Page 1

THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF COLLEGE & UNIVERSITY FOOD SERVICES

SUMMER 2 0 17

ALSO INSIDE: NACUFS 2017 National Conference Recap Facility Layout Analysis Beyond Contracts. Leadership, Accountability, and Excellence.


CONTACT US 800.283.5241 licensing@ErbertAndGerberts.com Not an offer to sell an E&G’s franchise. An offer is made by prospectus only.

Bring The

Flavor to your campus!

WE ALSO OFFER HOT SANDWICHES, BREAKFAST & GLUTEN FRIENDLY OPTIONS


The magazine of the National Association of College & University Food Services

Advertising Information and Article Submission Advertising of a product or service in this publication does not imply endorsement. Advertisers assume responsibility and liability for the content of any advertising. The National Association of College & University Food Services is exempt from any liability resulting from publication of articles. Editorial mention of commercial interests is intended entirely as an information service to readers and should not be construed as an endorsement, actual or implied, by NACUFS. The opinions expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect the official opinions of NACUFS. ©2017 The National Association of College & University Food Services. All rights reserved. No part of this publication shall be reproduced, stored in a retrievable system, or transmitted in any form, by any means, which includes but is not limited to, electronic, mechanical photocopying, recording, or otherwise without the prior written consent of NACUFS.

Editor-in-chief

Rochelle Rizzi, Director of Marketing & Communications

Associate Editor

Kortney Pitts, Marketing Coordinator

NACUFS BOARD OF TRUSTEES President

Patti Klos, Tufts University

President-elect

Robert Holden, University of Georgia

Immediate Past President

Amy Beckstrom, University of Colorado Boulder

Treasurer

Jeff Yawn, Georgia Southern University

Industry Trustee

Jon Garrett, Premier REACH

Chief Executive Officer

Gretchen Couraud, NACUFS

At-large Trustees

Ken Toong, University of Massachusetts – Amherst Sam Samaan, Azusa Pacific University Smitha Haneef, Princeton University Tim Backes, University of New Mexico Kristina Patridge, University of Alabama Alecia Stultz, University of Kansas Steve Mangan, University of Michigan Nancy Monteer, University of Missouri

Guest Trustee

Pam Schreiber, University of Washington

For advertising information, email advertising@NACUFS.org or call (517) 827-1111.

CORRECTIONS: “Campus Dining Today” strives to provide accurate journalism and fair reporting. It is our policy to correct substantive errors of fact. If you think we may have published incorrect information, please call (517) 827-1111 or email news@nacufs.org.


FEAT URES 4

LEADER SHIP AGENDA

6

OUTGOING PRESIDENT

8

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER’S PER SPECTIVE

10 FROM THE EDITOR

15 FEATURE B e yo n d C o nt ra c t s . L ea d e rshi p, A cco unta b ilit y, a n d Excellence. Capital Investment and Per formance O ptimization in Dining Ser vices. Consider these capital investment and contractual terms, weighing with what’s necessar y for excellence in leadership for the most successful, competitive program you can offer. Check out the bonus sidebar article: Learn how SUNY New Paltz paid for their new self- ser ve beverage program in 2 week s.

22 FEATURE Feature: Layout Analysis of a Firehouse Grill. A team from Robert Morris University walks through a movement study to improve the efficiency of service, outlining the process and findings and providing ten steps for a successful project. Check out the bonus sidebar article: A New Brew at SJSU (San Jose State University).

THERE’S A BETTER WAY

Automate fryer oil handling to protect your employees. Discover how your team can add, filter and dispose of oil at the flip of a switch in a safer, smarter kitchen environment. The benefits that our system brings are even more important when using student labor. Sustainability is key for your communication with the student body, faculty, prospective students and parents.

Learn more at rti-inc.com


Summer

2017 29 WHAT’S HOT Da r t mo uth D in i n g S e r v ice s I m p le m e nt s Ne w Tech n olo g ie s . Dartmouth outlines successful investment and implementation of technolog y, improving operations and the customer experience.

37

33 WHAT’S HOT Principia College Dining Services Involves and Inspires Students. Principia demonstrates what it takes to operations, innovations, and sustainability to the mission of the college. Outlining several creative alternatives and solutions on campus, Principia demonstrates how the College continues to inspire students, faculty, and staff to continue to make a shift in consciousness.

37 NUTRITION Ge t G ree n , Go Pl a nt- B a s ed . Plant-based eating is no longer a trend, and has become a staple and sustainable alternative to meat-based meals. Offering not only menu innovations, but improvements for sustainability and retail objectives as well, this article provides valuable research data and totes a few success stories.

40 NACUFS 2017 NATIONAL CONFERENCE V i e w s om e pho to s a n d re a d a b ou t f i ve hi g hli g hted in te re s t s e s s ion s f rom th e con fe re n ce.

43 NACUFS 2017 AWARD WINNER S A celeb ra ted l i s t o f a wa rd rec i p ie nt s , i n c l ud i n g a f ull p a ge in h on or o f th i s y ea r ’s M i n a h A wa rd W i nn e r, R ich Ne uma n n . G ra n d P r i z e W i n n e rs . E a ch ye a r, the g ra n d pr i z e w in n e rs a re a nn ou nce d a t the n a t ion a l con fe re n ce. T hi s yea r, NAC U F S pre s e n te d g ra n d p r i z e s to s i x d i n i n g a wa rd w i nn e rs a nd on e s u s ta i n a b i li t y a wa rd w i n n e r. R ea d th e s u m m a r i e s o f th e i r p ro je ct s a n d s u cce s s e s a n d b e s u re to s e nd you r con g ra t ula t ion s ! C u l i n a r y C h a l l e n g e . T h e w i n n e r s o f e a ch o f th e a s s o c i a t i o n s re g i o n a l c u l i n a r y co n te s t a n t s s q u a re d o f f a t th e n a t i o n a l co n fe re n c e b e fo re a l i ve a u d i e n c e . R e a d a b o u t th e f i r s t - p l a c e w i n n e r, R o b e r t B a n k e r t o f U n i ve r s i t y o f M a s s a ch u s e t t s A m h e r s t .

40


AGENDA LEADERSHIP

L E A DE R S HIP

C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

4

PATTI KLOS

NACUFS President

patti.klos@tufts.edu

The year ahead marks a milestone for our association. We’re about to turn 60! Do you suppose our founders could foresee what we would become today? Who, in 1958, could imagine how the food scene would change, that the pace of change would accelerate as it has, or that the landscape in higher education would be so different? As we prepare to celebrate our diamond anniversary next year, we will reflect on our journey— honoring our history, celebrating who we are, and ramping up for what’s ahead.

My role in the coming year as your president is to continue building on the successes of my predecessors, and to engage with the next generation of leaders to better understand what they need from NACUFS to be successful. We are the voice. This year we will continue to build and tell the story of our value on campuses throughout the country. At the NACUFS 2017 National Conference, Steve Donohue eloquently described how everyone has a story to tell about how they make a difference and add value. On your campus, each of you contributes in some fashion to student success: health and wellness, sustainability, and the financial viability or our colleges and universities. At NACUFS, we aspire to package your stories and provide proactive messages on behalf of the entire collegiate segment. Why? Because NACUFS is the only organization focused solely on excellence in collegiate dining. We are stronger as one community working together to articulate our value through a consistent message. NACUFS can be the platform that can speak nationally on behalf of our segment. Why does this matter? The trends in higher education are clear. As our administrators and families struggle with the rising costs and a decline in student enrollment, we will be called upon to be even more innovative in how we attract students, support their success and keep costs down. Let’s ensure that our campus community and the public know that campus dining is a key ingredient in the recipe for student success. We’ll continue to build on past work conducted by the elevating collegiate dining project team, led by Past President Frank Gladu. This will give NACUFS the tools to proactively

agenda tell the media stories about collegiate dining while giving our members a template to use on their own campuses. We’re going to need information to portray our value, so more conversations with you will occur about what key performance indicators we will select to tell our story. We are the place. As we continue to be the place where leaders are recruited, educated, and developed, our focus will be on preparing the next generation to manage change and hold ourselves accountable for the highest standards of excellence so that we set them up for success. The education committee will wrap up development of our comprehensive education strategy in early fall, and then we will initiate work on what is known as a body of knowledge. Creating a body of knowledge is one of the top strategic directions that resulted from our education stakeholders meeting in June. The body of knowledge will be a companion to our Professional Practices Manual. The PPM has been a valuable resource—really an operational checklist—to define what a well-run organization should be doing. The body of knowledge will articulate what a professional in the field needs to know and be able to do. It identifies learning outcomes that form the basis for curriculum/ learning activities that lead to competencies. A body of knowledge will enable NACUFS to audit all of our educational offerings, partner with other organizations, design overall conference curriculum, and identify content for publications. By building a body of knowledge, NACUFS will set the bar for excellence. You’ll be hearing a lot more about this. I believe one of our most urgent needs at this time is to strengthen our approach to education and to increase the quality and value of learning opportunities for our members. I’m excited this is a top priority for the upcoming year. We are the source. On our journey to become the source for data and information to succeed, we will build on our strongest asset— our community connections. A vibrant community, which we are, shares best practices virtually and through technology. This year, we will make strides to improve our eCommunity and address our discussion list. As Gretchen and her staff work to improve the back-of-thehouse systems that support the association, we will work to strengthen the Operating Performance Benchmarking Survey. I will assign a task force to do that work and explore other data needs and opportunities. The future is now. As we celebrate our 60th anniversary we are positioning ourselves for 60 more. I’m excited to lead us through this journey together!


Give Your Students the Options They Want! ®

Meat Free

Gluten Free

With gardein™ meat-free and Udi’s® gluten-free products, you gain the power of trusted brands backed by the experience of industry leaders. The delicious, authentic taste and pleasing texture will delight your students – and offering menu selections for EVERYONE will keep them coming back for more!

©2017 Pinnacle Foods Group LLC

For more information visit foodservice.pinnaclefoods.com or call 866-816-7313


OUTGOING

PRESIDENT

O U TG OIN G

C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

6

AMY BECKSTROM

NACUFS past president

amy.beckstrom@colorado.edu

president

This year has without a doubt been one of high-energy, growth, and continued positive transformation. Our association has matured from its proud grass-roots beginning, to a thriving 59-year-old organization with institutional members in every state and several countries. We’re now setting the stage for an exciting celebration in 2018 as we reach our diamond anniversary—60 years as a community of campus dining professionals!

NACUFS is the place, the source, and the voice of campus dining. We are a sought-after market from our beloved industry members, because we know innovation! Last year I promised you progress and results to help you on your campuses. I’m pleased to report the following results from my year as president. NACUFS is the place for collegiate dining education. We kicked off this year with a Food Service Directors Symposium featuring presentations on trends in higher education and foodservice. This symposium, followed by a webinar, provided rich content to help us envision how we will need to compete in the changing landscape of higher education and food. At NACUFS, we come together to share our stories, to learn from one another, to connect, and to elevate the voice of our profession. You have a story, and NACUFS is there to help you share it. The education committee has been very productive this year developing our comprehensive education strategy. In late June, a cross-section of 25 members met for two intensive days at an education stakeholders retreat to identify key points from the learning survey.

4 Key Take-a-ways From the Learning Survey 1. Content offered is the most important factor in deciding to participate in learning opportunities.

2. Most NACUFS learning events rated in the “some” to “good” value range, which offers us a tremendous opportunity for improvement across all association learning opportunities.

3. Nearly 70 percent of respondents, regardless of their own areas of responsibility, ranked “operations/management staff” as their first choice for who should be the focus for NACUFS learning opportunities.

4. Out of eight factors influencing the decision to participate in learning opportunities, price was ranked sixth. Keeping in mind that content ranked first, this is an indicator that members may be willing to pay more for relevant and highquality content. We will be sharing complete findings in many forums over the coming months.

NACUFS has a new home NACUFS now has a place of its own where members can meet, receive training, and offer video conferencing to conduct NACUFS business. The first group of volunteers that will be using it is our regional directors and regional directors-elect for their orientation at the end of this month. NACUFS is the source for data, information, and tools you need to succeed. Toward that end, this August we will roll-out improvements to our Customer Satisfaction Survey. Students will now be asked how important the perceived campus dining experience was to their decision to attend and remain at each institution. They’ll also be asked how important the campus dining experience is in terms of their academic success. This data will help you assess your contributions to student success and your campus’ mission. Over time, this data will help NACUFS tell your story of excellence and your value as a key contributor on campuses nationally. NACUFS is the voice for our segment and we want to tell your story through multiple venues. By showing your contributions to culinary and nutritional excellence and student success, we elevate dining services and help build your brand. As an example of this, two weeks ago we unveiled a weekly e-newsletter featuring a new segment, member connections. The purpose is to feature your regional news stories of excellence in dining services to our membership, our campus leaders, and the industry thoughout the country. Members can now submit their stories through an online portal for more timely news to be shared in appropriate marketing vehicles such as the e-newsletter itself, social media, or Campus Dining Today. Please submit your stories here: www.nacufs.org/InstitutionNews and be sure to share this link with your colleagues. NACUFS is the voice for our members and storytelling is one of the best ways we can continue to elevate our profession! As a strategic board, we tasked the staff and the membership committee with increasing membership several years ago. I am very pleased to report that our membership is growing for the first time since 2008, when our member numbers dropped during the recession and institutions began looking critically at how they spend money. This year we’ve added 35 new members! Likewise, we’ve maintained our member retention rate at 93 percent, while the average association retention rate is 87 percent. So, our numbers are up across the board! This demonstrates that our focus on long-term strategy is working. Finally, I would be remiss, if I did not pause to once again recognize Rich Neumann, treasurer, for 14 years of dedicated service to NACUFS. This is Rich’s last official role as our treasurer. Thank you for serving us so well and ensuring the viability and financial success of NACUFS. Thank you, all, for a wonderful year with NACUFS. I am truly honored to have served as the president of this enriching association. I now join all the past presidents in supporting you all in the great future that lies ahead with our mission to promote and support excellence in collegiate dining.


A Knockout Performance Like a true heavyweight champion, the RackStar® dishmachine by Jackson is known for its combination of strength and performance that outlasts even the most formidable opponents. The incredibly efficient RackStar performs at the highest level while using only 0.35 gallons of water per rack and less energy than other conveyor dishmachines. With its unique Energy Recovery System, exhaust heat is repurposed to heat the incoming water before it enters the booster heater. Round after round, the energy savings add up, making the RackStar the undisputed champion of your kitchen.

JACKSON WAREWASHING SYSTEMS

JACKSON WWS

Clean the First Time jacksonwws.com

®

888.800.5672


CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER’S PERSPECTIVE

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER’S

C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

8 GRETCHEN COURAUD

chief executive officer gcouraud@NACUFS.org

perspective

As our board of trustees focus their time and attention on vision, strategy, and the future of collegiate dining in higher education, they are delegating operational management to staff. In light of this issue’s theme, finance and capital improvement, I’d like to take this opportunity to share with you an operational update and tell you how business systems and staff support will benefit you as we continue building a strong foundation.

A primary focus of our work this past year, was work on the back-of-the-house and business systems. Systems aren’t glamorous, but effective organizations can’t survive without them. By comparison, your back of the house business systems support you with tools and information such as recipe management, inventory, purchasing, nutrition analysis, event planning, profitability, and cost analysis. These help you execute seamlessly and provide your students with a positive point of sale experience, a speedy C-store exchange, and nutrition and allergy labeling to give students the information they need to make solid nutrition choices. These are all examples of how systems ultimately provide your customer with a stellar experience. Similarly, NACUFS has a number of business systems that help our staff operate, execute, and provide value. By providing greater back-of-the-house support, this year we made our volunteers’ lives easier. For example, by bringing in-house all the regional conference financials including conference registrations, showcase, and sponsorship, we freed up valuable time for our volunteers to focus on building a powerful member experience at our conferences. By streamlining the registration process, our industry members now have one point of contact for payment, making their lives easier and saving them time.

We provided valuable staff support to our volunteers by creating the position of regional manager and promoting Karen Ciaramella to assist you in your work. As a second example, the myNACUFS campaign supported the efforts of the membership committee with strong staff support. This effective campaign relied on data analytics to track individual behaviors and patterns. This proved to be effective as we recruited 36 new members this year.

Imagine the possibilities when we can shift our focus from managing NACUFS to empowering volunteers to define excellence and help you succeed every day on your job. In the future, we will build information to not only plan better events, but ultimately to understand your needs, habits, and patterns as operators. With analytics and business intelligence, we will be able to plan proactively for the future, just like on your campuses. When we can understand your needs and preferences we can better connect you with your peers and develop products you desire. We will also be able to customize the learning experience to your needs. Toward that end, in 2017 we completed a systems audit. It identified strengths and weaknesses in our systems and laid the groundwork for us to upgrade our systems in 2018. Information is only as powerful as the people who interpret and use it to make decisions and influence change. So, let me share with you one story of what is possible. In April, our Horton dining judges met with a representative from our sustainability and nutrition awards teams. We started with a discussion about how to integrate metrics to articulate your value on campus and tell your story through our awards program to the world. There was vigorous dialogue, excitement and enthusiasm in the room about where technology can take us in the future. We are excited to continue tapping the enthusiasm for this and many other strategic initiatives. NACUFS is the voice, the source, and the place for campus dining professionals. As we enter our 60th year, we’re looking forward—creating a strong vision for the association—where member value is on the forefront of every decision. We are proud to serve our members and work towards offering the highest level of customer service possible.


Classic Tuna Salad Stuffed Avocados

“From the color to the flavor to the aroma, the quality blew us away.” “ We cut Wild Planet against our current brand and from the moment we opened the can the difference was clear. Wild Planet tuna not only exceeds our high standards for quality, it also helps to meet our ‘healthy option’ and sustainability goals. I would highly recommend Wild Planet to any foodservice professional.” Steven K. Olesen Sr. Director, Procurement & Budget Services Spartan Shops, Inc. San Jose State University

For recipes and more, visit: wildplanetfoodservice.com

MCURC founding sponsor Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch ® Partner

WILDLY GOOD is a trademark of Wild Planet Foods, Inc.


FROM THE EDITOR

F ROM T HE

editor

C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

10

ROCHELLE RIZZI

editor-in-chief rrizzi@NACUFS.org

That’s epic. It keeps reeling in my head. That’s epic. That’s EPIC. Since attending Steve Donahue’s session on epic storytelling at the national conference, storytelling is now coming to the forefront in my job and my life. When we think of our lives, or the history of our organizations, we often reflect back to all of the pivots, turns, heroes, villains, plot twists, crescendos, dénouements… so much of the story comes from growth through change.

How are your campuses responding to change? It’s always most interesting to me that our villains can end up being our biggest heroes. Sometime villains aren’t people, they’re economic challenges or natural disasters. New technology can also be a villain—or in business terms, a disrupter. Disrupters make us think differently—to adapt, to grow, and to innovate. We learn from encounters with villains. Maybe it’s how to communicate more effectively, how to build safe boundaries for ourselves (and our organizations), or how to examine the process that led us to encounter or be affected by them in the first place. We become more keenly aware of how we show up on a daily basis. How do you and your team improve and adapt to inevitable change? We often think of a dénouement as an absolute ending. Perhaps in a book, it can be. But, in life or an organization, we go on. We change and skillfully strategize. We get inspired! In listening to so many stories from our members, and witnessing the celebrated award-winning work at the

national conference, we’re now digging deeper into what inspires excellence with all of you. There’s a camaraderie and the connection you have with one another is immeasurable. You are a community of college and university foodservice professionals, always striving to be the best in your field—not simply following the trends, but driving innovation. Coupling epic story telling with the Banding People Together presentation by Alan Schaefer, we had the opportunity to learn a bit about our personalities. A fun and engaging presentation, it was fun to see how you all found your own corner of the quadrant. Many lightbulbs shone around the room as you began to not only identify your own strengths and weaknesses, but to find relation to your team members and possibly a better understanding of how to interact with other personality types. Are you Lady Gaga, Bruce Springsteen, Frank Sinatra, or Jimmy Buffet? In knowing ourselves truly and accepting all the talents and quirks, we can more easily relate to others and own ourselves fully—honoring the past to make room for positive focus on the future for ourselves and our organizations. The national conference is always a fun and energizing event, offering professional development opportunities, connections, and a chance to celebrate. This next year will be another pinnacle year for NACUFS and all campus dining professions. Isn’t it exciting that we have just entered our 60th year as an association?! We’re looking forward to gathering stories of campus dining from NACUFS’ inception to now. We’ll be wanting to hear your visions for the future of your professions. Next year’s national conference in Providence, Rhode Island will bring you all together again— the best and the brightest in the industry. And get ready, because, yup… it’s going to be epic!


W E D ON ’T JUST MA K E S O UP S. WE MAKE MOMENTS.

SOUP HAS THE POWER TO TRANSPORT YOUR CUSTOMERS TO ANOTHER TIME AND PLACE. WE KNOW THAT’S WHY THE RECIPE IS SO IMPORTANT. SO WE CLOSELY EVALUATED EACH OF OURS TO CRAFT OUR SOUPS THE WAY YOU WOULD. WE USED HIGH-QUALITY INGREDIENTS SUCH AS SUSTAINABLY SOURCED CLAMS, LOBSTER, SHRIMP AND CRAB, AND REMOVED ARTIFICIAL FLAVORS, HIGH-FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP, ANY COLORS FROM ARTIFICIAL SOURCES, ADDED PRESERVATIVES AND MSG. FROM OUR KITCHEN TO YOURS, LET’S MAKE MOMENTS.


2017 Engaging People to Improve Operational Performance A NACUFS Workshop for Anyone Who Supervises Others Whether you are a new or seasoned supervisor, you know how challenging it can be to manage the people-side of your operations. October 17 – October 18, 2017 Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI

Register Today! www.NACUFS.org/workshop


NACUFS 2017

Join your colleagues for an exciting line-up of speakers sharing their expertise and interest in student food trends; identifying and addressing food insecurity; and religious food practices. Sign up for one, two or all three webinars. Program times: All sessions will be held on WebEx® Meeting Center from

EDUCATION

fall webinars C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

13

4:00 - 5:00 p.m. (EST) 3:00 - 4:00 p.m. (CST) 2:00 - 3:00 p.m. (MST) 1:00 - 2:00 p.m. (PST) Working with Students to Deliver Catering Excellence across Campus

The Modern Consumer: Understanding Tomorrow’s Tastemakers Today

Food and Religious Practices on Your Campus

Tuesday, October 10, 4-5p.m. EST

Tuesday, October 31, 4-5 p.m. EST

Tuesday, November 14, 4-5 p.m. EST

If your catering operation supports a wide range of clients and activities on your campus—from formal presidential receptions to simple department coffee breaks—then you know that service quality and consistency are critical to your department’s reputation and repeat business. How are you preparing your student employees for success in this complex catering environment? Do service expectations change with different clients and venues? Join Amy Rasmussen, Catering Manager at Utah State University, to explore these questions around managing service excellence and training your student employees. Audience members will be asked to review several catering service blunders, and discuss how they might address similar situations with their student employees. People – Customer Service

This webinar presents findings from a Y-Pulse LLC study of dining preferences for 18- to 34-year olds. Join Sharon Olson, founding partner of Y-Pulse LLC, as she explores what this age group is saying about food-focused events, memorable food experiences, convenience, local sourcing, and nutrition. Learn how you might incorporate these findings into your campus menus. Culinary – Food Trends

Religion often reflects a dietary restriction, abstinence, or adherence. Special dietary and religious needs often require guidance from a dietitian or nutritionist, however, not all operations have access to an RD. Join Dr. Peggy Policastro, RDN, Director of Behavioral Nutrition/ Student Ambassador Program at Rutgers University for an update of her 2011 NACUFS webinar on religious food practices. This webinar is appropriate for anyone wishing to learn more about Islamic, Jewish and Christian common dietary practices. Culinary - Meal Planning

Webinar dates, times, speakers and topics are subject to change.

Register Today | www.NACUFS.org/webinars


SATISFYING options

Serving procurement choices: • • • •

Satisfies your procurement requirements Lowered food costs Contracts competitively-solicited on your behalf Nationally leveraged volume pricing

Participate at no cost.

NJPAcoop.org Here’s a sampling of our more than 200 national cooperative contract solutions:


Beyond Contracts. Leadership, Accountability, and Excellence. IN DINING SERVICES

15 C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

by Monte Pedersen, Principal, The CDA Group

FEATURE

CAPITAL INVESTMENT AND PERFORMANCE OPTIMIZATION

E

xcellence, especially in the foodservice profession, means understanding your competition and proving to be competitive. It’s important to understand what the competition is doing and why. This article will attempt to breakdown some of the terminology and nuances of capital investment as it has to do with operation of dining facilities; hopefully providing some thought-provoking education. College and university administrators understand intuitively a simple formula: access to capital can drive innovation. In turn, innovation can bolster revenue by attracting patrons and elevating customer satisfaction. What is paramount? Excellence. In both service and products, excellence is the most important element of a successful program.

The continuous flow of capital is critical to the performance and execution of most campus dining programs as they seek to modernize facilities, incorporate vital technology, and build new points of service. Campuses strive to elevate the quality of housing, dining, and other amenities to drive student enrollment. Clearly, contemporary dining facilities are a proven way to gain the attention of prospective students and their parents. But, at what cost to the program? What are the true costs of external capital? Step one for colleges and universities is to understand that there is a cost to capital funding. Administrators and food service professionals need to understand that precise cost, its implication, and options. Although knowing the cost is only one side of the equation, the other side is how to


realize the financial return necessary to support or pay for the capital. This challenge makes how you execute as an operating team, a critical aspect of capital spending.

FEATURE

IT ALL BEGINS WITH LEADERSHIP

C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

16

Executing against an aggressive financial plan requires several elements but most importantly it requires purpose driven leadership that understands what it means to be accountable to a plan. It also requires actionable intelligence and an organizational structure that will best support the annualized, strategic initiatives necessary to optimizing performance. For example, there are those colleges and universities that are looking to benefit from what contract management companies do best: to provide an uninterrupted source of management personnel, insure culinary creativity and innovation, manage risk, and insure regulatory compliance as well as providing other turn-key solutions. They may recognize they need help managing the people, so they can focus on quality of product. (In this case, it should be noted, the contract school needs a qualified contract administrator to lead the effort.) Plans on paper, whether mediocre or great are still just plans unless they can be executed. Financial and operational plans must be well articulated with measurable objectives assigned to the team in terms that are understandable, realistic, and achievable. Once broken down into clear parts, fully understood, and effectively managed, a team’s chances of accomplishing the plan are significantly increased. The ability to execute well does not come easily as evidenced by the fact that even with a dedicated focus on strategy and leadership over the last several decades—still more than 80 percent of all strategic plans fail to get implemented. According to Fortune magazine, it is estimated that “less than 10 percent of all strategies effectively formulated are effectively executed. Even worse, inside of that 10 percent number, less than 2 percent of those companies execute at a very high level. Equally startling are the results cited from major CEO’s according to Business Finance magazine (http://businessfinancemag.com/ business-performance-management/linking-strategy-operations-six-stages-execution)

TOTAL CAPITAL $ COMMITTED ÷ NUMBER OF YEARS AMORTIZED ÷ 12 MONTHS The formula above outlines how a capital investment is amortized or paid off on a straight-line basis, a frequently used accounting practice. Using this formula, accountants calculate a straight line of identical payments due at equally measured intervals over a predetermined period. It is a typical way to write-off the value of an intangible asset (the capital investment). Stating the offer in financial terms may be helpful to our understanding. Let’s try the formula in a hypothetical situation where contract management company XYZ has offered $1.5M in capital to college ABC in order to modernize a dining facility. The $1.5M will be amortized over ten years of a new contract. The straight-line accounting method would then allow for the management company to write off (amortize) the pre-determined amount of the investment over the ten-year contract

All College and University dining programs are important to the campus, their students, faculty and staff for providing an opportunity to stay engaged in the campus environment. If your program is self-op or contracted, the management team on campus are critical in providing the highest quality operation, innovation and vision. The potential for a great dining program ultimately depends on strong leadership that understands your campus, if a campus has a contracted provider, a strong campus liaison with knowledge of dining is also important. Robert Holden Associate Vice President Auxiliary Services University of Georgia

period (considered to be the useful life of the asset). This would equate to $150,000 being written off as a line-item cost to the dining program each year. In any year that $150,000 write off equates to a $12,500 cost per month or per the number of accounting weeks scheduled within that month. From our example, $12,500 per month for a shining new resident dining facility or retail brand operation may be a positive step for the institution, which inevitably will own the asset and the students who will benefit from its use. Whether positive or not, the question arises in knowing if there is value in the transaction based upon how much the patrons (students) end up paying for it. As many managers in our industry know and often quip, “you can’t eat a new dining facility.”

The real point lies IN DETERMINING WHAT THE TRUE COST OF CAPITAL INVESTMENT IS TO A PROGRAM WHEN DECIDING TO ACCEPT THE TERMS OF THE CONTRACT. THE SAME LEVEL OF ANALYSIS SHOULD BE APPLIED WHETHER YOU ARE AT A SELF-OPERATED INSTITUTION OR AT AN ACCOUNT CONTRACTED WITH A MANAGEMENT COMPANY. Following are the most commonly used practices and terms that accompany capital expenditures received from management companies’ contractual agreements: Working advances—many management companies require an annual up front payment for working capital (money used to fund operating costs prior to the company achieving an acceptable level of cash flow). This is a common industry practice that allows the company to start-up services with monies from the institution in place of using company financial resources. One of the most common formulas for calculating a working advance is estimating the revenue required to manage four weeks of board or resident dining operations (number of meal plans x average daily rate x 4 weeks). This money provided in “advance” gives the company working capital to start up and execute operations.


These two guarantees often establish a floor or minimum requirement for the first three to five years of the contract; again, guaranteeing the necessary level of revenue to support an acceptable internal rate of return to the company. Additionally, terms may also include automatic board rate increases or escalator clauses each year—designed to help the company meet IRR hurdle rates, covering the cost of capital and the company’s profit expectations. Volume Purchasing Discounts—These return payments, (calculated as a percentage of total food costs) drop directly to the company’s or unit’s bottom-line. They can range anywhere from 14 percent on the low end (making

Marketing Commitments—Marketing expense is another line item that most management companies charge as a reimbursement in client interest accounts and as an internal charge to profit and loss contract accounts. Marketing charges most often cover marketing personnel dedicated to a specific area or region, program development, and promotional costs including collateral materials used within the operation to advertise and sell products, services, and locations. Marketing expenses are typically a revenue based allocation calculated as a percentage of sales and can range anywhere from .5 percent to 1 percent. General Insurance Rates—another line item in the profit and loss statement are charges for insurance rates. Companies set certain rates annually (where possible) and charge their accounts internally regardless of how the account performs or incurs actual cost. In some cases the actual costs are less than the rate charged allowing the excess funds to accrue to the management company. The main contributors on the benefits side of the equation are employee healthcare, liability insurance, and worker’s compensation rates.

FEATURE

Resident Meal Plan Guarantees and Automatic Escalating Rates—companies meet IRR (internal rate of return) hurdle rates on capital invested through a schedule of guarantees that are outlined in the terms of the contract. This provision requires the college or university to pay for a minimum number of meal plans necessary for the management company to meet its target profit margin (regardless of the actual number of students on campus or on meal plans). Also, a minimum number of board service days may be required as part of the same agreement.

less subscribed purchases) to as much as 24 percent on the high end (making more subscribed purchases). Volume discounts to management companies have become a way to achieve consistent profitability from client accounts. Management teams are directed to purchase specific products, incorporate them in their menus on a consistent basis thus ensuring the rebate. So consistent this practice has become that financial rebates now represent more than 50 percent of a management company’s annual operating income.

17 C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

Often this “advance payment” is held in escrow and then used to pay for or offset the final monthly board bill issued at the end of the spring semester or quarter. Some institutions allow the company to retain the advance over consecutive years to avoid having to repeat the process each year. In either instance, the company has the benefit of accruing interest and holding dollars that the institution cannot use for other purposes.


Exclusive Service Provision—catering can also be a source of revenue and margin contribution, especially when contract terms stipulate “exclusivity” for the management company. Exclusivity allows the management company to perform all on campus catered event service or have “first right of refusal” on all proposed business.

FEATURE

The most often used model provides the college or university with a discounted price for all on-campus catering events and a commission paid back to the client on any outside (off campus) sale.

C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

18

FINDING THE TRUE COST OF CAPITAL One must analyze and closely review all terms that accompany any capital agreement. As you undertake a review, it is important to understand that there are two certainties when it comes to gaining access to capital funding: 1.) that the cost of using capital funds from a management company can become prohibitive resulting in an opportunity cost to the account; and 2) that management companies have an expectation for a financial return that will pay for the full cost of the capital. A third area of interest that will be addressed in any contract that contains a capital investment, is language or a clause that covers cancellation. Cancellation clauses cover what happens in the case of an early termination of the agreement between the two parties. When early termination occurs it typically triggers what is known as a buyback provision, that mandates the account pay back the unamortized balance of the investment, at the time of termination or shortly thereafter.

When a college or university AGREES TO SOME OR ALL OF THESE CONDITIONS, THEY ARE AGREEING TO PAY THE MANAGEMENT COMPANY’S PRICE FOR EXTENDING THE CAPITAL TO THEM.

“In any situation involving capital investment it is always prudent to do your homework.” According to Dan Koenen, executive director of dining services at Northern Illinois University, an individual who has experienced capital budgeting as a senior manager in both self-operated and contract worlds. “Always All of us in campus dining are continually challenged by the make sure that you review the out years of any agreement involving capital. Take a look ever changing realities of what success means for our dining from a long-term view and understand the program. We must balance new financial requirements, impact it will have on your operation over the sustainability, recruiting, training and retaining our staff, and total life span of the capital. In short, it must new diversity initiatives with the ever evolving expectations make good financial and business sense for of our customers. Quality, customer service, wellness and the operation.” dietary requirements, authenticity of menus, and international

and cultural needs all contribute to the expanding work that define what we do everyday. The pace of change will only continue to accelerate. Effective change management requires courageous leadership that challenges our teams to embrace new ideas, innovate around them, hold ourselves accountable to be as effective as possible, and develop ourselves and our teams to be ready for what the future will bring us. We should look to that future, manage with data, and be constantly telling our story to make sure our leadership is aware of the value we bring to our students, our staff, and our institutions. Steve Mangan Senior Director Michigan Dining University of Michigan

HOW EXECUTION FITS INTO THE CONCEPT OF CAPITAL INVESTMENT In all cases where capital investment is extended, contracted or self-operated, management teams must execute well in order to generate the surplus necessary to support the investment and meet profit or budget expectations. If your teams can’t perform at a high level, those potential capital dollars can be easily lost to other cost areas and negatively impact the program or fail to provide the needed return. Inside of every institution’s dining services operating budget lies the opportunity to develop and achieve a well thought out and conceived plan for capital spending. We’ve just examined how a management company


“Excellence is not a single act but it is routine. It is daily and dynamic, where we endeavor to exceed the expectations of our customers.”

When a management team executes well, the dollars they contribute can be used to refresh existing concepts and locations, fund innovative new projects; and deliver positive outcomes that drive a desired level of quality and vitality to the program. Perhaps the greatest impact that comes from executing well is that these dollars, beyond being accrued for capital needs, can provide for a higher quality food program “on the plate” while also helping to keep overall meal plan and retail pricing costs down. Improved execution means increased patron and guest satisfaction that elevates residential and retail dining participation, creates greater campus community and supports overall improved learning and performance.

The case for better execution HAS NEVER BEEN MORE EVIDENT. ORGANIZATIONAL

PERFORMANCE HAPPENS AT AN INDIVIDUAL LEVEL WHICH MEANS THAT YOUR PEOPLE NEED EVERY ADVANTAGE TO ACHIEVE THE DESIRED OUTCOMES THAT GET YOU TO YOUR GOALS. In order to close the gap in execution, as operators, we must do three things: 1) align the daily tasks and activities of all your dining services employees (from senior management to front line personnel) with the annual strategic initiatives of the program; 2) provide those employees with their personal job responsibilities and clear objectives making certain they are engaged and relevant to the process in whatever they do; and 3) create an environment of accountability that commits your people to achieving their goals, performing successfully as a team and then rewarding them for their efforts when they accomplish it. Just providing instructions or handing out directives does not cause execution to happen; and similarly, creating a great strategic plan does not cause execution. Capital funding is just one example of why executing well is so important

If your program lacks the discipline necessary to drive budgeted and expected growth while also creating the additional funding for future innovation, we suggest you take a look at how you execute every day, each week, and over each year with all of your teams. When measured against achievement, that examination should tell you a lot about why you are performing at the level you are and what you need to do in order to create incremental improvement.

Monte Pedersen is the Principal of the CDA Group, a unique management consulting firm that focuses on improving the lives of dining services operating teams. His expertise in “strategy execution management” has created positive change in the behaviors and contributions of individual managers bringing about consistent goal achievement and resulting in greater organizational success. He is a 35-year food service industry veteran with management experi ence in both self-operated and contract managed environments.

19 C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

would find the money to build its programs and provide a financial return for both themselves and their clients. This capital evaluation is useful for any type of business partnership that involves a capital investment. Self-operators have that same opportunity—along with the advantage of being able to reinvest dollars that accrue above budget, back into the campus.

to the success and livelihood of college and university dining programs. Given the growing complexity of the foodservice industry, it is imperative that your teams manage at a higher level or risk losing internal credibility as a service provider as well as valuable dollars (critical to remaining competitive). Being able to guarantee that your operating plan and strategic initiatives are being carried out on a daily basis from front line employees to senior managers, requires solid execution. Every dining services leader must ask themselves if they have the system and tools in place to help provide the team with what it takes to succeed.

FEATURE

Dawn Aubrey, Ph.D., MBA, FMP, CEC, CCA Associate Director of Housing for Dining Services


GOING GREEN JUST GOT EASIER!

INTRODUCING

Our NEW O2GO Reusable Container and Utensil Products!

HAVE YOU BEEN CONSIDERING A REUSEABLE CONTAINER PROGRAM?

IS YOUR CURRENT REUSEABLE PROGRAM UNSUCCESSFUL?

If the answer to either of these questions is YES, the OZZI System is for you!

SAVE MONEY AND GO GREEN!

The OZZI “GOING GREEN” Program includes • ONE OZZI Machine • ONE Year of Online Maintenance

Program will save tens of thousands of dollars annually to your operating budget. NEW FOR 2017 Program Startup Fee is only $2,017 and now includes custom graphics at no extra charge

“The OZZI System can pay for itself in months. It offers a convenient and effective return process, while exceeding the health department guidelines required for reusable containers and rewards accountability of participants.” said Tom Wright, CEO, “Without the OZZI System, programs fail to meet expectations of participants while becoming costly to maintain.”

AGreenOzzi, LLC • P.O. Box 747, East Greenwich, RI 02818 • 855-GRN-OZZI • AGREENOZZI.COM


Learn how SUNY New Paltz paid for their new self-serve beverage program in 2 weeks by Ryan Goodwin – Sodexo, SUNY New Paltz and Steve Deutsch, SUNY New Paltz

I

FEATURE

n 2015 the State University of New York at New Paltz campus (SUNY New Paltz) was already under a bottled water ban; and Sodexo, the food service operator, was struggling to find a steady workforce. Both parties needed to make some decisions on guest flow for their soon to open remodeled retail spaces. One of the options under consideration was implementing a guest-facing, self-serve beverage program featuring the Coca Cola Freestyle platform with its expanded brand options. Placing these dispensers outside of register control would improve guest flow, speed of service and introduce many new low and no calorie drink choices for guests.

21 C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

Working with Coca-Cola, the operator understood they had a partnership with ValidFill, a company that provides a controlled pour feature that could be linked to an RFID tag embedded in a refillable Whirley-DrinkWorks cup. The smartcup RFID tag can tell the dispenser if the guest has paid for a drink and trigger a pour while giving data that counts refills and how many disposable cups are being saved from the landfill. With an ability to control the dispenser, they still needed to justify the costs of this initiative, including site preparation costs to bring water, power and drainage to these non-traditional locations. Learning from SUNY partners at Binghamton University, there was a viable profit model in offering students a “Refill All Semester” drink offer where the students prepay for their drinks at the beginning of the semester. Working on a pricing and execution plan that would ensure the finance team of being able to pay for this initiative before the semester had concluded, they decided to be very aggressive with a big offer, priced at $34.98 (which included the cost of the smartcup). The projection needed was to sell at least 1,600 of these refill packages. Getting the students to prepay for their drinks at the beginning of the semester would drive upfront revenue to pay back the entire initiative. Because this program would be introducing several new elements at once to both the campus community and their employees (i.e. many new branded drink choices, an unlimited drink package, a sustainable vessel, and a sales target) getting the messaging and execution right was very important to them. Working with their partners they were able to get appropriate traditional and digital collateral in front of the students and had register employees trained to explain the offer with all the benefits and incented the crew to reach their sales goals by location. As a result, at SUNY New Paltz, they were able to meet their sales target of 1,600 “Refill All Semester” smartcups in only two weeks! Eventually they sold almost 2,000 packages while earning Sodexo and the Dining Services over $70,000 in prepaid revenue that positioned them for a great success. The program increased loyalty to their retail locations which increased food instances while speeding up throughput at the registers and decreasing overall labor per sales dollar.

INFOGRAPHIC PROVIDED BY: WHIRLEY DRINKWORKS

In the end, they were able to reverse the revenue constraints that a bottled water ban had placed on their low and no calorie drink category sales and actually expanded the drink choice options for everyone. The impact on their sustainability initiative by reducing consumable waste and being able to report out their data to their sustainability groups on campus as to how many cups, lids, and straws were saved from the landfill wasn’t bad either. Improving overall food service operations, generating profit, having a strong sustainability initiative that met the goals of the campus, all made for a great outcome.

Sources * From ValidFill customer data on average redemption ** Assumes purchased in Fall and recharged in the Spring, priced at $24.99 *** Consumable cost calculated .11 cents (cup, lid & straw) CUSCATALOG February 2017 202.097.6

https://www.bostonglobe.com/magazine/ 2014/04/02/why-p-per-cups-just-aren-greener/ W3TIBJ9dff8INIumPQvHSI/story.html


FEATURE C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

22

Layout Analysis

of a Firehouse Grill by Albena Ivanova, Bryan Behr, Eric Williams, Lisa Rodgers, Keith Lyne, and Dan Chiaverini Robert Morris University

I

n this project we present a simple approach to analyze the movements of a worker between different equipment at a Firehouse Grill to improve the efficiency of the layout. The goal of this project is to rearrange the equipment to minimize the movement of worker and to speed up the service rate. The motivation for this project came from observing long waiting lines during peak times of the day at the Firehouse Grill. During peak times there were four workers that were serving a waiting line of 10 or more customers. First we obtained the blueprints from the university operations center. Figure 1 shows the current layout: Freezer Section (104), Fryers with Filter (111), Griddle Top with Oven (109), Ventilation Canopy (105), Char-Broiler (108), Spreader Cabinet (107), Contact Toaster (110), Refrigerator Section (112), Front Counter Grill (113), Fry Chute (114), Sandwich Slide (115), Hot Food Well (116), and Protector Case (117).

104

112 111

109

105

113 114

Figure 1. Current Layout

115

108

107

110 116

117


Fryers w/Filter (111)

Griddle Top w/ Oven (109)

Char-Broiler (108)

Refrigerator Section (112)

Fry Chute (114)

Sandwich Slide (115)

Freezer Section (104)

0

2

4.5

6.5

9.5

2.5

6.5

Fryers w/Filter (111)

2

0

2

4

7

3

4.5

Griddle Top w/Oven (109)

4.5

2

0

2

5

4.5

3

Char-Broiler (108)

6.5

4

2

0

3

6

2.5

Refrigerator Section (112)

9.5

7

5

3

0

9

4

Fry Chute (114)

2.5

3

4.5

6

9

0

6

Sandwich Slide (115)

6.5

4.5

3

2.5

4

6

0

Figure 2. Distance matrix for the current layout Next, we measured the distances (in feet) between different equipment for the current layout. Note that when measuring the distance, we consider the position of the person in front of the equipment while the job was performed, trying to capture the distance that the person walks between different equipment. The matrix is diagonally symmetrical as the distance between 104 and 111, for example, is the same as the distance between 111 and 104. When using the blueprint to compute the distance, consider the scale that is provided in the blueprint. In our case, the scale was 1 inch = 4 feet. We used a ruler to measure the distances on the blueprint. Next, we collected data on the number of different items sold by the Firehouse Grill in one month (Figure 3). There were 18 different types of products sold, with six of them accounting for 81 percent of the total demand (see cumulative percentage in the last column). These six products are the first six products in the first column (sort by demand from highest to lowest): French Fries (32 percent), Cheeseburger (14 percent), Grilled Chicken Wrap (12 percent), Grilled Chicken (10 percent), Chicken tender basket (8 percent) and Grilled Cheese Sandwich (5 percent). Then, we videotaped the movements of the workers and recorded the movements between different equipment that corresponded to each of the six orders. For example, the movements of the worker during the preparation of a cheeseburger order were: 112-109, 109-115, 115-109, 109-115, 115-109, 109-111, 111-115, and 109-115. Then we multiplied the flows for each order by the number of orders per month and completed the flow matrix

(Figure 4). Another way to compute the flows would be to install a camera on the ceiling of the facility during peak hour and to record the movements of workers for 5-10 minutes. Then transfer the movements on the flow matrix and work with these numbers. To calculate the total flow-feet we multiply the corresponding cells in both matrixes and sum the products. The total flow-feet for the current layout is 81,322 flow-feet per month. This is the movement of the worker for one month for 80 percent of all orders. From the flow matrix we can also see the “highways� in the current layout

Product Description

(Figure 5). The two paths with the highest movement are between the Sandwich Slide (115) and the Griddle Top with Over (109) and between the Fryer with Filters (111) and the Refrigerator Section (112). You can see that the two path cross, meaning that if we have four workers during peak time, they will be constantly in a way of each other while completing orders. This was exactly what we observed in our video recording. To reduce the distance between these two paths, we rearrange the equipment by exchanging the positions of the Freezer (104) and Refrigerator Section

Product Quantity

Percentage

Cumulative percentage

FRENCH FRIES

4800

0.32

0.32

CHEESEBURGER

2015

0.14

0.46

GRILLED CHICKEN WRAP

1740

0.12

0.57

GRILLED CHICKEN

1541

0.10

0.68

CHICKEN TENDER BASKET

1143

0.08

0.75

GRILLED CHEESE SANDWICH

767

0.05

0.81

MOZZ STICKS

529

0.04

0.84

SPICY CHICKEN

471

0.03

0.87

DOUBLE CHEESEBURGER

395

0.03

0.90

CHICKEN PATTY

371

0.02

0.92

HAMBURGER

282

0.02

0.94

CHICKEN TENDERS

205

0.01

0.96

STRIP STEAK

188

0.01

0.97

CHEESE STEAK

168

0.01

0.98

RIBEYE STEAK

125

0.01

0.99

HOT DOG

77

0.01

1.00

FILET MIGNON

61

0.00

1.00

GARDEN BURGER

13

0.00

1.00

Figure 3. Demand per product per month

FEATURE

Freezer Section (104)

23 C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

DISTANCE MATRIX


FLOW MATRIX

Freezer Section (104)

Fryers w/Filter (111)

Freezer Section (104)

Griddle Top w/ Oven (109)

Char-Broiler (108)

Refrigerator Section (112)

Fry Chute (114)

Sandwich Slide (115)

1740

692

205

Fryers w/Filter (111) Griddle Top w/Oven (109)

8624

FEATURE

Char-Broiler (108)

C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

24

Refrigerator Section (112)

2015

Fry Chute (114)

1740

Sandwich Slide (115)

205

487

2015

4594

Figure 4. Movement/flow matrix (112) and exchanging the positions of the Char Broiler (108) and Griddle Top with Oven (109). The revised layout is presented in Figure 6. When comparing different options for the revised layout, we took into consideration two constraints: (i) we could not move any of the equipment on the back wall (104, 111, 109, 105, 108, 107, 110, or 112) to the front and vice versa, (ii) we could not move any of the equipment under the ventilation canopy away from it (111, 109, 105, 108, 107, and 110). If we compare the current layout (81,322 flow-feet) with the revised

layout (68,172 flow-feet), the revised one results in 16.16 percent savings in the total flow-feet per month. These results, if implemented, impact not only the work conditions of the employees by minimizing their movements, but also the service rate, by reducing the processing time per order and reducing the waiting time for the customers during peak time.

movement study periodically, as the movements depend on many different factors that are difficult to predict when creating the initial layout. For example, in our case the movements depend on the demand for different orders.

The recommended changes are not disturbing to the operations and could be easily implemented during summer break when the Firehouse Grill in not in operation. It is advisable to perform

This project was performed as a class project for operations management students at Robert Morris University in the spring of 2017. We would like to thank the Firehouse Grill managers and employees for providing us with the data and the cooperation to complete this project.

Steps for a successful project: 1.

Obtain the blueprints.

2.

Complete the distance matrix of the current layout.

3.

Collect data on items with the highest demand (80 percent of the total sales) or install a camera and record the movements for 5-10 min during peak hour.

4.

Complete the flow matrix.

5.

Multiply distance matrix by flow matrix and sum the products to get the total flow-feet of the current layout. You can use SUMPRODUCT command in Excel.

6.

Identify the “highways� in your current layout. These are the paths with the highest number of flows.

7.

Revise the layout, considering all the constrains.

8.

Prepare a new distance matrix for the revised layout.

9.

Multiple the flow matrix by the revised distance matrix to compute the new total flow-feel.

10. Implement the revised layout.

104 111

109

105 10

113 114

Figure 5. Two of the paths with the highest movement

115

108

107


7

03_RB_NACUFS_BTS_CDT_Ad_PrsQ.indd 1

6/28/17 4:20 PM

FRIDGE (112)

112

104

112

110 116

117

FREEZER (104)

GRIDDLE-TO CHAR-BROIL P OVEN (108) (109)

111

109

105

113 114

Figure 6. Revised layout with the two paths with the highest movement

115

108 10

107

110 116

117


Hungry Students Are Counting On

YOU You can count on us.

Parts Town has the largest parts inventory anywhere, and many high-demand parts are guaranteed to be . Let us help you keep every piece of foodservice equipment on campus up and running so you can focus on what you do best.

Partstown.com/campusdining


FEATURE

SAN JOSE STATE A NEW BREW AT SJSU

C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

27

W

hen you are a student studying at San Jose State University, a campus located in the heart of fast-paced Silicon Valley, caffeine becomes as important as your cellphone. This need is especially apparent at The Commons, a residential dining hall that serves around 2,500 meal plan holders. Customers were craving a new coffee concept that would not only keep them awake, but bring a unique change to the popular caffeine options already found at SJSU, including Starbucks and Peet’s Coffee & Tea. With a campus focused on current trends and a dedication to brands that believe in imbedding sustainability within their culture, choosing Barefoot Coffee Roasters seemed like a natural decision, especially since it aligned with the company mission of Spartan Shops, Inc. The easy part was selecting a company that is not only a short drive from SJSU, but also a brand that believes in direct trade, pesticide-free, sustainable, and high-quality coffee. Barefoot Coffee Roasters brought unique flavors to customers, including their famous Voodoo drink which is crafted with espresso, chocolate, and a coconut sweet milk blend.

The hard part? Opening a new coffee and tea station in less than two weeks, just in time for students to move back onto campus. In January 2017, work began quickly to transform an old space in The Commons to a new café which mimicked the look and feel of a Barefoot Coffee Roasters store. In only one week, a new space was designed, graphics and decor were produced and installed (including the use of reclaimed wood, laser-cut letters, and large floor to ceiling vinyl photo decals). In the following three days, employees were trained on the new recipes as they prepared to open their doors during move-in weekend.

Although it seemed a latte to handle, the transformation—which included aesthetics, equipment, and training— took only 10 days and less than $4,000. When students returned to the residential dining hall, there was an automatic buzz regarding the new station and the superior taste and quality of the coffee. The Commons saw an increase in the volume of coffee orders and received positive feedback from its meal plan holders. Besides the unique taste of the coffee, what students appreciated the most was the choice to go sustainable. Implementing a brand that creates its products added value to our dining facility and strengthened our sustainability story at SJSU.


Because Today’s Customer is Looking for #CoffeeAndMore Sure Tamp®

Easy-to-use, Easy-to-clean, Superautomatic Espresso

BUNN refresh®

Cold, Filtered, Still & Sparkling Water

44% of college students said the dining hall scene factored into their decision on where to attend college.1 Choose Experience. Choose BUNN. bunn.com/coffeeandmore 1

Technomic 2015


What’s Hot on Campus Dartmouth Dining Services Implements New Technologies

religious classification by integrating with Computrition menu management software. Txt-n-Tell allows students to send text messaging to key managers with requests and feedback with almost instantaneous responses displayed as part of those menu boards. This is a first of its kind combination for both companies, combining their software of menu boards and active feedback messaging into one display.

When Dartmouth students came back from winter break they not only welcomed 2017, but also changes to some of their favorite dining spots on campus. The Class of 1953 Commons and Courtyard Café both underwent menu board upgrades with Epicure digital menu boards and Touchwork TxT-N-Tell. The new menu board system allows for up-to-the-minute display of choices, allergen information, and

The Class of 1953 Commons is the campus’ All-You-Care-To-Eat facility comprised of nine food stations that serve a variety of cuisines. Meal choices are highlighted with portion size, applicable nutritional and classification symbols while text messages and responses scroll for the reader on 14 station-specific smart screen televisions throughout the servery. Setting an engaging tone,

29 C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

T

echnology is all around us; today’s college student can’t escape that fact. While walking across the Dartmouth campus it is quite common to see students, faculty, and staff using cell phones and laptops. In recognizing this trend, Dartmouth Dining Services has implemented several new technology initiatives all designed to maximize customer service and improve efficiencies.

WHAT’S HOT

by Arliene Belock, administrative & catering coordinator, and Jon Plodzik, director of dining services, Dartmouth Dining Services


WHAT’S HOT C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

30

at an administrative level. This data is then used to forecast on the next cycle by the purchasing department. The PDFs are dropped into a sharing Box which allow culinary staff to move to different prep areas and have access to recipes. Moving away from having paper production books resulted in saving four reams of paper, and saved eight labor hours per week from previous practice of filling binders. Forecasting is now able to be done within days of the meal running versus weeks. These savings can be driven back into the program to create new programs centered around better customer service.

the entry of the dining hall features a 65-inch digital greeter board featuring our main entrees, a nutritional tip of the day, staff information, food photography, athletic events, operational details, and Txt-N-Tell feedback. Prior to implementing the Epicure menu boards, PowerPoint was used along with a channel player. This new direct-linked system to Computrition with icons, eliminates the need for manually generated menu tags with allergen information, decreasing potential errors.

time the menu is updated at Courtyard Café. Plus, the new menu boards provide a clean, professional look that provides real time accurate information.

The Courtyard Café, a retail operation located in the Hopkins Center for the Arts, replaced old standard menu boards which contained only pricing information with Epicure digital menu boards. Now each serving counter has two displays that feature menu items, descriptions, pricing, and nutritional tagging along with moving graphics. These engaging new displays provided for quicker guest ordering on selections. In addition, Courtyard Café installed a large monitor to display Touchworks Txt-N-Tell feedback as guests wait for their made to order selections.

Touchwork Txt-N-Tell allows for better engagement with today’s students who view their phone as a part of their existence. In the first week of implementing the Txt-N-Tell program Dartmouth Dining Services received over 800 text messages. The management team responded to every single one, often within minutes. The Touchwork program also features a managerial module that allows for data classification and trending for use in menu planning, operational strategies, guest services. Students, faculty, and staff to feel as though they have a say in their overall dining experience. Additionally, Dartmouth Dining Services launched Touchwork’s text alert system, creatively name “The Scoop”. The Scoop enrollees receive exclusive information on dining happenings, promotions, and giveaways. The Scoop has played a powerful role in increasing participation by 30 percent in food truck sales, as well as theme event participation.

Student feedback has been incredible. Where previously there were questions about selections and allergens now there is engagement and efficient services. Reading Txt-N-Tell has become one of the student’s favorite activities. Time that was once used printing daily menu cards, is now being used to serve guests, promote upcoming events, and ensure culinary excellence. By linking food production software and digital menus dining has been able to save on at least 40 man hours per week, and approximately $75 per week in paper and toner supplies. Digital menus save over $400 each

Technology enhancements were not limited to just the front of the house, the Class of 1953 Commons implemented back of the house technologies to improve efficiencies, control inventory, and cut costs. In March, Dartmouth Dining Services launched the use of all in one computers in production areas and tablets for inventory. Ten computers were installed in kitchens which contain access to Computrition (menu management software), and PDF files with Computrition production reports. This allows for production staff to directly enter their post meal data into the software which was previously done

The Class of 1953 Commons also has four tablets which are used weekly for inventory purposes. Instead of hand writing the inventory and then handing it off to someone else for input, the storeroom staff enters the data live. By automating this process the inventory schedule has gone from monthly to weekly, which allows for tighter inventory control. Inventory levels were reduced by 64 percent, eliminated excess product, spoilage, and overflow. This also results in more organized storage, and product usage. By better managing these resources the dining can maintain a higher profit margin without increasing the cost to end consumers. The inventory process went from a 12-hour time commitment to a three-hour efficient process. Days of searching on paper sheets, and handing off paper to others to input are over, the team can put inventory data directly into the menu management system eliminating two steps from the previous system. Dartmouth Dining Services’ efforts in creatively utilizing Computrition were recently rewarded as the recipients of the 2017 Computrition Prodigy Award. The Prodigy Award highlights innovators in the industry in their efforts to drive efficiency, productivity, improved services to their guests. Dartmouth Dining Services and Computrition will continue to work closely to enhance technologies and their applications. Dartmouth Dining Services plans to find new avenues to improve operations to ultimately better the relationship with the campus community using technology as the backbone for future initiatives. Students need to feel like the dining halls are a home away from home, and know that they matter.


Looking for a degree in fresh nutrition?

The Subway® brand offers a variety of great tasting sandwiches and salads with menu options for multiple day-parts. Your students and faculty want a quick and portable meal, freshly prepared and made to order just the way they like it. When you either own or host a Subway® restaurant inside your campus, you become part of one of the world’s most recognized brands with over 600 locations in colleges and universities worldwide.

Contact: Joanne Kilgore 800.888.4848 x 1729 Or 203.877 4281 x 1729 Email: Kilgore_J@subway.com www.subway.com

Subway® is a Registered Trademark of Subway IP Inc. © 2017 Subway IP Inc.


Good , to go. FLAX & CHIA WHOLE GRAIN GLUTEN FREE HIGH FIBER

Now it’s even easier to enjoy the goodness of whole grain oatmeal just about anywhere, thanks to Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free Oatmeal Cups. The convenient grab-and-go, carry-anywhere cups feature hearty and healthy blends of whole grain gluten free oats, flaxseeds, chia seeds, fruits, nuts and spices. Available in four delicious flavors and ready in only three minutes —just add hot water or pop it in the microwave.

B O B S R E D M I L L . C O M / F O O D - S E RV IC E


WHAT’S HOT

What’s Hot on Campus

Principia College Dining Services Involves and Inspires Students by Lauren Fulton, graduate of Principia College, majored in business administration with a minor in sustainability and education

W

e are all connected in highly complex ways— so while a single act may seem inconsequential at the time, we cannot predict all the possible outcomes that may be triggered. For Principia College, a small liberal arts college perched on the scenic bluffs of the Mississippi River, single acts of “greening” have catapulted Dining Services into a leadership role in campus sustainability. The single act of composting kitchen food waste, for example, inspired students to establish volunteer, student-run composting in dormitories campus-wide. While we may not think about it on a daily basis, our dining decisions—individually and collectively—truly do matter. The food choices we make every day have a big effect on our community, on

the environment, and ultimately on the planet that we leave to the next generation. It’s a daunting challenge, but the good news is that even small changes in what we buy and eat can add up to real environmental benefits, including more humane treatment of livestock, less chemical waste, fewer climate-altering emissions, greater respect for the land, and more sustainable use of our ocean resources. Oftentimes, the hardest part of the hike is getting your boots on and getting out the door. At Principia, the students were the ones that really encouraged the “tying of the laces”, so to speak. Equally important has been Executive Chef Trey McCartt, who always listens to us with an open mind and holds strong to the idea that

shifting towards sustainability is the right thing to do. One small change has followed another, and today our Dining Services is Styrofoam®-free, serves free-range chicken and cage-free eggs, uses eco-friendly soaps with lower phosphates and less packaging, recognized for its 100 percent pre- and post-consumer composting, and has diverted 89 percent of waste from the landfill. Even the cooking oil is collected and recycled. Moreover, like the rest of the campus, our dining facilities have operated on 100 percent renewable power since 2009, embraced LED lighting, offer single stream recycling, and purchase only Energy Star® appliances. For a small, one-time fee, students can purchase a reusable eco-friendly to-go meal container,

C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

33


WHAT’S HOT

which can be traded for a clean container at each visit. At the end of each semester, the student may return the container in exchange for the deposit. As an alternative, single-use to-go cutlery, boxes, cups, lids, and straws are 100 percent compostable. Among Principia College’s newest student-driven triumphs are solar-powered umbrellas with the ability to charge mobile devices on the patio of our fast-casual concept operation, an 82.6 percent reduction in bottled water sales on campus

C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

34

Principia College was recognized - on the basis of our 100 percent composting of pre- and post-consumer food waste by Dining Services - as one of eight “Gold Partners” in the Illinois Food Scrap Coalition? That recognition has now led to Principia being recognized by the Office of the Chief Economist, U.S. Department of Agriculture, as a participant in the national Food Waste Challenge “to reduce, recover, and recycle food waste in the United States”. since 2010, the installation of water bottle filling stations, a “green roof” on the Science Center, participation in the local Green Dining Alliance, more vegan meal options, and the switch to Fair Trade, shade-grown coffee. Fair Trade coffee guarantees a set price to coffee growers, which makes them less vulnerable to exploitation and market fluctuations, improves the quality of life in their communities, and promotes more sustainable farming practices. “By offering opportunities for students to become more aware of and involved in environmental issues, we increase future generations’ awareness of the impact that their decisions have on the world,” says Dr. Karen Eckert, professor and director of the Center for Sustainability. “From an academic standpoint, we emphasize experiential learning, problem-solving, and leadership—and I think it’s wonderful that the students see these values reflected in our operations as well.” In addition to progress in renewable energy, waste management, and eco-friendly cleaning products, Principia College Dining Services emphasizes healthy menu items and transparent nutrition information.

A free Dining Services app features icons that identify foods with certain criteria, such as vegetarian or vegan. Food that comes from higher on the food chain or arrives at your plate after extensive processing tends to require more energy and release more global warming pollution into the air (e.g., vegetables have a much lower carbon footprint than a beef burger). With this in mind, Principia College Dining Services ensures that each meal features protein-balanced vegan and/ or vegetarian options; think soy yogurt, vegan frozen dishes, fresh salad bar, and hummus—yum! The college is piloting, in partnership with Sysco Foods, Beyond Meat®’s The Beyond Burger™ as a plant-based burger alternative. According to McCartt, “Our goal is to provide healthy and environmentally conscious options to all of our customers. We are a small college and it’s neither practical nor cost-effective to offer different meal plans, like organic, vegan, etc. So we put a lot of effort into providing a balance of healthy choices at every meal and being transparent about our choices. We’re really grateful to our students. They’re constantly pushing us to be the best that we can be!”

It is easy to overlook the environmental impacts of our food because these impacts are spread across all stages of production, including planting, harvesting, processing and transportation; which all along the way require energy, water, and chemicals. According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), agricultural lands occupy 40-50 percent of the Earth’s land surface and account for an estimated 10-12 percent of total global anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases. So, how do we do our part as colleges and consumers to make wise choices with future generations in mind? Fortunately, our experience has been that conservation and sustainability don’t have to be overwhelming undertakings. Each progressive decision, no matter how small by itself, is valuable in that it contributes to a shift in consciousness. At Principia College these small steps have inspired students, faculty, and staff to make their own contributions as well. There is still so much to be done, so throw your boots on and join us for the hike! Together, all of our daily decisions can add up to a better world.


Significant savings, proven expertise & powerful insights.

That’s the power of “&.” With nearly 100 competitively awarded contracts from top suppliers, technologies to improve your sourcing processes and expert consulting services, we’re here to help you save time and money and accomplish more with less. CONTACT US AND SAVE: (877) 693-2634

info@eandi.org

www.eandi.org


NUTRITION C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

36

Chicken and burger lovers love our delicious Ball Park Fully Cooked Chicken Patties because they pack big burger appearance, flavor and tenderness with bold, flame-grilled authenticity. Conveniently precooked, you enjoy speed to plate on multiple cook platforms that eases your back of house blues. Ball Park Chicken Patties have the name that consumers recognize and the flavor they crave. ®

®

Giving your customers what they prefer is on the line every day from insights to inventory. We’re here. We care. And we want to help you get answers to the deeper questions.

WHAT’S ON THE LINe?

©2017 Tyson Foods, Inc. Trademarks and registered trademarks are owned by Tyson Foods, Inc. or its subsidiaries, or used under license.

tm

Learn more: tysonfoodservice.com


NUTRITION

Get green, go plant based C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

37

by Sabina Yvas and Michele Simon

M

any colleges and universities across the nation have taken a hard hit to their budget in the past decade. Colleges and universities can raise capital and revenue to offset these cuts by diversifying their dining options. Students want more than the traditional fare and are demanding more transparency on the foods they are served—they want their food to be clean, sustainably grown, ethically sourced, and above all, taste good.

TAK ING S T E P S TO WA R D S PL A N T B A S E D ON C A MP U S

PL A N T B A SE D E AT I NG I S HE R E TO S TAY No longer seen as a trend, eating plant based is here to stay, and is quickly becoming the norm. A recent study by Wakefield Research found that 55 percent of U.S. residents (nearly 160 million people) made a conscious decision to eat more plant-based meals in 2016 and 42 percent of those respondents were young people in the 18-34-year-old range. In fact, 60 percent of millennials consume meat alternatives.

The first to pave the way was the University of North Texas, where in 2010, they reinvented an underperforming dining hall and opened the first all-vegan dining facility in the U.S., Mean Greens. They saw an astounding 20 percent increase in meal plans purchased in the first year and have retained this success to-date. A huge plus point, shared by their then director of special projects for Dining Services, Ken Botts, “is that the highest increase of meal plan purchases were from students who were not previously on a meal plan.”

The younger, Generation Z (born in 1996 or later) are even more focused on fresh and healthful items than the Millennials. A recent survey by Y-Pulse showed that these students want healthier grab-and-go options paired with late-night, and plant based menus with more authentic and international flavorings.

Similarly, in the Fall of 2016, Canisius College in Buffalo New York launched a new vegan station in their main dining hall (operated by Chartwells) to address students’ concerns that there weren’t enough plant-based protein options available on campus. Canisius remedied this issue by offering delicious options such as panko-crusted sweet

The University of Pittsburgh is joined by a number of campuses incorporating more plant based menus in their dining halls anywhere from a plant based pilot menu for Earth Day at NYU to the University of California, Berkeley recently opening a plant forward dining hall.


a recent Nielsen survey, 40 percent of Generation Z respondents said ingredients sourced sustainably are very important in their purchase decisions, followed by Millennials at 38 percent.

NUTRITION

With the goal of healthy eating and sustainability, the University of Pittsburgh recently launched a pop-up plant based station in their largest dining hall. “Within four weeks of launching our pop-up station, the number of students selecting plant based meals more than doubled for both lunch and dinner,” said Executive Chef Chris Cox of their Market Central dining hall. Nick Goodfellow, the sustainability coordinator for Pitt Dining by Sodexo also added: “The plant based options were so popular, we were running out of food and were thrilled to have zero food waste with demand being so high.”

C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

38

Growing plant based—where do we begin?

G

oing plant based doesn’t mean you have to completely overhaul foods students love. Rather, including more plant based menu items can be an opportunity to experiment with plant based versions of popular items and even expand your current offerings to include foods with more flare. The Plant Based Foods Association created an online searchable directory to help you find plant based alternatives for traditional meats, milks, cheeses, and more. This directory lists member companies that make the foods you’re looking for, from plant based burgers to bacon, with a click you can link directly to their site. Check it out: http://plantbasedfoods.org/our-members/ MORE INFO: • Vegan Fare Finds Traction Among Millennials, QSR Magazine, April 27, 2015 (survey 210 Analytics) • The Future of College and University Foodservice Is Now, Foodservice Equipment & Supplies, July 1, 2016 • Americans Are Nuts for Almond Milk, The Nielson Company, March 31, 2016 • Forward Food, Plant Based Culinary Trainings for Colleges and Universities

potato burgers piled high with sliced avocado and shaved red onion or seared tofu banh mi served with pickled zucchini noodles and a side of beet couscous. According to Chef Jennifer DiFrancesco, “the new station has more than quadrupled their lunch sales from the previously existing vegetarian station.”

S U S TA I N A BI L I T Y F O C U S Sustainability is a common goal for food service from reducing food waste to purchasing foods locally. With sustainability being at the forefront of concerns for students, campus leadership, and food service alike, the use of plant based ingredients and foods is a win-win. In

The University of Pittsburgh took tacos to another level during their pop-up, and created mushroom street tacos. Chef Chris Cox shared mouthwatering ingredients: “We used local Pennsylvania grown mushrooms marinated with Tamari soy sauce, sautéed with green peppers, fresh corn, red onions, and topped with Pico de Gallo, and a lime-cilantro infused vegan sour cream in a warm corn tortilla shell. We served that with grilled local zucchini and squash and chili seasoned black beans as sides. By far our most popular dish, we served more than 500 plates in one night for dinner,” he added.

G R O W ING PL A N T B A S E D IN R E TA IL

Sales of plant based milks and meats are booming in the retail sector. By increasing plant based options in vending, retail, and food service, your college or university can boost revenue. Grab-n-go items are often highly profitable and when combined with campus dining, students who have their preferences met are more likely to return as satisfied customers. Chef Jennifer DiFrancesco revamped their grab-n-go by dedicating one cooler to vegan and vegetarian items. “We saw a 78 percent increase in sales and 65 percent of those sales were from vegan and vegetarian items and recently we’ve seen a 183 percent increase in revenue combined from retail, board operations, and catering, all from sales of our plant based foods,” she said. Bottom line, making foods that taste good, are plant based, and more sustainable will appeal to your students, will help meet your college and university’s goals for sustainability, and will bring in the green—cash.


C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

40

2017

At a Glance

NATIONAL CONFERENCE


C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

41

NATIONAL CONFERENCE


NATIONAL CONFERENCE

THANK YOU TO OUR 2017 NATIONAL CONFERENCE SPONSORS

C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

42

Diamond

Platinum REACH

Gold Avocados from Mexico Bake’n Joy Foods, Inc Barilla America, Inc. Coca–Cola North America Hobart Hormel Foods Corporation

Land o’Lakes Meiko Rich Products Corporation Sambazon Co. Schwan’s Food Service, Inc. Sweet Street

Tyson Foods, Inc Ventura Foods Wells Enterprises/Blue Bunny Wild Planet Foods

Jennie-O Turkey Store Jim’s Organic Coffee Kitchens To Go built by Carlin La Colombe Coffee Roasters Lakeside Manufacturing Lamb Weston Maple Leaf Foods Nestle Dreyer’s Ice Cream Company Nestle Professional Oregon Fruit Products LLC Original Philly Cheesesteak Co. Pacific Foods Port City Java

Raindai LLC - Concept Italia RC Fine Foods Rippe Associates Rosa Foods, Inc. Starbucks Coffee Company Sugar Foods Corporation Sushi with Gusto T.W. Garner Food Company Tapingo, Inc. Teatulia Organic Teas Vintage Italia Webb Foodservice Design

Fetco Freshens Heartland Food Products Group Heritage Parts InnovAsian Cuisine Jones Dairy Farms Keen One Quinoa Kettle Cuisine, LLC

Kontos Foods Inc. LogoWorks Mercer Culinary Panda Restaurant Group, Inc. Partners By Design, LLC Real Rewards Cafe Seating Concepts, Inc Vegetarian Traveler, LLC

Niman Ranch

Spring USA

Silver Bakergroup Foodservice Consulting and Design Bob’s Red Mill Natural Foods BUNN Campbell’s Foodservice Caulipower Chobani The Dannon Company/DanoneWave Foodbuy LLC The Food Group Front Line Safety Hail Merry LLC Incredible Foods, Inc. Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams

Bronze AGreenOzzi, LLC Ajinomoto Windsor, Inc. Aurora Information Systems BSI, LLC CSM Cost Solutions The Den by Denny’s Ecolab Einstein Bros Bagels

In Kind Hubert


NACUFS 2017 Individual Award Winners Theodore W. Minah Distinguished Service Award: Rich Neumann, Ohio University Daryl Van Hook Industry Award: Greg Hetfield, Hormel Foods Corporation

2016 David R. Prentkowski Distinguished Lifetime Member: Scott Berlin, University of California – Santa Cruz Richard Lichtenfelt: Dawn Aubrey, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Richard Lichtenfelt: Dawn Aubrey

RECOGNITION

2017 David R. Prentkowksi Distinguished Lifetime Member: Richard Turnbull, Oregon State University

Daryl Van Hook Industry Award: Greg Hetfield

2017 David R. Prentkowksi Distinguished Lifetime Member: Richard Turnbull

2016 David R. Prentkowksi Distinguished Lifetime Member: Scott Berlin

Clark E. DeHaven Scholarship

T

he Clark E. DeHaven Scholarship Trust, established in 1990, honors Clark E. DeHaven, NACUFS’ first executive director. Its purpose is to provide merit scholarships to students at member institutions who are committed to pursuing careers in accredited programs in the foodservice profession or related areas. The trustees of

the NACUFS Clark E. DeHaven Scholarship Trust are pleased to announce that four - $5,000 scholarships were awarded to students at NACUFS member schools for use during the 2017-2018 academic year. Since 1992, 78 scholarships have been awarded in the total amount of $306,500. Congratulations to this years’ scholarship winners:

Victoria King Bowling Green State University

Nicole Wiley Oregon State University

Arielle Charlier University of Wisconsin - Stout

Chad Brown University of Central Missouri

C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

43


THE DAY MAY BE ROUGH, BUT YOUR BEURRE BL ANC IS SMOOTH. Land O Lakes® Butter Sauce Base brings real dairy deliciousness to savory entree sauces, sweet dessert sauces and more – without breaking or burning. So what’ll you make today?

FOODSERVICE ©2017 Land O Lakes, Inc.

Today is what you make it.

LandOLakesFoodservice.com


RECOGNITION

MINAH AWARD

C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

45

T

he Theodore W. Minah Distinguished Service Award is the highest honor NACUFS bestows upon an individual in recognition of their outstanding and enduring contributions to NACUFS and the foodservice industry. Each year, following a nomination process, nominees are evaluated and one recipient is chosen by the board of trustees and the past presidents to receive this prestigious award. This evening at the NACUFS 2017 National Conference, Dawn Aubrey, NACUFS’ immediate past president, presented the Minah Distinguished Service Award to Rich Neumann, director, culinary services of Ohio

University. “Rich’s career in college and university food service began in 1980 at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point (UWSP) and has worked in hospitality business a total of 37 years. This is a food service professional who has dedicated his career to the advancement of dining services on their campus and through NACUFS,” says Aubrey. Neumann held the position of NACUFS Treasurer for the past 10 years, accomplishing much for the association as it enters its 60th year. Another professional accomplishment occurred in 2013 when Neumann represented NACUFS internationally by delivering a keynote presentation

on benchmarking at the University Caterers Organization (TUCO) Conference in Wales, United Kingdom. Neumann says of winning the award, “I am humbled and deeply honored to be selected for the Ted Minah Award. During my 28-year career at OHIO, I have been fortunate to work with and now lead a team of diverse professionals who have developed and now run restaurant quality operations on our campus, serving 4.1 meals annually. Parents and alumni visiting OHIO this past year have said we offer world class food in an environment that is on trend.”


Loyal E. Horton Dining Awards

DINING

AWARDS

RESIDENTIAL DINING CONCEPTS

C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

46

Small School Gold Silver

Hendrix College Stevens Institute of Technology

Medium School Gold Silver Bronze Bronze

Azusa Pacific University Marist College Chapman University Monmouth University

Large School Gold Silver Bronze

University of Rhode Island University of Georgia University of Connecticut

RESIDENTIAL DINING – SPECIAL EVENT Small School Gold Silver Bronze Medium School Gold Silver Bronze Honorable Mention Large School Gold Silver Bronze Bronze Honorable Mention

Hendrix College Bowie State University Stevens Institute of Technology University of Colorado, Colorado Springs University of Montana – Game of Thrones University of Montana – Harry Potter and the Food Zoo Banquet The College of New Jersey University of Rhode Island Michigan State University – Superheroes Halloween Event Colorado State University Pennsylvania State University University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

RETAIL SALES – SINGLE CONCEPT Small School Gold Silver

United States Naval Academy Concordia College

Medium School Gold Silver Bronze Honorable Mention

University of San Diego Johnson County Community College University of Montana Azusa Pacific University

Large School Gold Silver Silver Bronze Honorable Mention Honorable Mention

University of Nevada, Reno University of Arizona Brigham Young University University of Washington University of Richmond University of New Mexico

RETAIL SALES – MULTIPLE CONCEPTS/MARKETPLACE Small School Gold

no winners

Medium School Gold

Azusa Pacific University

Large School Gold Silver Bronze Honorable Mention

Duke University University of Kansas Boston College University of Cincinnati

CATERING – SPECIAL EVENT Small School Gold

Hendrix College

Medium School Gold Silver Bronze Honorable Mention

College of the Holy Cross Marist College University of Montana Azusa Pacific University

Large School Gold Silver Silver Silver Bronze Honorable Mention

Vanderbilt University University of New Hampshire University of RichmondQueally Welcome Center Reception Yale University University of Richmond – 90th Birthday Celebration for Betty Gustafson Villanova University

CATERING – ONLINE MENU Small School Gold

Ashland University

Medium School Gold Silver Bronze Honorable Mention

University of Wisconsin-Stout University of Montana Azusa Pacific University University of St. Thomas

Large School Gold Silver Bronze Honorable Mention

University of Oregon North Carolina State University Colorado State University Princeton University


2017 NACUFS Sustainability Award Winners 2017 Outreach and Education Gold University of Texas at Austin Silver University of Massachusetts Amherst Bronze College of Saint Benedict Procurement Practices Gold Duke University Silver University of Montana Bronze Purdue University Waste Management Gold Unity College Silver Oregon State University Bronze Georgia State University Grand Prize Winner Unity College

NACUFS Nutrition Award Winners 2017 Best Local Foods Gold University of Connecticut Silver Northern Michigan University Bronze Oregon State University Most Innovative Wellness and Nutrition Program Gold University of Missouri Silver Georgia Southern University Bronze University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

2017

47


NACUFS

DINING

AWARDS

congratulates the 2017 GRAND PRIZE WINNERS:

C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

48

Azusa Pacific University • The University of Rhode Island • University of San Diego • Duke University • College of the Holy Cross • University of Oregon • Unity College Dining Services

1899 Dining Hall AZUSA PACIFIC UNIVERSITY

Gra nd

PRIZE WINNER S! NACUFS

A

zusa Pacific University’s Dining Services is committed to providing excellence in both service and product to the students, staff, faculty, administrators, and guests of the university. This is accomplished through the twelve different self-operated dining venues of the university. Through a multi-level point-based dining program, students are able to enjoy exceptional food from both all-you-care-to-eat and retail venues. As the only all-you-care-to-eat venue on campus, the 1899 Dining Hall provides a wide range of meal options within a large communal eating space. Seven different stations offer a variety of choices. Guests can get a delicious made-to-order omelet for breakfast at “Yolked”, make themselves a waffle at “Self-Served”, pickup hot entrées and sides at “Roasted”, quality stir-fry dishes and Pho at the Asian inspired “Wok’d”, fresh and healthy salads at “Tossed”, a panini at “Pressed”, and end with fresh baked cookies at “Frosted”. Multiple options are available for individuals with specific dietary needs. The central location of the 1899 Dining Hall on campus along with its all-you-care-to-eat program provides students, staff, faculty, and administration a single location to enjoy first class service, entrées, and an inviting environment to meet with friends and colleagues.


RI’s dining program services three campuses and consists of residential and commuter plans, catering options and retail outlets. Optional Ram Account increases flexibility with cashless access to on- and off-campus retail sites. Resident meal plans are available in 3 tiers, each providing unlimited access to our all-you-can eat dining halls and grab-n-go meals.

Candy Land: Mainfare Dining Center THE UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND

AWARDS

U

DINING

Mainfare Dining Center is open weekdays for lunch and dinner, and weekends for brunch and dinner. With 600 seats ranging from counter-stools to intimate tables, it appeals to both the “quick-meal customer” and those choosing to linger over cooked-to-order dishes. Mainfare features four platforms. Astros offers char-broiled beef or veggie burgers, hot dogs, soy dogs, fries, onion rings, and a toppings bars. Fusion offers 18 vegetables with beef, shrimp ,tofu, chicken, rice, pasta, and a choice of ethnic and regional sauces cooked-to-order in any combination (and an additional 46 items on the salad bar). Deli Creations has meatball grinders, daily specials, and made-to-order cold or grilled sandwiches. Homestyle promotes ethnic diversity through special entrées and side dishes.

C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

49

Candy Land aimed to increase Wednesday night attendance and provide a much needed break from the daily grind!

T

he University of San Diego is a Roman Catholic institution that has 8,508 undergraduate, graduate, and law students. Princeton Review ranks USD Dining 17th for Best Campus Food nationwide. Aromas coffeehouse is a retail operation within USD Dining, part of the self-operated Auxiliary Services division within Student Affairs. Aromas is a favorite community hub in the heart of campus. USD Dining encompasses six retail outlets, one residential/retail hybrid, a food truck and athletic concessions. Aromas opened ahead of the coffeehouse craze in 1994. The 2017 remodel allowed for improved traffic flow, new menu items, and a modern design. An array of innovative technology, such as a cold brew tap wall and mod bar system, brings enjoying brewed beverages to a whole new level of experiential retail. Today’s student customers want to have an experience when they dine and shop. It is imperative that our brewing and cooking is done right in front of them with the latest equipment that is not only innovative and effective, but looks intriguing and aesthetic. We want to educate our customers about where their coffee and tea comes from. What is the journey? How is it grown, procured, and brewed? From plant to cup!

Aromas UNIVERSITY OF SAN DIEGO


Welcome to West Union DUKE UNIVERSITY

D

uke Dining’s program creates opportunities to engage students in exploring different cuisines and traditions from around the world; and, does so by providing access to over 55 locations made up of restaurants that deliver, food trucks, and on-campus locations including 13 new restaurants in the newly renovated West Union Building.

DINING

AWARDS

West Union is a gathering place where the Duke community comes alive and sets a new bar for college dining, creating a one-of-a-kind dining experience. Duke Dining invited well-known area restaurateurs to operate these unique restaurants that craft healthy, fresh meals true to the region of origin with authentic recipes, traditional cooking techniques, and flavors. Each of the 13 restaurants features a distinct and unique custom design creating an independent look and feel for each venue to give them a streetscape, open-air market appearance that flows within West Union.

50 C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

West Union has received national recognition with an overwhelmingly positive reaction of the look and feel of the facility to the quality and authenticity of the food. Also “wowed” by West Union was Mario Batali who was here to kick off the opening of The Chef’s Kitchen and tour all 13 restaurants and described West Union as the “Temple Of Excellence!”

Become More: Campaign Kickoff Gala Kimball Hall COLLEGE OF THE HOLY CROSS

O

n the evening of April 30, 2016, the College of the Holy Cross kicked off their $400 Million “Become More” campaign with a Gala in historic Kimball Hall. The Gala was part of a weekend-long celebration with performances, lectures, and other events showing the history and future of the College. The event would be unlike anything the campus had seen before, including a complete transformation of the dining hall to set the stage for a truly extraordinary night. Holy Cross Dining had the task to create a menu that was both grand and evocative of an intimate gathering with friends—understated, yet exceptional. Along with creating a delicious and elegant meal for the weekend’s main event, the Office of Advancement had one additional request for Dining: incorporate the College’s color (purple) throughout the evening. In addition to the 1,000-plus faculty, staff, students, and alumni expected for campaign-related events, the College would also host their annual Academic Conference for faculty, and the board of trustees would hold private meetings and events separate from the campaign launch. Along with residential service for students, Holy Cross Dining would cater more than 30 separate events during the course of the weekend.


e recently redesigned the University Catering website— including the menu. Our business strategy is to provide seamless service and excellent quality to our clients. We incorporated our business strategy in the creation of the menu by improving the user experience on laptops, desktops, tablets, and mobile platforms; all while creating an inviting culinary experience for our clients. We used photos and descriptions that showed the quality and creativity and conveyed excellent catering experiences, including table settings and full-service catering.

UNIVERSITY OF OREGON

AWARDS

W

DINING

Success is defined as providing an excellent experience to our clients, and serving our campus and community. The menu allows us to extend the seamless service clients experience at an event to the initial contact a client may have with us when visiting our menu online. When we compare our analytics for the website before and after the redesign we see a 252 percent increase in traffic to the menu page over the same six-month time period before the launch of the new site. Our user-friendly online ordering system pre-populates order form fields for returning clients. Users can view past orders and the status of orders. The online form has reduced the use of paper in our office. This menu allows clients to learn about our sustainability measures and to sign up for compost and recycling stations at an event.

C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

51

We are proud of our full-service event planning, incorporating locally sourced foods and partnerships with farms, and our cultural authenticity though including client family recipes and guest chefs. We are also proud of the professionalism of our student staff and leadership development programs for students in front-of-house/ back-of-house positions. We are also proud to provide large-scale VIP events for 400-1200 people and our diversity in culinary expertise.

F

or Unity College Dining, supporting the college mission means sustainable stewardship of the triple bottom line: environment, ethics, and economics. Unity College became the first school in the nation to divest from fossil fuels; in Dining, we make important decisions that support this deep commitment to doing well by doing good.

Toward Zero-Waste Dining: Keys To Successful Organics Recyling UNITY COLLEGE DINING SERVICES

Taking a hard look at the impacts of dining on our campus footprint meant confronting the amount of waste generated from plate food, napkins, and disposable items provided at catered events. When this material goes to landfill, it accelerates climate change. We were inspired to make a change to look at this waste as a resource. Beginning with the return of students to campus in August of 2016, Unity College Dining teamed up with the Sustainability Office and a local business to implement a waste program diverting 100 percent of food service organics. Exeter Agri-Energy, and its hauling partner Agri-Cycle, is a family-owned company that uses an anaerobic process to convert organic waste into energy that helps power a multi-generational dairy farm in central Maine. Successful implementation required five key ingredients: (1) Mission, (2) Partners, (3) Consistency, (4) Training, and (5) Purchasing. Costs included purchasing of new Organics bins, signage, and a ramp and lighting added to an existing storage shed that serves as our central collection site. Outcomes are phenomenal. We have diverted 23.25 tons of organic waste from the landfill from August 2016 to February 2017, and our overall campus diversion rate went from 37 percent to 47 percent almost overnight. Measurement is easy because our hauler reports the number of full bins picked up on a weekly basis, and each bin holds a known weight of organic matter.

Gra nd

PRIZE WINNER S! NACUFS


Love Sunflower Seeds? You’ll Love SunButter®. • U.S. Grown and Roasted Sunflower Seeds • 7 Grams of Protein – 1.12 oz = 2T = 1 M/MA • Top 8 Food Allergen Free

SunButterFoodservice.com

©2017 SunButter is a registered trademark of Red River Commodities, Inc. and used under license.


RECOGNITION ROBERT BANKERT

1st Place: Gold Medal Robert Bankert, University of Massachusetts Amherst (Northeast Region) 2nd Place: Silver Medal C. David Wolf, The Ohio State University (Midwest Region) 3rd Place: Silver Medal Travis Robert Johnson, Tulane University (Southern Region) 4th Place: Silver Medal Conor Maki, University of Minnesota – Duluth (Continental Region) 5th Place: Silver Medal Mauro Daniel Rossi, The Art Institute of California – Hollywood (Pacific Region) 6th Place: Bronze Medal Michael Blackwell, Fairleigh Dickinson University (Mid-Atlantic Region)

I

ndividual competitors from each of NACUFS six regions had 60 minutes to produce a creative entrée incorporating the featured ingredient of bone-in pork loin. The culinary challenge recognizes outstanding food preparation and presentation skills in collegiate dining services. The winners of each of the association’s regional culinary contests square off at the national conference for gold, silver, and bronze medals before a live audience of college and university food service managers and industry suppliers.

Robert Bankert, chef at University of Massachusetts Amherst, was awarded first place in the 17th annual Culinary Challenge, held at the NACUFS national conference on July 13, 2017. Bankert won the challenge and a gold medal from the ACF with his dish, “Pork Loin wrapped with Porcini Farce & Confit Fat Cap, Polenta, braised wild mushrooms & kale, skillet roasted fennel, apricot glaze”

Bankert commented on his win, “Nashville is a really great city, and it was great to be a part of my first National NACUFS Conference. I want to thank UMass for all of the support they gave me before and during the competition. The competition was fierce as there were a lot of talented culinarians! Winning the competition was the goal, however it was the overall experience and knowledge

C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

Culinary Challenge Results

53


MICHAEL BLACKWELL

RECOGNITION

C. DAVID WOLF

MAURO DANIEL ROSSI

C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

54

TRAVIS ROBERT JOHNSON

C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

CONOR MAKI

himself in cooking and attended the New England Culinary Institute after high school. After graduating with a BA in Food & Beverage Management, Bob moved to Florida to work at Admiral’s Cove in Jupiter, working in both the front of the house and the back of the house. In 2006, Bob decided he wanted to move back to the northeast, and took a job as a sous chef at Castle Hill Inn in Newport, RI. Chef Bob’s culinary career took off from there as was promoted to Chef Tournant and then to Executive Sous Chef while helping Castle Hill Inn achieve the prestigious status of Relais & Châteaux. Chef Bob continued his growth in Newport as he went on to be the Executive Chef of The Mooring Restaurant, part of the same restaurant group that owns Castle Hill Inn. Chef Bob helped make The Mooring one of the best seafood restaurants in the state while focusing on sustainable, locally caught seafood.

that I picked up along the way that made the competition a real success for me. All of the Chef’s should be proud of making it to the National Competition as it was no easy task to get there for any of us!” Chef Bob Bankert grew up in the restaurant industry, working at his family’s restaurant in upstate New York at a young age. Bob quickly realized that he wanted to continue to immerse

In 2014, Chef Bob moved to Amherst, MA to become Chef de Cuisine at the award-winning UMass Amherst Dining Services. Chef Bob brought a lot of new ideas and inspiration to the menus at UMass Amherst, including a focus on sustainable seafood, and has helped UMass become #1 in the nation for Best Campus Food. Outside of work, Bob loves spending time with his wife and two girls, as well as running, brewing beer, and traveling.


*

loaded fries

55

*

breakfast chili

*

harvest chili

*

chili mac

* made easier

A delicious range of can’t miss chili options are ready dy to become ours. all-time favorites. Start with Bush’s Best and make it yours. Visit bushbeansfoodservice.com to learn more. ®

© 2017 Bush Brothers & Company. All rights reserved. 7/17


See what’s working for your peers. We surveyed 30 colleges with meal box programs in place to see what it takes to be best-in-class. So, why should you implement a reusable meal box program? Giving students the freedom to take their food to go keeps them eating on campus instead of spending their money elsewhere. Other benefits include reducing dispoables and increasing sustainability. But, how do you make sure your program is successful? Download the SlideShare below for 5 Key Elements to making your meal box program a hit.

FREE SLIDESHARE Download now at: go.whirleydrinkworks.com/campusdining


Interest Sessions Serving Fresh Experiences: Teaching and Demonstration Kitchens in Action Written by: Tarah Schroeder, LEED AP, principal, director of sustainability at Ricca Design Studios Presented by: Melissa Schrader, M.S., R.D., L.D., Unit Director, Kramer Dining Center/Instructor Department of Housing and Dining Services at Kansas State University

Two very different campuses worked with Ricca Design Studios to customize and implement demonstration kitchens to create life-enriching, memorable experiences that transcend a good meal. The focus of the presentation was on how design can encourage adaptability in dining centers, including a demonstration kitchen to teach students mindful eating and healthy cooking. Both schools committed to students’ life success through teaching and incorporating demonstration kitchens in their dining centers—encouraging students’ interest in nutrition, making cooking and culinary techniques accessible to everyone, supporting academic programs, and providing a platform to showcase guest chefs.

Melissa Schrader, unit director and instructor at Kansas State University, spoke about how their academic programs and dining centers are closely intertwined on her campus. The recently opened Kramer Dining Center includes an entire teaching platform that can support a changing menu from guest chefs as well as formal classes focused on “Food for Fifty”, complete with stadium seating and overhead screens. As executive chef at Stanford University, Daniel Lott leads his campus’ nationally recognized nutrition program, “Jamie Oliver’s Cook Smart Program”, a hands-on cooking program using health recipes and inspiring teaching style. He showcases Stanford Dining’s goal to inspire healthier and happier lives thru food education for students. Quote: “Today’s students are looking for life enriching, memorable experiences that transcend a good meal. Teaching and demonstration kitchens offer unique programs that draw interest in from across campus, teach life skills, and offer memorable out of classroom teaching experiences.” - Tarah Schroeder, LEED AP, principal, director of sustainability at Ricca Design Studios

Brand Together: The Expanding Role of Campus Dining in Student Success Written by: Julie Akard, marketing manager, Vanderbilt Campus Dining Presented by: Nona Golledge, Principal, Bakergroup Carol Peterson, Principal, Bakergroup Paule Houle, University of Colorado Boulder Summary: • Campus dining programs bring added value to the college experience by helping prepare students for their careers.

C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

57

David Lott, Culinary Educator and Training Executive Chef, Stanford University Summary:

NATIONAL CONFERENCE

NACUFS 2017 National Conference


• Plan experiential programs that make sense for your campus. • Provide the proper structure & properly designed facilities. • Tell students what they are learning & why it benefits them. • Tell your added value story to: prospective students, parents, and administrators. The perception among business leaders is that only 11 percent of college graduates are actually prepared for success in the work place!

The most important attribute in evaluating college graduates for hire is that the student completed an internship and employment during college. Campus dining programs bring added value to the college experience by helping prepare students for their careers. Here is what employers want, ranked in relative importance of attributes in evaluating college graduates for hire: Internships (23), Employment Dining College (21), College Major (13), Volunteer Experience (12), Extracurricular Activities (10), Relevance of Coursework (8), College GPA (8), and College Reputation (5). Quote: “One advantage we have on our campuses is the opportunity to assist students in being prepared for the real world. Through employment with campus dining, our students get an experience of what it is like to work with others, explore time management, and budget their finances. All the while they serve as ambassadors for the program.” – Julie Akard, marketing manager, Vanderbilt Campus Dining

RENOVATION INNOVATION Creating Campus Community with Flexible Interim Facilities From planned renovations to unplanned disasters, foodservice operators must serve thousands of students daily, and meet lifestyle and nutritional expectations.

CHALLENGE:

Interim facilities from Kitchens To Go keep you cooking. We equip your team with mobile and modular solutions to keep foodservice operations running.

SOLUTION:

To learn more, watch the Emory University video at KitchensToGo.com/video, or call for a consultation at (630) 355-1660.

We Keep You Cooking!

www.KitchensToGo.com


Presented by: Lorey Duprey, Director of Dining Services – Wyman Commons, Unity College Jennifer DeHart, Chief Sustainability Officer, Unity College Unity has exploded the structure of their organization by creating an inter-reliant executive board and then placing Dining Services directly under the sustainability officer. This novel approach clearly aligns the core actions of dining: procurement, production, and service with the central issues of sustainability. Gone are many of the barriers between business and environmental stewardship. Unity Dining maximizes their partnerships with farms and vendors to make true advances in sustainable dining that further the college’s mission of “turning environmentalism into business as usual”. Strategies for Success include: • Align key functions. • Revise job descriptions. • Nested revenue expectations. • Standard Sustainability Expectations. • Find unique opportunities. • Cross-Training. Quote “Unity College proves that unity is not just a name.” – Richard Clow, assistant director, Bryn Mawr College

Keeping Kosher on Campus Written by: Sojo Alex, associate, Envision Strategies Presented by: Sojo Alex, associate, Envision Strategies Kurt Kwiatkowski, corporate chef, Michigan State University Melody Vuong, associate director, retail & catering, Tufts University Pam Lampitt, director of business services, University of Pennsylvania Ian Magowan, assistant director of dining programs, Johns Hopkins University Summary: The panel members discussed the following questions with respect to their campuses: • If an operator is embarking on providing substantial kosher food on campus, what are your words of wisdom? • What process did you go through to start a kosher program on your campus? • How much did you spend on this program and how do you maintain those operating costs?

• Could you talk more about sourcing and any other standards you follow for the kosher program on your campus? • Describe your partnership with the Hillel organization on campus? • Do you work with the community for any catering events? • Tell us about your hiring process for this location. • What do you do to educate the staff and community about Kosher? • Do you have separate kosher meal plans on your campus? If yes, what are they and how are being used? Do other campuses need to have a separate kosher meal plan? • Do you do any marketing of the Kosher locations on your campus? There is a growing demand for meals with various dietary requirements among colleges and universities. Kosher is one such demand among students. Operators are looking for ways to satisfy this need by providing Kosher options while keeping operating costs in mind.

59 C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

Written by: Richard Clow, assistant director, Bryn Mawr College

NATIONAL CONFERENCE

Outside the Box, a Unique Strategic Structural Redesign


NATIONAL CONFERENCE

Four campuses shared how they serve Kosher food on their campuses at varying levels.

C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

60

• Michigan State University – Certified Station: MSU has partnered with a local restaurant to provide Kosher meals only at lunch during the week at three of their dining halls. The food is prepared and packaged at the restaurant and delivered to MSU. • Johns Hopkins University – Prepared Station: JHU has a Kosher station at their Fresh Food Café dining hall where the food is prepared and served to the campus community. • University of Pennsylvania – Dining Hall: Falk Dining Hall at UPenn serves only Kosher meals. • Tufts University – Retail Café: Tufts serves Kosher sandwich and soup options at their retail deli café called Pat et Lox. This session gave attendees an idea of things to consider and other resources when getting a request for a station or facility for any special dietary requirement. Quote “One of the trends that I have noticed as part of my visit to various campuses is the demand for meals with specific dietary requirements. Kosher is one example of this demand. Speaking with operators, I realized that along with the usual questions such as ‘why do I need Kosher’, and ‘how do I operate a Kosher location’, there were others such as ‘do I need a Kosher meal plan’, ‘how can I manage costs’, ‘how to be a better partner’, etc. I started researching and reading about how different campuses offer Kosher foods and found four different main levels Certified Station, Prepared Station, Dining Hall, and Retail Café.” - Sojo Alex, Associate, Envision Strategies

One of the most revealing segments of this talk was on “Buckets and Dippers”. In this segment, Nancy and Kim remind us that everyone has a bucket to fill, and everyone also has a dipper they use to empty someone else. As a leader, it’s critical to continually build into our teams – they have entrusted a significant portion of their life to their leaders. For the employee, it’s often the informal “filling of the bucket” that matters most – asking about their kid’s soccer game, checking how a doctor’s appointment went—the small simple acts of greeting that can leave a lasting impact. And as leaders fill, they themselves are filled. Teams perform best when they have proper motivation, training, recognition, and leaders who continually model for them what is expected both personally and professionally. By creating these positive working relationships with staff, it is certain to result in a more inclusive work environment where everyone is at their absolute best. Referenced Resources from this session for more information: • “Everyday Bias,” by Howard J. Ross • “Monday Morning Leadership,” by David Cottrell • “Radical Candor,” by Kim Scott • “The Diversity and Inclusion Handbook,” by Sondra Thiederman

The magazine of the National Association of College & University Food Services

Leaders vs Managers

Advertising Information and Article Submission

Advertising of a product or service in this publication does not imply endorsement. Advertisers assume responsibility and liability for the content of any advertising.

The National Association of College & University Food Services is exempt from any liability resulting from publication of articles. Editorial mention of commercial interests is intended entirely as an information service to readers and should not be construed as an endorsement, actual or implied, by NACUFS.

Relationship Building Through Inclusive Performance Management

The opinions expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect the official opinions of NACUFS. ©2017 The National Association of College & University Food Services. All rights reserved. No part of this publication shall be reproduced, stored in a retrievable system, or transmitted in any form, by any means, which includes but is not limited to, electronic, mechanical photocopying, recording, or otherwise without the prior written consent of NACUFS.

Rochelle Rizzi, Director of Marketing & Communications

Associate Editor

Kortney Pitts, Marketing Coordinator

• How much of your time in your role are you a manager? Leader?

NACUFS BOARD OF TRUSTEES President

Patti Klos, Tufts University

President-elect

Robert Holden, University of Georgia

Immediate Past President

Amy Beckstrom, University of Colorado

Treasurer

Jeff Yawn, Georgia Southern University

Industry Trustee

Jon Garrett, Premier REACH

Chief Executive Officer

Gretchen Couraud, NACUFS

At-large Trustees

Ken Toong, University of Massachusetts – Amherst

• How do you move from manager to leader?

Sam Samaan, Azusa Pacific University Smitha Haneef, Princeton University

Written by: Erik Haviland, Creative Director & VP, Foodesign Associates Presented by:

• Why is it important to be a leader?

Editor-in-chief

• How do you communicate respect for people different from yourself?

Tim Backes, University of New Mexico

Kristina Patridge, University of Alabama Alecia Stultz, University of Kansas

Steve Mangan, University of Michigan

Nancy Monteer, University of Missouri Guest Trustee

Pam Schreiber, University of Washington

For advertising information, email advertising@nacufs.org or call (517) 827-1111.

Nancy Monteer, associate director, Campus Dining Services at University of Missouri

2017 NATIONAL CONFERENCE

Kim Stonecipher, training and development coordinator, Campus Dining Services at University of Missouri

CORRECTIONS: “Campus Dining Today” strives to provide accurate journalism and fair reporting. It is our policy to correct substantive errors of fact. If you think we may have published incorrect information, please call (517) 827-1111 or email news@nacufs.org.

The magazine of the National Association of College & University Food Services

Buckets and Dippers

Summary: Advertising Information and Article Submission

There are many traits that characterize the great leaders: • How can you coach every member ability to inspire, decisiveness, innovation, confidence, of the team to become better? and passion. However, to be a great leader, inclusiveness • Recognition of, and communication to, NACUFS BOARD OF TRUSTEES is an often-overlooked trait. Without developing the necessary relationship-building skills to develop a team everyone on the team. through inclusion, a leader will never rise to be the best • Two factors you should never forget, that they can be and their team will languish. Advertising of a product or service in this publication does not imply endorsement. Advertisers assume responsibility and liability for the content of any advertising.

The National Association of College & University Food Services is exempt from any liability resulting from publication of articles. Editorial mention of commercial interests is intended entirely as an information service to readers and should not be construed as an endorsement, actual or implied, by NACUFS. The opinions expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect the official opinions of NACUFS. ©2017 The National Association of College & University Food Services. All rights reserved. No part of this publication shall be reproduced, stored in a retrievable system, or transmitted in any form, by any means, which includes but is not limited to, electronic, mechanical photocopying, recording, or otherwise without the prior written consent of NACUFS.

Editor-in-chief

Rochelle Rizzi, Director of Marketing & Communications

Associate Editor

Kortney Pitts, Marketing Coordinator

President

Patti Klos, Tufts University

President-elect

Robert Holden, University of Georgia

Immediate Past President

Amy Beckstrom, University of Colorado

Treasurer

Jeff Yawn, Georgia Southern University

Industry Trustee

Jon Garrett, Premier REACH

Chief Executive Officer

Gretchen Couraud, NACUFS

At-large Trustees

Ken Toong, University of Massachusetts – Amherst

In this NACUFS 2017 session, Nancy Monteer and Kim Stonecipher of University of Missouri shed some light on this critical component of leadership. Their talk on “Relationship Building Through Inclusive Performance Management” covers a variety of topics such as personal values and biases, integrity, relationship building, and hiring tough. For advertising information, email advertising@nacufs.org or call (517) 827-1111.

Guest Trustee

regardless of your title or position.

Sam Samaan, Azusa Pacific University Smitha Haneef, Princeton University

Tim Backes, University of New Mexico

• Your scorecard. • You need your team more than your team needs you.

Kristina Patridge, University of Alabama Alecia Stultz, University of Kansas

Steve Mangan, University of Michigan

Nancy Monteer, University of Missouri

Pam Schreiber, University of Washington

2017 NATIONAL CONFERENCE

CORRECTIONS: “Campus Dining Today” strives to provide accurate journalism and fair reporting. It is our policy to correct substantive errors of fact. If you think we may have published incorrect information, please call (517) 827-1111 or email news@nacufs.org.


n! o o p S a h t i w t at i E l l ’ u o Y d o o So G

L i v e We l l

E a t We l l

B e We l l

New in 2017: On-The-Go Packets & a NEW Flavor! For additional information, contact: Mary Crogan p: 612.716.3436 MCrogan@SweetHarvestFoods.com

Jennifer Becker p: 507.263.8599 x255 JBecker@SweetHarvestFoods.com

www.PBCrave.com


Grow Your Plant-Based Menu With RC Fine Foods. RC Fine Foods offers a full portfolio of products that will not only expand your plant-based menu, but will deliver exceptional taste every time. For more information on our products, and to get a free copy of our plant-based menu guide with recipes, call 1.800.526.3953 or visit us online at www.rcfinefoods.com.

Bases • Sauces • Gravies • Dressings • Desserts

Summer 2017 Campus Dining Today  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you