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2. SUNDAY SUN

JUNE 30, 2013


JUNE 30, 2013

SUNDAY SUN. 3

Stories by DAWN MORGAN THE OLD ADAGE “Prepare for the worst while hoping for the best” is a very good guidance principle when it comes to our preparation and attitudes towards surviving the annual storm season of Atlantic hurricanes. This year has been predicted by all the experts to be a very busy season with lots of winds coming from Africa merging with warm waters. We all need to pay attention to weather forecasts and updates. Since we have not suffered a major hit since Hurricane Janet of 1955, too many Barbadians shrug off the need for preparations and wait until the last minute to get into a frenzy of shopping, storing water and shoring up their residences and businesses. We have had some damage from Tropical Storms Lilli 2002 and Tomas, 2010 and much of that has been repaired or rebuilt, but with a stronger system the level of destruction and damage would be much greater. We could even suffer loss of life. Given the numerous trees felled during Tomas, imagine the major destruction that could result from a very strong storm or hurricane, in uprooting trees, damaging agricultural crops and killing livestock. We have an Emergency Management Department, which is linked with Government security and emergency sections as well as voluntary private organizations. These groups will come to the aid of people in the aftermath of a disaster. To this end, training, coordination, planning and meeting are year-round activities, in preparation for dealing with natural and man-made

catastrophies during and outside of the hurricane season. However, we are well advised to do our own preparations as individuals, families, organizations, communities and businesses, especially to survive the duration and the immediate time afterwards. Imagine if the roads become impassable, electricity is off, water mains are broken, businesses are closed, including banks and supermarkets, how will you and yours survive? Most people can afford to do some level of preparation and should not neglect this until a weather “beast” is breathing on our shores. To do so means too many people will be caught on our roads trying to get home, thus placing themselves in dangerous situations. It is also risky to go out surfing or sightseeing during the onslaught or in the calm period when the centre or eye is over the island, as those wild winds can whip up again very swiftly. By all means continue to believe that God is a Bajan if that keeps you calm and de-stressed, but be like the wise virgins and prepare your lamps/torch lights and other things you may need. Please note that the shelters listed are from the last available list, as the updated list was not available at the time of publication. THE NATION publishes this 24-page STORM WATCH 2013 special feature to give you information, reminders and tips, with the input of experts and support of advertisers to help you maximize your safety and minimize your risks.

THE DAMAGE natural disasters can cause is very real, so let’s all be sure to stay well informed about weather developments. (FP)

DON’T BE CAUGHT OFF GUARD… Install locally manufactured hurricane straps and shutters; stock up on non-perishable food items such as canned meats, juices, biscuits and medical supplies; and stay tuned to local radio stations for weather advisories.

Check your Supermarket, Pharmacy and Hardware Store for locally made supplies

MANAGED BY THE BARBADOS MANUFACTURERS’ ASSOCIATION

Suite 201, Building #8, Harbour Industrial Estate, St. Michael. Tel: (246) 426-4474 Fax: (246) 436-5182 Email: info@bma.bb

www.bma.bb


4. SUNDAY SUN

JUNE 30, 2013 THIS IS BUT a slight sight of what winds of certain forces can do. (FP)

THE PREDICTIONS of respected storm forecasters and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) of the United States, project a very busy season of Atlantic systems. On average there may be 13 to 20 named storms, of which seven to 11 could be hurricanes and three to six of those could be of major strength. The figures vary slightly but generally all predictions point to a busy season as the warm waters of the Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea combine with winds into recognizable systems that could strengthen and threaten land masses in their path. The wider picture includes a strong West African monsoon that whipped up higher hurricane activity since 1995 and still continues. Scientific forecasters do not opine as to which shores or land masses may be hit by hurricanes. As storms become stronger and grow into hurricanes, it is at that point that meteorological experts plot possible paths, assisted by Doppler radar data and hurricane hunter aircraft that actually fly into the system to guage its awesome power. However, after their early predictions, NOAA and the scientists give an update usually in early August – an historical peak time – during which earlier predictions may be adjusted up or down. However, whatever the predictions of numerous or few systems, everyone needs to bear in mind that it only takes one strong storm or hurricane which does not shift its path away from us, to seriously affect a small island such as Barbados.

HURRICANES CAN ALSO be described as tropical cyclones, which are caused by a combination of warm oceans, light winds and moisture, which meet up with a pre-existing weather disturbance such as a tropical storm. All depressions, waves and storms do not become hurricanes, however, these systems are watched to see if they are strengthening and getting into the circular pattern that typifies hurricane formation. Today’s technology works out a spread of possible paths so that we in Barbados, and the other islands and mainlands nearby, can have some idea if they are in a possible pathway. As the system gets closer, these paths become more probable than possible. Hurricanes are listed according to wind force and research during aftermaths has educated us about some of the damage that can be expected. Category 1 • Winds 74-95 mph (64-82 kt or 119-153 km/hr). • Storm surge generally 4-5 ft above normal.

• Continued on next page.

Hurricane Preparedness


JUNE 30, 2013

A BULLETIN is issued when a significant weather system is detected. A advisory is given at regular intervals when a tropical storm or hurricane is likely to affect this area. A watch is issued when there is a possibility that on its track it may come close to this island, however, these may be discontinued if there is a change of direction. A warning is the most serious alert as this means that a hurricane is expected to affect us in 24 hours. In the event of a warning, people

SUNDAY SUN. 5

should get home or to the shelter nearest to them in good time. To make it possible to do this, everyone should have made prior preparations so they can do things quickly when there is little time left before the onslaught. This includes having a battery-operated radio so that you can follow the weather updates and hear when the all clear is given afterwards. A lull during the storm does not mean you can safely go outdoors, as the wind will come back in a short while.

KNOWING the various meanings of notices when given can equip you with a good advantage to prepare. (FP)

• From Page 4. • No substantial damage to well constructed buildings and structures. • Damage mainly to poorly made homes with improper foundations. • Poorly rooted trees and shrubbery may be damaged. • May have some coastal flooding and minor jetty or beachside fence damage. Category 2 • Winds 96-110 mph (83-95 kt or 154-177 km/hr). • Storm surge usually 6-8 ft above normal. • Loss or damage to some roofing material, door and window damage also. • Considerable damage to trees and shrubbery. Category 3 • Winds 111-130 mph (96-113 kt or 178-209 km/hr). • Storm surge generally 9-12 ft above normal. • Some structural damage to small residences and utility buildings with a minor amount of wall failures (related to the strength of construction).

• Terrain continuously lower than 5 ft above mean sea level may be flooded inland for 8 miles (13 km) or more. Category 4 • Winds 131-155mph (114-135 kt or 210-249 km/hr). • Storm surge about 13-18 ft above normal. • More extensive wall failures and some complete roof destruction, especially on small or poorly constructed buildings. Category 5 • Winds 156 mph and up (135 kt plus). • Complete roof failure not only on residences but even commercial buildings and wall damage or destruction. Small buildings may be completely blown away. • Major flood damage to ground floors and flood-prone areas, including shoreline. • Massive evacuation of residential areas in the path of such a hurricane to safer shelters may be required.


6. SUNDAY SUN

JUNE 30, 2013

THE DEPARTMENT or man-made. Preventing OF EMERGENCY disasters, if possible, MANAGEMENT (DEM) lowering hazard risks, is the Government unit with preparedness, response responsibility for and recovery are all developing, coordinating included in the aims. and implementing Director of DEM, Judy programmes for the country Thomas, warned Bajans to be prepared to respond to prepare for an active to and cope with national season this year. She disasters of various types, said we could handle whether on an island-wide a Category 1 but anything scale or smaller problems. over and above “would To this end, it works cause tremendous stress closely with other . . . and we are nowhere emergency partners ready for a 3 or 4”. in carrying out exercises, Acting deputy workshops and other director of Barbados projects as well Meteorological Services, as in educating the public Sonia Nurse, confirmed in various ways of preparing we could expect about for disasters and recovering 18 systems, nine from them. of which could become Forerunner of the DEM hurricanes, four JUDY THOMAS (FP) was CERO (Central of which could be major. Emergency Relief Organization) which was Thomas concluded that hurricane preparedness in existence since 1940; however in 2007 DEM was a shared responsibility between DEM, the was formed, placing emphasis on coordinating public, media and other stakeholders. She advised all areas of management pertaining to large-scale people to be aware “of their own vulnerability and emergencies and disasters, whether natural what they are doing” to protect themselves. DIRECTOR GENERAL EDMOND BRADSHAW of the Barbados Red Cross Society readying to transport goods to the needy. (FP)

IN THE EVENT of a major disaster occuring in Barbados, the Red Cross Society will provide assistance as it is part of the international body known to respond to catastrophic happenings. Director General Edmond Bradshaw said: “Barbadians have also been able to provide assistance to other countries over the years through our organization. “Our new Warrens headquarters has made our normal operations easier and we also have a warehouse section where we can collect items. After Tropical Storm Tomas we succeeded in collecting items from Barbadians and sending them to other islands in the region with the help of our fisherfolk. “During the current storm season, we prepare ourselves for a possible storm or hurricane to impact us and/or nearby countries. If encroaching weather results in shelters being opened here, then we send volunteers trained in first aid to give whatever help they can in the various parishes.” In addition, Red Cross members participate in other types of training in areas such as preparedness, response procedures and recovery practices,

locally, regionally and internationally. Bradshaw noted: “One of our recent projects was managed by Tamara Lovell and administered by Deniese Dennis, Dean St Hill, Devrol Dupigny and Natalie Thomas. The work centred on mitigating risks and strengthening capacity in vulnerable communities such as Charles Rowe Bridge and South District, St George; Martin’s Bay, St John; Church Village, St Philip; Rock Hall, St Andrew and Sherman’s, St Lucy.” Training for people involved with the project was provided by the Red Cross, supported by European Commission Humanitarian Aid Office, and included training of Community Disaster Response Teams in the said areas. In other training, Rickie Yarde from Barbados Citizen Band Radio Association recently trained Red Cross volunteers in the use of radio equipment and assisted in installing radio equipment at the Red Cross headquarters and in its vehicles. Monetary donations are welcome at any time and especially in the aftermath of disasters. If wishing to donate items, please call first to ensure these are needed.

Fax: 429-7867 I Email: inforotoplastics@caribsurf.com


JUNE 30, 2013

SUNDAY SUN. 7

SATELLITE imagery of Hurricane Katrina as it developed back in 2005. (FP)

STORMS AND HURRICANES once carried only women’s names, usually Anglophile. It is even said that some of the male scientists doing the naming poked fun at wives and mothers-in-law by using their names, especially teasing them if one named after the nearest (even if not dearest) was destructive. Of course, these jokes spread into the wider community, and women with the same name as a hurricane would get an earful of “hell hath no fury like a woman storm� or similar verbal poking. Some of those unladylike “ladies� such as Hurricane Janet in 1955 were even given further fame in song, as in an old calypso that noted, “Janet sister was Mary, Janet blow ’way de whole o’ de army . . . Janet strong like a lion . . .�. Indeed, the lioness Janet gave hits to several places in the Caribbean, including Barbados and shorelines of South America. Its wrath still lives on in the memories of the elderly. However, in more recent times, female and male names were alternated and names from non-Anglophile cultures included. There is a rotational list, with names reused every six years or over except for those hurricanes which were excessively destructive, to the point that reusing

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the name could make people fearful upon hearing its repetition. In recent times, retired names include Irene, 2011; Tomas, 2010; Katrina, 2005; Ivan, 2004, and Lili, 2002. You will notice that the letter Q is not on the list, probably because of a dearth of first names after having used Quentin, something that could probably inspire a Sesame Street skit on the unwanted letter Q. In the case of having enough named storms to exhaust the English alphabet, the Greek alphabet is then used, hence Alpha, and so on. This year Andrea came out of the water early and drenched Cuba and the Florida panhandle, but gave Barbados no problems. The other names for this year are as follows: • Barry • Chantal • Dorian • Erin • Fernand • Gabrielle • Humberto • Ingrid • Jerry • Karen • Lorenzo • Melissa • Nestor • Olga • Pablo • Rebekah • Sebastien • Tanya • Van • Wendy

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8. SUNDAY SUN HIGH WAVES, storm surges and worst-case scenario, tsunamis can occur during the year but may be more likely to be experienced during the hurricane season. The Coastal Zone Management Unit works on various aspects of protecting people who live or work on and near beaches, and coordinates planning of beachfront property with the Town and Country Planning Department to mitigate against erosion. This involves ongoing research, analysis, public education and more targeted education with other shareholders who have an interest in the environment of such areas. Participating in local, regional and international fora and following scientific reports are also important. Although we do not like to think of ever experiencing a tsunami, in our distant past these did come our way and there is always a possibility that a hurricane or at-sea earthquake near to us can trigger one. In such a case we may have as little as 20 to 30 minutes to reach higher, inland ground; if one of those giant waves occurs because it was triggered in the region and is snaking its way towards us, we may have more time such as two to three hours. However, imagine if you had to flee from wherever you were: workplace, school, bus stand, beach or supermarket at little notice. What would you do? The advice is to run inland and as high as you can get. (If you can’t run, this writer suggests that you walk as fast as possible.) It will be necessary to focus and put your all into doing running or walking at top pace. Therefore keeping fit and walking, jogging or running (as your doctor says you are able) should be part of your life year round. Trying to get into a car or bus will delay you and the incredible force of the water will smash all vehicles. Leave them and run. If you are in an area where you can reach a high floor or roof of a strong building but cannot get up a hill, then get upstairs as high and as fast as you can. Worst-case scenario – no nearby hill

JUNE 30, 2013

or high building. If you can, climb a strong tree and hang on for your life. Or climb and hang on to a pole. A sign that a tsunami is coming is when the sea pulls back, exposing more of the near reef than normal, resist the impulse to stay on the beach and look at it, head for the hills, hard and fast, if you see that but be aware that this does not occur with every tsunami. Some survivors have noted strange behaviour in animals prior to tsunamis, and earthquakes as well, with animals going to higher ground, birds flying out of normal patterns, and so on. However, animals also have died in tsunamis and floods. A storm surge is not as big a monster as a tsunami but if it is high enough it comes with enough energy to run past normal wave shorelines and into areas where it can do damage. The strengh will feel similar to being caught in a rip tide and therefore people should try to escape being in areas of storm surge waves by getting inland and upland, or up high in a strong building.

ASIDE FROM coastal clean-ups Coastal Zone Management Unit plays a pivotal role in disaster preparedness. (FP)


JUNE 30, 2013

SUNDAY SUN. 9 REMEMBER to look out for your fellow man, being ready to offer any assistance to those with special need. (FP)

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DISTRICT EMERGENCY ORGANIZATIONS (DEOS) bring together groups of volunteers from within a community, albeit that experts in various areas from outside the district may help to train and advise them. The Government emergency management system depends on such organizations to render assistance in getting people to shelters, have knowledge of vulnerable people such as the elderly and disabled, and to give assistance before the professionals can get to areas, which may be marooned by blocked roads and floods. Among such groups it is helpful to have first-aiders, construction

workers, drivers of four wheel drive vehicles and if possible, a radio operator. DEOS may assist with damage assessment and needs analysis and inform the authorities and distribute relief supplies, if available. Active groups meet at times during the year, ahead of the hurricane season, as they should be prepared to render help in any disaster that impacts their area, whether it be flood, fire or landslide. DEOS form a vital community link with the Government emergency personnel and volunteers are always needed to start or restart these community groups.


10. SUNDAY SUN

JUNE 30, 2013

THE UNIVERSITY OF THE WEST INDIES is a Category 2 shelter. (FP) Category 1 • Barbados Community College – accommodates 50 • Bay Primary School – accommodates 50 • Charles F. Broome Memorial Primary School – accommodates 100 (wheelchair access) • Combermere School • Eden Lodge Primary School – accommodates 70 • Ellerslie Secondary School – accommodates 70 • Garrison Secondary School – accommodates 150 (wheelchair access) • George Lamming Primary School – accommodates

Category 1 • Good Shepherd Primary School – accommodates 84 • Gordon Greenidge Primary School – accommodates 50 (wheelchair access) • Queen’s College – accommodates 100 wheelchair access • St Alban’s Primary School – accommodates St Thomas public shelters – Category 1 • Hillaby/Turner’s Hall Primary School - accommodates 35 • Lester Vaughan School – accommodates 115 (wheelchair access) • Sharon Primary School – accommodates 40 Category 2 • Holy Innocents’ Primary School – accommodates 40

72 (wheelchair access) • Grazettes Primary School – accommodates 80 • Harrison College – accommodates 60 • Lawrence T. Gay Memorial School – accommodates 100 • Luther Thorne Memorial School – accommodates 100 • Parkinson Memorial Secondary School – accommodates 75 • Springer Memorial Secondary School – accommodates 110 • St Ambrose Primary School – accommodates 70 • St Leonard’s Boys’ Secondary School – accommodates 50 (wheelchair access) • St Matthew’s Primary School – accommodates 45 (wheelchair access)

80 (wheelchair access) • St James Secondary School – accommodates 80 (wheelchair access) Category 2 • St James Primary School – accommodates 58 • St Silas Primary School - accommodates 35 • West Terrace Primary School – accommodates 100

• St Stephen’s Primary School – accommodates 100 • The St Michael School – accommodates 105 • The University of the West Indies – accommodates 100 (wheelchair access) • Westbury Primary School – accommodates 100 (wheelchair access) Category 2 • Belmont Primary School – accommodates 30 • Deacons Primary School – accommodates 60 (wheelchair access) • Eagle Hall Primary School – accommodates 40 • Grantley Prescod Primary School - accommodates 60 • Hindsbury Primary School – accommodates 70 • St Giles’ Primary School – accommodates 120 • St Mary’s Primary School – accommodates 80 • St Paul’s Primary School – accommodates 165 • Wesley Hall Infants School – accommodates 30 • Wesley Hall Junior School – accommodates 65 • Wilkie Cumberbatch Primary School – accommodates 120


JUNE 30, 2013

SUNDAY SUN. 11

St Joseph public shelters – Category 1 • St Bernards Primary – accommodates 40 (wheelchair access) • Grantley Adams Memorial School – accommodation 135 • St Joseph Primary School – accommodates 45 (wheelchair access)

St Andrew public shelters – Category 1 • Alleyne School – accommodates 80 (wheelchair access) • St Andrew Primary School – accommodates 40

ST JOSEPH primary school is a Category 1 shelter. (FP) Category 1 • Ignatius Byer Primary School - accommodates 60 • St Lucy Primary School – accommodates 100 (wheelchair access) Category 2 • Half Moon Fort Primary School – accommodates 100 • Selah Primary School – accommodates 150 • St Lucy Secondary School - accommodates 50

Category 1 • All Saints’ Primary School – accommodates 42 (wheelchair access) • Coleridge & Parry School – accommodates 165 • Roland Edwards Primary School – accommodates 35 (wheelchair access)

St John public shelter – Category 1 • St John Primary School – accommodates 5 Category 2 • Mount Tabor Primary School – accommodates 40 (wheelchair access) • St Margaret’s Primary School – accommodates 40


o o

o o o o

o o o o o o

Time (CDT)

Direction

Forward Speed (mph)

Central Pressure (inches Hg.)

Maximum Wind (mph)

Lon gi (°Wtude )

o o o o o

Caribbean Sea

Atlantic Ocean

Intensity

AMBULANCE SERVICE QEH........... 511

Q.E.H HOSPITAL...........436-6450

FIRE EMERGENCY............311

EMERGENCY........... 436-6185 OR 427-8819

COAST GUARD & DEFENSE FORCE

7575

(CDERA) ............ 427-8513 OR 422-7725 /438-

DEPARTMENT OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

POLICE EMERGENCY...........211

EMERGENCY NUMBERS

Extra drinking water TV antenna taken down Tubs and sinks filled with water Fire extinguisher Plenty well stocked: canned goods, milk, dry cereal , baby food, powdered drinks and lots of EVE products

CHECKLIST FOR A HURRICANE WARNING

Date

Battery-operated radio Pets inside or otherwise protected Functional flashlights Loose outside objects stored or secured Batteries for radio and flashlights First aid kit with bandages, adhesive tapes, antiseptics, etc. Candles and plenty of matches Car tank filled with gasoline Extra ice in freezer Extra supply of prescription or emergency medications Gas for your cooking unit Tree branches tied or cut

Storm Name

Stock up for the hurricane season with Eve non-perishable foods.

When any disaster threatens, The NATION newspaper is your port in the storm. As soon as a hurricane is brewing in our area, you get on-the-scene coverage from The NATION’s award-winning reporters and photographers. Get all of the stories – the whole picture – in The NATION newspaper and on nationnews.com

Your best protection is to stay informed by getting the details from radio bulletins.

A Tropical Storm Warning is issued for areas not directly affected by the hurricane. A Tropical Storm Warning is issued when possible sustained winds within the range of 39 to 73 mph are expected within 24 hours or less.

A Hurricane Warning is issued when forecasters believe the island will suffer hurricane damage. A Hurricane Warning is issued when winds are expected to sustain 74 mph or higher within 24 hours or less. When a Hurricane Warning is issued listen to your radio stations continuously and take all safety precautions.

A Hurricane Watch is posted for Barbados when a hurricane or an incipient hurricane condition poses a possible threat to the island. A Hurricane Watch does not indicate immediate danger. However, safety precautions requiring more than 18 hours to complete, should be started immediately.

When the stations broadcast a hurricane advisory, use the chart below to note the pertinent information. Then mark the location of the hurricane on the tracking chart.

When a hurricane forms radio stations in Barbados will provide its eye position by latitude and longitude. (For example, latitude 12.5 degrees north and longitude 40.6 degrees west)

Always keep your radios tuned to a local station since they give regular & reliable bulletins

HOW TO TRACK A HURRICANE

• Make a list of storm damage to your home. Take photographs of the damage for Insurance purposes.

• Open freezers and ice chest only when necessary until power is restored.

• Stay away from disaster areas! Stay away from broken and low-hanging power lines. Notify police or the utility company of the damage. • Stay home! Do not drive!

Forward Speed (mph)

Movement Direction

HURRICANE TRACKING CHART

AFTER • Keep your radios tuned to a local station. Many precautionary steps must be taken after a hurricane passes.

• Keep your radio tuned continuously to a local station for frequent hurricane updates. • Stay inside! Leave only if ordered to evacuate. • If you must drive, watch for falling trees, fallen wires and flooding. • Keep one window slightly open on the leeward side of your house. If a window breaks, go to an interior room to avoid injury from flying glass. • Use your telephone for emergency calls only. • If the eye of the storm passes over your house, stay inside! The winds will return suddenly –possibly with even greater force.

DURING

• Keep your radios tuned to one of the local stations. Make certain the batteries are fresh in your portable radio. • Stay away from beaches and other low-lying areas which may be swept by high tides or storm waves. Leave early! Roads to high ground may become impassable hours before the hurricane hits land. • Store anything that could blow away: garbage cans, garden tools, furniture and plants. Remove tree limbs that could fall on your house or power lines. • Lock garage doors. Awnings should be tied securely or taken down. Board up windows. • Do not drain your swimming pool. Turn off all electrical pool equipment. Add extra chlorine to avoid contamination. • Boats should be hauled out or moored strongly. • Do not try to secure your boat in rough water. • Make certain your car is safe – preferably in a garage. Fill your tank with gasoline. • Keep your flashlight in good working order. Be very careful if you use candles and/or portable cooking equipment. • Fill clean containers with drinking water. Put large water container in the bathroom. Toilets will not flush if water supply is interrupted. Fill bathtubs and sinks. • Be sure you have plenty of non-perishable food on hand. • Fire can be a serious problem. Have a good fire extinguisher nearby. An alternative is a bucket of sand.

BEFORE

Lat itu (°N) de

Forecast

Increasing

Position

Decreasing

HURRICANE PRECAUTIONS

12. SUNDAY SUN JUNE 30, 2013 JUNE 30, 2013 SUNDAY SUN. 13


o o

o o o o

o o o o o o

Time (CDT)

Direction

Forward Speed (mph)

Central Pressure (inches Hg.)

Maximum Wind (mph)

Lon gi (°Wtude )

o o o o o

Caribbean Sea

Atlantic Ocean

Intensity

AMBULANCE SERVICE QEH........... 511

Q.E.H HOSPITAL...........436-6450

FIRE EMERGENCY............311

EMERGENCY........... 436-6185 OR 427-8819

COAST GUARD & DEFENSE FORCE

7575

(CDERA) ............ 427-8513 OR 422-7725 /438-

DEPARTMENT OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

POLICE EMERGENCY...........211

EMERGENCY NUMBERS

Extra drinking water TV antenna taken down Tubs and sinks filled with water Fire extinguisher Plenty well stocked: canned goods, milk, dry cereal , baby food, powdered drinks and lots of EVE products

CHECKLIST FOR A HURRICANE WARNING

Date

Battery-operated radio Pets inside or otherwise protected Functional flashlights Loose outside objects stored or secured Batteries for radio and flashlights First aid kit with bandages, adhesive tapes, antiseptics, etc. Candles and plenty of matches Car tank filled with gasoline Extra ice in freezer Extra supply of prescription or emergency medications Gas for your cooking unit Tree branches tied or cut

Storm Name

Stock up for the hurricane season with Eve non-perishable foods.

When any disaster threatens, The NATION newspaper is your port in the storm. As soon as a hurricane is brewing in our area, you get on-the-scene coverage from The NATION’s award-winning reporters and photographers. Get all of the stories – the whole picture – in The NATION newspaper and on nationnews.com

Your best protection is to stay informed by getting the details from radio bulletins.

A Tropical Storm Warning is issued for areas not directly affected by the hurricane. A Tropical Storm Warning is issued when possible sustained winds within the range of 39 to 73 mph are expected within 24 hours or less.

A Hurricane Warning is issued when forecasters believe the island will suffer hurricane damage. A Hurricane Warning is issued when winds are expected to sustain 74 mph or higher within 24 hours or less. When a Hurricane Warning is issued listen to your radio stations continuously and take all safety precautions.

A Hurricane Watch is posted for Barbados when a hurricane or an incipient hurricane condition poses a possible threat to the island. A Hurricane Watch does not indicate immediate danger. However, safety precautions requiring more than 18 hours to complete, should be started immediately.

When the stations broadcast a hurricane advisory, use the chart below to note the pertinent information. Then mark the location of the hurricane on the tracking chart.

When a hurricane forms radio stations in Barbados will provide its eye position by latitude and longitude. (For example, latitude 12.5 degrees north and longitude 40.6 degrees west)

Always keep your radios tuned to a local station since they give regular & reliable bulletins

HOW TO TRACK A HURRICANE

• Make a list of storm damage to your home. Take photographs of the damage for Insurance purposes.

• Open freezers and ice chest only when necessary until power is restored.

• Stay away from disaster areas! Stay away from broken and low-hanging power lines. Notify police or the utility company of the damage. • Stay home! Do not drive!

Forward Speed (mph)

Movement Direction

HURRICANE TRACKING CHART

AFTER • Keep your radios tuned to a local station. Many precautionary steps must be taken after a hurricane passes.

• Keep your radio tuned continuously to a local station for frequent hurricane updates. • Stay inside! Leave only if ordered to evacuate. • If you must drive, watch for falling trees, fallen wires and flooding. • Keep one window slightly open on the leeward side of your house. If a window breaks, go to an interior room to avoid injury from flying glass. • Use your telephone for emergency calls only. • If the eye of the storm passes over your house, stay inside! The winds will return suddenly –possibly with even greater force.

DURING

• Keep your radios tuned to one of the local stations. Make certain the batteries are fresh in your portable radio. • Stay away from beaches and other low-lying areas which may be swept by high tides or storm waves. Leave early! Roads to high ground may become impassable hours before the hurricane hits land. • Store anything that could blow away: garbage cans, garden tools, furniture and plants. Remove tree limbs that could fall on your house or power lines. • Lock garage doors. Awnings should be tied securely or taken down. Board up windows. • Do not drain your swimming pool. Turn off all electrical pool equipment. Add extra chlorine to avoid contamination. • Boats should be hauled out or moored strongly. • Do not try to secure your boat in rough water. • Make certain your car is safe – preferably in a garage. Fill your tank with gasoline. • Keep your flashlight in good working order. Be very careful if you use candles and/or portable cooking equipment. • Fill clean containers with drinking water. Put large water container in the bathroom. Toilets will not flush if water supply is interrupted. Fill bathtubs and sinks. • Be sure you have plenty of non-perishable food on hand. • Fire can be a serious problem. Have a good fire extinguisher nearby. An alternative is a bucket of sand.

BEFORE

Lat itu (°N) de

Forecast

Increasing

Position

Decreasing

HURRICANE PRECAUTIONS

12. SUNDAY SUN JUNE 30, 2013 JUNE 30, 2013 SUNDAY SUN. 13


14. SUNDAY SUN

Category 1 • Arthur Smith Primary School – accommodates 75 (wheelchair access) • Christ Church Foundation School – accommodates 160 (wheelchair access) • Christ Church Girls School – accommodates 90 •Gordon Walters Primary School – accommodates 40 (wheelchair access) • Milton Lynch Primary School – accommodates 55 • St Christopher Primary School – accommodates 75

JUNE 30, 2013

St George public shelters – Category 1 • St George Parish Church – accommodates 80 • St Jude’s Church Hall – accommodates 30 • St Luke’s Church – accommodates 30 FOUNDATION SCHOOL is a Category 1 shelter.

(FP)

Category 2 • St Bartholomew’s Primary School – accommodates 60 • St Lawrence Primary School accommodates 100 (wheelchair access) • Vauxhall Primary School – accommodates 100

PRINCESS MARGARET SCHOOL is a Category 1 shelter.

(FP)

Category 1 • Hilda Skeene Primary School – accommodates 32 (wheelchair access) • Princess Margaret Secondary School – accommodates 60 • Reynold Weekes Primary School – accommodates 60 • St Mark’s Primary School – accommodates 35 • St Philip Primary – accommodates 45

ST GEORGE Parish Church is a Category 1 shelter.

(FP)


JUNE 30, 2013

SUNDAY SUN. 15 IT’S BEST TO carry your own first aid and medication to any shelters. (RC)

THERE ARE RULES for Emergency Shelters which wardens, other Government personnel and private volunteers will expect the public to obey. These include: • The senior warden (or his/her appointee) is the supreme authority. • The warden can ask for assistance from any person/s. • Wardens and their assistants are not responsible for your personal property.

Privately owned shelters Christ Church private shelters – Category 1 • Cane Vale Seventh Day Adventist Church – accommodates 60 • Christ Church Parish Church Hall – accommodates 70 • St Christopher Church – accommodates 55 Category 2 • Hawthorne Methodist Church – accommodates 60 • Salvation Army Church – accommodates 40 • St Matthias Church St Philip private shelters – Category 1 • Rices Methodist Church – accommodates 55 • Six Roads Church of Christ – accommodates 40 • Six Roads Seventh Day Adventist – accommodates 80 Category 2 • Four Square Nazarene Church – accommodates 35 • Gemswick Nazarene Church – accommodates 48 • Ruby Nazarene Church – accommodates 30 • St Catherine Church – accommodates 40 • St Mark’s Church – accommodates 40 • St Martin’s Anglican Church – accommodates 70 St Michael private shelters – Category 1 • Black Rock Seventh Day Adventish – accommodates 80 • Dalkeith Methodist Church – accommodates 34 • Emmanuel Baptist Church – accommodates 50 • St Barnabas Day Care Centre – accommodates 40 • St Mary’s Church – accommodates 80 Category 2 • Chapman Street Church Of God – accommodates 50 • Government Hill Seventh Day Church – accommodates 60 • Haggatt Hall Wesleyan Holiness Church – accommodates 30 • St Matthew’s Church – accommodates 70 • Whitehall Methodist Church – accommodates 55 St James private shelters – Category 1 • Garden Seventh Day Adventist Church – accommodates 30 • Orange Hill Church Of God – accommodates 155 St Lucy private shelters – Category 1 • Hope Road Church Of The Nazarene – accommodates 150 • Pentecostal House Of Prayer – accommodates 50 • St Lucy Parish Church – accommodates 150 St George private shelters – Category 1 • St George Parish Church – accommodates 80 • St Jude’s Church Hall – accommodates 30 • St Lukes Church – accommodates 30 St Thomas private shelter – Category 1 • Clifton Hill Moravian Church St John private shelters – Category 2 • Codrington College – accommodates 50 • St Gabriel’s Church – accommodates 20 St Peter private shelter – Category 2 • St Philip The Less Church – accommodates 45

• The Department of Emergency Management is not responsible for your personal property, loss or destruction thereof. • Anyone damaging the shelter, furniture and so on, will be prosecuted. • Unseemly, indecent or anti-social behaviour, including profanity, violence or drunkenness will not be tolerated and prosecution will result. • No smoking of any kind. • No alcohol. • No firearms or other weapons. • No pets.

• Register your entire family when you go to the shelter. Shelter tips Note that limited first aid is available, such as trained Red Cross or other volunteers, but no medical care. • Walk with your important documents such as national identifiction card, National Insurance card, passport, and so on, in a waterproof bag. • Walk with your own medication and first-aid supplies. • Walk with your own hygiene products. • Carry your own water, beverages and ready-to-eat foods and snacks. • You should know where the nearest shelter to your home is located and get to the shelter early and do not delay. • Everyone does not have to go to a shelter, as those living in strong buildings can stay at home. Category 1 shelters can be used during storms, hurricanes and other hazards. Category 2 shelters can be used if still in reasonable condition after the disaster.


16. SUNDAY SUN

JUNE 30, 2013

IF YOU HAVE A CHILD (or children) then you need to make preparations for them in addition to those for yourself or other adults in the home during the storm season. You can make some of the preparation fun for them. If you think your home is not strongh enough, do a practice walk to the nearest shelter. Have fun getting them to bathe in a bucket of water since the water may go off and they need to be comfortable doing this. • Have extra supplies of toiletries and hygienic products. • Keep clothing laundered so that you always have available extra clothes. • You will need wet wipes and paper towels aplenty. • Their favourite snacks and ready-to-eat foods. • Favourite beverages. • Some of them need their special cup. • Plastic cutlery, plates, bowls. • Storybooks and easy to play, quiet games. • Radio or taped music, if you choose. • A cuddle buddy. • Battery lamp (do not use candles near children).

FOR BABIES remember their little toys and other things to keep them happy and smiling. (FP)

OF COURSE, it makes perfect sense to carry any snacks that are favourites of your children. (FP)


JUNE 30, 2013

TAKING STEPS to ensure that you and your family can stay in your residence and are ready to cope with any disaster is one way to feel confident that you will have a good chance of surviving such problems if they occur. Although there will be some assistance provided by emergency services in the aftermath, people will need to take care of themselves during and immediately after a storm or hurricane. • Ensure that your building insurance (and contents, if applicable) is paid and adjust the coverage, if necessary. • Install water storage tanks, above, or belowground. • Check your building with your contractor or maintenance professional, if possible. Write down what you need to repair or strengthen, paying special attention to the roof, ceiling, windows and doors so that nothing is forgotten. • Cracks in walls or openings between boards need to be repaired.

BE SURE to check your home thoroughly to spot any repairs that might be needed. (RC)

SUNDAY SUN. 17

• Drains need to be cleaned. • Trim trees and hedges. • Remove discarded items from the yard which can become flying missles during high winds. • Pick up of old appliances and large items can be arranged for a special day for your neighbourhood. • Decide which is the “strong room” in which you can huddle when winds are very high, for example the bathroom. • If your residence is in good condition consider staying there rather than going to a shelter, which is more of a necessity for those in ramshackle buildings. • Think of relatives or neighbours who may not

be in strong dwellings and ask if they would like to stay with you during the storms. • Hold family discussions about last-minute things to do, such as bringing in patio furniture and plants. • Decide which documents need to be kept in a waterproof container, so that they can be taken with you if it becomes necessary to leave your home. • Pack essentials, including ready-to-eat food, water in bottles, medicines, change of clothing, documents, flashlight, wet wipes and toilet paper, just in case you and your family have to leave home in a hurry. • Keeping some buckets filled with sand can help you to douse a fire.


18. SUNDAY SUN

JUNE 30, 2013 EAT HEARTILY before any major strikes occur, so that your food supplies will last longer. (FP)

HAVING MADE ALL PREPARATIONS, there are some important “don’ts” to be avoided during storms or hurricane’s passage. • Don’t use your telephone during lightning as there is a chance of getting shocked through the instrument. • Limit phone calls to real emergencies and refrain from casual conversations. • Keep away from glass windows and doors. • Don’t open windows or doors. • Don’t use candles as these are a high fire risk during windy weather. • Unless you have a specially built safe room, the bathroom might be the best place to stay during the worst. • Don’t go outside until the all clear is given. • You should eat before the full strength of the system bears down. During the bombardment eat snacks that do not require any preparation and take small sips of water. • It is a good time to pray and sing or even tell stories.

ALWAYS REMEMBER to refrain from using the telephone as much as possible during a storm, as the risks of being injured are very high. (RC)

STAY AWAY from candles and using them, so as to avoid fire hazards. It is better to use flashlights, and battery operated lanterns. (FP)


JUNE 30, 2013

SUNDAY SUN. 19

BE SURE TO HAVE your flashlights at hand and that a sufficient supply of batteries are available. (RC)

SOME OF THE must-haves to keep during June to November are: • Cash, including coins. • Water and other beverages. • Canned and bottled foods such as corned beef, Vienna sausages, luncheon meat, sardines and tuna, bottled or tubed cheese spread, peanut butter or other nut butter, jam or jelly, beans and peas. • Canned soups and dried soup mixes can be easily prepared with a bit of water. • Cereals can be eaten dry or with milk or hot water. • Biscuits and cookies. • Can opener. • Plastic cutlery. • Wet wipes. • Toilet paper. • Paper napkins. • Garbage bags. • Matches and lighter. • Flashlight. • Small radio and batteries. • Duct tape. • Toiletries. • Boots and gloves. If applicable: • Diapers. • Feminine hygiene items. • Baby food. • Pet food. MORE SO than any drink, having enough drinking water can go a long way during a storm. (RC)

IT MAY NOT appear to be, but having a good pair of gloves and boots can be very useful in certain situations. (RC)


20. SUNDAY SUN

JUNE 30, 2013

IF YOU LIVE in a flood prone area make plans ahead of time, so that if it does occur you would have already mapped out alternative routes for avoiding the flooding. (FP)

DO YOU LIVE in a flood prone district? If you are a new resident in the area, ask your neighbours for advice. • Can you place items higher than floor level? Hang some from the ceiling? Or place on top of furniture and appliances? • Place appliances on building blocks if able to do so. • Roll up carpets and rugs. • Have a personal and/or family plan of where to go if flooding becomes worse than expected and leave before it reaches a high level of danger. • Head for higher ground, never a gully or watercourse where the flood water will naturally flow. • You should already have packed

your documents and emergency supplies in waterproof bags. • Shut off gas, water and electricity in the early stages. • Wear boots and gloves. • Do not walk barefoot in flood water or let children play in it. Downed electrical wires can be live and give shocks. Also, faeces and urine from pests, animals and humans can be in the water. • If you must walk through flooded areas, it is best to walk with a long stick or pole, such as a mop or long broom handle, and test the depth in front of you before you step down into a hole or drain and water covers your head. • Your priority is your life and those of loved ones, your pets and livestock can probably swim and survive a flood.

A SIMPLE backpack can help transport items, especially if you need to leave, by keeping them dry and secure. (RC)

email: info@glacialpure.com •facebook: Glacial Ice Barbados


JUNE 30, 2013

SUNDAY SUN. 21

CARRY ANY and all items needed in the eventuality of treatment requiring medicinal remedies. (RC)

PEOPLE WHO take daily medication, whether over-the-counter or prescription, need to keep some extras during the hurricane season, rotating them as you get new drugs, so that you don’t allow any of them to become out of date. Whether you ride out a storm at home or in a shelter, you will need to have your medication with you and clean water to take the pills. In the case of diabetics, blood glucose monitors and testing strips should be on hand. Those who need to inject insulin should have a small cooler bag or box for times during storms when the electricity may be off. There are other health conditions for which extra supplies would be needed during disasters since

there may be delays in accessing health services. However, everyone should have some first-aid items in a waterproof container or bag during storm season. Some of the items you may include: • Plaster roll and

band-aids • Bandages and gauze • Cotton wool • Scissors and tweezers • Surgical alcohol • Disinfectant • Aspirin and paracetamol • Antibiotic ointment • Insect repellant • Washcloth • Hand sanitizer • Disposable gloves


22. SUNDAY SUN

JUNE 30, 2013

LOSING YOUR HOME and precious belongings in a storm can be very devastating. So always remember those who will be in need of the emergency shelters across the island and refrain from creating undue strain on the resources of shelters, once you don’t have to stay at them. (FP)

SEVERAL PEOPLE from the Emergency Management Department have recently spoken out against people coming to shelters because they feel they will get “free goodies”. That type of hobby class mentality is not in keeping with the public education that informs us when it becomes necessary to open shelters. Everyone is supposed to carry their own snacks and food, blankets and pillows, essential documents, medication and change of clothing. However, there are people, who are needy, who may not have such items or the money to get them. Some of them may have been already noted by the Vulnerable

Persons Committee of the National Assistance Board as “vulnerable persons”, especially if they are elderly, or disabled and living alone. However, others may not have attracted that attention. Such people can reach out for help from relatives, neighbours, churches and community groups. Those who are well off and can give food or other items, even temporary shelter, can also check on those living in poverty in their areas. This sort of assistance can be discreetly given to lower the number of people who feel the need to go to shelters or provide them with the essentials for at least three days sustenance.

ANIMALS tend to have an instinctive sense of self-preservation when it comes to weather patterns and natural disasters. However, if animals are tied, this will cause them to feel more anxious during bad weather since they are unable to run to a safe area. So unless you can keep livestock safe in a barn or well constructed pen, it is best to let them go free. In the case of pets, you may be able to keep some indoors in a spare room, or in a garage with doors, with water and food. However, depending on the animal and your housing and yard situation, you should also consider whether large dogs can be allowed freedom, or limited exposure in an open garage or on a patio. Part of your preparations during the hurricane season should be to keep extra supplies of animal food on hand.


JUNE 30, 2013

SUNDAY SUN. 23

UNLESS YOU ARE working in some area of construction or have handyman hobbies, you may be the average resident who does not always have basic tools. Perhaps you rely on your landlord or a maintenance person to do repairs. However, in the case of damage from storms, it is best to have some tools such as a hammer, wrench, spanner, screwdrivers, a saw, various nails, large and small torchlights, and duct tape. Workman’s gloves, rope, plastic sheeting, tarpaulin and boots can also come in handy. There are also ponchostyle rain jackets and rain hats which can offer some protection from rain if you have to go outside to shore up a house. If you have tools and skills, you can volunteer with a District Emergency Organization, the Roving Response Team or just offer assistance to people in your community, before and after the storm. After Tomas, several residents who only had slight damage to roofs, were helped by skilled people long before emergency personnel reached them. Those who do receive such assistance should offer some payment if they can afford it, especially since many construction workers are presently unemployed or only working part-time. Those with power saws, tractors and four wheel drive vehicles can also help people in their neighbourhoods to clear fallen trees and branches and make roadways and pathways useable.

KEEP SOME of these items in storage, just in case. (RC)


Printed and Published by THE NATION PUBLISHING CO. LTD, Nation House, Fontabelle, St Michael, Barbados. Telephone (246) 430-5400


Storm Watch June 2013  

A guide to hurricane preparedness.

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