18, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

believed to be the county’s first triple homicide in at least two decades. “It’s a tragedy,” the sheriff said. “Our hearts go out to the Bear River community and the Moon family. It’s just an absolute tragedy.” The killings have had profound impacts on the Bear River and Loleta communities. Shelly and Margarett Lee Moon both worked at Loleta Elementary School as aides, tutoring students and working in the afterschool program. “Loleta Union School District is saddened by the loss of two wonderful young women,” the district said in a statement emailed to the Journal. “They graced us with their beautiful smiles and loving hearts. Their work with children

was appreciated, they will be missed by everyone at LUSD.” In coordination with the Humboldt County Office of Education, the Bear River Rancheria, Two Feathers, Humboldt Bridges and SELPA, the district is offering counseling and support for anyone who needs it. Anyone wishing to access services or get more information can call 733-5705. “We are a community and are here to help each other,” the statement said. Attempts to reach the Bear River Band of the Rohnerville Rancheria for this story were not immediately successful. When deputies arrived at the scene of the Feb. 10 shootings, Honsal said they immediately recognized the gravity of


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Investigators process the scene of what's believed to be Humboldt County's first triple homicide in decades the morning of Feb. 10. Humboldt County Sheriff's Office

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the situation and called out the major crimes task force, which includes senior detectives and evidence technicians from a host of local agencies, all of whom “basically swarmed to the scene.” Investigators got a “ton of community cooperation,” Honsal said. “People came forward and gave us information,” Honsal said. “That ultimately led us to Mr. Johnson, the vehicle he was associated with and a likely destination.” Investigators learned Johnson was traveling with his mother, Melissa Sanchez Johnson, and her friend, Von Keener, in a white Toyota Highlander, reportedly heading to a friend or family member’s residence in Indiana. Honsal said investigators wanted to act on this information before it became public — potentially allowing Johnson to change course or destroy evidence. “We know that people listen to police scanners, so we oftentimes put this type of sensitive information out through email or teletype that say, ‘Do not trans-

mit over the air,’” Honsal said. “We don’t want the suspect to know we’re looking for him.” In this case, a “be on the lookout” advisory went out to allied agencies in California, Nevada and Utah, asking officers to look for the suspect vehicle and advising its three passengers were wanted in connection with a triple homicide and Johnson should be considered to be armed with a handgun. Despite the request not to broadcast the information, an agency in Placer County did announce the advisory over its dispatch radio, recordings of which then made the rounds on social media. Meanwhile, around 1:30 p.m. on Feb. 11, Utah Highway Patrol troopers were notified of the ongoing effort to locate the Highlander and its passengers. About an hour and 15 minutes later, troopers spotted the vehicle and “put a plan in place to safely stop” it and take its occupants into custody, according to a UHP press Continued on next page »

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11


ON THE COVER Continued from previous page

Mauricio Eduardo Johnson when booked into jail after being arrested on a murder warrant in Tooele County, Utah. Tooele County Sheriff's Office

release, calling for an emergency response team and readying a helicopter if backup should be needed. “A traffic stop was initiated and the vehicle refused to stop,” the press release states. “The vehicle’s tires were spiked shortly thereafter.” When the vehicle came to a stop, Johnson was arrested, Keener was taken into custody on an unrelated Humboldt County warrant and Sanchez Johnson was detained for questioning, according to the release. Honsal said officers constantly work to balance transparency and keeping the public informed with the potential of harm to an ongoing investigation. In this case, he said they did not have any information to indicate there was an ongoing threat to local residents and the balance tipped in favor of not releasing the suspect’s identity or whereabouts while they tried to bring him in to custody. As of Feb. 12, Honsal said investigators had no evidence that Keener or Sanchez Johnson were involved in or present at the time of the homicides but that they “are investigating their roles after the homicides.” “We take aiding and abetting very seriously, so we want to know through our investigation how they may have aided and abetted Mr. Johnson in his escape,” Honsal said. Autopsies on the victims in the case were scheduled Feb. 12, but Honsal said

12

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 18, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

they appeared to have died of “gunshot wounds.” Honsal said he’s grateful for the cooperation and hard work of his and allied agencies’ investigators and evidence technicians, many of whom worked 24 to 36 hours straight to get an arrest in the case, as well as the cooperation of community members who came forward with valuable information. “The first 24 hours of this investigation were just crucial,” Honsal said. “The reason we were able to get this information and develop it into an arrest warrant so quickly is because of the cooperation from the Bear River Rancheria, the community and the witnesses who came forward.” The Loleta Elementary School Facebook page cover photo was switched at 7:03 p.m. Feb. 10 to a picture of Margarett Lee Moon. “Heartbroken we are over this tragic loss, Margarett was a beautiful person inside and out,” reads the first comment. “Was there for everyone, she had an awesome personality and laugh like no other. Our prayers are with her family.” l Journal staff writer Iridian Casarez (she/ her), news editor Thadeus Greenson (he/him) and assistant editor Kimberly Wear (she/her) contributed to this report. Reach them at newsroom@ northcoastjournal.com.


northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 18, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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ince November, when the crew at Chuchi’s Old Town Eats takes off their aprons and heads out at 5 p.m., Seth Pate has been starting his shift. He’s been running New Americana, a separate nighttime delivery restaurant, out of the kitchen where once he cooked for the former Masaki’s Kyoto Restaurant, prepping and cooking its comfort food-heavy menu for customers largely ordering off DoorDash and Uber Eats. Pate’s rental agreement, under which he pays a fraction of what he would have for his own kitchen, is up at the end of the month, so he’s on the hunt for a place of his own. He’s looking at the move as a chance to expand, to see if his solo operation, which has him turning out orders until 11 p.m. seven days a week, can scale up with more space, more staff and maybe a new subscription model. But he’ll need to carry the operation alone for at least a little while longer. Pate has roughed it before. After moving from Sonora, he says he spent his first three months at Humboldt State University living out of a sedan, parking in a campus lot overnight, studying at the library and showering at the gym until he found housing. “Me and my buddy had little camp stoves cooking on the back of our cars … it’s not impossible to do but it’s profoundly uncomfortable.” As for what they cooked, he recalls “an awful lot of beans and rice, oatmeal in Mason jars.” It was around then he got a job dishwashing, followed by gigs as a barista, a bartender and a cook. By the time he finished his economics degree, Pate says he had a solid foundation in the restaurant business, too. The menu he developed for New Americana is “cravings” focused, ranging from Italian-inspired fried polenta sticks with marinara sauce to grilled Japanese shishito peppers and panko-crusted chicken sandwiches, with the biggest seller being the Midnight Moon Manchego Mac.

Seth Pate cooks up his Moonlight Manchego mac and cheese for delivery from New Americana. Photo by Mark McKenna

All of it’s geared for transport and heat retention, unlike, say, French fries, which can go soggy even with the best to-go containers and insulated bags. Pate briefly considered offering storable frozen items but some informal social media polling showed there was more local demand for “easy at-home family meals.” While the kitchen closes at 11 p.m., Pate says between clean-up and prep for the following day, he doesn’t leave until 1:30 or 2 a.m. “It sounds kind of insane because it is,” Pate says, admitting he doesn’t know how long he can keep it up. “The only way I’m able to maintain my sanity at this point is to have a heavily regimented schedule. … Literally the day revolves around sleeping, exercise, walking my dog and going back to work at the restaurant.” With a laugh he says, “I would much prefer living in my car at this point.” On a given night, Pate says he might turn out anywhere from 10 to 35 orders with an average check size around $25. There is no order minimum, and DoorDash and Uber Eats take 25 to 30 percent cuts of the profits. “I’m definitely earning a larger margin than a conventional restaurant [with no employees and reduced rent] but … I haven’t worked it out, but I’m probably earning less than minimum wage.” It’s worth it to him in the short-run to prove the concept can work if he scales up with a higher volume of sales to cover the cost of staff and overhead. “This industry is being destroyed and it necessitates innovation,” says Pate, making the pitch for the subscription model he sees a couple of restaurants in San Francisco trying out. Subscribers have meals delivered in reusable containers marked with a QR code and return them when they get

their next order. These setups, he explains, cut down both waste and costs over time, and make it easier to gauge demand and plan inventory. But unlike those kitchens outsourcing the necessary software, delivery and container services, he’d like to do it all in-house. That would likely take time and outside investors. “I would love to be able to do dine-in, there’s a lot of benefits to that,” Pate says, including added tab-boosting items like alcohol and desserts, but he doesn’t see enough customers eager to sit down at a restaurant anytime soon. When indoor dining eventually comes back, he thinks a to-go subscription service could strengthen a conventional dine-in restaurant, allowing it to sell beyond occupancy caps while not worrying about filling the room every night. “I think a lot of restaurants will have to transition to this model if they are going to sustain themselves as mom and pops.” A subscription service, according to Pate, would also need a more nutritionally balanced rotating menu. But that’s down the road — right now he’s looking at spaces like the former Marcelli’s restaurant and figuring out whether he can realize his plans from its tiny, time-worn kitchen. Then it’s back to the burners at 5 p.m. to cook the things his customers, homebound by the pandemic, want on a winter evening: a hand-dipped corn dog, a fried chicken sandwich and lots of macaroni and cheese. ● Jennifer Fumiko Cahill (she/her) is the arts and features editor at the Journal. Reach her at 442-1400, extension 320, or jennifer@northcoastjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @JFumikoCahill.

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 18, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

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IT’S PERSONAL

Living Tiny in Turbulent Times By Annie Kassof

views@northcoastjournal.com Our life is frittered away by detail … Simplify, simplify. — Henry David Thoreau

I

lived in my first tiny house — so to speak — in the mid-1980s when I was 27. It was in San Francisco, where I was working as a graphic artist, and I was getting tired of rising rents. So I bought a Chevy Stepvan that had formerly been used as a bread delivery truck, had a boyfriend build a plywood wall with a door in it behind the driver and passenger seats, put a mattress on a platform in the back, bought a propane light and a propane camp stove. Then I moved in, decorating it with colorful scarves and New Age artwork. I used public restrooms, took showers at my boyfriend’s apartment and made my phone calls from work. I wrote a letter that was published in the San Francisco Chronicle differentiating myself from those who had no housing options except their vehicles, as I and a handful of other van and bus dwellers I’d met had made small or nomadic living a choice. My letter was titled, “It’s My Home.” I didn’t want to travel anywhere. I had a job I enjoyed and I lived in a city I loved. I just didn’t want to pay rent and be tied down with lots of stuff. For about six months, I moved my homeon-wheels every couple days to different parts of the city and never got into trouble. I’d cook brown rice and miso soup on my little camp stove while cars whooshed by just feet away. I felt cozy and self-righteous. But I sold it after returning from a vacation in Mexico with my boyfriend. Rather than driving it there, I’d kept it in a friend’s driveway and came back during rainy season to find everything inside damp and mildewy. So that was the end of “vehicle-as-tiny-house” living for me. In the late 1990s, a man named Jay Shafer from Sonoma County began a company called Tiny Tumbleweed Houses that built and sold tiny homes, some on wheels, which are defined as being 400 square feet or less. Shafer built some that were smaller than 100. Although many credit him as the “godfather” of the tiny house movement, others argue the concept of simple living began with the publication of Henry David Thoreau’s 1854 Walden, chronicling his two years spent in a small cabin in the woods; this became for him both a social and spiri-

tual experiment. I’d stumbled onto Shafer’s website in my early days of using the internet and became fixated. Those little houses were just so darned cute. But it wasn’t the time for me to buy one. By then, around 1999, I was a single mom caring for foster kids and for my own, as well. My 900-square-foot home in Berkeley, considered small by most standards, was bursting to the brim with humans and their stuff. But I never forgot my dream of living less encumbered. Fast forward to the beginning of the pandemic. Having relocated to Humboldt County in 2015, I’d settled into another small house, though not a tiny one. Retired and with time on my hands, I began downsizing. It wasn’t as if my closets were bursting at the seams. Not by a longshot. I’d already gotten rid of a lot of possessions when I’d moved north from the Bay Area, and with a subsequent move within the county. But in methodically sorting through every single thing I owned, I discovered a much needed sense of continuity and purpose. Things had begun to feel increasingly surreal by then: the political landscape, enforced business closures ... 4 year olds in masks who couldn’t go to the park or touch their friends. I started getting a little carried away. Opening my silverware drawer one day, I counted 11 forks. Eleven! Well, for one thing, an odd number simply wouldn’t do. I certainly didn’t need more than six. Make that four. Even when I wasn’t practically living in exile due to the pandemic, I rarely entertained. I removed the “extras,” then pulled out other extraneous silverware, too, and began filling another giveaway bag. As the months passed and the roller coaster of politics plus pandemic took its toll on me emotionally, downsizing became my go-to mood enhancing activity. It metaphorically lightened all the darkness and uncertainty. Japanese author Marie Kondo, in her trendy book The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up, invites readers to ascertain whether possessions even as mundane as a pair of socks generate a “spark of joy” — hence the decision to discard or not. While I chose not to analyze every object’s psychological effects on me, I happily filled a dozen or so bags and boxes with all manner of things I was pretty sure I’d never miss after they were gone. I even went through some of my

The author’s tiny home. Photo by Annie Kassof

portfolios and threw out a lot of artwork, although with my old paintings and drawings I did silently question whether looking at them gave me a “spark of joy.” If the answer was “no,” away they went. “Be Here Now,” said spiritual teacher Ram Dass. I can always make more art. As I puttered around finding more and more things to throw away or re-home, the radio droning in the background with increasingly dire news about the pandemic, I began thinking about death. There’s a concept known as “death cleaning” that comes from the Swedish word döstädning. In her book The Gentle Art of Swedish Death Cleaning, author Margareta Magnusson extols the virtues of culling one’s possessions prior to their demise in order to simplify the amount of work tasked for loved ones when the end comes. While the idea of Magnusson’s book, if not the process, somewhat parallels The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up, the latter focuses on the immediate sense of gratification that can be achieved by letting go of stuff. I needed that magic. After I’d donated, sold or given away just about everything I felt I could part with, my small house felt too roomy. So I decided to buy a genuinely tiny house, pursuing the misty-edged dream I’d held onto since I’d discovered Shafer’s “Tiny Tumbleweed Houses” about 20 years earlier. Purchasing my 270-square-foot tiny house from a contractor-friend who’d built it, I put my not-so-tiny one on the market and within six weeks it was under contract. The week I moved into my “dollhouse,” COVID cases were shattering daily records and horrifying events were unfolding in our nation’s Capitol. With the agreement that I could reside in the tiny house in its current location (tucked away in back of the property on which it was built) until I found a preferable place to relocate, I’d packed all my possessions in my Ford pickup with no help and driven 30 miles north to my new

(moveable) abode. There was no need for a return trip as there was nothing left to bring. “She’s got everything she needs, she’s an artist, she don’t look back.” So sang Bob Dylan in his 1965 song, “She Belongs to Me,” and that line has always resonated. Over and over it played in my mind as I settled into my tiny house. In the weeks before I moved, I’d already mentally decorated it with my colorful artwork, Christmas lights, mirrors, cushions, an inflatable mattress, an electric heater that looks like a wood stove, candles and more. I knew where I’d set my goldfish bowl, hang my ukulele and stash my guitar and art supplies. I knew what I’d grow in the planter boxes that came with the house, and I also knew there’d be no need to store anything in the included shed. I knew I wouldn’t feel like the house was too small because I’d already lived small. And loved it. It’s important to note that I don’t take my privilege for granted. I realize some people have no choice but to reside in small, cramped spaces, or have no home at all. And while few with the wherewithal would ever choose to live in a house not much bigger than a large bathroom (let alone in a vehicle the size of a small one), I guess I’m not most people. But, like most of us, I have dreams, and there’s something inherently satisfying about realizing one, especially at a time when, for me, I’ve forgotten what a hug feels like; I hold my breath waiting to see if an elderly aunt will survive COVID; I reel from watching American politics turn somersaults faster than I can keep track. It’s so peaceful in my tiny house. Sunlight streams through the loft windows and I sip coffee, watching my goldfish shimmer and swish in their tiny house. I’m exactly where I’m meant to be. l Annie Kassof (she/her) is an artist and freelance writer living in Humboldt County.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 18, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

17


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Navigating between Dry and Big lagoons.

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t was a cotton cloak type of fog, reducing visibility to 30 or 40 feet. Donna and I swam this stretch in bathing suits, “skinning it,” without the protection of wetsuits. Ariana looked at us skeptically as she pulled her well-worn neoprene over her long limbs and we eyed each other warily from 10 feet away. I felt almost naked in the swaying, dewy grass. We walked from the small parking area at the northern end of Stone Lagoon to the water’s edge. We had been driven separately by our partners, and they gave us the send off. My husband, Tom, drove around to paddle from the visitor center to the campground, using the kayak as a cargo vessel for our resupply. The mood was momentous. The scheme for this September day began years ago with an article about a “Lagoon Challenge,” a human-powered traverse, swimming and hiking the lagoons from south to north. All I really remembered from the recorded adventure was some complicated kayak logistics and that they had a savory pie at the end. Yet the seed was planted. We slid into the 55 degree water. Adrenaline and excitement warmed us at first, but that dissolved into the blue-brown water, more opaque than translucent. We hugged the shore closely, preventing a dangerous disorientation in the fog. We couldn’t even see the sun’s position through the haze and I got a little scared. My two companions were faster than me and waited occasionally so we could keep each other’s buoys in sight. I tried to hurry in an effort to keep up but my limbs were numb, making my stroke even less efficient. I chopped heavily at the dark, salty water. Donna visibly shivered, her narrow shoulders making small waves when we stopped to strategize. She knew this part of the lagoon well and recognized landmarks as we progressed. Meanwhile, my two-piece bathing suit had announced its retirement. My sturdy, sporty top was fine, but I had neglected to consider that the elasticity of my bottoms was done, and without the wetsuit they were quite mobile. As I was struggling to keep up, I was also giving whatever otters were present a rather cheeky show.

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 18, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

Photo by Tom Phillips

The sun’s brightness finally burned through and radiated off the water as we neared the campground. Our kayak brought warm, dry clothes and we quickly transitioned for our hike to Dry Lagoon. The hike was the first time the three of us had really talked. When I posted the plan on the Humboldt Wild Swimmers Facebook page to see if anyone else wanted to join this feat, they were the only two who simply said, “I’m in.” We traded stories of pasts and futures as we walked at safe distance through the alders around the hill. Like so many others, adjusting to the new way of life with COVID-19 was sometimes effortless and sometimes painfully awkward. Daily reports of death and disease creaked out from the radio, and swimming helped me deal with it. It felt strangely grounding to be in the water. I marveled at silhouettes of paddle-boarders against the luminous mist, the sun’s rays shooting around their narrow bodies and shifting fog pockets. The rhythm of kicking, breathing and pulling occupied my mind and muscles in a way that loosened my grip on frustration and despair. I could glide through this lagoon and forget about almost everything. The backlit moss turned gold and we took a sandy trail to the parking lot, where our respective partners had brought snacks and wetsuits. My reconnaissance for the next hiking section had concluded that it was traversable at low tide, mostly on the beach with some boulder-hopping. There was a bluff above the beach if the tide wasn’t low enough. Well, apparently this Sept. 26, the low tide was extremely high, and the swells were huge. We walked on sand then boulder-hopped for about 30 seconds before the waves threatened and we scrambled up to the bluff. The fog returned and the waves crashed at the base, even with a receding tide. We traversed what was essentially an old landslide for an hour, carefully hopping up and down the cracks and scarps. The cutting grass got the best of our exposed arms and ankles. I was relieved when we hopped down to the solid sand and walked the last yards to Big Lagoon, the waves crashing maniacally behind us. “Big,” as some locals call it, is a gigan-

tic, brackish pool with a narrow spit of sand separating it from the Pacific. Our end point was 3.5 miles away, the lagoon’s spruce-lined cove at its southern tip. Ariana knew this section well and described spots of mud and logs like other people describe houses in their neighborhood. My friends pulled increasingly ahead of me as the ocean crashed emphatically on to our right. I didn’t understand how it was taking me so long to go a mile. My legs were strong from years of cycling but my arms felt like overcooked spaghetti. We chatted at the first meetup point and I apologized for my delay, but got the feeling that these ladies are part-mermaid — more comfortable in the water than on land. I was, and still am, impressed and inspired by them. We met up again at “the snag,” a tree that washed up on the spit years ago, its roots spreading out like welcoming arms of an octopus. This sun-bleached landmark is well known to most swimmers and is a mere 0.9 miles from the south end. After lagging behind again, I floated on my back and reveled in the day. It had gone reasonably well and the finish line was near. I felt good but tired. And slow. So I decided to adjust my mode of transportation, running along the spit for a mile on the water’s edge. I reached the snag and took it all in, welcoming the sun’s warmth on my body. My companions met me there, all smiles. To our surprise, almost 100 people were at Big Lagoon, picnicking, paddle boarding and canoeing with kids, dogs and sailboats. It felt like this gathering of Saturday strangers was a congratulatory party just for us. When I finally touched the sand with my feet, my team was waiting for me patiently, full of cheers and socially distanced fist bumps. Our bodies were pleasantly exhausted. We schemed on our next adventure and felt incredibly grateful to live in a place that lets us roam these green waters. ● Hollie Ernest (she/her) is a botanist and forestry technician, calling Humboldt County home for the past seven years. On hiatus from an international bike tour, she is happy to explore the corners the county. Follow her on Instagram @Hollie_holly.


FISHING THE NORTH COAST

Another Low Return for Klamath Kings in 2020 By Kenny Priest

fishing@northcoastjournal.com

F

ollowing a disappointing 2019 adult fall run on the Klamath, 2020 proved to be only slightly better. Unfortunately, the numbers weren’t enough to get us out of the “overfished” category, and it’s likely we’ll have some severe restrictions both in the ocean and in the Klamath and Trinity rivers in 2021. “Based on this year’s run size, I’d expect very limited fishing opportunity in the coming year,” said Wade Sinnen, a California Department of Fish and Wildlife senior environmental scientist on the Klamath and Trinity rivers. According to CDFW, the number of returning fall run kings in 2020 was 45,407, about half the long-term average. In 2019 only 37,270 adult kings returned. The return of fall Chinook jacks was 9,037 fish, which is also below the long-term average of 17,740. Returns to Iron Gate and Trinity hatcheries increased in 2020. A total of 8,331 adults returned to the two hatcheries this fall, while in 2019 only 5,178 returned. Spawning escapement to the upper Klamath River tributaries (Salmon, Scott and Shasta rivers), where spawning was only minimally affected by hatchery strays, totaled 5,559 compared to 8,564 in 2019. In 2018 there were 21,109 adults spawned in these tributaries. The Shasta River has historically been the most important Chinook salmon spawning stream in the upper Klamath River, supporting a spawning escapement of 27,600 adults as recently as 2012 and 63,700 in 1935. The escapement in 2020 to the Shasta River was 3,775 adults. Escapement to the Salmon and Scott rivers was 972 and 812 adults, respectively. According to the report, 5,117 fall Chinook adults were harvested in the Klamath Basin recreational fishery, more than four times the 1,296 quota. This was due to the fact that many of the 3-year-old kings

Tom Chapman, of Fortuna, left, and son Michael, from San Diego, enjoyed a rainy day on the Smith River last week and landed a nice winter steelhead. Photo courtesy of Tyler Gillespie

were less than 23-inches, and were initially counted as jacks, but in fact were adults. Next up is CDFW’s Annual Salmon Information meeting on Feb. 25 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The meeting will provide the latest information on California salmon stocks and the outlook for ocean salmon fisheries for the upcoming 2021 season. The public is encouraged to provide comments on potential fishing alternatives for California ocean salmon fisheries in 2021. A panel comprised of fishery managers, scientists and industry representatives will be assembled to address questions and collect public input that will be used in developing a range of season alternatives for California salmon fisheries at the Pacific Fishery Management Council meetings held March 2 through 5 and March 8 through 11. These meetings will be hosted as webinars only and the meeting links, agendas and other materials will be posted as they become available. Contact Ian Pritchard for more information at Ian. Pritchard@Wildlife.ca.gov.

The weather ahead “We’ll see another round of rain this week that will bring rivers up again then mostly dry weather will follow into next week,” said Kathleen Zontos of Eureka’s National Weather Service office. “The next chance for widespread rain will come Thursday through midday Friday. Light rain will continue Friday afternoon into Saturday but will be focused primarily across Del Norte and Humboldt counties. Light rain will dissipate Sunday. Del Norte could see between 2 and 4 inches from Thursday through Sunday. In Humboldt, 1 to 2.5 inches is forecast. Moving into next week, models look really dry. Some models show indications of some very light rain late next week but, as of now, it doesn’t look

like enough to impact rivers.”

The Rivers: Chetco/Rogue

High water has stalled steelhead fishing on the Chetco, keeping drift boats off the river and slowing catch rates for plunkers, reports Andy Martin of Wild Rivers Fishing. He said, “The river has been blown out for several days and although it could fish Wednesday, it is expected to blow out again at the end of the week and through the weekend. Fishing was slow early last week before Thursday’s decent bite. It has been high and muddy since. The lower Rogue continues to be a solid bet but is also high and muddy now. Guides tried to fish the Elk Monday but it was too high. The Sixes is muddy and over its bank.”

Smith River

The Smith was down to 14 feet on the Jed Smith gauge Tuesday and a few boats were plunking. The river will be back to driftable shape for Wednesday and Thursday before going back on the rise starting Friday. Depending how much rain falls, drifting may not be an option through the weekend. Fishing remains tough. l Read the complete fishing roundup at www.northcoastjournal.com. Kenny Priest (he/him) operates Fishing the North Coast, a fishing guide service out of Humboldt specializing in salmon and steelhead. Find it on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube and www.fishingthenorthcoast.com. For up-to-date fishing reports and North Coast river information, email kenny@fishingthenorthcoast.com

1001 Main St. in Fortuna

707.725.6734

www.eelvalleyappliance.com

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 18, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

19


Calendar Feb. 18 – 25, 2021

the Redwoods for a one-hour class with three group meditations, guidance and Q&A. Suitable for all levels. Free. mindfullymatt@gmail.com. us02web. zoom.us/j/86371764436?pwd=a1hJaVBoRC93cHd0ckcwQ1lFd2ltZz09.

19 Friday ART

Courtesy of A.E. Hotchner

Submitted

Shutterstock

Get to know the man, the myth, the legend when filmmakers and special guests explore Ernest Hemingway’s art and legacy in Conversations on Hemingway, a Zoom event series, happening Tuesdays and Thursdays starting Feb. 23 and continuing through March 18. The author is the subject of an upcoming three-part, six-hour documentary series directed by award-winning filmmakers Ken Burns and Lynn Novick. The virtual events will cover themes in Hemingway’s work and life, and include discussions with the filmmakers and leading writers and scholars, as well as clips from the series. Register to attend at www.PBS.org/hemingwayevents.

Humboldt County Black Music and Arts Association’s Harambee Liberation Month activities continue this weekend with the Liberation March on Saturday, Feb. 20 from 10 a.m. to noon at the Old Town Gazebo. Hear guest speakers and singers, including Dej “Heard Today,” Lettie Love and the Love Crew, Lorenza Simmons, Jude Drum and Olivia Dunn. Community participants are invited to bring instruments for the peaceful, voiceless march leaving for the Humboldt County Courthouse at around 11:30 a.m. There, candles will be lit to remember those lost. Participants are asked to wear black in solidarity. Social distancing and masking will be observed.

North Coast Big brother Big Sisters’ major fundraiser is not sitting out this year, even if the bowling lanes are closed. Instead, it’s rolling online for Virtual Bowl For Kids’ Sake 38: Comic Book Bonanza — now through March 6. It’s a month of challenges featuring online bowling, bowling at home, a comic art contest, trivia, costume contest and lip syncing battles. Join ’em, you’ve got time to spare. Or strike. Or gutterball it. However the pins fall, it’s good fun for a great cause. Tune in to NCBBBS’ Facebook page live Fridays at 5 p.m. for prizes, team updates and more (www. facebook.com/bbbsofthenorthcoast). There will also be an in-person, socially distant/safe drop-off for pledge sheets and to pick up prizes on March 6. Check the NCBBBS Facebook page for announcements.

18 Thursday ART

Disrupt Exhibition. Virtual World, Online. View the exhibition online. www.redwoodart.us. Hindsight 20/20. Virtual World, Online. A virtual exhibition that invites the community to reflect on the extraordinary year behind us. www.inkpeople. org/tuxford-gallery-shows/hindsight-2020. Redwood Art Association 2021 New Year Exhibition. Virtual World, Online. Virtual gallery exhibit in honor of Roy Grieshaber, who served as RAA Director for 15 years. www.redwoodart.us.

DANCE Dances of Brazil. 5:30 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. Learn Brazilian dances with instructors Rocío Cristal and María Vanderhorst. All levels. Limited to five people. Register online. $15. talavera.rocio@gmail.com.

LECTURE Klamath Mountains Winter Webinar Series. 7 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Series sharing stories of how geology, climate, fire and water help create the biological abundance of the Klamath Mountains. Register online. $69 for the 10-part series, $10 per class. www.backcountrypress.com/klamath/webinar-series. Seabird Community Science Info Webinar. 6-7 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Join the Trinidad Coastal Land Trust and Bureau of Land Management biologists to learn the basics of local seabird nesting ecology and Community Science Seabird Monitoring Training. Register via email or the website. michelle@ trinidadcoastallandtrust.org. www.trinidadcoastallandtrust.org.

20

MUSIC James Zeller Hosts the J St. Regulars Radio Hour. 7-8 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Tune in for a heartwarming versions of classics in many genres and original tunes. Via Facebook and Instagram @creative.sanctuary. Free, donations encouraged. music@sanctuaryarcata. org. www.facebook.com/thesanctuaryarcata. (646) 245-6865. Quarantine Sing-a-long. Ongoing, 7 p.m. Virtual World, Online. A Facebook group to join if you like fun group singing. Song of the day posted at 3 p.m., sing starts at 7 p.m. Free. www.facebook.com/groups/ quarantinesingalong.

SPOKEN WORD The Writers Lounge via Zoom. 7:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. A writing workshop geared toward stand-up and comedy. Zoom Room: 857 4217 6054. Password: writers. Join Zoom Meeting www.us02web.zoom. us/j/85742176054?pwd=dWp4UGVqaUVYQ0wzekVnZkZ0VlMzZz09.

EVENTS Virtual Bowl For Kids’ Sake 38: Comic Book Bonanza. Virtual World, Online. A month of challenges featuring online bowling, bowling at home, comic art contest, trivia, costume contest and lip syncing battles. Tune in to Facebook Live every Friday, for prizes, team updates and more. www.facebook.com/bbbsofthenorthcoast.

FOR KIDS Fortuna Library Recorded Readings. Virtual World, Online. Hosted by the Fortuna Branch Library on its Facebook page, www.facebook.com/HumCoLibraryFortuna. Virtual Junior Rangers. 11:30 a.m. Virtual World, Online. North Coast Redwoods District of California State Parks offers kids’ programs and activities about coast redwoods, marine protected areas and more,

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 18, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

plus Junior Ranger Badges. Register online and watch live. www.bit.ly/NCRDVirtualJuniorRanger.

MEETINGS Virtual Whiteness Accountability Space. Noon-1 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Community members who identify as white are invited to weekly conversations led by white facilitator from Equity Arcata. Email for the Zoom link. equityarcata@gmail.com.

OUTDOORS Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. California State Parks’ North Coast Redwoods District is broadcasting programs featuring tall trees and rugged seas from state parks via Facebook. Free. www.facebook.com/NorthCoastRedwoods. Mad River Steelhead Derby. 6 a.m. Virtual World, Online. The three biggest hatchery steelhead win cash and prizes from sponsors and partners. Register at Bucksport, RMI Outdoors or online. Derby fees: adult $35, youth $20. www.ncgasa.org.

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. This class offers pronunciation, speaking, reading, writing, vocabulary, verb conjugations and common expressions. All levels welcome. Join anytime. Free. www.englishexpressempowered.com. KEET What’s on Your Bucket List? 7:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Six-part series featuring 12 local people acting out their bucket list adventures. On KEET Ch. 13. Restorative Movement. 10:30-11:30 a.m. & 1:30-2:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. SoHum Health presents classes focused on strength and mobility (Tuesday), and on relaxation and breath work (Thursday). Contact instructor Ann Constantino for online orientation. Free. annconstantino@gmail.com. www.sohumhealth.org. 923-3921. Virtual Meditation & Mindfulness Class. 5-6 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Join on Zoom at the Abbey of

Disrupt Exhibition. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing. Hindsight 20/20. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing. Redwood Art Association 2021 New Year Exhibition. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing.

LECTURE Arcata Wastewater Treatment Plant Upgrade Update. 7:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Friends of the Arcata Marsh’s online lecture series continues with a presentation by David R. Couch, the water/wastewater operations supervisor for the city of Arcata. Q&A follows, recording will be posted. Join the Zoom meeting at www.us02web.zoom.us/j/87860556399.

MUSIC James Zeller Hosts the J St. Regulars Radio Hour. 7-8 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing. King Maxwell Quarantine Funk #9. 9-11 p.m. Virtual World, Online. King Maxwell spins funk, soul, electro, disco, roller skating jams and boogie, and adds vocoder flavor. Free. arcatasoulpartycrew@gmail.com. www. youtube.com/watch?v=pssTRy5HLAk. Quarantine Sing-a-long. Ongoing, 7 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing. Shelter n Play. 6 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Public group on Facebook made up of locals. Open mic for all skill levels, all styles, everyone’s welcome to watch or perform. Sign-ups Wednesdays at noon. www. facebook.com/groups/224856781967115.

EVENTS The Curiosity Hour: Weekly Double Dose of Weird with Veve Decay. 8 p.m. Virtual World, Online. An evening of strange tales, live chats and parlor games hosted by Altar Ego: Curious Art & Fashion Design. www.facebook.com/events/939880849742122. Virtual Bowl For Kids’ Sake 38: Comic Book Bonanza. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing.

FOR KIDS School-age Storytime. 11 a.m. Virtual World, Online. Hosted by the Arcata Branch Library via Zoom. To sign up, email sparsons@co.humboldt.ca.us or call 822-5954.

MEETINGS Mugs and Virtual Hugs. 8:30-10 a.m. A virtual support group for caregivers of a loved one in Humboldt County via Zoom. Free gift of mug and hot beverage of your choice when you RSVP for this group with Erin via email. Free. exm@redwoodcrc.org. www.redwoodcrc. org. 443-9747.

OUTDOORS Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing. Mad River Steelhead Derby. 6 a.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing.

ETC A Call to Yarns. Noon-1 p.m. Virtual World, Online.


A weekly Zoom meetup for knitters and crocheters. Sign up using the Google form for an email inviation. Free. sparsons@co.humboldt.ca.us. www.forms.gle/ CkdbZSbjbckZQej89. 822-5954. English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing. Tabata. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. SoHum Health presents online classes with short, high intensity cardio workouts. Contact instructor Stephanie Finch by email for a link to the class. Free. sfinch40@ gmail.com. www.sohumhealth.com.

20 Saturday ART

Disrupt Exhibition. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing. Hindsight 20/20. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing. Redwood Art Association 2021 New Year Exhibition. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing.

BOOKS Reading in Place - An Online Reading Group. 1 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Sign up online for a Zoom meeting invite and the week’s reading for discussion. www.forms.gle/zKymPvcDFDG7BJEP9.

MUSIC Art & Music - A Weekend Thing. 2-4 p.m. Virtual World, Online. A weekly collaboration of musical covers and original songs alongside live art production. Via Facebook. emily@emilyreinhart.com. www. facebook.com/EmRArt. EmRArt with James Zeller. 2-4 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Cross-platform entertainment from remote locations. James Zeller plays jazz from Arcata, and Emily Reinhart lays charcoal on birch wood in Eureka. Watch via Facebook (www.facebook.com/EmRArt) or by YouTube. Free. emily@emilyreinhart.com. www. youtube.com/channel/UClclGc_-RErDvHWjNBsbhIQ. Quarantine Sing-a-long. Ongoing, 7 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing.

THEATER Dell’Arte Spring Workshop - Grand Guignol. 2-5 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Workshop primer on “theatre of laughter and terror” from scripts to effects and techniques with Michael Fields and Debbie McMahon. Sign up online. www.dellarte.com.

sign up, email sparsons@co.humboldt.ca.us or call 822-5954.

FOOD Arcata Plaza Winter Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Every Saturday, rain or shine, Humboldt County farmers gather on the plaza to share their bounty. Current COVID safety guidelines online. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation.org. www.northcoastgrowersassociation. org. 441-9999.

OUTDOORS Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing. Mad River Steelhead Derby. 6 a.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing.

Now on DoorDash

English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing.

21 Sunday ART

Disrupt Exhibition. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing. Hindsight 20/20. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing. Redwood Art Association 2021 New Year Exhibition. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing.

COMEDY Sunday Service Comedy Open Mic: ZOOM. 5 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Virtual stage-time with Pastor Paula for aspiring comics working out sets and trying to land jokes. Five-minute sets. Join the show at www. us02web.zoom.us/j/82295455754. Zoom room: 822 9545 5754. Password: comedy.

MUSIC Quarantine Sing-a-long. Ongoing, 7 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing.

EVENTS Virtual Bowl For Kids’ Sake 38: Comic Book Bonanza. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing.

FOOD Food Not Bombs. 4 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Free, hot food for everyone. Mostly vegan and organic and always delicious. Free.

OUTDOORS

Club Triangle Streaming Saturdays. Virtual World, Online. Weekly online queer variety show. Submissions accepted daily. Post your art on social media and tag @clubtriangle. #coronoshebettadont. Free. www. facebook.com/clubtriangl . Liberation March. 10 a.m.-noon. Old Town Gazebo, Second and F streets, Eureka. Part of HC Black Music and Arts Association’s Harambee Liberation Month activities. Wear white and black, bring your candles and instruments. Sign up to speak about an icon, artist or activist at the blue tent at 9 a.m. More info on Facebook. Virtual Bowl For Kids’ Sake 38: Comic Book Bonanza. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing.

Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing. Mad River Steelhead Derby. 6 a.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing.

Preschool Storytime. 11 a.m. Virtual World, Online. Hosted by the Arcata Branch Library via Zoom. To

708 9th Street, Arcata • On the Plaza within Hotel Arcata HOURS: 4pm-8 pm Daily (707) 822-1414 • (707) 599-2909 • info@tomoarcata.com

ETC

EVENTS

FOR KIDS

TAKE OUT ONLY HAPPY HOUR: 4pm-5:30pm Daily $2 Pints | $2 off of Coctails

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing.

22 Monday ART

Disrupt Exhibition. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing. Hindsight 20/20. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing.

@northcoastjournal

Continued on next page » northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 18, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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Redwood Art Association 2021 New Year Exhibition. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing.

Mad River Steelhead Derby. 6 a.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing.

LECTURE

ETC

Public Banking Educational Forum. 6:30-8 p.m. Virtual World, Online. David Cobb (Cooperation Humboldt), Jake Varghese (Public Bank East Bay) and Trinity Tran (Public Banking LA) discuss via Zoom how California law Assembly Bill 857 allows the creation of 10 local regional public banks. Registration required. Free. ruthiengelke@gmail.com. www.us02web.zoom.us/ meeting/register/tZUpdu6hrzMqHdJkNvIicmBw16V2cUZqdcdu. (210) 364-7024.

MUSIC James Zeller Hosts the J St. Regulars Radio Hour. 7-8 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing. Quarantine Sing-a-long. Ongoing, 7 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing.

THEATER Dell’Arte Spring Workshop - Resistance Theatre with Michael Fields. 6-9 p.m. Virtual World, Online. This workshop explores the vital connections of devising theater in connection to social movements of resistance. Sign up online. www.dellarte.com/ school-of-physical-theatre/programs/online-workshops.

English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing. Tabata. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 19 listing.

23 Tuesday ART

Disrupt Exhibition. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing. Hindsight 20/20. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing. Redwood Art Association 2021 New Year Exhibition. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing.

COMEDY Savage Henry’s BigFish Open Mic via Zoom. 9 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Enjoy or participate in some stand-up open-mic Zoom style. Five-minute sets. Zoom: www.us02web.zoom.us/j/86421967992 Password: comedy.

EVENTS

LECTURE

Virtual Bowl For Kids’ Sake 38: Comic Book Bonanza. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing.

Conversations on Hemingway. Virtual World, Online. Tuesday and Thursday night events discussion of the author’s work and life with upcoming Hemingway documentary filmmakers, writers and scholars. Zoom link and schedule online. www.KEET.org.

OUTDOORS Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing.

CARTOON

MUSIC

World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing.

Daniel Nickerson Hosts the J Street Regulars Radio Hour. 7-8 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Artists give a one-hour program to connect, send healing music, educate on American music history, celebrate artists of color and more. Free, donations encouraged. music@sanctuaryarcata.org. www.facebook.com/ thesanctuaryarcata. James Zeller Hosts the J St. Regulars Radio Hour. 7-8 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing. Quarantine Sing-a-long. Ongoing, 7 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing.

EVENTS

EVENTS Virtual Bowl For Kids’ Sake 38: Comic Book Bonanza. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing.

FOR KIDS Tuesday Storytime with Ms. Tamara. Virtual World, Online. Posted every Tuesday on Arcata Library’s Facebook page, www.facebook.com/HumCoLibraryArcata.

MEETINGS Local Homesharing Info Session. 1-1:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. If you have a spare bedroom and could use extra income or help around the house, Northcoast Homeshare (a program of Area 1 Agency on Aging) can connect you with a compatible housemate. Join the weekly 30-minute Zoom informational session. Free. homeshare@a1aa.org. zoom. us/j/2673010045?pwd=eTJvajJXaWR4eEMwOUErQlpGZHBJZz09. 442-3763, extension 213.

OUTDOORS Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing. Mad River Steelhead Derby. 6 a.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing.

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing. Restorative Movement. 10:30-11:30 a.m. & 1:30-2:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing. Virtual Yoga: Gentle Vinyasa Flow. 5-6:15 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Join online at the Abbey of the Redwoods for a mellow practice. Suitable for all levels but previous yoga experience is helpful due to the limitations of online instruction. Free. mindfullymatt@gmail. com. www.facebook.com/abbeyoftheredwoods.

24 Wednesday ART

Disrupt Exhibition. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing. Hindsight 20/20. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing. Redwood Art Association 2021 New Year Exhibition. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing.

BOOKS On the Same Page Book Club. 5:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Online book club that meets on the first Wednesday of the month on Zoom. Sign up using the Google form at www.forms.gle/bAsjdQ7hKGqEgJKj7.

MUSIC James Zeller Hosts the J St. Regulars Radio Hour. 7-8 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing. Quarantine Sing-a-long. Ongoing, 7 p.m. Virtual

22

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 18, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

The Curiosity Hour: Weekly Double Dose of Weird with Veve Decay. 8 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 19 listing. Virtual Bowl For Kids’ Sake 38: Comic Book Bonanza. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing.

FOR KIDS Preschool Storytime. 11 a.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 20 listing. Try Out Girl Scouts: Be Your Own Boss. 6-7 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Zoom in with your girl(s) virtually to try out hands-on and fun activities as they explore ways to be their own boss. Visit www.norcal. gs/explore-gs. smetteauer@gsnorcal.org. norcal.gs/ explore-gs.

OUTDOORS Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing. Mad River Steelhead Derby. 6 a.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing.

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing. Reel Genius Virtual Trivia. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Create a team via Facetime, Skype, Messenger, Hangouts etc., order some food and brews from the Madrone and play while dining outdoors, or enjoying takeout at home. Invite link will be posted prior to the event. www.facebook.com/ events/657139721581557. Tabata. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 19 listing. Weekly Check-in with Rep. Huffman. Noon. Virtual World, Online. Rep. Jared Huffman (D-San Rafael) will hold Facebook Live check-ins to engage with his constituents on the latest updates regarding the novel coronavirus pandemic and to answer questions about the federal response. More information at www. huffman.house.gov/coronavirus. Free. www.facebook. com/rephuffman.

25 Thursday ART

Disrupt Exhibition. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing. Hindsight 20/20. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing. Redwood Art Association 2021 New Year Exhibition. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing.

DANCE Dances of Brazil. 5:30 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. See Feb. 18 listing.

LECTURE Conversations on Hemingway. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 23 listing. Dr. Nina Ellis-Hervey, Black Liberation Month Speaker. 4-5 p.m. As part of Black Liberation Month, the African American Center for Academic Excellence presents a lecture by Nina Ellis-Hervey. Zoom link online. Free. aacae@humboldt.edu. www.aacae. humboldt.edu/black-history-month. Klamath Mountains Winter Webinar Series. 7 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing.


SCREENS

MUSIC James Zeller Hosts the J St. Regulars Radio Hour. 7-8 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing. Quarantine Sing-a-long. Ongoing, 7 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing.

SPOKEN WORD The Writers Lounge via Zoom. 7:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing.

EVENTS Virtual Bowl For Kids’ Sake 38: Comic Book Bonanza. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing.

FOR KIDS Fortuna Library Recorded Readings. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing. Virtual Junior Rangers. 11:30 a.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing.

MEETINGS Salmon Information Meeting. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Virtual World, Online. The California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s annual public meeting on sport and commercial ocean salmon fisheries, and spawning escapement. Details and instructions for attendance online. www.wildlife.ca.gov/Fishing/Ocean/Regulations/Salmon/preseason. Virtual Whiteness Accountability Space. Noon-1 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing.

OUTDOORS Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing. Mad River Steelhead Derby. 6 a.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing.

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing. KEET What’s on Your Bucket List?. 7:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing. Restorative Movement. 10:30-11:30 a.m. & 1:30-2:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing. Virtual Meditation & Mindfulness Class. 5-6 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Feb. 18 listing.

Heads Up …

Coast Central Credit Union offers scholarships to all high school seniors graduating this year in Humboldt, Del Norte and Trinity counties and attending Humboldt State University, Chico State University, College of the Redwoods or Shasta College for at least the first two years. Deadline is March 15. Applications at www.coastccu.org/community/college-scholarships. Entries sought for 2021 Student Bird Art and Student Nature Writing Contests. Information about the two contests is available at www.godwitdays.org. Entries will be collected online until March 26. Dream Quest offers scholarships for students going to a two- or four-year college or vocational school. Apply by April 15. Email office@dqwc.org or visit www.dqwc.org. Graduating seniors at Humboldt County high schools who plan to major or minor in music or music education at an accredited college next fall may apply for Scotia Band’s 2021 Sewell Lufkin Memorial Scholarship ($500) until April 16. The application form is available at www.scotiaband2.org/Scotia_Band_ Scholarship.html.

The Humboldt-Del Norte County Medical Society’s Humboldt-Del Norte PreMedical Education Task Force offers two $1,000 Future Physician scholarships to students planning on attending medical school. Application at www.hafoundation.org/Grants-Scholarships/Scholarships-Apply-Now. Teen Court is looking for an artist to create a new image for a T-shirt design. Artists do not need to be a youth or connected to Teen Court, but youth are encouraged. For questions or to send samples of your work, email: hcteencourt@bgcredwoods.org. The Media Maker’s Night film festival is looking for video submissions that are 10 minutes or less that explore these themes: a story about you, community or anything inspired by/incorporating the North Coast. Also accepting a general submissions: documentaries, short films, dance videos, music pieces, experimental media, trailers or any creative video. For more info, visit www.accesshumboldt.net/media-makers-night. The city of Eureka has open seats on several boards and commissions. To see what seats are available and how to apply, call the city clerk at 441-4175, or go to www.ci.eureka.ca.gov. The city of Arcata has open seats on the Historic Landmarks, Transactions and Use Tax Oversight, Transportation Safety, Wetlands and Creeks, Parks and Recreation and Energy committees. To apply, visit www.cityofarcata.org or call 822-5953. Cooperation Humboldt invites artists, social change workers and those who imagine a better tomorrow to participate in “Just Imagine,” an ongoing public art show. Submit a piece by filling out the form and uploading electronic files of photos, videos, text or audio to www.forms.gle/jdQJfrAdu7Z1ULcz5. Email coophumed@gmail.com. The Humboldt Branch of Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom is seeking applications for its Edilith Eckart Memorial Peace Scholarship supporting projects that promote peace and social justice locally or globally. Grants range from $150-$500. Applications online at www.wilpfhumboldt.wordpress. com/scholarship-information are due April 1. Submit online or mail to: WILPF at P.O. Box 867, Arcata, CA 95518. Call 822-5711. The city of Arcata is offering curbside pickup and free delivery to all residents who purchase a compost bin. Backyard compost bins are available for $25 by emailing the Environmental Services Department at eservices@cityofarcata.org or by calling 822-8184. The city of Arcata is seeking community members for the Planning Commission. Applications may be dropped off, in a sealed envelope labeled “City Manager’s Office,” at the city’s drop boxes in the city hall parking lot and next to the USPS mailbox outside city hall. Visit www.cityofarcata.org or call 822-5953. The Humboldt Arts Council is distributing by CARES Act relief-funded grants to aid local arts organizations serving socially vulnerable populations not eligible for direct CARES Act grants. Details and application at www.humboldtarts.org/cares-act-grant-application. County of Humboldt is seeking additional applicants for the 2020/2021 Humboldt County Civil Grand Jury. Visit www.humboldt.courts.ca.gov or call 269-1245. Interested parties may also complete, download and email an application to: GrandJuryApps@ humboldtcourt.ca.gov. The Arcata Police Department is looking for Volunteer Patrol members. Contact Administrative Sgt. Brian Hoffman at 822-2428. l

Watching Republican senators being extremely chill about insurrection and incitement. Judas and the Black Messiah

Tragedy of the Inside Man Judas and the Black Messiah By John J. Bennett

screens@northcoastjournal.com JUDAS AND THE BLACK MESSIAH. As the eternal shuffle-step march of our plague years continues, as dates lose significance and shocks remain unsurprising, it can sometimes feel as if nothing is normal but everything is mundane. This paradigm shift — or slide, or decay, whatever one prefers — is not without some benefits. I cannot say I am glad that I have not seen a movie in a theater in almost a year; of course not. Has the pandemic reinforced the knowledge that I am a deeply introverted weirdo who would “quarantine” voluntarily, should it prove viable? Sure it has. But I remain steeped in the mythological occasion of going to the movies, so even as the poor behavior and questionable taste of the species has eroded my reverence, while technology has simultaneously brought a remarkably good facsimile of the theatrical experience into my living room, there are times when I miss it. I do not miss enduring the repeated three-hour cacophony of a certain self-serious costume-hero franchise, nor do I regret the absence of that predictable but somehow always new, little feeling of devastation brought about by a joylessly bad movie. The new era of watching from home, the embarrassment of riches provided by streaming services, has brought perhaps

an even greater proportion of garbage content heaving into view. But it has also allowed for a greater degree of control, a curation that can somehow embrace both surprise and predictability. We can give ourselves what we want and, lacking the quasi-binding contract of sitting in an auditorium with strangers, we do not have to sit through anything we do not like. This new model of self-determination in entertainment, coupled with an industry divided by holding its breath or adapting to the times, has flattened the curve delineating “good” from “bad”: unless we really seek it out, we are increasingly unlikely to be bowled over by anything from the extremes of the spectrum. For better and worse, that is one thing I actually miss. A sense of uncertainty that, unlike our questions about the survival of the species or of representative democracy, can actually produce fun surprises. Enter Judas and the Black Messiah, an experience that, absent the constant hectoring of theatrical trailers, came as a truly unexpected pleasure, a reminder that cinema is still alive and lively, a conduit to elevated experience even, as is distinctly the case here, when it describes the crimes and degradations of the past. Continued on next page »

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 18, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 18, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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SCREENS Continued from previous page

Developed from a story idea by Keith and Kenny Lucas, Will Berson and Shaka King (screenplay by Berson and King, King directing), Judas interpolates the minutiae surrounding the real-life assassination of Chicago Black Panther leader Fred Hampton (Daniel Kaluuya), a casualty in FBI director J. Edgar Hoover’s (Martin Sheen) extended campaign against Black America. As the Panthers gain traction as a community service organization and a practical means to create change, with charismatic leaders like Hampton with powerful oratory and the determination to support it with action continuing to emerge, Hoover meets the threat of potential racial fairness with misinformation, infiltration and murder. Agent Roy Mitchell (Jesse Plemons), presented here as a good soldier perhaps on the verge of developing a social conscience, is tasked with finding and placing an informant within the Panther organization, someone who can get close enough to Hampton to both provide intelligence and potentially corrupt the leadership. Mitchell finds his plant in Bill O’Neal (Lakeith Stanfield), an itinerant car thief presented with the option of five-plus years in prison or a job working for The Man. As is usually the case, it’s not really much of a choice. And so O’Neal ingratiates himself with Hampton, with his allegiance to the Panthers (and his ethical crisis) deepening all the while. The more committed to the movement he gets, though, the more Mitchell demands of him, until he is tasked with the unthinkable. Kaluuya dominates the frame whenever he appears, whether delivering breathtaking speeches or awkwardly courting the soon-to-be mother of his child, Deborah Johnson (Dominique Fishback). Stanfield plays the foil with astounding alacrity, finding the balance between humor and pathos, loyalty and self-preservation, that define a man trapped by circumstance. Even with performances as powerful as these at the center of the piece, though, King emerges as the star. His control of the narrative, his ability to infuse scenes with concurrent space and tension, his distinctive grasp of composition and camera movement, announce a formidable talent; an artist with something to say and the means to express it. As heartbreaking as Judas can be, as much as it serves as a reminder of the legacy of suppression and terror that is very much a part of this country’s identity, it is also hugely entertaining, compulsively watchable and a reminder not to let ourselves get too jaded; there are still some surprises in store. R. 126M. HBOMAX. l John J. Bennett (he/him) is a movie nerd who loves a good car chase.

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WORKSHOPS & CLASSES List your class – just $4 per line per issue! Deadline: Friday, 5pm. Place your online ad at classified.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/ MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Communication COMMUNITY MEDIATOR TRAINING 3/2 − 4/24 Join the HMS training program and learn the skills to be a community mediator. 27 hours over 8 weeks. All on Zoom. Tues/Thurs from 5:30−7:00 PM (+ one Sat. session 4/24). $300− Multiple discounts available. (707) 445−2505 humboldtmediationservices.org

Dance/Music/Theater/Film GUITAR/PIANO LESSONS. All ages, beginning & intermediate. Seabury Gould (707) 845−8167. (DMT −1230)

Fitness SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids & adults, child care, fitness gym & more. Tae Kwon Do Mon−Fri 5−6 p.m., 6−7 p.m., Sat 10−11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825−0182. (F−1230)

50 and Better OLLI ONLINE CLASSES: Shelter in place but stay connected with OLLI. Get more information or register @HSUOLLI (O−1230) OLLI ONLINE: BALLET FOR ADULTS: INTERMEDI− ATES WITH NANCY CALL. Appreciate the wonderful benefits of musicality, flexibility, strength, coordination, and balance. More ballet steps and complex combinations will be taught. Tues. & Thurs., March 2−April 8 from 10:30−noon. OLLI Members $145. Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0218) OLLI ONLINE: BASIC TAP DANCE WITH MELISSA HINZ. Enjoy the great benefits of tap dancing including balance, rhythm, stronger brain to body connection along with strengthening your feet, legs, and core.Fri., March 5−April 9 from 10:30−11:30 a.m. OLLI Members $72. Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0218) OLLI ONLINE: DECOLONIZING BEES WITH BRIAN DYKSTRA. Explore human−bee relationship case− studies to critically examine harmful historical and ongoing eurocentric momentum as well as posi− tive contemporary acts of change, resistance, and reclamation. Fri., March 5 from 3−5 p.m. OLLI Members $15. Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0218) OLLI ONLINE: OUR FRACTAL WORLD: SEEING THE COMPLEXITY WITH MOLLY CATE. Explore fractal geometry, the first mathematics to effec− tively model complex natural systems. Our built world is constructed of ideal shapes that produce convenience but encourage misuse of nature. Wed., March 3−17 from 10 a.m.−12 p.m. OLLI Members $30. Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0218)

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 18, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

OLLI ONLINE: BALLET FOR ADULTS WITH NANCY CALL. Learn the basic foundation steps including stretching, strengthening and floor work. Mon. & Wed., March 1−April 12 (no class March 31) from 9:30−11 a.m. OLLI Members $145. Sign up today! 826 −5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0218)

Spiritual EVOLUTIONARY TAROT Ongoing Zoom classes, private mentorships and readings. Carolyn Ayres. 442−4240 www.tarotofbecoming.com carolyn@tarotofbecoming.com (S−1230) SOTO ZEN MEDITATION Sunday programs and weekday meditation in Arcata locations; Wed evenings in Eureka, arcatazengroup.org Beginners welcome, call for orientation. (707) 826−1701 (S−1230)

Therapy & Support ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS. We can help 24/7, call toll free 1−844 442−0711. (T−1230) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATION− SHIPS? Confidential help is available. 707−825− 0920, saahumboldt@yahoo.com (T−1230)

Vocational 40−HOUR WILDLAND FIRE SCHOOL − DEL NORTE CAMPUS MAR 15−19, 2021 VISIT: https://www.red woods.edu/communityed/Detail/ArtMID/17724/ ArticleID/3722/Wildland−Fire−School or call College of the Redwoods at (707)476−4500 (V− 0218) ADDITIONAL ONLINE CLASSES − Are you looking for an online class? College of the Redwoods Community Education and Ed2GO have partnered to offer a variety of short term and career courses in an online format Visit: https://www.redwoods.e du/communityed/Detail/ArtMID/17724/ArticleI− D/4916/Additional−Online−Classes or call College of the Redwoods at (707)476−4500 (V−0218) FREE AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE CLASS visit https://www.redwoods.edu/adulted or Call College of the Redwoods at 707−476−4520 for more information and to register. (V−0325) FREE BEGINNING LITERACY WITH ESL CLASS visit https://www.redwoods.edu/adulted or Call College of the Redwoods at 707−476−4520 for more information and to register. (V−0325) FREE COMPUTER SKILLS CLASS visit https://www.redwoods.edu/adulted or Call College of the Redwoods at 707−476−4520 for more information and to register. (V−0325) FREE ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE CLASS visit https://www.redwoods.edu/adulted or Call College of the Redwoods at 707−476−4520 for more information and to register. (V−0325)

FREE GED/HISET PREPARATION CLASSES visit https://www.redwoods.edu/adulted or Call College of the Redwoods at 707−476−4520 for more information and to register. (V−0325) FREE LIVING SKILLS FOR ADULTS WITH DISABILI− TIES visit https://www.redwoods.edu/adulted or Classes Call College of the Redwoods at 707−476− 4520 for more information and to register. (V− 0325) FREE WORKPLACE SKILLS CLASSES visit https://www.redwoods.edu/adulted or Call College of the Redwoods 707−476−4520 for more information and to register. (V−0401) FRONT OFFICE RECEPTIONIST Apr 5 − Jun 25, 2021 Visit: https://www.redwoods.edu/communityed/ Detail/ArtMID/17724/ArticleID/5110/Medical− Billing−and−Coding−Specialist or call College of the Redwoods at (707)476−4500 (V−0218) INCIDENT SAFETY AWARENESS FOR HIRED VENDORS Dates Available in March & April Visit: https://www.redwoods.edu/communityed/Detail /ArtMID/17724/ArticleID/5088/Incident−Safety− Awareness−for−Hired−Vendors or call College of the Redwoods at (707)476−4500 (V−0218) MEDICAL OFFICE RECEPTIONIST Apr 5 − Jul 30, 2021 Visit: https://www.redwoods.edu/communit yed/Detail/ArtMID/17724/ArticleID/5110/Medical −Billing−and−Coding−Specialist or call College of the Redwoods at (707)476−4500 (V−0218) PHARMACY TECHNICIAN Mar 13 − Aug 7, 2021 Visit: https://www.redwoods.edu/communityed/ Detail/ArtMID/17724/ArticleID/3704/Pharmacy− Technician or call College of the Redwoods at (707)476−4500 (V−0218) REAL ESTATE CORRESPONDENCE Become a Real Estate Agent. Start Anytime! Visit: https://www. redwoods.edu/communityed/Real−Estate or call College of the Redwoods at (707)476−4500 (V− 0218)

Wellness & Bodywork AYURVEDIC HERBALIST/PRACTITIONER TRAINING W/TRACI WEBB & GUESTS. Starts March 2 online @ Ayurvedic Living School. Learn to Heal Yourself & Others Naturally w/Herbs, Foods, Lifestyle, Make Your Own Medicines. Includes Weekly Class, Monthly Clinic, Internship, Bimonthly Moon Meditations & Peer Support Circles, 1−on−1 Support Sessions, 3−Day Constitu− tional & Imbalance Assessment Immersion, Self− Care Immersion, Group Detox, Medicine Making. Launch a career good for you and the planet! Details & Reg: www.ayurvedicliving.com Email: info@ayurvedicliving.com DANDELION HERBAL CENTER CLASSES WITH JANE BOTHWELL. 10−Month Herbal Studies Program. Feb − Nov 2021. Meets one weekend per month with three camping trips. Learn in−depth material medica, plant identification, flower essences, wild foods, formulations and harvesting. Register online www.dandelionherb.com or call (707) 442−8157. INTRODUCTION TO ATTITUDINAL HEALING WORKSHOP VIA ZOOM. Begins March 4th. Pre registration required. Space limited. Contact Pat Cowan (707)599−4406 or email mylifecoach@suddenlink.net


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By Barry Evans

fieldnotes@northcoastjournal.com

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heir marriage law lays it down, that no girl shall wed until she has killed a man in battle.” — Herodotus, circa 600 B.C., writing about the Sauromatae, mythical descendents of Amazons

Herodotus, so-called Father of History, had much to say about Amazons, the legendary race of women warriors who nearly bested Greek soldiers while trying to free one of their own during the mythical Attic War. He claimed the Amazonian capital, Themiscyra, was located in present-day northern Turkey, near the shore of the Black Sea. Brooking no male presence, the women took care of procreation in an annual get-together with the tribe who lived on the other side of the mountain, the Gargareans. Baby girls were brought up to become Amazon warriors, while baby boys were sent back to their fathers. According to Herodotus, when they weren’t reproducing, the Amazons spent their days either pillaging their neighbors or founding new cities, including Ephesus and Smyrna. Herodotus was elaborating on Homer’s earlier tale of the Trojan War, the Iliad, which had its oral origins in the Late Bronze Age circa 1200 B.C. The Amazons were the “equal of men” (antianeira), and Homer began a literary tradition that saw these women allying themselves with the (losing) Trojan side. A later Greek myth has the hero Hercules stealing Amazon queen Hippolyta’s magic girdle as his ninth “labor,” while in another version, Hercules abducts the queen, giving her to Theseus, the Greek hero who supposedly founded Athens. What could have inspired all these myths about warrior women inspired fear and awe in the male-dominated Athenian

polis? One theory links the legendary Amazons with real Scythian-Sarmatian women who were buried with their weapons, and whose kurgans (mound graves) are found in great numbers in the southern Ukraine, as we saw in the news last week. Classical scholar Johann Bachofen, writing in the 19th century, went so far as to propose human societies began as matriarchies, only switching to patriarchies with the rise of agriculture. The story goes that composer Richard Wagner was a fan of Bachofen — in the Ring Cycle, Brünnhilde and her Valkyries were the Nordic equivalent of Sythian Amazons. The very name “Amazon” is also controversial. The ancient Greeks had a folk etymology that the word means “without breast” (a-mazos), in line with a tradition that the Amazons cut off or cauterized their right breasts in order to better fight with a sword or draw a bow. There are other, more convincing, etymologies (e.g. ama-zoonais = with girdles) and Amazons are always shown in their many Greek representations with both breasts. While there’s uncertainty about the word’s origin, we do know that the Amazon River in South America was named by the Spanish explorer Francisco de Orellana, who encountered — and fought — a tribe of warlike women on a tributary of the river in 1542. Stories of kickass women live on today in comics and movies: Wonder Woman, Lara Croft, Xena, Buffy Summers and the baddest of them all, Uma Thurman’s character in Tarantino’s Kill Bill. Now there’s an Amazon for our times. l Barry Evans (barryevans9@yahoo. com) finds the idea of Amazon warrior women totally awesome. As long as he doesn’t have to fight them.

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40. Not much, as of lotion 41. Big name in kitchen wrap 42. A____ist 46. JPEG alternative 49. Novelist McEwan 50. Course you hardly have to study for 52. Hint that, taken literally, will help you solve 19-, 24-, 34- and 42-Across 58. “The Bathers” Impressionist 59. Tasty ones? 60. HBO title role for Robert Wuhl 61. At all 62. Kvbrick opvs? 63. Grind, as teeth 64. Monopoly card 65. Lawn makeup

1. Co. led by Baryshnikov in the 1980s 4. Order in the court 8. Nonmainstream 13. Sigma follower 14. Misfortunes 15. Consecrate 16. Come to 18. Like Shakespeare’s sonnets 19. Lu____r 21. Instruct 22. Toilette water 23. Punk rock offshoot 24. Scy____ 32. Part of an Asian capital’s name 33. Jane who falls for Edward Rochester 34. A____ns

ANSWERS NEXT WEEK!

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1. One little bite 2. The “Ba” of BaSO4 3. Ask, as for assistance 4. Huck Finn, for one 5. “The Sopranos” actor Robert 6. Many an Eastern European 7. It is, en español 8. Snug bug’s place 9. Hideo who threw no-hitters in both the American and National Leagues 10. “I call that!” 11. “Last one ____ a rotten egg!” 12. List-ending abbr. 15. Quinn of “Elementary” 17. “Where did ____ wrong?”

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS TO ATTACK AD T G I F B E T O A N D Y T P I P E L I E A L E X D A L A S N O A N I D L A T E A S E V D U R A S I S L

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#1 song 44. Places for bears or villains 45. Place to stay 46. Source of the line “The Lord is thy keeper” 47. Slacker’s opposite 48. Bouncer’s confiscation 51. “____ aboard!” 52. “Charlotte’s Web” girl 53. Visiting Hollywood, say 54. Lane of DC Comics 55. “Decorated” on Halloween, informally 56. Own 57. Dueling sword 58. Sponge alternative

© Puzzles by Pappocom

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Warrior Women (Part 2)

CROSSWORD by David Levinson Wilk

Photo by Barry Evans

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Section of the “Amazons versus Greeks” marble frieze that once decorated the Mausoleum of Halicarnassos (modern Bodrum, Turkey), sculpted about 350 B.C. It’s now in the British Museum next to statues of King Mausolus of Caria (the guy for whom the mausoleum was built and from whom we get the word mausoleum) and his wife.

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©2021 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

FIELD NOTES

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LEGAL NOTICES NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF DONALD KEITH DICKSON CASE NO. PR2100028 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of DONALD KEITH DICKSON A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner CAROL CAMP− BELL In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition for probate requests that CAROL CAMPBELL be appointed as personal representative to admin− ister the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the dece− dent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for exami− nation in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on March 11, 2021 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 6. For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts. ca.gov/ IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal JOURNAL of estateNORTH assets orCOAST of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available

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attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Jocelyn M. Godinho, Esq. Law Office of Hjerpe & Godinho, LLP 350 E Street, 1st Floor Eureka, CA 95501 (707) 442−7262 Filed: February 8, 2021 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 2/18, 2/25, 3/4 (21−047)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF KAREN ANN JANDEBEUR CASE NO. PR2100027

fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. PETITIONER: Kara−Lee Hughes 209 Sonoma Street Eureka, CA 95501 (707) 616−4238 Filed: February 4, 2021 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, 2/11, 2/18, 2/25 (21−042) contingent creditors and persons NOTICE OF PROBATE PETITION who may otherwise be interested in Estate of Michelle Ann the will or estate, or both, of Mehalopoulos KAREN ANN JANDEBEUR CASE NO. PR2100014 A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, filed by Petitioner KARA−LEE contingent creditors and persons HUGHES who may otherwise be interested in In the Superior Court of California, the will or estate, or both, of County of Humboldt. The petition Michelle Ann Mehalopoulos for probate requests that KARA−LEE A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been HUGHES be appointed as personal filed by Michael Mehalopoulos representative to administer the In the Superior Court of California, estate of the decedent. County of Humboldt. The petition THE PETITION requests authority to for probate requests that Michael administer the estate under the Mehalopoulos be appointed as Independent Administration of personal representative to admin− Estates Act. (This authority will ister the estate of the decedent. allow the personal representative THE PETITION requests authority to to take many actions without administer the estate under the obtaining court approval. Before Independent Administration of taking certain very important Estates Act. (This authority will actions, however, the personal allow the personal representative representative will be required to to take many actions without give notice to interested persons obtaining court approval. Before unless they have waived notice or taking certain very important consented to the proposed action.) actions, however, the personal The independent administration representative will be required to authority will be granted unless an give notice to interested persons interested person files an objection unless they have waived notice or to the petition and shows good consented to the proposed action.) cause why the court should not The independent administration grant the authority. authority will be granted unless an A HEARING on the petition will be interested person files an objection held on March 4, 2021 at 2:00 p.m. to the petition and shows good at the Superior Court of California, cause why the court should not County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth grant the authority. Street, Eureka, in Room: 6. A HEARING on the petition will be IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of held on February 18, 2021 at 2:00 the petition, you should appear at p.m. at the Superior Court of Cali− the hearing and state your objec− fornia, County of Humboldt, 825 tions or file written objections with Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 6. the court before the hearing. Your IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of appearance may be in person or by the petition, you should appear at your attorney. the hearing and state your objec− IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a tions or file written objections with contingent creditor of the dece− the court before the hearing. Your dent, you must file your claim with appearance may be in person or by the court and mail a copy to the your attorney. personal representative appointed IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a by the court within the later of contingent creditor of the dece− either (1) four months from the dent, you must file your claim with date of first issuance of letters to a the court and mail a copy to the general personal representative, as personal representative appointed defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− by the court within the later of fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days either (1) four months from the from the date of mailing or date of first issuance of letters to a personal delivery to you of a notice general personal representative, as under section 9052 of the California defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− Probate Code. Other California fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days statutes and legal authority may from the date of mailing or affect your rights as a creditor. You personal delivery to you of a notice may want to consult with an • Thursday, Feb. 18, 2021 in• Cali− northcoastjournal.com under section 9052 of the California attorney knowledgeable Probate Code. Other California fornia law. statutes and legal authority may YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept affect your rights as a creditor. You by the court. If you are a person

by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. PETITIONER: Kenneth M. Bareillses 533 E Street Eureka, CA 95501 707−443−9338 Filed: February 2, 2021 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND JUDICIAL FORFEITURE On February 4th, 2021, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture from Dick Smith Lane in Fortuna, California, in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11359 of the Health and Safety Code of California. The seized property is described as: $40,261.00 in U.S. Currency. Control Number 21−F−13 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any corre− spondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney. If your claim is not timely filed, the Humboldt County District Attorney will declare the property described in this notice to be forfeited to the State and it will be disposed of as provided in Health and Safety Code Section 11489. 2/18/, 2/25, 3/4 (21−052)

2/4, 2/11, 2/18 (21−039)

PUBLIC SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property pursuant to Sections 21700−21716 of the Business & Professions Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, Section 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the civil Code. The undersigned will sell at public sale by competitive bidding on Wednesday February 24, 2021 at 10 AM, on the premises where said property has been stored and which are located at CUTTEN MINI STORAGE, 2341 Fern Street, Eureka, CA County of Humboldt the following: #62 Evan Carver #118 Joseph Brown #166 Stefani Edwards #258 Beth Contreras Items to be sold include, but are not limited to: table with 4 chairs, king mattress and box spring, blan− kets, electrical cords, particle board, canvasses, tarp, hoverboard, bicycle wheels, suitcases, boxes/ bins/bags/totes − contents unknown, stereo equipment. Purchases must be paid for at the time of the sale in cash only. Anyone interested in attending the auction must sign in at 2341 Fern Street, Eureka, CA prior to 9:00 AM on the day of the auction, no exceptions. All purchase items sold as is, where is and must be removed at the time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation in the event of settlement between owner and obligated party. Auctioneer: Cutten Mini Storage (707)443−2280, Bond #0336443 Dated this Thursday February 11, 2021 and Thursday February 18, 2021.

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND JUDICIAL FORFEITURE On December 2nd, 2020, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture from Riverwalk Drive, in Fortuna, California, in connection with controlled substance viola− tions, to wit, Section 11369 (A)(3)(D) of the Health and Safety Code of California. The seized property is described as: $47,071.00 in U.S. Currency. Control Number 20−F−47 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the prop− erty in any correspondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney. 2/18, 2/25, 3/4 (21−049)

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND JUDICIAL FORFEITURE On December 3rd, 2020, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture from Fifth Street, in Alderpoint, California, in connec− tion with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11359 of the Health and Safety Code of Cali− fornia. The seized property is described as: $75,275.00 in U.S. Currency. Control Number 20−F−51 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the prop− erty in any correspondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney. 2/1/, 2/25, 3/4 (21−050)

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND JUDICIAL FORFEITURE On January 14th, 2021, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture from Pigeon Point Road, in Fresh− water, California, in connection with controlled substance viola− tions, to wit, Section 11379 of the Health and Safety Code of Cali− fornia. The seized property is described as: $279,985.00 in U.S. Currency. Control Number 21−F−11 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the prop− erty in any correspondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney.

water, California, in connection with controlled substance viola− tions, to wit, Section 11379 of the Health and Safety Code of Cali− fornia. The seized property is described as: $279,985.00 in U.S. Currency. Control Number 21−F−11 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the prop− erty in any correspondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney. 2/18, 2/25, 3/4 (21−051)

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE On February 5th, 2021, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11351 of the Health and Safety Code of California from Fernbridge Drive, Fortuna, California. The seized property is described as: $6,415.00 in US currency and Control Number 21−F−12 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any correspon− dence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney. If your claim is not timely filed, the Humboldt County District Attorney will declare the property described in this notice to be forfeited to the State and it will be disposed of as provided in Health and Safety Code Section 11489. 2/18, 2/25, 3/4 (21−070)

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE On December 14th, 2020, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11359 of the Health and Safety Code of California from Munson Court in Eureka, California. The seized property is described as: $22,000.00 US currency and Control Number 21−F−02 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any corre− spondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney. 2/18, 2/25, 3/4 (21−061)

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE On December 15th, 2020, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11351 of the Health and Safety Code of California from Noe Ave in Eureka, California. The seized property is described as: $5,960.00 US currency and Control Number 20−F−50 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any correspon− dence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney. 2/18, 2/25, 3/4 (21−058)

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE On December 23rd, 2020, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11378 of the Health and Safety Code of California from the intersection of H and Russ Streets in Eureka, California. The seized property is described as: $19,666.00


SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE

SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE

On December 23rd, 2020, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11378 of the Health and Safety Code of California from the intersection of H and Russ Streets in Eureka, California. The seized property is described as: $19,666.00 US currency and Control Number 21 −F−03 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any correspon− dence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney.

On January 20th, 2021, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11351 of the Health and Safety Code of California from Palomino Lane in Arcata, California. The seized prop− erty is described as: $4,980.00 in US currency and Control Number 21−F− 07 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any correspondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney.

2/18, 2/25, 3/4 (21−062)

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE On December 28th, 2020, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11351 of the Health and Safety Code of California from 3500 Broadway Street in Eureka, California. The seized property is described as: $2,715.00 US currency and Control Number 21−F−05 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any correspondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney. 2/18, 2/25, 3/4 (21−064)

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE On December 28th, 2020, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11351 of the Health and Safety Code of California from 4827 Valley West Boulevard in Arcata, California. The seized property is described as: $3,912.00 US currency and Control Number 21−F−04 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any correspondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney. 2/18, 2/25, 3/4 (21−063)

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE On February 4th, 2021, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11351 of the Health and Safety Code of California from Highway 101, Cali− fornia. The seized property is described as: $10,061.00 in US currency and Control Number 21−F− 08 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any correspondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney. 2/18, 2/25, 3/4 (21−067)

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE On January 20th, 2021, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11351 of the Health and Safety Code of California from Palomino Lane in Arcata, California. The seized prop− erty is described as: $4,980.00 in US currency and Control Number 21−F−

2/18, 2/25, 3/4 (21−066)

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE On January 21st, 2021, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11358 of the Health and Safety Code of California from R Street, Eureka, California. The seized property is described as: $28,000.00 in US currency and Control Number 21−F− 10 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any correspondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney. 2/18, 2/25, 3/4 (21−069)

Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11352 of the Health and Safety Code of California from C Avenue in Mckinleyville, California. The seized property is described as: $6,155.00 US currency and Control Number 20−F−28 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any correspon− dence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney. 2/18, 2/25, 3/4 (21−059)

On November 27th, 2020, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11359 of the Health and Safety Code of California from US− 101 & Sunset Blvd in Arcata, Cali− fornia. The seized property is described as: $3,898.00 US currency and Control Number 20−F−48 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any correspondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney. 2/18, 2/25, 3/4 (21−056)

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE On November 11th, 2020, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11359 of the Health and Safety Code of California from US− 101 & Sprowl Creek Road in Humboldt County, California. The seized property is described as: $26,217.00 US currency and Control Number 20−F−49 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any corre− spondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney. 2/18, 2/25, 3/4 (21−057)

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE On September 8th, 2020, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11351 of the Health and Safety Code of California from Glen Street, in Eureka, California. The seized property is described as: $7,539.00 US currency and Control Number 20−F−44 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any corre− spondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney. 2/18, 2/25, 3/4 (21−053)

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE

On January 23rd, 2021, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11352 of the Health and Safety Code of California from Redwood Drive, Garberville, California. The seized property is described as: $22,560.00 in US currency and Control Number 21−F−09 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any correspon− dence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney.

On November 22nd, 2020, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11359(B) of the Health and Safety Code of California from US 101 in Orick, California. The seized property is described as: $10,000.00 US currency and Control Number 21−F−01 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any corre− spondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney.

On November 4th, 2020, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11370.1 of the Health and Safety Code of California from Telescope Road, in Hoopa, Cali− fornia. The seized property is described as: $5,160.00 US currency and Control Number 20−F−45 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any correspondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney.

2/18, 2/25, 3/4 (21−068)

2/18, 2/25, 3/4 (21−060)

2/18, 2/25, 3/4 (21−054)

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE

SUMMONS (Citation to Parent) CASE NUMBER: AD2100003

On January 6th, 2021, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11378 of the Health and Safety Code of California from John Hill Road in Eureka, California. The seized prop− erty is described as: $7,990.00 in US currency and Control Number 21−F− 06 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any correspondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney.

On November 24th, 2020, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11351 of the Health and Safety Code of California from 7th and G Streets in Eureka, California. The seized property is described as: $3,700.00 US currency and Control Number 20−F−46 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any corre− spondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney.

SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLT

2/18, 2/25, 3/4 (21−065)

2/18, 2/25, 3/4 (21−055)

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE On June 21st, 2020, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11352 of the Health and Safety Code of California from C Avenue in Mckinleyville, California. The seized property is described as: $6,155.00 US currency and Control Number 20−F−28 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any correspon−

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE On November 27th, 2020, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11359 of the Health and Safety Code of California from US− 101 & Sunset Blvd in Arcata, Cali− fornia. The seized property is described as: $3,898.00 US currency and Control Number 20−F−48 has been assigned to this case. Use this

CITATION TO CHRISTOPHER CARR Free Minor From Parental Custody and Control In the Matter of the Petition of TRISTA KILLINGSWORTH, formerly Anderson, to Declare Aliyah Lynn Marie Carr, a minor, Free from the custody and Control of Christopher Carr. To: The People of the State of Cali− fornia To: CHRISTOPHER CARR, Father of Minor

Continued on next page »

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS The City of Trinidad (“City”) will accept electronically submitted bids for its Downtown Trinidad Pedestrian & Connectivity Improvement Project (“Project”), by or before March 4, 2021, at 10:00 a.m., via email in the manner set forth in Information to Bidders, at which time the bids will be opened and the results will be posted on the City’s website at: https://trinidad.ca.gov/. The work consists of the furnishing of all labor, material, equipment, and supervision for the construction of the Downtown Trinidad Pedestrian & Connectivity Improvement Project. The work generally includes, but is not limited to constructing sidewalks, driveways, curb ramps, installing drainage systems, asphalt paving, and striping, as shown on the plans. The estimated construction cost of the base bid is $ 395,000. The plans, specifications, bid forms and contract documents for the Project, and any addenda thereto (“Contract Documents”) may be downloaded from City’s website located at: https://trinidad.ca.gov/. Each proposal must be submitted on the prescribed form and accompanied by a certified check or Bid Bond in an amount of not less than 10 percent of the amount bid. Successful bidders will be required to furnish both a Payment Bond and Performance Bond in the full amount of the Contract Price. In accordance with Public Contract Code Section 10263 the Contractor will be allowed to substitute securities for monies normally withheld by the Owner to insure performance under this contract. To bid on this project, contractors must hold the following contractor’s license: Class “A” General Engineering. This is a public works project so all bidders must be registered with the Department of Industrial Relations (DIR) and pay the prevailing wage rates (this includes, travel, subsistence, holiday pay, designated days off and overtime) determined by the Director of the DIR according to the type of work and location.

CITY OF FORTUNA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Fortuna City Council will hold a public hearing on Monday, March 1 at 6:00 P.M. to consider an amendment to Title 17 – Zoning Regulations of the Fortuna Municipal Code, Adding Section 17.06.220 Small Wireless Communications Facilities and Amending Section 17.07.004 Administration. The purpose of the hearing is to amend the City’s Small Wireless Cell Facilities to make administrative corrections to the ordinance. No changes to the standards will be made with regards to design, maintenance, and performance standards for small wireless communication facilities. This meeting will be held in accordance with the Brown Act as currently in effect under the State Emergency Services Act, the Governor’s Emergency Declaration related to COVID-19, and the Governor’s Executive Order N-29-20 issued on March 17, 2020 that allows attendance by members of the Council, City staff, and the public to participate by teleconference, videoconference, or both. If you wish to watch this meeting, it is scheduled to stream live on television via Access Humboldt on March 1st at 6:00 p.m. Information on the project is available at City Hall for review at the Community Development Department. Written comments may be submitted to the City Clerk in person at City Hall or by email to HYPERLINK “cityclerk@ci.fortuna. ca.us%20” cityclerk@ci.fortuna.ca.us by noon on Monday, March 1st, 2020. In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need special assistance to participate in this meeting, please contact the Building Department at (707) 725-7600. Notification 48 hours prior to the meeting will enable the City to make reasonable arrangements to ensure accessibility to this meeting (28 CFR 35.102 - 35.104 ADA Title II).

By order of the court, you are hereby advised that you may appear before the Judge Gregory Elvine−Kreis, presiding in Depart− ment 6 of the Humboldt County Superior Court on February 25, 2021 at 8:30 a.m. then and there to show cause, if any you have, why Aliyah Lynn Marie Carr should not be northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 18, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL declared free from your custody and control for the purpose of freeing her for step−parent adop− tion.

27


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YO U R G N I T S I L

E R E H

hereby advised that you may appear before the Judge Gregory Elvine−Kreis, presiding in Depart− ment 6 of the Humboldt County Superior Court on February 25, 2021 at 8:30 a.m. then and there to show cause, if any you have, why Aliyah Lynn Marie Carr should not be declared free from your custody and control for the purpose of freeing her for step−parent adop− tion. The following information concerns your rights and procedures which relate to this proceeding for the termination of parental custody and control of Aliyah Lynn Marie Carr, as set forth in California civil Code Section 237.5. The court shall consider whether the interest of the minor child requires the appointment of counsel. If the court finds the inter− ests of the minor do not require such protection, the court shall not appoint counsel to represent the minor. If the court finds the inter− ests of the minor require the repre− sentation of counsel, counsel shall be appointed whether or not the minor is able to afford counsel. The minor shall not be present in court, unless the minor so requests or the court so orders. If a parent appears without counsel and is unable to afford counsel, the court must appoint counsel for the parent, unless such representation is knowingly and intelligently waived. The same counsel shall not be appointed to represent both the minor and her parent. The public defender or private counsel may be appointed as counsel, pursuant to Family Code Section 7860, et seq. Private counsel appointed under the provi− sions of Family Code Section 7863 shall receive a reasonable sum for compensation and expenses, the amount of which shall be deter− mined by the Court. Such amount shall be paid by the real parties in interest, other than the minor, in such proportions as the court deems just. However, if the court finds any of the real parties in interest are unable to afford counsel, the amount shall be paid out of the general fund of the court.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00016

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00086

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00109

The following person is doing Busi− ness as REDWOOD REMEDY

The following person is doing Busi− ness as HAROLD THE HANDYMAN

The following person is doing Busi− ness as MRS. O’S ORIGINALS

Humboldt 2329 Plunkett Rd Bayside, CA 95524

Humboldt 3 Fenwick Ave Samoa, CA 95564

Humboldt 6 Upper Redwood Creek Road Blue Lake, CA 95525

Monica A Ahumada 2329 Plunkett Rd Bayside, CA 95524

PO Box 115 Samoa, CA 95564

PO Box 483 Willow Creek, CA 95573

Harold G Breit 3 Fenwick Ave Samoa, CA 95564

Lisa A OHanen 6 Upper Redwood Creek Road Blue Lake, CA 95525

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Harold Breit, Owner This February 2, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Lisa A OHanen, Owner This January 22, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

2/18, 2/25, 3/4, 3/11 (21−046)

2/11, 2/18, 2/25, 3/4 (21−045)

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on January 7, 2021 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Monica Ahumada, Owner This January 12, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 1/21, 1/28, 2/4, 2/11 (21−020)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00065 The following person is doing Busi− ness as MEADOWOOD MUSIC Humboldt 2194 Meadowood Lane Eureka, CA 95503 Stefan J Vaughan 2194 Meadowood Lane Eureka, CA 95503

Dated: January 14, 2021 Kim M Bartleson, Clerk of the Supe− rior Court Kimberlyn S., Deputy

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Stefan J Vaughan This January 26, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

2/4, 2/11, 2/18, 2/25 (21−033)

2/4, 2/11, 2/18, 2/25 (21−032)

The court may continue the proceeding for not more than thirty (30) days as necessary to appoint counsel to become acquainted with the case.

Hiring? Post your job opportunities in the Journal. 442-1400 ×314 classified@northcoastjournal.com

28

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 18, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00038

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00115

The following person is doing Busi− ness as EUREKA OXYGEN COMPANY INC

The following person is doing Busi− ness as HUMBOLDT HORIZONS

Humboldt 2810 Jacobs Ave Eureka, CA 95501

Humboldt 3259 Matthew Lane Fortuna, CA 95540

Eureka Oxygen Company DE 1524906 2810 Jacobs Ave Eureka, CA 95501

Humboldt Horizons LLC CA 202103710340 3259 Matthew Lane Fortuna, CA 95540

The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on September 1, 1992 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Keith Linville, Owner/President This January 19, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on February 2, 2021 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Eddie Adams, CEO, Owner This February 16, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk

1/28, 2/4, 2/11, 2/18 (21−023)

2/18, 2/25, 3/4, 3/11 (21−072)

LEGALS? 442-1400 × 314

classified@north coastjournal.com

County Public Notices Fictitious Business Petition to Administer Estate Trustee Sale Other Public Notices


FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00030

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00043

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00056

The following person is doing Busi− ness as HUMBOLDT REDWOODS INN

The following person is doing Busi− ness as ERRL HILL LLC

The following person is doing Busi− ness as BODYFREE

The following person is doing Busi− ness as GREENDALE FARM

Humboldt 987 Redwood Dr PO Box 98 Garberville, CA 95542

Humboldt 5655 West End Road Arcata, CA 95521

Humboldt 989 I Street, Suite D Arcata, CA 95521

Humboldt 20335 State Highway 36 Carlotta, CA 95528

PO Box 778 Bayside, CA 95524

PO Box 145 Bayside, CA 95524

20305 State Highway 36 Carlotta, CA 95528

ERRL Hill LLC CA 20173101074 5655 West End Road Arcata, CA 95521

Bodyfree LLC CA 202036611049 1836 Old Arcata Rd, Unit 145 Bayside, CA 95524

Catalyst Unlimited, Inc CA C3748442 20305 State Highway 36 Carlotta, CA 95528

The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Randy Scott Harris, Owner This January 14, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Sylvia Chrisney, Owner This January 20, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Ronald H Kennedy, CEO This January 22, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

1/28, 2/4, 2/11, 2/18 (21−029)

1/28, 2/4, 2/11, 2/18 (21−024)

2/11, 2/18, 2/25, 3/4 (21−041)

Mark Scown 987 Redwood Dr PO box 98 Garberville, CA 95542 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Mark Scown This January 7, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 2/4, 2/11, 2/18, 2/25 (21−035)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 20−00650 The following person is doing Busi− ness as NORTH COAST VETERINARY HOSPITAL Humboldt 1701 Giuntoli Lane Arcata, CA 95521

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00037

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00045

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00077

The following person is doing Busi− ness as SQUARE ONE YARD RESTORA− TION

The following person is doing Busi− ness as CALIFORNIA COLD RUSH INC.

The following person is doing Busi− ness as SUBSTANCE

Humboldt 3348 Jacobs Ave Eureka, CA 95501

Humboldt 4701 West End Road Arcata, CA 95521

PO Box 217 Bayside, CA 95524

PO Box 4807 Arcata, CA 95518

California Cold Rush 1890 Fairview Dr Bayside, CA 95524

Royal Key, LLC California 201719210149 4701 West End Road Arcata, CA 95521

Humboldt 520 South G St Arcata, CA 95521

2973 Penryn Road Penryn, CA 95663 Loomis Basin Equine Medical Center, Inc. CA C3045204 2973 Penryn Road Penryn, CA 95663

725 4th St, Ste Y Eureka, CA 95501 Nick E Campise 2203 Fern St Eureka, CA 95503

The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Langdon Fielding, President This December 31, 2020 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Nick Campise, Owner This January 15, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

1/28, 2/4, 2/11, 2/18 (21−021)

1/28, 2/4, 2/11, 2/18 (21−025)

@northcoastjournal

The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Keith Linville, President/Owner This January 21, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 1/28, 2/4, 2/11, 2/18 (21−027)

The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Josh Vert, Member This January 29, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 2/4, 2/11, 2/18, 2/25 (21−034)

Let’s Be Friends

BLUE LAKE RANCHERIA TRIBAL JUSTICE CENTER NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) (40 CFR § 1500-1508) to assist the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) to comply with 42 U.S.C. § 4371 et. seq. The EA documents the environmental review for the proposed development of a multi-purpose Justice Center and Transportation/O.E.S. Complex to be constructed on trust lands within the boundaries of the Blue Lake Rancheria. The purpose of the EA is to investigate and outline the potential environmental effects associated with the development of the facility. The Bureau of Justice Assistance, Office of Justice Programs (OJP), as Lead Agency, will use this EA to determine if the approval of the development of the multi-purpose Tribal Court Facility would result in significant effects to the environment. The purpose of the EA is to satisfy the environmental review process of NEPA as set forth by the U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice to document the need for the Blue Lake Rancheria to develop and administer the types of services that would be made available at the Blue Lake Rancheria Justice Center. The document provides a detailed description of the Proposed Action and an analysis of the potential environmental consequences associated with development of the proposed project. Also included is a discussion and analysis of project alternatives, impact avoidance, and mitigation measures. These mitigation measures are incorporated into the Environmental Consequences section of the EA and summarized in Table 4. Proposed is the construction of a BLR Multi-Purpose Justice Center and Transportation/O.E.S. complex on a portion of a 33.47-acre parcel with an affected area of 2.8 acres of tribally-owned trust lands within the boundaries of the Blue Lake Rancheria, Humboldt County, California. The U.S. Department of the Interior, through the Bureau of Indian Affairs, has been designated by federal law as the “Trustee” of all Indian lands. The BIA does not weigh in nor administer trust land within control of the Tribe and for Tribal purposes except in the approval of leases. Leases are not proposed under this action. By being aligned with the other tribal and non-tribal social service, health, and administrative entities, the Justice Center is a projected twostory, 10,750 square foot facility that will house the Rancheria’s Police Department, Tribal Court, Emergency Services, and Tribal staff. The Justice Center’s first floor will include a reception area, Tribal library, Elders Meal Program kitchen, dining hall, Emergency Operations Center, Tribal Court, and Police Department. The second floor of the facility will house Tribal administration offices. The proposed Transportation/O.E.S. complex consists of a 4,338 square foot building that will house a Tribal Transportation Office and Garage as well as the Fire Department. Both buildings are on the same lot. The proposed project involves construction of two new buildings and equipment purchase by the Blue Lake Rancheria Tribe on Tribal Trust Lands using grant funds received, in part, from the US Department of Justice, the annual continuing appropriations under the Tribal Transportation Program (TTP), and additional funds will be provided by the Tribe. The complete draft EA, provided by LACO Associates can be found at: www.bluelakerancheria-nsn.gov/publicnotifications/

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29


ASTROLOGY

EMPLOYMENT

Free Will Astrology Week of Feb. 18, 2021 By Rob Brezsny

Opportunities AMERICAN STAR PRIVATE SECURITY Is now hiring. Clean record. Driver’s license required. Must own vehicle. Apply at 922 E Street, Suite A, Eureka (707) 476−9262

Homework: Listen to and download my music for free. https://soundcloud.com/sacreduproar

freewillastrology@freewillastrology.com ARIES (March 21-April 19): Atheists like to confront religious people with accusations like this: “If God is so good, why does he allow suffering in the world?” Their simplistic, childish idea of God as some sort of Moral Policeman is ignorant of the lush range of ruminations about the Divine as offered down through the ages by poets, novelists, philosophers and theologians. For example, poet Stéphane Mallarmé wrote, “Spirit cares for nothing except universal musicality.” He suggested that the Supreme Intelligence is an artist making music and telling stories. And as you know, music and stories include all human adventures, not just the happy stuff. I bring these thoughts to your attention, Aries, because the coming weeks will be a favorable time to honor and celebrate the marvelously rich stories of your own life — and to feel gratitude for the full range of experience with which they have blessed you. PS: Now is also a favorable phase to rethink and reconfigure your answers to the Big Questions. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Blogger Rachel C. Lewis confides, “I love being horribly straightforward. I love sending reckless text messages and telling people I love them and telling people they are absolutely magical humans and I cannot believe they really exist. I love saying, ‘Kiss me harder,’ and ‘You’re a good person,’ and, ‘You brighten my day.’” What would your unique version of Lewis’ forthrightness be like, Taurus? What brazen praise would you offer? What declarations of affection and care would you unleash? What naked confessions might you reveal? The coming days will be a favorable time to explore these possibilities. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): It’s a good time to become more of who you are by engaging with more of what you are not. Get in the mood for this heroic exercise by studying the following rant by Gemini poet Adam Zagajewski (who writes in Polish), translated by Gemini poet Clare Cavanaugh: “Read for yourselves, read for the sake of your inspiration, for the sweet turmoil in your lovely head. But also read against yourselves, read for questioning and impotence, for despair and erudition, read the dry, sardonic remarks of cynical philosophers. Read those whose darkness or malice or madness or greatness you can’t yet understand, because only in this way will you grow, outlive yourself, and become what you are.” CANCER (June 21-July 22): You’re on the verge of breakthroughs. You’re ready to explore frontiers, at least in your imagination. You’re brave enough to go further and try harder than you’ve been able to before. With that in mind, here’s a highly apropos idea from Cancerian novelist Tom Robbins. He writes, “If you take any activity, any art, any discipline, any skill, take it and push it as far as it will go, push it beyond where it has ever been before, push it to the wildest edge of edges, then you force it into the realm of magic.” (I might use the word “coax” or “nudge” instead of “force” in Robbins’ statement.) LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In her story “Homelanding,” Margaret Atwood writes, “Take me to your trees. Take me to your breakfasts, your sunsets, your bad dreams, your shoes. Take me to your fingers.” I’d love you to express requests like that. It’s a favorable time for you to delve deeper into the mysteries of people you care about. You will generate healing and blessings by cultivating reverent curiosity and smart empathy and crafty intimacy. Find out more about your best allies! VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): You’re about to reach the end of your phase of correction and adjustment. To mark this momentous transition, and to honor your ever-increasing ability to negotiate with your demons, I offer you the following inspirational proclamation by poet Jeannette Napolitano: “I don’t want to look back in five years’ time and think, ‘We could have been magnificent, but I was afraid.’ In five years, I want to tell of how fear tried to cheat me out of the best thing in life, and I didn’t let it.”

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): It’s not a good time for you to be obsessed with vague abstractions, fear-based fantasies, and imaginary possibilities. But it is a favorable phase to rise up in behalf of intimate, practical changes. At least for now, I also want to advise you not to be angry and militant about big, complicated issues that you have little power to affect. On the other hand, I encourage you to get inspired and aggressive about injustices you can truly help fix and erroneous approaches you can correct and close-at-hand dilemmas for which you can summon constructive solutions. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “The most beautiful things are those that madness prompts and reason writes,” declared author André Gide. As a writer myself, I will testify to the truth of that formulation. But what about those of you who aren’t poets and novelists and essayists? Here’s how I would alter Gide’s statement to fit you: “The most beautiful things are those that rapture prompts and reason refines.” Or maybe this: “The most beautiful things are those that experimentation finds and reason uses.” Or how about this one: “The most beautiful things are those that wildness generates and reason enhances.” Any and all of those dynamics will be treasures for you in the coming weeks. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): The poet Nayyirah Waheed has some advice I want you to hear. She writes, “Be easy. Take your time. You are coming home to yourself.” I will add that from my astrological perspective, the coming weeks will indeed be a time for you to relax more deeply into yourself — to welcome yourself fully into your unique destiny; to forgive yourself for what you imagine are your flaws; to not wish you were someone else pursuing a different path; to be at peace and in harmony with the exact life you have. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “The chief object of education is not to learn things but to unlearn things,” wrote author G. K. Chesterton. He was exaggerating for dramatic effect when he said that, as he often did. The more nuanced truth is that one of the central aims of education is to learn things, and another very worthy aim is to unlearn things. I believe you are currently in a phase when you should put an emphasis on unlearning things that are irrelevant and meaningless and obstructive. This will be excellent preparation for your next phase, which will be learning a lot of useful and vitalizing new things. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873–1943) ultimately became one of the 20th century’s most renowned composers. But his career had a rough start. Symphony No. 1, his first major work, was panned by critics, sending him into a four-year depression. Eventually he recovered. His next major composition, Piano Concerto No. 2, was well-received. I don’t anticipate that your rookie offerings or new work will get the kind of terrible reviews that Rachmaninoff’s did. But at least initially, there may be no great reviews, and possibly even indifference. Keep the faith, my dear. Don’t falter in carrying out your vision of the future. The rewards will come in due time. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Ancient Greek playwright Euripides was popular and influential — and remains so to this day, 2,400 years later. But there’s a curiously boring aspect in five of his plays, Andromache, Alcestis, Helen, Medea and The Bacchae. They all have the same exact ending: six lines, spoken by a chorus, that basically say the gods are unpredictable. Was Euripides lazy? Trying too hard to drive home the point? Or were the endings added later by an editor? Scholars disagree. The main reason I’m bringing this to your attention is to encourage you to avoid similar behavior. I think it’s very important that the stories you’re living right now have different endings than all the stories of your past. l

NORTH COAST COAST JOURNAL JOURNAL • Thursday, • Thursday, Feb.Feb. 18, 2021 18, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com • northcoastjournal.com 230NORTH

ESSENTIAL CAREGIVERS Needed to help Elderly Visiting Angels 707−442−8001 default

NOW HIRING! Are you passionate about making a difference in your community? Are you tired of mundane cubicle jobs and want to join a friendly, devoted community with limitless potential? Join the Humboldt County Education Community. Many diverse positions to choose from with great benefits, retirement packages, and solid pay. Learn more and apply today at Build to edge of the document hcoe.org/jobs Margins are just a safe area Findtowhat Build edgeyou’re of thelooking document for inare education! Margins just a safe area

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Place a free classified ad in the North Coast Trader

Submit a free classified ad online at thetrader707.com/free-classified-ads Or submit your ad by snail mail, phone

or email 310 F St. Eureka CA 95501 Submit a free classified ad online at (707) 442-1400, ads@thetrader707.com thetrader707.com/free-classified-ads Free Ad Terms Conditions: Or submit yourand ad by snail mail,Limited phone to 1 Box size with text only, 50 words/300 or email 310 F St. Eureka 95501 characters. Free ads will runCA weekly (707) 442-1400, ads@thetrader707.com based on space available. Free ads will run for one issue and must be submitted weekly to be eligible for each issue printed. Ads that are submitted that do Free AdinTerms Conditions: Limited not run print and are not guaranteed to run following issue.  Free to 1 inBoxthesize with textprinted only, 50 words/300 Ads will not be accepted past deadline.

characters. Free ads will run weekly based on space available. Free ads will run for one issue and must be submitted weekly to be eligible for each issue printed. AdsUthat are submitted that do YO R G notLrunISinT print INare not guaranteed to run in the following printed issue.  Free Ads will not be accepted past deadline.

HERE

YOUR G LISTIN

HERE

The Hoopa Valley Tribe is accepting applications to fill the following vacant positions:

ACADEMIC ADVISOR/ STUDENT SERVICES COORDINATOR Hoopa Higher Education Department, Regular, F/T, Salary: $21.00-23.00/hr. DOE. Utilizes leadership, program development, advocacy, and collaborative methods o respond to identified student needs and promote student success rates among program participants while enhancing community partnerships that alleviate barriers to learning. Minimum Qualifications: Bachelor’s degree (B.A) in Education or related field from a four-year college or university and one year of academic advising is required. A combination of education, training and experience in vocational education or experience in a related field may be considered in lieu of requirements. An understanding of Native American cultural heritage is preferred. Must have a valid CA Driver’s License and be insurable, must be CPR certified or be willing to obtain. Title 30A background check required. DEADLINE: February 23, 2021

EMERGENCY SERVICES COORDINATOR

Office of Emergency Services, Regular, F/T, Salary: $38,000.00$41,600.00 per year. Assists with management of the OES Department; funding for department activities relies upon application and management of grants; manages components of the multi-hazard mitigation plan and emergency operations plan. Minimum Qualifications: Bachelor’s degree in biological sciences, communications, journalism, natural resources management, leadership, or business; and, 5 years’ experience in tribal, state, or federal program management in a leadership position. IN LIEU of degree requirement, at least 5 years’ experience in emergency management or services in a professional paid or volunteer organization (police, fire, EMS, non-government such CERT, Red Cross, VOAD) in a supervisory or team leader capacity. Must have a valid CA Driver’s License and be insurable. Title 30A background check required. DEADLINE: February 24, 2021

SOCIAL WORKER

Child & Family Services, Temporary, F/T, Salary: $22.0023.00/hr. Coordinates and implements various activities of the Indian Child and Family Services program, and performs case management and/or advocate role for program clients. Minimum Qualifications: Bachelor’s degree from a 4-year university in psychology, behavioral sciences, social services or related field; knowledge of federal, state, tribal and local laws, regulations, statutes, and ordinances; knowledge of Indian Child Welfare Act; and, must be knowledgeable in state and tribal procedures for placement of Indian children. Must have a valid CA Driver’s License and be insurable. Title 30A background check required. DEADLINE: February 24, 2021

CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER

Administration, Regular, F/T, Salary: DOE. Directs, administers, and coordinates operations of the Tribe in support of policies, goals, and objectives established by the Tribal Council; drives strategic planning processes and assists in defining organizational objectives to ensure achievement of goals of the Tribal Council; and, supervises overall tribal operations as delegated by the Tribal Chairman. Minimum Qualifications: Seven or more years’ experience in a role leading operations; Masters’ degree in business or equivalent field preferred; equivalent combination of education and experience considered. Must have a valid CA Driver’s License and be insurable. Title 30A background check required. DEADLINE: March 12, 2021 These positions are classified safety-sensitive. For job descriptions and employment applications, contact the Human Resources/Insurance Department, Hoopa Valley Tribe, P.O. Box 218, Hoopa, CA 95546. Call (530) 625-9200 or email hr1@hoopainsurance.com. The Tribe’s Alcohol & Drug Policy and TERO Ordinance apply.


The Hoopa Valley Tribe is accepting applications to fill the following vacant positions:

SR. GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTANT

Fiscal Department, Reg. F/T, Salary: DOE Minimum Qualifications: Must have a BA in Accounting or related field and a minimum of five years of related experience and or training. Must have a minimum of one year of bank reconciliation experience. A minimum of one year of experience working in accounting software preferably in Abila MIP Accounting. Must have supervisory experience. DEADLINE: OPEN UNTIL FILLED

HUMAN RESOURCES DIRECTOR Human Resources Department, Reg. F/T, Salary: $70,000-$80,000/yr. DOE. Minimum Qualifications: Must have a Bachelor’s Degree (B.A.) from a four year college or university; and one to two years of specific experience and/or training related to personnel management; or equivalent combination of education and experience. Must have a valid CA Driver’s License and be insurable. DEADLINE: OPEN UNTIL FILLED

POLICE OFFICER

Hoopa Tribal Police Department, Regular, F/T, Salary: $26.91/hr. Minimum Requirements: Must possess a High School Diploma or GED. Must possess a Basic Academy Certificate from a California P.O.S.T. approved academy. Must possess and maintain firearms qualifications. Must have a Valid CA Driver’s License and be insurable. Must successfully pass a Title 30A Employment Background and a California Police Officer Standards and Training (P.O.S.T.) background check. DEADLINE: OPEN UNTIL FILLED

SERGEANT

Hoopa Tribal Police Department, Regular, F/T, Salary: $34.13/hr. Minimum Qualifications: High School Diploma or GED; three (3) years of related experience and/or training. Must possess a valid P.O.S.T. Law Enforcement Academy Certificate. Must possess a P.O.S.T. Intermediate Certification or completion of a P.O.S.T. Supervisory Course; OR able to obtain within 1 year of hire. Must successfully pass a Title 30A Employment Background and a California Police Officer Standards and Training (P.O.S.T.) background check. Possess valid CPR/First Aid Certificates. Valid CA Driver’s License and be insurable. DEADLINE: OPEN UNTIL FILLED For job descriptions and employment applications, contact the Human Resources/ Insurance Department, Hoopa Valley Tribe, P.O. Box 218, Hoopa, CA 95546. Call (530) 625-9200 Ext. 20 or email hr2@ hoopainsurance.com. The Tribe’s Alcohol & Drug Policy and TERO Ordinance Apply.

SoHum Health is HIRING Interested applicants are encouraged to visit and apply online at www.SHCHD.org or in person at 733 Cedar Street, Garberville (707) 923-3921

CURRENT JOB OPENINGS INFECTION PREVENTION / EMPLOYEE HEALTH

Full Time Position. Position includes, but is not limited to, infection monitoring and reporting, infection risk assessment and prevention, policy and procedure development, staff education, and outbreak management. Employee Health role includes new employee and annual health assessments, immunization programs, exposure management, and safe patient handling programs. Must be able to communicate clearly, verbally and in writing to interface with employees, medical staff, and state, local, and federal health departments and programs. BSN preferred. Certification in Infection Control (CIC) preferred, but willing to train the right candidate.

LICENSED VOCATIONAL NURSE – CLINIC & HOME VISITS

Hospital position with cross-training for Skilled Nursing Facility, ER/Acute wing. Current California LVN license and BLS certification required. Work 8 or 10-hour shifts.

NURSING ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

Part-Time – The Nursing Administrative Assistant acts as an assistant to the Chief Nursing Officer by performing various assigned functions including executive and clerical duties that require the ability to work independently and to maintain compliance with regulatory and licensing agencies. The Nursing Administrative assistant also manages the email, schedules, and records of the Chief Nursing officer. High school diploma or GED required, knowledge of medical terminology required, 1-2 years experience in the medical field required.

ER/ACUTE CARE REGISTERED NURSE

Full-Time – The ER/Acute Care Registered Nurse performs all responsibilities of the RN position; schedule flexibility is a requirement, including both day and night shifts. Current RN license and BLS/ACLS required.

VISITING REGISTERED NURSE – CLINIC AND HOME HEALTH

Full Time Position, 5 days a week, Monday-Friday. The Visiting RN works 8-hour shifts in our outpatient Rural Health Clinic and at patient homes. Must be eligible to drive a company car and hold a California Driver’s License. Current RN license and BLS/ACLS required. New hires qualify for benefits as soon as they begin employment! SHCHD minimum wage start at $15.50 per hour featuring an exceptional benefits package, including an employee discount program for services offered at SHCHD.

Hiring? Post your job opportunities in the Journal. 442-1400 ×314 northcoastjournal.com

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   TEACHERS, Alice Birney/Fortuna/Jefferson Responsible for development & implementation of classroom activities—providing support & supervision for a toddler prog. Must have 12 core in ECE/CD (w/ 3 units in Infant/Toddler Development or Curriculum), meet Associate Teacher Level on the Child Development Permit Matrix, & have one-yr. exp. teaching in a toddler setting.  P/T positions, 28 hrs./wk. M-F $14.78-$15.52/hr. Open Until Filled.

TEAM TEACHER, Arcata Responsible for the development & implementation of classroom activities for toddler children. Must have 12 core in ECE/CD (w/ 3 units in Infant/Toddler Development or Curriculum), meet Associate Teacher level on Child Development Permit Matrix, & have one-yr. exp. teaching in a toddler setting. F/T 37.5 hrs./wk. M-F. $15.08-$15.83/hr. Open Until Filled.

TEMPORARY TEACHER, McKinleyville Responsible for the development & implementation of classroom activities—providing support & supervision for a toddler prog. Must have 12 core in ECE/CD (w/ 3 units in Infant/Toddler Development or Curriculum), meet Associate Teacher Level on Child Development Permit Matrix & have one-yr. exp. teaching in a toddler setting. Temp. F/T 36 hrs./wk. M-F $14.78-$15.52/hr. Open Until Filled.

ASSISTANT TEACHER, Arcata Assist teacher in the implementation & supervision of activities for preschool children. Min. of 6-12 ECE units & 6 months’ exp. working w/ children. P/T 28 hrs./wk. $14-$14.62/hr. Open Until Filled

ASSISTANT TEACHER, Arcata Assist teacher in the implementation & supervision of activities for toddler children. Min. of 6-12 ECE units & 6 months’ exp. working w/ children. P/T 25 hrs./wk. M-Fri (7:30am-12:30pm) $14.00-14.62/hr. Open Until Filled

HOUSEKEEPER, Eureka Perform duties required to keep site clean, sanitized & orderly. Must have exp. & knowledge of basic tools & methods utilized in custodial work & have the ability to learn & follow health & safety requirements. 10 hrs./wk. (M-F) P/T $14/hr Open Until Filled Submit applications to: Northcoast Children’s Services 1266 9th Street, Arcata, CA 95521 For addtl info & application please call 707- 822-7206 or visit our website at www.ncsheadstart.org

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 18, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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EMPLOYMENT default

THE NORTH COAST JOURNAL IS SEEKING

YUROK TRIBE

For a list of current job openings and descriptions log onto www.yuroktribe.org or Join us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/ yuroktribehumanresources for more information call (707) 482-1350 extension 1376

DISTRIBUTION DRIVERS

Wednesday afternoon/ Thursday morning routes in

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Northern Humboldt and Willow Creek/Hoopa Must be personable, have a reliable vehicle, clean driving record and insurance. News box repair skills a plus.

Contact Michelle

707.442.1400 ext. 305 michelle@northcoastjournal.com

K’ima:w Medical Center

an entity of the Hoopa Valley Tribe, is seeking applicants for the following positions:

HOUSEKEEPER - TEMP (UP TO 6 MONTHS) DEADLINE TO APPLY IS JANUARY 29, 2021 CERTIFIED DATA ENTRY CODER TECHNICIAN DEADLINE TO APPLY IS 5PM, FEB. 29, 2021. PHARMACIST DEADLINE TO APPLY IS 5PM MARCH 3, 2021. SOBER LIVING OPERATIONS CASE MANAGER MEDICAL SECRETARY CERTIFIED MEDICAL ASSISTANT MAT MANAGER - GRANT FUNDED LAB TECHNOLOGIST GRANTS COMPLIANCE OFFICER MEDICAL DIRECTOR ACCOUNTANT MENTAL HEALTH CLINICIAN RN CARE MANAGER ALL POSITIONS OPEN UNTIL FILLED, UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED For an application, job description, and additional information, contact: K’ima:w Medical Center, Human Resources, PO Box 1288, Hoopa, CA, 95546 or call 530-625-4261 or email: hr.kmc@kimaw.org for a job description and application. You can also check our website listings for details at kimaw.org. Resume and CV are not accepted without a signed application.

FREE

Get listed today for Place a free classified ad in the North Coast Trader

thetrader707.com/free-classified-ads (707) 442-1400 | ads@thetrader707.com

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YO U R G LISTIN

HERE

is now accepting applications for a

Donor Relations & Development Director This is an exempt, full-time position based in Bayside or Crescent City, CA. Compensation is $73k-$82k, plus health and retirement benefits, paid vacation, holiday and sick time as well as other generous benefits. Remote work required until COVID restrictions allow return to office, some evening/weekend work. This values-driven, engaging, entrepreneurial director will care for and maintain relationships with regional donors, create and implement a strategic donor cultivation and development plan, and foster a world-class donor experience. The director will provide expertise, direction and support to regional donors, including planned giving, new fund and legacy creation. The ideal candidate will meet with and provide technical assistance for individuals and their legal and financial advisors to develop planned gifts such as bequests. Meanwhile, your expertise will keep the foundation informed on legislative, legal, accounting, investment, and technology issues and opportunities as they affect current and prospective donor engagement. The director will possess excellent written and verbal communication skills, presentation skills, and listening skills for diverse audiences, and demonstrate a commitment to racial, economic, and social justice and respect for cross-cultural perspectives and experiences. A successful candidate is expected to have a Bachelor’s degree and eight (8) years of progressively responsible work experience developing long-term customer/client/ donor relationships, leading to the knowledge, skills, and abilities as described above. Preferred qualifications include a Master’s Degree and/or 10+ years demonstrated experience in donor relations, stewardship, and service offerings. Please visit www.hafoundation.org/jobs for application procedures and the complete job announcement, including all desired qualifications. For questions, contact Amy Bruce at amyb@hafoundation.org or (707) 442-5424, ext. 305. Please submit your resume and cover letter to jobs@hafoundation.org.

Deadline to apply for this position is 5 p.m. Friday, Feb. 19, 2021

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 18, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com


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sequoiapersonnel.com



436 Harris St, Eureka, CA 95503

Changing Tides Family Services increases the health and success of children, youth, families, and individuals

Intensive Care Coordinator $18.86/hour (part-time)

Clinician/Bilingual Clinician Wage dependent on qualifications $23.24-$29.45 (full-time) We are operating under strict COVID-19 safety protocols including daily health screenings, required masks, and increased hand washing and cleaning practices per the Reopening Plan certified by Humboldt County.

(707) 445.9641 

        

 

 

2259 Myrtle Ave., Eureka, CA 95501 (707) 444-8293

THE CITY OF

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open door Community Health Centers NOW SEEKING:

DEVELOPMENT SERVICES

PRINCIPAL PLANNER ENVIRONMENTAL $6,100 - $7,415 MONTHLY The City of Eureka is seeking a qualified individual to join their team who is interested in working on current and advanced planning and related issues with an emphasis on coastal zone and environmental planning. Incumbent administers current, long-range, and/or environmental planning activities, including serving as project manager for complex development and/ or environmental mitigation projects; administers complex and sensitive activities in such areas as zoning, redevelopment, housing, advanced and/or environmental planning. AICP Certification Required. For a complete job description or to apply online, please visit our website at: www.ci.eureka.ca.gov Final filing date: 5:00 pm, Wednesday, February 24th. EOE

Hiring? Post your job opportunities in the Journal. 442-1400 ×314 www.northcoastjournal.com

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

We are an Equal Opportunity Employer.

  

Water Division Ops Mgr • Biologist Front Office Clerk • CPA Onsite Managers • Controller General Laborers • Medical Scribe Warehouse Laborers

Mentor providers needed now, Make a difference today! As a mentor with us, adults with special needs live in your home and you mentor them towards a better life. You even earn 1400-4800/mo from the comfort and safety of your home while receiving professional support from our team.

Employee Health Nurse/ Infection Control Open Door Community Health Centers (ODCHC) is seeking an Employee Health Nurse to help ensure our employees and community are healthy and safe! This individual provides clinical health services to our employees and administer all functions of the employee health program, and also has oversight over all infection control and prevention related activities within the organization. This position collaborates with different teams across the organization to ensure employee health and safety as well as infection control via responsibility for pre-employment testing and vaccinations, employee health records/ databases, employee health initiatives, infection prevention and control strategies, risk assessments, and other related duties. The ideal candidate will have a current state nursing license (RN or LPN), strong Microsoft Office skills, BLS certification, and a minimum of 3 years’ experience in healthcare. This position is based at our Tomas Administrative Building in Arcata. Please visit our website for full description and application: www.opendoorhealth.com

For more information call Sharon at 442-2500 x16 or visit us at mentorswanted.com Find us on Facebook or visit mentorswanted.com to learn more.

 

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CITY OF FORTUNA

STREET MAINTENANCE WORKER II $33,487  $40,742 PER YEAR, FULLTIME.

Under the general supervision of the Lead Streets Worker and General Services Superintendent, to perform a variety of unskilled and semiskilled work assignments in the maintenance, repair, and construction of City streets and storm drains; to learn basic equipment operation assignments; and to do related work as required. Complete job description and applications are available at City of Fortuna, 621 11th Street, or friendlyfortuna.com. Application must be received by 4pm on Friday, March 5, 2021.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 18, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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MARKETPLACE Miscellaneous 4G LTE HOME INTERNET NOW AVAILABLE! Get GotW3 with lightning fast speeds plus take your service with you when you travel! As low as $109.99/mo! 1− 888−519−0171 (AAN CAN) AUTO INSURANCE STARTING AT $49/ MONTH! Call for your fee rate comparison to see how much you can save! Call: 855− 569−1909. (AAN CAN)

REAL ESTATE

FLASHBACK

116 W. Wabash • 443-3259

Hours 2:00-5:30

“Clothes with Soul”

CASH FOR CARS! We buy all cars! Junk, high−end, totaled − it doesn’t matter! Get free towing and same day cash! NEWER MODELS too! Call 866−535−9689 (AAN CAN) WRITING CONSULTANT/EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. (707) 443−8373. www.ZevLev.com default

What’s New

CLOSING SALE EVERYTHING

50% OFF

EXCEPT LEATHER AND JEWELRY

335 E Street, Eureka 445-8079 Open Wed, Thu. & Fri.

DISH TV $64.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Promo Expires 7/21/21. 1−855−380−250 DO YOU OWE OVER $10,000 TO THE IRS OR STATE IN BACK TAXES? Our firm works to reduce the tax bill or zero it out completely FAST. Let us help! Call 855−955−0702. (Hours: Mon −Fri 7am−5pm PST)

BECOME A PUBLISHED AUTHOR! We edit, print and distribute your work interna− tionally. We do the work... You reap the Rewards! Call for a FREE Author’s Submission Kit: 844−511 −1836. (AAN CAN)

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SAVE BIG ON HOME INSUR− ANCE! Compare 20 A−rated insurances companies. Get a quote within minutes. Average savings of $444/year! Call 844− 712−6153! (M−F 8am−8pm Central) (AAN CAN) SAVE YOUR HOME! Are you behind paying your MORT− GAGE? Denied a Loan Modifica− tion? Is the bank threatening foreclosure? CALL Homeowners Relief Line NOW for Help 1−855− 439−5853 Mon−Fri : 8:00 am to 8:00 pm Sat: 8:00 am to 1:00 pm(all times Pacific) (AAN CAN)

GUARANTEED LIFE INSURANCE! (AGES 50 TO 80). No medical exam. Affordable premiums never increase. Benefits never decrease. Policy will only be cancelled for non−payment. HOURS: M−F 9a−10p & Sat 11a−2p EST 1−888−386−0113 (Void NY) (AAN CAN)

HUGHESNET SATELLITE INTERNET − Finally, no hard data limits! Call Today for speeds up to 25mbps as low as $59.99/mo! $75 gift card, terms apply. 1−844− 416−7147 (AAN CAN)

Lodging

Ripple Creek TRINITY ALPSCabins WILDERNESS AREA Getaway in beautifully furnished cabins on the Upper Trinity River. Hike, bike, fish or just relax in seclusion.

OPEN YEAR ROUND www.ripplecreekcabins.com

(530) 266-3505

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HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS. Opening soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedroom Apts. Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $24,500, 2 pers. $28,000; 3 pers. $31,500; 4 pers. $34,950; 5 pers. $37,750; 6 pers. $40,550; 7 pers. $43,350; 8 pers. $46,150 Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922 Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Bldg. 9 Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104

YOUR AD

HERE

442-1400 ×319

melissa@ northcoastjournal.com

Auto Service ROCK CHIP? Windshield repair is our specialty. For emergency service CALL GLASWELDER 442−GLAS (4527) humboldtwindshield repair.com

Cleaning

DONATE YOUR CAR TO CHARITY. Receive maximum value of write off for your taxes. Running or not! All conditions accepted. Free pickup. Call for details. 855−978−0215 (AAN CAN)

HEARING AIDS!! Buy one/get one FREE! High−quality rechargeable Nano hearing aids priced 90% less than competi− tors. Nearly invisible! 45−day money back guarantee! 1−833− 585−1117 (AAN CAN) DRINKWARE SALE: GLASSES, STEINS. COFFEE MUGS & MORE! ALL ½ PRICE. Dream Quest Thrift Store, where your shopping dollars help local youth realize their dreams. February 18−24 Plus: Senior Discount Tues− days & Spin’n’Win Wednes− days! (530) 629−3006.

OVER $10K IN DEBT? Be debt free in 24−48 months. Pay a frac− tion of what you owe. A+ BBB rated. Call National Debt Relief 877−590−1202. (AAN CAN)

MARKETPLACE CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING Services available. Call Julie 839−1518.

Computer & Internet

Home Repair 2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. Although we have been in business for 25 years, we do not carry a contractors license. Call 845−3087

Musicians & Instructors Macintosh Computer Consulting for Business and Individuals Troubleshooting Hardware/Memory Upgrades Setup Assistance/Training Purchase Advice

FREE

Get listed today for Place a free classified ad in the North Coast Trader

You may submit a free classified ad online at thetrader707.com/free-classified-ads

707-826-1806 macsmist@gmail.com

BRADLEY DEAN ENTERTAINMENT Singer Songwriter. Old rock, Country, Blues, Private Parties, Bars. Gatherings of all kinds. (707) 832−7419

Other Professionals CIRCUS NATURE PRESENTS A. O’KAY CLOWN & NANINATURE Juggling Jesters & Wizards of Play Performances for all ages. Magical Adventures with circus games and toys. Festivals, Events & Parties. (707) 499−5628 www.circusnature.com

HERE

Or submit your ad by snail mail, phone or email to 310 F St. Eureka CA 95501, (707) 442-1400 ads@thetrader707.com

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 18, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

         

    

  

YO U R G LISTIN

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

 

Let’s Be Friends

 



BODY, MIND & SIRIT HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./ Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing profes− sionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822−2111


Charlie Tripodi Owner/ Land Agent

Owner/Broker

Kyla Nored

Barbara Davenport

BRE #01930997

Associate Broker

Realtor

Realtor

Realtor

Realtor

707.834.7979

BRE# 01066670

BRE #01927104

BRE #02109531

BRE # 02084041

BRE #01956733

707.798.9301

707.499.0917

916.798.2107

707.601.1331

BRE #01332697

707.476.0435

707.498.6364

Bernie Garrigan

Dacota Huzzen

LARABEE – HOME ON ACREAGE - $699,000

MAD RIVER – LAND/PROPERTY – $329,000

±19.18 Acre riverfront retreat in beautiful So Hum! Features a 2/2 home, shop, PG&E, open meadows, mature orchard, Eel River frontage with boat and fishing access, and end of the road privacy!

±55 Acres in Humboldt near the County line. Property features a small cabin, barn, year round spring, meadows, and oak woodlands. Elevation at approximately 4,000’.

DINSMORE - CULTIVATION PROPERTY - $749,000

Mike Willcutt

Katherine Fergus

BIG BAR – LAND/PROPERTY – $60,000

±40 Acres. Turn key operation ready for this spring. Residence, processing shed, 3 greenhouses, tank storage, and 500,000 gallon rain catchment reservoir. Interim and provisional permits for 8,250 sq ft of outdoor. Approx. 4,000 ft elevation. OMC.

±1.2 Acre parcel in Big Bar waiting for your dream home! With septic and power already in place, this parcel is ready to build.

WEITCHPEC – LAND/PROPERTY – $360,000

ARCATA – COMMERCIAL INVESTMENT – $499,000

±200 Acres with multiple water sources, several developed flats, and well-maintained road system w/ access to all parts of property. Private & gated, w/ 7500 sf cabin/ shop, and additional 1000sf building.

Commercial building on a high visibility corner just blocks from the Arcata Plaza! Two buildings, 10 dedicated parking spaces, and tenant in place.

DOUGLAS CITY – HOME ON ACREAGE – $355,000

CUTTEN – LAND/PROPERTY – $450,000

±124 Acres overlooking Reading Creek! Easy access, year round creek (with fish), buildable flats, solar system, and an unfinished 2,100 sqft 3/2 house!

±9.25 Acres in Cutten/Ridgewood area! Property has redwoods, open meadows, a skid road, and the potential to subdivide.

SALYER – LAND/PROPERTY – $115,000

BRIDGEVILLE – LAND/PROPERTY - $299,000

±1.45 Acre parcel w/ end of road privacy, two large buildable flats, water services in place, a 2,825 gallon water tank, power lines close by, and a small shed/cabin.

±40 Acre mountain hideaway just off hwy 36 featuring southern exposure, end of the road privacy, creek, springs, building site, and cabin & outbuilding in need of some TLC.

NEW LIS

TING!

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 18, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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