Page 1

EE R F

HEALTHY

LIVING

HEALTHY

PLANET

WHEN WORKOUTS DON’T WORK

GREEN THERAPY

Ecopsychology and The Nature Cure

The Art of Aging Well

Strategies That Work

January 2020 | Philadelphia, PA Edition | naphilly.com

January 2020

1


Are you using antibiotics, steroids or anti-fungals to treat a respiratory infection? Still sick and feeling worse? We use a natural, laboratory and clinically proven antimicrobial that kills bacteria, fungus and virus without harming the patient.

We use RESPIRATORY RELIEF from

20%OFF with coupon code RESP20

We get calls & orders from people who have tried all sorts of prescription medications that do NOT get rid of their respiratory infections. Time after time the infections clear up in a few days with Respiratory Relief. We shake our heads and wonder, “Why don’t they try this first?” Now you can.

For use in a nebulizer

Order online at MyNaturesRite.com or call 800-991-7088

North America’s Leader in End-of-Life Doula and Conscious Dying Coach Certification WWW .C ONSCIOUS D YING I NSTITUTE . COM

Be Held | Be Whole Be Healing Become a Sacred Passage End-of-Life Doula

Tampa, FL

Phase 1: Feb 25-27 2020 Phase 2: May 14-18, 2020 303.440.8018 info@consciousdyinginstitute.com

Asheville, NC | Boulder, CO | Ottawa, ON | San Marcos, CA | St. Paul, MN | Vancouver, BC | Tampa, FL 2

Philadelphia, PA

naphilly.com


January 2020

3


HEALTHY LIVING HEALTHY PLANET

PHILADELPHIA, PA EDITION PUBLISHER Kimberly Murray EDITOR Martin Miron CALENDAR EDITOR Sara Peterson AD DESIGNER Megan Connolly DESIGN & PRODUCTION C. Michele Rose CONTENT MANAGER Amy Hass SOCIAL MEDIA ASST. Eric Yang SALES & MARKETING Kimberly Murray

CONTACT US

letter from publisher

Happy New Year Philly Welcome to a new year and a new decade full of awesome opportunities, changes and challenges in our pursuit of healthy living. Let’s embrace each day with courage and fortitude to withstand obstacles that come our way. I’m excited about the wonderful possibilities this year and decade will bring. We begin this year with Wise Words from legendary journalist Bill Moyers, who is leading the charge for a new generation to make a critical difference in our world where it counts: climate change.

Natural Awakenings – Philly 8225 Germantown Ave., Suite 4333 Philadelphia, PA 19118 Phone: 215-902-9137 Fax: 215-402-3423

Natural Awakenings has accepted his challenge to join a global media project called Cov-

Publisher@naphilly.com naphilly.com

the planet, and how each of us can shrink our own climate change footprint. I would love

ering Climate Now to spread awareness of the urgency of this issue. Throughout this year, we’ll be sharing with our readers the many aspects of how we eat and how we live impact for Philadelphia to explore the ways we could make a difference locally with environmental changes in our community. Feel free to contact us with positive changes that impact the community so that our readers can become change agents locally.

SUBSCRIPTIONS Subscribe online to receive FREE monthly digital magazine at naphilly.com.

NATIONAL TEAM CEO/FOUNDER Sharon Bruckman COO/FRANCHISE SALES Joe Dunne NATIONAL EDITOR Jan Hollingsworth MANAGING EDITOR Linda Sechrist NATIONAL ART DIRECTOR Stephen Blancett ART DIRECTOR Josh Pope

Our focus on planetary health will complement our ongoing commitment to leave no stone unturned in all facets of personal health. This month, the eternal quest for the fountain of youth leads us to examine the factors that contribute not only to living long, but living well. Melinda Hemmelgan’s feature looks at the role of genes, environment and lifestyle factors; she offers age-defying strategies-from diet, exercise and sleep to protecting our telomeres and adjusting our attitudes. We look forward to an inspiring year as a source of healthy living, and with your participation, we can be proud of the service we do together in 2020.

Natural Awakenings Publishing Corporation 4933 Tamiami Trail N., Ste. 203 Naples, FL 34103 Ph: 239-434-9392 • Fax: 239-434-9513 NaturalAwakeningsMag.com ©2020 by Natural Awakenings. All rights reserved. Although some parts of this publication may be reproduced and reprinted, we require that prior permission be obtained in writing. Natural Awakenings is a free publication distributed locally and is supported by our advertisers. Please call to find a location near you or if you would like copies placed at your business. We do not necessarily endorse the views expressed in the articles and advertisements, nor are we responsible for the products and services advertised. Check with a healthcare professional regarding the appropriate use of any treatment.

Natural Awakenings Magazine is ranked 5th Nationally in CISION’S® 2016 Top 10 Health & Fitness Magazines

Philadelphia, PA

The Earth does not belong to us: We belong to the Earth. ~Marlee Matlin

Natural Awakenings is printed on recycled newsprint with soy-based ink.

4

Kimberly Murray, Publisher

naphilly.com


Natural Awakenings is a family of more than 70 healthy living magazines celebrating 25 years of providing the communities we serve with the tools and resources we all need to lead healthier lives on a healthy planet.

16

Contents 10 GREEN THERAPY

Ecopsychology and the Nature Cure

10

12 GUT CHECK

Feeding the Immune System

15 MAKING NEW YEAR'S

RESOLUTIONS STICK

16 LIVING LONG & WELL Age-Defying Habits and the Fountain of Youth

19

19 WHEN WORKOUTS DON’T WORK

Why Less Is Sometimes More

20 RAISING

ENVIRONMENTALISTS

Teachers Prep Kids for the Future

22 WHEN OLDER PETS GET QUIRKY Dealing With Cognitive Dysfunction Syndrome

ADVERTISING & SUBMISSIONS HOW TO ADVERTISE To advertise with Natural Awakenings or request a media kit, please contact us at 215-902-9137 or email Publisher@naphilly.com. Deadline for ads: the 10th of the month. EDITORIAL SUBMISSIONS Email articles, news items and ideas to: Publisher@naphilly.com. Deadline for editorial: the 10th of the month. CALENDAR SUBMISSIONS Email Calendar Events to: Publisher@naphilly.com or visit naphilly.com. Deadline for calendar: the 10th of the month. REGIONAL MARKETS Advertise your products or services in multiple markets! Natural Awakenings Publishing Corp. is a growing franchised family of locally owned magazines serving communities since 1994. To place your ad in other markets call 239-434-9392. For franchising opportunities call 239-530-1377 or visit NaturalAwakenings.com.

22

23 TIDYING UP

THAT BUCKET LIST

Deciding What We Really Want

DEPARTMENTS 6 news briefs 8 health briefs 10 green living 12 conscious

eating 14 healthy dining guide 18 practitioner profile

19 20 22 23 25 30 31

fit body healthy kids natural pet inspiration calendar resource guide classifieds

January 2020

5


news briefs

Planting and Tending Philadelphia’s Trees

T

he Pennsylvania Horticultural Society (PHS) Tree Tenders work to increase the number of trees in neighborhoods throughout Philadelphia, prioritizing communities with tree coverage well below the citywide goal of 30 percent of open space. Tree canopy in urban settings is correlated with many health, environmental, and economic impacts. One of the oldest established volunteer tree planting and stewardship programs, Tree Tenders is at the forefront of the urban tree movement across the country. They offer a training course and help start a Tree Tenders group in neighborhoods; all that’s required is three Tree Tenders graduates. The next basic training will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., January 25 and February 1. Since 1993, more than 5,000 volunteers in the region have become certified Tree Tenders, receiving hands-on training on the biology, identification, planting and proper care of trees. Each year, with PHS support, neighborhood Tree Tenders groups plant more than 1,000 trees, and focus on follow-up monitoring and care to ensure their survival. Register at Tinyurl.com/TreeTendersBasicTraining. For more information, call 215-988-1698.

Beware Ubiquitous Electromagnetic Radiation

I

GROW Your Business Contact us for special ad rates.

215-902-9137

nner Somatics Sourced Solutions has opened a Philadelphia office at 261 West Walnut Lane. The group practice focuses on health and wellness use of frequencyembedded water, or infoceuticals, as key to future health. It takes time to adapt to ideas, methods and technology, and they are on the cutting edge of next-generation holistic resources, going one step beyond homeopathy, Anaiis Salles energy healing and water memory research by Masaru Emoto, Dr. Luc Montagnier, Dr. Gerald Pollack and others. Maintaining an open mind and being willing to explore new wellness strategies can be our best allies as our species is forced to evolve. Certified practitioner Anaiis Salles says, “We’ve shifted from the age of information to the age of frequency. Our bodies are bombarded with both organized and disorganized arrays of frequency information. Knowing how to be in a healthy relationship with the challenges and stresses caused by new frequencies, such as the roll-out of 5G, is vital to our well-being.”

For more information, call 267-401-0477 or email LivingLessonsLibrary @gmail.com. See ad, page 30. 6

Philadelphia, PA

naphilly.com


Innovate Integrative Therapy Brings Results

T

he Rubenfeld Synergy Method (RSM) is a powerful and proven healing modality with a 50year history of using the wisdom of the body to provide transformational healing. Combining intentional, respectful, listening touch with verbal processing creates a dynamic integration of body, mind, emotions and spirit. Practitioners of RSM, known as Rubenfeld Synergists, address a wide variety of physical, emotional, mental, and spiritual ailments by listening to the wisdom of the body. Both client and synergist then process and use the body’s wisdom in a practical way to resolve underlying issues and create lasting change. The Rubenfeld Synergy Method was developed by Ilana Rubenfeld, a musician seeking her own balance and healing. In the 1960s, hours of practicing conducting at Juilliard in New York City resulted in debilitating back pain that affected her ability to move. Rubenfeld studied the F. M. Alexander Technique, Awareness Through Movement with Moshé Feldenkrais and gestalt therapy with Fritz and Laura Perls. Weaving these processes into an integrative whole, she created the Rubenfeld Synergy Method, which combines awareness through respectful, listening touch and the verbal processing of what is happening in the now. For more information, call 304-261-1443 or visit RubenfeldSynergy TrainingProgramPhiladelphia.com. See ad, page 30.

Rewarding Social Innovation

T

he 2020 Greater Philadelphia Social Innovations Awards will be presented from 4:30 to 8:30 p.m., January 23, at the IBX Innovation Center. With the theme of Innovating Ideas, Revolutionizing Realities, these awards honor our region’s most passionate social innovators, entrepreneurs and changemakers, whose work and social impact too often goes unacknowledged, yet their efforts are what make our communities across Greater Philadelphia the thriving region of innovation and opportunity they are for all people. They recognize organic leadership re-envisioning the challenges communities face and finding solutions by innovating ideas to reshape society through unique programs, policies and disrupting the political landscape to revolutionize realities that bring us all forward to a more equitable and inclusive tomorrow. Location: 1901 Market St., Philadelphia. For tickets, visit Tinyurl.com/SocialInnovationsAwards. January 2020

7


Drink Pomegranate Juice to Protect Fetal Brain Growth About one in 10 babies in utero struggles with a dangerous condition known as intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), in which the flow of oxygen and nutrients through the placenta is restricted, hampering development of the growing fetus. Now, a simple solution—of mom drinking an eight-ounce glass of pomegranate juice a day—offers hope of a way to reduce infant deaths and lower the need for infant surgery. Researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, in Boston, studied 77 mothers with IUGR at St. Louis’ Barnes-Jewish Hospital that received either one cup a day of pomegranate juice or a placebo. Evaluating 55 of the babies’ development with MRIs after birth, researchers found that the babies with pomegranate-drinking moms had evidence of both better brain connectivity and development of white matter—tissue through which messages pass in the central nervous system. Pomegranate juice is a rich source of polyphenols, a class of foods also found in nuts, berries, vegetables and teas that’s known to cross the blood-brain barrier and have neuroprotective effects.

8

Philadelphia, PA

naphilly.com

Ines Behrens-Kunkel/Shutterstock.com

Eating and drinking fermented probiotic dairy products such as yogurt, kefir, cheese and sour cream reduces the risk of heart disease for women, report researchers from the Netherlands that analyzed data from nearly 8,000 Australian women over a 15-year period. The effect was particularly strong for those that were obese and had Type 2 diabetes, according to the research. “In the process of dairy fermentation, beneficial compounds are released that have shown promise for improving glycemic control, blood lipids, cholesterol concentrations and blood pressure,” write the study authors.

Chomping on more nuts daily keeps the pounds at bay, according to research published in the journal BMJ Nutrition, Prevention & Health. Using records from three long-term longitudinal studies spanning 20 years and including nearly 300,000 health professionals, the report from Harvard University’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health found that increasing nut intake by a half serving a day—about 12 almonds or seven walnut halves—was linked to lower instances of weight gain and obesity. Swapping out a serving of meats, refined grains or desserts for half a serving of nuts was associated with staving off weight gain of between 0.9 and 1.5 pounds in any four-year period. A consistently higher nut intake of at least half a serving a day was associated with a 23 percent lower risk of putting on 11 or more pounds and becoming obese in the same timeframe. No such links were found for eating more peanut butter. The researchers suggest the high fiber content of nuts can make a person feel full longer, and that that the fiber also binds well to fats in the gut, affecting a greater discharge of calories.

onair/Shutterstock.com

Eat Fermented Dairy to Lower Heart Risk

Munch More Nuts to Stave Off Weight Gain

Live Near Green Spaces to Ward Off Metabolic Syndrome Middle-aged and older adults that live in greener neighborhoods have a lower risk of metabolic syndrome, reports research from the Barcelona Institute for Global Health in the journal Environmental Pollution. The study followed more than 6,000 British adults in a cohort initially between ages 45 and 69 for 14 years, and correlated health records and interviews with satellite images of greenery. They found that exposure to green spaces seemed to help prevent metabolic syndrome and its individual components such as large waist circumference, high levels of blood fats and hypertension. The results “could be related to better opportunities provided by green spaces to perform physical activity, as well as a decrease in exposure to air pollution,” notes Carmen de Keijzer, first author of the study. Women fared even better than men, perhaps because women may spend more time in green spaces.

Evgeny Karandaev/Shutterstock.com

health briefs


Eat Garlic and Onion for Breast Health

Studies in centenarians have suggested that people who live long and in good health have a regular lifestyle. They spend time in community, eat meals and go to bed at regular times, in sync with circadian rhythms. ~Eve Van Cauter

Deviatov Aleksei/Shutterstock.com

Women eating more onions and garlic reduced their risk of breast cancer by 59 percent compared to those that ate less of these, according to a study in the journal Nutrition and Cancer. Researchers from the State University of New York at Buffalo and the University of Puerto Rico surveyed 660 women in Puerto Rico to measure their intake of onions and garlic, as well as sofrito, a local dish also cooked with bell peppers, tomatoes, cilantro and black pepper. Women that ate the onion- and garlicrich sofrito sauce more than once a day slashed their risk of breast cancer by 67 percent compared to those that didn’t eat it. Both garlic and onions contain compounds with anticarcinogenic properties, and earlier studies have found a link between higher onion and garlic intake and fewer cancers of the lung, prostate and stomach. Puerto Rican women eat more onions and garlic than women in Europe and the U.S., mainly due to the popularity of those two ingredients in sofrito, and also have markedly lower breast cancer rates.

January 2020

9


After my time outdoors, I feel grounded, renewed, energized and much more clearheaded than before I started.

Cardiovascular Health plus: Regenerative Medicine

~Laura Durenberger

Readers are Seeking These Providers & Services:

Health Practitioners • Natural Food Stores Meditation • Nutritionists Fitness Centers & Health Clubs ... and this is just a partial list!

PLANT-BASED NUTRITION ISSUE

MARCH

Thriving on a Plant-Based Diet plus: CBD

APRIL

Grassroots Climate Crisis Strategies plus: Healthy Home

CONNECT WITH OUR READERS THREE-MONTH EDITORIAL CALENDAR & MARKETING PLANNER

Contact us to learn about marketing opportunities and become a member of the Natural Awakenings community at:

215-902-9137

10

Philadelphia, PA

naphilly.com

GREEN THERAPY Ecopsychology and the Nature Cure

F

by Ronica A. O’Hara

or clients of family therapist Christian Dymond, the path to wellness begins on his 10 acres of woods and meadows in Milton, Vermont, walking alongside him, sitting by a babbling brook, watching squirrels gather nuts or the sun slowly set, breathing in the piney air. “There is a sense of safety that comes from being in the forest,” Dymond says. “Safety is necessary in order for the client to open up and share themselves with another human being.” Children, too, readily respond: “Getting a child outside into nature can bring life back into their eyes. Every day I see this happen.” The sweeping Santa Barbara beach is the office of clinical psychologist Maria Nazarian, Ph.D., as she accompanies clients on hour-long barefoot walks that might include a mindfulness exercise, goal-setting and meditation—all while watching waves foam, pelicans glide and sun-sparkles on the water. “When we feel connected to the world around us, we experience more joy and belonging, less depression and less anxiety, all of which increase our thinking, creativity, wellbeing and generosity,” she says.

Their practices, known as ecotherapy, green therapy or nature-based therapy, are an outgrowth of a ballooning branch of psychology known as ecopsychology, which investigates the critical links between nature experiences and human well-being. In examining such matters as our neurological responses to nature, how climate change and weather disasters lead to anxiety and depression, how nature deprivation affects children, and why nature can produce transcendent awe, the field is reshaping the way that therapists and doctors help both adults and children heal. Ecopsychology is a relatively new discipline. Little more than two decades ago, historian Theodore Roszak pointed out in Psychology Today that in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of the American Psychiatric Association, one of the most-diagnosed categories involved sex: “In mapping sexual dysfunction, therapists have been absolutely inspired… [but] the volume contains only one listing remotely connected to nature: seasonal affective disorder.” Now, as the planet’s dire plight becomes a source of mounting concern, that

Song_about_summer/Shutterstock.com

FEBRUARY

green living


professional neglect is rapidly changing. Institute at the Golden Gate National There is a sense of safety The field of ecopsychology has produced Parks Conservancy. that comes from being in more than 100 authoritative studies Ecopsychology research programs the forest. Safety is necessary are opening at medical centers and linking nature to not only physical, but in order for the client to open universities, and ecotherapy classes are mental health. Researchers have found that spending time in nature settings up and share themselves with being added to academic degree programs helps lower stress, anxiety and depression, for therapists. Major health insurers are another human being. boosts positive mood, improves resilience financing pilot programs to measure time~Christian Dymond and immune response, increases life exin-nature outcomes, and electronic health pectancy, decreases anger, reduces blood records are starting to include nature pressure, eases computer fatigue and enhances energy, concenprescriptions, as well as pharmaceuticals. tration and cognitive functioning. Happily, it’s a therapy that can be self-prescribed. After Laura Recently, Danish researchers found that children raised in Durenberger, who blogs at ReduceReuseRenewBlog.com, gave the least-green neighborhoods were 55 percent more likely to birth to her son, she found symptoms of her generalized anxiety develop a serious mental illness than children that grew up in disorder at an all-time high, and ultimately linked it to rarely the greenest neighborhoods, regardless of social standing, affluleaving her house. When she goes too long without being outside, ence or parental mental illness. A British study of nearly 20,000 she says, “My anxiety spikes. I am irritable. My energy is low. people published in Scientific Reports concluded that spending at I don’t feel motivated or creative.” least two hours a week in nature, whether in brief breaks or long Now, even during the fierce Minneapolis winters, she is stretches, is an optimal amount of time to feel a sense of better dedicated to spending half an hour a day in nature: “After my time health and well-being. outdoors, I feel grounded, renewed, energized and much more Putting these findings in motion, doctors, therapists, clearheaded than before I started.” naturopaths, nurse practitioners and other health providers As ecotherapist Dymond puts it: “Nature is always there for are increasingly suggesting and prescribing time in nature, espepeople to heal themselves in.” cially for children. As of July 2018, there were 71 provider-based nature-prescription programs in 32 states, potentially involving Ronica A. O’Hara is a Denver-based health writer. Contact her at hundreds of thousands of patients, according to a survey by the OHaraRonica@gmail.com.

How to Practice Personal Ecopsychology n Spend two hours or more each week outdoors in natural settings, in either short or long blocks of time. n Take a free online course to gain an in-depth understanding of ecopsychology at Tinyurl.com/IntroEcopsychology. n Read books like Vitamin N: The Essential Guide to a Nature-Rich Life, by Richard Louv, or The Nature Fix: Why Nature Makes Us Happier, Healthier, and More Creative, by Florence Williams. n Bring plants, flowers, seashells, pebbles and other reminders of nature into work and home settings. n Garden outdoors or keep a kitchen herb garden indoors. n Join a local birdwatching group.

If You Are Reading This, So Are Your Potential Customers.

n Use nature scenes as wall art and screensavers. n Visit WalkWithADoc.org to join in a one-hour group walk with a local doctor. n Find more ideas at RunWildMyChild.com/incorporatingnature-into-daily-life.

Contact us today for ad rates.

215-902-9137 January 2020

11


conscious eating

The level of germ-fighting activity your immune system is able to maintain after a sugary meal decreases for a number of hours.

GUT CHECK Feeding the Immune System

R

by Julie Peterson

educing stress, sleeping enough, exercising and getting sunlight are all known strategies for improving the body’s ability to protect itself from harm. However, the most important factor in building a rock-star immune system is nutrition. Here is a guide to the care and feeding of the inner fortifications that fight off disease, supporting long-term wellness.

Ground Zero: The Gut

About 70 percent of the immune system resides in the gastrointestinal tract—home to a microbiome that contains trillions of bacteria. It works as a complex ecosystem in which the good bacteria prevent the bad bacteria from taking hold and causing illness or disease. Eating plants promotes the robust growth of that good bacteria. “The GI microbiome evolved closely with our immune systems and under the influence of the plants our ancestors ingested,” says Holly Poole-Kavana, who practices herbal medicine in Washington, D.C. Yet about 90 percent of Americans don’t eat enough fruits and vegetables, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The consequent weakening of the microbiome is a double-edged sword, because the processed foods Americans commonly consume promote the growth of harmful microbes. The 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans indicates that added sugars, saturated fats and sodium eaten by most Americans are far above recommended amounts. This tipping of the scales causes weight gain, toxin buildup and immune system dysfunction.

What Not to Eat

Plants and grains on grocery shelves today are typically processed into bread, cereal, pasta, desserts and snacks, abundant in added sugars, salt, detrimental fats and chemical additives. These altered foods slam the gut’s immune protection and increase the risk of chronic disease. A Czech Republic study on food additives found that gut microbes 12

Philadelphia, PA

naphilly.com

that fought inflammation were harmed by additives. According to the research, “Permanent exposure of human gut microbiota to even low levels of additives may modify the composition and function of gut microbiota, and thus influence the host’s immune system.” And of course, be wary of sugars. Anything that turns into sugar in the system—think carbs like refined bread products and pasta, not just sweets—is an immune-depressing culprit, says Heather Tynan, a naturopathic doctor at Evergreen Naturopathic, in San Diego. “The level of germ-fighting activity your immune system is able to maintain after a sugary meal decreases for a number of hours.” Saturated fats also alter immune cells, disrupting their functions and triggering inflammation. Getting away from processed food cravings can be a challenge, because the foods provide a temporary energy boost. Dorothy Calimeris, of Oakland, California, a certified health coach and author of three anti-inflammatory cookbooks, suggests that cravings mean the body needs something, but it may be rest or water. “By focusing on eating higher-quality nutrients, we can limit and eventually eliminate the cravings.”

Eat the Rainbow

Fruits and vegetables get their colors from phytochemicals, which provide the human microbiome with antioxidants, minerals and vitamins that keep the gut healthy and help the immune system combat cellular damage. National guidelines suggest Americans eat 10 servings of plants a day, ideally two each from the green, red, white, purple/blue and orange/yellow categories. But data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys show that eight out of 10 people in the U.S. don’t get enough of any color category. “A good strategy is to add one new vegetable a week to your grocery cart,” suggests Canadian nutritionist Lisa Richards, founder of TheCandidaDiet.com. “Blending fruits and vegetables into shakes or smoothies is also an effective way to eat the rainbow for those who are busy.” Whatever goes into the grocery cart should be certified organic, the only sure way to avoid ubiquitous genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in the food chain, which animal studies have linked to immune system damage. Herbs are also helpful to boost the body’s inherent ability to protect itself. Poole-Kavana points to medicinal herbs like astragalus and reishi mushroom, which support immunity and balance gut bacteria; antimicrobial herbs like garlic, thyme and oregano; and elderberry, an anti-inflammatory fruit that boosts the body’s ability to identify and eliminate viruses and bacteria. “The single greatest thing anyone can do for their health is to eat whole foods, including organic vegetables, fruits, high-quality proteins, whole grains and healthy fats,” says Calimeris. Julie Peterson writes from rural Wisconsin and can be reached at JuliePeterson2222@gmail.com.

marekuliasz/Shutterstock.com

~Heather Tynan


IMMUNE-BOOSTING RECIPES Add the cauliflower, garlic, ginger, turmeric, salt, pepper and cumin, and sauté to lightly toast the spices, 1 to 2 minutes. Add the broth and bring to a boil.

photo by Jennifer Davick

Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook until the cauliflower is tender, about 5 minutes. Using an immersion blender, purée the soup in the pot until smooth. Stir in the coconut milk and cilantro, heat through, and serve. Total cooking time is about 15 minutes.

Creamy Turmeric Cauliflower Soup Turmeric is the darling of the anti-inflammatory spices. For best absorption, it should be combined with pepper. This soup gets its creamy texture from coconut milk, but other nondairy milk can be used instead.

photo by Stephen Blancett

Yields: 4 servings 2 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil or coconut oil 1 leek, white part only, thinly sliced 3 cups cauliflower florets 1 garlic clove, peeled 1¼-inch piece fresh ginger, peeled and sliced 1½ tsp turmeric ½ tsp salt ¼ tsp freshly ground black pepper ¼ tsp ground cumin 3 cups vegetable broth 1 cup full-fat coconut milk ¼ cup finely chopped fresh cilantro In a large pot, heat the oil over high heat. Add the leek, and sauté until it just begins to brown, 3 to 4 minutes.

Excerpted from the book The Complete Anti-Inflammatory Diet for Beginners: A No-Stress Meal Plan with Easy Recipes to Heal the Immune System, by Dorothy Calimeris and Lulu Cook.

Lentil Stew Most stews take hours to cook, but this restorative dish, perfect for dinner or lunch, cooks up in a hurry. The plant-based recipe takes advantage of canned lentils and is loaded with nutritious, anti-inflammatory power foods. Yields: 4 to 6 servings 1 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil 1 onion, chopped 3 carrots, peeled and sliced 8 Brussels sprouts, halved 1 large turnip, peeled, quartered and sliced 1 garlic clove, sliced 6 cups vegetable broth 1 (15-oz) can lentils, drained and rinsed 1 cup frozen corn 1 tsp salt ¼ tsp freshly ground black pepper 1 Tbsp chopped fresh parsley

In a Dutch oven, heat the oil over high heat. Add the onion and sauté until softened, about 3 minutes. Add the carrots, Brussels sprouts, turnip and garlic, and sauté for an additional 3 minutes. Add the broth and bring to a boil. Reduce to a simmer and cook until the vegetables are tender, about 5 minutes. Add the lentils, corn, salt, pepper and parsley, and cook for an additional minute to heat the lentils and corn. Total cooking time is about 15 minutes. Serve hot. Another tip: This soup is as versatile as it is simple. Feel free to use any kinds of beans or vegetables you have—it’s a great way to use up leftover vegetables at the end of the week. Store in a covered container in the refrigerator for a week, or in the freezer for longer. Nutritional information per serving (4 portions): calories: 240; total fat: 4g; total carbohydrates: 42g; sugar: 11g; fiber: 12g; protein: 10g; sodium: 870mg Excerpted from the book The Anti-Inflammatory Diet One-Pot Cookbook: 100 Easy All-in-One Meals, by Dorothy Calimeris and Ana Reisdorf. Also visit DorothyEats.com.

Natural Awakenings recommends using organic, non-GMO (genetically modified) and non-bromated ingredients whenever possible. January 2020

13


healthy dining guide

Connecting you to leaders in natural and healthy food. To find out how you can be included in the Healthy Food Directory, email Publisher@NAPhilly.com. HEALTHY CAFÉS HOLISTIC HEALTH SUITE & CAFÉ 6802 Old York Rd, Philadelphia 215-995-5150

Our mission at Holistic Health Suite & Café is to encourage people to “Eat, Drink and Think Healthy” and to provide a safe space for that transformation to unfold. Our commitment is to honor you and your choices, and to provide guidance, education and skills to support your goals so that you can experience your optimum health and highest personal potential.

ESSENE MARKET

In the heart of historic Fabric Row 719 S 4th St, Philadelphia 215-922-1146 • EsseneMarket.com Philadelphia’s premier natural foods market, Essene specializes in organic, local, veganfriendly selections. Our café’s hot bar features readymade Korean, vegetarian and gluten-free entrees. Also, visit our fresh juice bar and our vegan bakery.

SPECIALTY COFFEE

SOY CAFÉ

630 N 2nd St, Philadelphia 19123 215-922-1003 • MySoyCafe.com Vegetarian/vegan restaurant/ coffee shop.

14

NATURAL FOODS MARKET & CAFÉ

Philadelphia, PA

naphilly.com

COFFEE HOUSE TOO

2514 E York St, Philadelphia 19125 267-324-5888 • CoffeeHouseCo.com A Fishtown location, they prove that being good to your customers, your staff and the environment is a win/win. With their daily specials, fair trade, organic coffee and eclectic environment, they are sure to provide the palate with something good.

GOOD KARMA CAFÉ

331 S 22nd St, Philadelphia 19103 TheGoodKarmaCafe.com Serving fair trade sustainable coffee blends in a relaxed setting.

OLD CITY COFFEE

221 Church St, Philadelphia 19106 215-629-9292 • OldCityCoffee.com This locally convenient café serves various roasted coffees and teas to local visitors.


Day. By making our resolutions realistic, there is a greater chance that we will keep them throughout the year, incorporating healthy behavior into our everyday life. More realistic goals may be a resolution to lose 10 pounds or quit smoking or get eight hours of sleep each night—but not all at once, starting the first of January. You can always expand our resolutions once we’ve developed some discipline.

Making New Year’s Resolutions Stick

A

by Hank Finkel

ccording to a study conducted by the University of Scranton, just 8 percent of people achieve their New Year’s goals, while around 80 percent fail to keep them, says clinical psychologist Joseph Luciani. Change is hard, especially if the change involves breaking habits and addictions. Without forethought, a poorly crafted New Year’s resolution can not only be setup for failure, but may actually lead to increased stress and anxiety. Here are some simple tips to increasing the odds of making lasting positive behavioral changes. Keep in mind that the new year isn’t meant to serve as a catalyst for sweeping character changes. What it can be is the start of a spiraling and expanding set of positive thoughts and actions that over time, become ingrained traits and habits. Start by setting small, attainable goals instead of a singular, overwhelming goal on January 1. n Keep it simple, specific and attainable. Managing expectations is key. If we have let our heath go for years, it is unrealistic to expect to get healthy in a matter of weeks. Keep goals and time frames attainable. n Take baby steps. Sure, we may want to lose upwards of 50 pounds, not smoke two packs a day or meditate an hour a day. But start small, resolve to lose the first 10 pounds, cut smoking to a pack a day or meditate for five minutes daily—and then expand from there. n Change one behavior at a time. Unhealthy behaviors develop over the course of time, so replacing them with healthy ones requires time. Don’t get overwhelmed and think that we have to reassess every aspect of our life. Instead, work toward changing one thing at a time. It is probably not realistic to expect to stop smoking, change our diet and begin working out on New Year’s

n Talk about it. We can share our experiences with family and friends or consider joining a support group, such as a workout class at the gym or a group of coworkers quitting smoking, to help reach our goals. Having someone to share our struggles and successes with and keep us accountable makes keeping our journey to a healthier lifestyle that much easier and more fun. n Don’t be too hard on ourselves. Be prepared for hiccups along the way. Perfection is unattainable. Remember that minor setbacks when striving towards our goals are completely normal. Don’t get sidetracked or discouraged and give up completely because we ate a brownie and broke our diet or skipped the gym for a week because we were busy. Everyone has ups and downs; resolve to recover from those mistakes and get back on track ASAP. n Reassess and rededicate. Each week, assess how we are doing—maybe journal about our progress or use a self-assessment tool like a one-to-10 scale of how we are doing. After a month assess our overall progress. At that point, we can expand the goals or rededicate to the initial goals. It may be that those initial goals were too ambitious and need to be reset. n Use the experience to make positive changes. Don’t allow the process to become a source of additional stress. Self-growth and development are important at any age, and we should congratulate ourself for the attempt, no matter the outcome. Dr. Hank Finkel is the owner of Advanced Chiropractic Services, located at 4245 Pechin St., in Philadelphia. For appointments, call 215 483-3661. For more information, email Info@AdvancedChiroRox. com or visit AdvancedChiroRox.com. See ad, page 21.

Make your community a little

GREENER… Support our advertisers. For every $100 spent in locally owned business, $68 returns to the community. source: the350project.net

January 2020

15


We know caloric restriction extends life. But no one wants to do it, because it’s no fun. ~Lori Taylor

In their search for secrets to longevity, investigators often look for lifestyle clues provided by long-lived populations. Those residing in what National Geographic Fellow and bestselling author Dan Buettner calls “Blue Zones”, for example, are more likely to celebrate their 100th birthday and escape chronic maladies such as heart disease and cancer—the two biggest killers in the U.S. Buettner has identified the “Power 9” lifestyle habits commonly practiced by centenarians living in the five designated Blue Zones—Sardinia, Italy; Okinawa, Japan; Ikaria, Greece; Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica; and the Seventh Day Adventist community in Loma Linda, California.

LIVING LONG & WELL Age-Defying Habits and the Fountain of Youth by Melinda Hemmelgarn

A

t age 29, Betty Holston Smith, of Rockville, Maryland, weighed more than 200 pounds, smoked cigarettes and ate processed junk food. Now, almost 79 years young, she is a vegan ultra-marathon runner and an inspiration to anyone wanting to age well. Smith’s story underscores the findings of researchers that have long pursued the keys to a long and healthy life. Some of these factors—heredity, for instance—are beyond our control. However, the most critical ingredient seems to be our daily habits. Although we’ve all likely heard or read about someone that lived into their 90s, ate bacon, drank whiskey and smoked a pack a day, these individuals are outliers: In truth, longevity is determined by a combination of genes, environment, lifestyle choices and luck. 16

Philadelphia, PA

naphilly.com

For example, some individuals may be born with genes that confer longevity, but be unlucky due to where they live. The National Center for Health Statistics reports that life expectancy varies by zip code. That’s because where we live influences how we live, predicting access to healthful food, clean air and water, safe neighborhoods and stress-relieving green spaces such as parks and gardens. Genes are important, but our social and physical environments play a greater role in predicting our “healthspan” —the essence of a long and healthy life. According to researchers at the Columbia Center for Children’s Environmental Health, in New York City, even our first environment—the womb—can spawn diseases later in life if pregnant women are exposed to air pollutants, pesticides and the toxic stress of poverty.

Regardless of genetics, the following behaviors can help anyone slow the aging process and improve quality of life: n Eat a plant-based diet. n Stop eating when 80 percent full. n Practice stress reduction techniques. n Find a sense of purpose. n Engage in physical activity throughout the day. n Consume moderate amounts of alcohol with food and friends. n Join a faith community, regardless of denomination. n Belong to a social network that engages in healthy behaviors. n Share love and time with children, parents and partners.

4 PM production/Shutterstock.com

Learning From the “Blue Zones”


Milles Studio/Shutterstock.com

Survival of the Fittest

Tom LaFontaine, Ph.D., a clinical exercise physiologist based in Columbia, Missouri, says, “Mounting evidence shows that engaging in regular aerobic and strength exercise offers robust defenses against life-threatening diseases such as heart disease and several cancers.” One important marker of long-term health, particularly among women, notes LaFontaine, is bone mineral density (BMD). After menopause, BMD decreases in women and can lead to osteopenia—low BMD—and osteoporosis—pathological loss of BMD. “Women with osteoporosis are particularly at risk for fractures, especially of the hip, which can lead to a reduced lifespan.” LaFontaine recommends weightbearing exercises such as walking, jogging and high-intensity weight training to significantly improve BMD; and he’s proven that it works. “In 2012, we started a program called Older Women on Weights (OWOW), in which 40 post-menopausal women with an average age in the low 60s train with heavy weights. Some even participate in weightlifting competitions.” “We have observed women in this group move from osteopenia to normal BMD and from osteoporosis to osteope-

nia based on pre- and post-bone density DXA scans,” he says. What’s more, the women in LaFontaine’s program have formed new friendships, benefitting from a strong network of social support.

Finding Inspiration

Smith, the septuagenarian marathoner, was inspired to make a change nearly 50 years ago when her 3-year-old daughter teased, “You can’t catch me!” during an innocent game of tag. She knew she had to make a change. She tried diet pills, fad diets and other quick fixes, but realized they were worthless. However, each evening Smith tuned in to Gabe Mirkin, a physician who hosted a na-

LEARN MORE, LIVE LONGER Blue Zones: BlueZones.com Reducing Environmental Cancer Risk, President’s Cancer Panel Report: Tinyurl.com/CancerRiskReport Life expectancy by zip code: Tinyurl.com/ZipCodeLongevity Plant-based diets explained: Tinyurl.com/PlantDietExplained Dietary Guidelines for Americans: Health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015 Hara Hachi Bu: Tinyurl.com/HaraHachiBuDiet Food Sleuth Radio segments: Lori Taylor: keto diets and intermittent fasting: Tinyurl.com/LoriTaylorInterview Dorothy Sears: intermittent fasting and circadian rhythm: Tinyurl.com/DorothySearsInterview Eve Van Cauter: importance of sleep: Tinyurl.com/EveVanCauterInterview Tips to cope with loneliness: Tinyurl.com/TheEffectsOfLoneliness Vitamin N: 500 Ways to Enrich Your Family’s Health & Happiness, by Richard Louv Improve sleep quality by reducing exposure to blue light at night: JustGetFlux.com

tional radio program about health and fitness. Following his advice, Smith began eating a diet rich in organic fruits, vegetables, whole grains, beans, nuts and seeds, and says today she doesn’t want to put anything in her body that interferes with her lifestyle. She outlines the steps to her transformation in the book, Lifestyle by Nature: One Woman’s Break from the Unhealthy Herd to Roam Forever Healthy in Nature’s Lifestyle Change Herd. The first step—finding internal strength—is the most important, she says. “Most people have something in their lives they can point to for strength.” In addition to running 60 to 100 miles each week, Smith practices tai chi, meditates and enjoys camaraderie with her running mates. She also has an upbeat attitude, believing in the importance of passion, perseverance and “taking negative experiences and making them positive.” According to a report in the Journal of the American Medical Association Network, this spirit of optimism is protective against heart disease and other causes of death.

Eating Well, but Not Too Much

Food is a major contributor to both quality of life and life extension. Global and national recommendations to eat more fiber-rich whole grains, fruits, vegetables, nuts and seeds, and omega-3 fatty acids, while decreasing added sugars and sodium, all help reduce our risk for life-shortening diseases. The plant-based Mediterranean diet consistently rises to the top for its health-fortifying benefits. However, in contrast to our Western culture’s practice of eating until belt-bust ing full, Blue Zone Okinawans practice hara hachi bu—eating until one is no longer hungry, but stopping before feeling full. “We know caloric restriction extends life,” says Lori Taylor, clinical dietitian and Core Faculty of Integrative and Functional Nutrition at Saybrook University, in Pasadena. “But no one wants to do it, because it’s no fun.” Instead, Taylor recommends intermittent fasting, eating only during a set window of 10 or 12 hours each day to reduce caloric intake.

January 2020

17


Similarly, Dorothy Sears, Ph.D., a professor of nutrition at the Arizona State University College of Health Solutions, has researched the impacts of both intermittent fasting and circadian rhythm on how our bodies handle calories. She recommends a “prolonged nightly fast” of 12 to 13 hours, as well as reducing caloric intake after 6 to 8 p.m. to help maintain a healthy weight and stave off such diseases as Type 2 diabetes and obesity-related cancers. Most significantly, she found that a 13-hour nightly fast reduced breast cancer recurrence by 36 percent among 2,300 breast cancer survivors in the Women’s Healthy Eating and Living study. Both improving diet quality and restricting calories appear to help slow the rate of aging at the genetic level, in part by preserving the length of our telomeres— the structures at the end of chromosomes that protect our DNA. The Mediterranean diet, with its abundance of protective antioxidant and anti-inflammatory nutrients such as vitamins C and E, polyphenols and omega-3 fatty acids, help prevent age-associated telomere shortening.

ductive time, but it’s a “biological requirement for life.” In fact, it is one of the three pillars of health, along with good nutrition and exercise, says Eve Van Cauter, Ph.D., former director of the Sleep, Metabolism and Health Center at the University of Chicago. “Studies in centenarians have suggested that people who live long and in good health have a regular lifestyle. They spend time in community, eat meals and go to bed at regular times, in sync with circadian rhythms.” No matter how long we live, we want to make the most of our time on Earth. Beyond diet and exercise, finding our personal passion, reducing stress and spending time in nature and with those we love can add years to our lives. Despite our virtual social networks, real human connection is vital for physical and mental health. According to a report in the journal Heart, loneliness is as dangerous as smoking for heart disease and stroke risk. So volunteer, join a club, sign up for a community garden plot, yoga or dance class, or host regular potlucks or game nights—these just might be among the best prescriptions for staying young.

The Sleep Connection

Melinda Hemmelgarn, the “Food Sleuth,” is an award-winning registered dietitian, writer and nationally syndicated radio show host based in Columbia, MO. Reach her at FoodSleuth@gmail.com.

Michael Grandner, Ph.D., director of the Sleep and Health Research Program at the University of Arizona College of Medicine, says Americans tend to see sleep as unpro-

practitioner profile

Pilates Benefits All Ages

G

ail S. Kotel, MPT, started practicing Pilates as a 13-year-old as part of rehabilitation from an ACL reconstruction and has never stopped. “It has taken me through four knee surgeries, pregnancy, birth and several car accidents,” says Kotel. “Pilates has had such a profound impact on me that I began my Pilates-based physical therapy practice, Therapeutic Pilates, 16 years ago. All of my patients, from teens through geriatrics, practice at least some of the Pilates method.” She says it is “fabulous for orthopedic/sports injuries, underdeveloped muscles, scoliosis, hyper flexibility, posture, pelvic floor issues, pre/postpartum care, joint replacement, Parkinson’s, stroke and cardiac care, to name a few.” Kotel shares, “As we age bones calcify, we become less flexible and muscles shorten. Pilates acts like an anti-aging drug by lengthening your muscles as you contract, rather than shortening them (which is the result of most gym exercises including weight training). By practicing the Pilates method, formerly called The Art of Contrology, muscles around the vertebrae help to separate and create length (people even get taller!).” She explains, “Practicing regularly develops a strong core, which further supports the spine and extremities. A stable, strong core allows the arms and legs to move freely and helps to prevent back and other injuries. One of the seven principles of Pilates is coordination, which helps to support memory and balance as we age.” Therapeutic Pilates is located at 1536 Catharine St. For appointments and more information, call 215-834-9799, email gailartpt@aol. com or visit TherapeuticPilatesPT.com.

18

Philadelphia, PA

naphilly.com


Aggressive workouts definitely perpetuate stress, and aren’t always necessary for weight loss.

fit body

oscarhdez/Shutterstock.com

~Stephanie Mansour

Cortisol-Conscious Workouts

When Workouts Don’t Work

Why Less Is Sometimes More

E

by Marlaina Donato

xercise is a proven component in losing weight and preventing cardiovascular disease and diabetes, but not all exercise regimens yield the same results for everyone, especially when daily stress is a factor. While workouts are often intended to reduce the body’s physiological response to mental and emotional stress, exercise itself can serve as a physical stressor that exacerbates the problem. This delicate balance revolves around the stress hormone cortisol. While cortisol is needed to kickstart metabolism and burn fat, too much of it can increase the body’s fat stores. Stephanie Mansour, host of Step It Up With Steph, a weekly TV fitness program in Chicago, sees this correlation in her private practice for women. “Aggressive workouts definitely perpetuate stress, and aren’t always necessary for weight loss. If one of my clients is stressed-out, sleep-deprived, overworked and doing intense workouts but not seeing weight-loss results, that’s a signal that cortisol is potentially too high and needs to be addressed.” Fat-burning, high-intensity interval training (HIIT)—bursts of exercise with minimal periods of rest in between—raises levels of cortisol. These tend to decrease after a workout, but can remain on overdrive if HIIT is not balanced with lowintensity movement. Add jam-packed schedules to the mix, and the side effects of chronically elevated cortisol result not only in longer recovery time, but insomnia, fatigue, low immunity and failure to lose weight, especially around the midsection—a phenomenon that has earned cortisol the nickname “the belly fat hormone”. Balancing HIIT with yoga, Pilates, elliptical training, swimming or walking can help to reset the nervous system and bring the rest of the body back up to speed.

Mansour works with a naturopath that analyzes her clients’ cortisol and other hormone levels. “One of the first things we focus on is helping the body move into the parasympathetic nervous system and out of the fight-or-flight stress response. One way we do this is by shifting into more relaxed workouts—gentle yoga, beginners’ Pilates class, light cardio or light strength training.” Fitness expert Beth Shaw chose a zealous approach in her own exercise regimen until high cortisol levels unraveled her health. The founder of YogaFit, a yoga teacher training program headquartered in Toronto, she emphasizes moderation. “The key is to not overtrain and to do just enough to adequately stimulate the system.” She recommends 30-to 45-minute cardio sessions and no longer than 45 minutes for weights. “Endorphin release from these two types of exercises should offset any release in cortisol.” When we exercise may be as important to achieving weight loss and enhancing overall energy as the type of workout we choose, a factor based on circadian rhythm—the body’s biological clock. There are some schools of thought that cortisol is higher in the morning, and therefore this is the best time to exercise, says Mansour, while others believe we should target the mid-afternoon slump. “I advise my clients to pick a time that simply feels good to them.”

Mixing It Up

Hopping on a bike, going for a brisk walk or catching the waves on a surfboard can provide a great low-intensity, steady-state (LISS) cardiovascular workout, which aims for a low level of exertion for a long, continuous period. Repetitive motion for 30 to 45 minutes not only helps to balance cortisol levels, but according to a 2014 Australian study published in the Journal of Obesity, it evens out fat distribution in overweight individuals. LISS also nudges the body to use fat as fuel, rather than taking valuable glycogen from the muscles. Yoga and Pilates classes, though distinctly different, offer valuable benefits. “If cortisol backlash is an issue, you definitely want to work with someone who knows the anatomy and physiology of breathing,” says Tori Brown, owner of The Pilates Room & Antigravity Studio, in Ithaca, New York. “By learning proper breathing techniques, practitioners are able to downregulate the nervous system into a more parasympathetic state, which leads to better focus, lower heart rate, better digestion, more optimal cortisol levels and improved sleep patterns. All of this leads to more focused workouts that build muscle while creating less stress on the nervous system.” Mansour suggests simple walking for stress-busting alternative cardio. “Brisk walking three times a week for 20 to 30 minutes is great to help reduce stress.” Marlaina Donato is an author and composer. Connect at AutumnEmbersMusic.com. January 2020

19


We emphasize the well-being of people, which is directly related to the health of the

healthy kids

~Robert Sendrey

RAISING ENVIRONMENTALISTS Teachers Prep Kids for the Future by Yvette C. Hammett

E

ducators have switched from preaching to kids about environmental degradation to using hands-on lessons to get K-12 students not only interested in the world’s environmental priorities, but also actively participating in solutions, maybe even seeking out related careers. “You hope students can translate passion into intellectual curiosity on these subjects and develop the expertise so they can go beyond being an activist to being an advocate,” says Kenneth Walz, Ph.D., who works on the Wisconsin K-12 Energy Education Program at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point. Walz, who teaches chemistry, engineering and renewable energy at Madison Area Technical

20

Philadelphia, PA

naphilly.com

College, also serves as its director of the Center for Renewable Energy Advanced Technological Education. While K-12 environmental education still has no specific niche in curriculum, according to a case study of The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine, numerous groups and educators are working to ensure the next generation is prepared for the environmental challenges it will certainly face. Today’s educators believe hands-on learning will prepare Generation Z and those that follow to look for solutions and even seek active roles to implement them. Aaron Baker, a Sussex, New Jersey, advanced placement environmental

science instructor and a two-time winner of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 2 Presidential Innovation Award, says the key to getting through to the next generation is showing them a problem that’s close to home that they can touch and feel, and then relating it to a global issue. “A major part of my philosophy for environmental education is to try to engage students in environmental issues in our own community,” Baker says. “We collaborate with the Wallkill River Watershed Management Group to restore riparian areas and increase biological diversity.” The high school students have planted more than 750 trees in the last three years along the creek that runs right below their school. “This type of hands-on work not only has a direct relationship to their lives here in Sussex County, but is also relevant to similar issues on a global scale.” The 30-year-old National Environmental Education Foundation (NEEF) no longer sends speakers to schools. Instead, it encourages teachers to get the students outside working with partners like the National Park Service or the U.S. Forest Service to learn about real world problems near their homes, says Robert Sendrey, program director of environmental education. Motivation and inspiration are key, he says. “We were created to help make the environment more accessible, relatable, relevant and more connected to

photos by Aaron Baker

environment.


DIGESTIVE CHALLENGES? the average American’s life.” Rather than focusing on the negative aspects of climate change and the challenges ahead, NEEF promotes a healthy lifestyle and emphasizes the need for clean air and water. “We emphasize the well-being of people, which is directly related to the health of the environment,” Sendrey says. Success starts with a change in attitude and awareness, and ultimately needs to culminate with action, he says. For example, NEEF teamed up with zoos and aquariums for the Skip the Straw campaign, educating the public about the environmental harm caused by single-use plastics. The University of Wisconsin K-12 education program focuses on environmental impacts of the energy sector—especially on air and water quality. “If you are burning coal to produce electricity, it creates all kinds of atmospheric pollution—acid rain and soot that causes respiratory illness,” says Walz. “If we weren’t burning fossil fuels, urban smog wouldn’t even be a thing.” The energy curriculum for students includes content on biofuels and electric transportation. “For them, it is more thinking about the types of transportation they use, whether they are driving, riding a bike or taking a bus.” They don’t get to choose what kind of fuel the bus runs on, but they can be educated to be good future consumers, he notes. “I think they appreciate the issue,” Walz says of the students. “Middle schoolers bring the passion. That sort of raw, emotional angst is something we left behind in our teenage years. Adults have been way too complacent for way too long.” Yvette C. Hammett is an environmental writer based in Valrico, Florida. She can be contacted at YvetteHammett28@hotmail.com.

Leaky Gut IBS Gas Bloating Constipation Diarrhea

Contact Us Today About Getting Tested!

Advanced Chiropractic Office: 215-483-3661 Cell: 610-733-3934 4245 Pechin Street, Philadelphia www.AdvancedChirorox.com

mission statement To empower individuals to live a healthier lifestyle on a healthier planet. To educate communities on the latest in natural health and sustainability. To connect readers with local wellness resources and events, inspiring them to lead more balanced lives.

January 2020

21


Signs to Watch For

Issues that could point to CDS include: n Confusion or disorientation: standing in a corner, difficulty walking through doorways, walking in circles or trouble following familiar routes

WHEN OLDER PETS GET QUIRKY Dealing With Cognitive Dysfunction Syndrome

A

by Julie Peterson

s dogs and cats get older, they may slow down or have other physical issues. Some experience cognitive decline which resembles Alzheimer’s disease in humans. It presents differently in every pet and can include numerous symptoms that begin gradually, sometimes just seeming like quirky behavior instead of a disease. Cognitive dysfunction syndrome (CDS) can affect dogs or cats, and there is currently no known cause or prevention. Progress has been made on Alzheimer’s research in humans, with neurologists

discovering that plaque buildup in the brain does not cause the disease: That is the immune system’s response to the disease. Necropsies on dogs with CDS have shown similar plaque buildup in the brain. “Unfortunately, little research has been done regarding this condition, so we can only hope to use human studies to gather information that will help our affected pets,” says Dennis W. Thomas, DVM, a holistic veterinarian in Spokane, Washington, and author of Whole-Pet Healing: A Heart-to-Heart Guide to Connecting with and Caring for Your Animal Companion.

Coming Next Month FEBRUARY

Cardiovascular Health plus: Regenerative Medicine

22

Philadelphia, PA

naphilly.com

n Decreased activity: sleeping excessively, seeming withdrawn, lack of grooming, loss of interest in toys, people or food n Restlessness, anxiety or compulsiveness: waking often at night, whining or yowling, new fears, pacing or constantly licking n Attention seeking: wanting to be near humans and showing high distress when left alone n Incontinence: soiling the house after previously being house-trained n Irritability or aggression: growling/ hissing or biting without cause These troubles could also be indicative of a treatable condition, such as a urinary tract infection or an injury, so it’s essential to have the pet examined.

Caring for the Patient While CDS will continue to alter brain and nerve function, there is some hope for pet lovers faced with the diagnosis in the early stages. Thomas recommends a natural approach that includes diet modification, filtered water, vitamin and herbal supplements, and eliminating stress. Diffusing calming essential oils can be helpful for dogs (and humans), but is not recommended for cats. Kathryn Sarpong, DVM, a veterinarian at Metro Paws Animal Hospital, in Dallas, also recommends dietary changes to her patients. “Recent studies have shown that medium-chain triglycerides may be helpful, and they are in some senior pet foods. Supplementation of melatonin may help with sleep-wake cycles.” Anxiety often becomes part of the animal’s new normal, but pet parents can help cats and dogs with this by keeping them as active as possible, introducing new toys and interacting. “Keep your dog’s mind active by

Anna Hoychuk/Shutterstock.com

With no test available for CDS, pets are diagnosed by excluding medical and behavioral problems that can resemble having the ailment.

natural pet


Keep your dog’s mind active by providing games and opportunities for play. Daily walks provide not only exercise, but also mental stimulation.

inspiration

CREATISTA/Shutterstock.com

~Lisa Lunghofer providing games and opportunities for play. Daily walks provide not only exercise, but also mental stimulation,” says Lisa Lunghofer, Ph.D., executive director of The Grey Muzzle Organization, in Washington, D.C. Pets with anxiety or pain may benefit from cannabidiol (CBD) products. Clarissa Valdes, a homemaker in Homestead, Florida, has a 15-year-old cat with CDS. Minini would wander around in the house, looking lost. Then, the all-night howling sessions began. “We started to worry that she was in pain,” says Valdes. However, a veterinarian diagnosed CDS. “The vet suggested medication, but I wanted to go in a natural direction,” says Valdes, who started Minini on CBD oil. The cat finally slept through the night. A month in, Minini is doing better overall. With time, CDS patients may lose hearing or sight in addition to experiencing a progression of symptoms. “Make sure your home is predictable and safe,” says Lunghofer. Use gates to close off stairs or move furniture or other items that could be hazardous.

Prevention on the Horizon

Because inflammation caused by an inappropriate diet is the underlying problem of most chronic diseases in pets, Thomas believes that prevention for CDS is possible. “Feeding a non-inflammatory, speciesspecific, balanced diet that is fresh and not heat-processed is critical,” he says. In addition, he advises his patients get probiotics, digestive enzymes, omega3s and antioxidant nutrients. Vaccinations, when necessary, should not contain heavy metal preservatives. “The goal is to keep the gut and immune systems healthy, avoid toxins that affect the nervous system and minimize environmental stress.” Julie Peterson writes from her home in rural Wisconsin. Contact her at JuliePeterson2222@gmail.com.

TIDYING UP THAT BUCKET LIST Deciding What We Really Want

M

by Carl Greer

any people have a bucket list of things they want to make sure they experience in this life. Tidying up that bucket list when it no longer reflects a person’s values and deepest desires makes sense. When reviewing our bucket list, we might feel inadequate or embarrassed because we haven’t accomplished what we thought we would. It’s okay if a goal is no longer as exciting as it once was. Guilt, frustration or embarrassment about what’s been lingering on a bucket list for years might be signs that it’s time to dream different dreams. What’s on a bucket list might have been based on a need to prove ourselves to others. If we no longer feel the need to impress people or win their approval, we can move on to new goals. Maybe our family has always talked about traveling to the land of our ancestors as an important thing to do someday, but we don’t feel the same way. We might prefer to travel someplace where we can swim with dolphins or meet people from a completely different culture than our own. Releasing the weight of having a bucket list heavy with other people’s expectations can help us feel much lighter. Maybe those bucket list items still spark some excitement, but it’s time to

change the form of the experience. A goal to write a novel might turn into a goal to write our life story and turn it into a book. A goal to marry again might become a promise to ourselves to enjoy life with a new romantic partner, regardless of whether that leads to marriage someday. As we go down our bucket list reviewing each item, we can acknowledge which goals still inspire us and which make us feel dispirited. Tidying up a bucket list written in the past can be a good exercise in becoming more conscious of what we want to experience and why—and what dreams we are ready to release—because we have new aspirations now. If we’re spending our time doing what gives us a sense of vitality, happiness and well-being and there is something we haven’t done that generates a feeling of joy and anticipation, it should go at the top of our bucket list—and we should find a way today to start making it happen. Carl Greer, Ph.D., Psy.D., is a practicing clinical psychologist, Jungian analyst and shamanic practitioner. He teaches at the C.G. Jung Institute of Chicago and is on staff at the Replogle Center for Counseling and Well-Being, in Chicago. Learn more at CarlGreer.com. January 2020

23


Copper in new device stops cold and flu

had colds going round and round, but not me.” Some users say it also helps with sinuses. Attorney Donna Blight had a 2-day sinus headache. When her CopperZap arrived, she tried it. “I am shocked!” she said. “My head cleared, by Doug Cornell no more headache, no more congestion.” Some users say copper stops nighttime stuffiness if used just before cientists recently discovered bed. One man said, “Best sleep I’ve had time. He hasn’t had a single cold for 7 a way to kill viruses and in years.” years since. bacteria. Copper can also stop flu if used early He asked relatives and friends to try Now thousands of people are using it it. They said it worked for them, too, so and for several days. Lab technicians to stop colds and flu. placed 25 million live flu viruses on a he patented CopperZap™ and put it on Colds start CopperZap. No viruses were found alive the market. when cold viruses soon after. Soon hundreds get in your nose. Dr. Bill Keevil led one of the teams of people had Viruses multiply confirming the discovery. He placed tried it and given fast. If you don’t millions of disease germs on copper. feedback. Nearly stop them early, “They started to die literally as soon as 100% said the they spread and they touched the surface,” he said. copper stops colds cause misery. People have even used copper on if used within 3 In hundreds cold sores and say it can completely hours after the first of studies, EPA prevent outbreaks. sign. Even up to New research: Copper stops colds if used early. and university The handle is 2 days, if they researchers have confirmed that viruses curved and finely still get the cold it is milder than usual and bacteria die almost instantly when textured to improve and they feel better. touched by copper. contact. It kills germs Users wrote things like, “It stopped That’s why ancient Greeks and picked up on fingers my cold right away,” and “Is it Egyptians used copper to purify water and hands to protect supposed to work that fast?” and heal wounds. They didn’t know you and your family. “What a wonderful thing,” wrote about microbes, but now we do. Copper even kills Physician’s Assistant Julie. “No more Dr. Bill Keevil: Copper quickly kills deadly germs that Scientists say the high conductance colds for me!” cold viruses. of copper disrupts the electrical balance have become resistant Pat McAllister, 70, received one in a microbe cell and destroys the cell in for Christmas and called it “one of the to antibiotics. If you are near sick seconds. best presents ever. This little jewel really people, a moment of handling it may Tests by the EPA (Environmental keep serious infection away. It may even works.” Protection Agency) show germs die save a life. Now thousands of users have simply fast on copper. So some hospitals tried The EPA says copper still works stopped getting colds. copper for touch surfaces like faucets even when tarnished. It kills hundreds of People often use CopperZap and doorknobs. This cut the spread of preventively. Frequent flier Karen Gauci different disease germs so it can prevent MRSA and other illnesses by over half, serious or even fatal illness. used to get colds after crowded flights. and saved lives. CopperZap is made in America of Though skeptical, she tried it several The strong scientific evidence gave pure copper. It has a 90-day full money times a day on travel days for 2 months. inventor Doug Cornell an idea. When back guarantee. It is $69.95. “Sixteen flights and not a sniffle!” she he felt a cold about to start he fashioned Get $10 off each CopperZap with exclaimed. a smooth copper probe and rubbed it Businesswoman Rosaleen says when code NATA16. Go to www.CopperZap.com or call gently in his nose for 60 seconds. people are sick around her she uses “It worked!” he exclaimed. “The cold CopperZap morning and night. “It saved toll-free 1-888-411-6114. Buy once, use forever. never got going.” It worked again every me last holidays,” she said. “The kids ADVERTORIAL

S

24

Philadelphia, PA

naphilly.com


calendar of events

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8

NOTE: All calendar events must be received by the 10th of the month and adhere to our guidelines. Review guidelines for submissions at NAPhilly.com or email Publisher@NAPhilly.com for more information.

SATURDAY, JANUARY 4

Sierra Club Southeastern Pennsylvania Group (SPG) Meeting – 6:15pm. Focused on environmental issues facing the greater Philadelphia area, members and nonmembers are welcome to join SPG Executive Committee meetings in-person or by phone. City CoHo, 2401 Walnut St, Philadelphia. 866-501-6174 (code: 100 4 100#)

Schuylkill Saturday: Nature Exploration for Families – 10:30-11:30am. Discover the beauty and wonder of nature in this free weekly program where we explore and learn about our forests and the creatures that call it home. Gather in the visitor center before hitting the trails for guided exploration. Each week explores a different theme. All ages. Schuylkill Center, 8480 Hagy’s Mill Rd, Philadelphia. 215-482-7300. Register: SchuylkillCenter.org.

SUNDAY, JANUARY 5 Inner Somatics Sourced Solutions – Exercise, healthy, nutritious diet and supplements won’t be enough support to maintain well-being in the EMF environment in which we all live, fully exposed, indoors and out. Are you aware of heightened levels of sensitivities and feeling energy drained? Is it more difficult to reset your natural energy levels? We recommend taking the time for your self-care to include finding out how you become empowered to navigate these new health challenges we face. 261 W Walnut Ln, Philadelphia. 267-401-0477. LivingLessonsLibrary@gmail.com. Sourced.Life/ Solutions/Practitioners. Bagels and Dharma: Forget the Resolutions – Focus on Aspirations – 9-10:30am (optional meditation), 10:30-11:30am (talk), 11:30-noon (refreshments). With Jude Robison. At this Bagels and Dharma, attendees will each pick one or two aspirations and contemplate, with embodied presence, how we might invite them into our lives in small (or big) ways. $5 donation. Shambhala Meditation Center of Philadelphia, 2030 Sansom St. Info: EllenBragarKnapp@gmail.com. Philadelphia. Shambhala.org. Greenhouse Yoga – 9:30-11am. Join for Bring Your Own Mat yoga classes led by local teachers. Escape the winter blues with an all-levels vinyasa style yoga class surrounded by tropical plants inside a greenhouse. Classes are led by Lauren Daddis

Reiki Share – 6-8pm. With Victoria Powell. A reiki share is a great way to get some healing in a shared space. No experience needed; all lineages and levels welcome. $5-$10 donation. Learn Reiki Philadelphia, 251 N 2nd St. LearnReikiPhiladelphia.com.

and will feature singing bowls with guest Johnny Baba. Fairmount Park Horticulture Center, 100 N Horticulture Dr, Philadelphia. MyPhillyPark.org. Contemplative Dance Practice – 3-5:30pm. This personal and group awareness of body/mind includes sitting meditation with self-directed body movement in space. Dress comfortably. $5-$10 donation. Shambhala Meditation Center of Philadelphia, 2030 Sansom St. 215-568-6070. RSVP: SilverSpaceDance@gmail.com. Philadelphia. Shambhala.org. Teen Group Meeting – 7-8:30pm. Helping teenagers 13-18 find personal empowerment through spiritual awakening. Along the way deep connections are made and a lot of fun is had. Greater Philadelphia Center for Spiritual Living, Paoli Corporate Center, 16 Industrial Blvd, Ste 112. 610-695-0375. cslPhilly.com.

TUESDAY, JANUARY 7 Reiki Share – 6:30-8:30pm. With Danielle Stimpson. A reiki share is a great way to get some healing in a shared space. No experience needed; all lineages and levels welcome. $5-$10 donation. Learn Reiki Philadelphia, 251 N 2nd St. LearnReikiPhiladelphia.com.

The People of Color Group – 6:30-8pm. A meditation, reading and discussion group for folks who identify as people of color who would like to contemplate and have facilitated discussion from that perspective. $5/donation. Shambhala Meditation Center of Philadelphia, 2030 Sansom St. 215-5686070. Info: PeopleOfColorGroup@gmail.com. Register: Philadelphia.Shambhala.org.

SATURDAY, JANUARY 11 Schuylkill Saturday: Nature Exploration for Families – 10:30-11:30am. Discover the beauty and wonder of nature in this free weekly program to explore and learn about our forests and the creatures that call it home. Gather in the visitor center before hitting the trails for guided exploration. Each week explores a different theme. All ages. Schuylkill Center, 8480 Hagy’s Mill Rd, Philadelphia. 215482-7300. Register: SchuylkillCenter.org. Restoration Volunteer Workday – 10am-noon. Help improve the health and biodiversity of the forest while getting to know the property, connect with nature, and make new friends. On workdays, volunteers will remove invasive plants and help to improve the trails. Recommended attendees wear long pants, sturdy boots, and a sense of fellowship. Gloves, tools, instruction, and snacks provided. Bring your own water bottle. Free. Schuylkill Center, 8480 Hagy’s Mill Rd, Philadelphia. 215482-7300. Register: SchuylkillCenter.org. “Know Thyself” Class – 11am-5pm. Socrates Start the New Year with a Commitment to Yourself! Oftentimes challenges to our intentions come not only

change can do you good

Join the Natural Awakenings Franchise Family

For more info visit: NaturalAwakenings.com January 2020

25


from within, but from the current human and planetary energetic influences. Relinquish and release patterns held in your cells and atoms. Restore and revitalize to move easily and fluidly into the new. Renew and realign your soul purpose to coincide personal unfoldment with planetary evolution. Cherry Hill. Register: Andrea Regal: 856-904-5566. HealersUniverse.com. Giants of the Forest – 1-3:30pm. During this guided hike, see some of the biggest trees in our forest. Learn how to identify these trees based on their winter characteristics, such as shape and bark pattern. Walk past old fields and ruins of 19th century homesteads, hear about the history of the land and how human use has influenced our forest. Wear warm boots or snowshoes in snow. Schuylkill Center, 8480 Hagy’s Mill Rd, Philadelphia. 215482-7300. Register: SchuylkillCenter.org.

SUNDAY, JANUARY 12 The Earth as You! You are the Earth! – Also Feb, 19, Mar 18, Apr 15. Are you concerned about what is happening to our home/planet? Learn how to connect, communicate, cooperate, collaborate and commune with earth structures (which are also in you) to regenerate her/your body; her/your life force! Co-creating her/your future through opening and amplifying your intuitive, psychic abilities. Info/register: 856-904-5566. HealersUniverse.com. Greenhouse Yoga – 9:30-11am. Join for Bring Your Own Mat yoga classes led by local teachers. Escape the winter blues with an all-levels vinyasa style yoga class surrounded by tropical plants inside a greenhouse Classes are led by Lauren Daddis and will feature singing bowls with guest Johnny Baba. Fairmount Park Horticulture Center, 100 N Horticulture Dr, Philadelphia. MyPhillyPark.org. Spirituality and Diversity in Community – 12:302:30pm. Free. Sourced Solutions, Germantown – Mt Airy, 5740 Wissahickon Ave, Philadelphia. 267401-0477. Sourced.Life/Solutions/Practitioners.

SATURDAY, JANUARY 18 Schuylkill Saturday: Nature Exploration for Families – 10:30-11:30am. Discover the beauty and wonder of nature in this free weekly program where we explore and learn about our forests and the creatures that call it home. Gather in the visitor center before hitting the trails for guided exploration. Each week explores a different theme. All ages. Schuylkill Center, 8480 Hagy’s Mill Rd, Philadelphia. 215-482-7300. Register: SchuylkillCenter.org. Your Story or Your Life – 12:30-2pm. Is your mother clueless about how she hurts you? Heal Your

“Me Too, Mom” relationship with a controlling, competitive or jealous mother. This Inner Somatics Holistic Education Program is a life-changer! 261 W Walnut Ln, Philadelphia. Anaiis Salles: 267-4010477. LivingLessonsLibrary@gmail.com. Sourced. Life/Solutions/Practitioners. Manifesting A Beloved Community: In Honor of Dr. Martin Luther King – 1-4pm. In this workshop, explore the questions: What is the relationship between our Buddhist practice and social engagement? How does each influence the other, or interweave with the other? $10 donation. Shambhala Meditation Center of Philadelphia, 2030 Sansom St. Info@PhilaShambhala. org. Register: Philadelphia.Shambhala.org.

SUNDAY, JANUARY 19 Teen Group Meeting – 7-8:30pm. Helping teenagers 13-18 find personal empowerment through spiritual awakening. Along the way deep connections are made and a lot of fun is had. Greater Philadelphia Center for Spiritual Living, Paoli Corporate Center, 16 Industrial Blvd, Ste 112. 610-695-0375. cslPhilly.com.

MONDAY, JANUARY 20 Martin Luther King Day of Service (2020) – 9:30am-12:30pm. Join for this annual day of service in honor of Martin Luther King, Jr. Volunteers will work with staff on seasonal tasks like weeding, cleaning, pruning, and light maintenance. No special experience or skills required. Dress for working outdoors, and if you have them, bring work gloves and a water bottle. Join for a small youth-led remembrance starting at 9:30am at the Sankofa Community Farm (down the trail on the left), no latecomers. Bartram’s Garden, 5400 Lindbergh Blvd. Philadelphia. 215-729-5281. BartramsGarden.org.

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22 The People of Color Group – 6:30-8pm. A meditation, reading and discussion group for folks who identify as people of color who would like to contemplate and have facilitated discussion from that perspective. $5/donation. Shambhala Meditation Center of Philadelphia, 2030 Sansom St. 215-5686070. Info: PeopleOfColorGroup@gmail.com. Register: Philadelphia.Shambhala.org.

SATURDAY, JANUARY 25 Full-Day Silent Meditation – 10am-4pm. Tibetan Buddhist Center, 954 N Marshall St, Philadelphia. TibetanBuddhist.org. Schuylkill Saturday: Nature Exploration for Families – 10:30-11:30am. Discover the beauty and wonder of nature in this free weekly program

where we explore and learn about our forests and the creatures that call it home. Gather in the visitor center before hitting the trails for guided exploration. Each week explores a different theme. All ages. Schuylkill Center, 8480 Hagy’s Mill Rd, Philadelphia. 215-482-7300. Register: SchuylkillCenter.org.

SUNDAY, JANUARY 26 Bagels and Dharma – 9-10:30am (optional meditation), 10:30-11:30am (talk), 11:30-noon (refreshments). With Jude Robison. This program reflects Shambhala’s vision of an enlightened community. It combines meditation practice with a dharma talk, food, and conversation. $5 donation. Shambhala Meditation Center of Philadelphia, 2030 Sansom St. Info: EllenBragarKnapp@gmail.com. Philadelphia. Shambhala.org. Cloth Diaper Workshop – 5-7pm. This cloth diaper class is intended to demystify and simplify cloth diapering for parents interested in investigating them as an option for their child. Participants will discuss why it can be an environmentally-sound and cost-effective option for families. The workshop will include information about how to get started with cloth diapering, the range of products that are available, and how to choose and care for these products. Free. The Nesting House, 4501 Baltimore Ave, Philadelphia. TheNestingHouse.net.

TUESDAY, JANUARY 28 Inclusivity Group – 7:30-9pm. Explore and discuss readings on mindful, inclusive communication and practice. We consider themes of inclusivity, diversity and intersectionality in the context of the Shambhala tradition. $5 donation. Shambhala Meditation Center of Philadelphia, Windhorse Rm, 2030 Sansom St. 215-568-6070. Register: Philadelphia.Shambhala.org.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 30 New Parent’s Support Group – 12:30-1:30pm. All are welcome. $5/donation/family. Lilypad in South Philly, 1234 S Broad St. BlossomingBelliesBirth.com. 20 Years of Environmental Art at the Schuylkill Center: Opening Reception – 7-9pm. Founded in 2000 as an opportunity for artists and audiences to explore and interpret the natural world and current ecological issues, theirr environmental art program has brought hundreds of artists to the Schuylkill Center to present contemporary art work in the gallery and on their trails. The opening reception will include refreshments and remarks from the artists and curator. 8480 Hagy’s Mill Rd, Philadelphia. 215-482-7300. Register: SchuylkillCenter.org.

MEET YOUR TRY FOR FREE!

‘TIS THE SEASON! Join now at NaturalAwakeningsSingles.com

26

Philadelphia, PA

naphilly.com


ongoing events NOTE: All calendar events must be received by the 10th of the month and adhere to our guidelines. Review guidelines for submissions at NAPhilly.com or email Publisher@NAPhilly.com for more information.

daily Al-Anon Family Groups – Support for families and friends troubled by someone else’s drinking. Greater Philadelphia. Schedule: aisdv.org. Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) Meetings – A 12-step program for those who need help with a drinking problem. Greater Philadelphia. Schedule: aasepia.org. Escape Rooms – Days/times vary. Transport into one of two fantastical worlds where a series of clues, codes, puzzles, and tasks lead teams to achieve an ultimate goal. The Franklin Institute, 271 N 21st St, Philadelphia. 215-448-1200 or GuestServices@ fi.edu. Parks on Tap – Wed-Sun. Follow this traveling community beer garden to different locations in Philly’s parks each week throughout the spring and summer. A portion of the proceeds goes back to the parks. Location rotates each week. Schedule: MyPhillyPark.org. Morning Prayer and Meditation – 6-7am. This service, conducted in Korean and English, includes prayer, chanting and sitting meditation. Free. Won Buddhism, 23 Abington Ave, Glenside. 215-8848443. Philadelphia@WonBuddhism.org. Essene Market and Café – 8am-9pm, Mon-Fri; 8am-8pm, Sat-Sun. Large selection of organically grown produce, natural foods deli, on-site bakery. Located in the heart of historic Fabric Row, 719 S Fourth St, Philadelphia. 215-922-1146. EsseneMarket.com.

sunday Reiki Level I for Beginners – This foundation course is the most important of all levels of training. Seasoned bodyworkers will benefit, as much as beginners with no background in spiritual development or holistic health. The Reiki School and Clinic, 727 S 4th St, 2nd Flr, Philadelphia. Info: 215-238-0659. Open Public Meditation – 9am. Meditation is the way that we can make a direct and simple relationship with our experience. Free. The Philadelphia Shambhala Center, Main Shrine Rm, 2030 Sansom St. 215-568-6070. Philadelphia.Shambhala.org. Sunday Morning Sangha – 9:30-11:30am. Practice includes mantra meditation, shamatha (calm abiding) meditation; Vajrayana guided meditations and visualizations, and traditional Buddhist prayers followed by dharma teaching. $10-$15/donation. 954 N Marshall St, Philadelphia. TibetanBuddhist.org. Guided Meditation and Sunday Celebration – 10-11:45am. Weekly meditation followed by a celebration in word, song and spirit. Greater Philadelphia Center for Spiritual Living, Paoli Corporate Center, 16 Industrial Blvd, Ste 112. 610-695-0375. cslPhilly.com. Silent Meditation and Sunday Celebration – 10:10-11:45am. Inspiring words, personal spiritual

practice and fellowship. New Thought Philadelphia, CA House, 118 S 37th St (UPenn campus). NewThoughtPhilly.org. Food Addicts Anonymous – 11am. A 12-step program for food addiction. Roxborough Memorial Hospital, 5800 Ridge Ave, Rm A (next to cafeteria), Philadelphia. 215-514-6692. Quaker Meeting for Worship – 11am. Participate in this unique, un-programmed service to worship by gathering and silently waiting for Spirit to guide us. Friends Center, 1501 Cherry St, Philadelphia. 215-241-7000. FriendsCenterCorp.org. Sunday Service – 11am. Embracing All Souls and Restoring Wholeness. The Unitarian Universalist Church of the Restoration, 6900 Stanton Ave, Philadelphia. 215-247-2561. uuRestoration.us. Korean Dharma Service – 11am-1pm. This dharma service, conducted in Korean, includes prayer, chanting, dharma talk and hymn singing. Lunch will be served after the service. $5-$10 donation. Won Buddhism, 23 Abington Ave, Glenside. 215-8848443. Philadelphia@WonBuddhism.org. Slow Flow with Friends –1-2:30pm. Biweekly alllevel vinyasa yoga class followed by meet and greet. $15. 1509 N Front St, Philadelphia. 267-273-0086. TheCommonRoomPhilly.com. Yoga in the Greenhouse – 1-2:30pm. 1st, 2nd & 4th Sun. Join for Bring Your Own Mat yoga classes led by local teachers at the beautiful Fairmount Park Horticulture Center. This class is not suitable for first time yogis. 100 N Horticulture Dr, Philadelphia. MyPhillyPark.org. Contemplative Dance Practice – 3-5:30pm. 1st Sun. This personal and group awareness of body/ mind includes sitting meditation with self-directed body movement in space. Dress comfortably. $5$10 donation. Shambhala Meditation Center of Philadelphia, 2030 Sansom St. 215-568-6070. RSVP: SilverSpaceDance@gmail.com. Philadelphia. Shambhala.org. Teen Group Meeting – 7-8:30pm.1st & 3rd Sun. Helping teenagers 13-18 find personal empowerment through spiritual awakening. Along the way deep connections are made and a lot of fun is had. Greater Philadelphia Center for Spiritual Living, Paoli Corporate Center, 16 Industrial Blvd, Ste 112. 610-695-0375. cslPhilly.com.

For roughly

$3 PER DAY

you can start marketing your business! Reach 35,000 TARGETED* Philadelphia readers per month with our Resource Guide.

*TARGETED:

100% of the people seeing your message are interested in he alth and wellness. CATEGORY NAME YOUR BUSINESS NAME Contact Name Address, City Phone • Website URL

Description: 40 words. Extra words and info lines available. The Resource Guide listings are a reference tool allowing our readers to find you when they need you. Special pricing for display advertisers. Page number of your display ad here (if applicable).

FOR NO ADDITIONAL CHARGE, YOU WILL RECEIVE: One News Brief every six months

(your opportunity to announce an event or a news item about your business – approx. 200 words)

Up to two Calendar Events every month Easy online submission forms for newsbriefs and calendars!

monday

Contact Us Today!

Fit Possibilities – 9-9:45am. Functional fitness group exercise class for men and women 55 and over to improve strength, balance, agility, promote weight loss and improve brain function. Grace Episcopal Epiphany Church, 224 E Gowen Ave, Philadelphia. Info: 267-779-7948 or LetsGo@ TransformUrLifeToday.com. TransformUrLifeToday.com.

Kimberly Murray, Publisher 215-902-9137 Publisher@NAphilly.com

Stretch 4 Life – 10-11am. Soulful flexibility group fitness classes for men and women 55 and over to improve leisure lifestyle and lengthen the lifespan. Bring a mat. Grace Episcopal Epiphany Church,

January 2020

27


224 E Gowen Ave, Philadelphia. Info: 267-7797948 or LetsGo@TransformUrLifeToday.com. TransformUrLifeToday.com.

weight loss and improve brain function. New Covenant Church of Philadelphia, 7500 Germantown Ave. Info: 267-779-7948 or LetsGo@TransformUrLifeToday.com. TransformUrLifeToday.com.

Mindfulness Meditation and Chair Yoga – 12:30pm. Ground your mind and body. Spend a peaceful half-hour with a guided meditation. Chair yoga is a twist on traditional yoga, making it accessible for any age. For adults. Fumo Family Library, 2437 S Broad St, Philadelphia. 215-685-1758. New Baby Meetup – 12:30-2pm. This informal group is designed for new moms and babies to meet and share with one another about the beautiful, and often times challenging, transition into parenthood. Free. 4501-4503 Baltimore Ave, Philadelphia. TheNestingHouse.net. Practice, Study and Sangha: An Informal Gathering – 6-8pm. A social gathering, meditation practice and study/discussion for meditation practitioners of all levels. Shambhala Meditation Center of Philadelphia, 2030 Sansom St. 215-5686070. Philadelphia.Shambhala.org. La Leche League – 7pm. 3rd Mon. Providing support, encouragement, information and education to parents who choose to breastfeed. Private home. Info: lllOfEasternPA.org.

tuesday Chair Yoga Fellowship – 8:30-9:45am. Ongoing classes for keeping the body youthful through mindful stretching on the mat and chair. Spend time meditating on scripture and practice with gratitude. Reformation Lutheran Church, 1215 Vernon Rd, Philadelphia. Yoga and Meditation – 9-11am. Indoor/outdoor yoga and meditation classes in the garden open to the public and free of charge courtesy of Southwest Philadelphia’s Family Practice and Counseling Network Health Annex. Bartram’s Garden. Eastwick Pavilion, 5400 Lindbergh Blvd, Philadelphia. Preregister: BartramsGarden.org. La Leche League – 10am. 2nd Tue. Providing support, encouragement, information and education to parents who choose to breastfeed. Calvary Presbyterian Church, basement nursery, 217 Fernbrook Ave, Wyncote. Info: lllOfEasternPA.org.

Natural Awakenings Reader Testimonial I just wanted to send this email to let you know how this magazine motivated me to focus more on self care. Lately I have been slacking off on taking care of me. I read a few articles from the magazine and also got a few resources. I look forward to reading more issues. Thank You.

Philadelphia, PA

La Leche League – 10am. 3rd Tue. Providing support, encouragement, information and education to parents who choose to breastfeed. Germantown. Theresa: 617-650-4436. Info: lllOfEasternPA.org. Tonic 4 Life – 5:30-6:30pm. A strength training and endurance class designed to speed up weight loss and condition the whole body for men and women 55 and over. Bring a mat and extra water. The New Covenant of Philadelphia Church Campus, Grannum Bldg, Rm A1. Info: 267-779-7948 or LetsGo@TransformUrLifeToday.com. TransformUrLifeToday.com.

naphilly.com

New Parents Meetup – 10-11:30am. Bring babies in arms and meet other new parents, get out of the house, and talk about whatever is going on. 1605 E Passyunk Ave, Philadelphia. TheNestingHouse.net. New Baby Support Group – 10:30am-12:30pm. This informal group is designed for new moms and babies to meet and share with one another about the beautiful, and often times challenging, transition into parenthood. Free. Mount Airy Moving Arts, Carpenter St & Greene St, Philadelphia. TheNestingHouse.net.

Kirtan Connection – 6pm. Music meditation and vegetarian dinner. $10. Mantra Lounge, 312 E Girard Ave, Philadelphia. 215-834-8043. MantraPhilly.com.

Meditation – Noon-1pm. Reduce stress, learn to remain peaceful in challenging situations, increase clarity of mind and more. Love offering. Greater Philadelphia Center for Spiritual Living, Paoli Corporate Center, 16 Industrial Blvd, Ste 112. 610695-0375. cslPhilly.com.

Open Public Meditation – 6pm. Meditation is the way that we can make a direct and simple relationship with our experience. Free. The Philadelphia Shambhala Center, Main Shrine Rm, 2030 Sansom St. 215-568-6070. Philadelphia.Shambhala.org.

Open Public Meditation – 6pm. Meditation is the way that we can make a direct and simple relationship with our experience. Free. The Philadelphia Shambhala Center, Main Shrine Rm, 2030 Sansom St. 215-568-6070. Philadelphia.Shambhala.org.

Tuesdays Grief – In This Moment – 6:30pm. A group that offers Support 7 Techniquest for coping with the grief process. $20/session or $100/6 sessions. 2801 Island Ave, Ste 13, Philadelphia. Register: 484-347-1490. SEPhillyCounseling. weebly.com.

Reiki Share – 6-8pm. 2nd Wed. With Victoria Powell. A reiki share is a great way to get some healing in a shared space. No experience needed; all lineages and levels welcome. $5-$10 donation. Learn Reiki Philadelphia, 251 N 2nd St. LearnReikiPhiladelphia.com.

Reiki Share – 6:30-8:30pm. 1st Tue. With Danielle Stimpson. A reiki share is a great way to get some healing in a shared space. No experience needed; all lineages and levels welcome. $5-$10 donation. Learn Reiki Philadelphia, 251 N 2nd St. LearnReikiPhiladelphia.com.

Sierra Club Southeastern Pennsylvania Group (SPG) Meeting – 6:15pm. 1st Wed. Focused on environmental issues facing the greater Philadelphia area, members and nonmembers are welcome to join SPG Executive Committee meetings in-person or by phone. City CoHo, 2401 Walnut St, Philadelphia. 866-501-6174 (code: 100 4 100#)

Group Meditation – 7-8:30pm. Practice sitting, walking and chanting meditation to calm your mind. All levels. $5-$10 donation. Won Buddhism, 23 Abington Ave, Glenside. 215-884-8443. Philadelphia@WonBuddhism.org. Sit n’ Stitch – 7-9pm. Brief periods of sitting will be interspersed with readings from dharma art books and creative time. Shambhala Meditation Center of Philadelphia, 2030 Sansom St. 215-5686070. Info: SusieAndersonFibers@gmail.com. Inclusivity Group – 7:30-9pm. Last Tue. Explore and discuss readings on mindful, inclusive communication and practice. We consider themes of inclusivity, diversity and intersectionality in the context of the Shambhala tradition. $5 donation. Shambhala Meditation Center of Philadelphia, Windhorse Rm, 2030 Sansom St. 215-568-6070. Register: Philadelphia.Shambhala.org.

wednesday Fit Possibilities – 9-9:45am. Functional fitness group exercise class for men and women 55 and over to improve strength, balance, agility, promote

~J.P. 28

Stretch 4 Life – 10-11am. Soulful flexibility group fitness classes for men and women 55 and over to improve leisure lifestyle and lengthen the lifespan. Bring a mat. New Covenant Church of Philadelphia, 7500 Germantown Ave. Info: 267-779-7948 or LetsGo@TransformUrLifeToday.com. TransformUrLifeToday.com.

Yoga – 6:30pm. With Brittany from Roots2Rise. Wipe away the stress of the week and get your body and mind ready for a relaxing weekend. Decompress, unwind, and relax and start your weekend off the right way. Fishtown Community Library, 1217 E Montgomery Ave, Philadelphia. RSVP: FreeLibrary.org. The People of Color Group – 6:30-8pm. 2nd & 4th Wed. A meditation, reading and discussion group for folks who identify as people of color who would like to contemplate and have facilitated discussion from that perspective. $5/donation. Shambhala Meditation Center of Philadelphia, 2030 Sansom St. 215-568-6070. Info: PeopleOfColorGroup@ gmail.com. Register: Philadelphia.Shambhala.org. Families Anonymous – 7pm. A 12-step program for relatives and friends of those who suffer from substance abuse or related behavioral problem. Saint Francis Xavier Church, Parish Center, 2319 Green St, Philadelphia. FamiliesAnonymous.org. Food Addicts Anonymous – 7pm. A 12-step program for food addiction. Bryn Mawr Hospital, 130 S Bryn Mawr Ave, 2nd Flr, Ladd Conference Rm. 610-659-0667.


Tonic 4 Life – 5:30-6:30pm. A strength training and endurance class designed to speed up weight loss and condition the whole body for men and women 55 and over. Bring a mat and extra water. The New Covenant of Philadelphia Church Campus, Grannum Bldg, Rm A1. Info: 267-779-7948 or LetsGo@TransformUrLifeToday.com. TransformUrLifeToday.com. Open Public Meditation – 6pm. Meditation is the way that we can make a direct and simple relationship with our experience. Free. The Philadelphia Shambhala Center, Main Shrine Rm, 2030 Sansom St. 215-568-6070. Philadelphia.Shambhala.org. Earth Stewards – 7-9pm. Learn to work collaboratively on earth projects as a group. Discover your unique connections to specific aspects of earth and nature; how to increase your ‘sensing’ and communication with devas, animals, insects, trees, rocks, etc; how to transmit energetics for your benefit, those around you and the earth. $180/4-classes. Cherry Hill, NJ. Andrea Regal: 856-904-5566. HealersUniverse.com Practical Magic – 7-9pm. What the ancients called magic, we now call science, when blended can be utilized to construct the world we desire personally and globally. Learn your unique way of creating; how to cooperate with earth law and in collaboration with architectural devas and the hidden folk to create the ‘soil-less garden’ of a project related to job, home, dreams! $180/4-classes. Cherry Hill, NJ. Andrea Regal: 856-904-5566. HealersUniverse.com.

thursday Healing for the Healer – Learn how to hold your footing on the path of a ‘sensitive’ in the wellness profession; work with structures within the energy field developing stability and balance; how to work with clients’ energy field for mutual benefit avoiding the drain or overpowering of energy patterns; how to modify, transform your field for optimal results in your specialty. $180/4-classes. Cherry Hill, NJ. Andrea Regal: 856-904-5566. HealersUniverse.com. You are All That and More! – Journey through the human energy field, a dynamic, energy-consciousness system. Discover how you can harness this powerful instrument to bring greater harmony and ease into your day to day life; experience subtle energy; awaken and heighten your intuitive abilities. Home practices for clearing, balancing and aligning. $180/4-classes. Cherry Hill, NJ. Andrea Regal: 856-904-5566. HealersUniverse.com. Chair Yoga Fellowship – 8:30-9:45am. Ongoing classes for keeping the body youthful through mindful stretching on the mat and chair. Spend time meditating on scripture and practice with gratitude. Reformation Lutheran Church, 1215 Vernon Rd, Philadelphia. New Parent’s Support Group – 12:30-1:30pm. Last Thur. All are welcome. $5/donation/family. Lilypad in South Philly, 1234 S Broad St. BlossomingBelliesBirth.com. Tai Chi – 2pm. Based on Chinese soft-style martial arts, modern tai chi is best known as a gentle slowmotion exercise that improves balance, leg strength, relaxation, deep breathing, calmness, focus and alertness. Register: 215-685-1758. Fumo Family Library, 2437 S Broad St, Philadelphia. Register: 215-685-1758. FreeLibrary.org.

Yoga for Adults – 6:30pm. Every Thurs (except 2nd Thur). Wipe away the stress of the week and get your body and mind ready for a relaxing weekend. Decompress, unwind, and relax and start your weekend off the right way. Bring a mat. Thomas F Donatucci, Sr Library, 1935 Shunk St, Philadelphia. 215-685-1755. RSVP: FreeLibrary.org.

friday Fit Possibilities – 10-11am. Functional fitness group exercise class for men and women 55 and over to improve strength, balance, agility, promote weight loss and improve brain function. Grace Episcopal Epiphany Church, 224 E Gowen Ave, Philadelphia. Info: 267-779-7948 or LetsGo@ TransformUrLifeToday.com. TransformUrLifeToday.com. Temple Community Garden Volunteer Day – 3-5pm. A student-run organization to combat the issue of food insecurity within the urban environment by providing community access to sustainably grown produce. General meetings are Thursday’s at 8pm during the school year to discuss gardening techniques and work on projects. Diamond St & Carlisle St, N Philadelphia. TempleCommunityGarden.com. Bhagavad Gita Wisdom Series – 6pm. Discussion, meditation and vegetarian feast. $10. Mantra Lounge, 312 E Girard Ave, Philadelphia. 215-8348043. MantraPhilly.com. Scripture Study –7-8:30pm. 2nd & 4th Fri. This small study group gathers together over a cup of tea to read the scriptures of Won Buddhism and discuss its meaning and how it relates to daily life. $5 donation. 23 Abington Ave, Glenside. 215-8848443. Philadelphia@WonBuddhism.org.

Dharma Service – 10am-noon. Includes sitting meditation, chanting, prayer, dharma talk and discussion on Buddhist philosophy and practice. $5-$10 donation. Won Buddhism, 23 Abington Ave, Glenside. 215-884-8443. Philadelphia@ WonBuddhism.org. Nature Play Saturdays – 10:30-11:30am. 1st Sat. Bring your family for a hike and unstructured nature play with representatives from our NaturePHL program. Climb, explore and learn more about the many health benefits of outdoor activity. Meet at the Tall Trees Playscape behind the Visitor Center. All ages. Free. Schuylkill Center, 8480 Hagy’s Mill Rd, Philadelphia. 215-482-7300. Preregister: SchuylkillCenter.org. LiquidBody Self Myofascial Release Movement – Noon-1pm. With Emily. Unwind your body and mind exploring movement, touch, breath and posture to create the balance of softness and strength. Release fascial restrictions using foam rollers, balls, chairs etc in this movement therapy class. Movement Rx Studio, 333 E Lancaster Ave, Wynnewood. MovementRXStudio.com. Reclaim Class – 6:30-7:45pm. Relax Therapy Spa, 7151 Germantown Ave, Philadelphia. 866776-3034. Fergies Fit Bootcamp – 7-8am. Challenging but fun outdoor exercise class (held inside in extremely cold and wet weather). Improve endurance strength and agility while enjoying the fall weather. A co-ed class for adults 35 and up. Meet at 120W NorthWestern Ave, by the North Western Stables. Info: 267-279-7948, LetsGo@TransformUrlifetoday.com or TransformUrlifetoday.com.

FEBRUARY

Coming Next Month

Regenerative Medicine Plus: Cardiovascular Health

Heart of Recovery – 7:30-8:30pm. A weekly support group bringing together Buddhist meditation practice and the wisdom of recovery. Meetings are anonymous and confidential. $2/donation. Shambhala Meditation Center of Philadelphia, 2030 Sansom St. 215-568-6070. Mark: phl.hor.coord@ gmail.com. Philadelphia.Shambhala.org.

saturday Vinyasa Yoga – 8am. With Chris Czopek. Prana, asana and meditation for all levels. Beginners welcomed. Relax Therapy Spa, 7151 Germantown Ave, Philadelphia. 866-776-3034. Bird Walks – 8-9am. 1st & 3rd Sat. Join our naturalists for a guided bird walk around the property. All ages/levels. Bring a field guide, binoculars or borrow a pair. Bucks County Audubon Society, 2877 Creamery Rd, New Hope. 215-297-5880.

January 2020

29


community resource guide Connecting you to the leaders in natural health care and green living in our Philadelphia community. To find out how you can be included in the Community Resource Guide, email Publisher@NAPhilly.com to request our media kit.

ENERGY HEALING

BOOKS THE SOUL ON ITS PATH TO PERFECTION

Toll-free: 844-576-0937 Gabriele-Publishing-House.com How is a soul guided in the beyond? What is it like for the soul of a child? The Eternal Wisdom gives answer.

CHIROPRACTIC CARE ADVANCED CHIROPRACTIC SERVICES Dr. Hank Finkel 4245 Pechin St, Philadelphia 215-483-3661 • AdvancedChiroRox.com

Dr. Finkel provides advanced spinal correction utilizing “state of the art” chiropractic techniques. We also provide the latest in brain fitness with our revolutionary BrainTap service. See ad, page 21.

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION MT AIRY USA

6703 Germantown Ave, Ste 200, Philadelphia • 215-844-6021 Info@MTAiryUSA.org Live. Work. Thrive. The mission of Mt. Airy USA is to preserve, empower and advance a vibrant and diverse Mt. Airy by stimulating development responsive to the community’s needs.

COUNSELING CREATING YOUR POSITIVE LIFE!, LLC Jan Collins, MEd • 484-416-3828 Mt. Airy-Phila • CreatingPositive.net

Heart-centered counseling, spiritual counseling, programs for organizations. Loving who you are... regardless... unconditional. How can you experience anyone's love – your own, others' or God's – if you criticize yourself or others, worry about the past or future, or hold onto unforgiving positions? Acceptance, compassion, forgiveness, love, expansion. Special introductory rates.

Natural Awakenings magazine is now available at

8208 Germantown Ave, #18, Philadelphia, PA 19118 30

Philadelphia, PA

naphilly.com

JOAN BROOKS

Joan@rsmTrainingProgrampa.com 304-261-1443 Rubenfeld synergy method Train To Heal, a proven and powerful modality with a 50-year history of using the wisdom of the body to provide transformational healing on a cellular level. Schedule a free 20-minute train to heal phone call with Joan Brooks.

INNER SOMATICS SOURCED SOLUTIONS

Sourced Solutions/Philadelphia Anaiis Salles, Certified Practitioner Germantown 267-401-0477 By Appointment Only: ​Sourced.Life/solutions/practitioners Develop your body’s natural wisdom. Discover greater energy, health and well-being. Dare to co-create a path to wholeness through the heartful art of conscious living. Be the solution!

HAIR SALON – ECO-FRIENDLY SL8 HAIR LOUNGE

Danielle Owad-Di Giovanni 8135 Germantown Ave, Philadelphia 215-248-2000 • SL8HairLounge.com SL8 hair lounge is a full service eco-friendly salon. The salon's signatures are designed with complimentary services paired together giving you that true fullservice salon experience and caring to your every hair desire. We strive to keep our products pure and eco-friendly. Lanza is 100% vegan and glutenfree. Oribe is cruelty-free and vegetarian. "A trendy hairstyle is only as good as the health of one's hair". Our mission is to make you beautiful without causing harm to our delicate ecosystem. See ad, page 7.

HEALTHY DENTAL CARE WEST PARK DENTAL

Dr. Alfredo Alexander, DMD 5906 West Girard Ave, Philadelphia 19151 215-748-0881 AlfredoAlexanderBrightSmiles.com West Park Dental of Philadelphia offers a friendly, knowledgeable staff dedicated to making every visit a great experience. Expert dental care is provided with a warm and personal touch in a comfortable relaxed setting. The first step towards a beautiful smile and a lifetime of good oral health is to schedule an appointment. See ad, page 3.

HOLISTIC HEALTH PRACTITIONERS SOUTH PHILLY WELLNESS

Jennifer June, HHP, LMT 2251 S 23rd St, Bsmt Lvl, Philadelphia 215-301-3072 • SouthPhillyWellness.com SPhillyWellness@gmail.com Take control of your wellbeing! Address reproductive concerns with Mayan Abdominal Therapy and Vaginal Steaming. Find relief and support during pregnancy and the postpartum period. Improve quality of life and manage stress through globally inspired bodywork. Release anxiety and the effects of long held trauma. Clients of all sizes, orientations and genders welcomed. See ad, page 18.

HOLISTIC SPA AND AROMATHERAPY THE SPA TERME DI AROMA

32 N Third St, Philadelphia 19106 215-829-9769 • TermeDiAroma.com Nestled in the heart of the city’s historic district, Spa Terme Di Aroma has long been a popular sanctuary for residents and travelers alike to enjoy an array of both classic and specialty spa treatments such as reiki, Indian foot massage and anti-aging collagen facials. Spa packages and gift cards are available. Appointments are recommended. See ad, page 3.

MED SPA SERENITY AESTHETICS AND WELLNESS

Dr. Gina Charles 7058 Germantown Ave, Ste 201,Philadelphia 215-278-6638 • Info@Serenityawmedspa.com Serenityawmedspa.com Peace and harmony to your mind, body and spirit. Serenity Aesthetics and Wellness specializes in state-ofthe-art, aesthetic treatments and wellness solutions for clients in Philadelphia and surrounding areas. Services range from micro-needling with platelet-rich plasma to mindful meditation. See ad, page 6.

MEDITATION THERAPY NIEMA GOLPHIN,

Meditation Consultant 215-828-5177 • NiemaGolphin.com NiemaGolphin@gmail.com “Minding my Soul Meditation” seeks to improve the human experience through mindful breathing combined with stretching techniques. Combining the breathing from yoga and stretching from the world of athletics, clients will receive an experience that incorporates the benefits of a full body massage, a yoga class, and tension reduction of stretching. Minding my soul offers whole group classes up to 35 people, one on one guided meditation and online live teachings. See ad, page 14.


MYOFASCIAL EMILY SMITH

Licensed Massage Therapist Myofascial Release & Movement Therapist Gardener 484-472-3626 • Emily-Smith.com Move your body, heal your Self, evolve your Spirit. Emily Smith is passionate about helping others learn how to heal naturally and enjoy life without pain.

NATURAL PHARMACY ASPIRE PHARMACY

4307 Locust St, Philadelphia 19104 215-883-0332 • AspireRxCare.com A one-size fits all slogan doesn’t work when it comes to ones health. We can work with your doctor and make your prescription tailored for your specific needs.We can customize your medical experience through prescription compounding and much more. See ad, page 11.

NATUROPATH EARTHLY ESSENCE

Dr. Jacquilen Fostor Tomas Ali 3901 Main St, Bldg B, Ste 201, Philadelphia 215-360-4110 • DrAliND.com Become the Master of Your Own Healing ©. Dr. Jacquilen Fostor Tomas Ali, ND, is a Naturopathic Physician, Certified Nutritional Counselor (CNC) and Master Herbalist (MH). Also, as a Certified BodyTalk Practitioner, Dr. Ali focuses on and addresses the causes of health challenges, not just symptoms. This focus provides a wellbalanced approach to health and healing.

REIKI AND HOLISTIC COACH BLISSFUL BEING

Pamela Matusz Master Reiki and Holistic Coach 2566 Frankfort Ave, Fishtown, PA 20 Nassau St, Princeton, NJ 609-360-5200 • BlissfulBeing.guru Pamela Matusz, owner of Blissful Being Reiki & Holistic Coaching, has opened a new location in Fishtown. Contact her about personalized, intuitive balancing and guidance at one of her two locations in Fishtown, PA and Princeton, NJ. See ad, page 7.

SUSTAINABLE ORGANIZATIONS SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS NETWORK 2401 Walnut St, Ste 206, Philadelphia 215-922-7400, ext 104 • sbnPhiladelphia.org

The Sustainable Business Network (SBN) of Greater Philadelphia is a nonprofit membership organization striving to build a just, green and thriving local economy.

classifieds Fee for classifieds is a minimum charge of $20 for the first 20 words and $1 for each additional word. To place an ad, email Publisher@NAPhilly.com.

OPPORTUNITIES OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE – in holistic counseling practice. Building near Philadelphia Airport. Convenient to public transportation and highways. Includes utilities and internet. Counselors, psychiatrists, nurse practitioners, etc. all are welcome. 610-627-0111. RELATIONSHIP MANAGEMENT SALES – Excellent opportunity for flexible part-time work. Natural Awakenings Philadelphia is seeking a self-motivated professional with strong interpersonal and communication skills to introduce businesses to the benefits of advertising in print and online. Must be self-motivated, organized, creative and good in sourcing suitable clients and events to target in Philadelphia. Must enjoy conversing on the phone and hosting face-to-face meetings, working from home and from the road. Need 20 flexible daytime hours per week to prosper. Occasional weekend and evening time required to attend events and network. Generous commission plus bonuses. Previous relationship-based ad sales experience necessary. Email your name, phone number and a brief description of your experience to Publisher@NAPhilly.com.

PSYCHO-ENERGETIC COUNSELOR HEALERS UNIVERSE

Andrea Regal, Psycho-Energetic Counselor 856-904-5566 Andrea@HealersUniverse.com HealersUniverse.com Sessions facilitate personal transformation, spiritual expansion, revelation of soul purpose and one’s unique role in the evolution of the planet. Individually tailored to organically reintegrate dissociated pieces of ones Essence experiencing definitive and permanent change of both inner and outer conditions in a relatively short period of time. 35+ years experience in counseling and teaching the energetics of mind, body and soul connection. See ad, page 14.

January 2020

31


What a

site to see! NATURAL AWAKENINGS HAS A

NEW WEBSITE We’ve launched a brand-new, comprehensive online hub for all things healthy and sustainable. Check us out to see the exciting features we’re rolling out for readers and advertisers alike.

How can we help your business succeed?

naphilly.com

If you are interested in digital advertising opportunities with online placements available on a first-come, first-serve basis, contact:

215-902-9137

Profile for Natural Awakenings Philadelphia

Natural Awakenings Philadelphia ~ January 2020  

Natural Awakenings is your guide to a healthier, more balanced life. In each issue readers find cutting-edge information on natural health,...

Natural Awakenings Philadelphia ~ January 2020  

Natural Awakenings is your guide to a healthier, more balanced life. In each issue readers find cutting-edge information on natural health,...

Advertisement