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E R F

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HEALTHY

LIVING

HEALTHY

PLANET

Philly Neighborhood Spotlight on Kensington

Gardening Honoring Climate ASANAS Earth Day CHANGE Yoga Poses to Stay Pain-Free

Local Events Why We Need a & Celebrations Healthy Planet

April 2018 | Philadelphia, PA Edition | naphilly.com

April 2018

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April 2018

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HEALTHY LIVING HEALTHY PLANET

PHILADELPHIA, PA EDITION PUBLISHER Kimberly Murray

letter from publisher

Happy April, Philly! Spring always seems to wake my spirit up to new possibilities, and since winter wanted to hang around longer

EDITORS Martin Miron Sara Peterson than anticipated, perhaps we can enjoy a long stretch of DESIGN & PRODUCTION C. Michele Rose CONTRIBUTING WRITER Lauren Davish SALES & MARKETING Kimberly Murray

CONTACT US Natural Awakenings – Philly 1515 Market St., Ste. 1200-533 Philadelphia, PA 19102 Phone: 215-902-9137 Fax: 215-402-3423 Publisher@naphilly.com naphilly.com

warm weather ahead. I absolutely love this time of year as we transition into spring, watching the pollen as it gathers and produces beautiful hues of flowers. My alltime favorite flower is the hydrangea—any color—and although I don’t have memories of my maternal grandmother because she died when I was 4 years old, I was told that was her favorite flower, too. Now I know why I smile when I see them.

Wherever I go, I’m always proud to talk about this magazine, and this month is no

exception. As we celebrate Earth Day, I’m particularly reminded of our tagline, “Healthy Living, Healthy Planet.” I’m mindful of my responsibility to the planet and thankful that it’s one of the greatest gifts to cherish. I recently read that approximately 1.3 billion selfies SUBSCRIPTIONS Subscribe online to receive FREE monthly digital magazine at naphilly.com.

NATIONAL TEAM CEO/FOUNDER Sharon Bruckman NATIONAL EDITOR Alison Chabonais MANAGING EDITOR Linda Sechrist NATIONAL ART DIRECTOR Stephen Blancett ART DIRECTOR Josh Pope FINANCIAL MANAGER Mary Bruhn FRANCHISE DIRECTOR Anna Romano FRANCHISE SUPPORT MGR. Heather Gibbs WEBSITE COORDINATOR Rachael Oppy NATIONAL ADVERTISING Kara Scofield Natural Awakenings Publishing Corporation 4933 Tamiami Trail N., Ste. 203 Naples, FL 34103 Ph: 239-434-9392 • Fax: 239-434-9513 NaturalAwakeningsMag.com © 2018 by Natural Awakenings. All rights reserved. Although some parts of this publication may be reproduced and reprinted, we require that prior permission be obtained in writing. Natural Awakenings is a free publication distributed locally and is supported by our advertisers. Please call to find a location near you or if you would like copies placed at your business. We do not necessarily endorse the views expressed in the articles and advertisements, nor are we responsible for the products and services advertised. Check with a healthcare professional regarding the appropriate use of any treatment.

Natural Awakenings Magazine is ranked 5th Nationally in CISION’S® 2016 Top 10 Health & Fitness Magazines

Natural Awakenings is printed on recycled newsprint with soy-based ink.

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are snapped every day. Just one day! I can only imagine the amount of energy we consume with our devices that we seem to not be able to live without. If I challenged myself to put down my devices for 24 hours, I wonder how that experience would be. Let’s continue to be mindful of what the Earth provides us as we celebrate this month.

I thought it appropriate to end April’s letter by paying tribute to Indian poet-dip-

lomat Abhay Kumar’s idea of an official “Earth Anthem” to be a creative and inspiring thought that would contribute to bringing the world together.

Kimberly Murray, Publisher

Earth Anthem by Abhay Kumar

Our cosmic oasis, cosmic blue pearl The most beautiful planet in the universe All the continents and the oceans of the world united We stand as flora and fauna United we stand as species of one Earth Black, brown, white, different colours We are humans, the Earth is our home


Natural Awakenings is your guide to a healthier, more balanced life. In each issue readers find cutting-edge information on natural health, nutrition, fitness, personal growth, green living, creative expression and the products and services that support a healthy lifestyle.

Contents 8 PLASTICS WARS

14

Celebrate Earth Day Locally and Globally

14 GARDENING ASANAS Yoga Poses to Stay Pain-Free

16 HEALTHY CLIMATE,

HEALTHY PEOPLE

Why a Warming Planet is Harming Our Health

19 WELCOME TO PHILADELPHIA –

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Kensington

20 CHANGING OUR DIET

TO COOL THE CLIMATE

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ADVERTISING & SUBMISSIONS

HOW TO ADVERTISE To advertise with Natural Awakenings or request a media kit, please contact us at 215-902-9137 or email Publisher@naphilly.com. Deadline for ads: the 10th of the month. EDITORIAL SUBMISSIONS Email articles, news items and ideas to: Publisher@naphilly.com. Deadline for editorial: the 10th of the month. CALENDAR SUBMISSIONS Email Calendar Events to: Publisher@naphilly.com or visit naphilly.com. Deadline for calendar: the 10th of the month. REGIONAL MARKETS Advertise your products or services in multiple markets! Natural Awakenings Publishing Corp. is a growing franchised family of locally owned magazines serving communities since 1994. To place your ad in other markets call 239-434-9392. For franchising opportunities call 239-530-1377 or visit NaturalAwakenings.com.

Good Food Choices Enable Global Health

22 INTO THE WOODS

Nature Helps Kids Build Skills and Character

24 NATURE’S REMEDIES How Animals Self-Medicate

DEPARTMENTS 6 news briefs 8 earth day 10 11 12 14 19 20

events health briefs global briefs event spotlight fit body neighborhood spotlight conscious eating

11 21 healthy dining 22 24 26 30 31

guide healthy kids natural pet calendar resource guide classifieds April 2018

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Ready, Set, Smile for Less

news briefs

Calling All Nurses

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erme Di Aroma is a Philadelphiabased holistic day spa that originates from the beliefs and practices of the great centers of healing and meditation of the ancient Mediterranean world. To celebrate Nurse’s Week, Terme Di Aroma is offering 20 percent off their signature aromatherapy massage (reduces tension and pain and is great for relieving stress, fatigue and sleeplessness) or facial (gently purifying and uplifting as skin is cleansed, exfoliated and massaged) from April 29 through May 5 for nurses with their work ID. Those legendary places of antiquity practiced a holistic approach to health as a balance of mind, body and spirit. Among the healing arts were aromatics in the form we know as aromatherapy; the use of the natural power of essential oils extracted from plants and trees to restore and rejuvenate health and well-being. Terme Di Aroma blends the enchantment of the old world with an alluring selection of aromatherapy skincare, massage and body treatments to calm the mind, soothe the soul and renew the spirit. Location: 23 N. 3rd St., Philadelphia. For appointments, call 215829-9769. For more information, visit TermeDiAroma.com. See ad, page 14.

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reparing bright smiles for the bright days of spring and summer, Alfredo Alexander, DMD, owner of West Park Dental, is offering lifestyle enhancement at an affordable price, with 25 percent off bleaching, Dr. Alfredo Alexander and staff veneers, crowns or bridges (front teeth) from April 10 through May 10. Location: 5906 W. Girard Ave., Philadelphia. For appointments, call 215-748-0881. See ad, page 7.

National Minority Health Month Event

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he Pennsylvania Department of Health and local community partners will bring awareness of the disparities some populations face more than others at a symposium held from 8:30 a.m. to noon, April 25, in Chester. Free breakfast and snacks will be served. Organizers say, “Partnering for Health Equity in our communities literally means everyone will have the opportunity to live a long, healthy life. No one should be disadvantaged because of race, ethnicity, gender, income, sexual orientation, neighborhood or any other social condition.” Topics include social determinants of health; chronic conditions: diabetes, hypertension and heart disease disparities; baby’s first project perinatal periods of risk study in Delaware county; and violence and health disparities. Speakers include David Saunders, director of the Office of Health Equity PA Department of Health; Greg Williams, CEO of BDG Enterprises and DHSS Division of Public Health training education administrator; Fran Stier, of the Chester Community Coalition; and Katie Kenyon, of the CK Community Foundation. Admission is free. Location: Friends Meeting House, 520 E. 24th St., Chester. For registration (required), visit Tinyurl.com/ HealthEquitySymposium.

Mount Airy Has Its Day

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he 48th annual Mt. Airy Day will take place from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., May 5, on the grounds of Cliveden of the National Trust, 6400 Germantown Avenue, with live entertainment, food, fun, shopping and fellowship. Highlights include morning Zumba, two entertainment stages, a Kid Zone, beer garden, food vendors/trucks and craft vendors. For more information, visit MtAiryDay.org.

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Comprehensive Professional Foot Care

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ennsylvania Foot and Ankle Associates, with five locations, is the premier provider of foot and ankle care and treatment in the Delaware Valley. Their podiatrists, with more than 250 years of combined experience, offer wound care, cutting-edge treatments, laser treatments, X-rays and unmatched customer service. They provide education to patients and parents to better understand their condition in a comfortable setting, and then diagnose, discuss treatment options and any associated risks so they can make the best and most informed decisions regarding their health. For appointments, call 215-742-1225. For locations, visit pafootankle.com/offices. See ad, page 6.

Philadelphia Health Symposium

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lack Nurses Rock Philadelphia will present its inaugural annual health symposium from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., May 19, at the Greater St. Matthew Baptist Church. The purpose of this event is to bring awareness to health disparities in the African-American community. Topics include HIV/AIDS, atrial fibrillation; the importance of life insurance, opioid awareness and resources; and what is hospice? Featured speakers include Dr. William Short, American Heart Association; Minister Aronissa Harris, Office of Minority Health; and Dr. Kristopher Halsey. Cost is $25. Location: 1538 W. Wingohocking St., Philadelphia. For tickets, visit Tinyurl.com/BlackNursesSymposium.

Virtual Race for Earth Day

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5K and 10K will be conducted any time during the month of April, even better if it is on Earth Day, April 22, to raise funds for an environment nonprofit. Contestants receive a beautiful Earth medal made of stained glass. At least 15 percent of every registration goes to Wild Earth Allies. Their mission is to protect vital areas of our natural world for the benefit of wildlife, habitats and people by inspiring collaborative action. A virtual race can be held at any location. Participants may run, jog or walk on the road, the trail, the treadmill, at the gym or the track, or even at another race, and time themselves. The medal will be shipped directly to the participant. They may complete a virtual 5K, 10K, half marathon or more. Cost is $18, which includes a medal, official bib and shipping. For more information, visit VirtualRunEvents.com. April 2018

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Philly Spring Cleanup

earth day events

April 7

Residents, civic organizations, businesses and nonprofits will work together to remove litter, beautify blocks, and spruce up shared spaces like parks, gardens and recreation centers. Submit your idea for a project or register for one near you. For more information, visit Philadelphia Streets.com/philly-spring-cleanup.

Neighborhood Cleanup Events April 14 and April 28

PLASTICS WARS Celebrate Earth Day Locally and Globally

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arth Day, on April 22, will serve again as a galvanizing force on ways to save our planet. With the theme of End Plastic Pollution, the Earth Day Network (EDN) is setting a specific focus this year on the importance of reducing the use of plastics and finding more Earth-friendly alternatives (EarthDay.org). The nonprofit notes that of the approximately 300 million tons of plastic annually produced to make bags, bottles, packages and other commodities worldwide, only about 10 percent is successfully recycled and reused. The rest ends up in landfills or as litter, leaching dangerous chemicals into soil and water, endangering humans and wildlife alike. EDN asks everyone to pledge to switch to sustainable alternatives, subscribe to its newsletter, spread the word via social media, educate and mobilize citizens to demand action,

and donate to support the adoption of a global framework to regulate plastic pollution that will engage individuals, companies and governments worldwide. Further, EDN is extending people’s ability to take personal responsibility by self-rating and guiding their involvement via practical toolkits. “People can create and follow a plan to reduce their plastic footprint and also share that data to help others via the Billion Acts of Green online campaign,” says Valeria Merino, vice president of Global Earth Day, adding that participants will be able to create an ongoing record and track their commitments. The initiative is also providing materials, tips on organizing cleanup events and social media tie-ins. Help Philadelphia celebrate and forward progress in sustainability efforts by participating in these local Earth Day 2018 events.

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The Philadelphia More Beautiful Committee has helped bring positive change to neighborhoods throughout Philly. Through their network of dedicated Block Captains, they work to organize events, provide support, and empower residents to come together for a more beautiful Philadelphia. For more info or to find out if your block is participating in a cleanup event, visit PhiladelphiaStreets.com/pmbc/cleanblock-officers.

SCA Earth Day

9 a.m. to noon, April 14 The Student Conservation Association (SCA) is hosting 60 projects in honor of 60 years of SCA. In Philadelphia, volunteers will participate in an annual cleanup of Darby Creek within John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge. Wear long pants and closed-toe shoes. Bring a reusable water bottle to stay hydrated. Location: 8601 Lindbergh Blvd. For more information, email Briley@thesca.org.

Earth Day Festival

11 a.m. to 4 p.m., April 14 Activities include live wildlife presentations, artisan vendors, native plant sales, creek exploration, bird walks, bug hunts, information tables about local organizations and more. Entrance is free; however bring cash/credit for food vendors and exhibitors. Donations accepted will benefit their high-quality environmental education programming throughout the year. Cost: Free. Location: Bucks County Audubon Society, 2877 Creamery Rd, New Hope. bcas.org.


Earth Day Celebration 4 p.m., April 16

Join for great stories and games about planet Earth. Location: Blanche A. Nixon/Cobbs Creek Library, 5800 Cobbs Creek Pkwy., Philadelphia. For more information, call 215-6851973 or visit FreeLibrary.org.

Earth Day Volunteer Day 10 a.m. to noon, April 21

Help celebrate nature and protect the environment with diverse volunteers from the community, including individuals, families, scout troops, and youth groups, to work on projects that improve habitat for wildlife, protect important natural resources and preserve the park’s plant and animal communities. Location: Newlin Grist Mill, 219 S. Cheyney Rd., Glen Mills. For more information or to preregister (required), call 610-459-2359 or email Info@NewlinGristMill.org.

Naturepalooza: A Family Earth Day Celebration

Day events, including food trucks, live music and crafts for kids, workshops on native plants and more. Proceeds will support the school’s community garden.

Earth Day Program

Location: 559 Carpenter Ln., Philadelphia. For more information, email kbTannen@ hotmail.com or visit WeaversWay.coop.

Location: Northeast Regional Library, 2228 Cottman Ave., Philadelphia. For more information or to register, call 215-685-0522 or visit FreeLibrary.org.

Earth Day Run for Clean Air 7 a.m., April 22

This charity run, to benefit Clean Air Council, offers something for everybody, and is a celebration of sustainable and healthy neighborhoods, clean air, and improvements in the region’s overall environmental health. Join for activities, sampling, exhibiting and fun. Post-race drink and eco-snacks will be provided. Eco-friendly make-and-take crafts and education will be offered for kids.

2 p.m., April 22

Kids will make an environmentally safe craft and snack in honor of Earth Day.

Household Hazardous Waste Event 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., April 28

Clean out the garage for proper disposal of items that contain these signal words: toxic, warning, caution, flammable, corrosive, reactive, danger. Location: Streets Department Training Center, 8401 State Rd. at Ashburner St., Philadelphia. For more information, visit PhiladelphiaStreets.com/events.

Location: Martin Luther King Dr., next to the Art Museum, Philadelphia. For more information or to register, visit CleanAir.org.

10 a.m. to 2 p.m., April 21

Spend Earth Day celebrating the Schuylkill Center’s Year of Water with science and environmental art activities, hikes and crafts. Also, live animal shows, food trucks, dance, and a fort-building competition. Naturepalooza is in partnership with the Philadelphia Science Festival. Cost: Free. Location: 8480 Hagy’s Mill Rd., Philadelphia. For more information, call 215-482-7300, ext 110.

Riverfront North Earth Day Festival

10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., April 21 In celebration of Earth Day, join for an allages festival in Lardner’s Point Park that will include an outdoor cleanup, live music, food trucks, environmental demos/vendors/activities, naturalist guided walks/tours and a yoga class. Location: 5202 Levick St., Philadelphia. For more information, visit drcc-Phila.org.

Earth Day Plant Sale and Celebration

11 a.m. to 3 p.m., April 21 Join Weavers Way Co-op and the C.W. Henry School for a plant sale and Earth April 2018

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health briefs

Whole Grains Help Us Eat Less DeryaDraws /Shutterstock.com

When overweight adults exchange refined grain products such as white bread and pasta for whole-grain equivalents, they tend to feel full sooner, eat less, lose weight and experience a reduction in inflammation, the journal Gut reports. Researchers from Denmark’s National Food Institute and the University of Copenhagen studying 50 adults at risk for Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease found that test volunteers realized these benefits by eating whole grains, and rye in particular.

Ingesting a combination of five herbs while making healthy lifestyle changes significantly reduced symptoms of polycystic ovary syndrome in a recent Australian study of 122 women published in Phytotherapy Research. The herbs were Cinnamomum verum (cinnamon), Glycyrrhiza glabra (licorice), Hypericum perforatum (St. John’s wort), Paeonia lactiflora (peony) and Tribulus terrestris (tribulus). Menstrual cycles returned to normal duration for 55 percent of the women, and significant improvements occurred in body mass index, pregnancy rates, hormones, insulin sensitivity and blood pressure. Subjects also exhibited less depression, anxiety and stress.

High-Fat Diet Risks Multiple Sclerosis Relapse A high-fat diet increases the risk of relapse of multiple sclerosis in children by as much as 56 percent, reports The Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry. A multi-university study of 219 children also found that each 10 percent increase in saturated fat as a share of total calories tripled the risk of relapse. Inversely, each additional cup of vegetables per week cut the risk of the disease by 50 percent.

ZenFruitGraphics/Shutterstock.com

Herbs Ease Polycystic Ovary Symptoms

A Harvard study of 325 women undergoing fertility treatments found that those consuming the most produce high in pesticide residues, such as strawberries, spinach and grapes, were 18 percent less likely to become pregnant and 26 percent less likely to have a live birth compared to women eating the least amount of pesticide-laden produce. Study co-author Dr. Jorge Chavarro suggests that women trying to conceive should eat organic produce or low-pesticide choices like avocados, onions and oranges. 10

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All kind of people/Shutterstock.com

FRUIT PESTICIDES LOWER FERTILITY IN WOMEN


global briefs

‘Sink’ Setback

Dirk Ercken/Shutterstock.com

Tropical Forests Releasing Excess Carbon

A study published in the journal Science found that forests across Asia, Latin America and Africa release 468 tons of carbon per year, equivalent to nearly 10 percent of the annual U.S. carbon footprint. Thus, tropical forests may no longer be acting as carbon sinks and could be releasing more carbon than they store. Lead author Alessandro Baccini, with the Woods Hole Research Center, in Massachusetts, says, “These findings provide the world with a wake-up call on forests. If we’re to keep global temperatures from rising to dangerous levels, we need to drastically reduce emissions and greatly increase forests’ ability to absorb and store carbon.” Researchers think nearly 70 percent of this loss of carbon storage capacity is caused by small-scale degradation from logging, drought and wildfire. Researchers say that policies to curb deforestation, reduce degradation and restore the integrity of the land could turn forests back into carbon sinks.

Distributed Power

Big Pants Production/Shutterstock.com

Energy Users Control Own Supplies

Some municipalities spend between 20 and 40 percent of their annual budgets on the energy needed to operate wastewater treatment plants. The city of Thousand Oaks, California, has transformed their biggest energy user into an energy generator. Across the U.S., energy users of all sizes are taking control of their power supply and relieving stress from the grid. That’s the idea behind distributed energy. Atlantic Re:think and Siemens have partnered to explore this burgeoning energy revolution. View a video at Tinyurl.com/TheThousandOaksSolution.

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event spotlight

Sue Greenwald Creates Her Dream Expo by Jay Workman

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of expert speakers and vendors, promoting healthy ue Greenwald has always been passionate lifestyles by offering healing products, services, about new ideas, healthy lifestyles and spiritual inspiration and information. development, “walking the talk” by teaching Now in its third year, the expo is held the last weekend yoga for 17 years and becoming a certified holistic of April and September in Oaks. The next expo will take health counselor, energy healer and ordained minplace from April 27 to 29, with more than 50 inspiring ister. She also operated a wellness center that offered talks in four different halls. The vendor floor promotes yoga, dance, healing energy treatments, massage and a more than 100 holistic vendors. Psychic and intuitive variety of spiritual and self-development classes. readings are available, as well as healthy food samples. The Empowered Light Holistic Expo started as Sue Greenwald “Everyone needs something different, so the expo offers an idea that grew and wouldn’t leave. Regularly pulling a wide variety. Sometimes people just need a contact or a together gatherings such as writers groups, networklike-minded friend, and it’s easy to make great connections at the ing groups and varied classes, Greenwald began to imagine how she expo,” Greenwald offers. would operate an expo and larger events. “I love the dynamic that The response has been so positive that Greenwald is starting comes from working with like-minded people, but my first reaction a similar event in Nashville, Tennessee, this October. “I found to these wonderings were, ‘No way! You don’t know anything about that I was being called to move away from my wellness center expos, and where would you find the time?’ she explains.” and work exclusively on the expos and other events. They are my Greenwald listened to the negative voice for six months. passion all day, every day, and I never tire of it,” she enthuses. During that time her expo ideas grew into a mild obsession, and Empowered Light has recently added spiritual, light-adventure she realized that this wasn’t just a crazy idea—it was a dream retreats called Empowering Journeys to their list of events, visiting she needed to pursue. Knowing that the best way to manifest Mexico in February 2019 for a light-adventure tour. Also in the something is to visualize it, Greenwald created a vision of the works are events called Raise Your Vibe, which focus successful expo she wanted and then took the more on workshops with a concentrated theme. risk of renting an enormous space at the Greater Greenwald offers, “I have big plans for the expo Philadelphia Expo Center, in Oaks—big enough to and am trying to ensure that it has a solid foundation hold the expo she held in her mind. She contacted before it grows again. I want to make the expo an a variety of holistic practitioners and vendors, international success, where people can come for the beginning with the many contacts she had from her connection and inspiration that they need. I want to wellness center. make a really big impact on the world, in my own way.” Greenwald learned everything by doing it. “I have a saying,” she shares. “Make a decision, then Admission is $5 to $20 and includes most talks and make it right.” She worked night and day, with workshops. Location: 100 Station Ave., halls D and her efforts culminating in the first Empowered E, Oaks. For tickets and more information, visit Light Holistic Expo in October 2016. A true manifestation of her vision, it was a collaboration EmpoweredLight.com. See ad, page 11.

Alyson and Helena Showell Philadelphia, PA risingdawnteas.com rdteas@gmail.com 267.289.2136 12

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fit body

Gardening ASANAS Yoga Poses to Stay Pain-Free

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by Marlaina Donato

ardening is good for body and soul, but long hours and repetitive movements can negatively impact even the fittest body. While stiffness and pain patterns might manifest in the lower back, shoulders, legs and hands, performing a few yoga poses can lessen pain, increase flexibility, boost stamina and prevent injury. “Every action needs a counter action for structural balance to be maintained. Repetitive movements can tighten fascia, restrict movement and compromise nerve impulses,” explains Asheville, North Carolina, yoga teacher and back care specialist Lillah Schwartz, author of Healing Our Backs with Yoga: An Essential Guide to Back Pain Relief. “What goes into spasm tends to remain in spasm,” observes Schwartz, who has helped many people overcome back pain and other chronic structural issues. Practicing yoga before, during or after spending time outside also promotes mind-body awareness which helps us tune into our body’s natural rhythms and prevent physical problems in the first place. Here are some basics to consider when working in the garden.

Be Aware

Great agility and strong muscles cannot compensate for being in one position too long, over-reaching or fatigue. “Listen to your body’s messages such as, ‘It’s time for a rest,’ or, ‘That’s too heavy,’” recommends Schwartz. Remember to take regular breaks to rest, stretch and drink water. 14

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Take a Breath

“Conscious breathing involves both the body and the mind. Long, slow inhalations and exhalations help us tune into our body,” says Schwartz. “Using long breaths when stretching in the garden can help muscles find relief.”

photos by Michelle Van Sandt

1.

2.

To reduce pain: n Stop and breathe. Take slow, deep breaths with a pause (inhalation retention) between inhalation and exhalation. n Don’t resist the pain or allow self-judgment. n Wait for a release.

Enjoy Being Outside 3.

4.

Bringing mindfulness to garden work not only helps prevent injury, but helps make it a more enjoyable experience. Here are a few more tips. n If rising early, begin time in the garden with a Warrior 1 pose while facing east. n Be mindful of feeling the breeze when it brushes the skin and pause to breathe deeply.

5.

6.

Strike a Pose

Doing yoga regularly will condition the body, but incorporating asanas, or poses, while gardening can be both a fun and practical way to avoid overstressing certain muscle groups and keep the spine and hamstrings supple. Using props in the garden environment such as fences, a wall or a chair can provide convenient support. Feel free to perform all poses before or after gardening, and all except numbers one and five in the garden.

n Notice the music of the birds or other pleasing sounds in the surrounding environment. n Stop to drink some water and take pleasure in the garden’s beauty and bounty. Marlaina Donato is a freelance writer, author and multimedia artist. Connect at MarlainaDonato.com.

1. Downward Facing Dog pose (Adho Mukha Svanasana) with feet placed against a support

2. Warrior 1 pose (Virabhadrasana I) 3. Straddle Forward Fold pose (Prasarita Padottanasana) 4. Standing Scissor Twist (Parivrtta Hasta Padasana) standing close to and bracing against a wall or fence

5. Locust pose (Salabhasana) 6. Squat Pull Spinal Traction (Ardha Malasana in traction)

April 2018

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Why a Warming Planet is Harming Our Health by Lisa Marshall

S

amantha Ahdoot’s son Isaac was 9 years old when he collapsed from the heat while playing clarinet at band camp. It had been a record-hot summer following a mild winter and early spring, and Dr. Ahdoot, an Alexandria, Virginia, pediatrician, had already noticed a string of unusual cases: A toddler had contracted Lyme disease in the once tick-free region of Northern Maine. A teenager had suffered an asthma attack in February, a full month before she usually started taking allergy medicine. A displaced grade-schooler from out of town arrived traumatized after fleeing a hurricane-ravaged home with her family. But it wasn’t until she saw her son laying on a gurney in the emergency room with an IV in his arm that she fully connected the dots.

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“I was aware that the weather had changed a lot since I was kid. But it really didn’t hit home until that day that climate change could affect my health and the health of my children personally,” recalls Ahdoot. “I realized it would be a betrayal of my duty as a pediatrician to sit back and do nothing about it.”

Health Care Alert

Ahdoot, now a vocal climate change activist, is among a growing number of healthcare professionals that have begun to reframe climate change not as a concern for elsewhere or the future, but as a pressing U.S. public

Ase/Shutterstock.com Boris Ryaposov/Shutterstock.com

Healthy Climate, Healthy People

health issue today. In one recent survey of 1,200 allergists, 48 percent said climate change is already affecting their patients a “great deal” or a “moderate amount.” In another survey of lung specialists, 77 percent said they were seeing patient symptoms grow more severe due to worsening climate-related air quality. In a sweeping review published last October in The Lancet medical journal, a team of healthcare professionals proclaimed that the human symptoms of climate change are “unequivocal and potentially irreversible,” noting that since 2000, the number of people in the United States exposed to heat waves annually has risen by about 14.5 million, and the number of natural disasters annually has increased 46 percent. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has also begun to weigh in with a Climate-Ready States and Cities Initiative to help local health departments brace for everything from the hazardous air quality associated with more forest fires to the spread of vector-borne diseases like Zika and West Nile as the range and season of mosquitoes and ticks expands. Meanwhile, groups like the newly formed and expansive Medical Society Consortium on Climate & Health, to which Ahdoot belongs, are being proactive. Its doctors are greening their offices, swapping cars for bikes, buses or carpooling, lobbying lawmakers and encouraging their patients to undertake measures to prevent the problem from worsening. In the process, they say, they might even improve their own health. “We want the public to understand that climate change is not just about polar bears or receding glaciers in the Arctic, but also about our children and our health here and now,” says Ahdoot.


Mega Pixel/Shutterstock.com

Flora and Fauna Issues

During the past century, average temperatures have increased between 1.3 and 1.9 degrees Fahrenheit, with annual increases accelerating in recent years as 2012, 2015, 2016 and 2017 all set records for ambient heat. Such rising temperatures, combined with increased rain and record-high atmospheric carbon dioxide levels, can have a significant impact on plants— both those that irritate or nourish us, says Howard Frumkin, a medical doctor who co-authored the Lancet report and teaches environmental and occupational health sciences at the University of Washington, in Seattle. Wild, allergy-inducing plants like ragweed and poison ivy are flourishing. Poison ivy is growing faster, larger and more toxic as excess carbon prompts it to produce more of its rash-inducing compound, urushiol. “We are seeing the season for ragweed productivity expanding, with pollen levels rising higher and earlier and lasting longer by several weeks,” advises Frumkin. In 2016, residents of Minneapolis, Minnesota, endured a ragweed season that was 21 days longer than in 1990. Other, desirable crops, like grains, do worse in hotter carbonrich climes, producing less protein and other nutrients, Frumkin notes. Meanwhile, bugs are thriving, with longer seasons and wider ranges in which to reproduce. Mosquitoes’ capacity to transmit dengue fever— the world’s fastest-growing mosquitoborne illness—has risen by 11 percent since 1950, more than half of that just since 1990, according to the Lancet report. Further, the tick that carries Lyme disease is now present in 46 percent of U.S. counties, up from 30 percent in 1998. “My physician colleagues used to treat two or three cases a month during tick season,” says Dr. Nitin Damle, a physician at South County Internal Medicine, in Wakefield, Rhode Island.

Five Steps to Take Today

1

Swap tailpipes for pedals:

Bike or walk instead of driving, especially for distances of less than two miles, which comprise 40 percent of all car trips. A study in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives found that if everyone did this in just 11 cities in the Midwest, not only would carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions fall, but it would extend 1,300 lives and save $8 billion in healthcare costs due to better air quality and less sedentary lifestyles.

2

Eat less red meat: Producing

red meat results in five times more climate-warming emissions per calorie than chicken, pork, dairy or eggs, according to a study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science. It also creates 11 times more emissions than the production of potatoes, wheat or rice. Eating less red meat can also decrease an individual’s risk of certain cancers.

3

Encourage hospitals and doctors’ offices to go green:

The healthcare system is responsible

“Now each of us sees 40 to 50 new cases each season.”

Heat Pollution

Rising heat can also aggravate lung conditions because it promotes the production of ozone, a major lung irritant. With prolonged heat often come wildfires. When one burned for three months in North Carolina in a recent summer, researchers discovered that residents of counties affected by the smoke plume showed a 50 percent increase in emergency trips due to respiratory illness. Like Isaac, more kids are ending up in hospitals due to soaring temperatures, with U.S. emergency room visits for heat illnesses up by 133 percent between 1997 and 2006. Ahdoot recalls a young football player from Arkansas that showed signs of weakness and fatigue during practice, but wasn’t treated right away. He ended

for about 10 percent of all greenhouse gas emissions, according to a recent study by researchers at the Yale School of Medicine, in New Haven, Connecticut. Boston-area hospitals recently slashed their overall emissions by 29 percent in five years.

4

Plant more trees: As they grow, trees remove carbon dioxide from the air. Being around green space has also been shown to boost mental and cognitive health.

5

Show compassion: Americans,

per capita, emit six times more CO2 than the global average, according to research by Jonathan Patz, a medical doctor who directs the Global Health Institute at the University of WisconsinMadison. In a TED Talk, he observed that U.S. lower-income populations and those in developing countries are often hit hardest by gaseous emissions. “Those most vulnerable to the health impacts of climate change are often the least responsible,” he says. “Doing something about this is a matter of compassion.”

up with heat stroke, kidney failure and pulmonary edema and ultimately required kidney dialysis. “Every summer now, I see the impacts of increasing temperatures and heat waves on kids,” she says. Climate change can also impact mental health, according to a recent review by the American Psychological Association. Exposure to natural disasters can lead to post-traumatic stress disorder. Plus, according to research institutions including the University of California, San Diego, and Iowa State University, chronic heat, especially at night, can interfere with sleep and even lead to aggressive behavior. Then there’s the worry about what to do about it, and whether it will be enough. “When you talk with people about what is affecting them, climate is definitely one of the things stressing them out,” says Thomas Doherty, Psy.D., a psychologist April 2018

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in Portland, Oregon. “There’s a sense of mystery and powerlessness around it that weighs on people.”

Fresh Perspective, New Hope

Connect ~ Promote ~ Advance Learn more at sbnphiladelphia.org

Mona Sarfaty, a family physician who is now director of the Medical Society Consortium on Climate & Health, attests that 69 percent of Americans are aware that climate change is occurring, and more than half agree that human activities are at least partly to blame. Yet only a third believe it could ever harm them personally. “So much of the early focus was on the receding glaciers and the penguins,” she says. “People today still think it will affect ‘those other people over there,’ but not them.” She agrees with the recent focus on imminent health issues, and is encouraged that a growing number of healthcare professionals feel it’s their duty to inform their patients about climate change to mobilize action. “When you talk about climate change not only in terms of the health impact it has on individuals and families, but also in terms of the real-time benefits of taking action against it, people are a lot more interested in doing something,” says Sarfaty. For instance, shifting to clean energy sources like wind and solar instead of coal can effect better air quality and easier breathing now. Cycling or walking to work rather than driving can reduce carbon emissions, boost feel-good brain chemicals and keep weight in check. Writing letters to editors or attending rallies to urge lawmakers to pass climate-friendly policies can not only fend off the anxiety and depression that comes with feeling helpless, but also effect real change. Ahdoot is taking these steps now. She has solar panels on her roof, is assisting the local hospital to reduce its carbon footprint, takes public transportation to work and encourages her kids to walk whenever possible. “I don’t feel powerless at all. I feel empowered and optimistic,” she says. “The more we know, the more we are moved to act. We can all do something small every day to protect our climate.” Lisa Marshall is a freelance health writer in Boulder, CO. Connect at LisaAnnMarshall.com.

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neighborhood spotlight

Welcome to Philadelphia—

Kensington by Lauren Davish

The greater Philadelphia area has been an important meeting ground in our country’s history since the days of the Liberty Bell, and is no less so today. Teeming with diversity and multicultural heritage from downtown to the suburbs, there are many neighborhoods, many points of view and many lessons to be shared among us all. We hope that our series of spotlights featuring events and personalities in all corners of our great metropolis will encourage residents to think outside the box and stray from their commute to explore their own city with a new perspective.

J

ust a few short years ago, we might not ever have imagined that Kensington would be the next up-and-coming Philadelphia neighborhood, but with new real estate and businesses popping up, it is becoming the new hip spot for Philly natives and newcomers.

Sustainable Eating

We may not associate gardens with the

ultra-urban vibe of Kensington, but this community certainly has a green thumb. Take the Cohocksink Community Garden, for example, which grows organic fruits and vegetables for Kensington and nearby area residents. The La Finquita Urban Farm and Community Garden is another great spot that’s actually been in Kensington for more than 25 years. The Little Farm

Stand is an outlet for this garden, selling its products every Sunday from May through November.

Stimulating the Imagination

Along with its great environmental locales, Kensington has its own neighborhood cinema, the Walking Fish Theater. This nonprofit alternative neighborhood regional theater shows everything from burlesque to sketch comedy and presents shows for the whole family to enjoy. Those with acting bug can even take classes at the playhouse performance space and be a part of the fun.

Doing Good Deeds

For some quick shopping, check out Circle Thrift. Besides the great finds, purchases support the church-based Circle of Hope, with proceeds and donations going to community and humanitarian crises. It’s easy to see that there are plenty of great things going on in Kensington, and we can’t wait to see what’s in store for the coming years.

KENSINGTON, PHILADELPHIA, PA April 2018

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Foods that Go Easy on Water

Changing Our Diet to Cool the Climate

Good Food Choices Enable Global Health by Judith Fertig

T

hree years ago, the New York Times added a new word to the world’s food vocabulary: Climatarian (n.) A diet whose primary goal is to reverse climate change. This includes eating locally produced food (to reduce energy spent in transportation), choosing pork and poultry instead of beef and lamb (to limit gas emissions), and using every part of ingredients (apple cores, cheese rinds, etc.) to limit food waste.

Changing our food choices to support this model can have a ripple effect. Researchers at the University of California, Santa Barbara, in a 2017 study published in the journal Climatic Change, looked at how diets impact personal health, the healthcare system and climate. They found that adopting a more plant-based diet reduces the relative risk of coronary heart disease, colorectal cancer and Type 2 diabetes by 20 to 40 percent. National annual health care costs

Make your community a little

GREENER… Support our advertisers. For every $100 spent in locally owned business, $68 returns to the community. source: the350project.net 20

Philadelphia, PA

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Hydroponic greens are hands-down winners. The Shelton Family Farm, near Whittier, North Carolina, weekly produces 10,000 to 12,000 heads of hydroponically grown Bibb lettuce. The controlled environment and carefully engineered nutrient delivery systems maximize all resources. “It’s an enclosed system that runs 24/7, and it’s highly efficient from a waterusage standpoint because we recycle the water,” says William Shelton Jr., a fourthgeneration family farmer. “The only water that’s actually consumed is what’s taken up and transpired through the plants.” In a moderate climate, energy costs to recycle the water and keep the plants at an even temperature are moderate, as well. Dry-tilled heirloom tomatoes, okra, melons and quinoa are drought-tolerant and only use available rainfall.

Foods that Go Easy on Greenhouse Gases

Plants beat meat. “Livestock farming produces from 20 to 50 percent of all manmade greenhouse gas emissions,” says nutritionist and climate activist Jane Richards, of GreenEatz, in Mountain View, California. “You can reduce your footprint by a quarter by cutting down on red meats such as beef and lamb.” An exception is the vegetarian staple of rice. According to researchers at Project Drawdown, a climate solutions organization in Sausalito, California, rice cultivation is responsible for at least 10 percent of agricultural greenhouse gas emissions and up to 19 percent of global methane emissions. New farming techniques, like midseason draining of the rice paddies, could cut methane emissions by at least 35 percent. Richards notes, “Meat, cheese and eggs have the highest carbon footprint;

Ekaterina Markelova/Shutterstock.com

could drop from $93 billion to $77 billion. Direct greenhouse gas emissions could annually drop 489 to 1,821 pounds per person. Such an approach involves considering the related water usage, greenhouse gas emissions and carbon footprint—the energy required to cultivate, harvest and transport food—plus processing associated food waste. Here are some top choices.

conscious eating


Hopeful Developments

New agricultural developments can also benefit our climate environment. According to Project Drawdown research, perennial grains and cereals could be pivotal in reaching soil, carbon and energy targets. The Land Institute, in Salina, Kansas, has been working with the Rodale Institute, in Berks County, Pennsylvania, to develop a perennial wheat that would not have to be planted from seed each year. This would save soil, carbon and both human and machine energy. Kernza, a new perennial grain proven to prosper in natural grasslands like the Great Plains, is not yet widely distributed. Maria Speck, author of Simply Ancient Grains, advises, “With up to 15-foot-long roots, it can be harvested for five years and uses less fertilizer than conventional wheat. Kernza tastes almost like a cross between rice and wheat—sweet, grassy, mesmerizing.” Michael Pollan, author of Food Rules: An Eater’s Manual and creator of the film Food, Inc., suggests we keep it simple: “Eat food, not too much, mostly plants.” Climatarians would add another guideline— eat as locally as possible. Judith Fertig writes cookbooks plus foodie fiction from Overland Park, KS (JudithFertig.com).

healthy dining guide

photo credit: P.S. & Co.

photo credit: Front Street Café

fruit, vegetables, beans and nuts, much lower. The carbon footprint of a vegetarian diet is about half that of a meat-lover’s diet.” Root crops such as carrots, radishes, potatoes and beets have a lower carbon footprint than above-ground plants due to less food waste. A beautiful beet is easier to grow than a bell pepper that blemishes more easily. Seasonal, regional fruit, vegetables, herbs and honey have a lighter carbon impact because they are transported shorter distances. Usually what grows best in a region and is consumed locally is also best for the climate. Foods naturally suited to their environment grow and taste better, and are packed with more nutrients, reports Sustainable Table, an educational nonprofit that builds healthy communities through sustainable eating habits (SustainableTable.org).

Philadelphia loves good, healthy food! COFFEE HOUSE TOO

2514 E York St, Philadelphia 19125 267-324-5888 • CoffeeHouseCo.com A Fishtown location, they prove that being good to your customers, your staff and the environment is a win/win. With their daily specials, fair trade, organic coffee and eclectic environment, they are sure to provide the palate with something good.

COSMIC CAFÉ

1 Boathouse Row, Philadelphia 215-978-0900 • CosmicFoods.com We believe in offering farm fresh, local and organic foods, wherever possible, because starting with good ingredients ends in a sumptuous meal. We offer breakfast and lunch options all day with indoor and outdoor (seasonal) seating.

GOOD KARMA CAFÉ

331 S 22nd St, Philadelphia 19103 TheGoodKarmaCafe.com Serving fair trade sustainable coffee blends in a relaxed setting.

HOLISTIC HEALTH SUITE & CAFÉ 6802 Old York Rd, Philadelphia 215-995-5150

Our mission at Holistic Health Suite & Café is to encourage people to “Eat, Drink and Think Healthy” and to provide a safe space for that transformation to unfold. Our commitment is to honor you and your choices, and to provide guidance, education and skills to support your goals so that you can experience your optimum health and highest personal potential.

OLD CITY COFFEE

221 Church St, Philadelphia 19106 215-629-9292 • OldCityCoffee.com This locally convenient café serves various roasted coffees and teas to local visitors.

ESSENE MARKET

In the heart of historic Fabric Row 719 S 4th St, Philadelphia 215-922-1146 • EsseneMarket.com Philadelphia’s premier natural foods market, Essene specializes in organic, local, veganfriendly selections. Our café’s hot bar features ready-made Korean, vegetarian and gluten-free entrees. Our fresh juice bar is renowned for invigorating smoothies and enlivening elixirs. Be sure to try freshly baked treats prepared in our own vegan bakery. From hard-to-find items to everyday staples, we’re your neighborhood market for healthconscious living. See ad, page 9.

P.S. & CO.

1706 Locust St, Philadelphia 21-985-1706 • PureSweets.com Pure Sweets promises 100% organic, vegan, gluten-free. The healthiest fare made from scratch with love.

FRONT STREET CAFÉ

1253 N Front St, Philadelphia 19122 215-515-3073 • FrontStreetCafe.net Try Philly’s Favorite f r e sh p l u s f r i e n d l y neighborhood café. The café offers a menu featuring farm-to-table, locally sourced and organic new American cuisine with international influence.

SOY CAFÉ

630 N 2nd St, Philadelphia 19123 215-922-1003 • MySoyCafe.com Vegetarian/vegan restaurant/ coffee shop.

April 2018

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INTO THE WOODS Nature Helps Kids Build Skills and Character by April Thompson

A

movement is afoot to get kids grounded in nature. Wilderness awareness programs, also known as primitive skills or Earth-based education, teach life-changing survival skills that build courage, compassion and camaraderie. “We help youth experience a true aliveness in nature. Kids gain knowledge of the outdoors and increase awareness, confidence and self-reliance, while having fun, positive experiences,” says Dave Scott, founder of the Earth Native Wilderness School (EarthNativeSchool.com), in Bastrop, Texas. They often go on to enthusiastically share what they’ve learned about natural flora and fauna with their families.

Experiential Learning

Youth engaged with organizations like this one enjoy gaining nature-oriented survival skills, such as making bows, baskets, shelters and fire. “By making a bow out of a particular type of tree, children discover what type of habitat the tree prefers and how to harvest it sustainably. Indigenous skills like animal tracking also help them relate to wildlife and develop empathy for animals,” says Scott. “When you learn to trust rather than fear nature, you’re more likely to take care of it,” adds Rick Berry, founder of 4 Elements Earth Education (4eee.org), a Nevada 22

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City, California, nonprofit that helps kids and adults connect with planet Earth via immersion in nature. Leaving room for spontaneity and improvisation is important. While infusing indigenous knowledge into their curriculum, wilderness programs emphasize universal principles such as deep understanding of local environments and life’s interconnectedness. “Fire making is for everybody. Shelter making is for everybody. We are all caretakers of the land,” says Berry. Physical and other challenges, such as walking blindfolded through the woods, heighten sensory perception while building confidence. “The landscape is a great teacher with its uneven ground and obstacles, posing an opportunity to learn agility, practice balance and ultimately, expand awareness,” says Simon Abramson, associate director of Wild Earth (WildEarth.org), in High Falls, New York.   Nature-immersion programs like Wild Earth’s further help kids sharpen their observation skills through activities like learning to identify birdsongs and trees. During a popular activity called “sit spot”, children learn to sit quietly, listen and observe from a specific location they may revisit over the course of a day or year to witness nature’s varied beauty. Another time, they may try “foxwalking”, creeping

silently and slowly, or test their “owl vision”, using peripheral vision. For younger kids, instructors may incorporate such skills into a game like “coyote or rabbit,” where by staying still, they can avoid detection by a predator. Kids learn to listen both to nature and their own inner voice, which can be challenging in the midst of dominating peers and authority figures. “We build on the tradition of vision quest, in taking time to get quiet in nature and hear what the heart is saying,” says Berry. Activities may be patterned after natural cycles of the seasons, the four directions and diurnal rhythms. On a bright morning, emphasis is on highenergy, outward-facing activities; day’s end brings a pause to reflect, glean and share what participants have made and learned.

Lasting Life Lessons

Mother Nature’s lessons can be hardearned, but the outdoor trials that kids experience are often their most honored and memorable moments. Whether youths try out a wilderness program for a season or stay on for years, Earth-based learning can have an enduring impact. They help foster healthy relationships not only with the Earth, but with other people, according to Samuel Bowman, a program coordinator with the Wilderness Awareness School (Wilderness Awareness.org), in Duvall, Washington. Team-driven activities like building a communal shelter can help kids learn how to work through conflict, listen to others and appreciate differences. “The kids that have come through our programs prove to be creative problem-solvers prepared to handle just about anything. They have focus and commitment, and tend to be service oriented,” observes Abramson, noting that 60 percent of their instructors are alumni. “Thinking back on kids we’ve worked with, you can often see their wilderness journey reflected in their paths as adults, how they are making choices with their heart and pursuing their passions,” concludes Berry. Connect with April Thompson, in Washington, D.C., at AprilWrites.com.

Hurst Photo/Shutterstock.com

healthy kids


April 2018

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Susan Schmitz/Shutterstock.com

natural pet

Nature’s Remedies How Animals Self-Medicate by Sandra Murphy

Earth Day

should encourage us to reflect on what we are doing to make our planet a more

sustainable and livable place. ~Scott Peters

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Every species embodies a solution to some environmental challenge, and some of these solutions are breathtaking in their elegance. ~Linda Bender, Animal Wisdom: Learning from the Spiritual Lives of Animals

F

rom birds and elephants to dolphins, animals, whether by instinct or learned behavior, have discovered ways to cope with parasites, pests, aches and pains. This science of self-medication is called zoopharmacognosy (zoo for animal, pharma for drug and cognosy for knowing). At home, a dog or cat that eats grass is practicing it to eliminate parasites or hairballs. Donald Brightsmith, Ph.D., of Texas A&M University, directs the Tambopata Macaw Project in the lowlands of southeastern Peru, studying the many macaws and other parrots that gather clay to eat as a supplement. First thought to help remove toxins from their bodies, clay adds needed sodium to their diet, researchers now believe. A pregnant elephant in Kenya’s Tsavo

Park was observed by ecologist Holly Dublin, Ph.D., to travel miles to find a tree not normally eaten. Four days later, the elephant gave birth. Dublin discovered that Kenyan women make a drink from the same leaves and bark to induce labor. While studying Bornean orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus) in the Sabangau peat swamp forest in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia, primatologist Helen MorroghBernard, Ph.D., of the University of Exeter, UK, observed an orangutan chew the leaves of a plant that were not part of its usual diet until it formed a lather. The orangutan spit out the leaves and used the lather much like humans apply a topical pain reliever. While animals have been known to eat certain plants when ill, hers may be the first sighting of an animal creating a salve.


Nearby villagers grind the leaves to make a balm for sore muscles and inflammation. Morrogh-Bernard believes humans learned this topical application from apes and passed it down through the generations. In the Red Sea, bottlenose dolphins rub against bush-like gorgonian corals covered by an outer layer of antimicrobial mucus that may protect them from infection, according to dolphin researcher Angela Ziltener, of the University of Zürich, Switzerland. “It’s amazing how much we’ve learned, but forgotten,” says Ira Pastor, CEO at Bioquark Inc., in Philadelphia, a life sciences company developing biologic products to regenerate and repair human organs and tissues. “We live with other organisms which from a health and wellness perspective are much further advanced than humans. No other species tries to cure with any single solution. Nature employs multiple options. We’re not appropriately imitating nature yet. We need to do more.” Cindy Engel, Ph.D., of Suffolk,

We feel the answers for the future will be found in the past, not in chemical factories. ~Ira Pastor England, author of Wild Health: Lessons in Natural Wellness from the Animal Kingdom, says, “Animals rely on plants to provide them with the essentials of life, making their health intimately dependent on plant chemistry to provide everything they need to grow, repair damage and reproduce.” She continues, “Wild animals carry diseases that affect livestock and humans. It’s sensible to explore why they’re successful in fending off the worst effects in order to find ways to improve our own health, instead of just trying to eradicate the disease. We can learn from behavioral selfhelp strategies animals employ.” Accomplishing this is more difficult than ever, she believes, because today’s severely shrink-

ing habitat makes it hard to find truly wild animals and plants. “Over the last 100 years, we’ve done a horrible disservice to all life by destroying habitat and exploring only a small percentage of what nature has to offer,” agrees Pastor. “As patents expire, pharma has to change. It’s important to develop botanicals. We’re advised to vary our diet and exercise, yet take the same dose of the same pill daily. We’ve studied dead organisms under microscopes, but living organisms, even as small as microbes, can communicate helpful positive reactions.” Western medicine has strayed from what nature offers to keep us healthy. Now is the time to take care of both the planet and all living beings on it. “We’ve discarded thousands of years of evidence,” says Pastor. “We cannot destroy the bounty of possibilities.” Connect with freelance writer Sandra Murphy at StLouisFreelanceWriter@mindspring.com.

April 2018

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calendar of events

Auditorium, Parkway Central Library, 1901 Vine St, Philadelphia. FreeLibrary.org.

NOTE: All calendar events must be received by the 10th of the month and adhere to our guidelines. Review guidelines for submissions at NAPhilly.com or email Publisher@NAPhilly.com for more information.

TUESDAY, APRIL 3 Tai Chi – Noon. Six-week program with Henry Vuong. Join for a healthy and stress relieving break in the middle of your day. Those with medical conditions should check with their doctor before participating. Free. Andorra Library, 705 E Cathedral Rd, Philadelphia. Register: FreeLibrary.org. Vegan for Non-Vegans: Redux – 6pm. Joy Manning and Marisa McClellan will demo some easy, make-ahead meat-free staples to prepare on the weekend for plant-based meals during the week. Explore the health benefits of recipes both sweet and savory using many fridge and pantry items onhand. $15/person. Parkway Central Library, 1901 Vine St, Philadelphia. 215-686-5322. Register: Eventbrite or FreeLibrary.org.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 4 Family Health Fair – 4pm. A family-friendly health fair, including snacks and a nutrition lesson with Matthew Whipple, RD. Learn about health resources for your family from local organizations, get a lesson in hands-only CPR from the Mobile CPR Project, and sample some tasty, healthy food. South Philadelphia Library, 1700 S Broad St. 215685-1866. FreeLibrary.org. Shambhala Open House – 7-8:30pm. Every first Wednesday, The Philadelphia Shambhala Center hosts an evening where newcomers can learn what the center has to offer. The evening includes guided instruction in meditation and a short presentation. Light refreshments will be served. $10/donation. 2030 Sansom St. 215-568-6070. Philadelphia. Shambhala.org.

THURSDAY, APRIL 5 Allergies, Inflammation and Nutrition Workshop – 7-8:30pm. With Wendy Romig, MS, CNS, LDN. Dietary choices can have a tremendous impact on allergies by either reducing or exacerbating the body’s allergic responses. Learn how to tamp down your body’s inflammatory response using food and herbal medicine. Sage Integrative Health Center, 538 Carpenter Ln, Philadelphia. Register: WeaversWay.coop.

Babywearing Workshop – 5-7pm. Participants will learn the benefits of wearing their baby, review carrier types, and learn about babywearing safety. Product samples will be available to try on and play with so participants can make an informed decision about which carrier is best for their family’s babywearing experience. Free. The Nesting House, 1605 E Passyunk Ave, Philadelphia. TheNestingHouse.net.

MONDAY, APRIL 9 performances, the Subaru Cherry Blossom Festival of Greater Philadelphia is the time to celebrate all things Japanese while enjoying the delights of spring. SubaruCherryBlossom.org.

Mindfulness Meditation – 12:30pm. Ground your mind and body, and spend a peaceful half-hour with a guided meditation. Fumo Family Library, 2437 S Broad St, Philadelphia. Register; FreeLibrary.org.

Children’s Yoga – 10:30am. Beth Heed, from Oak and Acorn Wellness, will host a program filled with yoga and fun for the young ones. Children will be encouraged to move, play and explore their bodies in creative ways as stories are read out loud. Wear comfy clothing. Roxborough Library, 6245 Ridge Ave, Philadelphia. 215-685-2550. FreeLibrary.org.

Lip Balm Workshop – 6pm. Presented by Urbanstead, this hands on workshop will show participants how to make all natural lip balm using herbs that are easy to grow in a home garden. Everyone will take home two tubes of lip balm. Fumo Family Library, 2437 S Broad St, Philadelphia. Register: FreeLibrary.org.

Quick Dinners – 11am.With Matthew Whipple, RD. Learn some tips and tricks for getting a healthy dinner on the table at the end of a busy day. South Philadelphia Library, 1700 S Broad St. Register: FreeLibrary.org. Spring Fair – 11am-3pm. Offering hands-on demos all day plus Plant and Seed Swap from noon-2pm. Chef Carolynn will serve fresh local food from the community kitchen. PaperTHINK tank will make hand-made paper onsite. Nichole Gerding from Thankful Sage Farm School will do a heritage cooking pit demo and discuss traditional soap and candle making. Greensgrow Farms, 501 E Cumberland St, Philadelphia. Greensgrow.org.

SATURDAY, APRIL 7

Women’s Wellness Circle – 11:30am. A six-week wellness program to promote physical, social, intellectual, spiritual and environmental health and well-being for the women of North Philadelphia. They aim to embolden, empower, and mobilize each other through life-changing relationships and mutual support and care. Lillian Marrero Library, 601 W Lehigh Ave, Philadelphia. Register: FreeLibrary.org.

Philly Spring Cleanup – Residents, civic organizations, businesses, and nonprofits all work together to remove litter, beautify blocks, and spruce up shared spaces like parks, gardens, and recreation centers. Submit your idea for a project or sign-up for one near you. Info: PhiladelphiaStreets.com/ philly-spring-cleanup.

Family Nature Play – 2-3:30pm. Come for some unstructured nature play and a hike with NaturePHL. Participants will climb, explore and learn more about the many health benefits of outdoor activity and time in nature. Meet at Tall Trees Nature Playscape. Free. 8480 Hagy’s Mill Rd, Philadelphia. 215-482-7300. Preregister: SchuylkillCenter.org.

Qi Revolution – Apr 7-9. 9am-6pm. Experiential qigong; learn nutrition science; breath powerfully. $149. Somerset Cultural Center, New Jersey. 800298-8970. QiRevolution.com.

SUNDAY, APRIL 8

Cherry Blossom Festival – Apr 7-15. Whether it’s admiring the fragile pink blossoms of 1,000 cherry trees, participating in origami-making and sushi-making classes or enjoying martial arts

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Contemplative Dance Practice – 3-5:30pm. 1st Sun. This personal and group awareness of bodymind includes sitting meditation with self-directed body movement in space. Dress comfortably. $5-$10 donation. Shambhala Meditation Center of Philadelphia, 2030 Sansom St. 215-5686070. RSVP: SilverSpaceDance@gmail.com. Philadelphia.Shambhala.org.

Taikoza Japanese Drummers – 2pm. Power, grace, pulse, and driving rhythm – this electrifying aural and visual display consists of three drummers and a dancer. The huge taiko drums (big drums) were originally used in Japan to drive away evil spirits and the plague – today they keep audiences glued to their seats. Free. Montgomery

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11 Herbal Incense Cones and Smudges – 6pm. Presented by Urbanstead, transform your herbs into incense for your home. Participants will learn how to make incense from all natural ingredients and oils and take home their creations. Fumo Family Library, 2437 S Broad St, Philadelphia. Register: FreeLibrary.org.

THURSDAY, APRIL 12 Wasted Essentials: Water, Textiles and Food – 4:45-7pm. The Sustainability Forum will bring together a diverse group of local experts on the forefront of reversing a tide of wasted essentials (water, textiles and food) in Philadelphia. Learn how Philadelphians are reducing, reusing, and recycling waste, and how you can become part of the solution. Bluemle Life Sciences Building, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, 233 S 10th St. Register: GreenBuildingUnited.org.19107Thu

SATURDAY, APRIL 14 Neighborhood Cleanup Event – The Philadelphia More Beautiful Committee has helped bring positive change to neighborhoods throughout Philly. Through their network of dedicated Block Captains, they work to organize events, provide support, and empower residents to come together for a more beautiful Philadelphia. Info/signup: PhiladelphiaStreets.com/pmbc/clean-block-officers. SCA Earth Day – 9am-noon. The Student Conservation Association (SCA) is hosting 60 projects in honor of 60 years of SCA. In Philadelphia, volunteers will participate in an annual cleanup of Darby Creek within John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge. Wear long pants and closed-toe shoes. Bring a reusable water bottle to stay hydrated. 8601 Lindbergh Blvd. Info: Briley@thesca.org.


Volunteer Day – 9:30am-12:30pm.Volunteers will work with staff on seasonal tasks like weeding, planting, cleaning, pruning and light maintenance. No special experience or skills required. Dress for working outdoors; bring work gloves and a water bottle. Bartram’s Garden, 5400 Lindbergh Blvd, Philadelphia. 215-729-5281. Register: BartramsGarden.org. Nature Exploration for Families – 10:30-11:30am. Grab your hiking boots for a naturalist-led exploration with your little ones. Gather in the Discovery Center for a short introduction and craft before hitting the trails for guided exploration and discovery. Each week explores a different theme. Free. Schuylkill Center, 8480 Hagy’s Mill Rd, Philadelphia. 215-482-7300. Preregister: SchuylkillCenter. org. Earth Day Festival – 11am-4pm. Activities include live wildlife presentations, artisan vendors, native plant sales, creek exploration, bird walks, bug hunts, information tables about local organizations and more. Entrance is free; bring cash/credit for food vendors and exhibitors. Donations will benefit their high-quality environmental education programming throughout the year. Bucks County Audubon Society, 2877 Creamery Rd, New Hope. bcas.org. Empty Plate Dinner – 5-8pm. A Taste of Northeast Philly with all-you-can-eat specialties from more than 70 local restaurants hosted by Philadelphia Interfaith Hospitality Network. All proceeds will benefit our neighbors dealing with homelessness that includes a feast with raffles, prizes and activities for the whole family. 8504 Frankford Ave. Tickets: PhilaShelter.org.

MONDAY, APRIL 16 Earth Day Celebration – 4pm. Join for great stories and games about planet Earth. Blanche A

Nixon/Cobbs Creek Library, 5800 Cobbs Creek Pkwy, Philadelphia. 215-685-1973. FreeLibrary.org.

SATURDAY, APRIL 21 Namas Day Spring Celebration – 8am-5:30pm. Philadelphia’s premiere yoga festival featuring workshops with leading and local regional teachers. More than 30 exhibitors will share their yoga and wellness related products and services in the Marketplace. Enjoy food trucks for lunch. $50-$145. WHYY Building, 150 N 6th St. NamasDay.org. Earth Day Volunteer Day – 10am-noon. Help celebrate nature and protect the environment with diverse volunteers from the community, including individuals, families, scout troops, and youth groups, to work on projects that improve habitat for wildlife, protect important natural resources, and preserve the park’s plant and animal communities. Newlin Grist Mill, 219 S Cheyney Rd, Glen Mills. Preregistration required: 610-459-2359 or Info@NewlinGristMill.org. Naturepalooza: A Family Earth Day Celebration – 10am-2pm. Spend Earth Day celebrating the Schuylkill Center’s Year of Water with science and environmental art activities, hikes and crafts. Also, live animal shows, food trucks, dance, and a fortbuilding competition. Naturepalooza is in partnership with the Philadelphia Science Festival. Free. 8480 Hagy’s Mill Rd, Philadelphia. 215-482-7300 ext 110. Riverfront North – Earth Day Festival – 10am4:30pm. In celebration of Earth Day, join for an all-ages festival in Lardner’s Point Park that will include an outdoor cleanup, live music, food trucks, environmental demos/vendors/activities, naturalist guided walks/tours and a yoga class. 5202 Levick St, Philadelphia. drcc-Phila.org. Yoga Storytime –11am. An integration of yoga,

story, songs and games for children ages 4-6. This approach will help children explore the art of listening, and build a stronger mind-body connection. Dress comfortably and be prepared to move and have fun. Joseph E Coleman Northwest Regional Library, 68 W Chelten Ave, Philadelphia. 215-685-2150. FreeLibrary.org. Earth Day Plant Sale and Celebration – 11am3pm. Join Weavers Way Co-op and the CW Henry School for a plant sale and Earth Day events, including food trucks, live music, crafts for kids, workshops on native plants and more. Proceeds will support the school’s community garden. 559 Carpenter Ln, Philadelphia. Info: kbTannen@ hotmail.com or WeaversWay.coop. Planting a Home Medicinal Herb Garden – 1-2:30pm. With Libby Felten, clinical herbalist. Join for a workshop on growing a home medicinal garden to treat common ailments. Felton will cover growing, harvesting and storing herbs to treat fever, infections, cuts, burns, bruises and other conditions. 559 Carpenter Ln, Philadelphia. Register: WeaversWay.coop.

SUNDAY, APRIL 22 Earth Day Run for Clean Air – 7am (on-site registration). This charity run, to benefit Clean Air Council, offers something for everybody, and is a celebration of sustainable and healthy neighborhoods, clean air, and improvements in the region’s overall environmental health. Join for activities, sampling, exhibiting and fun. Postrace drink and eco-snacks provided. Eco-friendly make-and-take crafts and education offered for kids. Martin Luther King Dr, next to the Art Museum, Philadelphia. Register: CleanAir.org.

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April 2018

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Make and Take: Spring Tonics – Noon-2pm. Spring tonics like nettle, dandelion, chickweed, and cleavers have been used to help us transition into a faster-paced time of year. Come learn about these early medicinal herbs and make a spring tonic vinegar infusion. $15/members, $20/ nonmembers. All materials provided. Bartram’s Garden, 5400 Lindbergh Blvd, Philadelphia. Register: BartramsGarden.org.

plan ahead FRIDAY, MAY 4

Earth Day Program – 2pm. Kids will make an environmentally safe craft and snack. Northeast Regional Library, 2228 Cottman Ave, Philadelphia. 215-685-0522. Register: FreeLibrary.org.

savethedate FRIDAY, APRIL 27SUNDAY, APRIL 29 Empowered Light Holistic Expo – Apr 27-29. Holistic and natural vendors wanted. If you have healthy products, lifestyle choices or healing services, join as a vendor or presenter. The last event attracted over 4000 attendees from PA, NJ, NY, DE and MD, and anticipates even more this spring. The Expo is promoted via billboards, print ads and color program distributed throughout the Greater Philadelphia area. Greater Philadelphia Expo Center, Oaks. Application/ tickets: EmpoweredLight.com.

SATURDAY, APRIL 28

Society and Marcus-Brind Center of Integrative Medicine present: Classical Yoga for Mental Health with Vijaydendra Pratap, Ph.d; and Intermittent Fasting for Brain Health with Mark Mattson, Ph.d. Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia. Register: 215-595-9642 or YogaResearchSociety.com. Cloth Diaper Workshop – 5-7pm. This cloth diaper class is intended to demystify and simplify cloth diapering for parents interested in investigating them as an option for their child. Participants will discuss why it can be an environmentallysound and cost-effective option for families. The Nesting House, 606 Carpenter Ln, Philadelphia. TheNestingHouse.net.

Eighth Annual Sustainability Symposium – 8am4:30pm. Green Building United hosts a full day of educational sessions covering cutting-edge green building and sustainability topics and industry best practices. Hear experts from across the region and beyond discuss their current work, opportunities for social, environmental, and economic impact, and challenges ahead in the sustainability field. Penn State at the Navy Yard, 4960 S 12th St, Philadelphia. GreenBuildingUnited.org.

SUNDAY, MAY 12 Love Your Park Week – May 12-20. Join friends and neighbors to clean, green and celebrate Philly’s parks. LoveYourPark.org.

THURSDAY, MAY 31 Philadelphia International Festival of the Arts – May 31-Jun 10. Celebrate the ground-breaking artistry of local and international music, dance and aerial magic performances and installations. Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts. KimmelCenter.org/ PIFA2018.

ongoing events

Neighborhood Cleanup Event – The Philadelphia More Beautiful Committee has helped bring positive change to neighborhoods throughout Philly. Through their network of dedicated Block Captains, they work to organize events, provide support, and empower residents to come together for a more beautiful Philadelphia. Info/signup: PhiladelphiaStreets.com/pmbc/clean-block-officers.

NOTE: All calendar events must be received by the 10th of the month and adhere to our guidelines. Review guidelines for submissions at NAPhilly.com or email Publisher@NAPhilly.com for more information.

Household Hazardous Waste Event – 9am-3pm. Clean out the garage for proper disposal of items that contain these signal words: toxic, warning, caution, flammable, corrosive, reactive, danger. Streets Department, Training Center, 8401 State Rd at Ashburner St, Philadelphia. PhiladelphiaStreets.com/events.

Al-Anon Family Groups – Support for families and friends troubled by someone else’s drinking. Greater Philadelphia. Schedule: aisdv.org.

Volunteer Day – 9:30am-12:30pm.Volunteers will work with staff on seasonal tasks like weeding, planting, cleaning, pruning and light maintenance. No special experience or skills required. Dress for working outdoors; bring work gloves and a water bottle. Bartram’s Garden, 5400 Lindbergh Blvd, Philadelphia. 215-729-5281. Register: BartramsGarden.org. Women’s Health Expo – Apr 28-29. 10am6pm. A showcase and marketplace for women entrepreneurs: artisans, designers and distributors of products such as jewelry, clothing, fine art, pottery and wood/metal/leather/glassware, children’s items, culturally diverse crafts, fiber art, specialty food items, gift baskets, household accessories, paper products and more. Free. Philadelphia Mills, 1455 Franklin Mills Cir. Eventbrite.com. Wellness Walk – 2-3pm. Welcome spring with some outdoor exercise on the trails. The walk will be led at a moderate pace; be prepared for uneven terrain. Free. Schuylkill Center, 8480 Hagy’s Mill Rd, Philadelphia. 215-482-7300. SchuylkillCenter.org.

SUNDAY, APRIL 29 Medical Yoga 2018: The Brain – Yoga Research

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Philadelphia, PA

naphilly.com

daily Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) Meetings – A 12-step program for those who need help with a drinking problem. Greater Philadelphia. Schedule: aasepia.org. Escape Rooms – Days/times vary. Transport into one of two fantastical worlds where a series of clues, codes, puzzles, and tasks lead teams to achieve an ultimate goal. The Franklin Institute, 271 North 21st St, Philadelphia. 215-448-1200 or GuestServices@fi.edu. Morning Prayer and Meditation – 6-7am. This service, conducted in Korean and English, includes prayer, chanting and sitting meditation. Free. Won Buddhism, 23 Abington Ave, Glenside. 215-8848443. Philadelphia@WonBuddhism.org. Essene Market and Café – 8am-9pm, Mon-Fri; 8am-8pm, Sat-Sun. Large selection of organically grown produce, natural foods deli, on-site bakery. Located in the heart of historic Fabric Row, 719 S Fourth St, Philadelphia. 215-922-1146. EsseneMarket.com.

sunday Reiki Level I for Beginners – This foundation course is the most important of all levels of training. Seasoned bodyworkers will benefit, as much

as beginners with no background in spiritual development or holistic health. The Reiki School and Clinic, 727 S 4th St, 2nd Flr, Philadelphia. Info: 215-238-0659. Manayunk Group Run – 8:30am. Meet in the shop. Philadelphia Runner Manayunk, 4358 Main St. PhiladelphiaRunner.com. Sunday Morning Sangha – 9:30-11:30am. Practice includes mantra meditation, shamatha (calm abiding) meditation; Vajrayana guided meditations and visualizations, and traditional Buddhist prayers followed by dharma teaching. $10-$15/donation. 954 N Marshall St, Philadelphia. TibetanBuddhist.org. Guided Meditation and Sunday Celebration – 10-11:45am. Weekly meditation followed by a celebration in word, song and spirit. Greater Philadelphia Center for Spiritual Living, Paoli Corporate Center, 16 Industrial Blvd, Ste 112. 610-695-0375. cslPhilly.com. Silent Meditation and Sunday Celebration – 10:10-11:45am. Inspiring words, personal spiritual practice and fellowship. New Thought Philadelphia, CA House, 118 S 37th St (UPenn campus). NewThoughtPhilly.org. Food Addicts Anonymous – 11am. A 12-step program for food addiction. Roxborough Memorial Hospital, 5800 Ridge Ave, Rm A (next to cafeteria), Philadelphia. 215-514-6692. Quaker Meeting for Worship – 11am. Participate in this unique, un-programmed service to worship by gathering and silently waiting for Spirit to guide us. Friends Center, 1501 Cherry St, Philadelphia. 215-241-7000. FriendsCenterCorp.org.


The People of Color Group – 6:30-8pm. 2nd & 4th Wed. A meditation, reading and discussion group for folks who identify as people of color who would like to contemplate and have facilitated discussion from that perspective. $5/donation. Shambhala Meditation Center of Philadelphia, 2030 Sansom St. 215-568-6070. Info: PeopleOfColorGroup@ gmail.com. Register: Philadelphia.Shambhala.org.

Sunday Service – 11am. Embracing All Souls and Restoring Wholeness. The Unitarian Universalist Church of the Restoration, 6900 Stanton Ave, Philadelphia. 215-247-2561. uuRestoration.us. Korean Dharma Service – 11am-1pm. This dharma service, conducted in Korean, includes prayer, chanting, dharma talk and hymn singing. Lunch will be served after the service. $5-$10 donation. Won Buddhism, 23 Abington Ave, Glenside. 215-8848443. Philadelphia@WonBuddhism.org. Monthly Sing – Thru Jun 3. 1pm. 1st Sun. For anyone who wishes to join mindfulness and song with Alexander Devaron. $5/donation. The Philadelphia Shambhala Center, 2030 Sansom St. 215-568-6070. Philadelphia.Shambhala.org. Contemplative Dance Practice – 3-5:30pm. 1st Sun. This personal and group awareness of body/ mind includes sitting meditation with self-directed body movement in space. Dress comfortably. $5-$10 donation. Shambhala Meditation Center of Philadelphia, 2030 Sansom St. 215-5686070. RSVP: SilverSpaceDance@gmail.com. Philadelphia.Shambhala.org. Teen Group Meeting – 7-8:30pm.1st & 3rd Sun. Helping teenagers 13-18 find personal empowerment through spiritual awakening. Along the way deep connections are made and a lot of fun is had. Greater Philadelphia Center for Spiritual Living, Paoli Corporate Center, 16 Industrial Blvd, Ste 112. 610-695-0375. cslPhilly.com.

monday New Baby Meetup – 12:30-2pm. This informal group is designed for new moms and babies to meet and share with one another about the beautiful, and often times challenging, transition into parenthood. Free. 4501-4503 Baltimore Ave, Philadelphia. TheNestingHouse.net.

312 E Girard Ave, Philadelphia. 215-834-8043. MantraPhilly.com. Honeygrow Run Club – 6:30-7:30pm. Last Tue. Join for a three-to-five mile out-and-back fun run. Receive 20% off next door at Honeygrow after the run. Philadelphia Runner Center City, 1601 Sansom St. PhiladelphiaRunner.com. Young Involved Philly Run Club – 6:30-7:30pm. 1st Tue. Participants will run two-to-five miles to an interesting place in the city for a brief fiveto-10 minute tour or Q&A followed by post-run camaraderie. Philadelphia Runner Center City, 1601 Sansom St. PhiladelphiaRunner.com. Tara Practice  and Discussion Group – 6:308pm. Open to all. Limited floor cushions, chairs also available. $10/donation. 954 N Marshall St, Philadelphia. ChenrezigTBC@gmail.com. TibetanBuddhist.org. Group Meditation – 7-8:30pm. Practice sitting, walking and chanting meditation to calm your mind. All levels. $5-$10 donation. Won Buddhism, 23 Abington Ave, Glenside. 215-884-8443. Philadelphia@WonBuddhism.org. Sit n’ Stitch – 7-9pm. Brief periods of sitting will be interspersed with readings from dharma art books and creative time. Shambhala Meditation Center of Philadelphia, 2030 Sansom St. 215-5686070. Info: SusieAndersonFibers@gmail.com.

wednesday

Practice, Study and Sangha: An Informal Gathering – 6-8pm. A social gathering, meditation practice and study/discussion for meditation practitioners of all levels. Shambhala Meditation Center of Philadelphia, 2030 Sansom St. 215-5686070. Philadelphia.Shambhala.org.

New Baby Meetup – 10-11:30am. Bring babies in arms and meet other new parents, get out of the house, and talk about whatever is going on. 1605 E Passyunk Ave, Philadelphia. TheNestingHouse.net.

La Leche League – 7pm. 3rd Mon. Providing support, encouragement, information and education to parents who choose to breastfeed. Private home. Info: lllOfEasternPA.org.

University Square Market – 10am-5pm. PennCash and Dining Dollars accepted. 36th St & Walnut St in front of the Penn Bookstore. 215-733-9599. FarmToCity.org.

tuesday Chair Yoga Fellowship – 8:30-9:45am. Ongoing classes for keeping the body youthful through mindful stretching on the mat and chair. Spend time meditating on scripture and practice with gratitude. Reformation Lutheran Church, 1215 Vernon Rd, Philadelphia. La Leche League – 10am. 2nd Tue. Providing support, encouragement, information and education to parents who choose to breastfeed. Calvary Presbyterian Church, basement nursery, 217 Fernbrook Ave, Wyncote. Info: lllOfEasternPA.org. La Leche League – 10am. 3rd Tue. Providing support, encouragement, information and education to parents who choose to breastfeed. Germantown. Theresa: 617-650-4436. Info: lllOfEasternPA.org. Kirtan Connection – 6pm. Music meditation and vegetarian dinner. $10. Mantra Lounge,

New Baby Support Group – 10:30am-12:30pm. This informal group is designed for new moms and babies to meet and share with one another about the beautiful, and often times challenging, transition into parenthood. Free. Mount Airy Moving Arts, Carpenter St & Greene St, Philadelphia. TheNestingHouse.net. Meditation – Noon-1pm. Reduce stress, learn to remain peaceful in challenging situations, increase clarity of mind and more. Love offering. Greater Philadelphia Center for Spiritual Living, Paoli Corporate Center, 16 Industrial Blvd, Ste 112. 610695-0375. cslPhilly.com. Sierra Club Southeastern Pennsylvania Group (SPG) Meeting – 6:15pm. 1st Wed. Focused on environmental issues facing the greater Philadelphia area, members and nonmembers are welcome to join SPG Executive Committee meetings in-person or by phone. City CoHo, 2401 Walnut St, Philadelphia. 866-501-6174 (code: 100 4 100#).

Families Anonymous – 7pm. A 12-step program for relatives and friends of those who suffer from substance abuse or related behavioral problem. Saint Francis Xavier Church, Parish Center, 2319 Green St, Philadelphia. FamiliesAnonymous.org. Food Addicts Anonymous – 7pm. A 12-step program for food addiction. Bryn Mawr Hospital, 130 S Bryn Mawr Ave, 2nd Flr, Ladd Conference Rm. 610-659-0667.

thursday Chair Yoga Fellowship – 8:30-9:45am. Ongoing classes for keeping the body youthful through mindful stretching on the mat and chair. Spend time meditating on scripture and practice with gratitude. Reformation Lutheran Church, 1215 Vernon Rd, Philadelphia. New Parent’s Support Group – 12:30-1:30pm. Last Thur. All are welcome. $5/donation/ family. Lilypad in South Philly, 1234 S Broad St. BlossomingBelliesBirth.com. Tai Chi – 2pm. Based on Chinese soft-style martial arts, modern tai chi is best known as a gentle slowmotion exercise that improves balance, leg strength, relaxation, deep breathing, calmness, focus and alertness. Wear comfortable clothing. Fumo Family Library, 2437 S Broad St, Philadelphia. Preregister: 215-685-1758 or FreeLibrary.org. Manayunk Group Run – 6:30pm. Meet in the shop. Philadelphia Runner Manayunk, 4358 Main St. PhiladelphiaRunner.com.

friday Bhagavad Gita Wisdom Series – 6pm. Discussion, meditation and vegetarian feast. $10. Mantra Lounge, 312 E Girard Ave, Philadelphia. 215-8348043. MantraPhilly.com. The Basic Goodness of Mental Illness: Support/ Study Group – 6:30-8pm. 4th Fri. For mental health professionals interested in building confidence, deepening compassion and developing supportive connections in their professional lives. Prerequisites and coursework. Shambhala Meditation Center of Philadelphia, 2030 Sansom St. 215-5686070. Philadelphia.Shambhala.org. Scripture Study –7-8:30pm. 2nd & 4th Fri. This small study group gathers together over a cup of tea to read the scriptures of Won Buddhism and discuss its meaning and how it relates to daily life. $5 donation. 23 Abington Ave, Glenside. 215-8848443. Philadelphia@WonBuddhism.org. Heart of Recovery – 7:30-8:30pm. (Formerly Working With Addictions). A weekly support group bringing together Buddhist meditation practice and the wisdom of recovery. Meetings are anonymous and confidential. $2/donation. Shambhala Meditation Center of Philadelphia, 2030 Sansom St. 215-568-6070. Mark: phl.hor.coord@ gmail.com. Philadelphia.Shambhala.org.

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saturday Vinyasa Yoga – 8am. With Chris Czopek. Prana, asana and meditation for all levels. Beginners welcomed. Relax Therapy Spa, 7151 Germantown Ave, Philadelphia. 866-776-3034. Bird Walks – 8-9am. 1st & 3rd Sat. Join our naturalists for a guided bird walk around the property. All ages/levels. Bring a field guide, binoculars or borrow a pair. Bucks County Audubon Society, 2877 Creamery Rd, New Hope. 215-297-5880. Bird Walk – Thru Apr. 9-11am. Last Sat. Join a staff naturalist and Wild Birds Unlimited for a monthly bird walk on the property. Free. Newlin Grist Mill, 219 S Cheyney Rd, Glen Mills. 610-459-2359. Bryn Mawr Farmers’ Market – Thru Apr. 10am-noon. 1st, 3rd & 5th Sat. The largest farmers’ market on the Main Line. More than 20 local farmers and food artisans during growing season. Lancaster Ave & Bryn Mawr Ave (in the Amtrak Station parking lot), Philadelphia. 215-733-9599. FarmToCity.org. Chestnut Hill Farmers’ Market – Thru Apr. 10am-noon. Year-round market featuring local food and products. Winston Rd between Germantown Ave & Mermaid Ln, Philadelphia. 215-733-9599. FarmToCity.org. Rittenhouse Farmers’ Market – Thru Apr. 10am2pm. Year-round market featuring local food and products: seasonal produce, herbs, mushrooms and honey, plus local wine. 18th St & Walnut St , Philadelphia. 215-733-9599. FarmToCity.org. Dharma Service – 10am-noon. Includes sitting meditation, chanting, prayer, dharma talk and discussion on Buddhist philosophy and practice. $5-$10 donation. Won Buddhism, 23 Abington Ave, Glenside. 215-884-8443. Philadelphia@ WonBuddhism.org. A Course in Miracles – 1pm. Members undergo spiritual healing and development by sharing and discussing the great spiritual Tome, A Course in Miracles. The New Leaf Cafe, 1225 Montrose Ave, Bryn Mawr. Meetup.com. Reclaim Class – 6:30-7:45pm. Relax Therapy Spa, 7151 Germantown Ave, Philadelphia. 866776-3034. Kirtan – 7pm. 1st Fri. Join for monthly kirtan and bhajans and a vegetarian meal afterwards. $10/ donation. Govindas Bhakti Garden, 1408 South St, Philadelphia. Meetup.com.

Service to others is the rent you pay for your room here on Earth. ~Muhammad Ali

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Philadelphia, PA

naphilly.com

community resource guide Connecting you to the leaders in natural health care and green living in our community. To find out how you can be included in the Community Resource Guide, email Publisher@NAPhilly.com to request our media kit.

ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE ARCANA CENTER FOR INTEGRATIVE MEDICINE

ENVIRONMENTAL CLEANING SERVICES GLO WITH GLORY

David Kanze, DO & Kylie Kanze, DO 3502 Scotts Ln, #1721A, Philadelphia 267-437-3299 ArcanaCenter.com

Antoinette Williams-Murray Cell: 267-207-7787 • Office: 215-342-7787 GloWithGlory.com

Come visit board certified physicians that blend traditional medicine with alternative modalities to help optimize your health with an individualized plan based on mind, body and spirit.

Your home or place of business is in good hands with Glo with Glory. We make great efforts to ensure we leave our clients’ properties spotless. If you decide to hire our team for your cleaning needs, we will discuss the expectations you have for us and agree on a fair price based on the size of your property. See ad, page 15.

ANIMAL HOSPITAL CHESTNUT HILL CAT CLINIC 8220 Germantown Ave Philadelphia • 215-247-9560 ChestnutHillCatClinic.com

We are a full-service veterinary hospital, dedicated to the gentle compassionate care of felines. We specialize in preventative health care and provide exceptional surgical and dental services. See ad, page 24.

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION MT AIRY USA

6703 Germantown Ave, Ste 200, Philadelphia • 215-844-6021 Info@MTAiryUSA.org Live. Work. Thrive. The mission of Mt. Airy USA is to preserve, empower and advance a vibrant and diverse Mt. Airy by stimulating development responsive to the community’s needs.

ENERGY HEALING UPGRADE YOUR FLOW

Energy Healing Services Dimitria Stevenson 1601 Walnut St, Ste 901, Philadelphia 267-225-0192 Dimitria@UpgradeYourFlow.com UpgradeYourFlow.com My mission is to give people an alternative way of healing themselves from old patterns and emotional blocks so they can simply feel good while living their most authentic, empowered and fabulous life. See ad, page 9.

HEALTHY DENTAL CARE WEST PARK DENTAL

Dr. Alfredo Alexander, DMD 5906 West Girard Ave, Philadelphia 19151 215-748-0881 AlfredoAlexanderBrightSmiles.com West Park Dental of Philadelphia offers a friendly, knowledgeable staff dedicated to making every visit a great experience. Expert dental care is provided with a warm and personal touch in a comfortable relaxed setting. The first step towards a beautiful smile and a lifetime of good oral health is to schedule an appointment. See ad, page 7.

HERBAL TEA COMPANY RISING DAWN TEAS

Helena and Alyson Showell RDTeas@gmail.com • RisingDawnTeas.com Through studying plants, herbs and their healing properties, Alyson’s and Helena’s creations of teas are to uplift others and in some small measure, help them rise through sadness, through trauma, through depression, through exhaustion and into light. Visit us online! See ad, page 12.

HOLISTIC DETOX TO YOUR HEALTH DETOX CENTER Ethel Wilson 2715 W Allegheny Ave, Philadelphia 215-223-5635

We offer holistic health and alternative healing and specialize in colonic cleansing. Learn about natural holistic remedies through the reliable sources. Included are holistic products and alternative health services. See ad, page 25.


HOLISTIC SKIN CARE NU YOU WELL MED

1601 Walnut St, Ste 1523 Philadelphia • 215-847-5659 Award-winning Nu You Well Med has certified estheticians that specialize in treating skin conditions holistically. We also offer a unique male waxing program. Let us help you look and feel amazing. See ad, page 13.

HOLISTIC SPA AND AROMATHERAPY THE SPA TERME DI AROMA

32 N Third St, Philadelphia 19106 215-829-9769 • TermeDiAroma.com Nestled in the heart of the city’s historic district, Spa Terme Di Aroma has long been a popular sanctuary for residents and travelers alike to enjoy an array of both classic and specialty spa treatments such as reiki, Indian foot massage and anti-aging collagen facials. Spa packages and gift cards are available. Appointments are recommended. See ad, page 14.

NATURAL ORGANIC MARKET ESSENE MARKET

In the heart of historic Fabric Row 719 S 4th St, Philadelphia 215-922-1146 • EsseneMarket.com Philadelphia’s premier natural foods market, Essene specializes in organic, local, veganfriendly selections. Our café’s hot bar features ready-made Korean, vegetarian and gluten-free entrees. Our fresh juice bar is renowned for invigorating smoothies and enlivening elixirs. Be sure to try freshly baked treats prepared in our own vegan bakery. From hard-to-find items to everyday staples, we’re your neighborhood market for healthconscious living. See ad, page 9.

NATURAL PHARMACY ASPIRE PHARMACY

4307 Locust St, Philadelphia 19104 215-883-0332 AspireRxCare.com

NUTRITION AND HERBS CENTER

Tony Moore 5601 N 10th St, Philadelphia 19141 215-549-6151 • NutritionAndHerbsCenter.com

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Supporting the healing process through education. Open Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Fee for classifieds is a minimum charge of $20 for the first 20 words and $1 for each additional word. To place an ad, email Publisher@NAPhilly.com.

NATUROPATH

OPPORTUNITIES

EARTHLY ESSENCE

Dr. Jacquilen Fostor Tomas Ali 3901 Main St, Bldg B, Ste 201, Philadelphia 215-360-4110 • DrAliND.com Become the Master of Your Own Healing ©. Dr. Jacquilen Fostor Tomas Ali, ND, is a Naturopathic Physician, Certified Nutritional Counselor (CNC) and Master Herbalist (MH). Also, as a Certified BodyTalk Practitioner, Dr. Ali focuses on and addresses the causes of health challenges, not just symptoms. This focus provides a wellbalanced approach to health and healing.

PODIATRY CARE PENNSYLVANIA FOOT AND ANKLE ASSOCIATES

ADVERTISE HERE – Are you: hiring, renting property/office space, selling products, offering services, or in need of volunteers? Advertise your personal/business needs in Natural Awakenings classified ad section. To place an ad, email Publisher@NAPhilly.com. RELATIONSHIP MANAGEMENT SALES – Excellent opportunity for flexible part-time work. Natural Awakenings Philadelphia is seeking a selfmotivated professional with strong interpersonal and communication skills to introduce businesses to the benefits of advertising in print and online. Must

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We don’t just treat our patients, we strive to provide complete care to the fullest of its definition. This all starts with education provided to our patients and parents of patients to better understand their condition in a comfortable setting. We diagnose, discuss treatment options and associated risks so our patients can make the best and most informed decisions regarding their health. We will be there every step of the way to guide you, counsel you and answer all of your questions. See ad, page 6.

Philadelphia. Must enjoy conversing on the phone

in sourcing suitable clients and events to target in and hosting face-to-face meetings, working from home and from the road. Need 20 flexible daytime hours per week to prosper. Occasional weekend and evening time required to attend events and network. Generous commission plus bonuses. Previous relationship-based ad sales experience necessary. Email your name, phone number and a brief description of your experience to Publisher@NAPhilly.com.

SUSTAINABLE ORGANIZATIONS SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS NETWORK 2401 Walnut St, Ste 206, Philadelphia 215-922-7400, ext 104 • sbnPhiladelphia.org

A one-size fits all slogan doesn’t work when it comes to ones health. We can work with your doctor and make your prescription tailored for your specific needs.We can customize your medical experience through prescription compounding and much more. See ad, page 12.

The Sustainable Business Network (SBN) of Greater Philadelphia is a nonprofit membership organization striving to build a just, green and thriving local economy. See ad, page 18.

GR W

Your Business Call for information:

215-902-9137

Love all, trust a few, do wrong to none. ~William Shakespeare

April 2018

31


Natural Awakenings Philadelphia  

Earth Day Issue!

Natural Awakenings Philadelphia  

Earth Day Issue!

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