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THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF COLLEGE & UNIVERSITY FOOD SERVICES

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Recruitment, Retention, and Training

People! ALSO INSIDE: What Students Want Employee Engagement Food on the Move


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NACUFS® AWARDS RECOGNIZE EXCELLENCE in COLLEGIATE DINING for YOU and YOUR INSTITUTION Market an award-winning dining program to your customers, showcase your success, and share your ideas with your industry peers. Winning an award for your dining program, not only gains national recognition, but also instills a sense of pride and team spirit with your staff! Become recognized as a leader in the foodservice industry. Each year, NACUFS gives out several national recognition awards to honor individuals and organizations for their outstanding service to the association and its membership.

Apply TODAY at NACUFS.org/recognition I cannot think of a better platform than NACUFS, where college and university professionals can come together to recognize each other, share ideas, and come up with the next best innovation — not only for our market segment, but for the whole foodservice industry.

Zia Ahmed Senior Director of Dining Services The Ohio State University

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www.myNACUFS.org For more information on how awards and other member benefits can help you elevate dining on your campus, please call the NACUFS office at 517.332.2494 or email membership@NACUFS.org.


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The magazine of the National Association of College & University Food Services

Advertising Information and Article Submission Advertising of a product or service in this publication does not imply endorsement. Advertisers assume responsibility and liability for the content of any advertising. The National Association of College & University Food Services is exempt from any liability resulting from publication of articles. Editorial mention of commercial interests is intended entirely as an information service to readers and should not be construed as an endorsement, actual or implied, by NACUFS. The opinions expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect the official opinions of NACUFS. The number of mailings sent to each member institution is based on annual dues classification. There is an $85 charge for all additional mailings. An annual subscription to “Campus Dining Today”® is $60 for members and $75 for nonmembers. ©2016 The National Association of College & University Food Services. All rights reserved. No part of this publication shall be reproduced, stored in a retrievable system, or transmitted in any form, by any means, which includes but is not limited to, electronic, mechanical photocopying, recording, or otherwise without the prior written consent of NACUFS.

Editor-in-chief

Rochelle Rizzi, Director of Marketing & Communications

Associate Editor

Kortney Pitts-Berehula, Marketing Coordinator

NACUFS BOARD OF TRUSTEES President

Amy Beckstrom, University of Colorado

President-elect

Pattio Klos, Tufts University

Immediate Past President

Dawn Aubrey, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Treasurer

Rich Neumann, Ohio University

At-large Trustees

Ken Toong, University of Massachusetts – Amherst Sam Samaan, Azusa Pacific University Smitha Haneef, Princeton University Tim Backes, University of New Mexico Kristina Patridge, University of Alabama Alecia Stultz, University of Kansas

Southern Region President

Susan Van Gigch, University of Georgia

Pacific Region Director

Kris Klinger, University of Southern California

Industry Trustee

Greg Hetfield, Hormel

Chief Executive Officer

Gretchen Couraud, NACUFS

For advertising information, email advertising@nacufs.org or call (517) 827-1111.

CORRECTIONS: “Campus Dining Today” strives to provide accurate journalism and fair reporting. It is our policy to correct substantive errors of fact. If you think we may have published incorrect information, please call (517) 827-1111 or email news@nacufs.org.


FEAT URES 6 8

LEADER SHIP AGENDA CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER’S PER SPECTIVE

10 FROM THE EDITOR 13 FEATURE D r iv in g E mploy ee R e te nt io n . Do d g e b ur n - ou t a n d i nc re a s e e m p loye e e n g a g e me n t . L e a r n how to in co r p o ra te te ch n olo g y a n d d e velo p t ra i n i n g p ro g ra ms to re ta i n th e b e s t a n d b r i g hte s t !

Kamran and Company, Inc. Food Service Consultant and Contractor

16 BY DESIGN Va lle y D i ni n g C e nte r, We s te r n M ichi ga n U ni ve rs i t y; K a la m a zo o, MI

20 BY DESIGN P ied m o nt C e nt ra l, G eorg i a S ta te U ni ve rs it y; A tl a nta , G A

25 WHAT’S HOT ON CAMPUS T ra i ni n g , to E n ga ge. D i s cove r s ome s u cce s s s to r ie s from your peers on how safety training is creating a fun and engag ing environment for employees, as they focus on quality customer ser vice from the inside-out.


Fa ll + W inter

2016 29 NUTRITION

43 MEMBER INSIGHT

Pl a nt- b a s ed C u l i n a r y T ra i n i n g. No r th e r n A r i z on a Uni ve rs i t y ’s s u cce s s f ul col la b o ra t ion w i th No r th e r n A r i z on a He a l th ca re p ave the wa y fo r to p - n o tch 2- d a y t ra i ni n g th rou g h the Hum a n e S o c i e t y o f the U n i ted S ta te s ’ fo o d a nd n u t r i t ion te a m.

Mot i va t i n g O ur Peo ple. F in d in g c rea t ive wa y s to p rov i d e you r e mp loyee s w i th a “p ie ce o f the pie ” – tha t in t r in s i c b u y - in we ’re a l l lo ok in g fo r f rom our tea m — ca n b e d i ff i c u l t . Me mb e rs sha re wha t mo t iva te s the ir tea ms a n d s u r ve y re s u l t s p u l l to g e th e r s ome t re nd in g s ta t s . How d o you comp a re?

33 NUTRITION S m a l l C olle ge , B i g A ch ie ve m e nt s . G r i n n el l Col le g e show s tha t b e i n g s m a l l, d o e s n’t me a n you ca n’t b e m i g ht y! T h i s l i ttle col le g e on the p ra i r i e showca s e s m a ny d e co ra te d che fs a n d a re cele b ra t i n g i n a BIG wa y.

47 FEATURE W h a t S t ud e nt s Wa nt . S t u d e n t s we i g h - in w i th a n t id o te s o f wha t m a tte rs to th e m f rom fo o d a s f uel to fo o d a s f u n . How ca n you u s e th i s feed ba ck to c rea te the mo s t e ffe ct ive p ro g ra ms on you r ca mp u s?

37 FOOD Hot W heels , Food on the Move. S everal colle ges and universities come to gether to share their food tr uck stor ies, che fs, and dishes. For full recipes, please visit www.NACUF S .org/CDT

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LEADERSHIP

AGENDA

L E A DE R S HIP

C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

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I had the pleasure of participating in the inaugural meeting of the education committee in October. This committee was appointed following an open call for volunteers, based on competencies and geographic diversity. Committee chair, Kory Samuels, executive director of dining at Rochester Institute of Technology, and his team are well qualified AMY BECKSTROM and eager to complete NACUFS president the work assigned by the amy.beckstrom@colorado.edu board. Briefly, committee members include: Teresa Cryan, food safety assistant manager at University Colorado Boulder, an experienced ServSafe trainer in healthcare and collegiate foodservices; Russell Reeves, bakery manager at University Wisconsin, Stevens Point, who has a teaching background in culinary arts; Ronnae Smiley, student training and development specialist at University of Michigan, who has an academic background in education; Jennifer Goupil, student program coordinator at UC, Riverside who brings expertise in data management; Dannika Kemp Avent, a member of Yale Hospitality’s leadership team, who is responsible for staff training and organization development; Denise Fields, c-stores operation manager at NC State University who recently reengineered NC State Dining’s customer service training. The primary charge for the committee is oversight for the development of a comprehensive education strategy, a roadmap that will help the association identify and build member education that adds member value. The charge is guided by an end statement approved by the board: NACUFS education is relevant, learner-centered, high quality, and supports excellence in collegiate dining. After dissecting the charge and end statement, the committee identified four component parts critical to accomplishing the end statement: learner, content, delivery vehicle, and business model (see diagram at right). In visioning NACUFS as the place where dining professionals are recruited, educated, and developed as leaders in the profession, the committee realized the magnitude of their task, and the tremendous opportunity

agenda to build upon past successes to enhance the future of NACUFS education. The meeting outcome included the approval of a request for proposal (RFP) to engage an education consultant to help NACUFs develop an education strategy based on four key questions: 1 Who is our learner (or learners)? 2 What content does the learner need? 3 How should the content be delivered (e.g., conferences, institutes, webinars, etc.) 4 How will the association pay for education?

Four Component Parts of an Education Strategy

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LEARNER CONTENT DELIVERY VEHICLE

BUSINESS MODEL

END STATEMENT

I am pleased to say that the request for proposal was distributed in early November. This is an exciting step for the education committee! I want to thank them for their hard work and passionate support at this inaugural meeting, and I’m very confident they will provide strong oversight for the development of a comprehensive education strategy!


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CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER’S PERSPECTIVE

C HI E F EXE C U T I V E OFF IC E R ’S Culinary Throwdown

C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

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It was a beautiful fall day, a bit cloudy and overcast, but warm with an array of orange, red, and rust hews. A perfect setting for the second annual MSU vs. UM Culinary Throwdown competition pitting the Michigan State University (MSU) and University of Michigan (UM) students, sous chefs and executive chefs against each other in a healthy competition. The GRETCHEN COURAUD event was held right outside chief executive officer Shaw Hall, under a tent, to gcouraud@nacufs.org engage students walking by on the way to the infamous MSU/UM football game. Students enjoyed the day, experiencing culinary services and a plentiful menu featuring pork. I was invited to be a judge and although I confessed my lack of judging experience, was welcomed anyway along with Kristin Anderson (chief of staff, MSU Residence Halls Association) and Becky Schilling (editor-in-chief, Food Management). I was reassured that the only criterion was neutrality so I launched into the event with an open mind, a novice pallet, and a commitment to do my best. Although I’ve observed our NACUFS regional and national culinary challenges for four years, there was something vastly different about being on the other side and being directly engaged in the judging. I felt an obligation to not only be fair (after all, we do have an historic rivalry between MSU and UM here in mid-Michigan) but also to honor the sense of professionalism and serious commitment demonstrated by the chefs. It was a fun event, and it was also clear that these were professionals who took their work seriously. The competition pitted two student teams against each other preparing a dish with pork skirt steak (who knew that pigs had skirts?), two sous chefs competing with pork top sirloin, and the executive chefs preparing boneless leg of pork. Each team was given twenty minutes to prepare a dish that was judged on serving presentation, creativity and overall flavor. As I observed the preparation my confidence grew and I began to notice the knowledge required, the attention to detail, and the innovation exhibited by the recipes developed by the chefs. As the event unfolded, three themes struck me—the student pride and devotion to their craft, culinary and food as art, and the professionalism of the chefs.

perspective Student Pride and Devotion to their Craft Nick Machcinski from UM competed against Dylan Keyes and Maria Osinski from MSU. Observing their preparation and final presentation, it was evident that each team had carefully planned and prepared their ingredients in advance to compliment the entire dish and make it unique. In my novice opinion, the students actually did the best job of slowing down to describe their dish to the judges, with a hint of nervousness and competitiveness. The skills and abilities they were learning to potentially become future chefs in our field was apparent.

Culinary and Food as Art Chef de cuisine Jeremy Moser and John Merucci from UM and chef Matt Wilson from MSU took it up a notch. All plates showed well. The creative, colorful, artistic plating of each dish definitely caught my attention. The attention to detail that goes into each dish to be attractive to the eye is impressive. The texture, taste, and overall flavor of the combined ingredients really stood out. Matt Wilson added fun and spirit to his dish by branding the pork top sirloin with the Spartan helmet and Jeremy Moser and John Merucci developed an excellent mix of flavors that tasted superb.

Professionalism of Culinary Services Although it was a game day and we were there to have fun, there was an air of seriousness throughout the competition. These are chefs who are thoughtful and focused. This is a proud profession. It’s a radical change from the days when I attended college—the homogenous food was awful and I gained my freshman fifteen through starch and sugar. UM Executive Chef Frank Turchan impressed us with his integration of boneless leg of pork with Michigan based, locally grown, healthy products along with the creation of a brand new, flavorful corn meal creation that tasted like a cookie. MSU Executive Chef Kurt Kwiatkowski impressed us with a melt in your mouth deep-fried cornmeal patty that complemented his leg of pork and a beautifully artistic display of food and use of the entire plate as a piece of art. As we ended the competition, I recalled the college trips we took with our two daughters. We visited a number of liberal arts colleges and big ten schools. Several schools were rejected out of hand by our daughters because of the lousy quality of food. Both our daughters knew instinctively that good food is part of healthy living and critical to their ability to stay focused on their studies, achieve excellent grades, and graduate on time. All the chefs demonstrated that college dining is a critical component of the college experience by the way they engaged the students in their passion for food, how they prepared healthy, attractive dishes and how they participate in student life. As they share with passion with others on campus dining services is essential to student success. In the end, MSU won the culinary competition, but UM went on to pummel MSU in the football game. We look forward to next year and the continuation of a healthy competition.


editor

FROM THE EDITOR

F ROM T HE

C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

10 ROCHELLE RIZZI

editor-in-chief rrizzi@nacufs.org

A few weeks ago I had an opportunity to attend the International Food Editors Council (IFEC) conference in Minneapolis, MN. What a wonderful opportunity to engage with many of our industry members on my quest for the best content for the college and university market. I ate my way through Minneapolis, learning from some of the best publicists and food editors in the world. We studied food trends, communication methods, content development, and collaboration at all levels.

As President Beckstrom mentions in her article, there is an amazing synergy happening right now with respect to our educational strategy. In that light, industry members at IFEC showed me they are excited to be brand ambassadors for NACUFS and are actively (and creatively) considering ideas for developing content to showcase research, trends, and case studies to benefit the ongoing education and professional development of our institution members. Coming home to mid-Michigan from the conference, I was full of ideas and enamored by the possibilities. Creating member value is a core objective of our strategic plan, with education being a top priority in creating premier learning opportunities.

NACUFS is the resource for campus dining professionals and from my experience with IFEC and our own NACUFS conferences, we truly are the market our industry members want to penetrate. Just over a year into my tenure here at NACUFS, I’m impressed with the ingenuity and passion you all have in your various professions. Cheers to all campus foodservice professionals for your own growth, creativity, and strategic pivots to make you are who you are today! You are leaders—creating culture and value on your campus—while creating new economic models for administrators, manufacturers, and restauranteurs around the world. Your innovation is paving the way for

the entire foodservice industry.

In a large effort to bring that innovation and success to the forefront, NACUFS is dedicated to building a solid communications strategy. Our NACUFS marketing committee is taking the first steps necessary by bringing “One NACUFS” to the next level. They’ll be reaching beyond boundaries and thinking holistically, bridging educational offerings (the place), working with membership initiatives getting to the heart of data (the source), and finding a common way to communicate NACUFS and industry news (the voice)—all in an effort to bring the greatest value: connections. We’re better together, and 2017 is going to be an amazing year for NACUFS and for you! Honored to serve you all,

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FEATURE

DRIVING Employee Retention By Ashley Ditch, Marketing Coordinator; CaterTrax

I

t used to be that people would get a job right out of school and stick with it for 20 to 30 years, potentially retiring from their first and only employer. According to fortune.com, 40 percent of baby boomers stayed at their jobs for an average of 20 years, and 18 percent of those individuals 50 and older stayed 30 years or more. So why is today’s workforce hopping from job to job, typically unwilling to stay at the same job for 20-plus years? 70 percent of the U.S. workforce is unengaged with their work or employer according to Gallup’s State of the American Workplace report. Sure, you can offer generous wages and benefits, but what happens when the university foodservice director down the road can offer even better wages and benefits than you can? Foodservice operators must set their campus dining operation apart from the rest to increase engagement and improve employee retention.

Technology Supports Retention The emergence of technology in foodservice has re-framed how we look at managing the many moving parts and pieces that come with working in campus dining operations. An everyday solution that creates efficiencies, keeps staff

organized, and ensures success is key to maintaining employee engagement since hand-written orders and calculators can no longer support serving such a wide variety of customers from the student body all the way up to the president of the school. In 2014, CaterTrax (a catering management software company) surveyed more than 4,000 foodservice professionals and industry experts, posing questions about the life cycle of an order, time spent on administrative activities, employee turnover, and general foodservice-related questions. CaterTrax gained insight into the biggest pain points within operations and uncovered the following: 24 percent of catering orders have some kind of mishap. Of that segment, here is a breakdown of those errors: • Miscommunication on an order change – 60 percent • Forgotten items – 20 percent • Resource scheduling issues – 20 percent Statistics like these lead to frustrated customers and stressed out employees, but can be improved by implementing new technologies that streamline day-to-day responsibilities. Saying goodbye to hand-written orders and adopting new technology that helps to better manage

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FEATURE C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

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foodservice operations may change the way you run your business, resulting in higher customer satisfaction and increased employee buy-in. In the same survey mentioned above, 95 percent of foodservice professionals said that using a hospitality management software had a positive impact on employee morale and 63 percent of those surveyed said they are 50 to 100 percent more efficient. With fewer fire drills, campus dining professionals won’t have to rely on heroics to run a successful operation and will feel more engaged in every order detail and campus event. • Campus catering staff will feel fully prepared knowing start and end times of upcoming events, all food-related order details, and guest count. • The kitchen has every order detail including kitchen notes and any guest allergies so they feel comfortable preparing for the day, minimizing food waste and eliminating order mistakes. • Managers can view and print invoices as needed and track customer payments with the click of a button, saving time and energy from constantly tracking down unpaid orders. When employees have access to essential details required to perform daily responsibilities, engagement is no longer an issue. They are comfortable knowing they have all the information they need at their fingertips to remain successful and happy in their positions, resulting in increased employee retention.

Employee Training Programs Promote Engagement Should you decide to implement a new foodservice platform to drive engagement, you can’t expect employees to know how to use it without any explanation or education. Train staff on their prime responsibilities, important jobrelated processes, and relevant programs to keep them fully aware of all aspects of your operation. Training employees well can have a huge impact on employee retention and promote engagement among your team. To create a highly engaging learning environment, create a training program that follows this proven educational methodology: 1 Overview – Provide trainees with a baseline for understanding why and how the topic is relevant to them. 2 See It – Provide an instructor-led demonstration on how the functionality works. 3 Model It – Trainees perform a series of tasks with guidance from the instructor to experience how the functionality works. 4 Try It – Trainee follows a set of instructions to execute the workflow themselves. 5 Test It – Give trainee a series of questions that cover what they just learned.

Keep in mind that while you create a highly effective training program, employee buyin should be a driving factor; otherwise, your efforts will go to waste. Once you create and implement a course, don’t be afraid to ask for employee feedback. Asking for their thoughts on what they learned and how they learned it promotes engagement, showing that you care enough to create an effective training program for employees, and go that extra step to see how they felt about it. Learning is leverage for moving up with the company or institution, but also lends a hand to flexibility if an employee calls in and you are short staffed. Knowing that every employee is cross-trained allows you to better manage this type of situation because: ••Dishwashers Dishwasherswill willlearn learnevent eventprep prep processes processes ••Servers Serverswill willlearn learnmanagerial managerialfunctions functions ••Managers Managerswill willrefresh refreshtheir theirkitchen kitchen safety knowledge safety knowledge Being aware of every facet of a campus foodservice operation promotes employee longevity from the top down and while each training course you create may not seem relevant to each employee, all courses should remain mandatory. Cross-training staff in all areas of the business shows that regardless of how many individuals you manage, or how many different positions there are, you manage one solid team.

Engaging to Retain The average lifespan of a catering manager or employee is about 13 months, living up to the foodservice industry’s reputation for high employee turnover. Implementing the right programs and processes with the right goals in mind will improve employee retention in your campus dining operation and increase satisfaction and morale among staff, ensuring that they’ll keep coming back, hungry for more.

Ashley Ditch, Marketing Coordinator; CaterTrax


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FEATURE


16

On the far west end of the dining center, guests find their favorite classic grill items at Blazin’ Bronco.

Colorful and festive, the seating area at Cilantro’s, which serves Latin cuisine, matches the flavorful and individually prepared entrees and sides.


Photographs courtesy of Western Michigan University Dining Services; Photographs by Mike Lanka

Positioned in a two-story, 61,152-square-foot building featuring nine micro-restaurants and seating 979 guests, Valley Dining Center at Western Michigan University replaces three residential dining operations nestled within three residence hall complexes in the Valley Residential Neighborhood. With approximately 3,000 on-campus residents living in the Valley Residential Neighborhood, and the routing of the on-campus buses, the beautiful setting, overlooking Goldsworth Valley Pond, is a gathering location for students in this neighborhood. “Making an investment in a facility to provide an exciting destination for fresh and healthy food along with dynamic social space was a priority for Western Michigan University,” says Judy Gipper, R.D., director of dining services. “We’re offering a restaurant-style experience that encourages students to connect to other students.” The Valley Dining Center also contains a retail location, Café 1903, and a social space on the first floor with additional seating for 50 students.

HIGHLIGHTS & UNIQUE FEATURES • Valley Dining Center is a two-story facility compared to all other dining centers on campus, which are situated on one floor. The service features primarily plated meals based on a menu or customized meals per an individual guest’s order. • Nine micro-restaurants offer a wide variety of on-trend, flavorful, and healthy menu options. Guests can interact with the chefs and view food preparation. Blazin’ Bronco: Traditional and contemporary grill menu with a wings bar. Cilantro’s: Latin American tastes with fresh baked tortillas, burritos, and wraps. Fresh Creations: Fresh salad bar and fruit station, deli counter, subs, and hot soup selections. Pacific Plate: Asian cuisine including fresh stir-fry, sushi, and appetizers. Pastaria: Italian inspired pasta choices, calzones, and pizzas fired in a hearthstone oven. Sweet Sensations: Full dessert station featuring fresh crêpes prepared to order, and s’mores. Traditions: Home-style classic dishes, carved and smoked meats. A hot breakfast menu and omelets made-to-order are served daily. My Pantry: Allergy-free zone that is gluten, peanut and nutfree featuring made-to-order meals based on a menu cycle in addition to self-serve selections. Café 1903: First floor retail café serving beverages, grab-n-go, and light meal and beverages, including a coffee concept.

Seating at Pacific Plate, serving Asian inspired cuisine, features greys, yellow, and ocean blue, with red as a highlight color.

BY

Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI.

17 C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

VALLEY DINING CENTER

DESIGN

CAMPUS DINING


PROJECT SIZE Total: 61,152 sq. ft. Servery: 5,601 sq. ft. Seating, second floor: 8,750 sq. ft. Private Dining Seating: 2,253 sq. ft. (two rooms)

BY

DESIGN

Kitchen: 3,288 sq. ft.

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To promote Western Michigan University pride and branding, the entrance of the dining space features a back-lit display of galloping Broncos, the university’s mascot.

Guests immediately view Traditions when entering the center. Here they receive breakfast and plated homestyle classics for lunch and dinner.


• The venue contains a variety of seating options, including community tables, booths, counter seating, and seating overlooking the iconic Goldsworth Valley Pond. Two private dining rooms can convert to general seating. A “harvest” table features classic farmer-style designed chairs. Numerous furniture selections contain recycled or reclaimed materials.

Seats: 1,000

• The first floor also includes the receiving dock and production kitchen.

Total Project Budget: $35.8 million

• Intelligent control systems for all exhaust hoods are expected to use 50 percent less energy for exhaust hoods in a similar facility. • Valley Dining Center holds a green roof on a section of the roof on the south side and a live wall on the south face.

PROJECT DETAILS Opened: September 2, 2016

Cost of Foodservice Equipment and Installation: $3.8 million Staff: 4.5 dining managers; 1 culinary manager of operations (chef); academic year employees, including 2 clerical staff, 36 unionized cooks/servers/stockroom/utility persons; approximately 350 student employees

KEY PLAYERS

DESIGN

• 39 percent of the materials used came from the region (within 500 miles).

Annual Sales Volume: $5.86 million anticipated

BY

• The facility is designed to achieve at least silver-level LEED certification

Average Check: Dining guest meal rate, $7.50 breakfast, $9.25 lunch, snack, or dinner. Café 1903, $3.25 anticipated.

19

Western Michigan University: Judy Gipper, R.D., director of Dining Services; Paul Choker, chef, associate director of dining services; John Koestner, project manager, WMU construction services. Architect: SmithGroupJJR, Detroit, MI Interior Designer: SmithGroupJJR, Detroit, MI

Hours of Operation: Monday – Thursday, 7:00 a.m. – midnight; Friday, 7:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m.; Saturdays, 9:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m.; Sundays, 9:00 a.m. – 11:00 p.m.

Foodservice Consultant and Designer: Bakergroup, Grand Rapids, MI; Mona Milius, MBA, vice president, senior principal; and Stephanie Occhipinti, project manager

Daily Traffic: 4,000 anticipated

Equipment Dealer: Stafford-Smith, Inc. Kalamazoo, MI

Valley Dining Center management team front row (L to R): Stacey Clancy, Hilary Hunt, Katie DeCamp, Judy Gipper; back row (L to R): Phil Kock, Paul Choker, Andrew Francisco, Jeff Upchurch, Angela Feltner, Tom Giles

C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

• The project was completed on-time and under budget.

Payment Accepted: Meal plans, Dining Dollars, cash, and credit cards


Five tv monitors display sports and entertainment news, social media feeds, text-n-tell, and campus news and events.

Piedmont Central’s seating placement allows customers to see the action stations while they dine.


PIEDMONT CENTRAL Georgia State University in Atlanta

BY

Photographs courtesy of GSU; Photographs by Nicole Galonczyk

DESIGN

CAMPUS DINING

“Dual entrances to the dining facility provide added convenience to customers entering our dining hall from the street or the dorms,” says Lenore Musick, director of dining and sustainability. “Vaulted ceilings reaching 24 feet in height maximize the appearance of wide open space and storefront windows bring in lots of natural light to illuminate the space, which minimizes energy costs.”

HIGHLIGHTS & UNIQUE FEATURES • Due to its location in downtown Atlanta, construction proved to be challenging. Much of the construction work required city-approved lane closures because the dining hall is situated on a one-way busy street downtown, which contributed to added expenses. To help meet deadlines and expedite the construction process, the walls for the entire facility were built off-site while the on-site construction occurred. These pre-made walls were then fitted inside the building like Lego pieces. • The interior environment features a variety of high-top and communal seating. Five television monitors display sports and entertainment news, social media feeds, textn-tell, and campus news and events. • Food stations’ layout and design encourage staff and guests to interact during food preparation. • Stations include: Almost Home (Mom’s home cooking); International (with induction woks and a flat-top griddle for making stir fries, chicken panang curry, and pad see ew tofu); Grill (meats smoked in-house, burgers, hot dogs, and Philly cheesesteaks); Pizza (with a stone-hearth oven that bakes pizza in 90 seconds); Exposition (made-to-order breakfast omelets, pancakes, quesadillas, burritos, and gourmet grilled cheese); Salad and Smoothie; and Dessert. • A wellness station is responsive to customers’ dietary and allergy needs. It also provides healthy, pre-made, customizable menu options. • The kitchen’s sterile flooring and hygienic wall cladding provides protection for the entire back-of-house space.

Hot surfaces allow the display of serviceware holding small batches of food.

• Remote BOH central ice machines feed to all FOH beverage stations, resulting in sleek FOH design and minimal machine cleaning. • The utility distribution system, in which all utilities and fire suppression are run through a single pre-engineered unit, allows for equipment flexibility and expandability, safety, cleanliness, and convenience. • The many sustainable practices include: – Remote rooftop condenser units provide continuous cooling and remove condenser heat from the facility so the dining hall is easier to cool. The redundancy built in to the refrigeration rack also helps decrease down-time. – A carousel dish drop alleviates noise from BOH and improves safety because water can’t splash out from the dish drop. – The waste handling and extractor system creates pulp organic waste for composting. – Freezer access from the loading dock helps maintain a consistent temperature so food is constantly kept cold, benefitting food safety and making it easier to receive deliveries.

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Quickly transitioning from a commuter to a residential campus, Georgia State University’s rapid growth necessitated a space for students to live and dine. The solution: increase the residence hall from 350 beds to 1,150 beds and add an additional dining hall to support student life. The new, 15,415-square-foot facility contains 450 scrambled seats positioned so customers have a clear line of sight to a variety of contemporary menu options.


PROJECT SIZE Total: 15,415 sq. ft. Servery: Approximately 300 linear feet, including beverage stations Seating 8,022 sq. ft. Kitchen: 5,816 sq. ft., including areas behind servery

Hot prep equipment includes a flat-top, char grill, tilting skillet and tilting kettle.

• Georgia State’s Food Recovery Network Student Group and dining hall chefs/managers work together to recover perishable food waste and donate it to local organizations combating hunger. • GSU implemented Freight Farms to grow leafy greens in an up-cycled shipping container with all of the necessary tools for a plentiful harvest such as LED lights to assist with photosynthesis, temperature monitoring and controlling for optimal growing. These leafy greens will be served in dining halls this fall, creating the ultimate farm-to-table experience.

PROJECT DETAILS Opened: August 2016 Hours of Operation: Continuous 24-hour service from 7:00 a.m. Monday – 9:00 p.m. Friday; 11:00 a.m. – 9:00 p.m., Saturday and Sunday Daily Traffic: 4,000 Seats: 450 and more as needed Payment Accepted: PantherCash (declining balance account), cash, checks, credit cards Average Check: $10 Annual Sales Volume (projected): $5 million in dining sales Total Project Cost: $63.1 million, including total residence hall and dining hall construction Cost of Foodservice Equipment: $6 million (includes construction, design, furniture, technology, and $1.8 million for equipment) Staff: 9 management positions (dining hall manager, supervisors, chefs, and sous chefs), 53 full-time employees and 100 part-time and student employees

KEY PLAYERS Georgia State University: Ramesh Vakamundi, associate vice president for facilities services, project manager; Lenore Musick, director of dining and sustainability Architect and Interior Designer: Cooper-Carry, Atlanta; Daniel Sweeney, project architect Dispensers for soda, milk and cereal brighten Piedmont Central.

Foodservice Consultant and Designer: Camacho, Atlanta; James Camacho, president; Brandon Drake, project manager Equipment Dealer: Atlanta Fixture & Sales Co., Atlanta


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Sesame Stir-Fry made with Gardein™ Beefless Tips & Birds Eye® Broccoli Florets

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C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

24 NUTRITION


WHAT’S HOT

What’s Hot on Campus

Training, to Engage Safety 101: Preventing Injury in Dining Hall Kitchens By Mike Foster, Director of National Accounts; Restaurant Technologies, Inc. Accidents happen—especially in the kitchen. But are you doing your best to reduce the frequency at which they occur? The National Safety Council estimates more than 25,000 slip-and-fall accidents occur every day in the United States—that’s more than 9.1 million every year. In addition to the physical injuries employees sustain and the subsequent work time lost as they recover, kitchen injuries can also hurt your dining hall’s bottom line. Consider this statistic that even dining hall kitchens can relate to: Restaurants have an average of four workers’ compensations claims each year, for a total cost of $45,600 per locale. There is no secret recipe for preventing injury and increasing safety in higher-education dining facilities. It all boils down to proper safety protocol and training. You might be thinking, “I know everything there is to know about cleaning up spills, turning off burners and calling 9-1-1 in an emergency.” While that may be true, are those action items clearly posted in your kitchen? Have you presented them to your back-of-house (BOH) and front-of-house (FOH) staff, who might be students working their first job in food service? Is the safety presentation part of employee orientation, and do you offer refresher courses every quarter? If you answered “No” to any of those questions, then it’s time for a crash course in setting up a safety program.

1. Training The Occupational Safety and Health Administration estimates that for every $1 spent on safety programs, facilities can save $4 to $6 in costs associated with injuries and fatalities. Simply put, you can’t afford not to implement safety training. And given the high turnover of student workers in higher-education dining facilities, consistent, repeat training is crucial. • Include a safety training module once per quarter at team meetings. • Educate workers on basic hygiene and safety protocols. • Train employees on the use of first-aid items. • Translate training manuals for employees who don’t speak English as a first language. Training is deep-rooted into the processes at SUNY Delhi. “All of our employees are required to attend ServSafe training, and higher ranking cooks need to be certified. This not only has improved the consistent quality of our service, but training our workforce to these standards opens the door to furthering their skill sets and furthering their careers at SUNY Delhi,” says Hannah Hauser, Dining Center Manager. “Although we most likely will never eliminate accidents,

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WHAT’S HOT

getting rid of the potential, can prevent one from happening. Showing that we are looking out for our employees before an accident occurs also helps our relationships and they like to see energy being put into their well-being and their work environment.”

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UCLA recently turned training into a competition with an engaging safety campaign. “We recently concluded our first year with a safety campaign titled Greenlight for Safety that produced a friendly competition to take all of our various safety training programs that have been developed over the previous years and [we] created a year-long competition broken down into monthly scores to improve our safety culture,” says Joshua Witt, executive steward, UCLA Dining Services. “Greenlight for Safety resulted in less lost work days and fewer OSHA recordable incidents.”

2. Safety Equipment A majority of the injuries that occur in higher-education dining facilities are high in frequency, low in severity, and require minimal medical care. The most common injuries include cuts, lacerations, and punctures (22 percent); slips, trips, and falls (20 percent); burns and scalds (13 percent); and sprains, strains and soft-tissue injuries (15 percent). These types of injuries can often be treated on-site, assuming you have the right supplies on hand and ready. • Stock a first-aid cabinet with supplies for treating common injuries. • Keep fire extinguishers nearby and inspect them regularly. • Require employees to wear slip-resistant shoes, cutresistant gloves, and eye protection when appropriate. • Establish a safety-shoes program that includes a payroll deduction and a clear policy for safety footwear.

“[We] created a year-long competition broken down into monthly scores to improve our safety culture.”

Although we most likely will never eliminate accidents, getting rid of the potential, can prevent one from happening. Liberty University Dining Services, in partnership with Sodexo, has introduced safer equipment in their kitchens which has also greatly reduced employee turnover and injury rates. “We utilize a process named SoSafe Observations where staff can give open and honest feedback about safety issues. Through this process our management team has successfully created an atmosphere with frontline staff in which they know that we genuinely care about their health and safety,” says Misty Cronin, training & Safety


4. Floors and Walkways Burners, fryer vats, and cleavers aren’t the only potential safety hazards that call the kitchen home. Even the most benign surfaces can become dangerous if not properly maintained. Case in point: Most slips and falls are caused by some type of liquid — such as oil — or other substance on the floor. Of those accidents, nearly 50 percent occur near sinks or fryer vats. Safety starts from the ground up. • Display caution signs to identify wet floors.

manager. “Several staff members voiced concerns over safe oil handling procedures, and we responded by introducing an automated oil management system. This was a visible response to employee feedback which gives our team the confidence to voice concerns of any nature, thus reducing turnover and injuries.”

3. Kitchen Appliances and Utensils The BOH can be a danger zone for student workers if the proper precautions aren’t taken. Not surprisingly, the most common BOH injuries are burns and cuts. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) estimates that emergency rooms treated approximately 44,800 injuries suffered by teenage restaurant workers. It also found that teens working in restaurant kitchens are six times more likely to be burned than teens working in any other industry. Fortunately, your employees and student workers can follow several steps to help prevent these types of accidents from happening.

When it comes to preventing injuries in the BOH, establishing proper safety protocols and training procedures is just the start. Safety isn’t a set-it-and-forget-it exercise, and reducing accidents starts with strong leadership. “It takes time to change the habits of 200 full time employees and 1,500 student employees. It also takes commitment at every level of the organization,” says Stacey Clements, safety, compliance, and training manager, student auxiliary Services at Rochester Institute of Technology. “We have worked for a number of years to build a culture that is conducive to preventing incidents. This started with making sure that all incidents were being properly reported. Many culinary employees see a cut or a burn as part of the job. We had to change that mindset before any progress could be made regarding incident reduction or prevention. We did this mainly through training and showing employees that the reporting process could actually be beneficial.” Armed with these tips and a strong plan of action, you’re well on your way to creating a safer environment for your institution and increased engagement from your employees.

• Turn handles away from burners. • Adjust burner flames to cover only the bottom of the pan. • Do not leave hot grease unattended. • Cover fryers when not in use. • Use a closed-loop oil management system. • Install protective guards on all slicingequipment. • Keep knives properly sharpened.

Mike Foster is a director of national accounts for Restaurant Technologies. He has been with the company since 2006 and works with higher ed, non-commercial and hospitality customers. Mike has a passion for helping customers run safer, more sustainable operations with automated oil management programs that improve operational profitability; food quality; and employee safety, increasing employee engagement, improving safety culture.

Slip and Fall Facts, http://www.lighthouseenterprises.us/Hurricone/Slip%20n%20Fall.pdf (accessed September 29, 2016). “Making [Brand’s] Kitchens Safer,” Restaurant Technologies. National Council on Compensation Insurance. “Top Four Restaurant Injuries,” QSR Magazine, September 19, 2011, https://www.qsrmagazine.com/news/top-four-restaurant-injuries (accessed August 5, 2016). Marsh & McLennan Companies, Workers’ Compensation Best Practices Report, August 2015. Fred Blosser, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), “Most Teen Worker Injuries in Restaurants Occur in Fast Food, NIOSH Study Finds,” August 27, 2012, http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/updates/teenfast.html (accessed August 5, 2016). Ibid. S.K. Verma, W.R. Chang, T.K. Courtney, D.A. Lombardi, Y.H Huang, M.J. Brennan, M.A. Mittleman, J.H. Ware and M.J. Perry, “Worker’s Experience of Slipping in U.S. Limited-Service Restaurants,” Liberty Mutual, May 19, 2010. Ibid.

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• Don’t allow employees to lift heavy boxes or objects on their own.

WHAT’S HOT

• Use floor mats to prevent slips and falls.


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Plant-Based Culinary Training INSPIRES NORTHERN ARIZONA UNIVERSITY FOOD SERVICE

NUTRITION

By Ben Hartley, Resident District Manager; Sodexo

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W

hen great minds work together, out-of-the box ideas become transformative experiences. That’s exactly what happened at Northern Arizona University (NAU) when Tricia Fortin, health educator and wellness coordinator, approached the campus food service provider about partnering to improve plant-based entrees on campus and at the local hospital cafeteria. Tricia introduced Daniel Parsons, senior resident dining manager, to the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) food and nutrition team which offers a free, twoday, hands-on, plant-based culinary training. The group quickly pulled together this unique opportunity for their team and the food service professionals at Northern Arizona Healthcare, Northern Arizona’s largest health care provider. “We are fortunate to have like-minded, health-conscious colleagues,” said Fortin. “This training event further enhanced and expanded plant-based options served to university

employees and students. The best part of the training for me was the unique collaboration with Northern Arizona Healthcare. Together, as partners, we have an opportunity to influence the health status of our entire community.” During the training held on the NAU campus, over 20 chefs, cooks, dietitians, and managers learned to create delicious plant-based meals that could be served for breakfast, lunch, dinner, and dessert. Some of the recipes included: garbanzo bean sliders on homemade focaccia bread, lo mein, enchiladas, mushroom street tacos, tamale pie, quinoa oatmeal and fruit parfait, pancakes, palmiers, oatmeal cookies and more. “It was a pleasure partnering with Humane Society, Flagstaff Medical Center, and NAU Employee Assistance and Wellness to learn more about plant-based diets,” said Timothy Cunningham, executive chef at NAU. “As a chef it is priceless to learn and prepare new recipes, and our culinary staff embraced this opportunity to create some


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Employee retention through comprehensive training programs HAS ALWAYS BEEN A FOCUS FOR NAU CAMPUS DINING AS ATTRACTING AND RETAINING THE BEST TALENT IS CRUCIAL TO SUCCESS.

are a great way to add delicious variety to the dining options for the students and employees to enjoy. traditional dishes using new concepts while also connecting with colleagues from across Northern Arizona. Training events like this help us to retain more skilled, energetic, passionate staff.” Employee retention through comprehensive training programs has always been a focus for NAU campus dining as attracting and retaining the best talent is crucial to success. The program currently boasts more than 1,457 years of service across their approximately 700 employees. Over 55 percent of campus dining employees have been with Sodexo at NAU for more than one year, 95 of whom have served the students faculty and staff on this campus for more than five years. NAU’s retention rates over the past five years have averaged 57 percent compared to an industry average of 27.9 percent according to the Bureau of Labor and Statistics. Nutrition experts worldwide are advising people to increase consumption of plant-based foods and to cut down on saturated animal fat and cholesterol, found exclusively in meat, eggs, and dairy products. With this training, the team at NAU learned that plant-based menus

“It was wonderful to see the separate organizations come together as one team during this training, to create delicious food and explore new recipes! Since the Food Forward training, our culinary staff has expanded our plant-based offerings in the resident dining operation driving an 11 percent increase in the participation in our vegetarian and vegan offer so far this semester,” said Parsons. The HSUS plant-based culinary experience brought university, healthcare, and dining food service professionals together to enjoy the plant-based menus, talk about the future of food, and build supportive professional networks. Taking advantage of this unique training helped employees learn new skills while providing an opportunity for innovation in the kitchen. For more information on NAU Campus Dining, contact Ben Hartley at Ben.Hartley@sodexo.com. For HSUS Food & Nutrition trainings, contact Ken Botts at kbotts@humanesociety.org.


SMALL COLLEGE,

BIG ACHIEVEMENTS NUTRITION

By Dick Williams, Director of Dining Services, Grinnell College; Grinnell, IA

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Back row, L – R: Chef Chris Grefe, CSC; Chef Jacob Nerness, CSC; Chef Amber Lacina, CEC; Chef Scott Turley, CEC, AAC; Chef Allissa Beck, CSC; Chef Jenny Ferriss, CEPC; Chef Terry Anderson, CEPC Front row, L – R: Chef Michelle Kalinay, CPC; Chef Kate Flowers, CC; Chef Sara Valentine, CSC; Chef Laura Kaiser, CCC

G

rinnell College, a small liberal arts college in the middle of the vast Iowa prairie, has an enrollment of about 1600 and is often listed among the very top of national liberal arts colleges. Although Grinnell College may be considered a small campus, it has big vision when considering culinary professionals. It was not always this way. Ten years ago, the challenge of recruiting qualified culinary professionals to the prairie of Iowa was very apparent. The dining services management team tried to develop different options to attract qualified culinary personnel but was unsuccessful. Dick Williams, director of dining services, says, “We decided that we needed to look at this challenge from a different angle. We needed to develop our staff from within.” The management staff began to generate a plan to offer specific training and educational opportunities to the

“What would it take to not only recruit talented culinary individuals but to retain them for future staff development?”

current culinary staff. Professional recognition for talent, training, and experience was an essential goal of this program from the onset. As the team began working together to formulate objectives and goals they kept asking the same question over and over. “What would it take to not only recruit talented culinary individuals but to retain them for future staff development?” The team made a strong commitment toward staff development for the culinary staff who were currently working in the dining department. It became clear that staff development needed to be the first step before tackling recruitment and retention. The journey began by sending one culinary employee to the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, NY to complete the professional bakers program. Next, it was off to the Wilton Decorating School in Chicago, IL. This may not sound like a big deal in today’s world, but it was the foundation of what was to come for Grinnell Dining.


NUTRITION

Grinnell set two powerful goals: professional credibility and staff recognition. To meet these goals, Grinnell turned to the American Culinary Federation (ACF) as the source for professionalism in the culinary industry. Over the past years, the dining department has offered opportunities to the culinary staff to further develop their skills through additional training, educational classes in charcuterie, chocolate foundation, sugar artistry, food carving, and leadership. The steady progress and successful certification through the ACF for Dining’s executive chef set a faster pace and ultimately raised the standards for all Grinnell Dining culinary staff. Through the leadership of the new Certified Executive Chef (CEC) offering, the program quickly advanced and the culinary staff began to set personal goals for their own culinary quests. This promoted a bit of healthy competition amongst the culinary staff to further their education and move through the levels of ACF certification.

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The first step was now complete and provided the progression into the second step—recruitment. As the Grinnell’s culinary story became wider-spread, the program began to attract young professionals from regional culinary schools. Grinnell Dining’s culinary intern program was established to provide an opportunity for the certified chefs to offer their talents in teaching young culinary students entering the culinary industry. When it comes to recruitment of qualified and talented culinary staff, Chef Scott Turley, CEC, AAC states, “It is the opportunity for advancement in their chosen career that attracts them to our program.” The second step progressed to the third step of retention. As team members took advantage of the additional training and professional development, a bond was developed that stabilized the culinary team. Increased pride in job performance, professionalism, and recognition, along with the ability to demonstrate their individual creativity created a loyal dedication to working for Grinnell Dining. Today, Grinnell College boasts eleven ACF certified chefs on its Dining Services culinary team. The certified chefs make a significant contribution to Grinnell’s dining program by offering a world of culinary knowledge and experience in menu development. The chefs of Grinnell prepare ninety-five percent of all foods from scratch using fresh ingredients. The chefs keep their skills sharp and utilize those skills to contribute to making the dining department more diverse, efficient, and cost-effective. They also pass along those skills to the other cooking staff and culinary students. One just needs to look at the list of Grinnell’s culinary team to see the certifications obtained: Chef Scott Turley, CEC, AAC • Chef Amber Lacina, CEC Chef Laura Kaiser, CCC • Chef Terry Anderson, CEPC Chef Jenny Ferris, CEPC • Chef Allissa Beck, CSC Chef Jacob Nerness, CSC • Chef Chis Grefe, CSC Chef Sara Valentine, CSC • Chef Kate Flowers, CC Chef Michelle Kalinay, CPC This past summer, Grinnell’s Scott Turley, CEC, was inducted into the ACF’s prestigious American Academy of Chefs. Grinnell College was also presented with the ACF Presidential Cutting Edge Award for having eleven ACF certified chefs on staff. This represents the highest standards of professionalism in the culinary industry. Yes, the small liberal arts college in the middle of the vast Iowa prairie has come a long way in the culinary world — from humble beginnings to a world-class culinary team. Perhaps the journey seems unattainable for your operation to accomplish the Grinnell model. Remember, when Grinnell’s journey began, no one thinking this outcome was in the realm of possibilities. If your staff has the passion and you can offer a path for them to follow, you can continue on the same journey. Start small, accept the challenge, and dream big!


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A busy day for the StrEat food truck at Texas Tech

HOT WHEELS

FOOD ON THE MOVE BY DONNA BOSS

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ollege dining services’ culinary teams continue to raise the level and expectations of food quality and creativity. Nowhere is this more prevalent than on campus food trucks. These trucks attract customers in locations convenient to classrooms and activities as well as remote areas of campus. They’re also supporting sports and special events and serve as emergency kitchens for disaster relief. These mobile carriers have the potential to boost campus dining revenue and customer satisfaction. When deciding the trucks’ menus, chefs must consider flavor profiles that appeal to customers frequenting the mobile units in various locations in addition to ease and speed of onsite menu preparation with or without the support of a centralized food preparation facility. They also prove to be a strong marketing tool, creating a sense of anticipation and fun. This issue of CDT features chefs’ creations at University of the Pacific’s e.a.t., Ohio University’s The Hungry Cat, Texas Tech’s StrEat, and UMass’ Baby Berk 1 and 2. These delights exemplify why we’ve just begun to see the full potential of food on wheels.

Beef Churrasco Sandwiches with Pebre Sauce on e.a.t. have been a menu mainstay for University of Pacific’s Chef Alvarado since he was a child growing up in Chile and during the 20 years he’s been in the U.S.


OHIO UNIVERSITY

THE HUNGRY C AT

Emily Chaparro and the Central Support Kitchen’s Vegetarian Chipotle Black Bean Burger and Pulled Pork at Ohio University in Athens, Ohio Prepared in Ohio University’s Culinary Support Kitchen from scratch, Chipotle Black Bean Burgers are shipped to residential dining venues and The Hungry Cat food truck. The cooked-to-order burgers prove to be popular on the truck’s Monday through Friday daily menus and weekend menus for catering events and tailgate parties for home football games. FOOD

“We use a myriad of spices, including our chipotle seasoning, giving our burgers a spicy kick that compliments the earthiness of the black beans,” says Emily Chaparro, production chef, retail operations, Ohio University Auxiliaries. “The key to making a good black bean burger is to cook the beans to the correct doneness. Though the black beans must be tender, they must still maintain their firmer texture so the burger stands up with all of the toppings.”

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Culinary support kitchen staff also prepares pulled pork by smoking the meat using locally-sourced wood. The menu item is shipped to residential dining venues, the food court on rotational menus, and The Hungry Cat. Pulled pork is offered with the same frequency as the burgers. “We season the pork with spices but the time spent getting this pork tender is what makes it special,” says Chaparro. “We let the natural flavors rise to the surface and offset the flavors with a little bit of sweetness from some brown sugar and spiciness from the cayenne pepper.” The culinary team typically uses sassafras wood to smoke the pork. “It offers a more balanced taste to the meat than other wood such as hickory,” says Chaparro. Emily Chaparro displays Vegetarian Chipotle Black Bean Burger (left) and Pulled Pork Sandwich.

At The Hungry Cat staff caramelizes the pork on the flat top grill before building it into a sandwich.

T

he Hungry Cat parks in predefined, high-traffic areas on campus. It operates Monday through Friday from 11:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m., and on weekends during special events. Many products are prepared in the central food facility and culinary support kitchen and prepped and finished on location in front of the customer. Staff: many in culinary support; and, three to four on the truck including a full-time cook, student workers and a manager. Equipment: flattop grill, deep fat fryer, steam table, hot hold steam cabinet, refrigerated rail, reach-in cooler and freezer, and three-compartment sink.

Photographs by Mark Brunton

Pulled Pork Sandwich features meat the culinary support kitchen staff smokes using locally-sourced sassafras wood.


UNIVERSITY OF THE PACIFIC

e.a.t. (E A SY ARTISAN TAKEOUT)

Marco Alvarado’s Chicken Tacone and Beef Churrasco Sandwich with Pebre Sauce at University of the Pacific in Stockton, CA.

Marco Alvarado, MA, executive chef, Bon Appetit at University of the Pacific, loves Vietnamese flavors. “The popular street food banh mi sandwich is one of my favorites and got me through a day of hard work a bunch of times,” he says. “The flavors are bold and refreshing but I wanted to make it more appealing to all types of customers and not have the banh mi name,” he says. “We all love burritos and many people enjoy Vietnamese flavors, so Chicken Tacone was the perfect combo.” The menu item features locally produced tortillas that Alvarado says are easy to carry, not too doughy, and a great vessel to carry flavors. The recipe also calls for vegetables and herbs from local farms, and freerange chicken thighs from a farm within 100 miles of campus. “This is a pretty fool-proof recipe, as long as the coleslaw has a refreshing citrus Nuoc Cham taste to it,” says Alvarado. “It must also have the heat of the sambal aioli, and the warmth of the chicken will do the magic. Just make sure you get some extra napkins because it might get a little messy.”

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Beef Churrasco Sandwiches have been a menu Marco Alvarado prepares mainstay for Alvarado since he was a child growing ingredients for menu items up in Chile and during the 20 years he’s been in the offered on e.a.t. truck. U.S. “We still prepare this sandwich, which replaces a hamburger in Chile, for family gatherings and on Friday pizza nights with my wife and kids we skip the pizza and make churrascos with the pebre sauce. The pebre sauce is one of my favorites even with just a piece of fresh plain bread.” Vegetables and herbs for the sandwiches are locally grown and the beef sourced is raised without antibiotics. Alvarado emphasizes that tomatoes must be seasoned with salt and pepper and the green beans must be cooked through and shocked in ice water to get the bright green color. “Spend some time making the pebre sauce to make it taste its best, even if you are not familiar with it,” he says. “Your taste buds should guide you to get the right umami flavor.”

d Downloa S IPE

REC

Bios at f e h C d a Re

Chicken Tacon is the perfect combination of burritos and Vietnamese flavors.

S .O N AC U F

FOOD

Located on south campus, e.a.t. (Easy Artisan Takeout) truck offers breakfast and lunch menu items to students who may not otherwise be able to eat between classes. It also supports pop-up events on campus.

R G /C D

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niversity of the Pacific’s e.a.t. truck offers breakfast from 8:00 a.m.to 10:30 a.m. and lunch from 11 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Monday through Friday. It serves 200 customers daily, registering $1,850 to $2,000 a day in sales (average check is $9 to $10 in sales daily with an average check of $7.25). Staff includes 2 cooks and a cashier who also expedites. The truck receives deliveries from the main kitchen three times a day. Some of the more intensive menu items, such as mac and cheese and carnitas, are prepared in the main kitchen and held in the truck’s hot table. Staff prepares other items from fresh ingredients. Equipment: warming box, cold drink well, cold drink refrigerator, one fryer, one flat top, two burners, one hot well good for four full hotel pans, a cold unit to keep cold food, opening for deli toppings, three-compartment sink, and hot water and cold water.


TEXAS TECH

StrEat

Drew Latham’s Bar-Ba-Bacon Taco and Pollo Loco Taco at Texas Tech in Lubbock, TX

FOOD

For StrEat food truck, a play on a classic barbacoa street food, Bar-Ba-Bacon Taco features slow-cooked traditional barcacoa served with crispy bacon, avocado crema instead of the traditional slice of avocado, and pico de gallo. The bacon is topped with house-made salsa verde. “Crispy bacon adds a salty crunch to every bite and is the most important and best part of this classic-meets-modern taco,” says Drew Latham, hospitality services chef. “Freshness is a must for tacos and the salsas.” A staff member comes in early to prepare all the veggies and salsas so they are ready for service at StrEat.

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Pollo Loco Taco contains chili braised pulled chicken, roasted poblano peppers, Monterey Jack cheese, cilantro, and onion. This taco is served with the housemade salsa rojo. “I tried to put the best parts of taco soup into a great taco,” Latham says. “The best part is the freshly chopped cilantro on top, which brings some freshness to the bacon and helps cool down the chilies.” Relying on developing strong and intense flavors during the sautéing of veggies, Latham and his crew par-cook and chill veggies before they are finished for service in order to speed onsite production. At StrEat food truck, the proteins are held on a steam table and remain covered to prevent them from drying out. “When needed we mix in some chicken or beef stock to keep them moist throughout the day,” Latham says. “We always assemble the tacos to order because no one likes a soggy taco.” With cotton being the primary source of agriculture in the area, Hospitality Services is limited in which items it can find that are locally available. The department works with distributors to purchase products that are grown in Texas when they are in season.

S

trEat is Texas Tech University’s first food truck. Operating hours: 11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Monday through Wednesday on the main campus off memorial circle, on Tuesday and Thursday it serves the Texas Tech Health Sciences Center, and on Friday its random location is announced on social media. On weekends it supports special events. Production primarily takes place on the food truck but some food takes place at The Commons. Staff: four members. Equipment: one flattop grill, two fryers, refrigerator, freezer, hot holding unit, hot well, and a flip-top preparation station.

Cilantro on Pollo Loco Taco [left] brings freshness to the flavors and helps cook down the chilies.

Photographs by Kayla Koerner

Drew Latham presents Bar-ba-bacon Taco (left) and Pollo Loco Taco to customers at StrEat.

A play on the classic barbacoa street food, Bar-ba-bacon features avocado sour cream and crispy bacon to add a salty crunch to every bite.


UMASS

Lobster Poutine with Paneer Korma at UMass Amherst interests customers looking for Indian cuisine.

babyBerk 1 & 2

Matthia Accurso’s Kimchi Burger with Gochujang Ketchup, Smoked Cheddar, and Teriyaki Mushrooms and Lobster Poutine at UMass Amherst’s Two Baby Berk Food Trucks

FOOD

Mushroom-blended burgers have been received with great enthusiasm at UMass Amherst. Matthia Accurso, CEC, chef de cuisine, retail dining, realized the menu category should be “elevated” so he added the Koreaninspired Kimchi Burger with Gochujang Ketchup, Smoked Cheddar and Teriyaki Mushrooms to the daily menu at Baby Berk 1, one of two food trucks on campus. “We incorporate cooked mushrooms into the ground beef to add umami flavor, increase the overall moisture content and holding characteristics, and offer a healthier and more sustainable menu option,” Accurso says. “Fat is cut by at least 30 percent when we use a 30 percent mushroom blend. Since Korean food is popular on campus we serve the burger with gochukang (hot red pepper paste) ketchup, which I believe is the second coming of siracha.” The recipe calls for local mushrooms, local cabbage and local smoked cheddar cheese.

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“The patties are held raw until ready to be cooked to order. We cook these patties on a griddle, which allows us to develop great flavor and a nice crisp exterior that is evenly seared,” says Accurso. In response to the growing popularity of Indian cuisine on campus, culinary staff enhanced a more familiar poutine dish and altered it with the flavors of the popular Indian dish korma to produce Lobster Poutine with Paneer Korma served on Baby Berk 2. Instead of the typical cheese curds, staff use paneer, which is an Indian-style fresh cheese curd. “We take the authentic spices and flavor of a korma to make the gravy with lobster, which we use to showcase the quintessential New England local ingredient in a unique way,” says Accurso. “Potatoes are another common ingredient in many korma dishes, so pairing this with the french fries in poutine was a natural combination.”

Trucks operate Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday from 11:00a.m. to 12:00 a.m., Thursday, 11:00 a.m. to 2:00 a.m., Friday from 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 a.m. and Saturday from 10:00 p.m. to 4:00 a.m. During weekends, the trucks support special events. babyBerk 2 serves hot breakfast Monday through Friday 7:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m.

b

Photographs by UMass Dining

Matthia Accurso’s Kimchi Burger with Gochujang Ketchup, Smoked Cheddar and Teriyaki Mushrooms (left) and Lobster Poutine with Paneer Korma at UMass Amherst add diversity to the Baby Berk food trucks.

abyBerk 2 is one of two babyBerk food trucks supporting UMass dining. Trucks operate Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday from 11:00 a.m. to 12:00 a.m., Thursday, 11:00 a.m. to 2:00 a.m., Friday from 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 a.m. and Saturday from 10:00 p.m. to 4:00 a.m. During weekends, the trucks support special events. babyBerk 2 serves hot breakfast Monday through Fridat 7:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m.


C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

42 NUTRITION


MEMBER INSIGHT C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

43

© Can Stock Photo / fisher-photostudio

Online Mem ber Survey Results on: r ecruiting, retaining, a nd training em ployees Members were asked to submit answers to “What ourly h motivates and keeps your id a s % .9 7 8 rn team engaged?” positions tu st … over the mo

ourly 86.2% said h the e positions ar lt most difficu to fill …

“My team is motivated by simple gestures of appreciation such as inviting the campus to help me surprise them for National foodservice employee day. I had a cake made for each facility and gave them all a pin that says ‘Making a difference’.” Lorey Duprey Director of Dining Unity College Unity, ME

(continued on page 44)


A piece of the pie!

MEMBER INSIGHT

NO 10.3%

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“Staff at all levels need to see that there are promotional opportunities. Over the last two years we have promoted 8 hourly staff into exempt positions and have had 8-10 managers who have been promoted into higher level positions. Our average seniority is 12 years, I have staff (both hourly and management) who have been here 25 plus years. We hold hourly staff training days (two full days in January & March). The topics we cover are customer service, professional behavior in the work place, iron chef competitions, computer training , Serve Safe, Sanitation 101 and various OSHA required trainings offered by our environmental health and safety department to name a few.” David P. Davidson Managing Director of Dining Services Harvard University Cambridge, MA

Foodservice Industry Job Boards 3.4%

Outside Search Firm 1.7%

Is there money allocated in your budget for professional development for management-level employees within your campus dining operation?

YES 89.7%

“Success is never final. You’re only as good as the last meal you serve.” Ken Toong Executive Director of Auxiliary Enterprises University of Massachusetts Amherst, MA

NACUFS Job Postings 10.3% Social Media 10.3% Professional Networking 3.4%

Recruitment Methods Top 5 most difficult positions to fill: Other 29.3% Online Job Search Engines 41%

Examples of others listed: Local store marketing Local newspapers Local online listings College website and in-house advertising University’s HR department Other associations such as ACF and NRA

5

1 Hourly Positions 2 Sous Chef 3 Assistant Manager 4 Dining Hall Unit Manager 5 Catering Manager


Linda Nardella Director of Holy Cross Dining Services College of the Holy Cross Worcester, MA

Does your dining service operation (or the unit overseeing dining services) have a director-level succession plan in place?

YES 43.1%

NO 56.9%

MEMBER INSIGHT

“What motivates our staff are the same ingredients that motivate me and most people. We want to feel appreciated and valued for the jobs that we do and feel included in the team’s growth and successes. I’m sure there are many complex books, articles and such on how to accomplish this basic strategy; however, our Holy Cross Dining team has a simple humanistic approach. Say “thank you” often and be sincere. Know your staff and let them know you. Share information and communicate through newsletters, meetings, training… Involve them in the decision-making process. Use yearly performance reviews as an opportunity for thanks, praise, and growth; but also take the time to thank and build up staff throughout the year. Most importantly, cultivate and foster a team that is grateful, humble, and proud—lessons taught best by setting the example.”

In your view, what is the main reason that people leave your campus dining operation? Low salary or wages Poor cultural fit Schedule inflexibility or Not Enough Work Hours (tie for 3rd) Not enough work hours (tie for 3rd) Lack of promotional opportunities Lack of training and professional development opportunities Poor leadership/management (tie for 6th) Lack of benefits (e.g. health insurance) (tie for 6th)

“We have an “Employee of the Month” award (utilizing the Foodservice rewards points) for temporary employees and staff employees each month and at each unit. The staff votes and anyone who received additional kudos from guests gets additional votes. They really enjoy being able to pick out what they want.”

YES 46.6%

1 2 3 3 4 5 6 6

NO 53.4%

Lenore Musick Director of PantherDining Georgia State University Atlanta, GA

Does your campus dining operation employ a full-time human resources coordinator/manager?

C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

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NUTRITION

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C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

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FEATURE

What Students Want How Students’ Views on Food Can Shape How You Run Your Operation By Anna Diehl, Global Consumer Insights Senior Associate; General Mills The current student body coming up through the ranks of colleges and universities has a distinct philosophy when it comes to food, and it is driving big changes in today’s dining halls. Today, college students see food as a way to express themselves, have fun, and connect with others — not just fuel their bodies. Last June, General Mills Foodservice partnered with Spoon University, an online community that connects leaders, influencers, and adventurers at college campuses through food. Together we surveyed more than 650 high school and college students, ages 18 to 22, to learn more about their perspectives, values, and actions in regards to food. One of the most telling findings includes how students describe what food means to them. The most common words they used were love, life, and people — indicating today’s students have a new set of expectations when it comes to food. These evolving expectations carry over to campus dining operations as it’s no longer about just getting students in the cafeteria door to eat. College and university foodservice programs are taking note of students’ increased appetite for more communication and engagement around food and using these insights to guide their own programs—from shaping menus, to how food is served and promoted, to the type of staff they recruit and train.

“Today’s college students are more food savvy, they are willing to explore their culinary horizons, and they appreciate locally grown foods,” said Mark LoParco, director of dining services at the University of Montana, where staff has done a number of things—from amping up social media efforts to adding a full-time gardener and an executive chef—to deliver on what students want from their food and campus dining.

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What Does Food Mean to Students?

FOOD AS HEALTH

The study done with Spoon University reports taste and quality are key drivers in determining where students choose to eat and what they purchase. However, it is students’ broader attitudes toward food that shed new light that may guide your own operations. Some of the key takeaways include:

“It’s a source of nutrients that is both tasty and healthy and makes you feel good afterwards rather than heavy and bloated.”

FOOD AS COMMUNITY “A delicious way of bonding and connecting with other people.” FEATURE

“When we celebrate, we eat, when we mourn, we eat. We go on dinner dates to get to know one another.”

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College students connect with one another through a shared food culture. Often they build community on campus with other students who share religious and cultural food traditions in clubs and campus events. They also use food to explore and learn about other people and cultures. A universal love of food has the power to build community and provides one of the easiest ways to connect with people with different backgrounds and learn from one another.

“I’m not going to be the one person who doesn’t eat dessert.” While college students recognize the importance of health and nutrition, they are more apt to eat unhealthy foods when they are among friends who eat unhealthily. Students are also developing health and food opinions as they learn to make food choices for themselves. Many are confused about what constitutes “healthy” and want to understand more. They are looking for ways for “good choices” to be socially acceptable and add value to their lives. They are eager to learn more about the inherent health benefits of food and sustainability so they can better express their food values.

FOOD AS COMMUNICATION “A way of enjoying and expressing yourself.” “Creating memories through food.” “The food you eat tells so much about who you are and what you value in life.”

FOOD AS FUEL “I always wonder if I should eat a late lunch or just a granola bar before the gym so I am not too hungry.” “I literally needed to leave work because I was so hungry.” Food also plays a very practical role for students—it needs to fit their lives! Students report worrying about how to organize meals when they have busy, irregular schedules that don’t allow for normal eating patterns. They acknowledge the role of food as fuel for satiation, but they also see it as fuel for performance—for optimal physical and mental function. Ultimately, they want healthful, energizing foods to get them through the day and they want convenient access to these foods across different areas of campus.

Today’s students use social media more than any other generation to share what they are eating and to connect with others around the topic of food. They use different social platforms in distinct ways. For instance, Instagram is often used for bragging rights or to discover new foods and restaurants, while Snapchat is more about small, everyday celebrations such as sharing what they’re eating in the moment with close friends. Outside of social, food is also gifted to show gratitude, acknowledgement, and celebration. Food has become a personal expression for this generation.

FOOD AS FUN “Food means expression and art as well as a way to feel good inside.” “Food is a source of happiness.” “Food means new adventures and trying different things.” Students find food to be a release from the stresses of everyday life and appreciate the freedom to be creative and not take food too seriously. They express this by exploring new cultures, personalizing menu items, and sharing the beauty of what they eat on social media. The principle of food as art and fun makes it clear that food needs to be more than just functional—it means that there are powerful opportunities to connect with students in new ways.


Putting Insights into Action Students’ evolving food values influence more than the products and menu items offered on campus. Most schools already offer a varied and diverse menu of options. But the Spoon University research points to operational areas that campus foodservice programs can better leverage to please and delight their college customers. Following are a few of these areas along with how this may shape staffing needs and training.

DISPLAY DINING FEATURE

More and more campus dining facilities are making their kitchen staff more visible with action stations and cooking demos. They are bringing forward the people who make food to encourage dialogue and build trust. For instance, the University of Connecticut (UConn) recently added a smoothie/juice station — a round kiosk where students grab a bowl and fill it with fruit, vegetables, etc. to hand to a staff member who blends the ingredients in a Vitamix.

“Students are often pleased to learn about what we are doing,” said Korandanis. “We have a shared responsibility for learning.” At the College of Holy Cross, the staff hosts frequent tastings with students to encourage engagement. Korandanis noted they also have a unique opportunity for connection with first-year students and an innovative program where the curriculum includes learning about the foodservice operations on campus and sharing ideas to plan for the future. “Students are often pleased to learn about what we are doing,” said Korandanis. “We have a shared responsibility for learning.”

“Whether it’s pulling a pizza from the oven or letting the students choose their noodles and ingredients for a stir fry, we want our production people out front,” said Korandanis. “If staff is out front carving and serving rotisserie chicken, they can engage with students.” Students today want a connection with their food and the people who make it, so that means hiring practices need to screen for ability to engage. “During the hiring process, we may be more in tune to interpersonal skills to ensure staff will be good at working with and engaging with students,” said Korandanis.

He added that student feedback led to the creation of a digital app, “HC on the Go,” which includes a dining app listing every menu item at the various campus locations along with all of the nutritional information and helpful icons that indicate if items contain allergens or are vegetarian, gluten-free, etc.

ROUND-THE-CLOCK OPTIONS To meet demand for more flexibility with meal plans and more options throughout the day, campus dining operations are expanding hours as well as locations across campus.

CREATE CONNECTIONS

“Where we used to have a more standardized approach that gave students a set number of meals per week, today we offer a cornucopia of food that is available at all hours,” said Dennis Pierce, director of dining services at UConn.

Whether it’s asking staff to share personal recipes or ensuring that frontline employees have a friendly, welcoming demeanor, it’s important to show you care. Creating an environment where students know they and their ideas are welcome will make for a stronger program overall.

He added that the “open refrigerator” approach can be a key driver in the need for labor, but it doesn’t necessarily mean they have had to hire more staff. “For us, it was more about reassigning tasks to make the most of staff that was already there.”

C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

Arthur Korandanis, director of auxiliary services at College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, Mass., added that they are turning operations inside out so that students can watch their foods being prepared.

49


While social media can be intimidating, student workers can be a big help in this capacity to share ideas and even help manage social posts as long as there is a protocol in place for when issues such as negative feedback arise.

KEEP IT FUN! Coach staff on fun and how to make dining an experience. Look to contests, special events and more to break the monotony. The right event can serve a dual purpose: to get students excited about eating with you and to serve as a morale booster for staff since everyone can get in on the fun.

FEATURE

The University of Montana realized this when its dining services staff did a complete transformation of its dining hall and planned a “Game of Thrones” dinner, decking out the space with elaborate props such as the “iron throne,” creating a special menu and even participating in jousting.

50 C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

CONTINUING EDUCATION Beyond educating students about healthy foods and choices, campus foodservice department often educate students on topics such as locally grown food, sustainable practices and food waste. Hosting events has been particularly impactful in terms of education at UConn. Staff recently partnered with the agricultural department on campus for “Tasty Waste” to raise awareness of food waste and how to reduce it. The team used foods that otherwise would have gone to waste to create a robust menu of entrees, soups and desserts for 1,400 people.

PARTICIPATE IN THE CONVERSATION Don’t overlook the very tools that students rely on as their primary forms of communication. If your team is using social media, ensure you are using it to not only promote your program and menus, but to actively engage with students and have a conversation. For instance, Sam Belanger, marketing director at the University of Montana, pays close attention to what students are saying about food in social media and is quick to respond. By tracking key words, he receives alerts when there is a post about the campus’ dining program and can immediately comment on or “like” a post. “Students are more likely to post about us if they know we are watching, responding and engaging with them,” said Belanger. “It is so much more meaningful when students post about ou r menus than if we were to share a post.” Belanger likes to keep it fun. For instance, when a student tweeted about the dining hall running out of chocolate milk, he was quick to post “the cows weren’t cooperating,” while the problem was remedied. Or when a student recently tweeted about clam chowder making her Friday, Belanger shared her post with the hashtag, #TGICCF (Thank God It’s Clam Chowder Friday) and it became a top trending topic on campus.

In closing, while campus dining operations may find they have to make changes to adapt to students’ ever-evolving food habits, ultimately it can make for a more rewarding workplace environment. As employees, from chefs to the frontline, take on a greater role in campus dining operations with more interaction and responsibility, they will likely feel more fulfilled. With happier employees and satisfied customers whose expectations are being met, it’s can be a “win win” for everyone!

About the Author: Anna Diehl is a Global Consumer Insights Senior Associate at General Mills. Anna works closely with operators, distributors and food management companies in the college & university and healthcare space to understand their needs and develop better solutions for their business. She began her work with General Mills in 2007.


C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

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FEATURE


l a e r get

or v a l f n a e resh, cl it

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make

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C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

52 make it make it

Avocado Farro Salad with White Balsamic Shallot Vinaigrette

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NUTRITION

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53 C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

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Renewal Deadline

12.20.16 NACUFS.org/membership

It’s time to RENEW your membership!

Claim your benefits TODAY!

STAY CONNECTED WITH NACUFS! For nearly 60 years, the National Association of College & University Food Services has supported the collegiate foodservice industry by providing our members with the programs and resources they need to excel—from benchmarking to educational programming and professional networking.

the PLACE This is the association where campus dining professionals are recruited, educated, and developed as leaders in our profession. NACUFS will prepare you and your team to build your program and make you a leader on your campus. NACUFS will prepare the next generation of leaders as we anticipate succession in our field.

the SOURCE We are the source for data, information, and tools to succeed in your career. NACUFS will provide you with the benchmarking surveys, college and university research/trend data, operational tools, and resources to empower you to manage a robust program that is a respected asset and contributor to your institution’s mission. As our institutions struggle with the rising cost of education, NACUFS will save you time and money through collaborative resource development and sharing to help you do your job more effectively.

the VOICE

th eV

OI

CE

CE LA

the VOICE, the PLACE, and the SOURCE

eP th

NACUFS advocates for the college and university food segment, therefore elevating and promoting the image of foodservice on campuses and publicly. NACUFS will be the voice that speaks for our segment. We will help you tell your story about the value of dining services to support the mission of your institution as you contribute to student recruitment, academic success, retention, and revenue generation on campus.

CONNECTIONS the SOURCE

To renew go to: NACUFS.org/renew Let us help! Call 517.332.3575 or email membership@NACUFS.org


NUTRITION C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

56

From farm to fry and back. Patrons want to know they’re eating real food. Grown with care. By people who care. Only Lamb Weston® lets you see where your fries got their start – then share the story with engaging, easy-to-use merchandising tools. Discover where your fries were grown at TraceMyFries.com

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NUTRITION

REGIONAL CONFERENCES

Continental Region February 26 - March 1 Fargo, ND Hosted By: Concordia College, North Dakota State University, & Sanford Health University

Midwest Region March 19 - 22 Iowa City, IA

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Hosted By: University of Iowa

Pacific Region March 2 - 4 Pomona, CA Hosted By: Azusa Pacific University

Southern Region March 15 - 17 Sante Fe, NM Hosted By: University of New Mexico

Northeast Region March 12 - 15 Groton, CT Hosted By: Connecticut College & University of Connecticut

Mid-Atlantic Region March 5 - 8 Valley Forge, PA Hosted By: University of Maryland

Six NACUFS 2017 Regional Conferences will connect like-minded professionals from around North America to fulfill our mission: to support and promote excellence in collegiate dining. NACUFS is the place, the source, and the voice for college and university foodservice professionals. Attend any one of the regional conferences and mark your calendar for NACUFS 2017 National Conference. Stay connected throughout the year with these events and other educational opportunities. For more information, please visit www.NACUFS.org/education.


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2017

AT A GLANCE

Dec. 5-9, 2016

Marketing Institute Atlanta, GA

March 31

Deadline: Loyal E. Horton Dining Awards, Sustainability, & Nutrition Award Entries

Dec. 12, 2016

Deadline: National Conference Interest Session Proposals

April 14

Deadline: Operating Performance Benchmarking Survey

Dec. 20, 2016

Deadline: 2017 Membership Renewals

April 28

Deadline: Ad Materials for National Conference Program Guide

Jan. 6

Deadline: Ad Materials for 2016 Membership Directory

May 12

Deadline: Salary Benchmarking Survey

Jan. 24-27

Operator Roundtables and Foodservice Directors Symposium San Antonio, TX

May 21

National Restaurant Association Show NACUFS Reception

May 26

Jan. 31

Deadline: National Individual Recognition Award Nominations

Deadline: National Conference Registration

June 5-10

Foodservice Management Institute Buffalo, NY

June 11-16

Planning Institute Austin, MN

Feb. 1

Deadline: National Officer Nominations

Feb. 26 - March 1

Continental Regional Conference Fargo, ND

June 19-22

Pacific Region ChefNet

March 2-4

Pacific Regional Conference Pomona, CA

June 19-23

Leadership Institute Solon, OH

March 3

Deadline: Summer Institute Applications

June 27-29

Human Resource Workshop East Lansing, MI

March 3

Deadline: Ad Materials for Spring issue of Campus Dining Today

June 30

Deadline: Ad Materials for Summer issue of Campus Dining Today

March 5-8

Mid-Atlantic Regional Conference Valley Forge, PA

July 12-15

NACUFS National Conference Nashville, TN

March 12-15

Northeast Regional Conference Groton, CT

Sept. 8

Deadline: Winter Institute Applications

March 15-17

Southern Regional Conference Santa Fe, NM

Sept. 15

Deadline: Ad Materials for Fall/Winter issue of Campus Dining Today

March 19-22

Midwest Regional Conference Iowa City, IA

Sept. 18

Deadline: Customer Service Benchmarking Survey

For a full calendar of events and more information on NACUFS programs and professional development opportunities, visit www.NACUFS.org.


2017

NATIONAL CONFERENCE J U LY 12 - 15 | NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE

BAND TOGETHER Learn together. Work together. Succeed together.


NUTRITION

BUILD STUDENT TRUST WITH NO ANTIBIOTICS EVER TURKEY

C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

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65% of today’s students want healthy options1. Now it’s easier than ever to provide the high-quality food students expect from a brand they trust. Perdue proudly offers a full line of great-tasting turkey products that are responsibly raised on a 100% vegetarian diet with NO ANTIBIOTICS EVER. All Vegetarian Fed

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To make the switch today, contact us via the following: Turkey.Expert@Perdue.com | 888-737-3832 | PerdueFoodservice.com/PerdueTurkey ©2016 Perdue

1. Datassential, “The Keynote Report: Colleges & Universities,” January 2016


NUTRITION C A M P U S D I N I N G T O DAY

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For recipes and more, visit: wildplanetfoodservice.com

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Fall/Winter Issue of Campus Dining Today  

Fall/Winter Issue of Campus Dining Today, focusing on Recruitment, Retention, and Training

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