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Version 14.3.2 Last major update: 6.20.2014 Last revision: 6.20.2014


ABOUT THIS MARKETING PLAN This marketing plan is different from most municipal marketing plans that you will encounter. The nature of the plan is as unconventional as its development. A typical plan is created with a shelf-life and the expectation that a new plan will be developed at a specified interval or when the current plan is sufficiently outdated. The last comprehensive marketing plan that the Arlington Parks and Recreation Department developed dates back to 1993. To say it was sufficiently outdated would be an understatement. When we set out to develop this plan we wanted it to be different. We wanted it to be practical. We wanted something that was always relevant. A living document that would grow and evolve with the department over time rather than collect dust until someone new came along with the motivation to start over again. We’ve approached this plan as if it were a piece of software. Each version of the plan will be an improvement as “bugs� are fixed and new functionality is added. A release schedule suggests when future versions of the plan should be published and new components added. This approach will allow the plan to stay fresh and adapt to the needs of the department. The plan will always look ahead three fiscal years. Every year the strategies will be re-evaluated and the objectives will be updated. Other elements of the plan such as customer satisfaction data may be updated every two years while demographic information and GIS maps may be updated in three or five year intervals. An unconventional plan calls for an unconventional approach to development. Rather than hiring a third-party to conduct the research, analyze the data and make recommendations, we decided to manage the project in-house. Numerous data sources were utilized to complete this plan. Sources included surveys of customers, staff and citizens, analytics reports from numerous software services, data from registration software, and information from ESRI Community Analyst and the U.S. Census Bureau.

2

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation

To ensure that we developed strategies that were both progressive and purposeful we hired seven expert consultants. Each consultant analyzed a specific aspect of our marketing efforts. The consultants then developed recommendations based on best practices and met with the marketing team to review their findings. After several months of analyzing data and discussing recommendations, the marketing team developed four strategies and a number of objectives that addressed each area of the APRD marketing model. These objectives as well as all of the data and analysis are presented in this document and the APRD Marketing Plan Appendix. We are confident that this plan will be instrumental in guiding our future efforts. We also hope that other park and recreation departments may find this document insightful and utilize these tactics and recommendations to further enhance thier marketing efforts. Sincerely,

Ryan Hegreness, CPRP Marketing & Enterprise Development Manager

Gary Packan, CPRP Assistant Director, Enterprise Programs


Acknowledgements A special thanks to all of the City of Arlington Parks and Recreation staff for their input in the development of the Marketing Plan. Without their insight and perspective it would not have been possible to assemble a comprehensive plan. PARK AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT ADMINISTRATION Lemuel Randolph - Director of Parks and Recreation Bill Gilmore - Assistant Director, Community Programs Gary Packan - Assistant Director, Enterprise Programs Matt Young - Assistant Director, Park Operations Amber Dembroski - Business Services Manager De’Onna Garner - Park Planning Manager MARKETING DIVISION Ryan Hegreness - Marketing & Enterprise Development Manager Phillip Rogers - Marketing & Enterprise Development Coordinator Justin Snasel - Electronic Media Specialist Jason Torres - Marketing Aide Michael Olson - Marketing Aide Grady Stephenson - Marketing Intern Jesus Silva - Marketing Intern Lauren Jewell - Marketing Intern INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Thomas Konzel - IT GIS Supervisor COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AND PLANNING Elaine Dennehy - Planning Manager I John Huggins - Operations Analyst II UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT ARLINGTON - STUDENT AFFAIRS Laura Kinch - Assistant Director of Marketing and Communications MARKETING PLAN DEVELOPMENT Ryan Hegreness and Gary Packan MARKETING PLAN DESIGN AND LAYOUT Phillip Rogers and Grady Stephenson

CONSULTANTS Colin Burns - Social Media Matt Gillmore - Website Design Greg Hickman - Mobile Marketing Charles Lustig - Writing Gina Nykerk - Email Marketing David Seay - Videography Peter Wood - Graphic Design Learning Resources Network (LERN) - Website and Publication Review SOURCES 2013 Citizen “Re:Connect” Survey (n=860) 2013 Aquatics Discount Survey (n=934) 2013 PROS Master Plan Survey (n=1,247) 2014 Staff SWOT Analysis Survey (n=46) CLASS Registration Data (6/1/11-7/29/13) ESRI Community Analyst Reports U.S. Census Bureau SERVICES Adobe Creative Suite ESRI ArcGIS ESRI Community Analyst Decision Analyst SurveyMonkey WRITER Mark Fadden EDITOR Justin Snasel

2014 Marketing Plan

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ALLAN SAXE PARK

3501 CURRY RD, 76001 4

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation


CONTENT 07

Introduction

97

Marketing Model

08

- Summary of the Parks

103

Audits and Best Practices

09

- Vision, Mission and Values

104

- Social Media

10

- Brand Philosophy

106

- Video

12

- State of the Department

108

- Writing - Graphic Design

17

Situation Analysis

110

18

- SWOT Analysis

112

- Email

20

- Community Relations Matrix

114

- Mobile

22

- Marketing Budget

116

- Website

24

- Results

119

Strategies and Objectives

142

Release Schedule

143

Appendix Guide

28

Business Unit Profiles

28

- Parks and Trails

32

- Customer Profile

36

- Parks and Trails

44

- Forestry and Beautification

48

- Center Programs

64

- Athletics

70

- Aquatics

74

- Arlington Golf

84

- Ventana Grille

88

- Arlington Tennis Center

92

- Rental and Lake Services

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“LOOK DEEP INTO NATURE, AND THEN YOU WILL UNDERSTAND EVERYTHING BETTER ” - ALBERT EINSTEIN

RIVER LEGACY PARKS PADDLING TRAIL

6

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation


INTRODUCTION FROM THE DIRECTOR G

reat parks and exceptional recreational opportunities provide the foundation for the physical, social, economic, environmental viability and well-being of a community. The demand for natural areas and open space in America dates back to the Industrial Revolution. The Union era that followed brought about a demand for more structured recreation programming in the United States. It was during this era that Parks and Recreation was established under the Health Department. It was also during the era that the City of Arlington opened Meadowbrook Park, the first community park in the city. As Arlington grew, so did the need for additional parks and recreation programming. As a result, the Arlington Parks and Recreation Department was formed in 1957. Over the next thirty years, as the population neared a quarter of a million residents, numerous parks, golf courses and recreation centers opened their doors. Arlington continued to expand through the 90’s, growing by nearly 30 percent and becoming increasingly diverse. Responding to the needs of the growing community, the department entered its largest period of development. Significant changes in population and demographics are not the only major developments in the City of Arlington over the last few decades. Arlington responded to a changing economy and the rapid growth of technology. In an increasingly “digital” world it is imperative that communities adopt modern platforms and advertising services for engaging constituents. Additionally, the City of Arlington’s emphasis on cost effective service delivery and increasing cost recovery requires a more innovative, strategic and entrepreneurial approach to marketing and enterprise development efforts. Recognizing this need, the department completed the reorganization of the Marketing, and Rental and Lake Services Division in October 2012. One expectation was to recoup costs associated with the reorganization within 18 months. In order to meet this goal, marketing efforts have been revamped over the last year-and-a-half, with an emphasis on improving design and leveraging digital platforms for greater efficiency and increased growth. The department’s last comprehensive marketing plan was adopted in 1993. The Arlington Parks and Recreation Department is in need of a marketing strategy which embraces

how consumers digest media in this day-and-age. This document provides the information, strategies and objectives to serve the needs of our diverse community through a progressive approach to marketing and communication. By pairing century-old principles with cutting-edge technology we will promote the benefits of parks and recreation and make Arlington known as a Naturally Fun place to live, work and play. Sincerely,

Lemuel Randolph Director, Parks and Recreation

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SUMMARY OF THE PARKS The City of Arlington has continued to evolve since its birth more than 150 years ago. With this evolution, a parks department which can serve a diverse and growing population is a necessity. The City of Arlington Parks and Recreation Department’s (APRD) mission is to “provide quality facilities and services that are responsive to a diverse community and sustained with a focus on partnerships, innovation and environmental leadership.” APRD believes parks provide a chance to commune with nature. The department’s assets also provide citizens with places to engage with community members and build a strong, socioeconomic environment. With consideration that “structures” are a necessary part of an urban infrastructure, open spaces and recreational opportunities are an essential part of a thriving community. Thoughts of New York City’s Central Park, Chicago’s Lincoln Park and San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park easily confirm this notion. Parks do not merely draw visitors to a city. The presence of parks increases the quality of life for its residents. They create a sense of community and a feeling of belonging. A thriving park is a status symbol, one 8

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation

which can be worn with pride by both city leaders and residents alike. The City of Arlington does not have just one grand signature park; it is blessed with numerous types of park environments. With 90 parks, seven pools, four golf courses, a tennis facility, lake and even a living science center, the Arlington parks system has always been as unique as the city itself. The Arlington Parks and Recreation Department is committed to offering quality parks and recreational opportunities to the local community. However, these assets have been among the best kept secrets in the metroplex for years. Known as the largest “mid-city” in the nation, Arlington has the potential to grow exponentially and attract new, young residents to contribute to a thriving society. If the parks themselves are the soul of the city, then the services provided in recreation programs are the spirit. These programs promote physical fitness and provide space for citizens to focus on general health and wellness. Community programming is


VISION, MISSION AND VALUES A clear vision informs customers, employees and other stakeholders about the potential inherent in the organization’s future. Put simply, the vision tells what the organization intends to be. The City of Arlington’s vision is as follows: “A pre-eminent city, providing an exemplary, safe environment in which to live, learn, work and play.” Working in concert with the City’s vision is APRD’s vision: “Arlington is a vibrant city that enjoys a high quality of life through great parks and exceptional recreational opportunities. These services provide a foundation for the physical, social, economic, and environmental viability and well-being of the community.” To accomplish the vision, a strong yet simple mission statement is needed to communicate the purpose and direction of the organization. The City’s mission statement is as follows:

an essential part of our department. From a consumer perspective, the services provided by aquatics, athletics, golf, tennis, and recreation divisions are an integral part of a successful community. Benefits like these are voluntary, unlike paying property taxes and water bills. It is our mandate to make ensure that our residents continue to see these assets as the valuable resource that they are. While the Arlington Parks and Recreation Department has done a remarkable job in promoting its parks and recreation programs in prior years, there is always room for improvement. Future successes will be a direct result the strategic marketing efforts which are outlined within this document.

“The City of Arlington proactively meets the needs of the public through active engagement, inclusive participation and highquality, cost-effective service delivery. As a supportive city department, APRD’s mission is to help the City realize its vision, which is reflected in our mission statement: “The Mission of the Arlington Parks and Recreation Department is to provide quality facilities and services that are responsive to a diverse community and sustained with a focus on partnerships, innovation and environmental leadership.” To carry out the mission on a daily basis, a durable set of values must be in place to provide the moral compass of the department. It is this moral compass which guides decision-making and establishes a set of “best practices.” The department’s values are as follows: “The Arlington Parks and Recreation Department will uphold the shared values of the city, which are: teamwork, responsiveness, respect, innovation, commitment, integrity.”

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BRAND PHILOSOPHY

ARLINGTON PARKS & RECREATION

Having hosted a Super Bowl, being home to an emerging Tier 1 research university as well as a flourishing business sector, and featuring a world-class Entertainment District, Arlington is a true “big city” with the profile to prove it. At the same time, the city maintains the same hometown feel it always has, complete with thriving neighborhoods and an exceptional park system that are the building blocks of any strong, diverse community. The goal is to integrate all these traits into the City’s brand and to “live the brand” by demonstrating the familial relationship of each trait while letting each one shine through.

City of Arlington Branding

The City Council made defining an identifiable brand one of its top priorities in 2013. The City of Arlington brand will emphasize the growing, innovative, authentic, natural and unexpected attributes of Arlington. While the City has different lines of business with unique features represented by individual logos, the brand will ensure that it is seen as a cohesive corporation unified under a common theme.

Department Branding – Naturally Fun

“Naturally Fun” is both the promise and the personality of the Arlington Parks and Recreation Department. For our residents, our businesses and our visitors who seek quality facilities and recreational opportunities in order to lead a healthy lifestyle, APRD offers value and convenience in our own backyard. Brand Promise: Naturally Fun Positioning Statement: For the Arlington community seeking quality facilities and recreational opportunities, the Arlington Parks and Recreation Department offers value and convenience in your own backyard. Affiliation: Community members who find value and fulfillment in leading a healthy, active lifestyle Personality: Passionate, Fun, Creative The Naturally Fun brand was developed in 2007 after a study conducted by National Service Research which involved focus groups with citizens and staff. Our consultants view the Naturally Fun Fun brand as a tremendous asset to the department and feel there is great potential to further develop the brand. 10

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation

While very pleased with the Naturally Fun brand, the new marketing team has worked over the past year to shift the application of the brand in terms of design and style. Though the brand was created nearly seven years ago, its implementation within various business units has been varied and its application inconsistent. One strategy of the marketing plan is to grow the Naturally Fun brand through consistency across business units. One objective to aid in accomplishing this is the development of formalized brand guidelines, including templates, tools and training. Business Unit Branding Just as APRD is a sub-brand of the City of Arlington, each business unit within the department naturally has its own brand. In most instances it is advisable for these sub-brands to have their identity tied to the department branding. Currently there is a lack of consistency in business unit branding. Some have never fully adopted the Naturally Fun brand and utilize the City of Arlington brand as their primary branding. Others have incorporated logos or tag lines from other organizations such as “Playing is Winning” or have developed their own internal tag lines. This inconsistency serves to confuse the Naturally Fun and City of Arlington brands rather than strengthen them. The branding guidelines which will be developed will provide clarity on how the Naturally Fun and City of Arlington brands are to be implemented. They will ensure consistency across the department and will outline the manner in which an additional tagline or mark may be used. Because of the negative association golfers have with municipal courses, and because of the steep competition with a multitude of municipal, public and semi-private courses in the DFW area, the department has developed a separate “Arlington Golf” brand for the four courses it operates. Arlington Golf information can be found in Naturally Fun publications and the department website; however, general golf marketing collateral does not use the Naturally Fun or City of Arlington Branding. The marketing team has identified opportunities to improve the“Arlington Golf” brand through updated design styles, fresh design of the primary logos for Meadowbrook Park Golf Course and Chester Ditto Golf Course (pending potential master plan), and a set of secondary logos that would unify all four courses together under the Arlington Golf brand. Other branding improvements to be considered include an updated golf website and smartphone app.


Multiple Brands? A brand is more than a logo and tagline. A brand is a promise, an experience and a feeling that a customer has about a business. A brand is comprised of numerous elements including: graphic design, voice, customer service, typography, processes, staff, the products and services themselves, and yes, a logo and tagline.

hand, citizens have numerous choices for health and fitness services and how they spend their leisure time. In addition to similar providers, departments must also compete with screen time, with the average child spending between seven and eight hours per day in front of a television, computer, smartphone or gaming device.

Every business, municipality, department and individual has a brand, whether it is formalized or not. Often an entity can be an element of more than one brand. A few notable examples include:

A municipal brand may not always be a fit for the services offered by park and recreation departments. It is generally expected that a city operates and maintains parks, trails and pools. It is less known that the city also operates golf courses, fitness centers, a tennis center, athletic leagues, a restaurant and a rental operation. A general city brand may not resonate as well with potential customers for programs that they do not perceive to be typical municipal services.

Oreo and Nabisco

Old Spice and Proctor and Gamble

Wheaties and General Mills

Air Jordan and Nike

Municipal departments serve as sub-brands of the City brand. These departments typically have their own vision, mission and values that take the city brand and personalize it to their services. Many municipal departments will adopt the city branding in terms of the logo and design; however, there are instances in which it makes business sense for a department to develop and promote its own brand. A park and recreation department is a good example of a municipal department that can significantly benefit from developing a sub-brand. Park and Recreation departments are heavily dependent on user fees to provide services. Many of the services offered by park and recreation departments are expected to recover all or most of their costs. Strong brand identity and brand recognition can result in increased revenues through greater participation and willingness to pay. Park and Recreation departments often operate in a highly competitive environment. Citizens don’t choose who will provide their water, trash service, or respond to an emergency. On the other

Some individuals are hesitant to do business with a government agency or may not expect the same level of engagement or service that they would receive from a private sector alternative. Sending potential customers to a municipal website or a .gov domain could deter business and negatively effect cost recovery. In the golf and tennis industry, a “municipal course” or a “public facility” is often associated with an inferior experience in comparison to private facilities. Golfers expect a lower caliber course because of the negative reputation that the “muni” label carries. Although the department brand is the central focus, it should be viewed as an extension of the City brand. When appropriate the City logo should be included in marketing materials. The marketing team is awaiting the release of the new City of Arlington branding and style guides in June of 2014. Once released the team will incorporate the new branding and slogans into future marketing efforts.

DEFINING AN IDENTIFIABLE BRAND. The following APRD initiatives support the City Council’s priority of defining an identifiable brand:

New parks and gateway signage

Increased social media presence

The design and installation of a sculpture trail

Re-design of Naturally Fun magazine

The launch of the new naturallyfun.org

Business unit branding

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STATE OF THE DEPARTMENT Since the inception of its “Pay to Play” initiative in 1987, the Arlington Parks and Recreation Department has operated with a focus on cost recovery. In 2011, the Park Board, City Manager’s Office and City Council supported the adoption of a cost recovery policy that would serve as the department’s guiding tool to improve operational performance. This philosophy was again echoed at the FY13 City Council Priority Setting Workshop, when the council stated that, “the cost effective delivery of core City services are understood by all to be baseline requirements for the municipal organization.” While the department has a superior cost recovery record there is an expectation to further improve cost recovery due to decreased subsidies from the City’s General Fund for the department’s Performance Fund. Achieving and maintaining cost recovery goals will be challenging considering that fees for some users are low or discounted based upon history, contractual arrangements, ability to pay, as well as changing demographics within the community.

Business Environment With over 130 cities comprising the municipal fabric of the DFW Metroplex, the City of Arlington exists within a highly competitive marketplace. With its mission to provide quality facilities and services that are responsive to a diverse community, APRD has an opportunity to help build a thriving community and define and leverage an identifiable brand, which are both areas of strategic interests set forth by the City Council. Arlington will remain vibrant and will attract homeowners to the city by successfully marketing its unique venues, such as River Legacy Parks and Lake Arlington, and promoting its highly touted recreational services, such as the Arlington Tennis Center and aquatics programs. Cost Recovery Analysis The Arlington Parks and Recreation Department’s budget consists of a General Fund and a Performance Fund. The planning and maintenance costs for the city’s parks, trails and medians are included in the General Fund, as are many of the salaries for the department’s administrative staff. Most other aspects of the department are funded out of the Performance Fund. The goal for the Performance Fund is to achieve 100% cost recovery. The chart below depicts the Performance Fund’s cost recovery trend.

PERFORMANCE FUND COST RECOVERY 130% 122%

120%

116%

114%

110%

100%

96%

96% 95%

96%

94%

94%

92% 90%

91%

87%

79% 80% 73%

70%

72%

80% 80%

78% 72%

75% 72%

71%

68%

60%

50%

12

97% 96%

82% 80%

114%

110%

64%

64%

79% 73%

70%

57%

FY09

FY10

FY11

FY12

FY13

Golf

116%

96%

110%

114%

114%

Rental/Lake Services

91%

80%

96%

57%

122%

Athletics

79%

87%

95%

94%

96%

Center Programs

64%

68%

64%

71%

73%

Aquatics

72%

72%

80%

78%

79%

Tennis Center

73%

75%

80%

72%

70%

TOTAL

92%

82%

94%

96%

97%

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation


ARLINGTON PARKS AND RECREATION BY THE NUMBERS

(APR 1, 2013-MAR 31, 2014):

82,500+

3.36M

Attendance at special events including Cinco de Mayo, Light Up Arlington, Daddy-Daughter Dance and Ecofest.

Total number of visitors to our parks, pools and athletics facilities.

37,594

279,840

Volunteer hours spent assisting department projects.

Feet of walking and jogging trails currently maintained by the department.

140,375

8,962

Rounds of golf played on our four City courses (Tierra Verde, Chester Ditto, Lake Arlington and Meadowbrook Park).

Boat permits issued for Lake Arlington, which measures 2,250 surface acres and has an 11 mi. paddling trail.

21.25M

4,711

Online impressions to NaturallyFun.org website and APRD social media channels.

Total acres of Arlington park land, divided among 91 parks throughout the city.

90,000

180,000

Attendance at Arlington Tennis Center, the premier public facility in DFW with 26 lighted courts and full-service Pro Shop.

Guests to our seven City of Arlington pools, which include six outdoor locations and the Hugh Smith Indoor Pool.

10,240 Total memberships including day camp, weight room, fitness and sports league registrants.

Visit naturallyfun.org/report to view the full Naturally Fun Report.

NATURALLYFUN.ORG


STATE OF THE DEPARTMENT

GROWTH

1987

2003

2014

Number of Parks

46

82

90

Total Park Acres

1,784

4,530

4,711

371

1,750

1,830

0

24

53

24

38

49

Recreation Centers

3

5

4

Senior Adult Centers

1

2

2

Event / Rental Centers

1

1

2

18-Hole Golf Courses

2

3

3

9-Hole Golf Courses

1

1

1

Outdoor Basketball Courts

6

18

26

18

49

51

Spraygrounds / Splash Pads

0

2

4

Off-Leash Dog Parks

0

0

1

Skate Parks

0

0

3

Linear Park Acres Linear Park Trail Miles Playgrounds

Tennis Courts

Financial Resources for Parks and Recreation - General Fund

- Arlington Tomorrow Foundation

- Program and User Fees

- Community Development Block Grants

- General Obligation Bonds

- Certificates of Obligation

- Neighborhood and Linear Park Fees

- Advertising and Sponsorships

- Gas Revenue

- Grants

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City of Arlington Parks and Recreation


REVENUE GENERATOR

A greenbelt in Boulder, Colo., that helped to increase the value of surrounding homes by approximately $5.4 million was shown to potentially generate $500,000 annually in property tax revenue for the neighborhood.3

VALUE OF TREES

Arlington’s urban forest is estimated to have a structural value of $2.75 Billion (e.g., the cost of having to replace a tree with a similar tree). Trees in Arlington are estimated to reduce energy-related costs from residential buildings by $2.80 Million annually.5

WELCOME HOME

The National Association of Home Builders found that 65 percent of home shoppers surveyed felt that parks would seriously influence them to move to a community.2

HEALTH BENEFITS

Active Living Research highlighted a Nebraska study which found that for every $1 spent on trails, there was almost $3 in savings in direct medical costs.3

POSITIVE PROPERTY

A PREMIUM ON PARKS

Value increase to homes located within 1,500 feet of the following types of parks according to the American 2 Planning Association:

A survey by the National Association of Realtors (NAR) revealed that 50 percent of voters would be willing to pay 10 percent more for a house located near a park or protected open space.2

• Natural Areas: $10,648 • Golf Courses: $8,849 • Specialty Parks: $5,657 • Urban Parks: $1,214

COMING FOR THE PARKS

In a study by Miller et al., a retiree sample was asked to review 14 features and indicate their importance in the decision to move. The first two in rank order were scenic beauty and recreational opportunities.2

WANTING TO SEE GREEN

A study in Active Living Research estimated that the average household living half a mile from open space would be willing to pay $4,104 more for a home to live a quarter mile closer to the open space.3

Parks provide intrinsic environmental, aesthetic and recreation benefits to our cities. They are also a source of positive economic benefits. They enhance property values, increase municipal revenue, bring in homebuyers AMERICAN PLANNING ASSOCIATION - CITY PARKS and workers, and attract retirees.”

Open Space San Francisco. “The Economic Value of Parks.” 2009. 2American Planning Association “How Cities Use Parks for Economic Development.” 2002. 3Active Living Research. “Economic Benefits of Communities that Support Physical Activity.” May 2010. 4Active Living Research. “The Economic Benefits of Open Space, Recreation Facilities and Walkable Community Design.” May 2010. 5City of Arlington. “Urban Forest Resource Analysis.” 2009. 1

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“TENNIS IS A PERFECT COMBINATION OF VIOLENT ACTION TAKING PLACE IN AN ATMOSPHERE OF TOTAL TRANQUILLITY. ” - BILLIE JEAN KING

ARLINGTON TENNIS CENTER 500 W. MAYFIELD ROAD


SITUATION ANALYSIS STATE OF MARKETING In the last several years the Arlington Parks and Recreation Department has been at a crossroads. City Council’s directive for “the cost effective delivery of core City services” coupled with “Pay to Play” and cost recovery initiatives, has put pressure on increasing revenue. At the same time, increasing demands for services and decreased funding has pushed the department to continually become more efficient. APRD must balance these business goals with its vision and mission which call for inclusive participation and services that are responsive to a diverse population. It is when these two worlds collide that marketing the right programs to the right audiences becomes most critical.

Historical/Restructuring Summary In 2011 APRD recognized the need to improve marketing and enterprise development efforts. A reorganization of the Marketing and Rental & Lake Services teams was proposed, with a goal of generating at least $85,000 in new revenue within 18-months. The previous marketing unit was comprised of one Marketing Manager and two part-time staff. The reorganized team would include three full-time positions: a Marketing and Enterprise Development Manager, a Marketing and Enterprise Development Coordinator and an Electronic Media Specialist. The new Manager was brought on board in May of 2012. The two remaining full-time positions were filled in October of the same year. As part-time positions became vacant their responsibilities became refocused. One aide position, with a graphic design focus, was filled in October of 2012 and the other, with a videography focus, was filled in May of 2013.

DEPARTMENT ROLES MARKETING & ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT MANAGER Primary Responsibilities: Strategy & Management Works directly with Senior Staff and the City’s Office of Communication. Point of contact for Parks Operations marketing needs. ELECTRONIC MEDIA SPECIALIST

MARKETING & ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT COORDINATOR Primary Responsibilities: Branding, Design, Publication Development Point of contact for all Enterprise Programs marketing

Primary Responsibilities: Social Media, Web Content, Media Relations Point of contact for all Community Programs marketing needs (Athletics, Aquatics, Center Programs)

MARKETING AIDE 1 (Part-time)

MARKETING AIDE 2 (Part-time)

Primary Responsibilities: Graphic Design, Website Development

Primary Responsibilities: Videography, Photography, Graphic Design

HS & COLLEGE INTERNS Primary Responsibilities: Various 2014 Marketing Plan

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SWOT ANALYSES NEW PHILOSOPHY With the reorganization of the Marketing division, the Marketing & Enterprise Manager introduced a “Three P’s” philosophy. These values serve to guide all efforts made by the team. Proactive The marketing team is expected to proactively seek solutions and begin new initiatives. The marketing staff should take the initiative to find out about upcoming programs or events and identify the best tools for promotion, rather than waiting to be contacted by staff. By being proactive, marketing efforts can be well planned and executed, instead of duplicating what has been done in previous years. Progressive With the boom of social media and mobile technology, the marketing landscape changes almost daily. It is a priority for the marketing team to be aware of new opportunities and to stay on top of best practices. Effectively engaging the public in this era means that dollars and time need to be invested in non-traditional advertising mediums. The team is encouraged to be leaders in the field by continuing their professional development, implementing new initiatives, and sharing their knowledge with colleagues. Purposeful Being progressive must be balanced with purpose. New tools and platforms cannot be adopted simply for their novelty, there must be a good business case for each investment of time and resources. Sometimes this means waiting to utilize a platform until there is evidence that has been adopted by enough citizens to be beneficial. Other times it may mean putting an initiative on hold until staff has ample time or resources to devote to the project.

MARKETING TEAM Strengths Progressive, Creative Approach • Diversity of Staff Skills/Talents • Quality of Staff •

Weaknesses Visibility and Communication with Internal Divisions • Balancing Quality and Efficiency • Prioritizing Work Load • Overzealous Ideas •

Opportunities Diversify Internship Program • Improve Stability of Positions (PT to FT) • Training and Empowering Department Staff • Educate Staff to Better Administer Social Media • Empower Staff to Manage Email Campaigns •

Threats Turnover in Part-Time Positions • Staff Burnout, Loss of Motivation • Loss of Support, Reduced Funding •

18

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation


DEPARTMENTAL

MARKETING Strengths

Quality of Staff • Customer Service • Variety of Programs/Services • Reasonable Cost of Programs/Services • Quality of Programs/Services •

Weaknesses Aging, Outdated, Inefficient Infrastructure • Insufficient Staffing for Existing and Future Needs • Not Enough Facilities/Space to Serve Community • Difficulty Operating Within Municipal Environment • Lack of Awareness of Facilities and Services •

Strengths Support from Department and City Leadership • Strong Social Media Presence and Engagement • Strong Internal Graphic Design/Layout Capabilities • Strong Videography Capabilities • Award Winning Website •

Weaknesses Design Quality on Business-Unit Level • Branding Consistancy Across Department • Restrictive Practices Limit Online Registration • Difficulty Reaching Minority Populations • Involving More Staff in Content Creation • Lack of Awareness of Facilities and Services • Outdated Software Limits Measurement •

Opportunities

Opportunities

Increase Partnerships • Identify Creative Funding Opportunities • Develop Additional Facilities • Increase Rentals, Receptions and Catering • Expand Programs and Services •

More Targeted Email Campaigns • Increase Advertisers and Partners • Better Understand Customers through GIS • Standardized Program Satisfaction Surveys •

Threats

Threats

Budget Cuts and Increasing Cost Recovery Demands • Not Investing in Existing Facilities • Expansion without Increased Funding • Competition from Similar Providers • Resistance to Increased Participation Fees • Lagging Behind on Current Programming Trends •

Turnover in Part-Time Positions • Similar Providers with More Attractive Facilities • Similar Providers with Lower Prices/Bundled Services •

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COMMUNITY RELATIONS MATRIX Part of the Arlington Parks and Recreation Department’s mission includes being responsive to a diverse community. This can only be done through effective two-way communication with the citizens of Arlington, city leadership, and the many associations, groups and non-profits that exist

within the community. The Arlington Parks and Recreation Department takes a proactive approach to informing and engaging these groups through numerous platforms. The department strives to be timely, transparent and engaging in all communication efforts.

Health & Wellness Information

Benefits of Parks and Recreation

Staff/Customer Spotlights

Budget & Financial Information

Vision, Mission, Values

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Local Colleges

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APRD Staff

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City Staff

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City Management

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City Council

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GROUPS AND ORGANIZATIONS

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Local Sports Associations

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News Stations

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Local Blogs & Websites

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Career Fairs

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Park Maintenance & Closures

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Park Planning & Development

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Program & Event Information

Job Opportunities

TOPICS

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Professional Associations

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City of Arlington Parks and Recreation

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Facility/Amenity Availability

Volunteer Opportunities

Opportunities for Public Input

Public Meetings

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TOPICS

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Informal Meetings

Fees & Policies

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METHODS

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2014 Marketing Plan

21


MARKETING BUDGET The APRD Marketing Budget is comprised of a general fund and a performance fund account. The general fund covers staff salaries and benefits, training, equipment, supplies, and all marketing and advertising efforts related to general fund initiatives. This includes public relations, general department branding and messaging, park dedications, and similar expenses. From fiscal year 2009 through fiscal year 2012 this budget averaged $202,969 in expenses.

The peformance fund is used for marketing and advertising efforts related to all performance fund based business units. This includes Athletics, Aquatics, Center Programs, Forestry and Beautification, Golf, Rental and Lake Services, and Tennis. This fund averages $84,000 in expenses each year. With the reorganization in fiscal year 2013, the marketing division benefited from an increase in its general fund to allow the addition of two full-time positions and one parttime position.

FY09-FY12 Average

FY13

FY14 Estimate

Performance Fund Revenue

$11,702,035

$12,463,164

$12,588,164+

Sponsorship/ Advertising Revenue

$0

$0

$120,000

General Fund Expenses

$202,969

$393,418

$393,418+

Performance Fund Expenses (Marketing)

$84,000

$84,000

$84,000

Performance Fund Expenses (Other Advertising)

$65,000

$65,000

$65,000

INVESTMENT VS RETURN* Performance Fund revenue increase Performance Fund Revenue increase compared FY09-FY12 average. comparedto tothe FY09-FY12 average. Performance and General Fund marketing budget Performance & General Fund Marketing budget increase increase compared to the FY09-FY12 compared to average. FY09-FY12 average.

$761,125 New revenue from New Revenue from sponsorships advertising sponserships and & advertising.

$190,449 $120,000 * The increase in markeitng resources is not solely responsible for new and increased revenue. Other factors, such as favorable weather, new programming, fee changes, customer loyalty, and initiatives by other staff also played a role in this increase.

22

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation


The investment of an additional $190,000 into marketing has resulted in numerous new initiatives, some of which are referenced in this plan. In the first year of the reorganization a new website was launched, thousands of new fans were added on social media accounts, branding was improved, publication design was brought in-house, photography and videography capabilities were greatly improved - to name a few. Revenue trends indicate that this investment has paid off. Fiscal year 2013 revenue was a record high, exceeding the previous four year average by over $750,000 dollars. Fiscal year 2014 revenues are currently on track to exceed the prior year numers. In 2014 a 3rd party was hired to solicit sponsorships and sell advertising opportunities. These clients are managed by the Marketing and Rental and Lake Services team. To date this new arrangement has resulted in over $400,000 in gross contracts and an estimated net of $120,000 per year. Although the markeing budget increased significantly in 2013, the department operates with a marketing budget that is significantly lower than recommended in the continuing education and lifelong learning field. The Learning Resources Network (LERN), which serves schools, colleges associationa and recreation departments, recommends for its clients a marketing budget equal to 10 to 15 percent of gross revenue. Currently, APRD spends just 4.3% of gross revenue on marketing. This takes into consideration all marketing expenses in both the general and performance fund as well as all advertising lines department-wide. The percentage drops to 2% or lower when considering the additional $14 million dollar budget in the general fund and other revenue sources. APRD does a good job of using its modest budget to marketing a diverse range of programs and services. The 2013 increase in funding for marketing efforts is proving to be a good investment. Further investment in marketing efforts would likely yield additional returns in program revenue as well as sponsorship and advertising dollars. Currently the marketing team has limited capacity to increase spending for program advertising. The team has also reached capacity in terms of staff hours to facilitate an increase in major marketing campaigns or a significant increase in new sponsors and advertisers.

For the recreation and continuing education industry the Learning Resources Network (LERN) recommends a marketing budget equal to 10 to 15 percent of gross revenue. $1,888,224

Recommendend Marketing Budget*

$1,258,816

Actual APRD Marketing Budget $542,418

APRD Marketing Budget

10-15% of gross revenue

4.3% of gross revenue

Marketing Budget $542,418

$84,000

$477,418

$65,000

General Fund (Salaries, Benefits & GF Advertising)

Marketing Performance Fund

Other Performance Funds (Advertising)

2014 Marketing Plan

23


RESULTS: SOCIAL ENGAGEMENT Since restructuring the marketing team (October 2012 through March 2014), Arlington has had more than 32 million impressions on their social media pages, 321,000 interactions and 157,000 unique users. The team has added over 21,000 Facebook fans across all pages and 1,300 Twitter followers.

facebook: Facebook ArlingtonParks Total Likes (ArlingtonParks Page) page total likes

October 2012 through March 2014

12000

88.6k Unique Users

219.8k Interactions

10000

8000

6000

4000

2000

25.8m Impressions

Total Impressions total impressions 1200000 1000000 800000 600000 400000 200000 Oct-13

Dec-13

Feb-14

Apr-14

Dec-13

Feb-14

Apr-14

Page Engaged Users engaged users

Oct-13

Aug-13

Jun-13

Apr-13

Feb-13

Dec-12

Oct-12

Aug-12

Jun-12

Apr-12

Feb-12

Dec-11

Oct-11

0

Facebook: Tierraverde Verde Totaltotal Likes likes facebook: tierrA 5000 4500 4000 3500 3000 2500 2000 1500 1000 500

24

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation

4/1/14

3/1/14

2/1/14

1/1/14

12/1/13

11/1/13

9/1/13

10/1/13

8/1/13

7/1/13

6/1/13

5/1/13

4/1/13

3/1/13

2/1/13

1/1/13

12/1/12

11/1/12

9/1/12

10/1/12

8/1/12

7/1/12

6/1/12

5/1/12

4/1/12

3/1/12

2/1/12

1/1/12

12/1/11

11/1/11

10/1/11

0

Aug-13

Jun-13

Apr-13

Feb-13

Dec-12

Oct-12

Aug-12

Jun-12

Apr-12

Feb-12

Dec-11

Oct-11

16000 14000 12000 10000 8000 6000 4000 2000 0

3/19/14

2/19/14

1/19/14

12/19/13

11/19/13

9/19/13

10/19/13

8/19/13

7/19/13

6/19/13

5/19/13

4/19/13

3/19/13

2/19/13

1/19/13

12/19/12

11/19/12

9/19/12

10/19/12

8/19/12

7/19/12

6/19/12

5/19/12

4/19/12

3/19/12

2/19/12

1/19/12

12/19/11

11/19/11

9/19/11

10/19/11

8/19/11

7/19/11

0


youtube views 12000

10000

8000

6000

48,562 Views

4000

44% Female

Apr-14

Mar-14

Jan-14

Feb-14

Dec-13

Oct-13

Sep-13

Nov-13

Jul-13

Aug-13

Jun-13

Apr-13

Mar-13

May-13

Jan-13

Feb-13

Dec-12

Oct-12

Nov-12

Jul-12

Sep-12

Aug-12

Jun-12

Apr-12

May-12

Jan-12

Feb-12

Mar-12

Dec-11

Oct-11

Nov-11

Jul-11

Sep-11

Jun-11

Aug-11

Apr-11

May-11

Jan-11

Feb-11

Mar-11

Dec-10

0

Nov-10

2000

Views

56% Male 44,262 Minutes watched

12% Mobile

October 2012 through March 2014

October 2012 through March 2014

993 Mentions

Twitterfollowers Followers twitter 1600

11.4k Links clicked

1400 1200 1000

691 Retweets

800 600 400 200 0

2014 Marketing Plan

25


RESULTS: PARTICIPATION

Campers Week Campers Per Per Week 440 420 400 380 360 340 320 300 FY10

FY11

FY12

FY13

After School After School Programs

600 400 200 0

1st Qtr

2nd Qtr FY12

26

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation

FY13

3rd Qtr FY14

4th Qtr


450 400 350 300 250 200 150 100 50 0

Active Fitness Active Fitness Memberships Memberships

Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep FY12

FY13

FY14

Outdoor Swim Lesson Registrations 1448 1266 1097

FY11

FY12

FY13

FY14

2014 Marketing Plan

27


COMMUNITY PROFILE: COMPOSITION 2013

2018

Total Population

373,671

395,704

Households (HH)

135,504

142,987

Average HH Size

2.73

2.75

Owner Occupied

51.9

52.9

Median Age

32.5

33.1

% Hispanic

29.5%

32.8%

% Minority

57%

60%

Diversity Index

77.9

79.7

Average Income

$71,354

83,140

Median Income

$53,431

Median Home Value

148,299

Arlington, the fiftieth largest city in the country, has a population that is increasing at a rate greater than the national average, but slower than the growth rate of the state. Arlington’s diversity index is greater than the national average, with many residents being foreign born. The number of hispanic residents is forcasted to grow by more than 60,000 people between 2013 and 2018. The west side of Arlington is the least diverse and most affluent. South East Arlington is characterized by young, relatively affluent citizens. North East Arlington has the greatest diversity and the least wealth of any other part of the city. GROWTH

ARLINGTON

STATE

NATIONAL

Population

1.15%

1.48%

0.71%

$66,135

Households

1..08%

1.50%

0.74%

183,422

Families

1.00%

1.43%

0.63%

Owner Households

1.47%

1.84%

0.94%

Median HH Income

4.36%

4.00%

3.03%

TOP ESRI TAPESTRY SEGMENTS

19. Milk and Cookies — 16.6% Neighborhoods of young, affluent married couples who are starting their families or already have young children. 12. Up and Coming Families — 10.7% Young affluent families with younger children. Eighty percent of the households are families. Most of the residents are white; however, diversity is increasing as the segment grows.

TAPESTRY MAP:

39. Young and Restless — 10.6% Approximately two-thirds of them are younger than 35. Fifty-six percent of these households are either single person or shared. Neighborhoods are diverse. 38. Industrious Urban Fringe — 8.1% Fifty-four percent are married-couple families. Multigenerational households are relatively common. Hispanics make up 61.7 percent of these residents. More than one fourth are foreign born. 52. Inner City Tenants — 7.2% Household types are mixed. These neighborhoods are a steppingstone for recent immigrants. 07. Exurbanites — 5.9% Affluent lifestyles in open spaces beyond the urban fringe. 40 percent are empty nesters. Thirty two percent are married couples with children still living at home. There is little ethnic diversity. 58. NeWest Residents — 5.4% Three-quarters of the population is Hispanic. Approximately half of this population is foreign born, more than half of whom have arrived in the United States in the last 10 years. 28

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation

See Appendix D1, E


7+ Person Household

6 Person Household

5 Person Household

4 Person Household

3 Person Household

2 Person Household

1 Person Household

HOUSEHOLD SIZE

2012 HOUSEHOLDS BY RACE/ETHNIC-

Persons per household

A m

1 7 6

White Alone e r

2

i Oragin Hispanic c

a Black Alone n I

Some Other Race Alone n

5

d

i Asian Alone

3

4

a

Two ornMore Races

A l American o‌ Indian Alone

Family Households: 68.4% | All Households with Children: 39.8%

Household Income 2013 2013 & 2018& 2018 HOUSEHOLD INCOME

25.00% 20.00% 15.00% 10.00% 5.00% 0.00% <$15,000

$15,000 $24,999

$25,000 $34,999

$35,000 $49,999

$50,000 $74,999

$75,000 $99,999

$100,000 - $150,000 $200,000+ $149,999 $199,999

2013 Percent

11.10%

9.60%

10.80%

14.70%

19.60%

13.30%

13.60%

4.30%

3.00%

2018 Percent

10.30%

7.20%

7.90%

11.10%

18.60%

19.00%

16.90%

5.60%

3.50%

Arlington POPULATION Population byBY Age ARLINGTON AGE

70,000 60,000 50,000 40,000 30,000 20,000 10,000 0 0-4

5-9

10-14

15 - 19

20 - 24

25 - 34

2010

See Appendix D1

2013

35 - 44

45 - 54

55 - 64

65 - 74

75 - 84

85+

2018 2014 Marketing Plan

29


COMMUNITY PROFILE: TECHNOLOGY USE Owns a TV

Owns computer

Has access to Internet

OWNS A TV

OWNS A COMPUTER

HAS INTERNET ACCESS

NO 11%

NO 13%

NO 23%

YES 77%

YES 89%

YES 87%

Arlington ARLINGTON Households HOUSEHOLDS Used Internet in last 30 days

75.20%

Used email in last 30 days

66.50%

Obtained news online in last 30 days

62%

32.40% 0%

68%

10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%

YES

NO

COMMUNITY PROFILE:

Perceived Quality of Facilities and Services

100% 90%

Parks and Recreation

NO 21%

59%

37.60%

Personal purchase online in last 30 days

FACILITIES IN PAST 12 MONTHS:

34%

41.50%

Paid bills online in last 30 days

Used Parks and Recreation USED PARKS Facilities in AND PastRECREATION 12 Months

25%

80%

PERCEIVED QUALITY OF PARKS AND RECREATION FACILITIES AND SERVICES:

46%

45%

36%

38%

51%

52%

51%

34%

35%

37%

70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

YES 79%

Excellent

30

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation

Good

See Appendix D1, C4


ESTIMATED ARLINGTON ACTIVITY PARTICIPATION Expected Number

Percent

Market Potential Index

walking for exercise

81,757

29.90%

100

swimming

56,182

20.60%

106

weight lifting

37,062

13.60%

115

bowling

35,549

13.00%

111

fishing (freshwater)

34,614

12.70%

98

jogging/running

34,221

12.50%

117

aerobics

31,364

11.50%

115

basketball

30,061

11.00%

117

golf

29,488

10.80%

105

backpacking/hiking

26,657

9.80%

103

bicycling (road)

26,522

9.70%

100

football

19,675

7.20%

116

boating (power)

16,949

6.20%

101

yoga

15,857

5.80%

99

frisbee

15,515

5.70%

104

baseball

15,003

5.50%

105

soccer

13,629

5.00%

115

canoeing/kayaking

12,906

4.70%

99

tennis

11,978

4.40%

102

softball

11,091

4.10%

104

volleyball

11,013

4.00%

115

target shooting

10,980

4.00%

105

bicycling (mtn)

10,352

3.80%

102

hunting (rifle)

10,355

3.80%

79

pilates

9,562

3.50%

106

motorcycling

9,667

3.50%

97

hunting (shotgun)

9,481

3.50%

83

ice skating

8,545

3.10%

108

horseback riding

7,254

2.70%

87

roller skating

5,887

2.20%

103

archery

6,083

2.20%

85

martial arts

4,265

1.60%

111

Activity

$55,778,948

The estimated amount of money that Arlington residents spend on participant sports, recreational lessons and memberships fees per year. An average of $411.64 per household. See Appendix D1

Estimates by the Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI)

2014 Marketing Plan

31


RACE/ETHNICITY CUSTOMER PROFILE: COMPOSITION Arlington

Engaged Customers

100%

RACE/ETHNICITY RACE/ETHNICITY

80%

80%

Arlington

Engaged Customers

100% 58%

60%

80%

80% 40%

58%30%

60%

19%

17%

20%

12%

40%

7%

30% 0%

White

Hispanic

20%

Household Income HOUSEHOLD INCOME

White

30%

Arlington 2013

26% 21%

Hispanic

Am. Indian

7%

Black

4%

19%

23%

16%

13%

12%

14% 4%

$0-24,999

A

23%

15%

0%

1%

Asian

Engaged Customers

20%

8%

Asian

19%

2%

1%

12%

0%

23%

Black 17%

4%

$25,000-49,999

$50,000-74,999

$75,000-99,999

$100.000-149,999

3%

4%

3%

$150,000-199,000

$200,000+

RECREATION SPENDING Amount Spent with Arlington Parks and Recreation

Amount Spent on Recreation in General

300

250

249

200

150 141

132

125

121

100 96

95

86 73

50

50

71

57 32

29

0

32

16

$0

$1 - $49

$50- $99

$100 $249

$250 $499

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation

$500 $749

$750 $999

39 27

$1,000 $1,999

7

$2,000 $2,999

8

22

$3,000 $3,999

13 5

$4,000 $4,999

3

6

$5,000 $5,999

2

2

$6,000 $6,999

2

$7,000 $7,999

1

$8,000 $8,999

$9,000 $9,999

2

2

$10,000+

See Appendix C1


Findings from the 2013 Park, Recreation and Open Space (PROS) Community Survey (n=1,247):

FACILITIES AND AMENITIES - IMPORTANCE RANKS IN THE TOP 10 IN ALL SECTORS: • Natural areas • Playgrounds • Hard surface trails • Natural surface trails • Picnic pavilions • Recreation centers • Spraygrounds RANKS HIGHLY IN ALL SECTORS: • Outdoor swimming pools • Soccer/Football fields • Baseball/Softball fields

PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITES - IMPORTANCE RANKS IN THE TOP FOUR IN ALL SECTORS: • Exercise and fitness (ranked No. 1 in all six sectors) • Community events • Youth sports leagues • Nature programs RANKS HIGHLY IN ALL SECTORS: • Instructional sports • Senior programs • Swim lessons • Adult sports leagues • Arts and crafts

FACILITY NEEDS - IMPORTANCE RANKS IN THE TOP 10 IN ALL SECTORS: • Greenways w/ trails • Nature trails • Soft surface trails • Natural areas

What types of programs would you like to see?

TYPE OF PROGRAMS YOU WOULD LIKE TO SEE? CATEGORIES Youth Adult Senior Family Community Todler Teen Free/No Cost Girl's/Women's Special Needs Infant Homeschool Preschool

5 4 4 3 2 2

PROGRAMS Fitness Aquatics Swim Lessons Yoga Athletics/Sports Arts/Crafts Dance Bike Golf Events Tennis Self-Defense Zumba Water Aerobics Gymnastics Football Fishing Concerts Baseball Walk/Run Sailing Basketball Geocaching Bowling Archery

8 7

8 7 7 6 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 2 2 2

AMENITIES Rec Center Trails Splash Pad Skateparks Lake Improvements Natural Areas Dog Parks

4 3 2 2 2 0

7

10

11 10 10

12 10

34

20

16 15 15

23

27

13

20

30

40

• Ponds RANKS HIGHLY IN ALL SECTORS: • Hard surface trails • Picnic areas • Small neighborhood parks • Indoor swimming pool

The above responses are based off of 295 open-ended responses from engaged customers. The following categories only received one response: Animal Training, Bike Safety, Boating, Care Giver, Equine, Fencing, Gardening, Health/Wellness, Holiday Camps, Horseshoes, Hula Hooping, Kayak, Local History, Model Airplane, Nature, Nature Classes, RV, Science, Table Tennis, Track and Field, Volleyball, Weights, Wrestling.

• Indoor fitness centers See Appendix C1, C4

2014 Marketing Plan

33


CUSTOMER PROFILE: COMMUNICATION PREFERENCES What yourPREFERRED preferred news sources? WHAT AREare YOUR NEWS SOURCES?

DO YOU PREFER Do you prefer onlineONLINE registration REGISTRATION FORMS OVER overTRADITIONAL traditional forms? FORMS?

Social Media

67.4%

TV: Local Programming

54.1%

Local News Websites

44.2%

Local Newspapers

42.7%

Radio: Local Programming

12.4%

35.1%

Email Newsletters

34.1%

National News Websites

28.3%

TV: National Programming

24.5%

TV: Cable Networks

87.6%

23.0%

Online Video

17.7%

Radio: National Programming

15.7%

Magazines: Local/Regional

14.2%

Review Sites

Yes

No

11.5%

Magazines: National

9.1%

National Newspapers

7.1%

Blogs: Local Focus

6.0%

Blogs: General Interest

4.7%

None of the above

0.5% 0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

60%

70%

How often do you use these social networks? HOW OFTEN DO YOU USE THESE SOCIAL NETWORKS? Facebook YouTube Pinterest Google Plus Twitter Instagram Vine FourSquare 0%

20%

40%

60%

Several Times a Day Once a Day Several Times a Week Once a Week Rarely

34

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation

80%

100%


How do you hear about local events? HOW DO YOUcommunity HEAR ABOUT LOCAL COMMUNITY EVENTS? Star Telegram Word of Mouth (off-line) Social Media Word of Mouth (online) NaturallyFun.org Local TV Stations Local Radio Stations Arlington Citizen's Journal Groupon Email Newsletters ArlingtonTX.gov MyArlingtonTX.com Living Social ExperienceArlington.org DowntownArlington.org DFW Child Living Magazine The Shorthorn (UTA) ArlingtonVoice.com Mansfield Mirror DallasNews.com 360 West Other Local Websites Other Newspapers None of the above Other Magazines

48.0% 42.3% 37.7% 37.3% 34.9% 33.5% 31.9% 28.8% 27.4% 23.6% 23.1% 16.9% 14.8% 11.2% 10.2% 10.1% 8.1% 7.8% 6.4% 6.3% 5.7% 3.1% 2.4% 1.9% 1.2% 0.9% 0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

60%

ACTIVE ON MEDIA? WhenWHEN are ARE YouYOU Active onSOCIAL Social Media? 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

See Appendix C1

2014 Marketing Plan

35


parks trails CENTER&PROGRAMS • 4,711 acres of park land • 1,939 surface acres on Lake Arlington • Parks comprise 7.5% of city area, which is below the national average (8.4%) for intermediate-low density cities.

42

NEIGHBORHOOD PARKS

17

• Arlington has 12.8 park land acres per 1,000 persons, which is below the national average (14.1) for intermediate-low density cities.

70%

Percentage of park visitors that have recommended a park to someone in the last 12 months (39% percent have made recommendations several times).

ARLINGTON PARKS: SATISFACTION Amazing

27%

Great

38%

No Complaints

35%

Poor

1%

13

COMMUNITY PARKS

12

6

PARK AND RECREATION FACILITIES

LINEAR PARKS

CITY PARKS

NATURAL AREAS

IN THE PAST FIVE YEARS ARLINGTON PARKS AND RECREATION FACILITIES HAVE:

Conveniently located

Improved

Remained About the Same

Declined

Quality

7%

Safety

Maintenance / Cleanliness 0% Poor

36

20% Fair

40% Good

60%

80%

100%

36%

57%

Excellent

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation

See Appendix C1


parks & trails: VISITATION Most Visited Parks

Annual Total

Harold Patterson Sports Center

750,000

Randol Mill Park

211,900

SJ Stovall Park

200,650

River Legacy Parks

181,400

Cravens Park

166,800

Martin Luther King Jr. Sports Center

155,000

Vandergriff Park

120,500

Founders Plaza / Levitt Pavilion

92,280

Veterans Park

81,800

JW Dunlop Sports Center

78,000

Visitation by Park / Facility Type

3.4m VISITS

Arlington parks are visited a total of 3,364,200 times annually.

CONSTRAINTS ( n=860):

Annual Total

Athletic Facilities

1,520,450

Community / City Parks

1,016,530

Neighborhood Parks

551,780

Aquatic Facilities

188,600

Linear Parks

NOTHING: 47% TIME: 42% HEAT/WEATHER: 7% GO TO A NON-ARLINGTON PARK: 6% NOT INTERESTED: 3% DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T LIKE AMENITIES: 3% PROBLEMS WITH PARK PATRONS: 3% LACK OF RESTROOMS: 1% LOCATION: 1%

86,840

Park Visitation Frequency

20%

18% 15%

15% 9%

10%

8% 4%

Several times per week

Once per week

Every 2-3 weeks

Once per month

Every 2-3 months

Every 4-6 months

Once or twice per year

Not in the last 12 months

2014 Marketing Plan

37


Basketball Bike/Hike Trails Disc Golf Equestrian Trails Fishing Fitness Course Golf Course Grill Horseshoes League Fields Natural Area Pavilion/Shelter Picnic Area Playground Practice Field Public Art Restrooms Soccer League Fields Splash Pad/Pool Tennis Volleyball Allan Saxe Park 3501 Curry Road, 76001 B.C. Barnes Park 3000 Daniel Drive, 76014 Blackland Prairie 4907 New York Ave., 76018 Bob Cooke Park 2025 Craig Hanking Drive, 76010 Bob Findlay Linear Park 900 Findlay Drive, 76012 Bob McFarland Park 410 E. Embercrest Drive, 76018 Bowman Branch Linear Park South Matlock Road, 76002 Bowman Springs Park 7003 W. Poly Webb Road, 76016 Brantley Hinshaw Park 2121 Overbrook Drive, 76014 Burl L. Wilkes Park 1300 Hillcrest Drive, 76010 California Lane Park 2001 California Lane, 76015 Carl Knox, Jr. Park 1200 Susan Drive, 76010 Center Street Trail Connection From Randol Mill Rd. to Ray St. Chester W. Ditto Golf Course 801 Brown Blvd, 76011 Clarence Foster Park 4400 Woodland Park Blvd., 76013 Clarence Thompson Park 1600 Brown Blvd., 76011 Cliff Nelson Park 4600 W Bardin Road, 76017 College Hills Park 151 University Drive, 76013 Cravens Park 400 Cravens Park Drive, 76018 Crystal Canyon Natural Area 1000 Brown Blvd., 76011 Deaver Park 5800 Kelly Elliott Road, 76017 Dixon W. Holman Park 2409 Burney Place, 76006 Dog Park - Tails N’ Trails 950 SE Green Oaks Blvd, 76018 Don Misenhimer Park 201 E Lonesome Dove Trail, 76002 Dr. Robert Cluck Linear Park Randol Mill Rd. to Sanford St. Duncan Robinson Park 2100 W Tucker Blvd, 76013 Fielder Park 1100 S Fielder Road, 76013 Fish Creek Linear Park Including Cravens Park, 76018 Fish Creek Neighborhood Park 2121 Havenwood Drive, 76018 F.J. ‘Red’ Kane Park 6500 S Cooper Street, 76001 Founders Plaza / Levitt Pavilion 100 W Abram Street, 76010 Gateway Park 815 W. Arbrook Blvd, 76015 Gene Allen Park 121 W Main Street, 76010 Gene Schrickel, Jr. Park 4500 Park Springs Blvd, 76017 George Stevens Park 400 W Sanford Street, 76011 Gibbins Park 2101 Margaret Drive, 76012 Green Oaks Blvd./ Rush-Village Creek Trail From River Legacy Parks S. to Bob Findlay Linear Park H.A.D. Dunsworth Park 1100 Waverly Drive, 76015 Harold Patterson Sports Center 1000 W Bardin Road, 76017 Helen Wessler Park 2200 Greenway Street, 76010

38

6 Arlington Parks and Recreation City of

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40

• • • •• • ••

• • • •

• ••• •••• • ••• • • • •••• • ••• • •••• • ••• ••••• • • •••

•• • • •• • • • •• • •• •• • •• • • • •• • • • ••• • • • •• • • • • ••• • • • ••• •• • • ••••• • •• • • •• • • • ••• • • • •• • • •• • ••••• • • • • • ••• • • ••• • • • • •• • • ••••• •• • • • ••• • •• • • • • • • • • ••••• • • ••• • • • • ••• • • • • ••• • • •• •• • • •••• •

Arlington CHECKParks OUT

NaturallyFun.org/parks/map or NaturallyFun.org/parks/finder

for a digital listing of the amenities and offerings at all of our parks and other facilities.

45

77

77

37 5

5

2

80 47 62

41

65

47

62 41 8

46

65 15

46

2

7

76

43

71

8

2

80

15

71

54

43

51

34 17

5170 73

34

17

70

79

21

73

66

21 69

57

68

51

53

53

72

72

6

69 1

52


Basketball Bike/Hike Trails Disc Golf Equestrian Trails Fishing Fitness Course Golf Course Grill Horseshoes League Fields Natural Area Pavilion/Shelter Picnic Area Playground Practice Field Public Art Restrooms Soccer League Fields Splash Pad/Pool Tennis Volleyball

Conveniences & Activities

• •

63

63 64 14

45

14

36

58 61

25 5 59

18

27

35

33 31 13

18

61

25

35 33 13 31

59

56

67

55 44

40

74

55 44 74

67

27

4

50

42

40

10

42

28

• • •

16

20

36

22

64

58

7

22

16

20

10 4

48

38

38

4

39

9

75

75

48

9

2

32

32 3 6

39

29

23

19

7

3

6 23

19

6

9

2

49

30

28 49

81

1

81 78

2 24

24

29

28

78

7

7

12

12

50

76

• •

••• •• • •• • • •••••• •• • • • • •

• • • • ••• • • • • ••••• • •• • • ••••• •• ••• •••• •• • • • •• • • • ••• • • •• •• • • ••••• • •• • • • • • • •• • • •• • ••••• • • • • ••• • • • • • • • • • •• • • • ••••••• ••• • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • ••• • ••• • ••• •••••• •• •••• • ••••••• • • • • • • •• • • ••••• •• • • • ••• • • •• • •• •• • •••

41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81

Heroes Park 2100 W Green Oaks Blvd., 76013 Howard Moore Park 2000 Bever Blvd., 76013 Jake Langston Park 4080 W Mayfield Road, 76016 Julia Burgen on the Greenway Collins St. to Park Row, 76010 J.W. Dunlop Sports Center 1500 NW Green Oaks Blvd., 76012 Kelley Park 4195 W Arkansas Lane, 76013 Lake Arlington Golf Course 1516 W Green Oaks Blvd, 76013 Lakes at Matlock 700 Central Park Drive, 76015 Lynn Creek Linear Park 6501 Matlock Road, 76002 Marrow Bone Spring Park 600 W Arkansas, 76014 Marti VanRavenswaay Park 4601 Bowman Springs Road, 76016 Martha Walker Park 7509 Sharon Lee Drive, 76001 Martin Luther King Jr. Sports Center 7001 Golf Club Drive, 76001 76060 Mary & Jimmie Hooper Park 2303 W Pleasant Ridge Road, 76015 Meadowbrook Park & Golf Course 1300 Dugan Street, 76010 O.S. Gray Natural Area 2021 W Abram Street, 76013 O.W. Fannin Natural Area Hardisty & Fox Hunt Parkway Central Park 600 Van Buren Drive, 76011 Pirie Park 1016 W Cedar Street, 76012 Randol Mill Park 1901 W. Randol Mill Road, 76012 Richard Greene Linear Park 1601 E Randol Mill Road, 76011 Richard Simpson Park 6300 W Arkansas Lane, 76016 River Legacy Parks 701 NW Green Oaks Blvd., 76006 River Legacy Parks - East 1601 NE Green Oaks Blvd., 76006 Rush Creek Linear Park-North 4200 W Pioneer Pkwy., 76013 Rush Creek Linear Park-South Sublett - Hardisty - Vintage Dr. Senter Park 700 Mary Street, 76010 S.J. Stovall Park 2800 W Sublett Road, 76001 Sublett Creek Linear Park Big Springs Drive & Bowen Road SW Nature Preserve 5201 Bowman Springs Road, 76017 Thora Hart Park 3510 W Green Oaks Blvd.,76016 Tierra Verde Golf Club 7005 Golf Club Drive, 76060 Treepoint Park 5403 Treepoint Drive, 76017 Valley View Park 908 Highland Drive, 76010 Vandergriff Park 2800 S. Center Street, 76014 Veterans Park 3600 W Arkansas Lane, 76016 Village Creek Historical Area 2605 Dottie Lynn Parkway, 76013 Webb Community Park 1100 Mansfield Webb Road, 76002 Wimbledon Park 2300 Wimbledon Drive, 76017 Woodland West Park 3200 Norwood Lane, 76013 W.O. & Zeta Workman Park 6701 Tabor Drive, 76002

2014 Marketing Plan

39

7


parks trails: NEEDS CENTER&PROGRAMS An assessment of the current state of Arlington’s parks system, open spaces, and recreation opportunities is vital so that deficiencies and needs can be identified and actions can be developed to address those deficiencies. Demand is derived from multiple sources: community engagement, research on trends, findings from benchmark communities and related research. Supply is informed by policy guidance, organizational structure, available resources and other factors. As such, conducting a needs assessment requires a synthesis of a wide array of inputs that ultimately yield valuable information about how to establish level of service standards.

strategic priorities The following priorities were developed by the 2013 PROS Master Plan Committee: • Quality Facilities • Partnerships and Engagement • Healthy Lifestyles and Recreation • Community and Character • Enrironment and Nature • Connectivity and Equity

40

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation

According to community surveys and public meetings conducted in 2013, access to close-to-home parks, playgrounds, trails and picnic areas is highly valued by Arlington residents. This value aligns with research suggesting that neighborhood parks in close proximity to homes provide opportunities for children to experience nature and engage in physical activity. APRD’s goal is to provide an equitable distribution of parks within ½-mile of every Arlington resident.

SERVICE AREAS


parks & trails: NEEDS FACILITIES AND AMENITIES - IMPORTANCE RANKS IN THE TOP 10 IN ALL SECTORS: • Natural areas • Playgrounds • Hard surface trails • Natural surface trails • Picnic pavilions • Recreation centers • Spraygrounds

OUTDOOR RECREATION AMENITITES NEEDS Nature trails Soft surface trails Ponds for fishing and wildlife Hard surface trails Spraygrounds/Splash pads Fitness/Exercise equipment

RANKS HIGHLY IN ALL SECTORS: • Outdoor swimming pools • Soccer/Football fields

Picnic areas Mountain biking areas

• Baseball/Softball fields Playgrounds

FACILITY NEEDS - IMPORTANCE

Skate park/Skate spots

RANKS IN THE TOP 10 IN ALL SECTORS:

Off leash dog parks

• Greenways w/ trails • Nature trails • Soft surface trails

Swimming pools Sand volleyball courts

• Natural areas • Ponds RANKS HIGHLY IN ALL SECTORS: • Hard surface trails • Picnic areas • Small neighborhood parks

Large, open grassy areas in parks Disc golf course Tennis courts Basketball courts

• Indoor swimming pool • Indoor fitness centers

Soccer/Football fields Baseball/Softball fields

Findings from the 2013 Park, Recreation and Open Space (PROS) Community Survey (n=1,247):

See Appendix C1, C4

0% Does Not Need More

20%

40%

Possibly Needs More

60%

80%

100%

Definitely Needs More

2014 Marketing Plan

41


parks & trails: goals

CENTER PROGRAMS

42

1

Raise awareness of parks, trails and amenities

2

Demonstrate the value and benefits of parks and recreation

3

Promote active and healthy lifestyles

4

Position department as a local leader on environmental and sustainability issues

5

Develop partnerships to improve service delivery and cut costs

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation


parks & trails: TACTICS Tactic

Status

Goal

New naturallyfun.org website with improved park profile pages, better SEO, an interactive park map and locator

Completed

ŒŽ

Rewrite park descriptions for the fifty most visited parks

Completed

ŒŽ

Partner with Macy’s to provide Naturally Fun Magazines at all checkout counters for the month of March

Completed

Œ

Maintain partnership with Experience Arlington. Advocate for parks presence on website and guides.

Ongoing

ŒŽ

Passive management of social media pages for 90+ parks (respond to questions, post updates related each park)

Ongoing

ŒŽ

Setup a marketing booth at all major events to promote Arlington parks, programs and services

Ongoing

Œ

Develop and disseminate annual report to showcase magnitude of services and showcase accomplishments

In Progress

ŒŽ

Unplug & Connect campaign - focus on values, active lifestyles and connecting with nature

In Progress

ŒŽ

Develop a plan to promote beautification in Arlington

In Progress

Develop new dog park signage and etiquette campaign

In Progress

Œ ŒŽ

Find community partner (local magazine/newspaper) to help increase distribution of the Naturally Fun Magazine

Planning

ŒŽ

Develop and distribute welcome packets for new Arlington residents, preferably at reduced cost through partnership

Planning

ŒŽ

Develop video and landing page to promote use of the mobile litter unit and volunteer cleanup opportunities

Future

Œ

Launch Pinterest boards dedicated to promoting values/benefits, active and healthy lifestyles and sustainability/conservation.

Future

ŒŽ

Develop informational campaign about local wildlife (local wildlife and how to appropriately interract/coexist with it)

Future



Develop policies and promotional plan for park amenitiy sponsorships and naming rights.

Future



Create a series of videos to showcase amenities at city-wide parks and sports complexes

Future

Œ

Develop design standards for informational signage in parks

Future

Œ 2014 Marketing Plan

43


PO

FORESTRY & BEAUTIFICATION

CONTENT UNDER DEVELOPMENT

44

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation


FORESTRY & BEAUTIFICATION

CONTENT UNDER DEVELOPMENT

2014 Marketing Plan

45


PO

FORESTRY & BEAUTIFICATION: GOALS

46

1

Raise awareness of departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s conservation and beautification efforts

2

Promote environmental conservation and sustainability

3

Promote beautification efforts across the city

4

Increase citizen involvement in beautification efforts

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation


FORESTRY & BEAUTIFICATION: TACTICS Tactic

Status

Goal

Forestry and Beautification presence on the new naturallyfun.org website

Completed

Share stories on social media relating to Forestry and Beautification efforts

Completed

Market “Tornado ReLEAF” efforts

Completed

Develop a plan and marketing collateral about beautification

In Progress

ŒŽ ŒŽ ŒŽ Ž Œ ŒŽ ŒŽ

Develop conservation-related childrens activity sheets themed around EcoMan

In Progress

Ž

Develop and disseminate annual report to showcase magnitude of services and showcase accomplishments

In Progress

ŒŽ

Unplug & Connect campaign - focus on values, active lifestyles and connecting with nature

Future

Ž

Develop informational campaign about local wildlife (local wildlife and how to appropriately interract/coexist with it)

Future

Œ

Develop and distribute welcome packets for new Arlington residents, preferably at reduced cost through partnership

Future

ŒŽ

Develop video and landing page to promote use of the mobile litter unit and volunteer cleanup opportunities

Future

ŒŽ

Launch Pinterest boards dedicated to promoting values/benefits, active and healthy lifestyles and sustainability/conservation.

Future

ŒŽ

Promote clean-up days and volunteer opportunities

Ongoing

Develop marketing collateral for Ecofest

Ongoing

Support Keep Arlington Beautiful initiatives

Ongoing

2014 Marketing Plan

47


CENTER PROGRAMS CENTER PROGRAMS

67%

Percentage of youth camp/ program users that have recommended an Arlington Parks and Recreation camp or program in the last 12 months. Only 7% have advised against.

63%

81%

Percentage of respondents that said we met their expectations, given the cost of a camp/program.

86%

YOUTH CAMPS/PROGRAMS: CUSTOMER SERVICE

Percentage of respondents that said we met their expectations, given the cost of facility membership.

RECREATION CENTER: CUSTOMER SERVICE

Amazing

22%

Amazing

25%

Great

36%

Great

32%

No Complaints

40%

No Complaints

42%

Poor

2%

Poor

1%

YOUTH CAMPS/PROGRAMS: SATISFACTION

48

Percentage of users that have recommended an Arlington Parks and Recreation center in the last 12 months. Only 7% have advised against.

RECREATION CENTER: SATISFACTION

Amazing

20%

Amazing

21%

Great

34%

Great

32%

No Complaints

44%

No Complaints

44%

Poor

2%

Poor

2%

CONSTRAINTS TO PARTICIPATING IN YOUTH PROGRAMS/CAMPS (n=148):

CONSTRAINTS TO USING RECREATION CENTERS (n=146):

TIME: 47% TOO EXPENSIVE: 30% CHILDREN NOT INTERESTED: 18% DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T LIKE THE PROGRAMMING: 13%

TIME: 38% HOURS ARE NOT CONVENIENT: 17% TOO EXPENSIVE: 13% CENTER IS TOO BUSY: 11% QUALITY OF EQUIPMENT: 10%

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation

See Appendix C1


HUGH SMITH RECREATION CENTER PROGRAM REGISTRANTS

DOTTIE LYNN RECREATION CENTER PROGRAM REGISTRANTS

0.0%

0.0%

76040 76006

76012

13.7%

41.7%

5.8%

76013

76015

76016

18.1% 76014

76017

76018

76001

8.2%

76010

76014

76017

76018

76001

76013

76010

76016

4.3%

76014

76017

76018

4.8%

76002

3.1% 76001

4.2%

76012

76011

76013

76010

76015

76014

76017

76018

34.8%

76015

76014

76017

76018

10.6%

76001

7.0%

EUNICE ACTIVITY CENTER PROGRAM REGISTRANTS 0.0% 76040 76006

5.9%

15.8%

4.1%

76002

2.1% 76001

4.1%

76012

76011

76013

76010

6.4%

7.2%

6.4%

9.9%

6.4%

11.6%

12.5%

76016

5.3%

6.0%

76002

13.3%

17.2%

3.2%

3.8%

0.3%

1.4%

1.4%

22.4%

23.6%

5.8%

76016

5.2%

0.0%

1.6%

76006

6.1%

3.5%

76015

76010

0.0%

3.4% 1.2%

5.1%

76013

76040

32.6%

5.9%

76011

1.5%

1.8%

76016

SENIOR CENTERCENTER NEW YORK SENNIOR RECREATION NEW YORK PROGRAM REGISTRANTS PROGRAM REGISTRANTS

76006

76011

76012

2.3%

1.1%

76040

76012

2.0%

1.5%

76002

1.8%

0.1%

18.5%

1.6%

2.0%

76015

4.1%

7.4%

ELZIE CENTER ELZIEODOM ODOMATHLETIC RECREATION CENTER PROGRAM REGISTRANTS PROGRAM REGISTRANTS

76013

4.5%

16.4%

76002

0.9%

76011

76040 76006

3.7%

76016

1.9%

76012

44.3%

76010

2.4%

1.5%

76006

1.6%

76011

0.0%

76040

2.4%

1.7%

CLIFF NELSON RECREATION CENTER PROGRAM REGISTRANTS

76015

76014

76017

76018

9.8%

5.1%

76002

2.2% 76001

1.4%

2014 Marketing Plan

49


CENTER PROGRAMS CENTER PROGRAMS ARLINGTON

CLIFF NELSON

DOTTIE LYNN

Total Population

373,671

21,707

28,957

Households

135,504

7,969

Average HH Size

2.73

Owner Occupied

ELZIE ODOM

HUGH SMITH

EUNICE

38,456

97,408

61,948

85,901

12,184

18,860

32,227

20,655

27,458

2.72

2.72

2.72

3.02

2.72

2.72

52.4

87%

59%

30%

38%

37%

39%

Median Age

32.5

40.3

39.4

32.1

27.6

27.4

27.6

% Hispanic

30%

14%

15%

22%

52%

53%

55%

% Minority

57%

29%

32%

57%

79%

73%

80%

Average Income

$71,354

$93,184

$73,018

$63,231

$45,037

$43,308

$45,088

Median Income

$53,431

$78,059

$51,831

$42,203

$34,906

$32,731

$34,892

Facility Hugh Smith Recreation Center

Cliff Nelson Recreation Center

Dottie Lynn Recreation Center

Elzie Odom Athletic Center

Eunice Activity Center

50

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation

NEW YORK

Year

Expenditures

Revenue

Cost Recovery

2012

496,107

231,252

46.6%

2013

496,840

243,323

49.0%

2012

447,419

431,894

96.5%

2013

439,756

416,350

94.7%

2012

435,475

377,612

86.7%

2013

449,635

425,038

94.5%

2012

646,868

474,429

73.3%

2013

651,682

488,905

75.0%

2012

267,481

126,529

47.3%

2013

318,769

163,925

51.4%


2014 Marketing Plan

51


'RPLQDQW7DSHVWU\6LWH0DS

CLIFF NELSON

&OLII1HOVRQ5HFUHDWLRQ&HQWHU :%DUGLQ5G$UOLQJWRQ7; 'ULYH7LPH0LQXWHV

RECREATION CENTER

NEIGHBORHOOD COMPOSITION TOP ESRI TAPESTRY SEGMENTS (6 minute drive time)

Milk and Cookies (19) - 55.1% Upscale living on a family allowance, Milk and Cookies are neighborhoods of young, affluent married couples who are starting their families or already have young children. Exurbanites (07) - 18.2% Exurbanites residents prefer an affluent lifestyle in open spaces beyond the urban fringe. Although 40 percent are empty nesters, another 32 percent are married couples with children still living at home. There is little ethnic diversity; most residents are white. Sophisticated Squires (06) - 12.7% Residents of Sophisticated Squires neighborhoods enjoy cultured country life on the urban fringe. These city escapees accept longer commutes to live near fewer neighbors. Mostly married couple families; more than 40 percent are married with children that range from toddlers to young adults. This segment is not ethnically diverse; most residents are white.

52

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation

817-561-2819 SOUTHWEST ARLINGTON 4600 W. Bardin Rd. Arlington, TX 76017 Cliff Nelson Recreation Center


PROGRAM REGISTRANTS 0.0%

PROGRAM REGISTRANTS

BUILDING PHOTO

76040 76006

2.0% 76012

76011

76013

76010

1.4%

1.4%

22.4%

0.3% 1.8%

2.3% 0.0%

1.5%

76016

76015

76014

76017

76018

34.8%

6.0%

76002

13.3% 76001

7.0%

CUSTOMER PROFILE The majority of the program participants at the Cliff Nelson Recreation Center live in southwest Arlington. This is the most affluent section of Arlington, with many young families. This corner of Arlington is also the least ethnically diverse. Likely Customers Based on neighborhood demographics, the most likely customers are budget-conscious, upper-middle class mothers with elementary age children.

RECOMMENDATIONS Programming at Cliff Nelson can be differentiated from programs offered elsewhere in the city. Specialty programs and sports camps with a higher price point and additional benefits should be piloted at this center. Citizens in this sector have more disposable income, and thus may be more selective in the services they choose. Convenience is a key selling point for fitness memberships and classes. These services should be targeted to the 76017 zip code. Camp and program advertising should be targeted based on interests to those living in the 76017, 76016 and 76001 zip codes. See Appendix D4

Drive Time:

6 Min

9 Min

1581

21,707

65,431

Households

622

7,969

23,978

Average HH Size

2.54

2.72

2.73

Owner Occupied

85%

87%

79%

Median Age

42.7

40.3

39.2

% Hispanic

15%

14%

14%

% Minority

30%

29%

34%

Average Income

$93,563

$93,184

$93,654

Median Income

$72,273

$78,059

$76,733

$572

$584

$584

Total Population

Avg. Rec. Spend

3 Min

2014 Marketing Plan

53


Dominant Tapestry Site Map

DOTTIE LYNN

Dottie Lynn Recreation Center 3200 Norwood Ln, Arlington, TX, 76013 Drive Time: 3, 6, 9 Minutes

RECREATION CENTER

NEIGHBORHOOD COMPOSITION TOP ESRI TAPESTRY SEGMENTS (6 minute drive time)

Prosperous Empty Nesters (14) - 22.5% Approximately 6 in 10 householders are aged 55 years or older. Forty percent of the households are composed of married couples with no children living at home. Residents are enjoying the move from child-rearing to retirement. Approximately 90 percent are white. Old and Newcomers (36) - 14.9% Residents of these transitional neighborhoods are either beginning their careers or retiring. They range in age from their 20s to 75 and older. There are more singles and shared households than families in these neighborhoods. Aspiring Young Families (28) - 12.5% Most of the residents in these neighborhoods are young, startup families; married couples; and single parents. Twenty seven percent are single person, and 9 percent are shared. This segment is more ethnically diverse than the total US population. Midlife Junction (33) - 11.7% Nearly 20 percent are aged 65 years or older. Nearly half are married-couple families; 31 percent are singles. Most of these residents are white. 54

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation

817-561-2819 WEST ARLINGTON 3200 Norwood Ln. Arlington, TX 76013 Dottie Lynn Recreation Center

L


DOTTIE LYNN RECREATION CENTER PROGRAM REGISTRANTS

PROGRAM REGISTRANTS

0.0% 76040 76006

13.7% 76012

76011

1.5% 3.7%

44.3% 76013

76010

2.0%

4.5%

16.4%

1.6%

76016

76015

76014

76017

76018

4.1%

1.6%

76002

1.8% 76001

1.1%

CUSTOMER PROFILE The majority of the program participants at the Dottie Lynn Recreation Center live in northwest Arlington. This is the second most affluent section of Arlington. It has a large population of empty nesters, though there is a broad mix of family types. This section of Arlington is the least ethnically diverse, especially in the older segments of the population.

Drive Time:

3 Min

6 Min

9 Min

Total Population

5,583

28,957

99,209

Households

2,271

12,184

39,727

Likely Customers Based on neighborhood demographics, likely customers are affluent, senior citizens and a budget-conscious, middle-class mothers with young children.

Average HH Size

2.54

2.72

2.73

Owner Occupied

70%

59%

53%

Median Age

43.3

39.4

34.8

RECOMMENDATIONS

% Hispanic

13%

15%

22%

Programming at Dottie Lynn should cater to a wide range of ages, but should feature more programming targeted toward seniors with disposable income.

% Minority

21%

32%

44%

Average Income

$79,221

$73,018

$67,924

Median Income

$52,902

$51,831

$46,317

Avg. Rec. Spend

$460.79

$415.29

$379.69

Marketing efforts should be targeted to the 76013, 76016 and 76012 zip codes. Camp and program advertising should be targeted based on interests to those living in the 76017, 76016 and 76001 zip codes. See Appendix D5

2014 Marketing Plan

55


'RPLQDQW7DSHVWU\6LWH0DS +XJK6PLWK5HFUHDWLRQ&HQWHU6HQLRU5HFUHDWLRQ&HQWHU 1HZ<RUN$YH$UOLQJWRQ7; 'ULYH7LPH0LQXWHV

HUGH SMITH RECREATION CENTER

NEIGHBORHOOD COMPOSITION TOP ESRI TAPESTRY SEGMENTS (6 minute drive time)

Industrious Urban Fringe (38) - 29.1% Family is central to these residents. Fifty-four percent are married-couple families; 17 percent are single parents. Multigenerational households are relatively common. Hispanics comprise 61.7 percent of the residents in these neighborhoods. More than one fourth are foreign born. Inner City Tenants (52) - 22.7% Household types are mixed; 34 percent are singles, 28 percent are married-couple families, 21 percent are single parents, and 10 percent share housing. These neighborhoods are also a stepping-stone for recent immigrants. NeWest Residents (58) - 16.5% Three-quarters of the population is Hispanic. The average household has 4.1 people. Children live in 54 percent of the households. Approximately half of this population is foreign born, more than half of whom have arrived in the United States in the last 10 years.

56

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation

817-275-1351 EAST ARLINGTON 1815 New York Ave. Arlington, TX 76010 Hugh Smith Recreation Center


HUGH SMITH RECREATION CENTER PROGRAM REGISTRANTS 0.0%

PROGRAM REGISTRANTS

76040 76006

1.7% 76012

76011

76013

76010

2.4% 1.6% 41.7%

5.8%

18.1%

2.4%

1.5%

BUILDING PHOTO

76016

1.9%

76015

76014

76017

76018

8.2%

76002

0.9% 76001

7.4%

CUSTOMER PROFILE The majority of the program participants at the Hugh Smith Recreation Center live within the 76010 zip code. This ethnically diverse area of town is characterized by larger households and lower incomes than the rest of the city. Many residents are immigrants. Likely Customers Based on neighborhood demographics, the most likely customers are lowerincome minorities with two or more children.

RECOMMENDATIONS Programming at Hugh Smith should be tailored to tighter budgets and responsive to the ethnic diversity of the community. Drop-in activities may be more successful than those requiring payment for multiple sessions. Reformatting some of the mini-camps to allow greater participation at a lower price may be advisable. Marketing for Hugh Smith should be targeted to the 76010 and 76014 zip codes. Producing materials in both English and Spanish is advisable in order to better serve the large Hispanic population in this region. Scholarship opportunities should be heavily targeted to this area of the city. See Appendix D8

Drive Time:

3 Min

6 Min

9 Min

25,323

97,408

195,535

7,677

32,227

68,287

Average HH Size

3.30

3.02

2.86

Owner Occupied

41%

38%

44%

Median Age

27.5

27.6

29.2

% Hispanic

51%

52%

44%

% Minority

82%

79%

73%

Average Income

$44,571

$45,037

$52,806

Median Income

$36,177

$34,906

$39,875

$243

$240

$287

Total Population Households

Avg. Rec. Spend

2014 Marketing Plan

57


Dominant Tapestry Site Map Eunice Activity Center 1000 Eunice St, Arlington, TX, 76010 Drive Time: 3, 6, 9 Minutes

EUNICE ACTIVITY CENTER

NEIGHBORHOOD COMPOSITION TOP ESRI TAPESTRY SEGMENTS (6 minute drive time)

Industrious Urban Fringe (38) - 36.0% Family is central to these residents. Fifty-four percent are married-couple families; 17 percent are single parents. Multigenerational households are relatively common. Hispanics comprise 61.7 percent of the residents in these neighborhoods. More than one fourth are foreign born. NeWest Residents (58) - 19.4% Three-quarters of the population is Hispanic. The average household has 4.1 people. Children live in 54 percent of the households. Approximately half of this population is foreign born, more than half of whom have arrived in the United States in the last 10 years. Inner City Tenants (52) -9.6% Household types are mixed; 34 percent are singles, 28 percent are married-couple families, 21 percent are single parents, and 10 percent share housing. These neighborhoods are also a stepping-stone for recent immigrants. Young and Restless (39) - 9.4% This young on-the-go population has a median age of 28.6 years. Approximately two-thirds of them are younger than 35. Fifty-six percent of these households are either single person or shared. Neighborhoods are diverse. 58

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation

817-277-8091 EAST ARLINGTON 1000 Eunice St. Arlington, TX 76010 Eunice Activity Center


EUNICE ACTIVITY CENTER PROGRAM REGISTRANTS

PROGRAM REGISTRANTS

0.0% 76040 76006

15.8% 76012

76011

6.4% 11.6%

12.5% 76013

76010

7.2%

6.4%

9.9%

6.4%

76016

76015

76014

76017

76018

9.8%

5.1%

76002

2.2% 76001

1.4%

CUSTOMER PROFILE The Eunice Activity Center draws from numerous zip codes likely because it has traditionally served as a senior center. In 2012 the center was renamed the Eunice Activity Center in order to appeal to older adults who may not consider themselves “Seniors.”

Drive Time:

3 Min

6 Min

9 Min

Total Population

5,325

61,948

165,908

Likely Customer Based on current programming, the likely customer is a senior over the age of 65. By serving as a multi-generational activity center, likely customers might include older adults and their families.

Households

1,863

20,655

61,180

Average HH Size

2.54

2.72

2.73

Owner Occupied

43%

37%

39%

RECOMMENDATIONS

Median Age

28.4

27.4

29.5

% Hispanic

57%

53%

42%

% Minority

71%

73%

67%

Average Income

$40,000

$43,308

$52,126

Median Income

$27,104

$32,731

$27,451

Avg. Rec. Spend

$212.09

$227.42

$276.60

Programs and services at Eunice could expand to include activities that would appeal to active older adults who aren’t interested in traditional “Senior Center” activities. There is a great opportunity to better serve this ethnically diverse region of the city by hosting multicultural and multi-generational programs and events. If programming at the center shifts to accommodate the younger, multi-cultural neighborhood, then producing materials in both English and Spanish would be recommended. See Appendix D8

2014 Marketing Plan

59


Dominant Tapestry Site Map Senior Recreation Center New York

76010 S E N I O R R E C R E A T I O N2015C Craig E NHanking T E RDr, Arlington, Texas, 817-460-5009

NEW YORK

Drive Time: 3, 6, 9 Minutes

NEIGHBORHOOD COMPOSITION TOP ESRI TAPESTRY SEGMENTS (6 minute drive time)

Industrious Urban Fringe (38) - 33.8% Family is central to residents of Industrious Urban Fringe neighborhoods; slightly more than half of the households have children. Fifty-four percent are married-couple families; 17 percent are single parents. Multigenerational households are relatively common. The high proportion of children contributes to the relatively low median age of 29 years. Hispanics comprise 61.7 percent of the residents in these neighborhoods. More than one fourth are foreign born.

Inner City Tenants (52) - 23.3% This multicultural market is younger than average, with a median age of 27.8 years. The household composition also reflects their youth. Household types are mixed; 34 percent are singles, 28 percent are married-couple families, 21 percent are single parents, and 10 percent share housing. Turnover is high in these neighborhoods because many are enrolled in nearby colleges and work part-time. These neighborhoods are also a stepping-stone for recent immigrants.

60

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation

EAST ARLINGTON 2105 Craig HAnking Dr. Arlington, TX 76010 Senior Rec Center New York


SENNIOR RECREATION CENTER NEW YORK PROGRAM REGISTRANTS 0.0%

PROGRAM REGISTRANTS

76040 76006

4.8% 76012

76011

4.1% 23.6%

5.8% 76013

76010

17.2%

3.2%

3.8%

5.9%

76016

76015

76014

76017

76018

10.6%

5.3%

76002

2.1% 76001

4.1%

CUSTOMER PROFILE The majority of Senior Recreation Center New Yorkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s customers come from just three zip codes: 76010, 76014 and 76017.

Drive Time:

3 Min

6 Min

18,341

85,901

199,963

5,900

27,458

67,725

Average HH Size

2.54

2.72

2.73

Total Population

9 Min

Likely Customer The likely customer is senior citizen age 65 or older who lives nearby or has transportation to the center.

Households

Owner Occupied

31%

39%

46%

RECOMMENDATIONS

Median Age

26.9

27.6

29.1

% Hispanic

59%

55%

45%

% Minority

84%

80%

73%

Average Income

$47,379

$45,088

$52,879

Median Income

$32,846

$34,892

$40,498

Avg. Rec. Spend

$219.58

$242.22

$288.97

While it is logical that the majority of participants would be local, there is a great opportunity to reach seniors from other areas of Arlington. Seniors across the city should be targeted to receive information about dances and major events. Growing partnerships with local churches may be another opportunity to expand awareness.

See Appendix D11

2014 Marketing Plan

61


CENTER PROGRAMS: goals

62

1

Raise awareness of recreation center facilities, programs and services

2

Increase customer base of facilities

3

Promote the health benefits provided by recreation centers for citizens and city of Arlington employees

4

Diversify programming

5

Increase awareness of rental opportunities

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation


CENTER PROGRAMS: TACTICS Tactic

Status

Goal

Improved design for website, Naturally Fun Magazine and Camp and Swim Guide

Completed

ŒŽ

Partner with Macy’s to provide Camp and Swim Guides at all checkout counters for the month of March

Completed

ŒŽ

Develop Destination Travel brochure for senior trips

Completed

New signs and banners for recreation center events

Completed

Search advertising campaigns for camps , programs and rental opportunities

Ongoing

YouTube advertisements for summer camps and fitness programs

Ongoing

Digital camp listing with DFW Child and print listings with the Star Telegram

Ongoing

Œ Œ Œ ŒŽ Œ

Manage social posts, online calendar of events, program listings on website, email campaigns

Ongoing

ŒŽ

Naturally Fun Blogger program to cover recreation center programs, events and rental opportunities

Ongoing

ŒŽ

Develop content to push to digital display boards in recreation centers

Future

Develop plan to promote new homeschool programming at Dottie Lynn

Future

ŒŽ Œ

Develop plan to advertise restructured sports camps and incrase sibling discounts at Hugh Smith

Future

Œ

Develop templates for marketing collateral to ensure higher quality design and branding consistancy

Future

Œ

Launch new email/marketing automation platform and create more targeted email campaigns

Future

ŒŽ

Submit proposal to increase directional signage for all recreation centers

Future

ŒŽ

Develop content to push to digital display boards in recreation centers

Future

Explore programming trends and pilot entirely new programs

Future

Improve descriptions of programs for print and online publications

Future

Develop videos/advertisements to showcase rental opportunities

Future

ŒŽ  ŒŽ Œ 2014 Marketing Plan

63


ATHLETICS: adult leagues CENTER PROGRAMS

81% 86%

Percentage that have recommended Arlington Adult Athletics Leagues to someone else in the last 12 months.

ADULT SPORTS LEAGUES REGISTRANTS 0.0%

PROGRAM REGISTRANTS

76040 76006

8.5% Percentage that said we met their expectations, given the cost.

76012

76011

76013

ADULT SPORTS LEAGUES: CUSTOMER SERVICE 40%

Great

33%

No Complaints

25%

Poor

2%

ADULT SPORTS LEAGUES: SATISFACTION Amazing

42%

Great

28%

No Complaints

28%

Poor

2%

1.4%

8.8%

4.2% 6.1%

5.1%

Amazing

5.8%

76016

76010

4.5%

76015

76014

76017

76018

16.9%

5.9%

76002

9.8% 76001

10.3%

CONSTRAINTS (n=43):

64

TIME: 56% NOT INTERESTED: 16% PARTICIPATE IN OTHER LEAGUE: 12% COST: 12% DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T LIKE PROGRAMMING OFFERED: 9%

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation

Likely Customer The majority of participants in adult sports come from regions of the city that have more discretionary income. The zip code with the greatest percentage of participation is 76017, followed by 76002, 76001 and 76016.

See Appendix C1


ATHLETICS: youth leagues

68% 82

%

YOUTH SPORTS LEAGUES REGISTRANTS Percentage that have recommended Arlington Youth Athletics Programs to someone else in the last 12 months.

0.0%

PROGRAM REGISTRANTS

76040 76006

10.8% 8.9%

Percentage that said we met their expectations, given the cost.

76012

76011

4.5% 8.1%

6.5% 76013

76010

YOUTH SPORTS LEAGUES: CUSTOMER SERVICE Amazing

18%

Great

35%

No Complaints

44%

Poor

3%

YOUTH SPORTS LEAGUES: SATISFACTION Amazing

19%

Great

32%

No Complaints

44%

Poor

5%

6.4%

2.3%

11.1% 76016

76015

76014

76017

76018

10.7%

8.2%

76002

6.8% 76001

10.0%

CONSTRAINTS (n=96):

TIME: 38% COST: 28% CHILDREN NOT INTERESTED: 22% DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T LIKE PROGRAMMING OFFERED: 18%

See Appendix C1

Likely Customer Although registration is slightly higher in southwest Arlington, registration is much more evenly distributed throughout the city when compared to adult athletics. It is likely that adult sports are viewed an optional expense; whereas, youth sports are viewed by many residents as an essential component of youth development. This would explain why youth sport participation has less of a correlation with household income.

2014 Marketing Plan

65


Dominant Tapestry Site Map Elzie Odom Athletic Center 76006, Arlington, TX Drive Time: 3, 6, 9 Minutes

ELZIE ODOM ATHLETIC CENTER

NEIGHBORHOOD COMPOSITION TOP ESRI TAPESTRY SEGMENTS (6 minute drive time)

Young and Restless (39) - 50.8% This young on-the-go population has a median age of 28.6 years. Approximately two-thirds of them are younger than 35. Fifty-six percent of these households are either single person or shared. Neighborhoods are diverse. Enterprising Professionals (16) - 17.8% Enterprising Professionals neighborhoods have a median age of 32.4 years. Forty-three percent of the households are singles who live alone or share housing with roommates, and 43 percent are married couple families. Metro Renters (27) - 7.7% Young, educated singles, residents of Metro Renters neighborhoods are just beginning their professional careers. The median age is 33.6. Approximately 30 percent are in their 20s; 14 percent are in their early 30s. Eleven and a half percent of the residents are Asian.

66

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation

817-459-6434 NORTH ARLINGTON 1601 NE Green Oaks Blvd. Arlington, TX 76006 Elzie Odom Athletic Center


ELZIE ODOM RECREATION CENTER PROGRAM REGISTRANTS

PROGRAM REGISTRANTS

0.1% 76040

BUILDING PHOTO

76006

32.6% 18.5% 76012

76011

76013

76010

3.4%

5.9%

3.5%

1.2%

5.1%

6.1%

76016

4.3%

76015

76014

76017

76018

5.2%

76002

3.1% 76001

4.2%

CUSTOMER PROFILE The majority of program participants at the Elzie Odom Athletic Center live in north Arlington. This area, especially the neighborhoods closest to the center, are comprised of young adults who live in apartments.

Drive Time:

3 Min

6 Min

9 Min

Total Population

9,203

38,456

108,281

Households

4,750

18,860

46,057

Average HH Size

2.54

2.72

2.73

Owner Occupied

25%

30%

38%

Median Age

31.6

32.1

32.8

Programs and services offered at Elzie Odom should take into account the number of young adults in the vicinity. While many apartments have their own fitness equipment, promoting group fitness opportunities that resonate with a younger crowd is advisable.

% Hispanic

18%

22%

30%

% Minority

53%

57%

58%

Average Income

$63,074

$63,231

$62,484

Partnering with local apartment complexes to offer fitness center memberships or group fitness classes is an opportunity worth exploring. Marketing efforts should be focused on the 76006 and 76012 zip codes and should be geared toward young adults.

Median Income

$43,797

$42,203

$44,565

Avg. Rec. Spend

$327.53

$329.71

$336.80

Likely Customers Based on neighborhood demographics, the most likely customer is a young adult, late-twenties/early-thirties, with no children and some college education.

RECOMMENDATIONS

See Appendix D6

2014 Marketing Plan

67


ATHLETICS: GOALS CENTER PROGRAMS

68

1

Raise awareness of athletics facilities, programs and services

2

Increase rentals at Elzie Odom

3

Maintain youth league enrollment and increase adult league enrollment

4

Increase summer camp enrollment

5

Diversity athletics programming

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation


ATHLETICS: TACTICS Tactic

Status

Goal

Improved design for website, Naturally Fun Magazine and Camp and Swim Guide

Completed

ŒŽ

Partner with Macy’s to provide Camp and Swim Guides at all checkout counters for the month of March

Completed

ŒŽ

Search advertising campaigns for adult softball leagues

Ongoing

Œ

Manage social posts, online calendar of events, program listings on website, email campaigns

Ongoing

ŒŽ

Digital camp listing with DFW Child and print listings with the Star Telegram

Ongoing

Œ

Naturally Fun Blogger program to cover athletics programs rental opportunities and events

Ongoing

ŒŽ

In Progress

Œ

Identify major corporate sponsor to cover the cost of athletics uniforms

Future

ŒŽ

Develop partnerships with local apartments/businesses for fitness programs and/or team building

Future

Œ

Develop plan to promote rentals and parties at Elzie Odom

Future

Œ

Develop templates for marketing collateral to ensure higher quality design and branding consistancy

Future

Œ

Launch new email/marketing automation platform and create targeted email campaigns

Future

ŒŽ

Utlize digital displays in facility entrances to cross-promote programs

Future

ŒŽ

Evaluate opportunities to expand programming in youth softball and select leagues

Future

ŒŽ

Develop campaign to introduce lacrosse and grow interest in the sport

2014 Marketing Plan

69


aquatics CENTER PROGRAMS

77% 87%

Times attended in last 12 months (n=860) Percentage of pool visitors that have recommended an Arlington Pool to someone else in the last 12 months.

Percentage of pool visitors that said we met their expectations, given the cost.

Several times per week

7%

Once a week

7%

Every 2-3 weeks

7%

Once a month

6%

Every 2-3 month

2%

Every 4-6 months

2%

Once or twice per year

19%

Never

60%

OUTDOOR POOL ADMISSIONS 134,103

ARLINGTON POOLS: CUSTOMER SERVICE Amazing

23%

Great

29%

No Complaints

46%

Poor

2%

127,102

121,952

ARLINGTON POOLS: SATISFACTION Amazing

24%

Great

32%

No Complaints

43%

Poor

1%

CONSTRAINTS (RE:CONNECT SURVEY, n=349):

70

TIME: 27% TOO CONGESTED: 25% GO TO ANOTHER POOL/WATERPARK: 21% HOURS NOT CONVENIENT: 17% LOCATIONS NOT CONVENIENT: 9%

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation

FY11

FY12

FY13

FY14

CONSTRAINTS (CUSTOMERS, DISCOUNT SURVEY n=765):

COST TOO HIGH: 32% HOURS NOT CONVENIENT: 26% OVERCROWDING: 25% LOCATIONS NOT CONVENIENT: 15% POOL PASS ELSEWHERE: 12% BACKYARD POOL: 10%

See Appendix C1, C2


AQUATICS: LESSONS INDOOR SWIM LESSON REGISTRANTS

INDOOR SWIM LESSONS

0.0% 76040 76006

7.4% 76012

76011

76013

76010

OUTDOOR SWIM LESSONS

3.6%

6.9% 76016

15.6%

76015

76014

76017

76018

6.0%

0.0%

4.1% 24.0%

4.3%

OUTDOOR SWIM LESSON REGISTRANTS

4.8%

8.6%

76040 76006

76002

4.1%

3.6%

76001

7.9% 76012

76011

76013

76010

3.9%

1.1% 7.8%

11.2%

OUTDOOR SWIM LESSON REGISTRATIONS

8.9%

3.6%

10.7%

76015

76016

1448 1266

76014

1097

16.3% 76017

76018

9.0%

76002

8.3% 76001

4.3% FY11

FY12

FY13

2014 Marketing Plan

FY14

71


aquatics: GOALS CENTER PROGRAMS

1

Raise awareness of aquatic facilities, lessons, programs and rental opportunities

2

Promote water safety and drowning prevention

3

Increase enrollment in swim lessons

4

Increase weekday attendance at outdoor pools

5 72

Increase enrollment in water aerobics classes

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation


aquatics: TACTICS Tactic

Status

Goal

Improved design for website, Naturally Fun Magazine and Camp and Swim Guide

Completed

ŒŽ

Partner with Macy’s to provide Camp and Swim Guides at all checkout counters for the month of March

Completed

ŒŽ

Create “Safe, Clean, Fun” logo for aquatics staff/training

Completed

Identify sponsor for Make a Splash event

Completed

 Œ

Develop a marketing campaign to increase weekday attendance and gain insight on customer satisfaction and constraints to attending more.

Completed

Œ

Promoted water safety through blog posts and Arlington Today magazine article

Completed

Œ

Promote first annual April Pools Day mock drowning event

Completed

ŒŽ

Develop marketing collateral and promote new aquatics discounts and promotions.

In Progress

Œ

Search advertising campaigns for pools

Ongoing

Œ

Manage social posts, online calendar of events, program listings on website, email campaigns

Ongoing

ŒŽ

Naturally Fun Blogger program to cover aquatics programs and events

Ongoing

ŒŽ

Develop promotional plan for Make-a-Splash and tie it in to the national campaign

Future

Œ

Develop ad campaign to promote water aerobics classes

Future

Create video to highlight the Hugh Smith Indoor Pool and available services.

Future

Develop video to promote rentals and parties at outdoor pools

Future

Œ ŒŽ Œ

Launch new email/marketing automation platform and create targeted email campaigns

Future

ŒŽ

Develop ad campaign to promote water safety and drowning prevention

Future

ŒŽ

2014 Marketing Plan

73


arlington golf CENTER PROGRAMS

65% 82

%

Percentage of golfers that have recommended a City of Arlington golf course in the last 12 months.

GOLFER FREQUENCY 37% 14%

Percentage of respondents that said we met their expectations, given the cost to play.

Once or twic e Every 4-6 per year months

13%

Every 2-3 months

12%

Once per month

10%

Once per week

10%

4%

Every 2-3 Several times weeks per week

ARLINGTON GOLF: CUSTOMER SERVICE Amazing

12%

Great

32%

No Complaints

55%

Poor

1%

GOLF CAMPS/PROGRAMS: SATISFACTION Amazing

12%

Great

40%

No Complaints

46%

Poor

2%

CONSTRAINTS (n=128): TIME: 57% TOO EXPENSIVE: 33% FRIENDS GOLF ANOTHER COURSE: 11% SPOUSE/SIGNIFICANT OTHER DOES NOT PLAY: 9% FRIENDS DON’T PLAY: 9% DON’T KNOW RULES/NORMS: 9% COURSE TOO CONGESTED: 6% ROUND TAKES TOO LONG: 6%

74

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation

See Appendix C1


FREQUENT PLAYERS AND ANNUAL TICKETS Tierra Verde Golf Club Lake Arlington Golf Course Chester W. Ditto Golf Course Meadowbrook Park Golf Course ď&#x201A;ľ Frequent Player Club

0.5% 5.7% 6.8% 0.6%

2.1%

3.7% 0.3% 1.1%

10.5% 0.3%

1.8%

14.6%

11.3%

0.3%

1.9%

1.9% 11.2%

3.6%

1.5%

11.0%

2014 Marketing Plan

75


CHESTER W. DITTO GOLF COURSE

NEIGHBORHOOD COMPOSITION

TOP ESRI TAPESTRY SEGMENTS (10 minute drive time) Young and Restless (39) - 26.5% This young on-the-go population has a median age of 28.6 years. Approximately two-thirds of them are younger than 35. Fifty-six percent of these households are either single person or shared. Neighborhoods are diverse. Enterprising Professionals (16) - 10.0% Enterprising Professionals neighborhoods have a median age of 32.4 years. Forty-three percent of the households are singles who live alone or share housing with roommates, and 43 percent are married couple families. Milk and Cookies (19) - 8.1% Upscale living on a family allowance, Milk and Cookies are neighborhoods of young, affluent married couples who are starting their families or already have young children. Inner City Tenants (52) - 7.1% Household types are mixed; 34 percent are singles, 28 percent are married-couple families, 21 percent are single parents, and 10 percent share housing. These neighborhoods are also a stepping-stone for recent immigrants.

76

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation

817-275-5941 NORTH ARLINGTON 801 Brown Boulevard Arlington, TX 76011 Chester W. Ditto Golf Course

Dominant Tapestry Site Map

Industrious Urban Fringe (38) - 6.2% Chester W Ditto Muni Golf Course Family is central to these residents. Fifty-four percent are married-couple Drive Time: 10, 15, 20 Minutes families; 17 percent are single parents. Multigenerational households are relatively common. Hispanics comprise 61.7 percent of the residents in these neighborhoods. More than one fourth are foreign born.

Latitude: Longitude:


FREQUENT PLAYERS AND ANNUAL TICKETS Tierra Verde Golf Club Lake Arlington Golf Course

BUILDING PHOTO

Chester W. Ditto Golf Course Meadowbrook Park Golf Course  Frequent Player Club

Ditto Drive Time:

10 Min

15 Min

20 Min

178,530

537,172

1,030,507

72,317

206,204

376,420

Average HH Size

2.43

2.59

2.71

Owner Occupied

34%

42%

47%

Median Age

31.6

32.3

32.8

% Hispanic

33.7%

34.7%

37.0%

% Minority

61.7%

61.7%

62.5%

Average Income

$59,283

$60,464

$64,758

Median Income

41961

44106

46762

$327.26

$335.97

$366.46

Total Population Households

CUSTOMER PROFILE The majority of Frequent Player Program participants that purchased their card at Chester Ditto reside within a five-minute drive time of the course. However, due to its location within close proximity to Arlington’s entertainment district, major roadways (I-30, HWY 360) and DFW airport, the course sees a larger percentage of non-residents than most municipal golf courses. The course is also ideally located near the new Viridian master-planned community, which is expected to add 15,000 residents, more than 3,000 houses, condos and retail on more than 2,000 acres of land within minutes of the golf course. Other potential real estate development near the course is a proposed $160 million apartment development for East Lamar Blvd. in north Arlington.In June 2013, the city council members approved a multimillion investment package for developer JCKPL, which is proposing to tear down four existing complexes and build higher-quality, highdensity apartments on a 31-acre area. As a part of the City’s continued re-development of North Arlington and the entertainment district, the Arlington Parks and Recreation Department has identified Chester Ditto Golf Course as an area of focus during these efforts. Ditto Golf Course is currently undergoing a Master Plan review that includes significant course renovations

See Appendix D3

Avg. Rec. Spend

RECOMMENDATIONS Marketing efforts should be wide-reaching, especially if the proposed Master Plan renovations take place. Marketing efforts should focus on Ditto’s close proximity to the Entertainment District and Viridian community. Partnerships with Experience Arlington, area hotels and DFW Airport should key in on Ditto’s attractive location. Marketing efforts to residents should focus on zip codes north of I-30 and a 20-min drive time to hit HEB golfers. If a course and clubhouse renovation is approved, marketing efforts would need to elevate to match the new type of facility, which would be a higher-end golf course with clubhouse and banquet facility capable of hosting large weddings, private events and corporate functions.

2014 Marketing Plan

77


LAKE ARLINGTON GOLF COURSE

NEIGHBORHOOD COMPOSITION

TOP ESRI TAPESTRY SEGMENTS (10 minute drive time) Milk and Cookies (19) - 13.3% Upscale living on a family allowance, Milk and Cookies are neighborhoods of young, affluent married couples who are starting their families or already have young children. Prosperous Empty Nesters (14) - 8.3% Approximately 6 in 10 householders are aged 55 years or older. Forty percent of the households are composed of married couples with no children living at home. Residents are enjoying the move from child-rearing to retirement. Approximately 90 percent are white. Exurbanites (07) - 7.9% Exurbanites residents prefer an affluent lifestyle in open spaces beyond the urban fringe. Although 40 percent are empty nesters, another 32 percent are married couples with children still living at home. There is little ethnic diversity; most residents are white. Young and Restless (39) - 7.5%% This young on-the-go population has a median age of 28.6 years. Approximately two-thirds of them are younger than 35. Fifty-six percent of these households are either single person or shared. Neighborhoods are diverse. 78

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation

817-451-6101 WEST ARLINGTON 1516 W. Green Oaks Blvd. Arlington, TX 76013 Lake Arlington Golf Course

Inner City Tenants (52) - 7.5% Tapestry Site Map Dominant Household types are mixed; 34 percent are singles, 28 percent are marriedLake Arlington Golf Course W Green Oaks Blvd, parents, Arlington, Texas, 76013 couple families, 211516 percent are single and 10 percent share housing. Drive Time: 10, 15, 20 Minutes These neighborhoods are also a stepping-stone for recent immigrants.

Latitude Longitude:


FREQUENT PLAYERS AND ANNUAL TICKETS Tierra Verde Golf Club

BUILDING PHOTO

Lake Arlington Golf Course Chester W. Ditto Golf Course Meadowbrook Park Golf Course  Frequent Player Club

CUSTOMER PROFILE Lake Arlington serves a wide array of golfers, including area junior golf teams due to the beginner-friendly layout, and a core group of senior players. Redesigned in summer of 2008, the Ralph Plummer design is a traditional 18 hole, par 71 facility that sits on 185 acres. The course offers challenging golf along with a practice putting green and chipping area at an exceptional value. Lake Arlington Golf Course blends open and tree-lined fairways, long challenging par 3’s and scenic greens to appeal to every level of player. As a result, there is a great variety of ages and skill levels present each day of operation. Lake Arlington participates in the same third-party resellers that other area courses do (GolfNow, Ideal Golfer, Avid Golfer, etc.), drawing in many customers from around the DFW area.

RECOMMENDATIONS Marketing efforts should be targeted to Arlington residents in the 76013, 76016, 76015 and 76012 zip codes. As course conditions of other golf venues in the area fluctuate, it would be wise to target golfers from Ft. Worth and surrounding areas too. A campaign focused on Lake Arlington being a “beginner-friendly” course would be well served.

See Appendix D9

LAGC Drive Time:

10 Min

15 Min

20 Min

240,288

558,486

1,063,019

92,317

204,759

383,951

Average HH Size

2.57

2.69

2.73

Owner Occupied

50%

48%

51%

Median Age

34.5

32.8

32.8

% Hispanic

24.6%

32.2%

34.6%

% Minority

55.2%

61.9%

59.9%

Average Income

$66,051

$62,352

$64,072

Median Income

$ 45,771

$43,829

$46,856

Avg. Rec. Spend

$406.80

$358.58

$357.25

Total Population Households

2014 Marketing Plan

79


MEADOWBROOK PARK GOLF COURSE

817-275-0221 CENTERAL ARLINGTON 1300 Dugan St. Arlington, TX 76010 Meadowbrook Park Golf Course

Dominant Tapestry Site Map

NEIGHBORHOOD COMPOSITION

TOP ESRI TAPESTRY SEGMENTS (10 minute drive time) Young and Restless (39) - 17.7% This young on-the-go population has a median age of 28.6 years. Approximately two-thirds of them are younger than 35. Fifty-six percent of these households are either single person or shared. Neighborhoods are diverse. Industrious Urban Fringe (38) - 15.7% Family is central to these residents. Fifty-four percent are married-couple families; 17 percent are single parents. Multigenerational households are relatively common. Hispanics comprise 61.7 percent of the residents in these neighborhoods. More than one fourth are foreign born. Inner City Tenants (52) - 15.0% Household types are mixed; 34 percent are singles, 28 percent are married-couple families, 21 percent are single parents, and 10 percent share housing. These neighborhoods are also a stepping-stone for recent immigrants. NeWest Residents (58) - 10.0% Three-quarters of the population is Hispanic. The average household has 4.1 people. Children live in 54 percent of the households. Approximately half of this population is foreign born, more than half of whom have arrived in the United States in the last 10 years. 80

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation

Meadowbrook Park Golf Course 1300 Dugan St, Arlington, Texas, 76010 Drive Time: 10, 15, 20 Minutes

Milk and Cookies (19) - 6.4% Upscale living on a family allowance, Milk and Cookies are neighborhoods of young, affluent married couples who are starting their families or already have young children.

Latit Longitu


FREQUENT PLAYERS AND ANNUAL TICKETS Tierra Verde Golf Club Lake Arlington Golf Course Chester W. Ditto Golf Course Meadowbrook Park Golf Course ď&#x201A;ľ Frequent Player Club

CUSTOMER PROFILE The majority of golfers at Meadowbrook Park are fixed-income seniors, families and those just learning the sport. Due to the lower-priced green fees, golfers regularly travel from a 15-min drive time (population base of 530,000+). Surrounding the course is a customer base that is predominately hispanic, with multigenerational households a common occurrence.

RECOMMENDATIONS Marketing efforts should be focused on introducing the game of golf. With a reduced median income and larger minority population in the surrounding areas in comparison with the other City courses, most customers from the immediate area are first-generation golfers. With its close proximity to UTA, promoting a low-cost golf option to college students would be well served.

See Appendix D10

MBPGC Drive Time:

10 Min

15 Min

235,482

531,866

995,885

89,251

195,927

362,051

Average HH Size

2.61

2.7

2.73

Owner Occupied

36%

45%

49%

Median Age

30.4

31.8

32.5

% Hispanic

38.5%

35.8%

34.2%

% Minority

65.7%

65.2%

62.6%

Average Income

$57,268

$62,651

$65,885

Median Income

$40,519

$47,019

$49,960

Avg. Rec. Spend

$280.55

$350.86

$377.14

Total Population Households

20 Min

2014 Marketing Plan

81


TIERRA VERDE GOLF CLUB

NEIGHBORHOOD COMPOSITION

TOP ESRI TAPESTRY SEGMENTS (10 minute drive time) Milk and Cookies (19) - 29.1% Upscale living on a family allowance, Milk and Cookies are neighborhoods of young, affluent married couples who are starting their families or already have young children. Sophisticated Squires (06) - 15.1.7% Residents of Sophisticated Squires neighborhoods enjoy cultured country life on the urban fringe. These city escapees accept longer commutes to live near fewer neighbors. Mostly married couple families; more than 40 percent are married with children that range from toddlers to young adults. This segment is not ethnically diverse; most residents are white. Up and Coming Families (12) - 10.8% Young affluent families with younger children. Eighty percent of the households are families. Most of the residents are white; however, diversity is increasing as the segment grows. Median household income is $76,135. Boomburbs (04) - 10.5% Busy, affluent young families. The highest concentration of two-income households. More than half over the age of 25 hold a bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s or graduate degree. Median household income is $110,681. 82

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation

817-478-8500 SOUTHWEST ARLINGTON 7005 Golf Club Drive Arlington, TX 76001

Dominant Tapestry Site Tierra MapVerde Golf Club Tierra Verde Golf Club 7005 Golf Club Dr, Arlington, Texas, 76001 Drive Time: 10, 20, 30 Minutes

Enterprising Professionals (16) - 5.0% Enterprising Professionals neighborhoods have a median age of 32.4 years. Forty-three percent of the households are singles who live alone or share housing with roommates, and 43 percent are married couple families.

Latitude Longitude:


FREQUENT PLAYERS AND ANNUAL TICKETS Tierra Verde Golf Club Lake Arlington Golf Course Chester W. Ditto Golf Course Meadowbrook Park Golf Course ď&#x201A;ľ Frequent Player Club

CUSTOMER PROFILE Tierra Verde draws a large amount of play from residents of Mansfield, Kennedale, Ft. Worth and southwest Arlington. This is the most affluent section of Arlington,

10 Min

20 Min

30 Min

137,963

844,763

1,941,084

48,564

292,309

699,402

Average HH Size

2.83

2.85

2.74

Owner Occupied

71%

56%

53%

RECOMMENDATIONS

Median Age

37.1

32.7

33.2

% Hispanic

17.8%

33.0%

33.0%

Marketing efforts should reach all households within a 10-min drive time of the course, including Arlington, Mansfield and Kennedale residents. Heavy emphasis should be placed on the new Eden Glen neighborhood. Partnerships should be created with area hotels and businesses for corporate outings and Stay & Play packages. Highlighting the large practice facility and mastery course to families and beginning golfers will be crucial.

% Minority

39.0%

61.9%

57.9%

Average Income

$91,479

$68,066

$67,691

Median Income

$72,667

$50,797

$50,569

Avg. Rec. Spend

$589.78

$379.42

$383.49

with many young families. This corner of Arlington is also the least ethnically diverse. Due to its reputation as one of the top public courses in the region, TVGC attracts golfers from a longer drive-time than average, and many rounds from tourists and those in town for business.

See Appendix D12

TVGC Drive Time: Total Population Households

2014 Marketing Plan

83


VENTANA GRILLE

817-548-5047 SOUTHWEST ARLINGTON 7005 Golf Club Drive Arlington, TX 76001

Ventana Grille Dominant Tapestry Site Map

NEIGHBORHOOD COMPOSITION

TOP ESRI TAPESTRY SEGMENTS (10 minute drive time) Milk and Cookies (19) - 29.1% Upscale living on a family allowance, Milk and Cookies are neighborhoods of young, affluent married couples who are starting their families or already have young children.

Tierra Verde Golf Club 7005 Golf Club Dr, Arlington, Texas, 76001 Drive Time: 10, 20, 30 Minutes

Enterprising Professionals (16) - 5.0% Enterprising Professionals neighborhoods have a median age of 32.4 years. Forty-three percent of the households are singles who live alone or share housing with roommates, and 43 percent are married couple families.

Latitude: Longitude: -

Sophisticated Squires (06) - 15.1.7% Residents of Sophisticated Squires neighborhoods enjoy cultured country life on the urban fringe. These city escapees accept longer commutes to live near fewer neighbors. Mostly married couple families; more than 40 percent are married with children that range from toddlers to young adults. This segment is not ethnically diverse; most residents are white. Up and Coming Families (12) - 10.8% Young affluent families with younger children. Eighty percent of the households are families. Most of the residents are white; however, diversity is increasing as the segment grows. Median household income is $76,135. Boomburbs (04) - 10.5% Busy, affluent young families. The highest concentration of two-income households. More than half over the age of 25 hold a bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s or graduate degree. Median household income is $110,681. 84

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation

See Appendix D13


52

%

72%

Ventana 10m Drive Time Percentage of past restaurant patrons have recommeded Ventana Grille in the last 12 months.

Percentage of respondents that said we met their expectations, given the cost.

VENTANA GRILLE: CUSTOMER SERVICE Amazing

10%

Great

26%

No Complaints

55%

Poor

9%

VENTANA GRILLE: SATISFACTION Amazing

11%

Great

25%

No Complaints

58%

Poor

7%

CONSTRAINTS (n=61):

20 Min

30 Min

137,963

844,763

1,941,084

48,564

292,309

699,402

Average HH Size

2.83

2.85

2.74

Owner Occupied

71%

56%

53%

Median Age

37.1

32.7

33.2

Average Income

$91,479

$68,066

$67,691

Median Income

$72,667

$50,797

$50,569

Avg. Rec. Spend

$589.78

$379.42

$383.49

Households

See Appendix C1, D13

MPI

Went to family restaurant/steak house in last 6 months

31,984

79.6%

111

Family restaurant/steak house last month: <2 times

10,584

26.3%

103

Family restaurant/steak house last month: 2-4 times

11,929

29.7%

110

Family restaurant/steak house last month: 5+ times

9,471

23.6%

122

Family restaurant/steak house last 6 months: breakfast

6,171

15.4%

117

Family restaurant/steak house last 6 months: lunch

11,033

27.5%

111

Family restaurant/steak house last 6 months: snack

947

2.4%

84

Family restaurant/steak house last 6 months: dinner

25,052

62.3%

118

Family restaurant/steak house last 6 months: weekday

17,816

44.3%

116

Family restaurant/steak house last 6 months: weekend

21,025

52.3%

118

Family restaurant/steak house last 6 months: Applebee's

12,244

30.5%

121

Sharing a clubhouse with Tierra Verde, Ventana Grille draws primarily from the Mansfield, Kennedale, Ft. Worth and southwest Arlington zip codes. Daily diners are a mix of Tierra Verde golfers, neighborhoods along HWY 287 and a small lunch crowd of employees of surrounding businesses. Ventana Grille special events draw customers from a extended drive-time, with Paella Night and Party on the Patio bringing in guests from 30+ minutes away.

10 Min

Total Population

Percent

CUSTOMER PROFILE

VENTANA DOESN”T COME TO MIND: 36% LOCATION NOT CONVENIENT: 33% DON’T LIKE THE FOOD: 13% DON’T LIKE THE MENU SELECTION: 11% PRICES TOO HIGH: 10% SERVICE IS POOR: 7% DON’T LIKE THE ATMOSPHERE: 5% NOT FAMILY FRIENDLY: 5% Ventana Grille 10m

Number

RECOMMENDATIONS Heavy emphasis should be placed on the new Eden Glen neighborhood and other new development surrounding the course. Larger marketing initiatives should reach all households within a 10-min drive time of the restaurant, including Arlington, Mansfield and Kennedale households. Themed promotions and special events should market Ventana Grille as family-friendly dining. A re-designed menu (both from a food cost and design perspective) and competitive happy hour program will attract sought after demographics of women, young professionals and business people that work within a 10-mile radius of the clubhouse. Marketing collateral and staff training should also be focused on appealing and catering to our core golf customer and making that the catalyst for increased food & beverage sales. 2014 Marketing Plan

85


arlington golf/VENTANA GRILLE: GOALS CENTER PROGRAMS

86

1

Develop golfer hub, which integrates general website content with tee time booking engine, social media, golf news, photos/video, in-house discounts, â&#x20AC;&#x153;find a friendâ&#x20AC;? pairing platform, SMS texting, e-mail, and other innovative best-practices.

2

Improve customer experience through better service delivery; which will be based on results of newly implemented print and online customer service survey and quarterly data analyzation.

3

Increase Arlington Golf/Ventana presence thru partnerships with area businesses, hotels and Experience Arlington.

4

Raise awareness of Ventana Grille, its events and rental/catering capabilities both on location and offsite.

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation


Tactic

Status

Goal

Improve the look and feel of all print and digital marketing collateral.

Completed

Œ

Send event/lessons info through postcard to targeted neighborhoods within a specific drive time of each facility.

Completed

Ž

Improve Frequent Player Program.

Ongoing

Increase Frequent Player Program participants by 10% annually.

Ongoing

Œ ŒŽ

Create a more dynamic Arlington Golf website which features a responsive booking engine, social media integration, and feature content.

Ongoing

Œ

Bring daily deal promotions in-house to grow e-subscriber base and improve revenue.

Ongoing

Œ

Develop onboarding email campaign for current external daily deal purchasers.

Ongoing

Œ

Increase Arlington Golf and Ventana Grille presence on partner website including City of Arlington, NaturallyFun.org, Experience Arlington.

Ongoing

Ž

Add three stay-and-play partners for each 18-hole golf course by March 1, 2015.

Ongoing

Ž

Introduce spiff program to encourage awareness and referrals to golf properties. Print and deliver cards to at least 25 targeted Arlington businesses.

Ongoing

Ž

Introduce strategic partnership with targeted media publications to highlight Arlington Golf and upcoming events to include print, TV, radio advertisements and additional featured content.

Ongoing

Ž

Create Arlington Golf Flyer to be delivered in welcome package to new residents.

Ongoing

Ž

Grow Arlington Golf e-subscriber base by 15% by June 30, 2015.

Ongoing

Develop and implement customer service survey by June 30, 2014.

Ongoing

ŒŽ ŒŽ

Generate 500 clicks per month to ArlingtonGolf.com at CPC of less than $0.60 by June 30, 2014.

Future

ŒŽ

YouTube Advertising to be viewed by a minimum of 1,000 targeted users at a cost of $0.10 per view or less.

Future

ŒŽ

Air Tips from the Pros on local PEG channel monthly.

Future

Attain overall customer satisfaction rate fo 85% by December 31, 2014.

Future

ŒŽ ŒŽ

2014 Marketing Plan

87


Dominant Tapestry Site Map

ARLINGTON

817-459-6163

Arlington Tennis Center 500 W Mayfield Rd, Arlington, Texas, 76014 Drive Time: 10, 15, 20 Minutes CENTERAL ARLINGTON

TENNIS CENTER

NEIGHBORHOOD COMPOSITION

TOP ESRI TAPESTRY SEGMENTS (10 minute drive time) Milk and Cookies (19) - 20.7% Upscale living on a family allowance, Milk and Cookies are neighborhoods of young, affluent married couples who are starting their families or already have young children. Up and Coming Families (12) - 14.2% Young affluent families with younger children. Eighty percent of the households are families. Most of the residents are white; however, diversity is increasing as the segment grows. Median household income is $76,135. Industrious Urban Fringe (38) - 11.4% Family is central to these residents. Fifty-four percent are married-couple families; 17 percent are single parents. Multigenerational households are relatively common. Hispanics comprise 61.7 percent of the residents in these neighborhoods. More than one fourth are foreign born. Inner City Tenants (52) - 9.4% Household types are mixed; 34 percent are singles, 28 percent are married-couple families, 21 percent are single parents, and 10 percent share housing. These neighborhoods are also a stepping-stone for recent immigrants.

88

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation

500 W. Mayfield Rd. Arlington, TX 76014

Arlington Tennis Center

Young and Restless (39) - 6.4% This young on-the-go population has a median age of 28.6 years. Approximately two-thirds of them are younger than 35. Fifty-six percent of these households are either single person or shared. Neighborhoods are diverse.


ARLINGTON TENNIS CENTER REGISTRANTS 0.6%

PROGRAM REGISTRANTS

76040 76006

8.8% 76012

76011

76013

76010

4.2%

3.5% 76016

76015

76014

76017

76018

19.0%

76001

7.3%

Percentage of users that have recommended the Arlington Tennis Center to someone in the last 12 months.

ARLINGTON TENNIS CENTER: CUSTOMER SERVICE

Drive Time:

10 Min

15 Min

20 Min

242,740

557,422

929,282

83,758

195,882

325,366

Average HH Size

2.54

2.72

2.73

Owner Occupied

56%

61%

57%

Median Age

31.0

32.6

32.2

% Hispanic

34%

31%

34%

% Minority

64%

60%

66%

Average Income

$65,248

$72,624

$66,076

Median Income

$50,800

$54,680

$49,336

Avg. Rec. Spend

$373.11

$423.16

$375.06

Amazing

15%

Total Population

Great

46%

No Complaints

39%

Households

Poor

0%

ARLINGTON TENNIS CENTER: SATISFACTION Amazing

30%

Great

44%

No Complaints

25%

Poor

1%

CONSTRAINTS (n=59):

4.5%

76002

13.7%

73%

1.3% 1.4%

8.4%

13.1%

BUILDING PHOTO

5.7%

NOT ENOUGH TIME: 49% PLAY AT A PUBLIC PARK: 19% COST: 14%

See Appendix C1, D2

2014 Marketing Plan

89


TENNIS CENTER CENTER: PROGRAMS GOALS

1

90

Raise awareness of the Arlington Tennis Center facility, Pro Shop offerings and programming. Brand ATC as the premier public facility in DFW, with affordable offerings from certified staff.

2

Increase participation in youth programming.

3

Promote off-site instruction and growth of the game initiatives.

4

Increase online presence with expanded website content including customer spotlights, tips from the pros, social media/paid search ads and additional relevant info.

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation


TENNIS CENTER: TACTICS Tactic

Status

Goal

Develop templates for marketing collateral to ensure higher quality design and branding consistency

Completed

Œ

Promote 10 and Under Tennis Center Grand Opening

Completed

Develop 10 and Under Tennis Marketing Collateral

Completed

Develop promotional video for 10 and Under Tennis

Completed

Develop Arlington Tennis Center general info brochure and video

Ongoing

ŒŽ Œ Œ Œ

Manage social posts, online calendar of events, program listings on website, email campaigns

Ongoing

Œ

Facebook and Paid Search Advertising

Ongoing

Œ

Combat other tennis instruction in the area with campaign that focuses on ATC as the premier place for indiviaulized and group instruction for all ages and ability levels from certified instructors in a top facility.

Ongoing

ŒŽ

Digital camp listing with DFW Child and print listings with the Star Telegram

Ongoing

Œ

Partner with fellow APRD divisions and local businesses for cross-promotion of offerings.

Ongoing

Œ

Develop Tips from the Pros Video Series

Future

Launch brand awareness campaign for ATC

Future

Œ ŒŽ

Highlight growth of the game initiatives thru off-site programming from ATC staff (tennis in the parks and P.E. class instruction)

Future

ŒŽ

Identify area businesses and resturants for a tennis league

Future

Naturally Fun Blogger program to cover tennis programs and events

Future

Œ Œ

2014 Marketing Plan

91


PO

+

rental & lake services

71%

Percentage of renters that have recommended an Arlington facility in the last 12 months.

+

Revenue Up from FY 2012

RENTAL: CUSTOMER SERVICE Amazing

31%

Great

29%

No Complaints

32%

Poor

3%

RENTAL: SATISFACTION

Pavilions                           + $ 13,614.38

Lake                        + $ 7,934.80

Meadowbrook            + $ 13,103.91

Amazing

31%

Great

31%

No Complaints

38%

Poor

0%

Bob Duncan                       + $ 87,599.26

Athletic Fields          + $ 116,043.68

CONSTRAINTS (n=80):

DON’T HAVE A NEED: 58% PRICE TOO HIGH: 16% NOT AWARE OF OPPORTUNITIES: 10%

8,371

Rentals per year (April 2013 through March 2014). An average of 23 rentals per day.

8,962

Boat permits issued in a year (April 2013 through March 2014).

RENTALS April 2013-March 2014

92

Recreation Centers

5,398

BDC

1,108

Pavilion Rentals

1,205

Aquatic Rentals

536

Lake Room Rentals

124

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation

See Appendix C1


rental & lake SERVICES: SPONSORS/ADVERTISING $400k

Gross contracts in the first 12 months.

$120k

Current annual net for sponsorship and advertising contracts.

In April of 2013 he City of Arlington Parks and Recreation Department retained S&B Visionary to solicit sponsors and advertising partners on behalf of the City. In the first year this has resulted in an annual net of $120,000.

GOALS FOR S&B VISIONARY:

NEW IN Fy 2013 & 2014

Increase gross revenue annually

Grow special events

Acquire advertising in APRD publications

Effectively use Splash Radio to increase commercial sales and in-kind sponsorships

Create partnership opportunities that increase organizational awareness

• Skate Park Events

Coordinate work between S&B Visionary and the Arlington Parks and Recreation Department in an efficient manner

• Boat Rental Program

• Focus on Special Events • Adventure Runs • Food Truck Events

• Cinco de Mayo Event • Creation of Rental Call Center • Meadowbrook Recreation Center to 100% Cost Recovery

2014 Marketing Plan

93


rental & lake services: GOALS

1

94

Increase rentals at the Bob Duncan Center

2

Promote the boat rental program

3

Expand and enhance community envents

4

Increase sponsorships and partnerships

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation


rental & lake services: TACTICS Tactic

Status

Goal

Rebrand Arlington Rentals, create Facebook presence and marketing collateral

Completed

Develop Wedding Brochure

Completed

Redesign Lake Arlington map

In Progress

Implement Google 360 Photos for the Bob Duncan Center

In Progress

Œ Œ Ž Ž Ž   Œ

Raise Awareness of Boat Rental Program through Groupon or similar deep discount deal

In Progress



Develop videos/advertisements to showcase rental opportunities

Future

Develop videos/advertisements to showcase rental opportunities

Future

Œ Œ

Launch new email/marketing automation platform and create more targeted email campaigns

Future

ŒŽ

Develop Search Advertising Campaign

Future

Develop Rental and Lake Services Promotional plan

Future

Develop Boat Rental Plan

Future

ŒŽ ŒŽ 

Promote Fishing Tournaments

Ongoing

Develop marketing collateral for all major events

Ongoing

Create promotional videos/advertisements for major events

Ongoing

Develop marketing collateral for sponsors and advertisers

Ongoing

2014 Marketing Plan

95


MARKETING MODEL FUELED BY TACO CABANA It started as a napkin sketch while enjoying a taco plate. It became the backbone of the APRD marketing efforts.


MARKETING MODELMODEL APRD MARKETING CUSTOMER BUYING CYCLE The Arlington Parks and Recreation Department marketing model begins with the customer buying cycle. The first step in the customer’s journey is awareness of a product or service. After becoming aware, the customer goes through an evaluation phase, determining which product is right for them. This is followed by the decision to purchase, and finally the customer’s experience with the product. The above steps coincide with Google’s Zero Moment of Truth (ZMOT) model, which demonstrates that one customer’s experience (Second Moment of Truth), becomes a factor in someone else’s evaluation phase (the Zero Moment of Truth). The next section of the marketing model depicts the various methods used along the progression of the customer buying cycle. These include: Advertising, Publishing, Engaging, Promoting, Delivering, Listening, Measuring and Evolving. Beneath each method are three boxes that include tools related to the method. The first box depicts tools that were in use by the Arlington Park and Recreation Department in some form prior to FY2013. The second box shows tools that have been implemented since the start of FY2013. The third box shows tools that are under consideration for future use by the department. AWARENESS The primary goal of the marketer in this stage of the cycle is to build awareness. Awareness (Stimulus) is typically generated through advertising or publishing information. At this stage reaching a large audience is key. Advertisements should be distributed to large audiences, across multiple platforms and with a specific call to action.

EVALUATION During this exploratory phase of the journey (Zero Moment of Truth) it is important to have good information, readily available to the customer. Google’s research shows that the average customer consults more than 10 sources of information before making a purchasing decision. It is vital that information about department programs and services are easy to find for the customer during this phase. It is also important that the information is relevant and presented in an appropriate, attractive manner. The methods most associated with this phase are publishing content and engaging the potential customer. DECISION In this decision phase (Zero Moment of Truth) the goal is to make the sale. The methods closely tied to this phase are engaging the customer and promoting the program or service. During this phase discounts, coupons,or bundling services can be influential in making the sale. EXPERIENCE This phase involves both the customer’s experience in the program as well as all follow-up correspondence with the customer. Delivering an outstanding experience and listening for issues or feedback are crucial to ensure a good experience. This will lead to increased customer loyaltyand will build advocates for the department’s brand. Closely tied to listening, the department should also be measuring results and continuously evolving. This evolution should include improving programs, becoming more effective and efficient marketers, and developing the skills and knowledge of staff.

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NATURALLY FUN MARKETING MODEL AWARENESS

CONSUMER MENTAL MODEL

STIMULUS

zeromomentoftruth.com

METHODS

ADVERTISING Newspaper Ads Magazine Ads Facebook Ads* Cement Stickers Promotional Items Interstate Billboards

EXISTING TOOLS

TOOLS RECENTLY IMPLEMENTED

FUTURE / POTENTIAL TOOLS

EVALUATION

ZERO MOMENT OF TRUTH

Search Advertising Splash Radio YouTube Ads

Sponsored Blog Posts Twitter Targeted Tweet

PUBLISHING Naturally Funtimes Camp/Aquatics Flyers Postcards/Rackcards MyArlingtonTX.com Arlington App Foursquare* Email Newsletter* APRD Website* YouTube* Articles in Magazines Text Messaging Arlington Golf App Naturally Fun Bloggers Naturally Fun Authors New Websites Slideshare Issuu Zenfolio Google+ Google 360 Photo Local Magazine Content Silverpop

ENGAGING

PROMOTING

Face-to-Face Phone Email Communication Facebook APRD Pages Facebook Friends Pages

Groupon IdealGolfer Golf Q Avid Golfer Passbook Golf-Now

Business-to-Business Twitter Website Comments

Foursquare Plum District Rest. Partnerships Hotel Stay & Play Pack. North Social Deal Apps

HOA Liasions LinkedIn Google+ Webinars Livestream Mom Blog Meetups

SaveLocal (CC) Facebook Check-Ins Golf18 Advocate Reward Prog.

Pinterest Tips from the Pros

BUSINESS GOALS & OUTCOMES

ENHANCE THE APRD BRAND

COMMUNITY GOALS & OUTCOMES

HEALTH & WELLNESS | SAFETY | QUALITY OF LIFE | COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT EDUCATION | ECONOMIC STABILITY | INCLUSIVE PARTICIPATION ENVIRONMENTAL LEADERSHIP | SUSTAINABILITY

BUILD TRUST

Developed by Gary Packan, Ryan Hegreness and the APRD Marketing Team. gary.packan@arlingtontx.gov | ryan.hegreness@arlingtontx.gov | 817-575-8285 98

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation


DECISION

FIRST MOMENT OF TRUTH

DELIVERING

LISTENING Verbal AMANDA Foursquare Surveys (Paper) SurveyMonkey*

APRD Programs and Events

TweetDeck Manage Flitter

Google Reviews CitySearch Yelp Trip Advisor Urban Spoon

EXPERIENCE

SECOND MOMENT OF TRUTH

MEASURING Secret Shopper Social Statistics Arlington App Analytics Survey Results* Google Analytics* Facebook Insights* Facebook Ad Reports* Constant Contact Stats* Google Adwords Stats SproutSocial Bit.ly Reports ESRI Com. Analyst Dashboard Marketing Plan ArcGIS Benchmarking Alexa.com OnlyWire.com CLASS/GIS Integration PRORAGIS

EVOLVING

Lunch & Learn Project Management In-Kind Advertising APRD Marketing Model Naturally Fun Library Marketing Training Creative Room Zenfolio (indexing) Corporate Sponsors Media Kit / Ad Space Reading Program Online Staff Resources Naming Rights Cutomer Serv. Training

IMPROVE COST RECOVERY

ENHANCE THE CITY OF ARLINGTON BRAND

METHODS

EXISTING TOOLS

TOOLS RECENTLY IMPLEMENTED

FUTURE / POTENTIAL TOOLS

BUSINESS GOALS & OUTCOMES

Copyright 2014 Arlington Parks & Recreation Department. This document is a work in progress. Last updated 06/12/2014. 2014 Marketing Plan

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COMMUNITY & BUSINESS GOALS THE WHY: The Arlington Parks and Recreation Department believes that parks and recreation services are the foundation to the physical, social, economic, and environmental viability and well-being of the community. The City and department vision and mission statements outline several values (community goals) that serve as the reason for the department’s existence. These values include:

• Safety

To build trust in the community the department must be transparent and personal. The APRD should be seen as a forthright, community-driven intently where the customer comes first. The department must also remain responsive to a diverse community by ensuring facilities and programs are available to a wide-range of Arlington residents. Focusing on the customer will create a sense of loyalty to the department in the community. Furthermore, the customer will always know what to expect from the department regardless of which facility, program, or business unit they choose to interact with. If the department is successful in this endeavor, then a customer’s instinctive reaction is one of trust and belief.

• Education

Improve Cost Recovery

Quality of Life

Community Engagement

Economic Stability

Inclusive Participation

In order for the department to build new, quality facilities and programs, recovering cost through community sponsorships and partnerships is essential. This initiative also provides an opportunity for the APRD to cross-promote with local business which can be mutually beneficial for other community-driven businesses. If successful, this endeavor can provide new revenue streams to help offset cost, and increase available capital to improve existing assets, fund new programs, and build new facilities.

Environmental Leadership

• Health • Wellness

• Sustainability THE WHAT: The above community goals are the result of great parks, quality programs and facilities and exceptional recreational opportunities. [EXPAND ON THIS, make the connection better] THE HOW: Delivering great parks, quality programs and facilities and exceptional recreation opportunities requires cost-effective service delivery that is responsive to the needs of a diverse community. An emphasis on partnerships and innovation is necessary to continue to provide these services with tightening budgets. APRD’s marketing efforts address the following business goals, which make the community goals possible to achieve.

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Build Trust

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation

Strengthen the Brand The City of Arlington is a brand made up of many brands. Municipal and private sector businesses all play a part in the economic success of the City. The APRD The following APRD initiatives support the City Council’s priority of defining an identifiable brand: New parks and gateway signage, the design and installation of a sculpture trail, the launch of the new naturallyfun.org, increased social media presence, re-design of Naturally Fun magazine, Business unit branding.


CITY COUNCIL PRIORITIES

FY2014 CITY COUNCIL PRIORITIES

FY2015 CITY COUNCIL PRIORITIES

“Enhancing Regional Mobility” is a priority of the Arlington City Council. Improving the efficiency and effectiveness of Arlington’s transportation connections within and beyond our borders is critical because of our central location within the region. Our community is at the crossroads. As the regional and statewide conversation to increase mobility continues, Arlington faces an important decision to determine its place in the future of this system.

The Arlington City Council has determined that “Champion Great Neighborhoods” is a priority for the work of our City. Great neighborhoods contribute to a higher quality of life and greater investment in our economy. Every part of our corporation contributes to our overall success and vitality as we make Arlington a great place to live, work, learn, and play.

The Arlington City Council has determined that “Building a Thriving Community” is a priority for the work of our city. Every part of our organization contributes to our overall success and vitality as we make Arlington a better place to live, work, learn and play. A successful community requires a variety of support systems and an environment that enables educational opportunities to flourish. Residents, students and families seeking a community to invest in desired choices and a culture of achievement. Arlington strives for quality public, private and higher education for our community. This focus will attract new residents and businesses, and prepare a foundation for our future. The synergy between educational institutions, the municipal corporation, the private sector and the community can help ensure success and achievement for all students. Arlington is achieving a higher profile on a regional, national and international basis with world-class events taking place in the Entertainment District and as a home to an emerging Tier I research university. As our visibility increases, we want to be known for our authentic hometown charm and big city amenities. We strive to be genuine, the community of choice for our own residents and businesses and for those seeking a place to call home.

A successful community requires a variety of support systems and an environment that enables educational opportunities to flourish. Residents, students and families seeking a community to invest in desire choices and a culture of achievement. Arlington strives for quality public, private and higher education for our community. The synergy between educational institutions, the municipal corporation, the private sector and the community can help ensure success and achievement for all students. Focusing on supporting quality education will attract new residents and businesses that will invest in our economy. “Enhancing Regional Mobility” is a priority of the Arlington City Council. Improving the efficiency and effectiveness of Arlington’s transportation connections within and beyond our borders is critical because of our central location within the region and important to growing our economy. Our community is at the crossroads. As the regional and statewide conversation to increase mobility continues, Arlington faces an important decision to determine its place in the future of this system. The Arlington City Council has identified “Invest in Our Economy” as a vital component of the effort to ensure that our community continues to thrive. As Arlington strengthens its position as a key city in the North Texas region, we will develop a systematic approach that directs our future, addresses current and prospective challenges, and positions us to capitalize on opportunities as they develop.

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“ADOPT THE PACE OF NATURE: HER SECRET IS PATIENCE.” - RALPH WALDO EMERSON

BOB FINDLAY PARK


AUDITS & BEST PRACTICES BACKGROUND The marketing team strives to be progressive in their approach to marketing the programs and services of the department. In an effort to ensure the team is moving in the right direction, the City of Arlington Parks and Recreation Department retained the services of seven consultants to analyze specific aspects of the department’s marketing efforts. Each consultant is an expert in the respective area. Several of the consultants are known nationally and even internationally for their work with major brands and Fortune 500 companies. The following areas were identified for analysis by the consultants:

CONSULTANTS • Colin Burns - Social Media • Matt Gillmore - Website Design • Greg Hickman - Mobile Marketing • Charles Lustig - Writing

Social Media

Website Design

Mobile Marketing

Writing

Email Marketing

• Peter Wood - Graphic Design

Videography

• Learning Resource Network (LERN)

Graphic Design

• Brochure Critique

• Website Critique

Each consultant was asked to analyze current practices, make recommendations based on industry best practices, and develop a proposed timeline for implementing changes. The consultants then met with staff to present their analysis and answer questions.

• Gina Nykerk - Email Marketing • David Seay - Videography

The pages that follow summarize their findings. The full reports can be found in Appendix A.

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SOCIAL MEDIA AUDIT The explosion of social media in the past five years has proven that no online marketing campaign can be successful without incorporating some form, or several, of social media. While proving the return on SM investment is difficult, adhering to industry best practices can increase that return. The department’s social media consultant encouraged the team to establish key performance indicators in order to develop a social strategy framework with clear and concise goals and objectives. The indicators include measuring social media effectiveness and evaluating platform priorities and the media model. Colin Burns is the Client Success Director at Sprinklr, a social media management system for the global enterprise. Previously he was the Senior Manager of Digital and Social Media for AT&T, the Social Media manager for Match.com, and Marketing Manager for Chipotle Mexican Grill. Burns reviewed Arlington’s social media presence and made a number of recommendations.

4.

Implement hashtags - Hashtags can also provide a measurable means of tracking social media success. By implementing a hashtag for different events, promotions and campaigns, we can track how many people are directly speaking about various initiatives and follow up with them through social media.

Evaluate platform Priorities APRD claimed existing Facebook and FourSquare pages from 2010-2011 with the intention of gaining control over each public forum. When users would use a park or facility, they had a previous habit of checking in or creating a page for that asset on social media. The department claimed each of these pages, giving the department control of more than 150 social media profiles. The problem lies in maintaining a content schedule for these pages. Burns recommends establishing a page hierarchy and generating social initiatives for important pages. The remaining profiles will then simply be used for check-ins and engagement moderation.

Measuring effectiveness Burns recommended a four-point plan to increase APRD’s ability to measure its social media effectiveness. 1.

2.

3.

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Track site referrals - In the spirit of establishing a means to track what we do on social media, it is also important to be mindful of social referrals to the various APRD websites. Tracking site referrals from SM can help generate engaging content and save money on a cost-per-click (CPC) budget. Track and quantify reach - Paid impressions on SM are referred to as, “cost per mille” (CPM) or the advertising cost per thousand views. By tracking how much we pay per 1,000 impressions, we can obtain a measurable return on our investment. Track fan demographics - Tracking fan demographics can give us an edge when deciding what content to produce and when.

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation

Pages with high potential (growth, check-ins, organic impressions): • Arlington Parks and Recreation Department • Arlington Tennis Center • Chester W. Ditto Golf Course • Harold Patterson Sports Complex • Randol Mill Park • Tails N Trails Dog Park • Tierra Verde Golf Club

Assuming a $3 CPM (cost per thousand impressions), organic (unpaid) impressions of APRD Facebook posts were valued at $2,434 for the month of June 2013.

See Appendix A1


Twitter Recommendations

Evaluate media model

• Be timely

With SM best practices changing daily, it is important to focus on what is appealing to current day users. Burns recommended a three-point plan to increase APRD’s ability to constantly evaluate its media model in this ever-changing environment: 1.

2.

3.

Move to a more visual content publishing model - This model would require less text in posts and more emphasis on the visual appeal. Limit posts to less than 140 characters with a “trackable” link - This style of posting helps practice brevity and keeps your message concise. The use of “Snackable Content”, similar to infographics which are quickly digested and understood by the user provides a visual appealing means to relay information.

• Stream of thought • Current events • Highlights • Build an engagement strategy to create community (give and take) • Explore Vine as a plugin and response mechanism

Honda’s Vine as a Response Engine

Develop Instagram strategy – As the preferred picture provider on the Internet, people use Instagram to share their lives with each other. A strategy for using Instagram as it relates to Twitter and the blog needs to be developed.

Facebook Posts

June

Goal

Characters

320

100

Clicks

160

--

Likes

37

100

Comments

10

20

7

20

Engaged

209

750

Reached

2,870

5,000

Shares

Visual Social & Snackable Content

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VIDEO AUDIT Each day, an estimated 100 million Internet users watch an online video.

90%

90 percent of Internet users say that seeing a video about a product is helpful in the decision process.

95%

People that watch videos typically retain 95 percent of the message.

10%

Only 10 percent of a message is retained when it is read.

Taking these statistics into consideration, it is easy to see that video is important to the online experience. Producing video which is both high-quality and informative, so that the source is seen as credible and trusted, becomes indispensable when trying to market products or services to customers. David Seay is an award-winning documentary filmmaker with more than 25 years of experience producing videos, commercials and television programming. Seay made an in-depth assessment of the department’s current video production standards. He understands that the department has done much to improve our campaign recently (bringing on staff and creating several creative videos) but emphasizes the need for improvement in areas specifically related to equipment, staff and specialty video content. Seay divided his recommendations into several sections: short-term (12 months), mid-term (24 months), long-term (36 months), and video style/production. Short-term recommendations From a technical standpoint, Seay recommends making a number of essential equipment additions such as microphones, lights, lenses, reflectors, and tracking systems (such as a dolly, jib, skater, etc.) to increase production capabilities. From a production standpoint, he recommends the creation of standard “open and close” slides for every

106

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation

video to improve style. In addition, he also suggested adding new artistic, stylized videos from time to time, as well as adding a staff member (assistant producer) to help during shooting and editing. Mid-term recommendations Seay recommends streamlining workflow through the development of pre-production templates and postproduction structure. He further suggests working on Search Engine Optimization (SEO) to help drive content and adding another full-time staff member (making two full-time producers and one assistant producer). Long-Term recommendations Seay recommends a strong focus on web/video integration and SEO by populating video content to the department’s social media channels. He suggests bringing on a part-time hire to handle this responsibility. He also proposes moving towards live video feeds at APRD events, event recaps, and even video kiosks at our parks facilities. Video/style production recommendations As far as video/style production is concerned, most of Seay’s recommendations are in line with industry standards. Most successful video strategies coming from larger companies tend to incorporate higher production value. Video campaigns by Red Bull and British Airways are perfect examples of the work that these larger ventures typically produce. However, on a smaller scale, many growing companies are working towards these same exact standards for their videos. Though they might not have the budget to pay an athlete to race an airplane (an example of British Airways ingenuity), they are coming up with creative and inspired content that fits into their budget. The bottom line remains: having necessary equipment, a high volume of titles, engaging and regular content, and a strong brand presence in each work is essential for a successful video strategy. Quality videos containing useful information is the key to becoming and remaining a credible source to the customer, keeping them engaged with APRD, and making them more likely to make future purchases.

See Appendix A2


STANDARD OPEN/CLOSE TED TALKS http://www.youtube.com/user/TEDtalksDirector

Blendtec http://www.youtube.com/user/Blendtec

ARTISTIC/STYLIZED/EXPERIMENTAL Chipotle – The Scarecrow http://youtu.be/lUtnas5ScSE

The Gift: A Shoppable Video from Levi’s http://youtu.be/umpBakcs6Qk

WEEKLY BROADCAST

British Airways – A Ticket to Visit Mum http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WPcfJuk1t8s&feature=share Rooster Teeth – RT News https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUBVPK8x-XMjuhtwUGQMuCmWbJDumPZAl

EMOTIONAL

Google Chrome – Dear Sophie http://youtu.be/R4vkVHijdQk

Rooster Teeth – RT News https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUBVPK8x-XMjuhtwUGQMuCmWbJDumPZAl

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WRITING AUDIT Technical writing and copywriting is one of the most important aspects of successful marketing. Copy is produced on nearly every piece of marketing collateral. Chuck Listig, a writing teacher and former advertising agency copywriter, examined the department’s current writing platforms including our blog, web content and articles, Naturally Fun Magazine, and the email marketing campaign. Lustig made the following recommendations:

Email marketing Lustig recommended the use of action-oriented, brief wording. Short and persuasive text should be used whenever possible. Within each email, the link must open to a fully populated landing page so the user may digest all the information they need within one click.

Blog content Lustig advised against using a passive voice when writing blog content. In addition, leading phrases especially in subject lines should be re-worded. He suggested avoiding the use of confusing syntax and vague wording. Lastly, he cautioned against using any sort of word choice which might come across as negative. Web content and articles In this category, Lustig recommended that visuals support an article whenever possible. When it comes to producing content about events, he encouraged the team to communicate the “why” by getting to the point and explaining the benefit for the user. The consultant noticed the use of run-on sentences which didn’t seem to be leading anywhere. He made the recommendation to not “fluff” to try and expand an article to fill space. In regard to the park finder descriptions, he advocated removing bullet points and fact sheets, and making each description into a full-length piece with the important information at the beginning. Also, he recommended that all information be listed clearly and creatively. Funtimes content Content within the magazine needs to live up to its name – fun. Lustig again recommended communicating the “why” within the content. The consultant also recommended including more feature articles and community stories.

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City of Arlington Parks and Recreation

See Appendix A3


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GRAPHIC DESIGN AUDIT “We live in a world of living, breathing color. Let’s embrace it. Let’s keep it bright and simple. Simply put, let’s be bold.” - Peter Wood

erested. ouch of

Those words from branding expert Peter Wood capture what needs to be the essence of every marketing piece as well as being the shared vision of every Arlington Parks and Recreation Department (APRD) employee. Wood was retained by APRD to conduct an in-depth assessment of current graphic design practices. His experience in the and design field spans 25 years, where he boosted atypography screen. the marketing efforts of Fortune 500 companies such as IBM, Motorola and Volvo during his tenure at some of the top public relations firms in the world including Saatchi & Saatchi, Yellowhammer, and Ogilvy. Wood is also a teacher of design and branding, having taught at renowned programs such as the Miami Ad School and the Savannah College of Art and Design. A lifelong student of design and its impact on the world around us, Wood’s body of work not only emphasizes the quote above but also confirms what APRD’s overall marketing effort should focus on above all else: simplicity. Voices that demand public attention seem to grow louder and more numerous on a daily basis; therefore, Wood stresses the need for simple design. He recommends a much stronger marriage of APRD’s “Naturally Fun” online and print publications.

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“Static print has evolved into a personal, customizable visual experience that is being fully shared, rebroadcast and pinterested. Online. Not off. A totally involved human experience, augmented with video, animation, additional content and fully interactive. A “story” that “starts here” in print and continues online. We remove the catalogue element. In everything we do, “The Human Need” must come before all else. Otherwise why are we doing what we do? And the human need is satisfying itself more and more online, not off. It will stay hungry or go away if we don’t embrace its appetite.”

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Wood said he would like to see the APRD print publications evolve from a catalog of times and registration codes to an engaging publication that entices participation first and foremost. After the stimulus is complete, the content can then guide the customer to the website for program details and registration.

WELCOME

Teen Camps HERE

36

REGISTER TODAY.

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nd 110

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation

Reduced in size to 5.5 by 8.5. Become a Guide to .ORG Then an App. Set your audience up for where you need to go, with them. Because the “human

See Appendix A4


Be poster like. Poster is the new long form. Use two typefaces. Eg. Bebas Neue & Gotham, which has many weights. Specifically, Wood recommends that all marketing typography be reduced to two fonts, Bebas Neue and Gotham. He further suggests that the masthead on the Naturally Fun Magazine be changed to the font Bebas Neue as well. Wood also suggests the introduction of vector art, which can be scaled by any amount without degrading quality. Additionally, illustrations and engaging imagery need to be presented as well, all while introducing a color palette inspired by golf, soccer, swimming, tennis, athletics, landscapes, the sky and clouds. Wood notes that making changes to the brand is not an easy task, nor an easy decision. He sees the major roadblock to APRD’s success could be the organization itself, due to its identity as a part of municipal government. While the perception remains that government cannot be entrepreneurial, that it is bound by red tape, there is also another unique aspect of government that would foster the type of environment that could allow Wood’s recommendations to become reality.

LERN BROCHURE CRITIQUE

SPRING 2014

See Appendix A8

n a t u ra l l y f u n .o rg i s a re g i ste re d p a s s i o n o f t h e a r l i n g to n p a r k s & re c re a t i o n d e p a r t m e n t

ARE OUR PARKS, ANIMAL? VEGETABLE? OR MINERAL?

Illustration is as powerful as photography. And vector art is even simpler and equally striking. The Learning Resources Network (LERN) is the world’s And costs a whole lot less. largest association in continuing education and lifelong learning. As one of their services, LERN offers a comprehensive an organization’s The print assessment shouldoffeel iconic.website. The consultant praised most of the brochure Like we stand foraspects something. including the size and materials, cover graphics, use of Like we want engage, fonts, photography, andto content. we respect our “audience”.

Recommendations: •

Use the first few pages of the publication to sell programs. Move maps and contact information to the back of the brochure, but note their location in the table of contents.

Add a registration form to the back of the brochure.

Include photo captions with images.

Remove lines between course offerings and embrace white space.

Move to a three column format for increased efficiency.

Add instructor information to course descriptions.

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EMAIL AUDIT According to a 2013 study by ExactTarget.com, 77 percent of consumers prefer to receive permission-based marketing communications through email. Furthermore, 44 percent of email recipients made at least one purchase last year based on a promotional email. Email marketing remains one of the most effective tactics for driving sales. Gina Nykerk, founder and head Email-Marketing Consultant for Reclaim Marketing, a boutique online marketing firm in Denver, would agree. She has spent nearly a decade performing sales, marketing and business development for a variety of organizations ranging from a technology start-up to a multi-million dollar nonprofit. Nykerk evaluated APRDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s email practices dating back to 2009 and, while the email campaign has become more consistent in design and frequency, she noted numerous areas for improvement. Improve database management Nykerk notes that the existing email database, consisting of more than 24,000 addresses, should be cleanedup by removing all invalid addresses. This will minimize the bounce-rate of emails and reduce the cost of mailings. She also notes that the database contains only names and email addresses, making it impossible to target campaigns based on demographic information or customer preferences. She recommends importing available customer information along with the addresses and collecting customer information and preferences in email sign-up forms. Nykerk also recommends that the department change the way in which the database is built. Currently the list is populated primarily by importing user addresses from the department program registration system. She notes that newsletter sign-up forms are not present on the naturallyfun. org website. She strongly encourages placing sign-up forms in multiple places on both the website and social media pages. She also cautions against transferring all participant addresses to the newsletter. Instead, she recommends an opt-in option during the registration process (both online and on paper forms) so the user can indicate on which lists they would like to be added.

lists. This re-engagement campaign would go out to the existing general list and also be promoted through social media and sign-up forms on the website. Maintain content and consistency Taking a page from Peter Wood regarding design, Nykerk recommends that the design of the email be consistent from one mailing to the next, which would help the department reach its design goal of simplicity. Each list should have a standard template and use the same header. The sending email address and display name should also be consistent. She recommends keeping the Naturally Fun brand in the header, though variations could be created for the segmented lists. She also recommends keeping the day the email is sent consistent from month-to-month. Experimenting with sending emails at different times of the day can help staff evaluate when we get the most opens and clicks. When it comes to the content of the emails, in addition to developing specific content for the segmented lists, Nykerk recommends focusing more on the values and emotional connection in our content and less on the specifics of the programs and events. She encourages including incentives such as coupons or rewards in the emails, as well as snippets from social media posts by customers and the department. She encourages the department to have fun with their emails - to plan, and to experiment with different tactics. She believes that there is room to improve the metrics for the general mailing list, and that there is enormous potential to better engage customers through the segmented lists. Leverage technology Nykerk encourages the department to move to a new email service provider that can offer more advanced features. She specifically recommends Emma, which supports multiple user accounts for segmented emails and many of the advanced features she is recommending. Nykerk also believes the department email strategy can be improved by sending welcome emails to new subscribers, developing autoresponder emails, and developing a series of automated emails that are sent to customers on a pre-determined schedule.

Nykerk strongly recommends creating smaller, more customized lists. In doing so, users will receive information that is more relevant to their interests. She encourages the department to develop a campaign to build these targeted

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See Appendix A5


#1

Email is still the #1 communication tool for getting a controlled, specific message in front of a specific or large quantity of readers in a personalized GOALS: GENERAL LIST

Between January 30, 2009 and October 14, 2013 Arlington Parks and Recreation has sent 1,430,847 emails.

• Send no more than one email per month • Subscriber Rate: Increase 5% Annually

18.7%

Average open rate Average bounce rate

7.9%

4

• Social Share Rate: Increase from .01% to 3% • Bounce Rate: Lower from 10% to less than 5%

1

• Unsubscribe Rate: Retain at .2% or lower

%

From January 1, 2013 to October 23, 2013 the department sent 240,769 emails.

• Spam Complaint Rate: Less than one complaint per email

TARGETED LISTS: • Subscriber Rate: Increase 100%

Average open rate Average bounce rate

2.3%

• Click-Through Rate: Increase from 2.3% to 10%

%

Average click-through rate Average forward rate is less than

20.7%

• Open Rate: Increase from 20% to 25% or greater

• Open Rate: Aim for greater than 35%

10%

• Click-Through Rate: Aim for greater than 10%

Average click-through rate

• Bounce Rate: Aim for less than 3% • Unsubscribe Rate: Aim for less than .2% • Spam Complaint Rate: Aim for 0

Given everything we know about your email program and your readers, you need to approach email marketing with a new angle. From this point forward, you need to focus on just two concepts with your email marketing content: 1.

Sell. Sell the Arlington TX Parks & Recreation Programs, Facilities, Parks & Services by offering discounts, incentives, and creating valuable, email-only opportunities and information that provide your readers reason to keep opening and engaging with your emails.

2.

Build Relationships. Tell the stories of the many folks who are members and are participating and finding value in their time spent participating with Arlington Parks & Recreation. Help people feel connected to the organization and the community by telling the community’s stories.

And, from this point forward, you need to focus on just two concepts regarding your email organization: 1.

Stop relying on your General Interest list, and start segmenting your emails into smaller, more impactful communications to targeted lists based on program area. Create brand identity for each.

2.

Streamline the sign-up process. Relying on in-person registration for programs is not an efficient or effective way to build an engaging email database. Data is not transferred quickly enough, data can get lost or confused, and too many people have access to the marketing database this way.

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MOBILE AUDIT Some are calling 2013 “the Year of the Mobile.” With a 75 percent growth rate in mobile device usage in 2013 (according to AdAge.com), that declaration is warranted. Mobile is no longer an emerging channel; it is an essential part of every digital marketer’s strategy.

To make arlingtongolf.com a better experience for the end user, Hickman made the following suggestions:

To analyze the impact of mobile marketing on APRD’s overall marketing strategy, the department retained MobileMixed.com founder Greg Hickman to serve as the mobile marketing consultant. Hickman’s prior consulting work has ranged from top professional sports teams, Fortune 500 companies and industry leading entrepreneurs. Hickman also serves as the Mobile Marketing Manager for Cabela’s, where he heads all mobile strategy, mobile product development and mobile customer experience for the Cabela’s brand and all of its retail locations.

3.

Currently, there are two APRD sites that are true mobile websites: naturallyfun.org and arlingtongolf.com Through his analysis, Hickman discovered that 50 percent of all traffic to naturallyfun.org and 20 percent of all traffic to arlingtongolf.com come from mobile devices. A big influence on the mobile use of these sites is the speed by which the pages load. naturallyfun.org had an average load time of 6.45 seconds, which Hickman translated into a page speed score of 53 out of 100. Arlingtongolf.com had an average load time of 2.26 seconds, which translated into a page speed score of 77 out of 100. To make natutrallyfun.org a better experience for the end user, Hickman made the following suggestions: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

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News vs Utility based content and tools Clean up Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) to fix minor formatting issues. Add performance related enhancements to speed up load times. Remove content filtering, sharing/commenting/font adjusting tools giving the user less distractions. Update navigation for easier access to park finder and other “tools” and reformat the park finder. Remove “search” auto-text from the search field.

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation

1. 2.

4. 5. 6.

Leverage browser caching. Eliminate render-blocking JavaScript and CSS in above- the-fold content. Move call-to-action to top of page for each course (i.e. click-to-call, book a tee time). Address issues with current mobile tee sheet and booking engine. Tie an offer to e-club registration. Update compliance language at registration for text messaging service (TMS) and the E-Club.

More than 50% of all traffic is from mobile devices

>50% 67%

67% of Mobile Searchers take action within 1 hour

After analyzing the Bobduncancenter.com website, Hickman


Hickman had these suggestions for the mobile version:

Email marketing:

1. 2.

1.

3.

Mobilize the site by removing flash. Mobile site should focus on click-to-call, contact form and pricing. Objective should be to provide access to amenities, rates, phones and lead conversion.

Hickman also analyzed the current email and TMS marketing initiatives pertaining to APRD’s mobile web presence and offered these suggestions: TMS marketing: 1. 2.

3.

See Appendix A6

Update all call-to-actions and messaging to be Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA) compliant. Create a TMS marketing calendar that supports overall marketing objectives and communications throughout the year. Look for opportunities to build a mobile database through naturallyfun.org to communicate City events, news, etc.

2. 3. 4.

Be brief and to the point; entice the user to open within five words. Avoid two-column layouts and small buttons. Don’t crowd text links. Utilize responsive email templates. Avoid early emails as mobile devices have become a filter for email in the morning.

Finally, Hickman analyzed the department’s marketing initiative as a whole and suggested that the best way to promote the mobile programs is using channels which are already in place. By using dedicated e-mail announcing programs, secondary/tertiary email banner call-outs, oncourse signage and flyers, print and radio ads and even adding a TMS sweepstakes for the Family Sports Challenge or a TMS vote campaign for best Halloween costume, these vehicles will help build the marketing database. “Don’t re-invent the wheel,” Hickman said. “Look to mobilize programs you already have.”

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WEBSITE AUDIT An engaging, user friendly and informative website is a critical component to any organization’s marketing efforts. The new marketing team identified the department’s website as one of the greatest opportunities for improving the department’s brand and providing a central platform for all marketing efforts. The team spent six months developing a new site from scratch. In May of 2013 the new naturallyfun. org website was launched. In the fall of 2013 Matt Gillmore was retained to analyze the new website and provide recommendations for further improvement. Gillmore is a former IT Director who went on to form a corporation specializing in web design, development, ecommerce and interactive marketing services. He now holds two Director of Interactive positions and works as a developer and consultant for several major brands. Gillmore praised the social media integration of the website, referring to the utilization of the Facebook comment functionality as “example of a beneficial and appropriate use of social networking....[that] provides great function....and engages your audience in a valid discussion.” Gillmore also commended the use of Twitter on the homepage as “a great example of what it should be.”

multi-language translation feature as one of the best implementations he has seen. From a design perspective, Gillmore observed that the color palate and grid design is appealing, but could use modification. He demonstrated that reversing the background and foreground colors, so that the background is the darker of the two, significantly improves readability. Adding additional margin and padding between elements and bulking up the serif heading fonts were further recommendations to improve readability. He also observed compatibility issues with certain versions of Internet Explorer. Gillmore observed that many third-party sites are in use by the department (registration, Arlington Golf, Athletics, and the Bob Duncan Center). He encouraged these thirdparty sites to be designed in a way that closely resembles the naturallyfun.org website. He also suggested that user experience would be improved by incorporating a “hand-off” page that notifies the user that they are being transferred to another site. Other recommendations by Gillmore include the recommendation to remove HTML text links to prevent spam, increasing the size of user controls for ease of use, adding a terms of use and privacy policy page for compliance, ensuring that a valid security certificate is in place for error free browsing, and implementing a caching plugin to improve load times.

From a technical perspective, Gillmore observed that the search functionality of the site is intuitive, image optimization is good, traffic is healthy, and that the best standards in SEO are implemented. He also described the

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See Appendix A7


LERN WEBSITE CRITIQUE The Learning Resources Network (LERN) is the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest association in continuing education and lifelong learning. As one of their services, LERN offers a comprehensive assessment of an organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website through which they complete the following tasks: 1.

Find out how your program matches up to others in your constituency.

2.

Get the benchmarks you must be tracking to measure performance.

3.

Understand the key actions you need to implement to reduce costs and boost revenue and registrations.

4.

Know the specific steps you need to take to improve programming, marketing, sales and operations.

A LERN consultant conducted a website critique of the naturallyfun.org website in November 2013. The consultant praised the site design, load time and use of visuals throughout the website. The consultant observed that upcoming events are easy to find and programs are prominently featured on the website. The consultant also noted the usefulness of the search functionality. The consultant pointed out that there are more links away from the main website then advisable, but praised the organization of the links. As far as changes are concerned, the consultant recommended three:

AWARDS

1.

Contact information should be moved to the top of the website so that it can be found more easily.

In 2013 the naturallyfun.org website received a national award from the Learning Resource Network and a State award from the Texas Recreation and Park Society for Best Website Design.

2.

Pricing information should be included on all program pages and articles.

3.

All program pages should link directly to the online registration system.

See Appendix A9

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TIERRA VERDE GOLF CLUB 7005 GOLF CLUB DRIVE, 76001 118

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STRATEGIES & OBJECTIVES STRATEGIES

The Marketing Team has identified four overarching strategies to focus on for the next three years. These strategies were identified through the assimilation of the SWOT analysis, consultant’s audits, analysis of customer survey data and demographic information about the City of Arlington. FOCUS ON THE CUSTOMER • • • • •

Improve customer service through staff training Improve user experience though design standards and updated registration software Continually seek and respond to customer input Ensure marketing messaging is relevant to the recipient Seek to reach and respond to the needs of a diverse community, remembering that all citizens are our customers, whether or not they are enrolled in our programs

PROACTIVE, EFFICIENT APPROACH TO EXPANSION • • • • •

GROW BUSINESS-TO-BUSINESS PARTNERSHIPS AND REVENUE STREAMS •

STRENGTHEN THE NATURALLY FUN BRAND • • • •

Consistently apply brand standards across business units and platforms Develop an emotional connection to the brand by focusing on values and benefits (the “human need”) Improve awareness of the brand and services through advertising and advocacy efforts Train staff to “become the brand”

Develop more brand advocates and partners Use existing platforms to maximum potential Strategically adopt new platforms Add marketing resources when business case warrants Measure performance and adapt accordingly

• • •

Identify opportunities to reach new customers through mutually beneficial partnerships Identify opportunities to improve efficiency and reduce costs through shared resources Identify opportunities to increase revenues through sponsorships and advertising Identify opportunities to strengthen the brand by partnering with organizations that have resonate values

OBJECTIVES Objectives are outlined in the work plan that follows. Each objective is measurable and time-bound. The objectives are organized by marketing method, as outlined in the Arlington Parks and Recreation Marketing Model. Icons to the left of each objective indicates the strategies that the objective addresses.

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ADVERTISING

IMPLEMENTATION

MILESTONE

IN PROGRESS

COMPLETED MILESTONE

STRATEGIES: (C) FOCUS ON THE CUSTOMER • (B) STRENGTHEN THE NATURALLY FUN BRAND (E) PROACTIVE, EFFICIENT APPROACH TO EXPANSION • (R) GROW BUSINESS-TO-BUSINESS PARTNERSHIPS AND REVENUE STREAMS

STRATEGY Objective GOOGLE ADWORDS E

Pilot Goole Adwords campaign for select business units.

E

Generate 1,000 clicks per month to naturallyfun.org at an average CPC of less than $0.70 by June 30, 2014. Increase to 1,500 clicks per month by June 30, 2015 when new online registration system in place.

B, E

Generate 500 clicks per month to ArlingtonGolf.com at CPC of less than $0.60 by June 30, 2014.

YOUTUBE ADVERTISING E B

Generate at least 2,000 views (CPV under $0.15) prior to major public events.

E B

Generate at least 500 views per video (CPV under $0.15.) for select revenue generating programs/events.

B, E

YouTube Advertising to be viewed by a minimum of 1,000 targeted users at a cost of $0.10 per view or less.

TWITTER ADVERTISING E B

Pilot Twitter Ads for Revenue Generating Programs/Events by September 30.

FACEBOOK ADVERTISING E B

Reduce Quarterly Average CPC to less than $0.25 by June 30.

E B

Promote Video prior to major events with a CPV less than $0.10.

TV ADVERTISING E B

Launch trial advertising campaign on local cable stations that yields an increase in direct website visits by a minimum of one visit for every dollar spent.

E B

Explore airing commercials for summer camps, programs and events on local television stations.

PRINT ADVERTISING

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E B

Partner with local magazines to run editorial content about park and recreation services. Have least twelve articles per year by March 31, 2015

E B

List summer camps annually in the Star Telegram Camp Issue

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GOOGLE ADWORDS Adwords campaigns were launched for Summer Camps ($0.72 CPC), Camp Kitsu ($1.79 CPC), and an Aquatics Promotion ($0.45).

YOUTUBE ADVERTISING EcoFest campaign had an average CPV of $0.10. Campaign resulted in 63,920 impressions and 9,307 views. Three campaigns launched as of 2/28/14. Average CPV of $0.11. 80,799 total impressions and 9,491 views.

TWITTER ADVERTISING

FACEBOOK ADVERTISING

TV ADVERTISING Unplug & Connect commercials did not result in significant web traffic. Golf Demo Day commercials resulted in new customers attending the event.

PRINT ADVERTISING

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ADVERTISING

PLANNING STAGE

IMPLEMENTATION STAGE

IN PROGRESS

COMPLETED

STRATEGIES: (C) FOCUS ON THE CUSTOMER • (B) STRENGTHEN THE NATURALLY FUN BRAND (E) PROACTIVE, EFFICIENT APPROACH TO EXPANSION • (R) GROW BUSINESS-TO-BUSINESS PARTNERSHIPS AND REVENUE STREAMS

STRATEGY Objective DIRECT MAIL ADVERTISING E B

Develop cost-effective solution to deliver welcome packets to new residents by December 31, 2014.

E B

Increase distribution of the Naturally Fun Magazine through targeted direct mailings by May 31, 2015

E B

Send advertisement out through water bills for major evnets

WEBSITE ADVERTISING E B

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List summer camps annually in the DFW Child Camp Finder

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DIRECT MAIL ADVERTISING

WEBSITE ADVERTISING

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PUBLISHING

PLANNING STAGE

IMPLEMENTATION STAGE

IN PROGRESS

COMPLETED

STRATEGIES: (C) FOCUS ON THE CUSTOMER • (B) STRENGTHEN THE NATURALLY FUN BRAND (E) PROACTIVE, EFFICIENT APPROACH TO EXPANSION • (R) GROW BUSINESS-TO-BUSINESS PARTNERSHIPS AND REVENUE STREAMS

STRATEGY Objective WEBSITE B C

Launch a new, mobile-friendly, CMS based website

B C

Incorporate consultant’s design changes by October 31.

B C

Incorporate consultant’s technical recommendations by December 31.

B C

Incorporate mobile consultant’s recommendations by September 30, 2014.

B C

Develop a section of the naturally fun website for the Unplug & Connect campaign. Reach 10,000 pageviews and 5,000 unique visitors by September 30, 2014.

B C

Create Cinco de Mayo, Light Up Arlington and Ecofest sections on the NaturallyFun.org website by May 30, 2014.

RE

Create an Arlington Rentals section on the naturalyfun.org website, migrate content from the BobDuncanCenter.com site by September 30, 2014.

C B

Develope and promote a section of the website by March 31, 2015 that serves to educate the public on local wildlife.

EMAIL E C

Transition to a more sophisticated email platform that will allow for multiple users and greater customization by June 30, 2014.

E

Grow email database to 30,000 addresses by September 31, 2014, 35,000 by September 31, 2015 and 40,000 by September 31, 2016.

VIDEO B E

Show department videos on Arlington PEG station by December 31, 2013.

C B

Acquire better video production equipment by December 31, 2013.

B E

Complete a series of short videos that showcase each recreation center and rental facility by March 31, 2015. Include city parks and sports complexes by March 31, 2016.

B E

Release a video/video advertisement about wedding venues by December 31, 2014.

B E

Complete a series of short videos that showcase different types of programming and activities available through APRD.

C B

Display department videos on kiosks or screens at major events.

GRAPHIC DESIGN

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WEBSITE The new naturallyfun.org website was launched in May of 2013. It has since received state and national awards. Design changes were made immediately, significantly improving the readability of the site. Most technical edits were made by December 31.

EMAIL Staff is currently being trained on new platform. Will be implemented by June 30, 2014.

VIDEO All department videos are now provided to OOC to be shown on the Arlington channel. New cameras, mics and lighting equipment acquired.

GRAPHIC DESIGN

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PUBLISHING

PLANNING STAGE

IMPLEMENTATION STAGE

IN PROGRESS

COMPLETED

CONTINUED...

STRATEGY Objective

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MAGAZINE ADVERTISING B C

Partner with local magazines to run editorial content about park and recreation services. Have least twelve articles per year by March 31, 2015

WRITING C B

Improve park descriptions for 50 most visited parks by December 31, 2013.

B

Develop writing style guide and present to staff by November 30, 2014.

NATURALLY FUN MAGAZINE B

Bring publication design in-house and redesign publications with new brand standards by September 30, 2013.

C

Feature at least 4 special interest stories in the Spring 2014 Naturally Fun Magazine

C

Feature at least 6 special interest articles in the Summer 2014 Naturally Fun Magazine

C B

Develop a more interactive digital version of the Naturally Fun Magazine with integrated online registration

B C

The physical version of the Naturally Fun Magazine becomes primarily story and infographic based. The Digital version and NaturallyFun.org website are the primary location for program information and registration.

NATURALLY FUN BLOGGERS (EXTERNAL BLOGS) E

Grow program to 12 bloggers and 100 posts by December 31, 2013 and 20 bloggers with 300 total posts by December 31, 2014.

NATURALLY FUN AUTHORS (ON NATURALLYFUN.ORG)

E

APRD will have 6 different authors on the Naturally Fun Blog, with at least 2 guest bloggers by September 30, 2014. APRD will have at least 12 different authors on the Naturally Fun Blog, with at least 4 guest bloggers by September 30, 2015.

STRATEGIES: (C) FOCUS ON THE CUSTOMER • (B) STRENGTHEN THE NATURALLY FUN BRAND (E) PROACTIVE, EFFICIENT APPROACH TO EXPANSION • (R) GROW BUSINESS-TO-BUSINESS PARTNERSHIPS AND REVENUE STREAMS

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MAGAZINE ADVERTISING

WRITING Park descriptions were rewritten and updated on the website for our top 50 parks.

NATURALLY FUN MAGAZINE

NATURALLY FUN BLOGGERS (EXTERNAL BLOGS)

NATURALLY FUN AUTHORS (ON NATURALLYFUN.ORG)

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PUBLISHING

PLANNING STAGE

IMPLEMENTATION STAGE

IN PROGRESS

COMPLETED

CONTINUED...

STRATEGY Objective

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SIGNAGE C E

Submit proposal to increase street signage for recreation centers and rental facilities by December 31, 2015.

INSTAGRAM E B

Grow Instagram followers to 250 by September 30, 2014; 400 by September 30, 2015; and 600 by September 30, 2016

ACTIVITY SHEETS E B

Launch section of the naturallyfun.org website with branded, downloadable activity sheets for kids by September 30, 2014

E B

Get Naturally Fun activity sheets into three local restaurants by December 31, 2014.

GOOGLE BUSINESS VIEW E C

Implement Google Business View for Bob Duncan Center search listings and webpage by September 30, 2014.

E C

Implement Google Business View for Tierra Verde Golf Club search listings and webpage by December 31, 2014.

DISPLAY BOARDS C E

Develop plan by September 30, 2014 to push marketing messages out to facility display screens and cross-promote programs.

NATURALLY FUN REPORT C E

Create an annual report to showcase department accomplishments and statistics. Identify opportunities for mass distribution.

STRATEGIES: (C) FOCUS ON THE CUSTOMER • (B) STRENGTHEN THE NATURALLY FUN BRAND (E) PROACTIVE, EFFICIENT APPROACH TO EXPANSION • (R) GROW BUSINESS-TO-BUSINESS PARTNERSHIPS AND REVENUE STREAMS

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SIGNAGE

INSTAGRAM

ACTIVITY SHEETS

GOOGLE BUSINESS VIEW

DISPLAY BOARDS

NATURALLY FUN REPORT

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ENGAGING

PLANNING STAGE

IMPLEMENTATION STAGE

IN PROGRESS

COMPLETED

STRATEGIES: (C) FOCUS ON THE CUSTOMER • (B) STRENGTHEN THE NATURALLY FUN BRAND (E) PROACTIVE, EFFICIENT APPROACH TO EXPANSION • (R) GROW BUSINESS-TO-BUSINESS PARTNERSHIPS AND REVENUE STREAMS

STRATEGY Objective FACEBOOK E

Reach 10,000 Fans on Main Page by December 31, 2013; 13,000 by December 31, 2014; 16,000 by December 31, 2015.

B C

Focus on visual posts by reducing text to less than 140 characters for at least 40% of posts.

TWITTER E C

Launch Twitter account and reach 1,000 followers by September 30, 2013.

E

Grow followers to 3,000 by September 30, 2014; 4,000 by September 31, 2015; and 5,000 by September 30, 2016.

E C

Reach 100 mentions per month by September 30, 2014 and 150 mentions per month by September 30, 2015.

PINTEREST E B

Launch Pinterest account and grow following to 200 by September 3, 2015.

EMAIL C E

Use behavior tracking on emails and website to generate customized/targeted email campaigns based on user preferences.

C E

Utilize marketing automation software to develop behavior-based email campaigns for target markets.

YOUTUBE C E

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Reach 100 YouTube followers by September 30, 2014; 250 by September 30, 2015; and 500 by September 30, 2016.

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FACEBOOK

The majority of posts have fewer than 140 characters and focus on the visual element. TWITTER The Twitter account reached 1,000 followers by the end of September, 2013.

PINTEREST

EMAIL

YOUTUBE

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PROMOTING

PLANNING STAGE

IMPLEMENTATION STAGE

IN PROGRESS

COMPLETED

STRATEGIES: (C) FOCUS ON THE CUSTOMER • (B) STRENGTHEN THE NATURALLY FUN BRAND (E) PROACTIVE, EFFICIENT APPROACH TO EXPANSION • (R) GROW BUSINESS-TO-BUSINESS PARTNERSHIPS AND REVENUE STREAMS

STRATEGY Objective SMS / TEXT MESSAGING C

Implement SMS program by December 31, 2014. Grow General Department subscribers to 1,000 by June 30, 2015

C

Implement SMS program for Golf by December 31, 2014. Grow Golf subscribers to 400 by June 30, 2015.

DISCOUNTS C E

Increase sibling discounts at the Hugh Smith Recreation Center for the Summer of 2015.

C B

Bring daily deal promotions in-house to grow e-subscriber base and increase golf revenue by December 31, 2014. Develop plan by September 30, 2015 to utilize discounts and coupon codes with new software platform.

MASCOT Determine future strategy of a department mascot by June 30 2015.

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SMS / TEXT MESSAGING

DISCOUNTS

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DELIVERING IMPLEMENTATION STAGE IN PROGRESS PLANNING STAGE COMPLETED STRATEGIES: (C) FOCUS ON THE CUSTOMER • (B) STRENGTHEN THE NATURALLY FUN BRAND (E) PROACTIVE, EFFICIENT APPROACH TO EXPANSION • (R) GROW BUSINESS-TO-BUSINESS PARTNERSHIPS AND REVENUE STREAMS

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STRATEGY Objective

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ONLINE REGISTATION Work with Business Services Division to enable online account creation for new customers within the CLASS registration software by September 31, 2014. Increase the number of people registering online by 100% by March 31, 2014. Work with Business Services to implement new registration software by June 30, 2015.

T F

Have 15% of all transactions taking place online by December 31, 2015 and 25% by September 30, 2015. SALES / REGISTRATIONS Grow summer camp registrations to 420 campers per week in 2013, 430 campers per week in 2014, 450 campers per week in 2015 and 460 campers per week in 2016. Increase rentals at Elzie Odom Athletic Center by 15% by June 30, 2015.

A R D Add 16 new homeschool participants to Dottie Lynn’s new programming by December 31, 2014 and 30 by March 31, 2015. Increase enrollment in Hugh Smith’s sports camps by 15% through new formatting of the program, reduced pricing and increased advertising.

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Record enrollment of 423 campers per week (399 in 2012)


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SALES / REGISTRATIONS

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LISTENING

PLANNING STAGE

IMPLEMENTATION STAGE

IN PROGRESS

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STRATEGIES: (C) FOCUS ON THE CUSTOMER • (B) STRENGTHEN THE NATURALLY FUN BRAND (E) PROACTIVE, EFFICIENT APPROACH TO EXPANSION • (R) GROW BUSINESS-TO-BUSINESS PARTNERSHIPS AND REVENUE STREAMS

STRATEGY Objective Standardize customer satisfaction surveys across all business units by June 30, 2015. Conduct global customer survey every two years.

A R D City of Arlington Parks and Recreation

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T F

SURVEYS

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T F

A R D

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T F

A R D 138

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EVOLVING STRATEGY Objective TASK MANAGEMENT Implement cloud-based task management tool for marketing team accountability by STAFF DEVELOPMENT Implement a monthly Lunch & Learn program to encourage staff development and continuing education. Develop an in-house library of books on topics related to business, marketing and parks and recreation. Announce a reading program to start January 1, 2014 in which staff commit to read one book every quarter. ADVERTISING AND SPONSORSHIP INITIATIVE Generate $50,000 gross advertising/sponsorship revenue by March 31, 2014; $150,000 by March 31, 2015; and $200,000 by MArch 31, 2016. Launch website advertising campaign and have five local advertisers on board by June 30, 2015. Develop media kit for advertising in the Naturally Fun Magazine and sell at least two paid ads per issue by December 31, 2015. ZENFOLIO Store and tag existing photographs in Zenfolio by December 31, 2014 and have a process in place for continued utilization. Utilize Zenfolio to sell images and image-based products from select community events and leagues by September 30, 2015. BRAND+AID CONFERENCE Expand the Brand+Aid Conference to another State/region by September 30, 2015. Expand the Brand+Aid Conference to the national scale by September 30, 2016. Generate a minimum of $5,000 in net revenues from the Brand+Aid Conference(s) to be devoted to staff development and training by September 30, 2015 and $10,000 net by September 30, 2016. STAFFING Hire part-time Marketing Aide that specializes in videography. Eliminate one PT Marketing Aide position and create full-time graphic design position. Fill by November 31, 2014. Create full-time video/advertising position and fill by March 31, 2016. Existing PT Marketing Aide position will serve to assist graphic design and video production needs. 140

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FY16 Q4

Naturally Fun Magazine

$120k

Position was filled in May of 2013.

2014 Marketing Plan

141


GOLF OBJECTIVES STRATEGIES: (C) FOCUS ON THE CUSTOMER â&#x20AC;˘ (B) STRENGTHEN THE NATURALLY FUN BRAND (E) PROACTIVE, EFFICIENT APPROACH TO EXPANSION â&#x20AC;˘ (R) GROW BUSINESS-TO-BUSINESS PARTNERSHIPS AND REVENUE STREAMS

STRATEGY OBJECTIVE C, E

Improve Frequent Player Program.

C

Increase Frequent Player Program participants by 10% annually.

C, B

Create a more dynamic Arlington Golf website which features a responsive booking engine, social media integration, and feature content.

E

Bring daily deal promotions in-house to grow e-subscriber base and improve revenue.

C

Develop onboarding email campaign for current external daily deal purchasers.

R

Increase Arlington Golf presence on partner website including City of Arlington, NaturallyFun.org, Experience Arlington.

R

Add three stay-and-play partners for each 18-hole golf course by March 1, 2015.

R

Introduce spiff program to encourage awareness and referrals to golf properties. Print and deliver cards to at least 25 targeted Arlington businesses.

R

Introduce strategic partnership with targeted media publications to highlight Arlington Golf and upcoming events to include print, TV, radio advertisements and additional featured content.

YouTube Advertising to be viewed by a minimum of 1,000 targeted users at a cost of $0.10 per view or less. C, E, B

Air Tips from the Pros on local PEG channel monthly.

C, E

Create Arlington Golf Flyer to be delivered in welcome package to new residents.

C

Grow Arlington Golf e-subscriber base by 15% by June 30, 2015.

C

Implement SMS program for Golf by December 31, 2014. Grow Golf subscribers to 400 by June 30, 2015.

C

Develop and implement customer service survey by June 30, 2014.

C

Attain overall customer satisfaction rate of 85% by December 31, 2014.

C, B

Improve look and feel of all print & digital marketing collateral.

C, E

Send event/lessons info thru postcard to targeted neighborhoods within a specific drive time of each golf course.camp/e

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation

FY13 Q2

FY13 Q3

FY13 Q4

T F

A R D

Generate 500 clicks per month to ArlingtonGolf.com at CPC of less than $0.60 by June 30, 2014.

142

FY13 Q1


PLANNING STAGE

FY14 Q1

FY14 Q2

FY14 Q3

FY14 Q4

IMPLEMENTATION STAGE

FY15 Q1

FY15 Q2

FY15 Q3

IN PROGRESS

FY15 Q4

FY16 Q1

COMPLETED

FY16 Q2

FY16 Q3

FY16 Q4

2014 Marketing Plan

143


RELEASE SCHEDULE FISCAL YEAR 2014 14.3.1 - CURRENT RELEASE 14.3.2 - April - June

FISCAL YEAR 2017

Add community and business goals

17.1 - October - December

Busines Unit strategies

Expand park and trail information

17.2 - January - March

Update strategies & objectives

14.4 - July - September

Update Objectives

17.3 - April - June

Branding update

17.4 - July - September

Update GIS data to include non-residents

Update Psychographic Profiles

Conduct “Re:connect” survey

FISCAL YEAR 2015

FISCAL YEAR 2018

15.1 - October - December

18.1 - October - December

Update strategies & objectives

Update strategies & objectives

Add Maps for Memberships and Point-of-Sale

Integrate “Re:Connect” Data

Develop Rental & Lake Services plan

18.2 - January - March

Competitive Analysis - Enterprise Programs

18.3 - April - June

15.2 - January - March

18.4 - July - September

Competitive Analysis - Community Programs

Marketing Budget Trend (Past and Future)

Conduct Fee Study

Update Demographic Information

FISCAL YEAR 2019

15.3 - April - June

19.1 - October - December

Program Trend Analysis

Update strategies & objectives

15.4 - July - September

19.2 - January - March

19.3 - April - June

Conduct “Re:connect” survey

19.4 - July - September

FISCAL YEAR 2016

Conduct “Re:connect” survey

16.1 - October - December •

Update strategies & objectives

FISCAL YEAR 2020

Integrate “Re:Connect” Data

19.1 - October - December

Add Capacity Analysis

Update strategies & objectives

Integrate “Re:Connect” Data

16.2 - January - March 16.3 - April - June 16.4 - July - September


APPENDIX GUIDE APPENDIX D: REPORTS & PROFILES

APPENDIX A: AUDITS A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 A6 A7 A8 A9

Social Media Audit Video Audit Writing Audit Graphic Design Audit Email Audit Mobile Audit Website Audit LERN Publication Critique LERN Website Critique

APPENDIX B: POLICIES & PROCEDURES B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 B6 B7 B8 B9 B10 B11 B12 B13

City of Arlington Communication Policy News Media Relations Policy and Procedure Media Relations Tips Sheets City of Arlington Advertising Policy SOP Practical Advertising Uses City Publication Policy SOP Policy Template Public Information Act Poster Social Media Personnel Policy Social Media SOP Procedure City of Arlington Style Guide Public Information Statement Photo Release Forms

D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 D8 D9 D10 D11 D12

Arlington Community Profile & Reports Arlington Tennis Center Chester W Ditto Golf Course Cliff Nelson Recreation Center Dottie Lynn Recreation Center Elzie Odom Athletic Center Eunice Activity Center Hugh Smith Recreation Center Lake Arlington Golf Course Meadowbrook Park Golf Course Senior Recreation Center New York Tierra Verde Golf Club / Ventana Grille

APPENDIX E: ESRI Tapestry Guide E1

Tapestry Segmentation Reference Guide

APPENDIX C: SURVEY RESULTS C1 C2 C3 C4

Re:Connect Survey Results Aquatics Discount Survey Results Citizen Survey Results PROS Master Plan Survey Results

2014 Marketing Plan

145


Version 14.3.2 Last major update: 6.20.2014 Last revision: 6.20.2014

146

City of Arlington Parks and Recreation

Marketing Plan - Version 14.3.2 - Arlington Parks and Recreation Department  

The Arlington Parks and Recreation Department Marketing Plan - Version 14.3.2.

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