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ML

72 jan/feb 2012

The

Mountain Modern Issue

FEATURES 56

64

72

DEPARTMENTS

RUSTIC REDUX Two East Coast designers shake things up in Montana, mixing sleek midcentury furnishings with a palette of weathered materials. Architecture by JLF & Associates Interior Design by Haynes-Roberts HIGH STYLE In a penthouse high above Vail Village, crisp lines, warm textiles and a refined rusticity add up to elegant mountain-modern style. Interior Architecture & Design by Greenauer Design Group THE NEW WEST The traditional trappings of Old West style are traded for furnishings with a modern edge in a new take on the Sun Valley ski lodge. Architecture by Michael Blash & Associates Interior Design by jamesthomas

25

ML RECOMMENDS Four shops in Jackson, Wyoming, offer the perfect finishing touches for your home.

29

DESIGNER UPDATE A Dutch design duo unveils their latest collection of extravagant lighting sculpture.

35

SHOPPING Stunning serving pieces set the tone for a sleek and stylish tablescape.

40

SHOPPING Eight style-setters share the classic modernist furnishings they love most.

43

DESIGN DESTINATION Discover some of the West’s most iconic Midcentury Modern designs in Palm Springs.

84

IN THEIR WORDS Top tastemakers share their design resolutions for the new year.

ON THE COVER Warren Platner armchairs mingle with weathered barn timbers and stone in a slopeside home in Big Sky, Montana. For more, turn to page 56. Photography by Audrey Hall Vol. XVIII, No. 1.© 2012 by Network Communications, Inc. All rights reserved. Permission to reprint or quote excerpts granted by written request only. Mountain Living ® (ISSN 1088-6451) is published 7 times per year in Jan/Feb, Mar/Apr, May/Jun, Jul, Aug, Sep/Oct, Nov/Dec, by Network Communications Inc. 2305 Newpoint Parkway, Lawrenceville, GA 30043. Periodical postage paid at Lawrenceville, GA, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Mountain Living® P.O. Box 9002, Maple Shade, NJ 08052-9652. For change of address include old address as well as new address with both ZIP codes. Allow four to six weeks for change of address to become effective. Please include current mailing label when writing about your subscription. Subscriptions: $29.95 for one year; $52.95 for two years. Canada and Mexico add $20 per year. Single copy price: $4.95. Subscription questions, call (888) 645-7600. CPM#40065056. Canada post PM40063731. Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to: Station A, P.O. Box 54, Windsor, ON N9A 6J5.

4

ML | January / February 2012

PHOTO BY TIM BROWN

IN THIS ISSUE


Photo by David O. Marlow

CELEBRATING

30

YEARS

Photo by Aspen Architectural Photography

Photo by David O. Marlow

OF AWARD WINNING ARCHITECTURE

610 EAST HYMAN AVENUE

ASPEN, COLORADO 81611

WWW.CUNNIFFE.COM

970-925-5590


ML

EDITOR’S LETTER

READING LIST My desk, bedside table and backseat are always piled with design books and magazines, and the stack just got higher, thanks to the season’s newest reads. Here, a few at the top of the pile.

Design*Sponge at Home Step-by-step tips (and more than 600 photos) for giving your home the “it” factor—without spending a fortune—from super-blogger Grace Bonney. $35; Artisan

PORTRAIT BY DEBORAH COTA; PHOTO BY MARTIN CRABB

Katie Ridder Rooms Gorgeous photos, useful design tips and page after page of elegant, confident rooms. My kind of bedtime story! $50; The Vendome Press

If there’s one thing we’ve learned over the past 18 years, it’s that our readers hold firm opinions regarding what a mountain home should be. For some of you, a mountain home means shelter and protection; a cozy place to hibernate and escape the drifting snow. For others, it’s all about expansive walls of glass that capture views and open to the outdoors. Some envision a sprawling lodge with space to entertain family and friends, while others imagine a cabin with room for just one or two. With so many different ideas of the perfect mountain home, it’s hard to keep everyone happy! But for the new year, we’ve planned seven jam-packed issues designed to do just that. As a counterpoint to this, our annual Mountain Modern issue, we’re working on an edition filled with classic Western lodges and cabins—each one filled with some of the finest rustic furnishings. There’s an issue devoted to smartly designed small spaces, and another showcasing mountain dream homes with some amazing, over-the-top design details. You’ll also find editions featuring dramatic befores-andafters, sustainable designs, and some of the most innovative, creative architecture and interior design we’ve seen. It’s an exciting time in mountain home design, and we’re looking forward to sharing the very best of it with you.

Mountain: Portraits of High Places Spectacular images of the world’s loftiest peaks, collected by lifelong mountaineer Sandy Hill. $85; Rizzoli

6

CHRISTINE DEORIO EDITOR IN CHIEF cdeorio @mountainliving.com

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ML | January / February 2012


Photographer : Matthew Millman

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jackson,wy

denver,co

Inspired by Place


MOUNTAIN

®

LIVING

Publisher Editor in Chief

HOLLY PAIGE SCOTT CHRISTINE DEORIO

Art Director

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Integrated Sales & Marketing Manager Copy Editor Contributing Writers

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Contributing Photographers

TIM BROWN, DAN CHAVKIN, MARTIN CRABB, KIMBERLY GAVIN, DAVID GLOMB, AUDREY HALL

Advertising and Editorial Offices 1777 South Harrison Street Suite 903, Denver, CO 80210 303-248-2060 • 303-248-2064 Fax Advertising Inquiries hscott@mountainliving.com Editorial Inquiries cdeorio@mountainliving.com For Subscription Information: 888-645-7600

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President & CFO GERRY PARKER General Counsel SUSAN DEESE

8

ML | January / February 2012


MOUNTAIN

LIVING COM Discover more rooms we love Browse and share photos of hundreds more high-country spaces—curated by ML editors— at our new Pinterest page. Check it out at pinterest.com/mtnlivingmag

Get the look Love the designs featured in this issue? Visit

mountainliving.com to find out how and where to get the look, plus browse neverbefore-seen photos of your favorite ML homes.

ABSOLUTELY HANDMADE Find a Pro

Hand-forged iron & solid bronze hardware We’re blogging! Start your day in style with our latest design discoveries, product picks, tips and highcountry event updates—plus posts from our team of stylesavvy guest-bloggers—at

HARDWARERENAISSANCE.COM

blog.mountainliving.com

Blog blog.mountainliving.com

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ML | January / February 2012

Looking for products and pros to complete your next project? The resources you need are just a click away at mountainliving.com. Browse our online “Luxury Directory” or click “ML At Your Service” to work with our design concierge.

Facebook Mountain Living Magazine

Twitter @MtnLivingMag


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Ski In, Ski Out Whether the trail runs right by your door or a private car’s waiting to bring you there, we’ll put you on the slopes. The Clear Creek Group offers Jackson Hole’s finest vacation properties for rent, from firelit log cabins to grand mountain estates – and superb concierge service to match. We’ll light the fire in your fireplace, tune up your skis and snowboards, and leave the lift tickets on the table. We can even make sure Santa drops by for that special visit. All you have to do, is call us. 164 East Deloney Avenue t Jackson, Wyoming 83001 Office (307) 732-3400 t Toll-free (877) 427-3400 www.theclearcreekgroup.com

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ML

RECOMMENDS

Dwelling

DWELLING PHOTO BY DAVE AGNELLO; RARE GALLERY PHOTO BY RICK ARMSTRONG; FLOWER HARDWARE PHOTO BY CARRIE PATTERSON; WORKSHOP PHOTO BY LONETA SHOWELL

Kate Binger opened this home-furnishings boutique as a complement to her interior design business, Designed Interiors, and while she believes her role as a designer is to interpret her clients’ aesthetic, she admits the shop is stocked with her favorite items in her own signature style: “Pieces inspired by clean lines but still warm, cozy and inviting, that would be really unique in anyone’s home. I’m offering something fresh that hasn’t been in Jackson before.” 120 West Pearl, dwellingjh.com

HOT

SHOPS IN SEARCH OF SOMETHING SPECIAL FOR YOUR HOME? LOOK NO FURTHER THAN JACKSON, WYOMING

Flower Hardware RARE Gallery of Fine Art

Cecelia Heffernan has a no-fuss philosophy on arranging flowers: “Simple flowers, unique containers.” She buys directly from growers for freshness and longevity, and takes pride in carrying out-of-the-ordinary varieties: cut figs, green ranunculus, lady slipper orchids. In addition to her shop’s selection of high-quality cut flowers, go (by appointment only) for the inventory of antiques and objects for home and garden. 170 East Deloney, flowerhardware.com

Extreme skier Rick Armstrong channels his passion for art in this gallery’s everchanging display of rustic-contemporary works. Lately, emerging artist A.M. Stockhill’s richly textured mixed-media creations share space with Tomás Lasansky’s “Jackson Pollock-meetsLeonardo da Vinci” canvases and goldsmith Pat Flynn’s rustic-luxe baubles that marry hand-forged metals with gold and diamonds. Rounding out the selection are works by Warhol, Picasso, Pollock and Johns, to name a few. 60 East Broadway, raregalleryjacksonhole.com

Workshop Jewelry designer Susan Fleming’s charming boutique showcases handmade items from independent artists, from sculptural ceramic gourd bowls and intricately patterned porcelain pieces to lambswool scarves and pillow covers. Shoppers can also watch Fleming craft her signature jewelry—made with hand-silkscreened papers, gold, silver and diamonds—at her on-site studio, bringing the handmade concept full circle. 180 East Deloney, workshopjh.com ○ ML | www.mountainliving.com 25


Latest

PROMOTION

PHOTO COURTESY OF CLYFFORD STILL MUSEUM

the

STYLE. LIFE. HOME.

DENVER UNVEILS THE CLYFFORD STILL MUSEUM The Clyfford Still Museum, the newest addition to Denver’s Civic Center Cultural Complex, is now open to the public. The museum, designed by Allied Works Architecture, celebrates the art of Clyfford Still, one of the most influential artists of the 20th century, the majority of whose work has never been seen by the public until now. CLYFFORDSTILLMUSEUM.ORG

VAIL RESORTS RAMPS UP EPICMIX ELWAY’S RESTAURANT OPENS IN VAIL A high-country outpost of acclaimed Denver restaurant Elway’s is opening at The Lodge at Vail in time for the 20112012 winter ski season. Named for former Denver Bronco quarterback and NFL Hall of Fame Inductee John Elway, the new Vail Village restaurant is the company’s first location outside of Denver.

HYATT REGENCY LAKE TAHOE RESORT, SPA AND CASINO GETS A MAKEOVER

ELWAYS.COM

Last year Vail Resorts joined the social media revolution with its innovative EpicMix app that tracks skiers’ vertical feet and number of days on the slopes. For the 2012 ski season, EpicMix is adding photo capabilities, making it even easier for skiers and snowboarders to share their on-mountain experience. Vail Resorts also plans to eliminate almost all paper tickets by offering each skier a reusable and durable card that loads daily lift tickets or a season pass. To download the free app, visit EPICMIX.COM.

The lakeside Hyatt Regency Lake Tahoe Resort, Spa and Casino has announced a $20-million renovation, slated for completion by April 30, 2012. The project will include a complete redesign of the property’s 422 guestrooms and suites, a new mountain-contemporary look for the Sierra Café, and a remodeled Spa Terrace Conference Center featuring enhanced audiovisual and technology capabilities.

LAKETAHOE.HYATT.COM

TOP DESIGNERS TO SPEAK AT 2012 DESIGN BLOGGERS CONFERENCE Celebrity designers Martyn Lawrence-Bullard and Bunny Williams will deliver keynote addresses at the second annual Design Bloggers Conference, February 26-28, at the Millennium Biltmore Hotel in Los Angeles. This two-day event offers unique and valuable insights on the intersection of interior design with the world of new media.

DESIGN-BLOGGERS-CONFERENCE.COM

DECORATIVE MATERIALS HIRES NEW DESIGN TALENT Decorative Materials recently welcomed Michele Baum to its Denver design team. An industry veteran with more than 20 years of experience, Baum is poised to become a true asset to her new clients. Stop by to meet Baum and to browse the new vignettes recently created at the company’s Denver Design District showroom. DECORATIVEMATERIALS.COM


fine residential design and custom remodeling p h 3 03. 278 . 8 8 4 0 w w w. t k p a r c h . c o m


ML

DESIGNER UPDATE

NORTHERN LIGHTS

PHOTO COURTESY THE ARRABELLE AT VAIL SQUARE, A ROCKRESORT

DUTCH DESIGNERS WILLIAM BRAND AND ANNET VAN EGMOND UNVEIL THEIR LATEST COLLECTION OF EXTRAVAGANT LIGHTING SCULPTURE

In 1988, Dutch designers William Brand and Annet van Egmond made a grand entrance into the international design scene with the debut of their first lighting sculpture, “Chandelier.” Fast forward to today. In addition to unveiling dazzling new collections of handcrafted fixtures at Milan each year, the duo’s achievements include illuminating the 76th Academy Awards in 2004 with their “Hollywood” chandeliers, creating pieces for film stars and royalty, and publishing their first book, Lighting Sculptures, to coincide with the 20th anniversary of their eponymous company. While Brand Van Egmond has grown considerably over nearly 25 years, its principals have stayed true to their original intent: to create art without restraints. “We started in my parents’ garage, making our lighting sculptures with our own four hands,” van Egmond recalls. “What we create is not an idea but a soul product. We like to dream and sketch and make a piece from beginning to end.” >> above FLOATING CANDLES left ANNET VAN EGMOND & W ILLIAM BRAND

ML | www.mountainliving.com 29


ML

DESIGNER UPDATE

above NIGHT WATCH below TABLE D’AMIS

above CRUSHED COVER right DIAMONDS FROM AMSTERDAM

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ML | January / February 2012

This hands-on approach is evident in the designers’ workshops, where Brand and van Egmond personally train their team of welders, and experiment with materials and colors just as a fashion designer plays with fabrics. “We’re making haute couture lighting,” van Egmond says. The design duo—self-described minimalists—doesn’t envision their outside-the-box fixtures in equally extravagant spaces, but rather as the focal point in a room. “It should be eye-catching, but it should also relate to the space,” van Egmond explains. From the company’s beginning, each new design has been shaped by its own story. “We draw inspiration from nature, music and even history—it could be a speech by Winston Churchill,” van Egmond says. The new Table d’Amis collection, for example, was inspired by candlelit dinners with friends, while the Crushed Cover lamp evokes the purity and tranquility of water. And the ultra-glam Diamonds from Amsterdam collection takes its cues from diamond-encrusted rings. Lately, the pair has also been drawing inspiration from collaborations with other artists. First up was Dutch designer Richard Hutten, who created the frisky new “Pin-Up” lamp. “We intend to work with different designers,” Brand says. “Not only furniture designers or lighting designers, but people from a totally different discipline. A car designer or a fashion designer, or maybe even a sculptor or painter.” Adds van Egmond, “We like that Brand van Egmond is a brand with different designers. We like to use the best ingredients from all worlds.” For more, visit brandvanegmond.com. ○


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ML | January / February 2012


ML

SHOPPING PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARTIN CRABB

PRODUCED BY LONETA SHOWELL

SET IN STYLE

A FEAST FOR THE EYES IN SILVER, GOLD AND BOLD NEW HUES, THESE STUNNING SERVING PIECES ARE SURE TO GET THE CONVERSATION STARTED

FRONT TO BACK: ARRONDI CAKE SERVER by Aaron Johnson; at Nambé, nambe.com BLACK CAKE STAND by Martha Stewart Collection; at Macy’s, macys.com MANGO WOOD SMALL PLATE by Williams-Sonoma, williamssonoma.com GILDED TWIG STEEL NUT DISH by Michael Aram, michaelaram.com NEWPORT GATE DIP BOWL in Coral by Jill Rosenwald Studio; at Ashley Campbell, ashleycampbell.com GOLD CIRCLES BULLET BOWL by Waylande Gregory Studios; at Slifer Designs, sliferdesigns.com

MARTIN CRABB

PEBBLE CHARGER in Antique Turquoise by Z Gallerie, zgallerie.com RECYCLED GLASS SQUARE PLATTER by Abigails; at Revampt Goods, revampt goods.com >>

ML | www.mountainliving.com 35


FRONT TO BACK: STEMS SALAD PLATE by The Cellar Dinnerware; at Macy’s, macys.com SONNY’S DECORATIVE PLATE by Natalie Martin Studios; at Element, element-home.com SILVER APPLIQUÉ ACCENT PLATE by Lenox, lenox.com PARK CITY SQUARE ACCENT PLATE by Lenox; at Bed, Bath & Beyond, bedbathandbeyond.com ANTIQUE SERVING SPOON & FORK at HW Home, hwhome.com ST. KITTS COUPE ACCENT PLATE by Kate Spade, katespade.com

MARTIN CRABB

MODERN GRACE SERVING PLATE by Villeroy & Boch, villeroyboch.com

36

ML | January / February 2012


ML

SHOPPING

FROM TOP LAYER TO BOTTOM: CHISEL DOUBLE OLD-FASHIONED GLASS in silver by Z Gallerie, zgallerie.com SOIRÉE CHAMPAGNE GLASS by Posh, poshindenver.com BLUE BOMBAY SAPPHIRE BOWL by Diana Branscome; at Revampt, revamptgoods.com

MARTIN CRABB

HAND-BLOWN GLASS DISH at Slifer Designs, sliferdesigns.com BARTON BOWL at HW Home, hwhome.com SPRUZZO SILVER CHARGER by Z Gallerie, zgallerie.com DORE GOLD TEAPOT (from nine-piece tea set) by Teavana, teavana.com STAINLESS-STEEL TRAY by Room & Board, roomandboard.com ○

ML | www.mountainliving.com 37


Experience what you can’t live without.

Today, children are starving in the Horn of Africa. But we can save them. It’s the worst drought in 60 years. Food is scarce. And over 2 million children’s lives are at risk.

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ML | January / February 2012

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PHOTO BY TIM STONE, COURTESY KELLY & STONE ARCHITECTS

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SHOPPING

MOD CLASSICS EVERY DESIGN DEVOTEE HAS A FAVORITE PIECE OF

ICONIC MIDCENTURY FURNITURE, LOVED FOR ITS LUSCIOUS SILHOUETTE,

WOMB CHAIR PHOTO COURTESY KNOLL, INC.; CHIEFTAIN CHAIR PHOTO COURTESY DECONET.COM

EXPECTATION-SHATTERING USE OF MATERIALS OR FORMATIVE ROLE IN HISTORY. HERE, A FEW INSPIRED FOLKS SHARE THEIR FAVES

1941 “This CONSOLE TABLE designed by Gio Ponti, with rare colored tiles (also Ponti’s design) fabricated by the enamel master Paolo de Poli, is one of my favorite works. Its streamlined design with pointy legs—so typical of Ponti—is particularly wonderful.” HUGH GRANT DIRECTOR, KIRKLAND MUSEUM OF FINE & DECORATIVE ART, DENVER, CO, KIRKLANDMUSEUM.ORG

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ML | January / February 2012

1948 “Florence Knoll asked her friend Eero Saarinen to design a chair ‘that she could curl up in.’ The organically shaped WOMB CHAIR uses the advanced (for the time) technology of molded fiberglass for the generous and curvaceous shell that floats on slim steel supports.” MICHAEL AND KATHERINE MCCOY DESIGNERS, MICHAEL MCCOY DESIGN, COLORADO, MICHAELMCCOYDESIGN.COM

1948 “My favorite midcentury piece has to be the NOGUCHI TABLE by sculptor Isamu Noguchi. It has such a simple form that’s organic but incredibly sophisticated.” ELIZABETH TULLIS OWNER, THE MODERN HOTEL, BOISE, ID, THEMODERNHOTEL.COM

1949 “I love the CHIEFTAIN CHAIR

by Finn Juhl. This timeless and rare piece showcases true Danish craftsmanship with its elegant, sculptural arms, and Juhl’s use of organic shapes and an innovative floating back and seat conveys movement.” JENNIFER BRASH OWNER, FULLHOUSE MODERN, VANCOUVER, B.C., FULLHOUSECONSIGN.COM


MOLDED ALUMINUM TRIPOD CHAIR PHOTO COURTESY SHERRY GRIFFIN/R 20TH CENTURY; NAKASHIMA TABLE PHOTO COURTESY 1STDIBS.COM - CONVERSO; NIEMEYER LOUNGE CHAIR PHOTO COURTESY WRIGHT20.COM

FIND YOUR FAVORITE ONLINE 1stdibs.com

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“This MOLDED ALUMINUM TRIPOD CHAIR by Poul Kjærholm is gorgeously simple with perfect integrity, smashing good looks, never-get-up comfort and a bit of fun. Plus, the man and his timeless mustache were genius.”

“My vintage ARC LAMP is the most-talked-about piece in my house. Not only is it unique and gorgeous, but it has a vintage room key hidden within the travertine base. I can only guess why the key needed to be tucked away.” (Arco by Achille Castiglioni pictured above.)

DAVID LARABEE AND DEXTER THORNTON FURNITURE MAKERS, DOUBLEBUTTER, DENVER, CO, DOUBLEBUTTER.COM

DORIAN FERLAUTO OWNER, MOD LIVIN’, DENVER, CO, MODLIVIN.COM

1964 “I love the versatility of GEORGE NAKASHIMA’S TABLES that are organic yet

modern at the same time. They would fit beautifully into your mountain, beach or city home.” MICHAEL BRUNO FOUNDER, 1STDIBS.COM, NEW YORK, NY

Shop.housing works.org Place your virtual bid on vintage seating, tables and more (plus reproductions) and support AIDS relief too

1972 “This LOUNGE CHAIR was initially designed for the Communist Party headquarters in Paris by architect Oscar Niemeyer. An unsung design hero of the 20th century, he proposed this chair of elegant beauty that echoes the fluid forms of his architecture.” MICHAEL P. JOHNSON ARCHITECT, MICHAEL P. JOHNSON DESIGN STUDIO, CAVE CREEK, AZ, MPJSTUDIO.COM ○

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DESIGN DESTINATION:

Palm Springs

PHOTO BY DAVID GLOMB

WHILE AWAY A WEEKEND AT THE EPICENTER OF MODERNISM, WHERE YOU CAN SEE—AND STAY IN—SOME OF THE WEST’S MOST ICONIC MIDCENTURY DESIGNS

A DRIVE THROUGH THE NEIGHBORHOODS of Palm Springs, California, reads like a roster of the midcentury’s most notable architects—Wexler, Williams, Cody and Frey, to name a few—who designed homes for some of Hollywood’s biggest stars, from Frank Sinatra and Bob Hope to Elvis Presley and Lucille Ball. Thanks to this confluence of moneyed clientele and forward-thinking architects, Palm Springs quickly became home to the greatest concentration of Midcentury Modern architecture in the country. The dramatic landscape of towering mountains and stark desert inspired these visionary architects to design sleek modern homes that respond to and embrace the environment. Their design aesthetic—flat roofs that seemingly float above walls of glass, deep overhangs that shield rooms from the sun, and open floor plans that merge seamlessly with the outdoors—would become known as Desert Modernism, and to this day, its informal yet elegant indoor/outdoor style inspires architects throughout the West and around the world. STORY BY CHRISTINE DEORIO Kaufmann House, 1946; 470 West Vista Chino Road Designed for the same Edgar Kaufmann Sr. who commissioned “Fallingwater” from Frank Lloyd Wright, this glass, steel, aluminum and stone landmark (above) is one of the best-known designs by architect Richard Neutra, whose buildings are considered the embodiment of modernism’s International Style. After enduring years of neglect and insensitive renovations, it was restored to its original glory in 1997 by Los Angeles-based architecture firm Marmol Radziner. >> ML | www.mountainliving.com 43


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PHOTOS BY DAN CHAVKIN

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INSIDER TIP The homes pictured here are private residences to be admired from the street. The very best way to see Palm Springs’ most important architecture is on a tour with the fascinating Robert Imber, who knows the stories behind almost every building in town and shares many of them on a 3-hour driving tour, available twice daily ($75). Palm Springs Modern Tours, psmoderntours@aol.com; 760-318-6118 Prefer to go it alone? Pick up “A Map of Palm Springs Modern” at the Palm Springs Visitors Center or at psmodcom.org.

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ML | January / February 2012

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WHAT TO SEE 1

Swiss Miss Houses, 1958-1962; Vista Las Palmas The George Alexander Construction Company relied on architects William Krisel and Dan Saxon Palmer to design nearly all of its Palm Springs dwellings; 15 notable exceptions are known as the “Swiss Miss” houses. Designed by architect Charles E. DuBois, these charming post-and-beam structures are equal parts tiki hut and alpine chalet. While each of the Swiss Misses is unique, common threads include a peaked entry and A-frame living room featuring a massive floor-toceiling stone fireplace flanked by large expanses of plate glass.

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Tramway Gas Station (Palm Springs Visitors Center),1965;

2901 North Palm Canyon Drive Designed by architects Albert Frey and Robson C. Chambers at a time when many businesses commissioned works of architecture to reflect their success, this eyecatching former gas station, now the Palm Springs Visitors Center, is a fitting gateway to the town. Frey was known for treating roof planes as sculptural elements, and this structure’s soaring roofline that spans nearly 100 feet—and is supported by just six steel pipe columns—serves as a beautiful example.

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Twin Palms Estates, 1957-1959; between Camino Real, La Jolla and Twin Palms Roads In the 1950s and ’60s, the George Alexander Construction Company changed the face of Palm Springs by building more than 2,000 stylish single-family homes, nearly all of them designed by architects William Krisel and Dan Saxon Palmer. Their first tract of 39 homes was built here in Twin Palms Estates. Although the square-shaped floor plans are essentially identical, the homes’ unique rooflines, façades and finishes create distinctive looks. To identify one of these gems, look for this sequence of spaces: a parking area, then a breezeway, windows and a wall.

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Alexander Steel Houses, 1960-1962; 300 and 330 East Molino Road; 290 Simms Road; 3100, 3125, 3133 and 3165 Sunnyview Drive In the early 1960s, architect Donald Wexler, who believes that steel is an ideal building material in desert climes, set about designing an easily replicated, all-steel “home system” for the George Alexander Construction Company. The project came to a halt when a steel embargo made the development unprofitable—but not before Wexler designed and built seven 1,400-plus-square-foot homes. After surviving a period of neglect and decay, the north-end neighborhood and its one-of-akind homes are now protected as historic sites.

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Edris House, 1953; 1030 West Cielo Drive A classic example of Desert Modernism in the Little Tuscany Estates neighborhood, this house clad in stone and Douglas fir appears to rise organically from the rocky landscape, perfectly conveying architect E. Stewart Williams’ philosophy of bringing the desert into the architecture rather than placing the architecture on the desert. To this day, everything you see is original. Even the palm trees are left untrimmed, as the home’s first owner Marjorie Edris had preferred.

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Coachella Valley Savings & Loan No. 3 (Chase bank), 1960;

499 South Palm Canyon Drive Fans of architect Max Abramovitz’s Avery Fisher Hall at Lincoln Center in New York City may notice familiar elements in this sculptural structure on Palm Springs’ main thoroughfare. Designed two years before the Avery Fisher Hall by architect E. Stewart Williams, this 1960 bank, now a Chase bank branch, draws the eye with its elegant, inverted white arches that rise above a floating terrazzo staircase and cast shadows on a dramatic wall of bronze corrugated metal. >> ML | www.mountainliving.com 45


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TRAVEL

WHERE TO STAY ( IN A MIDCENTURY CLASSIC) 1 Desert Star Hotel This hip Midcentury Modern property—designed by Howard Lapham in 1954— may be small, but its five bungalows are anything but modest. Each light-filled room is nearly 600 square feet, furnished with modern designs by Eames, Nelson and Bertoia, and includes a king-size bed, lounge area, full bathroom, fully equipped kitchen and a private patio for relaxing and dining. A central courtyard offers more outdoor living space, complete with a heated saltwater pool, stylish lounge furniture and mountain views. In a word: cool. From $140 per night. desertstarhotel.com

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The Horizon Hotel

Designed by William Cody in 1952 for media mogul Jack Wrather and his wife, actress Bonita Granville, this peaceful, adults-only hotel features low-slung, angular architecture. Spare and stylish guest rooms are all about the views, which are framed by floor-toceiling walls of glass and perfectly positioned clerestory windows. Some rooms take the indoor-outdoor connection even further with private outdoor showers. Each room has its own patio; have your complimentary breakfast served there or even poolside. For the ultimate getaway, book the private 1,000-square-foot residence, complete with a full-size pool and swanky sunken bar. From $109 per night. thehorizonhotel.com

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Orbit In

This little piece of paradise consists of two properties— The Orbit In (1957) and the Hideaway (1947)—located just two blocks apart, in the Historic Tennis Club District at the base of the San Jacinto Mountains. Featuring the classic midcentury courtyard style, both lodges were built by Herb Burns, the designer/builder who introduced Palm Springs to the “ultra-modern motor court inn.” Meticulously maintained guest rooms feature private patios, original kitchens and baths, iconic Midcentury Modern furnishings by Bertoia, Saarinen, Eames and more, and even a Crosley record player. From $129 per night. orbitin.com

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Beau Monde Villas

Imagine spending the weekend at Frank Sinatra’s Twin Palms estate (pictured on facing page) or lounging at a home designed by William F. Cody or William Krisel. Beau Monde Villas offers them all in its portfolio of more than 30 architecturally significant Palm Springs homes. Each is stylishly furnished and impeccably maintained, and comes with perks including a personal house butler, concierge services, pre-arrival grocery delivery and more. Inquire for rates. beaumondevillas.com >>

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ML | January / February 2012

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PHOTO BY ARTHUR COLEMAN

3

WHERE TO EAT IN PALM SPRINGS There’s no better way to start a day of architecture-peeping than with a hearty breakfast—featuring seasonal, locally grown ingredients—at Cheeky’s. Forget calorie-counting and start with the West’s most delicious cinnamon roll (the secret is the flaky croissant dough). cheekysps.com At lunchtime, head to Jake’s for tasty fish tacos or the turkey BLTA. Don’t leave without stopping at the dessert case, where you’ll find gorgeous cakes and the restaurant’s famous giant cupcakes-ofthe-day. jakespalmsprings.com For a casual dinner, snag a patio table at Birba, where you can kick back and watch passersby as you sip cocktails (try a refreshing Lemongrass Rickey) and snack on delicious thin-crust pizzas topped with everything from San Daniele prosciutto and arugula to egg, pancetta, pecorino and spring onion. birbaps.com

4 ML | www.mountainliving.com 47


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WHERE TO

GET THE LOOK 5

1

notNeutral

The name says it all. This little shop is brimming with bold colors and fun patterns—splashed on everything from tableware to area rugs, accent pillows to furnishings just for kids. On our wish list: “In the Mix” plate sets featuring four mod black-and-white patterns—perfect for dressing up basic white dinnerware. notneutral.com

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Interior Illusions

Shop a wide range of glam furnishings, rugs, lighting, artwork and accessories, almost all in a bold palette of black and white. interiorillusionshome.com

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Insolito Home

Find cool and quirky limited-production furnishings, including “Seatbelt” chairs from the Phillips Collection, sculptural “Peacock” chairs by acclaimed designer Dror Benshetrit and one-of-a-kind hand-blown-glass lighting fixtures. insolitohome.com

4

Modern Way

Pop in and browse an ever-changing selection of real-deal furniture, accessories, lighting, rugs and art from the 1950s, ’60s and ’70s (think iconic Warren Platner lounge chairs, Bertoia Bird Chairs (pictured) and a groovy Milo Baughman lambswool pouf). psmodernway.com

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ML | January / February 2012

Trina Turk Residential

Uncover a bright and bold array of decorative accessories, pillows, prints and the latest, greatest design books. trinaturk.com ○


MOUNTAIN LOG HOMES

MOUNTAIN LOG HOMES Brian L. Wray, President/General Contractor and the Mountain Log Homes of CO team, have specialized in quality construction of one-of-a-kind log, log accented and timber-frame custom homes in the Colorado Rocky Mountain region since 1988. Our partnerships with Pioneer Log Homes of B.C. and Rocky Mountain Log Homes of Montana ensure we have the right timber package to fit your design and budget needs. We also offer in-house interior design support for a truly cohesive project. To see several award-winning ENERGY STAR client homes or to schedule a complimentary plan review and building site evaluation, call 970-468-8683 or visit mlhoc.com. Mountain Log Homes of Colorado, Inc., 619 Main Street, Frisco, CO 80443-1701.

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www.mountainliving.com A MOUNTAIN LIVING SPECIAL SECTION


      

        

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ARCHITECT & BUILDER FINDS LUXURY ARCHITECTS AND BUILDERS

VERTICAL ARTS ARCHITECTURE Your home is what we will craft together; living spaces both inside and out designed to echo the character and soulfulness that color your world. Situated in the heart of Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mountain country, Vertical Arts is a team of hand-selected, highly talented architectural, interior and landscape professionals inspired by a shared devotion to creativity and ďŹ nesse. VERTICAL-ARTS.COM

PHOTOS BY GIBEON PHOTOGRAPHY

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A MOUNTAIN LIVING SPECIAL SECTION

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DESIGN FINDS LUXURY PRODUCTS AND SERVICES FOR YOUR HOME

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WOODLAND CREEK FURNITURE Let the artisans at Woodland Creek handcraft a unique piece of furniture for you. Designs range from modern mountain to elegant rustic, and custom furniture is our specialty. See more than 2,500 proprietary furniture designs at WOODLANDCREEKFURNITURE.COM

GRACE HOME DESIGN Interior designer Jennifer Visosky creates spaces dripping in color and imaginative pattern play. Her fresh vision and eye for the details have launched her design work all over the country. Visosky shares with her clients the ideas and resources that she finds exciting and inspiring. Her firm, Grace Home Design, Inc., offers consulting and full-scale interiors. GRACEHOMEDESIGN.COM

FIRE ON DEMAND Let the artisans at Fire On Demand design and build a one-of-a-kind fire pit especially for you. Every log set is sculpted out of steel at our Breckenridge, Colorado facility. Shipping available nationwide. Pictured fire pit: $6,750 FIREONDEMAND.COM

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A MOUNTAIN LIVING SPECIAL SECTION

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LAKE STEVENS SLEIGH COMPANY We design and build high-quality distressed sleigh fixtures for rustic and mountain structures. Our unique, built-green sleighs are the perfect addition to your mountain home or business. LAKESTEVENSSLEIGH.COM


For your home. For your life. For your environment.

Imagine Kitchen & Baths 8130 S. University Blvd #155 Centennial, CO 80122 303-773-1311 www.imaginekitchensandbaths.net Kitchens at the Denver 761 Kalamath Street Denver, CO 80204 303-629-0119 www.kitchensofcolorado.com Timberline Kitchen & Bath 1842 S. Broadway Denver, CO 80210 303-777-6788 www.timberlinekitchens.com

Penthouse View by Wood-Mode

February 26-28 | Millennium Biltmore Hotel | Los Angeles, CA

Martyn Lawrence-Bullard and Bunny Williams to Speak at the Event of the Year for Interior Design Bloggers! Martyn Lawrence-Bullard is an illustrious and multiple award winning interior designer, his glamorous style and worldly interiors for high profile and celebrity clientele that ranges from Rock Stars to Royalty. Bunny Williams is a designer with a modern vision, a sense of history, and the confidence to take the unexpected path. Both a trailblazer and a tastemaker, Williams’ style is classic, but never predictable.

A Sampling of Our Other Illustrious Speakers includes: t Ronda Carman, All the Best t Tobi Fairley, Tobi Fairley Interior Design t Cassandra LaValle, coco+kelley t Hardy Wallace, Dirty South Wine t Kelley Moore, For the Love of Design

Join interior design bloggers, new media innovators, and interior design industry leaders for the second annual Design Bloggers Conference – the premier conference and experience for professionals actively using or interested in learning about new media and the interior design industry. This two-day conference builds on the exciting success of our inaugural conference in 2011, and brings you a unique opportunity to participate in the intersection of interior design with the world of new media including blogging, social media, and more. We invite all our fellow interior design bloggers to attend! The conference will delve into the depths of: Interior Design Trends in 2012; Cashing in on Your New Online Footprint: Paths to Income and Careers; Creating Inspirational Content; BlogStars: Social Networking, Content, and The Future of Blogs; The Impact of Social Media on Content Creation; The Emerging Integration of Search and Social Media – Google+, Facebook, and Klout; Building Your Brand: Grow Your Blog With Creative Video; Curated Content: A New Business Model.

AS A BLOGGER YOU CANNOT AFFORD TO MISS THIS EVENT! REGISTER TODAY TO BE PART OF THIS YEAR’S EVENT.

design-bloggers-conference.com ML | www.mountainliving.com 53


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ML

JANUARY / FEBRUARY

THE

PHOTO BY AUDREY HALL

MOUNTAIN MODERN ISSUE

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Rustic Redux SLEEK MIDCENTURY FURNISHINGS AND WEATHERED TIMBER AND STONE REDEFINE WESTERN STYLE IN A MONTANA HOME

STORY BY CAREN KURLANDER

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY AUDREY HALL


Interior designers Timothy Haynes and Kevin Roberts collaborated with architect Paul Bertelli to create a mountain home with modern style. Mohair-covered midcentury Edward Wormley for Dunbar sofas and vintage Scandinavian swivel chairs complement the living roomâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reclaimed barn timbers and old stone. FACING PAGE: The stairwayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s steel-andglass railing establishes a contemporary tone.

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ARCHITECTURE BY JLF & ASSOCIATES 58

INTERIOR DESIGN BY HAYNES-ROBERTS


The structure—made of timber, wood and glass— steps up the hillside to help break down the scale. FACING PAGE: The 1960 Mazzega chandelier in the dining area plays off the rough interior surfaces and echoes the snow outside. Vintage Jacques Adnet armchairs are upholstered with snakeskin, and the oak table is a custom design.

TIMOTHY HAYNES AND KEVIN ROBERTS, FOUNDING PARTNERS OF THE DISTINGUISHED NEW YORK CITY INTERIOR DESIGN FIRM HAYNES-ROBERTS, HAVE NO INTEREST IN PLAYING IT SAFE. When the duo accepted their first commission in Montana—a ski house in Big Sky for a family with young children—they saw no reason to sacrifice their sophisticated style and had no intention of falling into Western clichés. “We wanted to shake things up a bit,” says Roberts, “and show that you can still have the great warmth and beauty of a Western house, but infused with a hip, up-to-date sensibility.” To achieve that goal, the designers collaborated closely with architect Paul Bertelli, principal of Bozeman, Montana-based JLF & Associates, and his team as they created a structure that was authentic to the region but pared down to communicate a 21stcentury lifestyle. The architects designed framing elements from huge weathered barn timbers, clad ceilings and floors with reclaimed wood planks and constructed fireplace surrounds from regionally quarried stone. “The whole contemporary belief of ‘less is

more’ is how you keep reducing the components down to their essence,” Bertelli says. “So the question became, how do we do that using these reclaimed timber assemblies?” Their solution was to strip away extraneous knee braces, avoid trim and decorative embellishments, and simplify a prominent staircase down to a spare steel-and-glass form. “It was an opportunity to bring these very clean materials and uncluttered lines into the historic shell,” he explains. The rich texture and warm gray tones of the building materials served as both complement and counterpoint to the furnishings. “We wanted to impose a sense of modernity you don’t often see in the antler-filled Western ski home,” says Roberts, “and because of the quality of the wood and stone background materials, I felt that this was the perfect opportunity to add a hip 1960s/’70s overlay. The vintage pieces provide more nuance than contemporary furniture, and they evoke a bit of the James Bond era.” >> 59


While the furnishings exhibit clean minimal lines, tactile fabrics in a “dark neutral” palette blend with the surrounding walls and recede from the sweeping vistas. “The views are so spectacular that I wanted to keep the colors to a minimum,” Roberts says. While the hues are meant to blend in, the light fixtures are meant to stand out. Starting in the living area, two 1960s Murano glass fixtures set an immediate point of departure. “People usually use bronze or brass,” says Roberts, “but I wanted nothing that was expected.” The furnishings follow suit. Rich charcoal-colored mohair covers two Edward Wormley for Dunbar sofas, and Warren Platner lounge chairs pull up to a black-lacquer game table in the adjacent sitting area. Underfoot, the traditional cowhide rug is remade into a modern patchwork that “continues the texture of the background,” Roberts says. The architecture also provided inspiration for the sturdy dining table the designers had made from solid planks of rift white oak and then sandblasted so “it could handle a lot of heavy-duty

ABOVE: A small banquette offers additional seating in the kitchen. RIGHT: The island’s grey concrete countertop blends with the reclaimed wood surfaces of the kitchen. FACING PAGE: Warren Platner lounge chairs upholstered with Knoll fabric pull up to a custom black-lacquer game table to form a second sitting area in the living room. The rug was custom-made by Beauvais.

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use,” Roberts says. Vintage Jacques Adnet chairs upholstered with taupe snakeskin encircle the table, and a linear 1960s Italian chandelier sparkles above. “I wanted the light fixtures in this house to be particularly special,” says Roberts, who hung a striking vertical metal-and-glass fixture in the hallway and a 1960s Stilnovo chandelier in the master bedroom. To give the bedroom a distinct, luxurious feel, the designers had a graphic silk-andwool carpet made in a warm bronze tone and upholstered a custom bed with a silk-velvet fabric by Clarence House. “The design wasn’t meant to feel modern and jarring,” Roberts explains. “It was meant to feel exciting and sophisticated.” While it doesn’t fit the typical image of a rustic Western home, the house is still thoughtfully tailored to its mountain environment. “It has a sense of timelessness, like it’s always been here,” adds Bertelli, “but it doesn’t respond to what people think the West should be, but more what the West really is.” >>


“THE PREDICTABLE SKI CHALET JUST SEEMED A BIT TIRED. I FELT THAT IT NEEDED TO BE INFUSED WITH A FRESH, UPDATED APPROACH.” KEVIN ROBERTS

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The use of regional materials was carried into the bath, where a stone wall and wood beams warm the space. FACING PAGE: “I didn’t want the master bedroom to feel like you’d changed ZIP codes,” says Roberts, “but I wanted it to have a luxurious feel.” Rich textiles, including the silk-velvet fabric from Clarence House covering the bed frame and custom wool-and-silk carpet, add a layer of softness.

MODERN IN MONTANA

“In New York, modernity has been embraced and accepted,” says Kevin Roberts of Haynes-Roberts. “In Montana, that’s not necessarily so.” But that didn’t stop the designers from appointing a timber-and-stone residence in Big Sky with streamlined midcentury furnishings. By keeping these simple guidelines in mind, Roberts and his partner Timothy Haynes were able to create a modern interior that, while unexpected, feels right at home.

DON’T TAKE IT LITERALLY

STAY DOWN-TO-EARTH

MATERIALS MATTER

DON’T OVERDO IT

Choose pieces that reflect the feel of the region in a modern way. Replace antler chandeliers with glass light fixtures that evoke the feel of snow, and try a geometric cowhide rug instead of the typical bearskin.

“The most beautiful thing about Montana is the outdoors,” Roberts says. “I felt that the blue of the sky and the green of the trees should really provide the bulk of the color.”

Give your project a sense of authenticity and timelessness by reclaiming building materials from the region. “This could have been done with new wood stained to look old,” says Roberts, “but it wouldn’t have been nearly as successful.”

“I find that in Western ski areas, people tend to clutter things up,” Roberts says. “In a house with this much texture and strength in terms of the view, it’s really important to pull back and try to keep things spare.” ○

more 62

Visit www.mountainliving.com for a guide to this home’s products and pros.


“IN THIS HOUSE YOU REALLY HAVE A SENSE OF WHERE YOU ARE ALL THE TIME. AND I DON’T MEAN WHICH ROOM, I MEAN MONTANA.” PAUL BERTELLI

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The fireplace wall, clad with Colorado buff sandstone, shows off interior designer Melissa Greenauerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s love of linear drama: Instead of opting for a more typical horizontal stone treatment, she gave the board-and-batten-inspired design a vertical orientation. A custom-made leather trunk houses a television that pops up when in use. The oak-topped cocktail table stores four leather ottomans for extra seating.

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HIGH STYLE

IN A PENTHOUSE HIGH ABOVE VAIL VILLAGE, CRISP LINES, WARM TEXTILES AND A REFINED RUSTICITY ADD UP TO ELEGANT MOUNTAIN-MODERN STYLE

STORY BY ELIZABETH MARGLIN

PHOTOGRAPHY BY KIMBERLY GAVIN

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INTERIOR DESIGNER MELISSA GREENAUER WAS FAMILIAR WITH HER CLIENTS’ TASTES AND PRIORITIES when she embarked upon the design of their penthouse at Vail’s chic Solaris Residences: great style, unfettered views of the mountains, and a space that comfortably accommodates family and lively entertaining. “We picked a neutral path between a scaled-back Western ruggedness and upscale European sophistication,” Greenauer says. One of the most impactful moves the designer made was to paint the ceiling a dark ebony hue. “At first we went with a lighter color, which cast an orange tone,” she says. “Somehow the effect wasn’t quite right and my clients agreed with going darker. The payoff? A bold balance of light and dark that gives the penthouse extra oomph.” The big picture established, Greenauer turned her eye toward small, unique features: leatherembossed stair risers, a painted-glass wall in the bar, and contemporary lighting that reflects her clients’ passion for form and function. “It’s the tiny details that build on each other and cumulatively tie everything together,” she says. “I have a fondness for the finer points in the design process, because that’s what allows homeowners to develop a bespoke design that’s entirely their own.”

CUSTOM TOUCHES Intricately carved custom leather panels inserted into the risers transform a nondescript stairway into a work of art. Strands of two-toned leather wrapped around the banister complete the look. In the dining room, the two-toned motif continues with a wooden table that can be lengthened and reconfigured with extra leaves. The chair legs complement the table base to anchor the space visually, while the upholstery fabric, reminiscent of snowflakes, imbues the room with a touch of whimsy. But the pièce de résistance is the massive bronze chandelier that adds dynamic rhythm to the fixed lines below—and can be moved to

INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN BY GREENAUER DESIGN GROUP 66

accommodate different seating layouts. >>


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SMALL DETAILS, BIG IMPACT Above the bar area, pendant lights hang from an arced bronze-finished light fixture, designed by Greenauer to soften the dramatic lines of the ceiling. A game table, with a unique tree-shaped base, echoes the organic curve of the light fixture; its dual tones recall the dining table’s interplay of light and dark wood finishes. In the evenings, the bar wall, clad with a putty-colored painted glass, gives off a sexy, muted glow. On the bar’s top shelf, the homeowners’ custom-made tequila boxes pay homage to their Mexican roots. A carefully calibrated mix of tones and textures—bar cabinets with stamped-leather fronts, custom bronze appliance door panels, creamy chair fabrics and bar top, raffia chandelier—make for a sophisticated, nuanced palette. >>

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SPACE PLANNING The penthouse’s open plan, broken into more intimate areas for dining, socializing and lounging, perfectly accommodates the homeowners’ love for entertaining. Its clean, crisp and contemporary design is the result of careful advance planning. Visual clutter such as air vents were strategically The powder room (above) serves as a

hidden, resulting in unmarred

cool oasis: Set off by a white Thassos

expanses of wall and ceiling.

marble countertop, shagreen vanity

Floor-to-ceiling windows and

and three-dimensional white onyx tile

sliding glass doors suffuse the space

on the walls, a Vitraform frosted-glass

with natural light. And furnishings

bowl sink emits a luminous glow. A

were carefully positioned to

glorious view of the Pepi’s Face ski

create a heightened sense of order

run dominates the master bedroom

and flow. Textured fabrics keep the

(top); cleverly concealed blackout

spaces from feeling too formal

drapes can instantly cloak the light-

and add tactile interest—

filled room in darkness. Well-executed

and a feminine touch—to

details, such as the inlaid carpet, give

the neutral color scheme.

the room a seamless sophistication.

more 70

Visit www.mountainliving.com for a guide to this home’s products and pros.


MASTER CLASS WHAT’S THE TRICK TO DESIGNING FOR AN OPEN FLOOR PLAN? INTERIOR DESIGNER MELISSA GREENAUER SHARES HER TOP TIPS

One of the challenges posed by an open floor plan is creating spaces that feel unified but distinct. Striking the right balance requires attention to color, scale and texture. • COLOR Start light and go dark, as it’s more difficult to undo a darker color. Add color in stages, massaging the design as you go to fit the space. The owners of this penthouse originally wanted a much lighter, reddish color for the ceiling, but discovered it felt too airy. They decided to take the plunge and go for a dark chocolate stain. • SCALE It’s crucial to get the scale of furnishings right. Start by building a good foundation and acquiring slowly, assessing the impact each new

element has on the space. Don’t try to furnish a home in one shopping spree. • TEXTURE AND MATERIALS Repeat details for continuity. Greenauer wove a nail-head motif throughout the penthouse to create an expressive pattern language unique to her clients. Another recurring detail the designer helped orchestrate: two-toned wood tables that echo and play off of one another. Variety creates richness, but repetition, in the right dose, hits the sweet spot of tranquility. ○

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To honor the homeowners’ wishes for a modern mountain home, interior designers Thomas Riker and James Dolenc added contemporary touches that echo the Western aesthetic without reading as “rustic,” such as the large-scale equestrian painting in the entry by California-based artist Ashley Collins. FACING PAGE: African cup stools from Chista and sleek onyx-topped tables by Bradley Hughes complement the living room’s upholstered furnishings. 72


A SUN VALLEY HOME REINTERPRETS WESTERN STYLE FOR A MODERN-MINDED FAMILY

THE NEW WEST

STORY BY ELISABETH A. SULLIVAN

PHOTOGRAPHY BY TIM BROWN

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ARCHITECTURE BY MICHAEL BLASH & ASSOCIATES

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INTERIOR DESIGN BY JAMESTHOMAS


“THE ARCHITECTURE IS SO STRONG INSIDE THAT WE DIDN’T WANT TO COMPETE WITH IT. THAT OBJECTIVE DEVELOPED INTO A MONOCHROMATIC COLOR PALETTE.” THOMAS RIKER

Lighting in this spacious home was kept simple—save for a few standout fixtures. A custom-made chandelier by Pagani Studio in Brooklyn, N.Y., hangs over the custom dining table by Eurocraft. FACING PAGE: A chandelier designed by Kirkland, Wash.-based lighting craftsman Charles Loomis cascades like a waterfall through several stories of the spiral staircase. Throughout the rest of the home, architect Michael Blash worked with lighting design firm Hefferan Partnership in Boulder, Colo., to create a lighting scheme that replicates natural light. The staircase treads are by Cimarron Lofting in Hailey, Idaho.

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The 12,000-square-foot residence was designed as three separate buildings to make it feel cozier and less monolithic. The exterior, clad in cedar and steel, mixes traditional Craftsman touches such as pitched roofs and hefty rafters with more contemporary horizontal planes.

The owners of this mountain home in Sun Valley, Idaho, had a clear directive for their design team: “No antler chandeliers, no Navajo rugs, nothing really rustic,” says interior designer Thomas Riker. Instead, they wanted a comfortable, familyfriendly home appropriate for their three young children—but with a modern edge. While Chicago-based Riker and James Dolenc, partners at interior design firm jamesthomas, certainly could appreciate the owners’ aesthetic, they wanted to ground the home in its rugged surroundings. “We didn’t want it to look harshly modern, or like it could have been anywhere. We wanted this home to feel right for its setting,” Riker says. “That really forced us to think about the Western idea in a very different way.” Riker and Dolenc took cues from architect Michael Blash’s contemporary take on Craftsman style, which melds pitched rooflines and thick rafters with patinated steel and floor-toceiling windows. Rather than drawing up one cavernous structure, 76

the architect—based in Ketchum, Idaho—designed a cluster of five separate forms connected by glass-walled transitional spaces. “Our original concept for the structure was to create a village feel—a few buildings nestled against the hillside, which keeps it from feeling so huge and imposing,” Blash says. The interiors, too, are more intimate than the home’s significant square footage would suggest. “It doesn’t feel like a massive house,” Riker says. “The family room is actually quite a cozy space. Nothing is out of scale or unnecessarily large.” To add warmth throughout the home, the design team employed wood and stone not only as furniture and flooring material, but also as wall and ceiling treatments. But there are no distressed ceiling beams or salvaged barn wood to be found here. The natural materials are refined rather than rugged. Custom-made cabinets and paneling feature mahogany and walnut, and modern latticework on the ceiling in the entry and master bath recall the industrial underside of a drawbridge. >>


PUSH THE LIMITS Every design project has its boundaries and limitations—and that can be a good thing. Restrictions can force you to be efficient, to refine your choices and to get creative. Architect Michael Blash faced limitations when designing this expansive Sun Valley home, situated alongside a hiking trail and in close proximity to a historic ski lift. But rather than viewing the restrictions on height and building placement as impediments to the design process, Blash created solutions to address them and then worked backward, using those solutions as inspiration for other aspects of the home’s design. For example, to keep the building within height limits, Blash had to create a flat roof over the master suite. That horizontal plane was then echoed in a roof over lower-level living spaces, as well as in the adjacent terraced landscape, which steps away from the home and down toward the driveway. The horizontal rooflines give the otherwise peak-roofed residence a contemporary edge.

FROM TOP: The powder room features a glamorous sconce by Fuse Lighting. “It’s light, it’s bright, it’s fun; it has that Rastafarian ottoman,” designer Thomas Riker says of the stark-white office. The bronze Cote d’Or chair by Baal Creations offers an unexpected perch.

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“THE MOST IMPORTANT THING IN THIS HOUSE IS WHAT’S OUT THE WINDOWS. WE DEFINITELY DIDN’T WANT TO DISTRACT FROM THAT.” THOMAS RIKER

Riker and Dolenc balanced the polished finishes with warmly upholstered furnishings, along with a few eclectic combinations to bring the interiors to life. In the living room, the designers paired onyx-topped coffee tables with African cup stools. In the family room, a futuristic Ellipse chair by Modernica is upholstered in an unexpected tweedy wool, and a clean-lined, custom-designed couch is wrapped in wide-wale corduroy for a “twist on rustic mountain style,” Riker says. In the entry, the designers pushed the homeowners’ limits on Western design by encouraging them to buy a largescale equestrian painting by California-based artist Ashley Collins. “They were like, ‘It’s a horse.’ But we said, ‘It’s a modern horse,’” Riker explains. “It’s this cool, contemporary piece of artwork, but it speaks to where you are.” They also put a modern spin on bringing the outdoors in, adding a trough of river rock under the sink in the master bath, placing a live-edge console table carved from a big chunk of tree in the entry, and filling an empty corner near a stairway with a sculptural bronze chair by Baal Creations that “looks like a dug-up boulder,” Riker says. “The home is this super-cool combination of modern and the mountains. It’s so unexpected and organic,” Riker says. It has all of the customary materials—stone, cedar, weathered metal—but none of the traditional trappings of Old West style. Consider this Western design for the next generation. ○

more

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Visit www.mountainliving.com for a guide to this home’s products and pros.

Cozy upholstered pieces like a club chair by John Hutton for Holly Hunt make the contemporary master retreat feel warm and welcoming; glossy wood finishes bounce natural light around the space. In the closet, ample storage space is concealed behind sleek wood doors. FACING PAGE: The soapbubble-like glass orbs of the Aqua chandelier by jGood Design feel right at home above the tub. A streamlined installation of river rock brings the outdoors in.


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OUT & ABOUT

Summit County Parade of Homes Awards Gala Summit County, Colorado September 16, 2011

EVENT PHOTOS BY STUDIO KIVA AND HOME INTERIOR PHOTOS BY BOB BLOCH PHOTOGRAPHY

2011 Mountain Living Peak Award winner Beverly Voss of Design One Interiors and Liam Cassidy of Cassidy Homes.

Mountain Living was proud to sponsor this year’s Summit County Builders Association's Summit County Parade of Homes, an annual showcase of highcountry homes located in beautiful Summit County, Colorado. On Friday, September 16, 2011, local residents and design-industry insiders joined Mountain Living at the Silverthorne Pavilion to celebrate the best design on display on this year’s tour. We were pleased to present our Peak Award for best in show to Beverly and Bob Voss of Design One Interiors for their design team’s work on the spectacular home at 330 High Park Court. Congratulations from all of us at Mountain Living!

ML | www.mountainliving.com 81


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IN THEIR WORDS

DESIGN RESOLUTIONS A NEW YEAR BRINGS FRESH THINKING. DISCOVER HOW THESE INSPIRED CREATIVES PLAN TO CHANGE UP THEIR DESIGNS IN 2012

KEITH KELLY AND TIM STONE ARCHITECTS, KELLY & STONE ARCHITECTS, STEAMBOAT SPRINGS, CO, KSAARCH.COM

“Over the past year, we’ve had the opportunity to venture outside of Steamboat Springs to work in Lake Tahoe, Santa Fe and Calgary, which has given us the chance to translate different landscapes into inspired designs. This year, we’d like to design a shorefront property. We feel as though blending the rugged influences of mountain terrain with the dynamic qualities of water will lead to an intriguing design solution.” ANN GISH FOUNDER AND DESIGNER, ANN GISH LUXURY LINENS AND BEDDING, NEW YORK, NY, ANNGISH.COM

“I resolve to not design in the middle of the night and to try to find that special ‘quiet time’ during the hours normal people keep!”

GRACE BONNEY BLOGGER AND AUTHOR, DESIGN*SPONGE AT HOME, BROOKLYN, NY, DESIGNSPONGE.COM

“I want to be less afraid to make bold design decisions at home. I used to be willing to paint the walls dark colors or build things myself, but I’m paralyzed to make decisions anymore! Maybe it’s because I’m afraid of seeing my house online, or because the more you immerse yourself in design, the harder it can be to make decisions, it seems.”

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ML | January / February 2012

MICHAEL ARAM METAL ARTIST, MICHAEL ARAM, INC., NEW YORK, NY, MICHAELARAM.COM

“For 2012, I will be working with new materials and techniques that really encapsulate the height of handcraftsmanship. I’ll also be introducing some exciting brand extensions in jewelry, porcelain, furniture and dinnerware.”

MICHELLE LAMB COLOR FORECASTER AND EDITORIAL DIRECTOR, THE TREND CURVE, EDEN PRAIRIE, MN, TRENDCURVE.COM

“I’m resolving to immerse myself in the 1960s. Midcentury style has always been a favorite of mine, but now that it’s coming back with a ’60s point of view, I am even more drawn to it than before. I’ll let Mad Men guide me in the look, but I won’t be too literal. It’s the updates that make ’60s style feel so fresh.”

ASHLEY CAMPBELL INTERIOR DESIGNER, ASHLEY CAMPBELL, INC., DENVER, CO, ASHLEYCAMPBELL.COM

“It’s simple: support America. Buying locally and supporting American factories is a proactive step toward decreasing our global carbon footprint, not to mention unemployment.”

RICHARD SHAW LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT AND PRINCIPAL, DESIGN WORKSHOP, ASPEN, CO, DESIGNWORKSHOP.COM

“I’m resolving to utilize more native plants because now more than ever, they are the essence of the landscapes we are creating. They represent the inherent optimism that exists in the art of planting and cultivating a garden.”

MARNI JAMESON NATIONALLY SYNDICATED HOME-DESIGN COLUMNIST AND AUTHOR, HOUSE OF HAVOC AND THE HOUSE ALWAYS WINS, DENVER, CO, MARNIJAMESON.COM

“For me, this is a time of transition—one child is off to college, and another is not far behind—so I’m looking at all I own and all I may acquire in a new way and asking: Is it nimble? If a piece is not versatile, handsome, wellmade and nimble, I’m not interested.”


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Stone Knowledge | Fair Pricing | Expert Masonry

This project was Inspired by ancient Puebloan masonry

Designed by Tommy Hein Architects: 970.728.1220 Built by Tandem Construction: 970.729.0079 Stone as Art by Simon Aplin: 970.708.0501 w w w.aplinmasonr y.com


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