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MOuntain Living

Bringing the Spirit of the High Country Home

&

August 2014

Art Antiques

August 2014

from fine art to flea market finds

www. mountainliving.com

Get the collected look


Photographs by Eric Morley Photography Construction by Ronnie D. Waller Construction, Inc.


WOOD

info@arrigoniwoods.com www.arrigoniwoods.com 888.423.6668 Aspen . Austin . Boston . DC . Denver . Houston . Lake Tahoe . Monterrey, MX . New York . Vail . North Palm Beach


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Photo by David O. Marlow

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30 Y E A RS Photo by David O. Marlow

Photo by David O. Marlow


Photo by David O. Marlow

Photo by David O. Marlow


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in this issue

25

shopping

30travel

3shops 6

Art Antiques

&

1

August

04

2014

vintage vibe

11 4

the art of living

IN  EVERY ISSUE From the Editor

8

Online This Month 22 Featured Homes 103 Gallery 152

124

timeless in telluride

134

an artful escape

on the cover A rustic little bunkhouse in Montana’s Madison River Valley brims with an eclectic mix of vintage and antique furnishings and quirky flea market finds. For more, turn to page 104. Photography by Emily Minton Redfield. 6

ML | August 2014

Vol. XX, No. 5.© 2014 by Network Communications, Inc. All rights reserved. Permission to reprint or quote excerpts granted by written request only. Mountain Living ® (ISSN 1088-6451) is published 7 times a year: bi-monthly, with an additional special issue in August, by Network Communications Inc. 2 Sun Court, NW, Suite 300, Norcross, GA 30092. Periodical postage paid at Norcross, GA, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Mountain Living® P.O. Box 705, Selmer, TN 38375. For change of address include old address as well as new address with both ZIP codes. Allow four to six weeks for change of address to become effective. Please include current mailing label when writing about your subscription. Subscriptions: $29.95 for one year; $52.95 for two years. Canada and Mexico add $20 per year. Single copy price: $4.95. Subscription questions, call (888) 645-7600. CPM#40065056. Canada post PM40063731. Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to: Station A, P.O. Box 54, Windsor, ON N9A 6J5.tt


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BEHIND THE SCENES

FROM THE EDITOR

Ever wonder what it takes to create the photos featured in Mountain Living? While we’re lucky to work with some pretty photogenic subjects, getting the right shot still requires much more than simply pointing and shooting. It can take more than an hour to nail the perfect portrait, and a day

or two to photograph one of our featured homes. Here’s a behind-the-scenes peek at the making of just one of the shots that made it into this issue’s Shops story featuring one of my favorite highcountry gems: DRAM Apothecary in Silver Plume, Colorado. (You’ll find the full story on page 36.)

Before taking each shot, we view our subject from every corner of the room to find the perfect angle. This portrait of shop owner and herbal alchemist Shae Whitney posed a dilemma: Do we show the room’s charming lace-curtained window or simplify the composition and focus in on our subject?

Try this in your next selfie: Rather than smiling at the camera, try looking in different directions, as photographer Kimberly Gavin is directing our subject to do here. Often, the best angle is the most natural one.

You wouldn’t believe it if we told you how many times we rearranged the bottles on the back bar to create just the right mix of heights, shapes and colors. And those bar stools? It took at least 20 tiny adjustments to position them perfectly.

{

}

THE FINAL SHOT

8

Sometimes the camera captures what art director Loneta Showell calls “unintended tangencies.” In this case, it was a beautiful antique lamp on the shelf behind the bar that, when viewed through the lens, appeared to be growing out of Shae’s head! Needless to say, the lamp had to go.

It’s rare to get the perfect shot on the first try. Shae poured bitters from shaker to glass no fewer than five times before we got it just right.

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HINMAN CREEK RESIDENCE - PHOTO BY TIM STONE

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i n n o v a t i v e

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MARTIS CAMP RESIDENCE - PHOTO BY JOY STROTZ

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Publisher Holly Paige Scott Editor in Chief Christine DeOrio Art Director Loneta Showell Associate Editor Laura Beausire Copy Editor Michelle Asakawa Contributing Writers Norman kolpas,

Hilary Masell Oswald

Contributing Photographers kimberly gavin, gibeon photography,

audrey hall, emily minton redfield

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Printed in U.S.A.

679 E. 2nd Ave. Suite 9, Durango, CO

Architecture | Interiors | Planning

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President & CFO Gerry Parker Senior Vice President Adam Japko Senior Vice President, Finance & Administration Diana Young Group Vice President, Interactive Stuart Richens


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Here at HUNTSMAN SPRINGS, children (and their parents) marvel at the many kinds of life flourishing in their backyard. From cutthroat trout to soaring eagles to the skittish grey tail fox – all are preserved in this unique family vacation community. Filling out the picture is a thrilling David McLay Kidd golf course, The Springs Wellness Center & Spa, and the finest fly fishing in the West. If you are game for discovering an unspoiled family retreat under the Teton Mountains, come out and we’ll show you around. CALL 208.354.1888 AND FIND OUT HOW YOU CAN DISCOVER HUNTSMAN SPRINGS FOR YOURSELF.

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online

/ARt &Antiques

online This month

Focus On:

/

Go Behind the Scenes

Get an all-access look at our photo shoot in the Telluride home featured on page 124 at mountainliving.com/timelessintelluride.

I CHOOSE NCFI HIGH-PERFORMANCE SPF INSULATION Dan F. Sater II, AIBD,CGP

CEO and Principal of the Sater Companies

/ THE SCIENCE OF

ENERGY EFFICIENCY

Shop the Homes in this issue

Discover designers’ favorite sources for art and antiques—just visit mountainliving.com, click on each featured home and scroll down to the project resources.

/

Read Extended Interviews

The story behind the renovation of DRAM Apothecary (featured on page 36) is a fascinating one, and we didn’t have room to tell it all here. Visit mountainliving.com/dram to read the full interview with shop owner Shae Whitney.

w w w. i n s u l s t a r. c o m

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[

Web mountainliving.com Blog blog.mountainliving.com Facebook Mountain Living Magazine Twitter @MtnLivingMag


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SHOPPING

THE ART OF

SITTING

PHOTOS BY, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: JOHN WATSON, ERICKSON WOODWORKING, MATT COLLINS, JESSE CROWE, D. DEGABRIELE.

HAVE A SEAT CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: THUNDERBIRD CHAIR,

solid walnut and hand-sewn Italian leather, by Sabina Hill with Andy Everson, price upon request; Sabina Hill Design, sabinahill.com. SIDE CHAIR, salvaged European elm and precision-machined brass, $3,100; Erickson Woodworking, ericksonwoodworking.com. CONTINENTAL ARMCHAIR, railroad cross-ties with antique steel rails, $4,595; Rail Yard Studios, railyardstudios.com. TREE CHAIR in cherry and walnut, $4,400; Hughes Woodworks, hugheswoodworks.com. SNOW ON PINE ARMCHAIR in fumed cherry and leather with appliquĂŠd wool gabardine and hand-embroidery, $8,700; Anne Beard, 541-989-8144. >>

ML | www.mountainliving.com 25


Best place to own a second home in Tahoe. Barron’s

Best place to own a home. Anywhere. Period. Susan, San Francisco

Congratulations, your priorities are now perfectly in sync. How is it that a “second home” can be the home that owns your heart? When it’s at Martis Camp, it happens effortlessly. Sure, we can boast a Tom Fazio golf course, a direct ski lift to Northstar California™ and a Camp Lodge that contains an abundance of amazing. But home here is defined more by what you create than what you are given. And when those creations translate into memories, your Martis Camp home is, indeed, where your heart is.

.. MC. H  ,’ C H  ,,’

Access to and use of the recreational amenities are not included in the purchase of homesites and require separate club membership. Obtain and carefully review the offering circular for Martis Camp Club before making any decision to purchase a club membership. The information provided in this advertisement is strictly for informational purposes and shall not be construed as an offer in California or any other jurisdictions where prior registration or other advance qualification of real property is required. Prices are subject to change without notice. This is not an offer to sell property to, or a solicitation of offers from, residents of NY, NJ, CT, OR, or any other state that requires prior registration or qualification of real estate. Obtain the Property Report or its equivalent, required by Federal and State law and read it before signing anything. No Federal or State agency has judged the merits or value, if any, of this property.


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shopping

the pattern of

Textiles

Photos courtesy, clockwise from left: toh-atin gallery, azadi fine rugs, sheptons antiques, fighting bear antiques, shiprock gallery.

woven beauty clockwise from Left: Navajo weaving, bird

pictorial, 1978, 25 x 48 inches, $1,350; Toh-Atin Gallery, Durango, CO, toh-atin.com. antique serapi rug, c. 1880, 10 x 13 feet, price upon request; AZADI Fine Rugs, multiple locations including Telluride, CO, and Jackson, WY, azadifinerugs.com. Small kuba cloth runner, from the Democratic Republic of Congo, 2000, 17 x 40 inches, $67.50; Sheptons Antiques, Denver, CO, sheptonsantiques.com. late classic child’s blanket, circa 1875, 32 x 53 inches, $28,500; Fighting Bear Antiques, Jackson, WY, fightingbear.com. BANDED NAVAJO WEARING BLANKET, c. 1890, 4 x 6 feet, $7,500; Shiprock Gallery, Santa Fe, NM, shiprocksantafe.com. o

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M I L L E R C A N D A C E

A R C H I T E C T S , T I L L O T S O N - M I L L E R ,

4 0 6

2 2 2

7 0 5 7

w w w . c t m a r c h i t e c t s . c o m

A I A

P C


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TRAVEL

Rediscovering Reno NEVERMIND THOSE CASINOS. “THE BIGGEST LITTLE CITY IN THE WORLD” IS HOME TO ONE OF THE WEST’S MOST VIBRANT ARTS SCENES, TOO. STORY BY CHRISTINE DEORIO

YOU DON’T HAVE TO SCRATCH FAR BENEATH THE SURFACE TO FIND there’s a lot more than just gambling going on in this desert town at the foot of the Sierra Nevada. Turns out, Reno has become a minimecca for creative types. A few key factors, from its affordability to its proximity to the Silicon Valley and Lake Tahoe’s beaches and ski slopes, have made Reno an entrepreneurial hotspot, home base for top tech compa-

nies, destination for kayakers and mountain bikers—and home to a thriving arts and culture scene rivaling that of much larger cities. How did fine art find its way to Reno? With the help of a few pioneers who recognized the creative talent that’s always been in the region—and knew just how to showcase it. Here’s what we can thank them for:

PHOTOS, THIS SPREAD, COURTESY, FROM LEFT: VISITRENOTAHOE.COM, STREMMEL GALLERY.

LAKE TAHOE SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL

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STREMMEL GALLERY

STREMMEL GALLERY One of the finest contemporary art galleries in the West—founded in 1969 by husband and wife, Turkey and Peter Stremmel—can be found right in Reno’s Midtown district. It’s worth a stop just to marvel at the building’s award-winning architecture, but what’s inside the 6,500-square-foot space is equally impressive: paintings, drawings and sculptures by a broad range of mid-career and established artists from America and Europe. This fall, check out shows featuring Roger Berry’s graceful yet industrial metal sculptures, and remarkably realistic watercolor cityscapes by John Salminen. 1400 S. Virginia St., stremmelgallery.com >> ML | www.mountainliving.com 31


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travel

STAY The Peppermill Resort Spa Casino is Reno’s poshest place to stay, with luxe guest rooms, a three-story, 33,000-square-foot spa, and a “Caldarium” complete with indoor pool, sun deck and “secret garden.” peppermillreno.com

Truckee Riverfront

Artown Reno owes its reputation as a vibrant arts community in large part to Artown, a month-long festival held each July that showcases artists and performers from around the region and around the world. With more than 500 events to choose from (most of them free) in nearly 100 locations around town, there’s something to do every day, from art exhibitions and workshops to theatrical and musical performances to movies and dancing in the park. Not visiting in July? Get a taste of the festivities by strolling the Truckee River Arts District, where you can enjoy galleries, public art installations and events ranging from wine walks to street fairs any time of year. renoisartown.com nevada museum of art Inspired by the geologic formations of the nearby Black Rock Desert, this dramatic structure (by Phoenix-based Will Bruder Architects) encloses 15,337 square feet of gallery space—plus a rooftop sculpture garden—showcasing contemporary works, landscape photography, Western art and more, with special exhibitions highlighting an exciting array of artists and media. While you’re there, stop for a bite at Chez Louie, where menu items are often inspired by current exhibitions. 160 W. Liberty St., nevadaart.org

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EAT Unfussy, locally sourced, delicious Italian food is the focus at Campo, where chef/owner (and James Beard Award semifinalist) Mark Estee ensures that just about everything—from pizzas to salumi—is made in-house. camporeno.com

Photos, this spread, courtesy visitrenotahoe.com (TOP LEFT & RIGHT), Jamie Kingham for Nevada Museum of Art (BOTTOM).

When in Reno


Pioneer Center for the performing arts

pioneer center for the performing arts Known for its gold geodesic dome roof that nearly touches the ground, this 1,500-seat venue—completed in 1967—is on the Nevada State Register of Historic Places and the National Register of Historic Places. Home to the Reno Philharmonic Orchestra and the A.V.A. Ballet Theatre, the “Golden Turtle” hosts more than 100 live performances each year, including the popular “Broadway Comes to Reno” series—this fall, catch Blue Man Group, “Flashdance” and “Jersey Boys.” 100 S. Virginia St., pioneercenter.com

grimes point rock art Some of the area’s most fascinating art can be found not in galleries or museums, but outside, at one of the country’s most accessible petroglyph sites. At Grimes Point (about 75 miles from Reno) you’ll find hundreds of chocolate-brown boulders inscribed with circles, lines, and human and animal figures— all estimated to be about 6,000 years old. Visit on your own and view the petroglyphs from a short, self-guided interpretive trail, or join a free educational tour led by the Nevada Rock Art Foundation this August 16 or October 18. nvrockart.org

lake tahoe shakespeare festival The drama of Lake Tahoe’s spectacular scenery meets the drama of live theater at this annual festival at Sand Harbor State Park, not far from Incline Village. Each summer, more than 20,000 patrons gather at the outdoor amphitheater to enjoy professional productions of Shakespeare’s works as he intended them to be seen—outdoors, under the stars. This year, gorgeous sets and costumes will transform the lakeshore into the Forest of Arden six nights a week from July 11 to August 24, in a production of Shakespeare’s comedy “As You Like It.” laketahoeshakespeare.com

RIVERSIDE artist lofts Rising above the Truckee

Nevada Museum of Art

River, the Late Gothic Revival-style Riverside building has been converted from a historic hotel to a unique art space. The top five floors offer affordable live/work studios to artists—occasionally open to the public during the annual Artown festival—while the ground level houses the Sierra Arts Gallery, where you can browse contemporary artwork by new, mid-career and established artists, as well as University of Nevada students. 17 S. Virginia St., sierra-arts.org o ML | www.mountainliving.com 33


Photograph by Brent Bingham

JOIN THE RED CARPET CLUB Created for interior designers to provide handmade rugs, information, services and promotions for the trade. 201 Main St. Minturn, CO (970) 949-1730

thescarab.com/designers


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shops

A Wee Dram mixing up vintage design— and libations— in silver plume, colorado

Up in the mountains, in a tiny little town, there’s an even smaller shop and its name is DRAM. Don’t let the “BREAD” sign fool you; this 1890s-era building once housed a miner’s supply store and a bakery, but now it’s home to a booming business in bitters. DRAM Apothecary is the creation of Shae Whitney and Brady Becker, who handpick wild Colorado botanical ingredients for their bitters, teas and syrups from the nearby meadows and forests.

Story by Laura Beausire photography by Kimberly Gavin

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TASTING ROOM Whitney and Becker hauled more than 15 truckloads of garbage out of the neglected building, then they stained the wood and painted the walls a creamy white reminiscent of the nineteenth century. “Bitters are old-fashioned medicine that came into popularity in the 1800s, and I imagine our tasting room to be exactly like a place you would have been able to buy them during their heyday,” Whitney explains. “We really just stripped the space down to the elements that are meant to be appreciated on their own, without all the clutter and junk that had built up over years.” AUTHENTIC DETAILS

“Over the years the building has retained many of its original antiques and hardware, as it has always been the deal that everything stays with the building,” Whitney notes. Among the treasures the pair inherited (and repurposed) are an antique Hobart coffee and grain grinder, bulk grain drawers and vintage scales that were made in Denver in the 1900s. >>

ML | www.mountainliving.com 37


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Shops

historic magic “We found Silver Plume to be magical and charming and we love how it’s so close to Denver, yet feels so secluded,” Whitney says. “Brady and I are adventurers. We love to travel around to obscure mountain towns and forgotten ruins, and we always wished there was a place where we could get a great drink in a spooky/historic atmosphere, so we created it.” The sundrenched outdoor seating area features homemade picnic tables surrounded by vintage chairs rescued from a Denver alley and restored. The hand-cut “BREAD” letters are original. To uphold the bakery tradition, the Long I Pie Shop provides DRAM with an enticing array of pies.

beyond the bar Educated in food science, botany and ecological agriculture, Whitney, a Colorado native, also worked as a bartender for many years. Noticing the synthetic ingredients on a bottle of bitters, she declared, “I bet I could make better cocktail bitters, and I’m going to do it using wild Colorado plants and pay homage to my home.” Whitney and Becker found the building in Silver Plume the same week that she finally found the courage to quit her job.

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A LABOR OF LOVE

Whitney and Becker did all of the renovation work themselves, infusing their personalities into the shop. “We just wanted the building to look like it would have in the beginning—with a touch of whimsy offered by our collection of vintage taxidermy, antique knick-knacks, plants and gems and crystals.” The result is a delightful time-warp experience that pleases the two elixir entrepreneurs. “We want people to feel like they’ve gone somewhere that time forgot, where they can have a cocktail or piece of pie in an environment that’s relaxing, exciting and inspiring at the same time.” 

more

TO BUY Products are available for purchase online, where you’ll also find a variety of creative cocktail recipes. IF YOU GO Hours are limited; check website for updated information. Special tastings available by appointment. DRAM Apothecary Tasting Room and Bread Bar Silver Plume, Colorado 720-608-0063 dramapothecary.com

For more information on DRAM Apothecary, including recipes, visit mountainliving.com/dram.

ML | www.mountainliving.com 39


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Rustic Ranch Elegance When Suzanne Allen Sabo and Courtney Saldivar, owners of Allen-Guerra Architecture, started the architectural process on this Colorado home, they found themselves facing multiple challenges. One of their clients wanted a Colorado log cabin, while the other client wanted an elegant traditional design. After many months of design and modification, the resulting home is stunning. The two aesthetics truly come together beautifully in this state of the art log post and beam hybrid home. Allen-Guerra Architecture is a boutique architectural firm based in Breckenridge, Colorado and Houston, Texas. They specialize in Residential, Ranch and Farm, and Aero-architecture, with projects around the world. Courtney, Suzanne and the rest of their team can be found at www.allen-guerra.com.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY Roger Wade

A MOUNTAIN LIVING SPECIAL SECTION


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slater resiDence Breckenridge, Colorado

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Concierge Architecture firm specializing in ranch and farm, extraordinary homes, and beautiful commercial designs. FinD us at WWW.allen-GueRRa.com anD as FeatuReD in WWW.houZZ.com

Allen-Guerra Architecture & Allen-Guerra Design-Build, Inc. 1915 Airport Road, Ste 105, PO BOX 7488 Breckenridge, Colorado 80424 West Houston Airport, 18000 Groschke Road, Hangar G4-5 Houston, Texas 77094 www.allen-guerra.com

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niichel Design, llc

DiXie niichel, asiD, has eXtensiVe eXPerience on a wide range

of projects including showhomes, custom homes, multi-unit residences, and large commercial projects. Her strengthsinclude space planning, interior architectural design, Archi-CAD 3D software drawing, job site supervision, project planning, and budgeting. Dixie believes that the design is based upon a solid commitment of responding to the needs and desires of clients through creative, innovative solutions based on sound economic principles. Her extensive resources and experience, credibility and integrity are the cornerstones of her success in the design process. For more information, visit niicheldesign.com. Visit WWW.niichelDesiGn.com oR call 303 779 1790

FrOM sMall VacatiOn hOMes tO elaBOrate resOrts,

Sitka Log Homes always provides quality craftsmanship and professionalism. The timeless beauty of log and timber is enhanced in each of our projects. We strive to produce extraordinary homes and structures, we embrace creative design and with our clients, architects and designers, we are dedicated to providing premium results. At Sitka Log Homes, we offer the expertise of an internationally respected company, yet we take pride in our family business qualities that developed our company. Our goal is to provide our clients with results they will enjoy for many years to come. Visit WWW.sitKaloGhomes.com oR call 250 791 6683

DragOn FOrge, ltD. is an OrnaMental

blacksmithing studio owned and operated by Craig May. The studio is located in the foothills of the majestic Rocky Mountains southwest of Denver, where Craig has been designing, creating and breathing life into metal for more than 30 years. Using traditional forging methods, each project is hand-crafted as an individual endeavor geared to the client. The work incorporates the elements of their personal vision, the surrounding architecture and the stamp of Craig’s originality that distinguishes the art of Dragon Forge, Ltd. See next page for images. Visit WWW.DRaGonFoRGeltD.com oR call 303 838 1302

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Concierge Architecture firm specializing in ranch and farm, extraordinary homes, and beautiful commercial designs.

www.allen-guerra.com / 970.453.7002

2 We offer the expertise of an internationally respected company yet still embrace the family qualities that developed Sitka Log Homes.

www.sitkaloghomes.com / 250.791.6683

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niichel Design, llc

Niichel Design, LLC is owned by industry leading designer, Dixie Niichel, who creates innovative custom interior design concepts for national clientele. www.niicheldesign.com

DragOn FOrge, ltD.

An ornamental blacksmithing studio owned and operated by Craig May where each project is hand-crafted as an individual endeavor geared to the client.

www.dragonforgeltd.com / 303 838 1302

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ethan guerra, inc.

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engineering Design WOrKs, inc.

Specializing in custom residential construction for nearly two decades.

www.avalancheconstruction.com / 970 390 2621

Sturctural engineering, Carl Warnke, PE

edw@springsips.com / 970 879 4890 A MOUNTAIN LIVING SPECIAL SECTION

Top left and bottom right photo courtesy of Dragon Forge, LTD.


Makers of Fine Rugs Antique Navajo Rugs stocked

Cobblestone Center 475 N. Lake Blvd. Tahoe City, CA 96145 530-581-2555 tahoerugs.com

Rivers and ridges 3b

ML | www.mountainliving.com 47


promotion

save the date Mountain living is proud to sponsor the following high-country events:

August aspen art museum art crush www.aspenartmuseum.org aug. 1–2, 2014

Beaver creek resort arts fest www.beavercreek.com aug. 1–3, 2014

steamBoat all arts festival www.steamboat-chamber.com aug. 1–17, 2014

steamBoat wine festival www.steamboatwinefestival.com aug. 6–10, 2014

Beaver creek resort music experience www.beavercreek.com aug. 6 & 13, 2014

Beaver creek resort wine & spirits festival

E R I C SWA N S O N

www.beavercreek.com aug. 8–10, 2014

Beaver creek resort rodeo series www.beavercreek.com aug. 8 & 14, 2014

Beaver creek resort oktoBerfest www.beavercreek.com aug. 30–31, 2014

Swag and Swirl

Beaver creek resort culinary demonstration series

Antique door with hand-carved swag

www.beavercreek.com aug. 1–3, 15, 22–23, 30–31, 2014

and embellishments, fitted with curving, floral grillwork and cast bronze hardware

martis camp home tour www.martiscamp.com aug. 24, 2014

telluride film festival www.telluridefilmfestival.org aug. 29–sept. 1, 2014

aspen music festival www.aspenmusicfestival.com aug. 2014

strings music festival www.stringsmusicfestival.com aug. 2014

vail symposium www.vailsymposium.org aug. 2014

505.984 . 8164

48

ML | August 2014

LAPUE RTAOR IG I NALS .COM

Visit mountainliving.com/events for more high-country happenings. information/dates subject to change.


30TH ANNUAL JAckSoN HoLe FALL ArTS FeSTIvAL A Visual, Performing & Culinary Arts Celebration

SePTeMBer 3-14, 2014 Joshua Tobey

JAckSoN SYMPHoNY

Nancy Dunlop p Cawdrey

Forever Fore ver JAckSoN


LO G A N M A X W E L L H AG E G E O n e M a n S h o w - C h a n g i n g L i g h t

L OGAN M AXW ELL HAGEGE, LIKE A PASSING STORM , 24 X 48, OIL

FALL GOLD

N e w Wo r k s b y J o h n S e e r e y - L e s t e r , L i n d s a y S c o t t & T i m S o l l i d a y

TIM SOLLIDAY, ADJUSTING HIS SADDLE,

JOHN SEEREY-LESTER, KEEPER OF SECRETS,

LINDSAY SCOTT, UNDER THE ESCARPMENT,

40 X 40, OIL

36 X 60, ACRYLIC

42 X 25, OIL

SEPTEMBER 1 - 14, 2014 | RECEPTION: SEPTEMBER 13TH

| J A C K S O N H O L E , W YO M I N G

F O R A D D I T I O N A L I N F O R M AT I O N O N T H E S E O R O T H E R G A L L E RY A RT I S T S P L E A S E V I S I T T R A I L S I D E G A L L E R I E S . C O M

JACKSON HOLE 130 East Broadway, Jackson, WY 83001 (307) 733.3186 SCOTTSDALE 7330 Scottsdale Mall, Scottsdale, AZ 85251 (480) 945.7751 WWW.TRAILSIDEGALLERIES.COM

EMAIL INFO@TRAILSIDEGALLERIES.COM


A Foundation In Fine Living.

Jackson Hole I Scottsdale I Sedona I Telluride For More Information Please Call 307.734.0169

I

Kona

TM


Welcome

to the 30th year of the Jackson Hole Fall Arts Festival, widely recognized as one of the premier cultural events in the Rocky Mountain West. Every year the Fall Arts Festival continues to grow and draw thousands of art enthusiasts to experience the diverse artwork and breathtaking natural surroundings that make Jackson Hole a leading cultural center. For the 30th anniversary, the Fall Arts Festival has added a second Featured Fall Artist in the medium of sculpture to highlight the magnificent bronzes that Jackson has to offer.

The 2014 Festival will take place September 3-14, with world-class installments of visual, contemporary, culinary, western and Native American arts. Visitors will once again experience the works of nationally and internationally acclaimed artists, in addition to an exceptional array of music, cowboy poetry and cuisine. More than fifty events… gallery walks, workshops, artist receptions and more round out our 11-day Festival. A few of this year’s most anticipated events include the “Taste of the Tetons” during which participants experience food, wine and dessert in the heart of historic downtown Jackson; the 19th annual QuickDraw Art Sale and Auction where over 30 artists are showcased while creating original works as spectators watch; and the annual Western Design Conference! Jackson Hole is the proud host of this fabulous event known as the world’s preeminent exhibition of western furniture, fashion and accessories. Home to abundant wildlife, historic Old West appeal and award winning eateries, Jackson and the Fall Arts Festival cater to more than just the art lover. The valley is an avid outdoorsman’s paradise, with numerous activities such as horseback riding, river rafting, rock climbing and biking. More leisurely attractions include golfing, fly fishing and thousands of miles of hiking trails. After a day of adventure, visitors can unwind with a massage or body treatment in one of Jackson’s highly acclaimed luxury spas. The 2014 Jackson Hole Fall Arts Festival with its record number of artists, galleries and restaurants participating, as well as an event schedule catering to all interests, is shaping up to be the best yet! We invite you to come to Jackson and experience it for yourself!

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Table of contents

Schedule of Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Town Map & Gallery Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Fall Arts Festival 2014 – Featured Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Western Design Conference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Western Visions: Wild 100® . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Western Visions: Events Schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Signature Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 QuickDraw Art Sale & Auction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Festival Sponsors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

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112 Center Street • PO Box 550 • Jackson, WY 83001 • 307.733.3316 jacksonholechamber.com

JACKSON HOLE


Experience the wonder of nature through the lens of Thomas D. Mangelsen 170 North Cache

|

Jackson, WY

|

1/2 block north of the town square LIMITED EDITION FINE ART PHOTOGR APHY

|

|

307-733-9752 888-238-0177

www.mangelsen.com


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 3 JeW eLrY A ND A rTISA N LUNcHeoN AT SNoW k INg r eSorT

Enjoy an elegant luncheon at an exclusive destination. Preview and purchase handmade goods by premiere artisans of jewelry, fiber, leather, and other wearable art during this elegant event. This ladies-only event kicks off the Jewelry and Artisan portion of the National Museum of Wildlife Art’s Western Visions® activities. Register by August 28th online at WesternVisions.org or by calling 307.732.5411.

T Wo gr e Y HILLS

Award winning Hopi jewelry artist Duane Maktima will be in the gallery showing his latest works and pieces in progress. Duane was a premiere artist at the opening of the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington DC. His talent and over 38 years of experience have made Duane an accomplished designer & craftsman. Please join us in the gallery to meet Duane and enjoy his contemporary styled jewelry in both 14kt gold and sterling silver. 11am-6pm | 110 E. Broadway; 307.733.2677; fineindianart.com

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 5

11am-4pm | Snow King Resort. $100 per person

T Ur PIN gA LLerY

In studio demonstration by wildlife artist, Derek Wicks. Come meet the artist and view his latest works! 10am-4pm (continutes thru September 6th) | 25 S. Cache Street; 307.733.7530; turpingallery.com

A LTA MIr A gA LLerY

Schedule of events

R. Tom Gilleon “The Journey, not the Destination” Sept 1-15th Howard Post “Western Perspectives” Sept 1-15th Glenn Dean “The Lure of the West” Sept 1-15th Ed Mell “Beyond the Visable Terrain” Sept 1-15th Greg Woodard “Legends” Sept 5-15th Reception for each of these artists on Wednesday, September 10th from 5-8pm | Altamira Fine Art, 172 Center Street, 307.739.4700, altamiraart.com

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 4 W eSTer N DeSIgN coNFer eNce oPeNINg Pr e v IeW PA rT Y

VIP early entry into the Exhibit + Sale allows the public to view award winning craft, meet this year’s artisans, walk through the Designer Show House, experience a Fashion + Jewelry Show and participate in the live WDC Auction while enjoying local culinary creations by Café Genevieve + signature cocktails during a festive night of shopping and entertainment. Snow King Center / Doors open at 6pm Tickets $125–$50 in advance online and at the door (includes return privileges) WesternDesignConference.com

T Ur PIN gA LLerY

Artists reception for wildlife artist, Derek Wicks. Come meet the artist and view his new work. Refreshments and appetizers will be offered. 6pm–10pm | 25 S. Cache Street; 307.733.7530; turpingallery.com

W eSTer N DeSIgN coNFer eNce eXHIBIT + SA Le

The world’s preeminent exhibition and celebration of what is happening in the world of western design. Over 100 exhibitors showcase one-of-a-kind creations of furniture, fashion, jewelry, and home accessories during the 21st annual Exhibit + Sale hosted by Teton Home and Living magazine. NEW! Join us at 11am for the unveiling of more than $22,000 in Design Excellence Awards; meet the judges and enjoy a celebratory reception of libations and brunch bites with catering by E.Leaven Food Company. 10am–5pm | Snow King Center, Tickets at the door $15 (includes return privileges) WesternDesignConference.com

PA L ATeS & PA LeT TeS gA LLerY WA Lk

More than 30 art galleries open their doors to showcase magnificent art with food, wine and music! 5-8pm | Various locations, see gallery map, Open to the public.

r A r e gA LLerY

Come in and meet the artists, Rick Armstrong featuring his newest mixed media photographic collection, Pat Flynn will be displaying museum quality designer jewelry, Dan Burgette will debut his latest piece in his highly awarded carvings, Patricia Griffin will air her museum collection of paintings, Ron Russon will unveil his latest masterpiece, and Shawn Rivett will be available to discuss the rarest fossils from the Kemmerer mine featured in his photographs. This is the night to be at RARE Gallery! 5-8pm | 60 E. Broadway 2nd Floor, 307.733.8726, raregalleryjacksonhole.com

T Ur PIN gA LLerY

Join us for Palates & Palettes! Turpin Gallery once again joins with Moo’s Ice Cream to celebrate the Fall Arts Festival. Come enjoy specialty desserts and meet two of our artists, Derek Wicks and Cynthia Feustel. 5–8pm | 25 S. Cache Street; 307.733.7530; turpingallery.com

JAck SoN HoLe HISTor Ic A L SocIeT Y & MUSeUM

Folk and traditional arts fair featuring demonstrations and sales of frontier and homestead crafts and skills. Featured crafts include cinch and saddle pad making, hooked rugs, rope making, quilting, and other ranch and domestic arts.

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2–8pm | 225 N. Cache Street (Museum Gallery); 307.733.2414; jacksonholehistory.org

LegAc Y gA LLerY JACKSON HOLE

Kyle Polzin, One Man Show.

6-8pm | 75 N. Cache, 307.733.2353, legacygallery.com


80 W. BROADWAY, SUITE 104

P: 307.733.8582

W: DWELLINGJH.COM – DESIGNEDINTERIORSJH.COM

In the Heart of Jackson Hole


gr A ND TeToN gA LLerY

Artists in Residence: 11am–3pm | Shawndell Oliver - Mixed Media; 1–4pm | Jd Challenger - America’s most prominent painter of Native Americans; 6–8pm | Artist reception for Jd Challenger. 130 West Broadway, 307.201.1172, grandtetongallery.com

gr A ND TeToN gA LLerY

Artists in Residence: 11am–3pm | Shawndell Oliver - Mixed Media; 1–4pm | Jd Challenger - America’s most prominent painter of Native Americans. 130 West Broadway, 307.201.1172, grandtetongallery.com

T Wo gr e Y HILLS

Award winning Hopi jewelry artist Duane Maktima will be in the gallery showing his latest works and pieces in progress. Duane was a premiere artist at the opening of the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington DC. His talent and over 38 years of experience have made Duane an accomplished designer & craftsman. Please join us in the gallery to meet Duane and enjoy his contemporary styled jewelry in both 14kt gold and sterling silver.

11am-6pm | 110 E. Broadway; 307.733.2677; fineindianart.com

Schedule of events

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 6

10

W eSTer N DeSIgN coNFer eNce eXHIBIT + SA Le

The world’s preeminent exhibition and celebration of what is happening in the world of western design. Over 100 exhibitors showcase one-of-a-kind creations of furniture, fashion, jewelry, and home accessories during the 21st annual Exhibit + Sale hosted by Teton Home and Living magazine. NEW! Join us at 11am for the unveiling of more than $22,000 in Design Excellence Awards; meet the judges and enjoy a celebratory reception of libations and brunch bites with catering by E.Leaven Food Company. 10am–5pm | Snow King Center, Tickets at the door $15 (includes return privileges) WesternDesignConference.com

HISTor Ic r A NcH ToUr S

Visit historic valley ranches, where Jackson Hole’s cowboy heritage still thrives. Start out at the Walton Ranch and then head to the Snake River Ranch. The tour is complete with cowboys, Western entertainment, and a good ol’ fashion barbeque. Hosted by Mountain Living magazine. Busses leave Jackson’s Home Ranch parking lot at 2pm, $50 307.733.3316

r A r e gA LLerY

Today is a wonderful time to join us for a more in-depth look at the collection of Rick Armstrong. He will take you on a journey of his newest collection from concept thru creation. Pat Flynn trunk show and personal fitting. Permanent collection in the Smithsonian Museum. Shawn Rivett will be here to visit about each fossil subject in his photography so come full of questions! Patricia Griffin will be creatively painting on the deck overlooking the Town Square. 3-5pm | 60 E. Broadway 2nd Floor, 307.733.8726, raregalleryjacksonhole.com

JACKSON HOLE

T Wo gr e Y HILLS

Award winning Hopi jewelry artist Duane Maktima will be in the Gallery showing his latest works and pieces in progress. Duane was a premiered artist at the opening of the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington DC. His talent and over 38 years of experience have made Duane an accomplished designer & craftsman. Please join us in the Gallery to meet Duane and enjoy his contemporary styled jewelry in both 14kt Gold and Sterling Silver.

11am-6pm | 110 E. Broadway; 307.733.2677; fineindianart.com

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7 W eSTer N DeSIgN coNFer eNce eXHIBIT + SA Le

The world’s preeminent exhibition and celebration of what is happening in the world of western design. Over 100 exhibitors showcase one-of-a-kind creations of furniture, fashion, jewelry, and home accessories during the 21st annual Exhibit + Sale hosted by Teton Home and Living magazine. NEW! Join us at 11am for the unveiling of more than $22,000 in Design Excellence Awards; meet the judges and enjoy a celebratory reception of libations and brunch bites with catering by E.Leaven Food Company. 10am–5pm | Snow King Center, Tickets at the door $15 (includes return privileges) WesternDesignConference.com

15TH A NNUA L TA k IN’ IT To THe STr eeTS

An open-air, juried art fair featuring 40 local artists, including some of Jackson’s finest, selling an array of fine artwork. Presented by the Jackson Hole Art Association. 10am–4pm | Jackson Town Square, Contact Amy Fradley at 307.733.8792 or artistinfo@jhartfair.org

TA STe oF THe TeToNS

Valley chefs, restaurants and caterers put their best culinary work on display for sampling. Also enjoy the Rotary Supper Club of Jackson Hole’s wine tasting & silent auction, and the Howdy Pardners “Pickin’ in the Park” – and live musical entertainment. Each taste ticket is $1. 11am–3pm | Jackson Town Square. Open to the public.

roTA rY SUPPer cLUB’S FA LL A rTS FeSTIvA L WINe TA STINg A ND SILeNT AUcTIoN

Joining with Taste of the Tetons and Takin’ It to the Streets, the Rotary Supper Club produces the Wine Tasting and Silent Auction! All proceeds go back into the community through scholarships and sponsorships. 11am–4:30pm | Jackson Town Square


r A r e gA LLerY

Patricia Griffin is painting this afternoon overlooking the Town Square. Petra Class Trunk Show will have her latest custom pieces to try on while you get your personal color palette done. Trenton Higley will be here to show his most recent Yellowstone paintings. Dan Burgette will take you on a journey of the high Tetons through his 1st Place World’s Awarded avian carvings. His knowledge of the local mountains is unparalled! noon-5pm | 60 E. Broadway 2nd Floor, 307.733.8726, raregalleryjacksonhole.com

gr A ND TeToN gA LLerY

Artists in Residence: 1–4pm | Jd Challenger - America’s most prominent painter of Native Americans. 130 West Broadway, 307.201.1172, grandtetongallery.com

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9 gr A ND TeToN gA LLerY

Schedule of events

Artists in Residence: 11am–3pm | Gary Keimig, Tom Lucas, Les LeFevre - painting demonstration; 3–6pm | Rip Caswell – sculpture demonstration, Gayle Weisfield - painting with watercolors.

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130 West Broadway, 307.201.1172, grandtetongallery.com

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10 PoSTer SIgNINg WITH NA Nc Y DUNLoP c AW Dr e Y AT W eST LIv eS oN coNTeMPor A rY

Meet artist, Nancy Dunlop Cawdrey, and receive a personally signed poster of her featured painting, “Forever Jackson”. 3-5pm | West Lives On Contemporary, Open to the public.

PoSTer SIgNINg WITH JoSHUA ToBe Y AT A STor I A FINe A rT

Tr Io FINe A rT gA LLerY DeMoNSTr ATIoNS

The opening of “In Our Valley” exhibition that features the Trio artists and paintings of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Free and open to the public. 5–8pm | Trio Fine Art Gallery, 545 N. Cache, 307.734-4444, triofineart.com

r INgHoLZ ST UDIoS

The “Night Fenix” will rise for ONE NIGHT ONLY at 125 N Cache Street with a creative opening reception for Amy Ringholz. An inspired evening will showcase her twelve new wildlife works. Stop in from the Art Walk for live music, a coffee treat or a cocktail as you meander through the streets of Jackson. We will be open late to celebrate the Fall Festival. 5-11pm | 125 N Cache, ringholzstudios.com, 307.734.3964

A LTA MIr A gA LLerY

Reception for: R. Tom Gilleon “The Journey, not the Destination” Sept 1-15th Howard Post “Western Perspectives” Sept 1-15th Glenn Dean “The Lure of the West” Sept 1-15th Ed Mell “Beyond the Visable Terrain” Sept 1-15th Greg Woodard “Legends” Sept 5-15th 5-8pm | Altamira Fine Art, 172 Center Street, 307.739.4700, altamiraart.com

gr A ND TeToN gA LLerY

Artists in Residence: 11am–3pm | Deb Penk - painting with acrylics; 1–4pm | Rip Caswell – sculpture demonstration and pre-cast sale. 130 West Broadway, 307.201.1172, grandtetongallery.com

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 11 WILD 100 A rTIST PA rT Y

4-6pm | Astoria Fine Art. Open to the public.

As part of the National Museum of Wildlife Art’s 27th annual Western Visions: Wild 100 Show & Sale, artists and patrons have an opportunity to view the art, place bids, and mingle with artists before the big sale. The Wild 100 Artist Party features delicious hors d’oeuvres provided by the Rising Sage Café, a full bar, and a low key, casual evening.

A rT WA Lk

5:30-8:30pm | National Museum of Wildlife Art Entry: $100 (Registration Required), westernvisions.org

Meet the Fall Arts Festival first Featured Sculptor, Joshua Tobey, and receive a personally signed poster of the first featured sculpture “Jackson Symphony”.

Join more than 30 Jackson art galleries for the Third Thursdays Art Walk, moved to Wednesday evening for the week of the Fall Arts Festival. Enjoy fine art and experience the vibrant Jackson art scene. Look for the Art Walk banners! 5-8pm | Various locations – see gallery map. Open to the public.

r A r e gA LLerY

Tonight’s Art Walk we are honored to host Rick Armstrong, Dan Burgette, Patricia Griffin and Shawn Rivett. Be sure to “Meet the Artist” tonight. You will have a new appreciation for the work of our highly awarded artists at RARE Gallery.

r A r e gA LLerY

Petra Class Trunk Show & Personal Fitting. Her unique 22K designs are adorned with amazing gemstones of the West. Her work is in permanent collections of multiple museums; we will house an incredible collection to choose from. 3-5pm | 60 E. Broadway 2nd Floor, 307.733.8726, raregalleryjacksonhole.com

A LTA MIr A FINe A rT

Meet the artists: R. Tom Gilleon and Greg Woodard

5-8pm | 60 E. Broadway 2nd Floor, 307.733.8726, raregalleryjacksonhole.com

2-4pm | Altamira Fine Art, 172 Center Street, 307.739.4700, altamiraart.com

T Ur PIN gA LLerY

A STor I A FINe A rTS r ecePTIoN

6–10pm | 25 S. Cache Street; 307.733.7530; turpingallery.com

3-6pm | Astoria Fine Art, 35 E. Deloney (on the Town Square), 307.733.4016, .astoriafineart.com

Artist reception for contemporary bronze artist, Alex Alvis. Come meet Alex and view her new work. Refreshments and appetizers will be offered.

JACKSON HOLE

Welcome to Fall Arts Artist Reception for Joseph Alleman and Gerald Balciar


Bar B Bar Ranch

J A C K S O N H O L E , W YO M I N G

Set on 72 acres, this ranch estate is nestled at the base of the Teton Mountains with panoramic Teton views. Included in the offering is a 7,600 sq. ft. luxury lodge, a six bedroom bunk house and separate recreation home with observatory, squash court, climbing wall and fitness gym. Beautiful spring creeks and ponds enhance the native foliage, aspen and conifers of the nature scape. Privacy with easy proximity to the town of Jackson and the Jackson Hole private airport. Price upon request.

JACKSON HOLE 2014 • • • • •

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LEARN MORE : : 307.739.8132 The #1 Real Estate Team in Jackson Hole in 2013


gr A ND TeToN gA LLerY

Schedule of events

Artists in Residence: 11am–1pm | Deb Fox - painting with watercolor on canvas and Deb Penk - painting with acrylics; 2–5pm | Rip Caswell – sculpture demonstration and precast sale.

14

r A r e gA LLerY

130 West Broadway, 307.201.1172, grandtetongallery.com

Rick Armstrong: Come meet the artist and hear about the next collection and presale of the unreleased work. It is a one -of-a-kind opportunity to collect a piece from his next series. Patricia Griffin will be painting a new piece, overlooking the Town Square. Represented in 11 museums.

T Wo gr e Y HILLS

3-5pm | 60 E. Broadway 2nd Floor, 307.733.8726, raregalleryjacksonhole.com

Jeff Roller, award winning Santa Clara pottery artist will be in the gallery to show his latest works. Jeff is a 6th generation potter in the famous Tafoya family. As the son of award winning potter Toni Roller and the grandson of the famed potter Margaret Tafoya, he was exposed to the finest works in traditional Pueblo pottery. Jeff began making his pottery at age nine and today his creations are among the most exquisite Native American pottery to be produced. Please join us in the gallery to meet Jeff and discuss his art. Gene Waddell from Waddell Trading Company in Scottsdale, AZ will be in the gallery showcasing his fabulous collectible jewelry. The collection will have a selection of contemporary and the finest vintage pieces. You will have an opportunity to see and purchase works from Charles Loloma, Preston Monongye, Jesse Monongya & Don Supplee to name a few. Please join us in the gallery for the show and sale of the Masters. 11am-6pm | 110 E. Broadway; 307.733.2677; fineindianart.com

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 12 THe JAck SoN HoLe SHoWc A Se oF HoMeS

The Jackson Hole Showcase of Homes is a two-day, self-guided fundraising tour to experience the craftsmanship and meet the artists behind some of Jackson’s most spectacular homes. More than the ordinary walk-through, the Jackson Hole Showcase of Homes has a superb catch: face-to-face conversations with the finest professionals in architecture, construction, interior design, landscaping and electronic systems. They will reveal the art—and perhaps the magic— behind their achievements in some of the most exciting living spaces in the West. Hosted by Homestead Magazine. Limited tickets available. For more information and to purchase tickets please go to: jacksonholeshowcase.com.

WILD 100 SHoW & SA Le

Featuring works by 100 of the country’s leading artists. This is the final opportunity to place your bid prior to the drawing that determines who is going home with a beautiful new work of art. This exciting evening features a buffet dinner and beverages, and most importantly, the names of the winning bidders are drawn. Entry: $150 (Registration Required) Doors open 5:30pm, bidding closes 7:00pm, presentation follows | National Museum of Wildlife Art. westernvisions.org

LegAc Y gA LLerY

“Legacy of Nature” Group Wildlife and Sporting Art Show featuring Tim Shinabarger, Michael Coleman, Luke Frazier, Chad Poppleton, Bill Alther and Brian Grimm. 2-5pm | 75 N. Cache, 307.733.2353, legacygallery.com

A LTA MIr A FINe A rT

Meet the artists: R. Tom Gilleon and Greg Woodard 2-4pm | Altamira Fine Art, 172 Center Street, 307.739.4700, altamiraart.com

A STor I A FINe A rTS r ecePTIoN Artist Reception for Joshua Tobey and Greg Beecham

1-4pm | Astoria Fine Art, 35 E. Deloney (on the Town Square), 307.733.4016, .astoriafineart.com

gr A ND TeToN gA LLerY

Artists in Residence: 11am–4pm | Bob Coontz - wildlife painting with acrylics, Rip Caswell – sculpture demonstration and pre-cast sale; 7–9pm | Artist reception: Bob Coontz, D. Michael Thomas, Rip Caswell, Gayle Westerfeild, Deb Fox and Deb Penk. 130 West Broadway, 307.201.1172, grandtetongallery.com

W eST BA Nk A rTISTS ST UDIo ToUr

Rare opportunity to visit prominent artist’s studios. Watch the creative process, interact with the artists and appreciate their creative environment. West Bank Art Studios, Variety of locations (visit jacksonholechamber.com for complete list) 307.733.5096, thalglass.com

T Wo gr e Y HILLS

Jeff Roller, award winning Santa Clara pottery artist will be in the gallery to show his latest works. Jeff is a 6th generation potter in the famous Tafoya family. As the son of award winning potter Toni Roller and the grandson of the famed potter Margaret Tafoya, he was exposed to the finest works in traditional Pueblo pottery. Jeff began making his pottery at age nine and today his creations are among the most exquisite Native American pottery to be produced. Please join us in the Gallery to meet Jeff and discuss his art. Gene Waddell from Waddell Trading Company in Scottsdale, AZ will be in the gallery showcasing his fabulous collectible jewelry. The collection will have a selection of contemporary and the finest vintage pieces. You will have an opportunity to see and purchase works from Charles Loloma, Preston Monongye, Jesse Monongya & Don Supplee to name a few. Please join us in the gallery for the show and sale of the Masters. 11am-6pm | 110 E. Broadway; 307.733.2677; fineindianart.com

JACKSON HOLE


THe JAck SoN HoLe SHoWc A Se oF HoMeS Friday, Sept., 12th - through Saturday Sept., 13th

Tour a selection of Teton County’s most exquisitely designed, built and decorated homes by our valley’s premier architects, builders and interior designers. This event will be a self-guided tour, offering an opportunity for established and prospective residents as well as visitors to see first hand the craftsmanship and artisan style that is uniquely Jackson Hole – where western and contemporary unite. Hosted by Homestead Magazine. 10am-6pm | Various Locations, see Showcase map, Tickets online or at select retailers $10 in advance, or $15 day of Showcase homes. www.jacksonholeshowcase.com

19TH A NNUA L JAck SoN HoLe QUIck Dr AW A rT SA Le A ND AUcTIoN

Nationally, regionally, and locally recognized artists paint and sculpt as spectators look on. The one-of a-kind artwork will be auctioned off following the ninety minute creative process, along with the sale of “Forever Jackson,” by Nancy Dunlop Cawdrey and the first-time sculpture raffle of “Jackson Symphony”, the featured artwork of the 2014 Fall Arts Festival. 9am | Jackson Town Square. Open to the public.

BeST oF A STor I A SHoW

8th annual Best of Astoria Show – 25 gallery artists in attendance Special Artist Guest: Ewoud de Groot 10am-1pm | Astoria Fine Art, 35 E. Deloney (on the Town Square), 307.733.4016, .astoriafineart.com

W eST BA Nk A rTISTS ST UDIo ToUr

T Wo gr e Y HILLS

Jeff Roller, award winning Santa Clara pottery artist will be in the gallery to show his latest works. Jeff is a 6th generation potter in the famous Tafoya family. As the son of award winning potter Toni Roller and the grandson of the famed potter Margaret Tafoya, he was exposed to the finest works in traditional Pueblo pottery. Jeff began making his pottery at age nine and today his creations are among the most exquisite Native American pottery to be produced. Please join us in the gallery to meet Jeff and discuss his art. Gene Waddell from Waddell Trading Company in Scottsdale, AZ will be in the gallery showcasing his fabulous collectible jewelry. The collection will have a selection of contemporary and the finest vintage pieces. You will have an opportunity to see and purchase works from Charles Loloma, Preston Monongye, Jesse Monongya & Don Supplee to name a few. Please join us in the gallery for the show and sale of the Masters. 11am-6pm | 110 E. Broadway; 307.733.2677; fineindianart.com

FA LL A rTS FeSTIvA L A rTIST PA rT Y oN THe ToWN SQUA r e

Rare opportunity to visit prominent artist’s studios. Watch the creative process, interact with the artists and appreciate their creative environment.

Join artists from Astoria Fine Art & West Lives On galleries for this fun-filled reception in the tent on the Town Square! Meet both featured artists, Joshua Tobey and Nancy Dunlop Cawdrey, as the weekend winds down for the Fall Arts Festival!

West Bank Art Studios, Variety of locations (visit jacksonholechamber.com for complete list) 307.733.5096, thalglass.com

TBD | Jackson Town Square. Open to the public.

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 14

A LTA MIr A FINe A rT

A rT BrUNcH gA LLerY WA Lk

Meet the artists: R. Tom Gilleon and Greg Woodard 2-4pm | Altamira Fine Art, 172 Center Street, 307.739.4700, altamiraart.com

Schedule of events

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 13

Join Jackson’s 30-plus art galleries for brunch and festive beverages at this closing day celebration of yet another superb Fall Arts Festival! Brunch, Bloody Marys and spectacular art…what an ending! 11am-3pm | Various locations – see gallery map. Open to the public.

SePTeMBer Future Festival Dates

September 10-20, 2015 • September 8-18, 2016 • September 7-17, 2017

2014 FALL ARTS FESTIVAL

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INSPIRED BY THE NATURAL WORLD.

Design Studio & Interiors 30 S. King Street • Jackson, WY 83001 307.200.4881 • wrjdesign.com


INFORMED BY THE REST OF IT.

Like you, we are inspired every day by the natural beauty, textures and colors of the mountain west. Informed by European styles and worldly knowledge of art, design, antiques and architecture, we combine these influences with your dreams and aspirations to create luxurious interiors with sophisticated alpine elegance. We invite you to stop by our showroom or visit us online.


Kelly

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TOWN TO WN P PARKING ARKING LOT Gill

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Town Map & gallery guide

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Perry

Jackosn Hole Golf and Tennis nnis Estates Estate


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Art Association/Center for the Arts 240 South Glenwood 733-6379

12. Images of Nature 170 North Cache Street 733-9752

22. Trio Fine Art 545 North Cache Street 734-4444

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Astoria Fine Art 35 East Deloney Avenue 733-4016

13. Legacy Gallery 75 North Cache Street 733-2353

23. Two Grey Hills 110 East Broadway Avenue 733-2677

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Brookover Gallery 125 North Cache Street 732-3988

14. Mountain Trails Gallery 155 North Center Street 734-8150

24. West Lives On Gallery 75 North Glenwood Street 734-2888

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Cayuse Western Americana 255 North Glenwood Street 739-1940

15. National Museum of Wildlife Art 2820 Rungius Road 733-5771

25. West Lives On Contemporary Gallery 55C North Glenwood Street 734-2888

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Diehl Gallery 155 West Broadway Avenue 733-0905

16. RARE Gallery 60 East Broadway 733-8726

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Fighting Bear Antiques 375 South Cache Street 733-2669

17. Rich Haines Gallery 150 Center Street 733-7530

26. Wilcox Gallery 110 Center Street and 1975 North Highway 89 733-6450

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Grand Teton Gallery 130 West Broadway 201-1172

18. Turpin Gallery 25 South Cache Street 733-7530

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Heather James Gallery 172 Center Street | Suite 101 200-6090

19. Shadow Mountain Gallery 10 West Broadway Avenue 733-3162

gallery Listing

Altamira Fine Art 172 Center Street 739-4700

10. Hennes Studio & Gallery 5850 Larkspur Drive 733-2593

Horizon Fine Art 30 King Street 739-1540

21. Trailside Galleries 130 East Broadway Avenue 733-3186

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27. Wild by Nature Gallery 95 West Deloney Avenue 733-8877 28. Wild Hands 265 West Pearl Avenue 733-4619

20. Tayloe Piggot Gallery 62 South Glenwood Street 733-0555

2014 FALL ARTS FESTIVAL

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Nancy Dunlop p Cawdrey

Forever Fore ver JAckSoN

“Jackson Hole has been good to me…and for me! Each September when I do the Falls Arts Festival Quick Draw in the town square, I hope to invite folks along in the creative process of showing up and being as big as I can be. Pushing the edges of medium, form, technique and subject matter, I broadcast an invitation to expansiveness – which is why I love the West. The sky is the limit…and it is limitless. When I found silk painting some 25 years ago, I was struck with the strength of color, the fluidity of the medium, the expressiveness of the brush strokes. For 2014, the C.M. Russell Museum has selected the founding members of the Russell Skull Society of Artists, a new, elite group of contemporary Western artists. Nancy Dunlop Cawdrey is one of only two women selected. Nancy shows regularly at the National Museum of Wildlife Art, the Buffalo Bill Historical Museum, the CM Russell Museum, the National Cowboy Museum, the Gilcrease, the Phippen Museum, the “Cowgirl” Up Show, and the Western Masters Show. Cawdrey is represented by West Lives On Gallery, Jackson, WY, The Big Horn Galleries, Cody, WY and Tubac, AZ; Hayden Hays Gallery at the Broadmoor Hotel in Colorado Springs, CO and The Howell Gallery in Oklahoma City, OK

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Joshua Tobey

JAckSoN SYMPHoNY Josh grew up in Santa Fe, New Mexico, the son of renowned ceramic and bronze sculptors Gene and Rebecca Tobey. Josh began sculpting in clay and casting in bronze at the age of six. “My childhood was full of gallery shows and art foundries. Many of the people I grew up around are today’s most established western artists”. At 35 years old, Josh is well established in the Western art world, creating bronze sculptures of wildlife featuring a contemporary patina. Renowned for this patina work, Josh combines his love of art and his lifelong passion for the outdoors in his bronze sculpture. Sometimes called whimsical, Josh’s work also has a serious side; it depicts the “interdependence of wildlife and humanity” by revealing aspects of human emotion, experience and culture through wildlife sculpture. His work ranges in size from miniature to monumental. Josh’s work has been featured in several national magazines, including the cover artist for Wildlife Art. Most recently, John was invited to the Collectors’ Reserve Show at the Gilcrease Museum in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Other honors include three major works in the Raymond James Financial art collection, and public works in the collections of Na ‘Aina Kai Botanical Gardens and Sculpture Park in Kauai, Western State University, the Medical Center of the Rockies, and the Phoenix Children’s Hospital. Josh became an elected member of the National Sculpture Society in 2012 and currently serves as a board member of the Artist Charitable Fund, a nonprofit organization.


CONTEMPORARY & TRADITIONAL WESTERN ART

“Fire in the Belly”

• 23 x 83 French dye on silk

Jackson Hole Fall Arts Festival September 3 – 15, 2014 Featured Artist

NaNcy cawdrey Artists Reception September 6th • 2 – 6 pm “Peek-A-Boo”

• 16 x 20 French dye on silk

Please call for photos of additional work or visit our website at: www.westliveson.com We update our website weekly. All acquisitions are guaranteed and can be returned within two weeks if not satisfied.

“Where the Wild Things Run”

• 20 x 42 French dye on silk

75 N. GleNwood, across the street west of the Wort Hotel • Po Box 4840 • JacksoN, wY 83001 ph: 307 734-2888 • tf: 800 883-6080 • fx: 307 734-2812 • FineArt@WestLivesOn.cOm • WWW.WestLivesOn.cOm


22nd WeSTerN DeSIgN conference H ATS oFF To A NeW cL A SSIc IN JAck SoN HoLe! Just when you thought you knew what to expect, the 2014 Western Design Conference Exhibit + Sale introduces a contemporary slate of events and exhibits showcasing preeminent artists working in the American Western genre. On the evening of September 4th, the Snow King Center will come alive with the Opening Preview Party and Fashion + Jewelry Show. Models, live music, and libations will flow as the 22nd annual WDC kicks off a festive night of shopping with great style. Over 130 artists and exhibitors will deliver an unprecedented intersection of functional Western art and entertainment.

Best of the West

In a highly anticipated creative change, a Designer Show House will anchor the show floor. Six rooms created by acclaimed designers, artists, and vendors will incorporate sophisticated finishes and highly prized pieces into a contemporary timber frame-inspired home.

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The WDC is one of the landmark events of the Fall Arts Festival in Jackson Hole. It is renowned for the caliber of artists and couture pieces showcased annually. With over seventeen thousand dollars awarded in prize money, juried artists from around the country jockey for the opportunity to participate at this nationally acclaimed exhibit and sale. Recognizing the need for a multi-faceted experience, Retail Row was created as another new component to debut at the 2014 show. “Retail Row is a secondary shopping experience featuring fashion, jewelry, and home goods that’s designed to be accessible to everyone,” says show owner Allison Merritt. The WDC Exhibit+ Sale is a signature event of the Fall Arts Festival and runs September 4-7 at the Snow King Center in Jackson, Wyoming. Visit WesternDesignConference.com for tickets and more information.

For more information contact: Allison Merritt, 307.690.9719 or allison@westerndesignconference.com

events Schedule THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 4 W eSTer N DeSIgN coNFer eNce oPeNINg Pr e v IeW PA rT Y

VIP early entry into the Exhibit + Sale allows the public to view award winning craft, meet this year’s artisans, walk through the Designer Show House, experience a Fashion + Jewelry Show and participate in the live WDC Auction while enjoying local culinary creations by Café Genevieve + signature cocktails during a festive night of shopping and entertainment. Snow King Center / Doors open at 6pm Tickets $125–$50 in advance online and at the door (includes return privileges) WesternDesignConference.com

FRIDAY, SATURDAY & SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 5-7 W eSTer N DeSIgN coNFer eNce eXHIBIT + SA Le

The world’s preeminent exhibition and celebration of what is happening in the world of western design. Over 100 exhibitors showcase one-of-a-kind creations of furniture, fashion, jewelry, and home accessories during the 21st annual Exhibit + Sale hosted by Teton Home and Living magazine. NEW! Join us at 11am for the unveiling of more than $22,000 in Design Excellence Awards; meet the judges and enjoy a celebratory reception of libations and brunch bites with catering by E.Leaven Food Company. Snow King Center, 10am – 5pm. Tickets at the door $15 (includes return privileges). WesternDesignConference.com

JACKSON HOLE


The art of timberframing Wood & Steel. Like a frame on a fine painting, a beautiful timber-framed structure is not complete without the mass and strength of steel plates.

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Visit me at the Western Design Conference in Jackson, WY • September 4th-7th

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FIREPLACE SCREENS

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27th Annual Western visions

Wild 100

®

The National Museum of Wildlife Art has announced a new “Wild 100®” approach for its annual Western Visions® fundraiser, scheduled for August 30 – September 21, 2014. A month-long art celebration presented by the Jackson Hole, Wyoming-based museum, Western Visions combines lectures, artist demos and fabulous artsy parties with the chance to view and purchase the best of wildlife and Western art – and has been a cornerstone of the Jackson Hole Fall Arts Festival for more than two decades. But the event’s very success had become a problem as the number of participating artists grew, prompting the decision to focus on a field of 100 artists – the Wild 100 – for 2014.

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“What started 27 years ago as the work of 30 artists in a single miniatures show and sale to benefit the museum has evolved and grown until in 2013 we featured 150 artists and numerous related events, exhibitions and sales,” says Jim McNutt, president and CEO of the museum. “We’re thrilled that Western Visions has become established as a major national show. In order to give the kind of attention to each artist and buyer that we would like to provide, we have fixed the number of artists participating at 100 as we move forward, and rebranded our two major events as the Wild 100 Show & Sale and the Wild 100 Artist Party.” Western Visions’ new, curated, 100 artists approach allows the National Museum of Wildlife Art to showcase a combination of well-established top-selling artists and emerging talents who will be the next generation of leading wildlife artists in an exceptional arts experience for artists and collectors alike. In addition to the Wild 100 Artist Party, September 11, and the Wild 100 Show & Sale, September 12, the museum has announced its featured artists for 2014 – painter Ewoud de Groot and sculptor Gwynn Murrill – and will present opportunities to experience their work and techniques in presentations on September 11. Other Western Visions activities include the Paintings, Sculpture and Sketch shows and sales, the Jewelry & Artisan Luncheon and Show & Sale, the Palates and Palettes free tasting and viewing event, September 5, and the follow-up Art a’ Brewin’ browsing and buying opportunity, September 24. For more information and a complete schedule of Western Visions events, visit westernvisions.org.

JACKSON HOLE

EWOUD DE GROOT PAINTING

cASPIAN Oil on Linen 25 x 25

eWoUD De grooT

lives and works in Egmond aan Zee, a coastal village in the north of the Netherlands. Born in 1969 in Alkmarr, he attended the Minerva Academy of Art and received a degree in illustration and painting. After illustrating nature books for a couple of years, he began painting full time. His work has been featured in many exhibitions in the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and the United States. His subjects are often seabirds and waders. He spends time on his Dutch shrimp cutter exploring the Waddensea, an internationally known wetland that is actually a chain of islands, mudflats, and sandbanks, starting in the Netherlands and ending in the south of Denmark.

GWYNN MURRILL SCULPTURE

FLYINg eAgLe M AQUeTTe Bronze and Pink Sandstone 17.5 x 11 x 7.5

gW YNN MUrrILL’S work bridges figurative and abstract sculpture. Her animal figures serve as points of departure for the exploration of form, becoming vessels, which, reduced to their most basic lines and shapes, elegantly echo the essence of her subject. Her initial sculptures of the early 1970s, carved from found wood, laminated into large blocks, gave way to stone and marble pieces as Murrill’s process evolved through the early 1980s. Murrill is now best known for her timeless animal forms cast in bronze. Murrill’s work is held by numerous private collections and can be seen in number of public commissions throughout the U.S. and across the globe.


Authentic.

Cheyenne/Sioux Child’s Saddle Circa 1885

V i n ta g e N ava j o , Z u n i and Pueblo Jewelry 1880-1950

F i n e C ow b o y, I n d i a n a n d N at i o n a l P a r k A n t i q u e s S e l e c t C o n t e m p o r a r y A r t s o f t h e We s t

2 5 5 N o r t h G l e n w o o d , J a c k s o n , WY 8 3 0 0 1

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More information is at our website, Facebook, or contact Cayuse Western Americana


Grand Vision

A S h ow o f Wo r k & B o o k S i g n i n g C e l e b r at i n g t h e r e l e a s e o f

Harrison R. Crandall By Dr. Kenneth A. Barrick

At T h e W e s t e r n D e s i g n C o n f e r e n c e A n d at C ay u s e W e s t e r n A m e r i c a n a S e p t e m b e r 6 – 8 , 2 0 13 More information is at our website, Facebook, or contact Cayuse Western Americana

F i n e C ow b o y, I n d i a n a n d N at i o n a l P a r k A n t i q u e s

2 5 5 N o r t h G l e n w o o d , J a c k s o n , WY 8 3 0 0 1

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®

Wild 100 events Schedule

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WILD 100 EVENTS CALENDAR WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 3 - FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 5

features delicious hors d’oeuvres provided by the Rising Sage Café, beverages, and an exciting evening.

This premier show and sale features one-of-a-kind and limited-edition work by the greatest contemporary artisans in the country. Select offerings include handmade fine jewelry, wearable art, leather work, and other beautiful accessories.

5:30pm-8:30pm | $100 per person. Complimentary catalog included. Register online or call 307.732.5412. Party and Show Event Combo ticket available to attend the Wild 100 Artist Party and the Wild 100 Show & Sale. $200 per person.

JeWeLrY & ArTISAN SHoW & SALe

9am-5pm

JeWeLrY & ArTISAN LUNcHeoN

FeATUreD ArTIST eveNT: goINg WILD WITH eWoUD De grooT

11am-4pm | $100 per person. Register online or call 307.732.5412.

6pm-7pm | Free for guests attending the Wild 100 Artist Party. Register online for the Wild 100 Artist Party or call 307.732.5412.

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 3

Enjoy an elegant luncheon at the newly renovated Snow King Grand Room in Jackson. Preview and purchase handmade goods by premiere artisans of jewelry, fiber, leather, and other wearable art during this elegant event. This ladiesonly event kicks-off the Jewelry and Artisan portion of the National Museum of Wildlife Art’s Western Visions activities. The luncheon will be followed by two events featuring Jewelry & Artisans at the Museum: Thursday, September 4 from 9am-5pm Join us for High Tea at 2pm through the afternoon (while champagne lasts!) Friday, September 5 from 9am-5pm Join us for Palates & Palettes from 3-5pm THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 11

WILD 100 ArTIST PArTY

As part of the National Museum of Wildlife Art’s 27th annual Western Visions: Wild 100 Show & Sale, artists and patrons have an opportunity to view the art, place bids, and mingle with artists before the big sale. The Wild 100 Artist Party

On the evening of Thursday, September 11, join featured artist Ewoud de Groot “Going Wild.” Join Ewoud in learning his process in a demonstration. Ewoud will be painting in the open so everyone can experience his technique.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 12

WILD 100 SHoW & SALe

Doors open 5:30 PM Bidding closes 7:00 PM Presentation to follow Featuring works by 100 of the country’s leading artists. This is the final opportunity to place your bid prior to the drawing that determines who is going home with a beautiful new work of art. This exciting evening features a buffet dinner and beverages, and most importantly, the names of the winning bidders are drawn. $100 per person. Complimentary catalog included. Register online or call 307.732.5412.

FALL ARTS FESTIVAL SPONSORS The Jackson Hole News & Guide is Teton County, Wyoming’s award winning, hometown newspaper. Voted Best of the Best by the National Newspaper Association in 2004, the News&Guide offers its readers a weekly reflection of life in the Tetons with compelling photography and presented in an easy-to-read format. Whether you call Jackson Hole home or simply share a special interest in the issues and events shaping the future of the valley, the News & Guide is the source to keep you connected. Both mail-delivered and e-edition subscriptions are available by calling 307.733.2047 or at jhnewsandguide.com/subscribe. JACKSON HOLE

Mountain Living is a proud sponsor of the Jackson Hole Fall Arts Festival. Mountain Living magazine celebrates the homes and lifestyles of the Rocky Mountain West. Discover all the latest trends in high country decorating and architecture as well as entertaining and travel tips, food, shopping and the arts. Pick up this month’s issue on the newsstands now, visit us online at mountainliving.com or call 888.645.7600 to subscribe.


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 5

PA L ATeS & PA LeT TeS More than 30 galleries welcome you to town by opening their doors to showcase spectacular art and cuisine. Each gallery will offer fine dining, wine and music. Spend the evening walking from gallery to gallery, discovering the diversity of artwork ranging from rustic to elegant. This event is a great casual way to start the Fall Arts Festival. Put on your walking shoes and join the crowd in a social and relaxing atmosphere. 5-8pm | Various locations Open to the public

gallery Walks

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 14

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SUNDAY A rT BrUNcH Join us for the 5th year of the Sunday Art Brunch Gallery Walk. After tremendous success with last year’s events, Jackson’s 30 art galleries are preparing for brunch and festive beverages at this closing-day celebration of the 29th Fall Arts Festival! Brunch, Bloody Marys, spectacular art, and the announcement of the 2014 Featured Artist… what an ending! 11-3pm | Various locations Open to the public

JACKSON HOLE


JOIN US

under the Big White Tent on the Town Square during the Taste of the Tetons for a

WINE TASTING & SILENT AUCTION

Come sample a variety of great wines!

11am - 4 pm Sunday, September 7 Discover incredible buys at a silent auction:

Everything from fishing, float trips, golf, art, collectibles and much more…to benefit the “Save the Arches” and charitable projects.

For more information, visit us on Facebook:

JH Fall Arts Festival Wine Tasting & Auction Presented by the Jackson Hole Rotary Supper Club in conjunction with the Fall Arts Festival’s Taste of the Tetons

“Westerninspired, handcrafted, solid wood functional art.”

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showcase

FRIDAY & SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 12 & 13

JAck SoN HoLe SHoWc A Se oF HoMeS It’s no secret that Jackson Hole boasts some of the country’s most spectacular homes. This year during the Jackson Hole Fall Arts Festival, you can experience the reality of this well-deserved reputation. The Jackson Hole Showcase of Homes will provide a one-of-a-kind opportunity to tour a selection of our valley’s most exquisitely designed, built and decorated homes by our premier architects, builders and designers. From mountain modern to a log masterpiece, this is a rare chance to see the innovative artisan style that is uniquely Jackson Hole – where western and contemporary unite. This two-day event will be a self-guided tour allowing for personal contact to be made with each of the designers, architects, builders and landscapers that are behind these unique projects.

The Art of Wine

All ticket proceeds will be donated to local charities supported by each of our generous homeowners. For more information please go to jacksonholeshowcase.com.

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COMMEMORATIVE FALL ARTS FESTIVAL WINE 2012 c A LIFor NI A c A Ber NeT SAU vIgNoN 2013 c A LIFor NI A cH A r DoNNAY Among the many important elements of the Fall Arts Festival are the food and the wine. The Chamber of Commerce, with the help of The Liquor Store, has for the past eight years made available a commemorative bottling of a quality red and a white wine. Part of the proceeds of the sale of these wines is designated to support the Fall Arts Festival.

Bottles may be purchased for $19.99 at The Liquor Store next to Albertson’s. With the additional wine label this year, grab a red and a white to use for gifts all year long!

JACKSON HOLE


R. Tom Gilleon

ROSS

U S TO M LLEAT E AT H E R CUSTOM

172 Center Street | Jackson, WY | 307.739.4700 7038 E. main Street | Scottsdale, AZ | 480. 949.1256 www.altamiraart.com

KICK-OFF SUMMER AT

• Live Music Friday-Sunday • Daily Happy Hour Specials • Pro Rodeo Prime Rib Wednesday/Saturday Nights • Soul Supper Sundays with special southern creations LOCATED IN THE SNOW KING RESORT HOTEL

HAYDENSPOST.COM

307.734.3187

Best of Show Western Design Conference 2013 Gear – Accessories Jewelry – Interior Objects Anne@RossCustomLeather.com 434-294-7528


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7

TAk IN’ IT To THe STr eeTS Support our local artists at the Art Association’s 13th annual Takin’ It To The Streets art fair. This ever-popular, intimate, 40 booth street fair takes place in conjunction with the Fall Arts Festival, on the Town Square during Taste of the Tetons. Come experience the breadth of talent that abounds in our community! Takin’ It to the Streets gives our wonderful, local artists the spotlight! .“This is one of my favorite Art Association events because it gives our vibrant arts community a day to celebrate!” said Amy Fradley, art fair director. “The talent in our community never ceases to amaze me!”

The fair is open to any and all local artists in categories that include, but are not limited to, painting, glass, jewelry, leather, photography and ceramics. There is something for everyone, from handmade crafts to gallery-quality artwork. For more information on Takin’ It To The Streets please contact Amy Fradley, art fair director for The Art Association of Jackson Hole via email at amyf@artassociation.org or by phone at 307.733.8792. 10-4pm | Jackson Town Square

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7

Signature events

WINe TA STINg A ND SILeNT AUcTIoN

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roTArY SUPPer cLUB’S FALL ArTS FeSTIvAL WINe TASTINg AND SILeNT AUcTIoN

The Rotary Supper Club joins with Taste of the Tetons and Takin’ It to the Streets to produce the Wine Tasting and Silent Auction. All proceeds go back into the community through scholarships and sponsorships. Each taste ticket is $1. 11-5pm | Jackson Town Square

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7

TA STe oF THe TeToNS & TINe TA STINg ArT oF THe MeAL

Renowned chefs have brought a worldly palate to the Valley—often incorporating special-to-the-Hole fresh ingredients, including naturally raised and wild meats and regionally grown organic offerings. The Jackson Hole Fall Arts Festival presents a rare opportunity to sample the culinary artistry of a roundup of more than 24 top chefs at this year’s Taste of the Tetons, Sunday, September 7th on the Jackson Town Square. In addition to fabulous food, Taste of the Tetons’ guests can enjoy a wine tasting, a silent auction, and Howdy Pardners’ Pickin’ in the Park live cowboy music hosted by the Jackson Hole Cowboy Jubilee. Taste of the Tetons pairs up with the popular JACKSON HOLE

Takin’ It to the Streets juried art fair featuring the works of 40 exceptional local artists. Jackson Hole restaurants incorporate the finest from a remarkably diverse group of cultures and continents, from Italian and Thai to steakhouses and bistros. Participating chefs in this year’s event include Couloir Restaurant, Million Dollar Cowboy Steakhouse, The Wort Silver Dollar Bar & Grill, Four Seasons, eLeaven, the Fine Dining Group, Amangani, Dining In Catering, and The Spur at Teton Mountain Lodge. 11-3pm | Jackson Town Square


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~ Visit our furniture showroom at 745 W. Broadway, Jackson

(307) 733-0274 | www.stocktonandshirk.com

Proudly representing the work of Jd Challenger, America’s most prominent painter of Native Americans. Also representing world renowned bronze sculptors: Chester Fields, Rip Caswell, D. Michael Thomas, and H. R. Kaiser www.grandtetongallery.com | 130 W Broadway | Jackson WY | 307.201.1172 | info@grandtetongallery.com


quickdraw Art sale & auction SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 13 If you have an eye for art of just want to spend a day in the Town Square, the annual QuickDraw Art Sale & Auction will take care of those desires. Give 30-plus accomplished artists ninety minutes to complete a painting or sculpture in front of a crowd of curious onlookers, and art becomes an adrenaline-charged spectator sport. Now in it’s 18th year, the popular QuickDraw offers a close look at the techniques of nationally, regionally, and locally recognized artists, in a setting that makes the process intimate and the artists approachable. Watch these talented artists as they make their creations in ninety minutes. Afterwards, each piece, including the 2014 Fall Arts Festival Artist Nancy Dunlop Cawdrey’s original piece, entitled, “Forever Jackson” will be auctioned off and Joshua Tobey’s limited edition of “Jackson Symphony” will be raffled off. Make sure to check the QuickDraw schedule before the event to find out when your favorite will be auctioned. 9am | QuickDraw, 11am | Auction, Open to the public

QuickDraw

2014 ARTISTS AS OF JUNE 1

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Matt Montagne Jared Sanders – Altamira Fine Art Duke Beardsley – Altamira Fine Art Josh Clare – Astoria Fine Art Linda Tuma Robertson – Astoria Fine Art Carol Swinney – Astoria Fine Art Gary Keimig – Grand Teton Gallery/Silver Sage Wyoming Gayle Weisfeld – Grand Teton Gallery Dean Bradshaw – Horizon Fine Art Kay Stratman – Horizon Fine Art John Poon – Legacy Gallery Chad Poppleton – Legacy Gallery Gary Lynn Roberts – Legacy Gallery Tim Tanner – Legacy Gallery Jeff Ham – Mountain Trails Gallery Amy Poor – Mountain Trails Gallery Carrie Wild – Mountain Trails Gallery Chris Navarro – Mountain Trails Gallery Dustin Payne – Mountain Trails Gallery John Potter – Mountain Trails Gallery Debbie Whitehead – RARE Gallery Amy Ringholz – Ringholz Studios Mar Evers – Shadow Mountain Gallery Jennifer Hoffman – Trio Fine Art Bill Sawczuk – Trio Fine Art Kathryn Mapes Turner – Trio Fine Art Lyn St. Clair – West Lives on Contemporary Joe Kroenenberg – West Lives On RC Jones – West Lives On Tom Mansanarez – Wilcox Gallery Jim Wilcox – Wilcox Gallery

JACKSON HOLE


The Jackson Hole Chamber of Commerce deeply appreciates the support of the local, regional and national businesses and corporations that have made contributions to the 2014 Fall Arts Festival. Please join us in recognizing them. MoUNTAIN oAk SPoNSor-$10,000

Sponsors

Thank you for your enthusiasm & support

rIver BIrcH SPoNSor-$5,000

AUTUMN ASH - $2,500

WILLoW - $250

SAge BrUSH - UP To $200

Canvas Unlimited

Anglers Inn Cowboy Bar Gift Shop Grand Teton Gallery Grand Teton Lodge Company Gun Barrel Steak & Game House Häagen-Dazs Horizon Fine Art Jackson Hole Art Auction Jackson Pendleton Jackson Hole Resort Lodging Lower Valley Energy Million Dollar Cowboy Bar Million Dollar Cowboy Steakhouse Ranch Inn RARE Gallery Shadow Mountain Gallery Snake River Grill Snake River Interiors Tayloe Piggot Gallery Teton Motors The Art Association Trailside Galleries Trio Fine Art

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reD MAPLe - $1,000 Altamira Fine Art OPEN Creative Wells Fargo WordenGroup PR

coTToNWooD - $500 Astoria Fine Art Bank of Jackson Hole Jackson Bootlegger Lee’s Tees Legacy Gallery Mountain Trails Gallery Scenic Safaris Teton Signs Two Grey Hills UPS Store Western Design Conference

A sincere thank you to all the volunteers, Fall Arts Festival Committee members,Chamber Board members and Chamber staff, family, and friends, who have worked so hard to bring you yet another great fall celebration!

2014 FALL ARTS FESTIVAL

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Fighting Bear Antiques Terry and Claudia Winchell 307-733-2669 or 866-690-2669 store@figthingbear.com • www.fightingbear.com 375 South Cache • P.O. Box 3790 • Jackson, WY 83001


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ground up or starting a home remodel, the first thing you need to do is select a designer. We’ve written a book to answer your questions and help get your project underway— request a PDF copy at sesshudesign.com/pdfbook.

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design finds Unique products for mountain lifestyles

mountain ComFort Furnishings & design www.mountaincomfort.com/ml

Working with mostly reclaimed wood and old doors, talented craftsman create these magnificent accent pieces, dining tables and cabinets to form The Hacienda Collection. A closer look will reveal the age-old grain, weathering, blue copper patinas, hand-hammered copper panels and hand-forged iron accents and pulls. This collection is available at all Mountain Comfort locations in Colorado, California and Idaho.

BeatriZ Ball ColleCtion

www.beatrizball.com, 888-265-1069 Beatriz Ball’s large Bark bowl and Forest salad servers bring a touch of mountain living to your home. Made of 100% recycled metal, the beautifully detailed bowl and servers are distinguished by rich, nature-inspired surfaces. Tarnish free; never need polishing.

sKYhawK ultra highPowered BinoCulars

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worth home - Vail showroom worthinteriors.com, 970-476-3224 WORTH HOME is the Vail Valley destination for your home decor needs. Featuring decorative accessories and furniture curated from an eclectic mix of artisans and manufacturers, WORTH HOME combines organic, industrial and modern elements in a compelling, contemporary style. Interior design services available.

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design finds Unique products for mountain lifestyles

new moon rugs

www.newmoonrugs.com, 800-863-0442 Internationally known and respected for their unmatched quality of design and workmanship, New Moon makes luxurious custom carpets for clients around the world. For more information, call 800.863.0442 or visit newmoonrugs.com or kurtzcollection.com.

D’amore interiors

www.damoreinteriors.com, 303-422-8704 Tired of searching for the perfect pieces that fit your lifestyle? At D’Amore Interiors, we specialize in creating spaces that cater to your entire family’s needs. With the use of our complete interior design services, you can relax knowing that you will be taken care of by our highly skilled design team, with their access to an abundance of resources.

DECORATIVE MATERIALS

montana leather designs

Denver, Edwards, Basalt, Aspen, Colorado decorativematerials.com, (866) 576-7928

Elegant or casual leather bracelets handmade by leather artist Olive Parker in Montana are here to accent your summer look. More than 20 styles to choose from. USPS Priority Shipping is included. $38 — $58.

Whether you’re smitten with luxe patterns, calmed by simple geometries or somewhere in between, you’ll find it worth your while to visit one of Decorative’s four showrooms, in Denver, Edwards, Basalt or Aspen. With the guidance of a keen design team creating fresh synergy in the realm of tile and stone, you are sure to be delighted.

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photo courtesy Corey Kopischk

steamboat springs Lifestyles Steamboat Springs is quintessential Colorado. Stunning scenery, natural hot springs, a colorful history, world-class skiing, rafting, hiking, biking, and a vibrant community combine to create an unforgettable destination. The Ute and Arapahoe tribes first visited the area for summer hunting, and to utilize the mineral springs. French trappers gave the town its name after hearing the chugging sound of a steamboat’s engine—they discovered that the sound was a natural mineral spring. Pioneers James and Margaret Crawford settled the town in the late 1800s, and with the arrival of the railroad in 1909, the boom was on. Soon, visitors began arriving to enjoy the area’s recreational opportunities, and to establish ranches and farms. Now, Steamboat Springs celebrates its Western heritage, and thrives as a year-round destination. What to Do Summertime in Steamboat brings almost unlimited opportunities for fun. Whether your tastes run to the mild or the wild, there’s always something to do. Enjoy golf at one of the four nearby courses, soak in a natural hot spring, visit a luxurious spa or hit a local hiking or mountain biking trail. Other options might include a trip up Mt. Werner in an eight-passenger gondola, a thrilling ride down the Howler Alpine Slide on Howelsen Hill, a free outdoor, Saturday night movie at Gondola Square, or a gourmet mountainside meal. The

A M O U N TA I N L I V I N G S P E C I A L S E C T I O N

Coca-Cola Adventure Zone at the ski area base, hot air balloon tours, a PRCA Pro Rodeo series, chuck wagon dinners and helicopter rides make for an unmatched mountain experience.

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STEAM B OAT SPR I NGS L I FESTY L ES

photo credit: Tim Murphy Photography

Expert Q&A with architect

Michael J.k. Olsen Your design philosophy is… first and foremost, listen to our clients, followed by understanding the legal, technical, financial, and environmental issues associated with a project and its site. Your style is influence by… principles of proportion and composition both in a visual and physical experiential sense; which are then applied to a wide range of vernaculars. The most inspiring thing you’ve seen lately is... images of African Safari Lodges for I recently completed a lodge design located in the South Luangwa National Park, Zambia. I was fascinated by the creative use of found objects & materials in practical yet artistic ways. Clients come to you for…

simple solutions to tough design problems.

Michael JK Olsen, AIA Architect

Every home must have… a warm, cheerful personality. Share with us one of your go-to design resources… A Field Guide to American Houses by Virginia & Lee McAlester. Make a design prediction... Light, transparency, and movement will continually become more prevalent within man-made objects. Our conditioning to the illuminated activity within our devices will drive this prevalence. Contact Us: 1169 Hilltop Parkway, Suite #205B, Steamboat Springs, CO 80477 P: 970 870 1584 www.mjkoarch.com


Expert Q&A with

finial designs interior design Your design philosphy is…

A home should be a reflection of the people who live there.

Clients come to you for... Guidance and knowledge to help create their vision through my eyes. Most people know what they like. My challenge is to consolidate their ideas into a cohesive design. Your design philosophy is... A home should be a reflection of the people who live there; balanced and comfortable, as inspiring as it is timeless. My goal is to create an environment that is beautiful and functional while exuding quiet elegance.

Traci Clark, Principal Designer

Your style is influenced by... Growing up in the south, where personalities are large, and homes are filled with nostalgic and meaningful pieces reflective of the personalities of the people who live there. The most inspiring thing you’ve seen lately is… The changing of the seasons, which is a constant source of inspiration for me. The combined transformation of color and texture enhance my ability to provide continuity and brilliant colors to create a statement. Every home must have... A personal retreat for all family members; a refuge from the stressors of everyday life. Whether inside or out, everyone should have their own space that invigorates the senses and calms the soul.

Share with us one of your go-to design resources. I often refer to the interior design trade articles from numerous magazines and online sites which, coupled with my philosophy, enable me to incorporate current trends with my client’s vision.

Make a design prediction. I predict that people will navigate towards creating smaller, yet more meaningful spaces of higher quality, adding pieces that are unique and reflective of their personalities, and yet stand the test of time.

Contact Us: PO Box 772835, Steamboat Springs, CO 80477 P: 970 846 3405 www.finialdesigns.com A M O U N TA I N L I V I N G S P E C I A L S E C T I O N


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DESIGN + REDESIGN INTERIOR DESIGN + DECOR + UPHOLSTERY + LIGHTING + RUGS + TURN KEY SERVICE WWW.RUMORDESIGNS.COM | 970.819.9721 | 345 LINCOLN AVE. STEAMBOAT, CO 80487


A M O U N TA I N L I V I N G S P E C I A L S E C T I O N


STEAM B OAT SPR I NGS L I FESTY L ES

Celebrating 17 years of Remodeling and Designing Homes

Full-Service Design Studio and Retail Showroom 345 A Sundance Plaza, Steamboat Springs, CO | 970.879.1893 | OliviasHomeFurnishings.com


A SYMPHONY OF COLOR FOR YOUR HOME SINCE 1994.

S t e a m b oat S p r i n g S

A M O U N TA I N L I V I N G S P E C I A L S E C T I O N

970-879-5667

w w w . d av i d c h a S e r u g S a n d f u r n i t u r e . c o m


STEAM B OAT SPR I NGS L I FESTY L ES

photo credit: David Patterson

Expert Q&A with

Dimension fine homes, inc. design + build

Clients come to your for… our integrated Design/Build services, our love of architecture and design, our passion for pushing the envelope, our quality craftsmanship and our ability to collaborate with and nurture each client’s individuality to create timeless, one-of-a-kind spaces that are always functional and inviting. Your design philosophy is… TAKE RISKS! Experimenting, taking risks and thinking outside the box are the only way to grow. Seek out new inspirations and express yourself. A well designed home should be a reflection of its occupant’s personality and best self. Every home must have…a sense of soul with infectious energy, a fabulous light fixture, and a terrific piece of art that means something to you. Your building philosophy is... Treat every custom home like we were building our own.

Susse Budde, designer Corey Larsen, builder

The most inspiring thing you’ve seen lately…the beautiful sights and surroundings of Florence, Italy and the incredible sense of style and design throughout Copenhagen, Denmark.

Share with us one of your go-to design resources... Google. Make a design prediction... a continued movement towards simplified structures that are more sustainable, energy efficient and contemporary. Contact Us: 1625 Mid Valley Drive #1-98, Steamboat Springs, CO 80487 P: 970 846 3782 www.dimensionfinehomes.com


S T E A M B OA T A R C H I T E C T U R A L A S S O C I A T E S architecture

planning

Steamboat Springs, CO

A M O U N TA I N L I V I N G S P E C I A L S E C T I O N

interior design

www.steamboatarchitectural.com

(970)879-0819


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ART ANTIQUES

PHOTO BY KIMBERLY GAVIN

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Story by Hilary Masell Oswald 104

Photography by Emily Minton Redfield


VINTAGE VIBE

DESIGNED WITH GUESTS IN MIND, A MONTANA BUNKHOUSE SHOWS OFF A PLAYFUL COLLECTION OF ART AND ANTIQUES

Architect Van Bryan designed the bunkhouse’s asymmetry to suggest that the home started out as a smaller structure that has been expanded over time. “I like the character of it, the implicit story,” he says.FACING PAGE: The entry shows off practical good looks: Hooks offer easy storage, and a vintage expandable bench from 14th Street Antiques in Atlanta is the perfect spot to slip shoes on or off.

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Architecture by Van Bryan Studio Architects interior design by Carter Kay Interiors CONSTRUCTION by JDL CONSTRUCTION

Bunkhouses have come a long way since the days when cowboys crawled into rough-hewn beds after long, hard days on the trail. Proof positive: this enchanting 1,600-squarefoot bunkhouse in Ennis, Montana, a pinprick of a town in southwestern Montana’s Madison River Valley. Purchased by a pair of couples from Texas, the property originally held a dilapidated ranch house that was revived by the creative work of Bozeman-based architect Van Bryan and interior designer Carter Kay, of Atlanta. The main house is both fresh and appropriately rustic, its design deeply devoted to a marriage of Western vernacular and modern touches. The owners soon realized that they needed more sleeping space for guests, especially their grown children and grandkids, and asked Bryan and Kay to create a bunkhouse that would be a welcome—and durable—retreat near the main house. The team dreamed up a three-bedroom, three-bath space that mirrors the main house’s style. Clad with reclaimed wood and a roof of cedar shingles and rusted metal, the bunk-

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house feels like an old structure that’s been given new life. “Everything is like a worn shoe, cozy and livable,” Bryan says. And good-looking, too. Inside, Kay and her colleague Nancy Hooff mixed antiques, vintage furnishings and accents and art for a style that’s playful and easy. “There’s a sense of spontaneity in the rooms,” Kay explains. “I think that’s one of the joys of designing with antiques and vintage pieces: They feel found, not forced, and maybe a little quirky in the best sense.” A perfect example is the living room’s pair of old rattan chairs “covered in the hairiest hide you’ve ever seen,” Kay says. The chairs stand opposite a hunky wood coffee table and a sectional sofa covered in durable denim. A pair of vintage silhouetted horse cutouts adds a lighthearted note. “We just flipped when we found these horses,” Kay says. “They’re an artful way to say, ‘We love animals and the West,’ without putting taxidermy on the walls.” >>


Interior designer Carter Kay found the living room’s two antique rattan chairs, covered in hair-onhide, at South of Market in Atlanta. The sectional, from Lee Industries, is covered in denim by Arabel Fabrics to make it especially kid-friendly, and the rug, from Keivan Oriental Rugs, is a contemporary riff on a fence-inspired pattern. The wooden horse cutouts are from Bobo Intriguing Objects.

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How to Find the Good Stuff Designer Carter Kay shares her best advice for tracking down the perfect art and antiques. Shop locally “We always go to the little flea market in Ennis, and we find more treasures there than you can imagine,” Kay says. By scouring local boutiques and markets, you’re more likely to find pieces that are evocative of your home’s history and setting. Be patient “At the flea market, we move through a lot of piles of comic books and old toys to find that one great accessory,” Kay says. Even if you plan to visit more refined antique stores, wait until you can devote a whole morning—or better yet, an entire day—to your search. Call ahead “Sometimes, to save time, I give a call to the shop owner and tell him what I’m looking for,” Kay says. If you can’t stop dreaming about a Biedermeier chest or a pair of Louis XVI chairs, ring your favorite antique shops and ask for help tracking down your heart’s desire. Kay sometimes checks online antiques marketplaces, such as 1stdibs.com and thehighboy.com, where she can easily search for pieces by era or style. 108


“It’s steel, and it does not budge,” Kay says of the dining table from Go Home Ltd. “I was thinking of the grandkids: It’s sturdy and easy to clean.” FACING PAGE, FROM TOP: Guests gather in the main house for most meals, so the kitchen is intentionally small. Its open shelves are made from antique wood. “You just need one splash of color in such a small room,” Kay says of the colorful vintage rug. The breakfast nook’s distinctive light fixture was custommade by an Atlanta artist and purchased through South of Market.

The modern open kitchen features a Wolf range, new granite countertops and a glass mosaic backsplash. Interior designer Dana Hugo had the Hickory Chair stools upholstered with nubby Donghia fabric. FACING PAGE: Tree-patterned drapes of Pierre Frey fabric frame the windows of the dining room, where Hugo used long-nosed pliers to painstakingly hang each of the crystals on the Ochre chandelier.

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A colorful scarab print, discovered at A. Tyner Antiques in Atlanta, is a playful addition to the second master bedroom. The vintage chest (from Provenance Antiques in Atlanta and a complement to the chest in the other master bedroom) rests atop an animal-print rug. The ladder is a convenient rack for hanging scarves or magazines. “I buy ladders whenever I find them,� Kay says.

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BELOW, LEFT: A bedroom gets an infusion of fun from the “Birds on a Wire” series by Atlanta artist Corinne Adams. The bed is from Environment Furniture, and the vintage adjustable side tables with triangular metal tops are made from machinery springs. BELOW, RIGHT: Whimsical antique chairs from BoBo Intriguing Objects hang as artwork over an antique chest from Provenance Antiques in Atlanta.

But Kay did have a little fun with what is perhaps the West’s most identifiable design element. In one of the bedrooms, white resin deer heads with colorful antlers are mounted in frames made from old barn boards. Cheeky and whimsical, the heads stand sentry over a pair of beds and a turquoise cabinet enclosed with chicken wire—“so you can see where you put your things,” Kay says. The mix of old and new continues in other spaces: A pair of curvy antique chairs are suspended over a vintage pine chest in one bedroom. In another, guests find “Birds on a Wire,” a colorful series of mixed-media art pieces, which Kay chose for their bright hues and nod to nature. Across the room, an old canvas print of a scarab hangs above another antique pine dresser. Even

the small kitchen gets a flash of whimsy from a trio of rusted metal fish, found at the Ennis flea market and hung from an old hand-tied fly near the open shelves. A vivid rug with a fish motif, another retro find, adds a theme-appropriate pop of color to the floor. Though the home showcases antiques and art in every nook and cranny, it’s hardly a museum. “People think that antiques are very serious. They can be, but the bunkhouse shows that bringing in old pieces and unique art actually can make a home more fun,” Kay observes. “This particular mix of things says to guests, ‘Come on in, kick off your shoes and relax,’”—just as a welcoming Western bunkhouse should. 

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IF YOU’RE “OPEN TO USING THINGS IN A DIFFERENT WAY, A FLEA MARKET CAN BE AN ABSOLUTE GOLD MINE.

Carter Kay

TOP: Kay tucked a simple wooden desk from Four Hands behind one side of the living room’s sectional and added a fleecy pouf from Go Home for seating. The small wooden chairs and table are antiques. RIGHT: This bedroom plays with Western tropes, courtesy of white resin deer heads from online shop White Faux Taxidermy. Kay had the frames made from reclaimed barn wood to give the “art” a greater presence. The beds, from West Elm, are topped with coverlets by Utility Canvas and paired with a painted metal cabinet from Four Hands.

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For a guide to this home’s products and pros, visit mountainliving.com/vintagevibe.


Made from recycled gears, a console by Vintage Studios is a rugged foil to the softness of the beds in the kids’ bedroom. A local craftsman fashioned its wood top. A watercolor of a fly fisherman, purchased by one of the homeowners, feels right at home next to a vintage fly basket Kay found at Peachtree Battle Antiques in Atlanta.

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Story by Norman Kolpas

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Photography by Kimberly Gavin


THE ART OF LIVING

ARCHITECTURE, ART AND NATURE SUBTLY COMPLEMENT ONE ANOTHER IN A SCULPTURAL COLORADO HOME

In the dining room, neutral-toned furniture and finishes provide a quiet backdrop for the visual dialogue between two bold artworks: “We the People,” an acrylic-on-canvas flag by Andrew Baird, and Jeanne Bessette’s “Not Just a Number,” an acrylic-and-mixed-media figurative painting. The blue-stained walnut dining table can seat up to 14.

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The exterior’s walls of horizontal sandstone blocks extend into the house, past the custom offset-pivot entry door made of glass, wood and steel. FACING PAGE: Beneath a gabled roofline that was required by the community, the main entrance takes a sculptural twist with the support of subtly uplit Douglas fir columns. Each one is pitched at a slightly different angle from the next, visually balancing the asymmetry of the roof.

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Its select collection of paintings and sculpture is superb, its architecture stunning. Yet even the briefest conversation with the owners of this home on a mountainside site in Colorado confirms that, to them, nature is the biggest attraction. “The real art in this house is the outdoors, the natural beauty surrounding us,” says the wife, who with her husband bought the site above the town of Avon for its sweeping west-facing vistas. “We overlook the valley and have 180-degree views,” she continues. “We can see the storms rolling in. And the sunsets are unbelievable.”

Architecture by RKD Architects

The couple, who collect artworks that make a strong impression on them, knew right away that a home in such a location needed to be a work of art in its own right. That desire led them to RKD Architects, a Vail Valley firm with a reputation for putting innovative contemporary spins on the Rocky Mountain vernacular. Working with RKD’s president, Jack Snow, and his business partner and wife, Sally Brainerd, they arrived at a design that, says Snow, “feels like living inside a sculpture that is modern, transparent and open to the views.” >>

interior design by Studio 80 Interior Design and Slifer Designs

Construction by George Shaeffer Construction Company

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Artistic Enlightenment

With its large-format artworks and bold yet subtly detailed architecture, the home presented particular lighting challenges. Lighting designer Greg Mackell of 186 Lighting Design Group in Denver worked with the architects and homeowners to create special solutions, including: KEEPING IT HIDDEN Narrow rows of LED lighting—“almost a tape light,” says architect Jack Snow—are hidden along the ceiling beams. The result highlights the sculptural structure of the rooms. LIGHTING UP Fixtures set at regular intervals along the base of the home’s exterior walls—as well as some inside, like the curved red-painted feature wall facing the dining room— send a soft wash of light upward. SPOTLIGHTING THE ART Hidden high-intensity MR16 LED bulbs are positioned in the ceiling to spotlight each work of art. CENTRALIZING CONTROL A sophisticated Lutron system allows the homeowners to control all of the fixtures from a computerized panel, which includes an “Art” command that instantly adjusts the lighting to the optimum configuration and levels for showcasing their art.

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ABOVE: “Smile, Sonrisa,� an oil-on-canvas portrait by Daniel Ochoa, dominates the great room, its medley of earth tones and bold, expressionistic brushstrokes in harmony with the materials and forms of the surrounding architecture. Dove-gray Minotti sofas and red Maxalto Kalos chairs provide welcoming comfort while also appearing to be minimalist works of sculpture in their own right. FACING PAGE: A wall of window-doors opens to the covered portion of the patio, furnished with casual weatherproof furniture and sheltered on three sides from the high-altitude climate. 119


To accommodate the steeply sloping site while capturing the panoramic vistas, the RKD team came up with a floor plan that staggers the arrangement of the main living spaces. The structure is organized around three gabled forms—one in the great room and kitchen, one in a secondary living area and one in the master suite—each of which features a sloping window wall that appears to soar into space. Ceilings as high as 20 feet at the ridgeline add to the sense of expansiveness while meeting the subdivision’s requirement that all houses have gabled roofs.

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Using indigenous materials including dry-stacked sandstone and wire-brushed Douglas fir, the architects expressed their trademark creativity in details that range from a colonnade that appears to cascade along one side of the entrance, to blackened-steel panels, floated 3/4 inch off the wall, that compose the fireplace surrounds and a pass-through between the kitchen and dining room. Snow and Brainerd refined such touches down to the smallest detail, taking particular pride, for example, in the way that specially designed >>


MATERIALS “WETHEUSED COULD BE DIFFERENT, EVEN WEIRD. BUT THEY ALSO HAD TO FEEL WARM AND APPROACHABLE.

Jack Snow

ABOVE: Seen from outside at night, the master suite glows like a vitrine for displaying precious objects. LEFT: Opposite the foot of the bed, the same limestone used for the exterior walls creates the fireplace surround. FAR LEFT: In the master bedroom, the expansive vista is the featured work of art, on view through window walls including a gable-topped bay section that tilts outward, as if ready to soar into the sky. Behind the bed, fauxpainted drywall resembles weathered wood that’s been dipped in molten steel. “It eventually may have a piece of art,” the homeowner says of the room. “Or it may not.”

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The powder room offers a playful nod to high style with its sleek black-glass pedestal sink, floor-to-ceiling mirror and patterned wallcovering. FACING PAGE: Unlike the rest of the house, which has concrete floors, the library features a floor of rift-cut oak stained a soft blue-gray. One of the first pieces of art the owners ever purchased, a feather collage by David McCarthy, found a new home next to a door facing an aspen grove.

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steel connecting pins make columns appear to float free of the concrete floor below and the eaves above. “We jokingly called this ‘the no-touchy house,’” Snow says. Simultaneously understated and bold, the architects’ design provides an ideal setting for the homeowners’ collection of art. “They wanted to highlight a few pieces very well rather than show an extensive collection,” Snow says of the oversized works, each of which occupies its own stretch of stone or drywall. Yet, nothing in particular about the architecture was designed with a specific piece of artwork in mind. “We wanted to wait until the house was

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done, and see how it felt, to decide what art we wanted to put where,” the homeowner explains. The goal was for each piece to be able to make its own statement. “I’ve never grouped anything on a wall except for family pictures,” the owner says. “The art we buy has to stand out and be a real finishing touch. It’s easy to pick up a couch or table or pillows. But you could put the same couch in 10 different rooms.” On the other hand, a painting or sculpture that has found its own ideal place can make a room come alive. “An artwork is what brings in your personality,” the homeowner adds. “It makes the house yours.” o

For a guide to this home’s products and pros, visit mountainliving.com/theartofliving. 123


timeless in telluride City sophistication meets mountain town casual in an antique-filled, anything-but-fussy home

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Although it was built in the 1990s, this Telluride home has the simple charm of older times. FACING PAGE: A trio of leather chairs, including two French antique seats, makes a stylish conversation area in the den. The antique flat-weave Turkish rug and wheeled coffee table are from Studio Frank in Telluride.

STORY BY LAURA BEAUSIRE

PHOTOGRAPHY BY GIBEON PHOTOGRAPHY 125


Architecture by Bercovitz Design Architects

interior design by Studio Frank

Renovation Construction by Evans Construction

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On a street lined with Victorian homes at the base of a Telluride mountain, there’s a tall white house that looks as if it’s been there for ages. But it hasn’t. While it may resemble one of the town’s vintage residential gems, this home is relatively new but deeply respectful of the past, with a charm that’s just about timeless. Designed in the mid-1990s by Telluride’s Bercovitz Design Architects, the home offers spectacular views, but the interiors were ready for a remodel when the new owners arrived. They called upon interior designer Catherine Frank, of Studio Frank, to add a touch of the laid-back local character to their mountain retreat. “Being based in a large urban city, they have long appreciated Telluride’s casual attitudes and natural beauty,” Frank explains. “They wanted to infuse their home with these essential characteristics of the town.” With stunning box canyon vistas beckoning through every window, it was obvious that the home’s décor needed to collaborate with what nature had already provided. And, because the owners wanted a cozy place to share with friends and family, comfort and livability were priorities. Given the existing structure’s relatively formal architecture, Frank wanted to introduce contrasting elements for balance. “The existing painted wood trimwork and millwork is more reminiscent of traditional East Coast style,” she remarks, “so we worked to create contrast by utilizing soft, inviting furnishings and rich, textural textiles.” Plainly elegant herringbone-patterned Belgian linen >>

The kitchen was left in its existing condition during the renovation, but the dining space gained a pair of 1930s-era rose-colored glass pendant lights. The new table, distressed to look old, is flanked by two antique ladder-back chairs and a quartet of comfy slipcovered slipper chairs. 127


Bringing Bright Ideas to Light

Interior designer Catherine Frank shares some of the secrets behind this home’s unique lighting solutions: A MIXTURE OF FIXTURES For this project, Frank sourced a combination of retro and reproduction beauties that complement the home’s more traditional detailing with an industrial aesthetic that references Telluride’s storied past.

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VINTAGE VOLTAGE “Vintage light fixtures have such character and are often masterfully constructed. Nowadays there’s so much emphasis on hiding the working components of a fixture, but that’s what interests me most. And, those metal rods and cogs allow for adjustability, too.”

GLASS ACTS “Hand-blown glass shades have natural imperfections that add visual texture and disperse light in unique ways. When the bulb is exposed, bulb selection is of paramount importance. I like Edison bulbs because the exposed filament is so delicate and sculptural.”

ARTFUL IMPACT “I see light fixtures as a supplement to artwork. When illuminated, they almost become living sculptures, whether mounted from the ceiling or a wall. Floor and table lamps also have this impact, with more atmospheric light.”


LEFT: The living room’s sofas, slipcovered in a cotton herringbone fabric, rest atop an antique folk art rug from South America. Vintage French metal chairs surround a metal coffee table with a black stone top. The framed barn image is part of the owners’ extensive photography collection. BELOW: With windows on each side and soft sage-green walls, the passageway connecting the den to the rest of the home is a welcoming place to pause.

FAUX ANTIQUES When they couldn’t find the perfect fixture, Studio Frank created their own that look like Victorian originals. For the powder room, the design team paired a vintage fabric cord with a shapely tungsten-filament bulb for a simple hanging pendant that glows. 129


goal “ isMynot to decorate, but to provide interiors that blend harmoniously with a structure and its surroundings.

Catherine Frank

drapes hug the ceiling in the living room and den, while the master bedroom has delicately hand-embroidered linen drapes from Larsen that lend an air of Victorian nostalgia. Throughout the house, antique rugs in rich yet gentle hues warm the floors. Frank’s meticulous approach to design moves toward sophisticated luxury despite its apparent simplicity. And she doesn’t shy away from using earthy materials to play against fine finishes and sleek surfaces— Frank gravitates toward the raw and the rustic, the natural and the ruggedly textured, often with a nod to Telluride’s early mining history. In this home, every detail is carefully chosen and thoughtfully calibrated for comfort and warmth, from the leather-wrapped and hand-stitched stair railings to the extra cushioning added to plump the window seats and make them even more inviting. To create a more durable floor surface >>

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A French oak-veneered antique desk provides an elegant workspace in the master suite. The authentic apothecary cabinet is a lucky local find. FACING PAGE, FROM FAR LEFT: A handy peg rail surrounds the master bathroom, joining the porcelain pedestal sinks, Restoration Hardware light fixtures and polished subway tiles in creating a retro charm. A French mid20th-century chair is displayed like a work of sculpture on the stair landing.

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on the home’s entry level, Frank chose a poured concrete in a patinated charcoal color reminiscent of authentic, weathered warehouse floors. The designer painted the walls and millwork in soft neutral shades to create an understated and nearly monochromatic backdrop for the owners’ impeccable collection of furnishings and artwork. “Our clients have excellent taste,” Frank explains, “and they’ve procured an impressive art collection over the years. With their input, we placed pieces throughout the house.” Many of the home’s finest antiques, such as the graceful leather club chairs, are mid-20th-century French pieces

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from Paris, and a carefully chosen mix of antique furnishings from near and far graces every room. Walls in several rooms are hung with a series of compelling contemporary photographs featuring old barns and country landscapes, striking a rural note in keeping with the local vibe. When you’ve landed in a small town at the end of a deep canyon, surrounded by enormous mountains and 45 miles away from the nearest stoplight, time slows down and simplicity seems to come naturally. And with a collection of gorgeous antiques, vintage finds and fascinating artwork like this, relaxed comfort gains a refinement that ends up feeling totally Telluride. o


ABOVE: An antique French leather club chair provides a stylish resting place beside the guest bedroom’s patio door; an old wooden wardrobe provides storage for bedding. LEFT: Painted wainscoting and retro-styled exposed-bulb pendants by Studio Frank set an old-fashioned scene for the powder room’s rustic sink made from an antique Balinese wooden trough. FACING PAGE: The entry hall is airy and colorful. A pair of antique red benches faces a weathered Spanish table in a surprising—and beautiful—shade of turquoise, with a bentwood rocking chair behind. The patinated charcoal-gray floors are concrete.

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A gallery hall leading to the living room presents photographs of African wildlife by Nick Brandt and a large print of a horse’s hoof by photographer Flor Garduño. Abstract wooden sculptures by Dick Jemison resemble modern totem poles. French leather club chairs and a contemporary rawhide bench add a rustic touch. FACING PAGE: Adjoining an outdoor living space, a stretch of lawn presents the chiseled-granite sculpture “My Five Lilies” by Ilan Averbuch. 134


An Artful Escape

A highly personal collection of art, antiques and photos finds a tailor-made home in the Rocky Mountain West

Story by Norman Kolpas

Photography by AUdrey Hall 135


In the study, a side table fashioned from railroad ties features a large watercolor, “Pay Day,� by Nelson Boren. Alongside it are displayed a traditional Sioux Indian pipe, made in the present day, and an antique-style contemporary lamp with a copper shade. 136


“Our client wanted a sanctuary, his own beautiful little personal space,” says architect Paul Bertelli, design principal of Bozemanbased JLF & Associates, of the one-bedroom house his firm designed for a ranch property outside of Livingston, Montana. With so many guests sometimes staying at his nearby main ranch house, the owner felt the need for a private place where he could slip away to enjoy peace and quiet—and a selection of mostly Western-inspired works from his extensive holdings of art, photography and antiques. Though the aesthetically attuned client wanted the house to showcase his collections, he also hoped it would be an authentic and beautiful creation in its own right. Early on in their conversations, Bertelli showed him another house his firm had designed in the region, a structure inspired by

the local materials and humble building methods used by 19th-century immigrants to the Rocky Mountain West. “He really loved that little stone building,” Bertelli recalls. The architect also took note of his client’s admiration for early industrial-style, steel-framed windows and the spare yet finely detailed woodwork of the late 19th- and early 20th-century Arts and Crafts movement. The resulting structure bears all those stylistic signatures in a compact 2,000 square feet of living space arranged on two levels. Bertelli and his team, led by the project’s principal-in-charge, Logan Leachman, designed the house with walls of Montana moss rock, exposed ceiling timbers that were repurposed from regional corrals >>

The driveway passes beneath the great room; its window wall frames west-facing valley and mountain views. Alongside the drive, large quarry stones shore up an embankment on which sculptures are displayed. Plantings of fir trees create a lush backdrop.

Architecture by JLF & Associates

Construction by On Site Management

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When the homeowner first discovered the red, life-sized Indian bowman and blue cowboy during a visit to the international art fair Art Basel in Miami Beach, he knew they would look perfect on this hillside near the main ranch house. Made by Yoram Wolberger from reinforced fiberglass composite and pigmented resin, they recall the vintage toy prizes found in Cracker Jack boxes.

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Art on Display

Architect Paul Bertelli shares his expert tips for creating an ideal environment for displaying art. Discuss before designing When working with architects, show them key pieces you own and want to display. “Often,” says Bertelli, “our early discussions about a wonderful antique piece or work of art” will help give direction to the home’s design. Keep it simple “Don’t overdo the architecture,” Bertelli cautions. “Remember that it’s going to be the canvas for everything else.” He recommends using “simple forms and materials with great and timeless character.” Let there be light Though architects and designers can plan electric lighting schemes to highlight art displays, it’s important to remember the power of natural light. “Light is critical to viewing art, so find ways to bring daylight into the building whenever you can,” Bertelli suggests. Keep the sun’s rays at bay All the windows in this house feature specially manufactured two-layer glass that filters out 98 percent of ultraviolet rays, which can harm artwork.

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A landing at the bottom of the stairs provides an ideal reading nook, with a leather-upholstered wingback armchair, a stand lamp fashioned from antlers, and built-in bookshelves for leather-bound volumes interspersed with small pieces of art. Uniformly framed black-andwhite photographic prints are hung in an orderly arrangement on the stairway walls. 140


WE PURPOSELY “DON’T CALL THE BUILDINGS WE DESIGN HOMES. WE CALL THEM HOUSES. IT’ S OUR CLIENTS WHO TURN THEM INTO HOMES.

The living is easy at Martis Camp, a private 2,177-acre enclave nestled in the Sierra Ne

Paul Bertelli

LEFT: Alongside the great room fireplace, an array of photography is displayed on narrow steel shelves embedded into the wall. Highlights include, on the top and center rows, century-old prints of Native American life by Roland Reed. The bottom row features prints from Wouter Deruytter’s “Crow Warriors” series, photographed between 1998 and 2005. BELOW: The master bathroom’s vanity features white marble sinks and chrome pipes by Waterworks. On the wall above the heated towel rack are photos from Wouter Deruytter’s “Cowboy Code” series.

and log buildings, siding of weathered boards that once served as highway snow fences, and reclaimed floorboards on which the original circular saw marks are still visible. Although Bertelli was not asked to make any special efforts to design the house around any particular artwork or antique, he did approach the project with an expert awareness of what it takes to showcase art (see sidebar). “As our client slowly brought in more and more pieces, each of them found its own space,” Bertelli recalls. “In his head, he knew all along that his vision for his art and antiques would work with what we were doing.” Bertelli and his team did add subtle touches that help the house welcome its owner’s collections with ease. Steel picture ledges set at multiple levels along the wall of a gallery-style hall allow the client to easily display— and rearrange—his extensive array of vintage and contemporary fine-art photography. And the combination of natural stone and sheetrock interior walls provides the perfect neutral background for larger framed pieces. >>

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The owner’s aesthetic sensibilities extend beyond high-end, gallery-quality artwork. His master bedroom and bath, for instance, feature a delightful assortment of vintage team photographs he purchased online. Bertelli believes it’s this deeply personal collection, combined with a thoughtful mix of design details big and small, that allows the home to successfully capture the essence of his client. “It’s all about showcasing his flair for interior details and finishes in a very comfortable, light-filled and airy space,” the architect says. “It’s a perfect small house for a Western lifestyle.” 

ABOVE: Crowned by a small peaked overhang adjacent to the driveway pass-through, the home’s main entry presents an understated welcome—but a sensible one during inclement weather. The adjoining structure resembling a lean-to contains the closet space off the foyer. RIGHT: Comfortable contemporary seating and classic Missionstyle tables furnish the great room, which evokes a Rocky Mountain spirit with collectibles including antler candelabra and, facing the fireplace from the sofa table, a large 1912 plaster bust of Shawmut tribal chief Obbatinewat.

more

For a guide to this home’s products and pros, visit mountainliving.com/ anartfulescape.

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Above the master bed hangs “980m” (2002), a large-format limited-edition print by landscape photographer Norman Maier. Architects JLF & Associates designed the Arts and Crafts–style bed and matching wall paneling. The assorted vintage team photos, displayed in a playful jumble of overlapping frames, were all purchased on eBay. A collection of antique leather suitcases is stored over the bed. 143


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designing the west

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ML | August 2014


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Redesigned with our readers in mind,

WHERE DESIGN COMES TO LIFE

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Myth. Orchids have a reputation for being difficult to grow, however, there are many varieties that make excellent house plants. Orchid care is not difficult, it is just different. Another myth is that working with an interior designer is difficult and complicated. In fact, when you hire an ASID interior designer, you get an experienced practitioner who can solve problems, even save you money by helping you avoid costly mistakes, referring reliable contractors, and selecting products and materials that meet your budget and design requirements. ASID interior designers are different. Let your interior design project come to life. Hire an ASID interior designer, today.

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ML | www.mountainliving.com 151


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GALLERY

SCULPTURE IN THE WILD

SCHNEEWITTCHEN Pard Morrison

BEST KNOWN FOR: Installations of colorful, block-like metal abstract sculptures, resting on land or dipped in water. INSPIRATION: “Being born and raised in Colorado, I have a strong connection to the West, and I feel that it has significantly shaped my aesthetic,” Morrison explains. He is especially sensitive to rural areas. “The West to me is about space, and a minimalist loves nothing more than the activation of space by the specific placement of form.”

fired pigment on aluminum Installed at the Denver Botanic Gardens, 2013 Rule Gallery 3254 Walnut Street Denver, CO

PROCESS: Morrison fabricates each piece himself. “I begin by welding the forms together out of aluminum. Then I use giant industrial ovens to heat-cure hand-brushed 303-800-6776 pigment onto the surface, in a process similar rulegallery.com to glazing ceramics. Finally, a UV protective clear coat is fired over the pigment. All of my work can be placed indoors or outdoors.”

A SENSE OF PLACE AND PRESENCE: “With the outdoor installations, I am interested in the conversation that begins by the juxtaposition of my geometric forms in a natural setting.

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For me, the most successful installations are ones in which the sculptures are placed where there are no other, or very few, human traces.”

WHAT’S NEW: Morrison is putting the finishing touches on a permanent site-specific installation that will grace the campus of his alma mater, Colorado State University, in Fort Collins. 

PHOTO BY SCOTT DRESSEL-MARTIN

THE ARTIST: Pard Morrison


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Mountain Living August 2014  

Art & Antiques

Mountain Living August 2014  

Art & Antiques

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