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see from a far, the ruins and nature. A complex context in which we have tried to adapt our design in order to provide pilgrims with a platform for reflection upon what is behind them, what is to come, and the beauty in natural processes. Arriving Santiago, the first thing on your mind, regardless of religion or how long you have walked is visiting to the old cathedral. The holiest place for a pilgrim and the culmination of the walk. For whatever reasons a person has for walking the Camino, be it meditative or recreational this is the ultimate climax. Upon arrival it is time to rest body and soul and to summarize and readjust to the transition between the camino and normal daily life, full of memories, experiences and ideas. The garden, in which our project exists, is a hidden yet public space, it has an invisible border in the fact that it is not easily found. Our project aims at breaking borders by placing visible elements that reaches beyond the physical boundaries created by the wall. Every building is carefully placed so as not to destroy the beauty and essence of the site, rather emphasize and empower its qualities, by providing hints on where to go in order to experience the site. The structures of the project relate to each other in the same approach, every line revealing a new line, the roof making a landscape open for interpretation. These are either pilgrims or visitors, for the garden is to be kept public. Our program includes sleeping quarters, bath, kitchen, different places to read, a book wall, view points, and a Chapel. We have strive to make the “religion free� chapel the most important building in the project. It is the resumeSchool of the walk, where the architecture is manipulating daylight and a Bergen of Architecture Autumn use of a2012 familiar windmill. The chapel is designed to be powerful as religious space often does, and as can be widely experienced in Santiago. The monotonicity of the sounds, movements, and light created by the wind turbine and natural processes makes the experience powerful.

Complex Context


Thank you Arild Wage Andre Fontes Kalle Grude Harald Røstvik For the inspiration and guidance

Nadav Kochavi Mathilde Rønning


Chapter I

Getting to know

Chapter II

Walking together

Chapter III

Working together

Chapter IV

The project


Chapter I Getting to know


Research Essay summery Carlo Scarpa, Sigurd Lewerentz


CARLO SCARPA Born: 1906 Nationality: Italian Education: professorial diploma as an Architectural drawing instructor from the Royal Academy of Fine Art in Venice The drawings were means of exploration and explanation rather than simple representation. A tool with which he communicated with the builders and craftsmen. As stated by Scarpa “I draw because I want to see” this indicates that for Scarpa drawing is a tool for creating a conversation between him and the paper, his consciousness and subconscious. In order to keep a vibrant exchange of dialogue between him and the drawing Scarpa advocated keeping the drawing as vague as possible.

Layering as a strategy to enhance the quality of his work and to create a meeting platform between the past and the present. An important concept explained by Edmund Bacon as the principle of the second man in his book The Design of Cities. The concept stats that “it is the second man who determines whether the creation of the first man will be carried forward or destroyed (Bacon). This idea implies that an architect who designs a new building on a site on which a significant building already exists, must not detract from the value of the work by the first architect, in order to avoid destroying the essence of the place and the role it holds for the community. Scarpa once claimed his approach can be viewed as an intervention as opposed to restoration. In Scarpa’s work the joints is used in order to highlight the qualities and attributes of materials, the design decisions, and create a logical relationship between the past and the present. The joint is achieved both formally and materially. Scarpa’s techniques of alternation and transition between elements in the design resulted in an awareness of the transition, therefore, a coherence of orientation with relation to space and time. According to Peter Zumthor, the joint is the place where the rhythm of a place is created. The detail tells the story of what the construction required may it be; to belong, to separate, to create tension, or to create smooth transition (Zumthor)Just as a joint connect elements so too does architecture mediate between the natural world and our daily lives and between the past and the present.

The detail focuses on the smoothness of the materials. It is as if the steel was bounded in the wood handrail forever. It is placed at the curved portion of the handrail as too emphasize its curvature and the upward and downward path one’s must take in order to pass over the canal and to enter the museum. The bridge itself acts as a joint between the public space and the private space illustrating the element of the joint as the code for the whole. Scarpa also focuses on the perceptual joints those that holds philosophical meaning and are the element which above all others creates the clarity and coexistence between past and present. This is being carried by the juxtaposition of different materials and the emphasis on material breaks and contrasts


Examples:

Carlo Scarpa drawings for linking elements

Carlo Scarpa Layering examples

Carlo Scarpa joint examples perceptual and functional


Sigurd Lewerentz Born: 1885 Nationality: Swedish Education: Educated in Berlin and Sweden,Sigurd gradually shifted from the strict, old fashioned ways of the early 1900’s schools of architecture towards national romanticism. Lewerentz was a man of few words, what Sigurd left us with are the testimonies of the people who knew-him, or worked more or less with him. That is also one of the reasons why I find his works so intriguing; the profound feeling of realness and unpretentiousness that seems to be the core of his thinking. Where the materials speak for themselves. Alteration of symmetry In His original design, the chapel was to be placed so that the visitors would enter from the north and leave to the south. This was rejected, as it’s a tradition for chapels to be built on an east-west axis, with the altar in the east-end, the direction of sunrise and rebirth. Lewerentz defied this by indeed building the chapel with the altar east to west. The chapel seems at first glance a simplified version of a neo classicist building, which is exactly what it is. What makes the building so beautiful is the way he’s finds inspiration in an ancient and simple style. Details by making the materials naked and raw, one’s give the opportunity to discover space, this is created due to the contradiction. For Lewerentz, each brick is different. The mortar between the bricks from thin to thick, same goes for the bricks. Sigurd Lewrentz spent hours in finding out how to master brickwork. Lewerentz received a lot of respect from the contractors due to his ability to solve structural and aesthetic problems. The material become the details of the church. The ornaments are kept them to a minimum. You wouldn’t find door-sills, fundaments or roof swills. The windows in themselves are an important asset as they are the light-bringers, a building element that is as important to the room and as the walls it selves. It builds up the atmosphere needed in of a place and give its character. The windows don’t break the continuity, they make the transition of light and dark, inside outside more differentiated and enhanced. The trees becomes pictures and while the inside of the church remains a constant.

Aesthetic. When asked about design decisions He answered it was purely aesthetic. Today, if somebody ask me a question like this, I feel reluctant to give the real answer; “because it’s beautiful.” But why shouldn’t it be? Isn’t beauty some of the qualities that people look for in life?The aesthetics is a

function in itself. THE projects created by Lewerentz are fundamentally different in many ways, however they still bear similarities in principles. The darkness of the brick church and the lightness of the chapel are both extremes The emphasis of light and material in the creation of atmosphere. The connection between the buildings and the landscape are also similar; blending with it, and the use of material strategy. The architecture created by Lewerentz resonant calmness, they indicate strong attentiveness to details,materials,process in the pursuit of the appropriate atmosphere and expression.


Examples:

Alteration of symmetry: Chapel of the Resurrection Enskede Cemetery Stockholm

Details: Chapel of the Resurrection, St Peter’s. Klippan

The windows: St. Peter’s. Klippan


The Flower Shop 1969


Atlas assignment


3 4

A C

B

D

Galicia is situated on the North West coast of Spain, just above Portugal. The name Galicia originates from the Latin name Gallaecia, associated with the name of the ancient Celtic tribe that resided above the Douro river. Galicia has yet to be conquered by the massive tourism, is a highly appreciated destination for travelers. In Galicia it is still easy to find old-time hospitality, which has become harder and harder to find in other parts of Spain.

Galicia A A Coruna B Pontevedra C Lugo D Ourense

Altitude Population Province Economy

0-2124m 2,795,400 Galicia Fishery, agriculture and tourism

Lugo Ourense


Santiago De Compostela

Lavacolla R. Lavacolla

Arzua Castaneda Boente Leboreiro

Melide Palas do Rei Vilar de Donas

Ventas de Naron

Portomarin

R. Mino

1286m

Barbadelo Sarria

Samos Real

Triacastela Linares

Road to - Santiago de Compostela

387m

443m

542m

Cebreiro


255m

385m

456m

549m

703m


Typology diagram

Towards

Through

In between

At eye level

At community level

At spiritual level

Walking up to

Walking down to

Walking forward to


Location

Important architecture

Melida

1 2

Map meso scale

Melide church Roman-built bridge

Information A

1

Melide was founded in the 10th century. It is closely linked to the Camino de Santiago through It many pilgrims pass on there way to Santiago de Compostela. Located in the geographic center of Galicia. The town has a couple of old streets that appear to date back to medieval times.

1 2

Map macro scale

Images

Information B 458m 7901 La Coru単a Agriculture, Meat,Tourism

Atlas layout example

* Full copy of Atlas attached to the last page


Typological models: albergues/ hostels analysis


Tent Location: Trollstigen, Norway 62° 28’ 0’’N, 7° 40’0’’E

Cullen harbor hostel Location: Cullen, Scotland 57° 41’40.92’’N, 2° 48’ 54.9’’W

Cabin Location: Anywhere, Norway 61° 0’ 0’’ N, 8° 0’ 0’’E

Capsule Hotel Location: Tokyo, Japan 35° 41’22.22’’N, 139° 41’ 30.12’’ E

Gyreum Eco-lodge Location: North-West, Ireland 54° 4’45.12’’N, 8° 22’ 33.96’’W


Silent Arrow Location: Mitzpe Ramon, Israel 30° 36’ 28.8’’ N, 34° 48’ 10.8’’E

1:100

Kadir’s Tree House Location: Olympus, Turkey 36° 24’ 10’’ N, 30° 28’ 28’’ E

1:200

Coober Pedy Underground Location: Coober Pedy, Australia 29° 0’ 40’’ S, 134° 45’ 20’’ E scale 1:100

Tong-Len Hostel Location: Dharamsala, India 32° 13’ 19.2’’ N, 76° 19’1.2’’ E

Hakka Tulu Location: Fujian Province, China 25° 1’ 23’’ N, 117° 41’ 9’’E

Section


Chapter II Walking together


Camino Report

Leon: Analysis of modern architecture with relation to the old city, and the immediate context.


Leon: The old city is beautiful. There is something about old cities that make me feel very comfortable. The streets are designed for pedestrians and the idea of a plaza is realized to its full potential.


Leon: analysis of a plaza This plaza is a powerful space, quite yet dynamic, private yet accessible. A place I could sit and draw for hours.


Between Ourense and Cea Image: tectonic detail The recurring element of the small storage structure A reminder of an older approaches to basic needs as it transforms to landscape sculptures, or modified to meet new needs.


Elevated as a platform above ground the structure emphasis its location between heaven and earth. It shows the delicate work of construction and the heaviness of the stone. It is a beautiful example of a need and a solution. The staircase that leads to the structure is a unit by itself. It almost reach the platform but doesn’t, because it doesn’t need to. This detail fascinates me, it is as if I look at stalagmites in a cave. I know that I will never be able to see them connect due to constrains of time, but I really wish I could.


Typology: study diagrams along the rout


The Albergue at Cea, a destination reached after 22 km of hiking in beautiful landscapes. The new albergue has a remarkable terrace. It provides space for socializing and drying wet clots. The noise at night and the morning was frustrating.


A model illustrating a proposition to use high ground as a platform for reflection, supplemented by the monotonic noise created by the water tower.


Oseira: first corporation project, designing an albergue in a complex context situated in the monastery grounds. The charette type work emphasized quick decision making and short presentation time. This forced us to make critical decisions based on hierarchal essence.


Botos: Project drawings and diagrams


4 km before Silleda: The “Ruin� It stands there as it always was, it is empty, it is quite. Should it stay that way? Should it be modified, if so how?


I walk , I think about the place I’m going to and where I came from, I think about how would it be and when I will get there. I wish it to be constructed from stone. I enjoy walking from ruin to ruin and observe how vegetation grows around above and under what used to be a structure, today as if a sculpture. A reminder that things eventually end and new begin.


A pilgrimage shelter “What is an Albergue? Be careful from restricting yourself�

1

1 Kalle Grude


Santiago De Compostela: site project analysis The site interested us because it deals with voids of spaces. spaces which once was and no longer. They raise questions about the link between old and the new, local identity and the “dynamic of change�1.

1 Andre Fontes


Bridging Gaps


Investigating optional sites along the Camino


Chosen site


Site Analysis


Bridging Gaps between public spaces

Initial project proposal. The project is to create a better connection for pedestrian movement and to provide public and private programs. Thus creating a richer space for citizens and pilgrims in Santiago.


In order to break the perfectness of our place, It is crucial to tear down what society strives to rebuild, but failed to succeed. The park should reflect something more of a forest, the ruins, let them be ruins and not some artificial, confused symbol of power. The first step would be to remove the unnecessary, even though it might be crucial for our understanding of what it used to look like, but do we really need that? The mysteries of the past is called a mystery for a reason. What happens when we can’t dream, but is served the truth? A truth which isn’t even a real truth, but voids and empty spaces, pretending to be useful. Wouldn’t it be more useful to revive the curiosity in order to eliminate the confusion of the human mind? The ruins should not be reconstructed, but left bathing in their own decay. Then what do we have? We have a platform to be free, an open form that ignites the brain of the architect. A space in which we can think freely and work WITH, not around. The purpose was not to have to deal with the limitations of the already created landscape, but nature, in it’s true form. What we get as pilgrims on the Camino. The place where we became children and could think and reflect freely while walking. One should never under estimate the power of nature. Nature emphasizes so very well the man-made. Especially if it’s well done.


Site plan 1750

Bridging Gaps with relation to history


Stools Case study: improving accessibility and creating programs. Exercising physical manipulations on site as a strategy for accurate analysis.


Site drawing: Depicting qualities Simplifying complexity.


gated core

expansion

branching phase A

branching phase B

Bridging Gaps between branches

Diagram: Evolution of the city Santiago De Compostela


Final proposal: Emphasizing hard movement and easy movement.


Chapter III Working together


Concept model Next page: Study models


Study models


Initial sketches


A

B1 B2


A

B1

B2


Light and volumetric studies


1-1 Negotiated item: Relationship between the wall and the project.


Process Documentation


Chapter IV The project


Our project is about a garden and it’s surroundings, the people of Santiago and the travelers, the nearby buildings and the one’s you can see from a far, the ruins and nature. A complex context in which we have tried to adapt our design in order to provide pilgrims with a platform for reflection upon what is behind them, what is to come, and the beauty in natural processes. Arriving Santiago, the first thing on your mind, regardless pf religion or how long you have been walking is to visit the old cathedral. The holiest place for a pilgrim and the culmination of the walk. For whatever reasons a person has for walking the Camino, be it the meditative or recreational this is the ultimate climax. Upon arrival it is time to rest body and soul and to summarize and readjust to the transition between the Camino and normal life, full of memories, experiences and ideas. The garden,in which our project exists, is a hidden yet public space, it has an invisible border in the fact that it is not easily found. Our project aims at breaking borders by placing visible elements that reaches beyond the physical boundary created by the wall. Every building is carefully placed so as not to destroy the beauty and essence of the site, rather emphasize its qualities. The structures of the project relate to each other in the same approach, every line revealing a new line, the roof making a landscape open for interpretation. Ether pilgrims or visitors, for the garden is to be kept public. Our program includes sleeping quarters, bath, kitchen, different places to read a book wall, view points, and a chapel. The chapel is the resume of the walk, where the architecture is manipulating daylight and a use of a familiar windmill. The monotonicity of the sounds, movement, and light created by the wind turbine and natural processes makes the experience powerful.


Panorama view from the site


A A

N A Santiago Cathedral B Belvis Monastery

C Albergue Seminario Menor Project


B

C


Project Site

A The project as a hinge between branches of the city

Cathedral

Project Site

B Camino routs into the city The Portuguese rout

The Spanish rout

Cathedral

Project Site

Macro relations A Hinge between branches B Camino routs C Project and cathedral

C Relationship between project and cathedral


Ki

tc

he

n

th

Albergue

Ba

Bo

ok

Entrance

View p oint A

Project program

w

al

l

Chapel

View point B


Site plan


B A C

nd level plan 0

Ground level/Underground level plans


E

D


D

Section view: from units to view point B


C

B

A


Section view: from garden through view point A


Movement and Rhythm


A

C

B

D

A Pedestrian movement curved in mass B Movement of structure on the landscape

C Rhythm created by openings D Rhythm created by roof variations


The wall


To puncture a path

To Bring the wall to the interior

To puncture a view

To shelter the wall

To build next to the wall

To capture the wall

Strategies for dealing with the wall


B

B

B

B

Joint detail


Existing Wall/structure detail


The Units


Units with relation to context


Unit variations


Joint detail detail

Unit exploded axon


The Chapel A response for the other pilgrim. The one that is not searching for a higher spirit. The chapel as a system is in essence self operated. The use of mechanical systems emphasis the beauty in processes that are exposed and elemental.


Sound instrument


Chapel exterior view Next page: Chapel interior view


Chapel perspective top view Previous page: Interior view looking towards the sound system


sis analy e pilgrim t h g i th L el for Chap


Sketch illustrate relation between main structure and chapel Previous page: South West view towards the monastery and chapel


Images depicting site and space Qualities


Conceptual view bath and kitchen


Relationship to street and platforms


Light qualities


West view towards the cathedral from cantilever structure


COMPLEX CONTEXT_BAS