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Working Together SINDA Annual Report 2010


Coming together is a beginning. Keeping together is progress. Working together is success. Henry Ford

SINDA’s Annual Report in 2008 was themed as ‘Coming Together’. In 2009, the theme was ‘Keeping Together’. After rallying support from the community to come together to join hands with SINDA in our mission, when the nation (and the rest of the world) faced the economic downturn in 2009, we kept together and built the resilience of the community. In 2010, the community and SINDA worked together to spur Indian children and families towards greater aspirations. We now have new building blocks in the form of fresh initiatives.

SINDA’s vision is to build a strong and vibrant Singaporean Indian community together. Each core programme of SINDA is a brick and each type of service a building block. You – our volunteers and partners – are the builders who work together with SINDA to lay these building blocks in their place. As each of us lay these blocks, the parts become a whole to make SINDA’s vision a reality.

contents Vision

To build a strong and vibrant Singaporean Indian community together.

Mission

To build a well-educated, resilient and confident community of Indians that stands together with the other communities in contributing to the progress of multi-racial Singapore.

02

President’s Message

05

Board of Trustees & Executive Committee

06

2010 at a Glance

12

Maximising Educational Opportunities for all

20

Nurturing More Enlightened Families

34

Strengthening Partnerships, Community Engagement and Outreach

44

Educational Indicators 2009

52

Financial Statements


2010

The Singapore Indian Development Association (SINDA) is a self-help group that works to uplift the Singapore Indian Community. SINDA’s key thrusts within this annual report are each represented by a unique colour – blue for education, green for family services, and orange for active collaboration.

MAXIMISING EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES FOR ALL Number of students who attended SINDA’s tuition programmes*

Number of students who enrolled in STEP programme

Number of students who enrolled in Project Teach

Number of students who received full or partial subsidies for tuition programmes

4,558

3,020

1,085

974

NURTURING MORE ENLIGHTENED FAMILIES Total number of Straits Times School Pocket Money Fund, SINDA and preschool bursaries disbursed

Number of enquiries received at SINDA’s Career Development and Resource Centre

Number of families assisted by SINDA Family Service Centre

1,753

1,011

425

STRENGTHENING PARTNERSHIPS, COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT AND OUTREACH Total amount raised through Project Give

Number of households SINDA connections was distributed to

Number of festive gift packs distributed

$1.14 Million

65,000

1,200

* Includes STEP, Project Teach, Collaborative Tuition Programme, June Holiday Programme, STU-STAR, NUSTLS ‘A’ Level Tuition Programme- Saadhana and Math Centres


Annual Report 2010

President’s Message

On 26 October 2010, I was appointed President of SINDA’s Executive Committee. This was not the usual appointment at the beginning of a new term. Rather, I was parachuted in mid-term after the sad and untimely passing of Dr Balaji Sadasivan, Senior Minister of State for Foreign Affairs, who held the post of President before his demise. Remembering Dr Balaji Dr Balaji took over as SINDA’s President in March 2009, when Singapore was well into the economic downturn following the global financial crisis. Under his guidance and leadership, SINDA devised an effective response plan to help those most affected by the recession, whilst expanding its programmes in the area of tuition, family support, employment and skills upgrading, strengthening partnerships and community engagement, fundraising and leveraging on national resources. He introduced new ideas and initiatives to broaden SINDA’s outreach to engage the community and more importantly, to the students who needed help the most. Dr Balaji was an exemplary leader – selfless, dedicated and fully committed to the duties he undertook. He did not let his illness deter him. I recall several SINDA events he attended which, with the benefit of hindsight, we now know was when he was receiving treatment at the height of his illness. However, he did not let it show and he carried out his duties in the same calm and insightful manner as always. He is sorely missed, but his work continues to bear fruit and we are glad for that. The best way to honour our friend and former President is to build on his legacy and take SINDA to new heights.

Coming on board as new President Since accepting this appointment, many have asked me why I accepted it when I already have many other tasks on my plate. That is a good question. The answer is that after I thought about it long and hard, I realised that being asked to take on the post of SINDA President is one of those rare moments in life when one is presented with an opportunity to make a significant positive difference in the lives of others. The official raison d’etre of SINDA is to help Indian students level up in terms of education so that they will be on par with the national average for major national exams. In truth however, SINDA’s mission is much more exciting than that – which is to transform lives through education, empower young Indians, shape their futures, and help the Indian community grow in strength and confidence so that it can continue to be a strong pillar of Singapore. When I thought about it in those terms, I realised that this was not an appointment I could turn down. So I said “yes”. Let me now turn to SINDA’s report card for 2010. EDUCATION In 2010, SINDA continued to support students in financial need so that they could progress in their studies. About 21% of our students received partial or full tuition subsidies.

Preschool Bursaries SINDA gave out Preschool Bursaries to help Indian children from lowincome families to build a strong educational foundation before entering Primary 1. 230 children benefited from the Preschool Bursaries totalling $65,361.33. SINDA Bursaries and Straits Times School Pocket Money Fund (SPMF) SINDA continued to disburse bursaries from SPMF as well as its own bursaries to eligible full-time primary to pre-university students enrolled in government schools/ education institutions and independent schools. In 2010, SINDA disbursed 890 SPMF worth $381,435 and 633 SINDA Bursaries worth $423,525. STEP and Project Teach STEP and Project Teach continued to be our core programmes. These programmes were enhanced with new initiatives like flexible choice of tuition subjects, allowing students to choose the subjects they needed the most help in instead of taking fixed subject combinations. Maths and Science Statistics MOE statistics show that the percentage of Indian students with at least 3 ‘O’ level passes has increased from 87.2% in 2000 to 91.8% in 2009. Those with 5 ‘O’ level passes increased from 66.2%


03 MAXIMISING EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES ALL president’sFOR message

to 73% in 2009. This is good progress, but there is still room for improvement, which we will work to achieve. YOUTH SINDA Youth Club (SYC) Launched on 28 August 2010, SYC has reached out to 900 youths via youth workshops and high quality dialogue sessions with prominent community leaders and outstanding industry practitioners from various fields. The SINDA Young Leaders’ Programme aims to develop a network of young leaders among promising youths aged between 17-25 years. COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT SINDA’s task of raising the level of educational performance of Indian students cannot be accomplished by SINDA alone. Without community participation and support, we cannot succeed.

SINDA Volunteers SINDA has the privilege of a large pool of dedicated volunteers drawn from the community. They make a positive difference by teaching young children, mentoring youth, befriending families, imparting IT skills, providing legal advice to families, tutoring under-performing students and generally encouraging and inspiring the people they work with. In 2010, 2,713 volunteers contributed their time to SINDA and we are greatly indebted to them. SINDA-Narpani Engagement Forum SINDA and Narpani Pearavai, the People’s Association Indian Activity Executive Committees’ Coordinating Council (PA IAEC) held an engagement forum titled ‘Achievements and Aspirations’ in February 2010. Dr Balaji was the Guest-of-Honour.

The forum reviewed the progress made under the 2009 Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between Narpani Pearavai and SINDA, pursuant to which the two organisations addressed the skills training and employment issues faced by the Indian community, and collaborated on other initiatives. Talks and Roadshows Talks and roadshows were also held at schools and religious and grassroots organisations. Emphasis was placed on the importance of a good foundation in education and the need for parents to play an active role in their children’s education. PROJECT GIVE CHARITY SHOW The fund-raising Project Give Charity Show 2010 – ‘Kai Kodupom’ was jointly organised by SINDA and Vasantham on 27 November 2010. It featured


Annual Report 2010

popular Vasantham personalities, and showcased SINDA beneficiaries and their families to reinforce the message that bringing about a brighter future for those in need is a task for the entire community. Innovative fund-raising techniques, the assistance of our partners and volunteers and the generosity of donors and the public raised $1.14 million for Project Give 2010, all of which will be disbursed to students in need. SINDA 20TH ANNIVERSARY (S2020) 2011 is SINDA’s 20th Anniversary. This is a watershed year for us, to take stock and chart our future strategic direction. S2020 Review To this end, SINDA is undertaking a major review of its past work, and planning its future direction. Four committees have been set up to study different areas: • Review Committee chaired by Dr N Varaprasad • Data Analysis Team chaired by Mr Ravi Menon • Education Study Team chaired by Mr Puvan Ariaratnam

The review will look at statistical data gathered from the Ministries as well as qualitative information and ground feedback collected through 14 Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) and two Dialogue Sessions with key stakeholders such as students, parents, teachers, tutors, facilitators, volunteers, organisations and professionals.

SINDA 20th Anniversary Book A commemorative SINDA 20th Anniversary Book will capture the history of SINDA, with anecdotes and stories from beneficiaries and individuals who played a significant role in SINDA’s development and programmes, and outline the challenges ahead of us.

The feedback and data will be collated into a Review Report, which will serve as a foundational document for future SINDA work plans, programmes and services. It will also be a strategic archival document for the progress of the Indian community in the Singapore landscape.

SINDA 20th Anniversary Dinner The S2020 activities will culminate in a dinner at which the 20th Anniversary Book will be launched.

Community Forum A Community Forum will be organised for members from the various community organisations and leaders from our partner organisations. About 400 participants are expected to attend the Forum. Community Event–Family Day A Community Event will be held together with Narpani Pearavai to commemorate 20 years of the community’s progress.

CONCLUSION I would like to conclude by thanking all those who have helped and supported SINDA in the past years, especially the Board of Trustees, the EXCO and the executive and management team, as well as our volunteers and partners, for their service and dedication. We have much to do in 2011, and this is the year in which we will lay the groundwork for SINDA’s direction in the next 10 years. It is a challenging but exhilarating endeavour.

• Family Study Team chaired by Mr Shabbir Hassanbhai

Ms Indranee Rajah President, SINDA

President Ms Indranee Rajah believes everyone in the Indian community has a role to play in building the foundations for a bright future for the Singapore Indian community.


MAXIMISING EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES FOR ALL

PATRON Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong

Board of Trustees

Executive Committee

CHAIRMAN Mr Tharman Shanmugaratnam

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE President Dr Balaji Sadasivan (March 2009 - September 2010) Ms Indranee Rajah (October 2010 - Present)

LIFE TRUSTEES Professor S Jayakumar Mr S Dhanabalan Mr S Chandra Das Mr J Y Pillay Mr Sat Pal Khattar Mr Tharman Shanmugaratnam Mr K Shanmugam Dr N Varaprasad

term trustees Mr Inderjit Singh Ms Indranee Rajah Mr Haider M Sithawalla Mr Bobby Chin Yoke Choong Mr M Rajaram Mr V Shankar Mr Ravi Menon Mr R Jayachandran Mr Hsieh Fu Hua Mr Girija Pande Mr Gautam Banerjee BG Ravinder Singh

ADVISORS Dr Vivian Balakrishnan Mr S Iswaran Mr Hri Kumar Nair

Audit Review Committee Members Mr Haider M Sithawalla Chairman Mr Shabbir Hassanbhai Mr K V Rao Mr Sarjit Singh Mr Vinodh Sabesan Coomaraswamy

Vice-President Mr Viswa Sadasivan Secretary Mr Shabbir Hassanbhai, PBM Treasurer Mr R Subramaniam Iyer

MEMBERS OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Mr V P Jothi Mr R Rajaram Mr Predeep K Menon Mr Puvan Ariaratnam Mr Naseer Ghani Mr P Thirunal Karasu, BBM Mr Aaron Maniam

Chief Executive Officer Mr T Raja Segar

resource panel members Mr K V Rao Dr Joshua V M Kuma Ms M Nirmala Mr P B Desai Dr Sivasankaran Subramaniam Mr Mohamed Abdul Jaleel Ms Sabanitha Shanmugasundram Mr Sajen G Aswani Mr Sarjit Singh

Auditors KPMG LLP

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Annual Report 2010

26 FEB SINDA-ITE RoadShow 300 students from all ITE colleges gathered at the ITE College East campus to take part in a roadshow, titled, ‘Secrets of Success’. The roadshow aimed to motivate and convince students to remain in ITE, and complete their course of study.

2010

Popular Vasantham celebrity, Vadivalagan PVSS, hosted the roadshow while performances from other Vasantham artistes, motivational videos and sharing sessions with former ITE students kept students engaged.

In Conversation Series (ICS) The SINDA Youth Club organises the ICS for students to have a better understanding of various professions. This will help them make informed choices on their careers. Mr Palani Pillai, CEO of Crush Advertising, entertained and inspired more than 50 students from various pre-university institutes with insights into the nuts and bolts of the advertising industry.

10 MAR


07 MAXIMISING EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES ALL 2010 at FOR a glance

Distinguished Speaker Series (DSS) A flagship event of the SINDA Youth Club, the DSS, brings prominent individuals from diverse walks of life to share their experiences with youths. Mr Gautam Banerjee, ex-Nominated Member of Parliament and Executive Chairman, PricewaterhouseCoopers Singapore, spoke on ‘The Global Game of Change’.

SINDA Chairman’s visit to Project Victory Centre Minister for Finance and Chairman, SINDA, Mr Tharman Shanmugaratnam, visited Jurong Primary Project Victory Centre where he interacted with students and participated in the classroom activities.

More than 80 young professionals and undergraduates were enthralled by Mr Banerjee’s talk which addressed two key issues; the key drivers of change and leadership attributes needed in a modern world. 5 MAY

8 MAY


Annual Report 2010

14-23 JUN Holiday ProgrammeS The annual June holiday programmes reached out to students sitting for their PSLE and GCE ‘O’ level examinations. These programmes focused on enhancing academics and had a motivational element in getting students to set goals. More than 100 students benefited from these programmes.

Motivate Me! Seminar A seminar titled ‘Motivate Me!’ was organised for the first time this year as part of the June holiday programme line up for PSLE students. Students picked up key skills in time management, exam stress management and realistic target setting.

Some 60 students participated in the seminar conducted by Mr Vijayan Nambiar. While the kids attended the ‘Motivate Me!’ seminar, 29 parents were involved at a dialogue session on how they can play a more impactful role in their children’s education and motivation.

Eagle’s Eye Programme SINDA together with Raffles Institution (RI) embarked on the Eagle’s Eye Programme. This new programme is aimed at identifying and grooming potential students in Primary 5 to excel in PSLE and to subsequently gain entry into the Institution through mentorship by current RI students. In 2010, 7 students were selected for the Eagle’s Eye programme.

3

JUL


2010 at FOR a glance 09 MAXIMISING EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES ALL

17 JUL

28 AUG

Volunteers Tea The biennial Volunteers Tea was held at D’Marquee, Downtown East. 92 awards were given away at the event for various categories including 8 Years Gold Award, 5 Years Silver Award, Friends of SINDA Award and Group Awards for Reading Centres. Two new awards were also introduced this year; the Volunteer Leader Award and Volunteer Rookie Award.

SINDA Youth Club (SYC) SYC started in late 2009 and has since organised various youth workshops and dialogue sessions with prominent community leaders and outstanding industry practitioners from various fields.

Joint Tuition Awards To recognise the star students who have made significant improvements at major examinations, the four Self-Help Groups (SHG) jointly organised the SHGs Joint Tuition Awards Ceremony at Nanyang Polytechnic. 473 students from the Chinese Development Assistance Council (CDAC), Eurasian Association (EA), SINDA and Yayasan Mendaki’s tuition programmes received awards at the ceremony.

SINDA Excellence Awards 407 students were lauded for their achievements in the academic categories ranging from PSLE to University levels as well as non-academic areas such as sports and arts at the SINDA Excellence Awards ceremony held on 25 September 2010, at the Nanyang Polytechnic Auditorium. Minister Lim Swee Say graced the ceremony as the Guest-of-Honour.

31 JUL

28 August saw the official launch of SYC. It was an eventful day filled with fringe activities and a launch event. Deputy Prime Minister (DPM) and Minister for Defence Mr Teo Chee Hean was the Guest-of-Honour.

25 SEP


Annual Report 2010

2 OCT

4 DEC Back to School Festival and Indian Community Bursary Awards Ceremony On 4 December, as part of the annual Back to School Festival (BTSF), over 600 students received a kit worth $100 comprising of a school bag, BATA shoe vouchers, EC-House hair cutting vouchers and POPULAR bookstore vouchers.

Heritage Trails Heritage Trails aim to bring Indian permanent residents and Singaporean Indians to bond through different activities. On 2 October, 13 local and permanent resident families took part in the Heritage trail by the Singapore River. Two other similar trails also took place on 10 July and 28 August for students. 147 students took part in these trails.

Project Give Charity Show 2010 SINDA and Vasantham joined hands once again to organise the Project Give ‘Live’ charity show – ‘Kai Kodupom’. The event featured Vasantham artistes as well as SINDA’s beneficiaries. Project Give 2010 raised $1.14 million. This will be used to support bursaries and other educational needs of children from low income families.

27 NOV

Concurrently, 80 students received bursaries at the Indian Community Bursary Awards Ceremony (ICBAC).


2010 at FOR a glance 11 MAXIMISING EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES ALL

11 DEC Dramaths Dramaths is a new initiative fusing drama elements into solving problem sums. The one-day camp empowered students to visualise problems in real-time context as well as enabled them to be more vocal on social platforms. The programme focused on Mathematics and motivation. Bridging Programme This programme is offered to children from low-income families who have not attended pre-school or have attended pre-school but are not ready for primary school. The programme seeks to improve the literacy, numeracy and social skills of these children to prepare them for Primary 1. The programme was jointly organised by the four Self-Help Groups (SHGs)

17 DEC

and supported by the Ministry of Education (MOE). In 2010, the SHGs extended their outreach beyond the PAP Community Foundation (PCF) kindergartens by inviting all non-profit kindergartens to identify children for the programme. 13 primary schools hosted this programme. 224 children of all races benefited from it in 2010. Of these, 25 were Indian children.


MAXIMISING EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES FOR ALL


SINDA annual report 2009

SINDA’s core thrust is “Maximising Educational Opportunities for All”. This is aligned to the overarching goal of ensuring that Singapore Indian children have ready access to educational opportunities to maximise their potential. SINDA, in partnership with schools and community organisations, enlightens and enables Indian students and their families to get the most out of these opportunities. We continue to help Indian students level up with the national average at landmark examinations like the PSLE, GCE ‘O’ levels and GCE ‘A’ levels.

The Indian community is at the crossroads of the best opportunity to realign itself towards greater success in education. Minister Tharman Shanmugaratnam, Minister of Finance and Chairman, SINDA


Annual Report 2010

Improving Academic Performance

Maximising Educational Opportunities For All

SINDA offers quality tuition programmes at heavily subsidised rates. In 2010, 4,558 students enrolled in the programmes. Of these students, 974 students received full or partial waiver of the already subsidised fees.

Key features of the programme:

SINDA Tutorials for Enhanced Performance (STEP) STEP is a holistic tuition programme that helps primary and secondary students in English, Mathematics and Science. The programme has been enhanced significantly since its launch in 1992.

• MOE-trained or experienced teachers,

Highly subsidised fees and the location of 21 STEP centres islandwide make STEP a choice for many Indian families. In 2010, 3,020 students benefited from the programme. Of these students, 604 received full or partial waiver of fees.

• Small class size of between 12 and 15, which enables teachers to provide individualised attention to students,

Household Income STEP Students

• Six hours of tuition per week from January to October,

• Target-setting guidance that helps students to achieve their goals, • Regular tests / Centre level exams,

557 18.4%

665 22%

700 23.2%

465 15.4%

Number of Households

633 21%

3020

• Curriculum materials & assessment books, • Flexible choice of subjects,

$1,000 and below

$2,001 - $2,500

• Reading programme,

$1,001 - $1,500

$2,501 and above

• Holiday programmes, and

$1,501 - $2,000

• Refreshments.

2010 STEP centres Bowen Secondary School

First Toa Payoh Primary School

Ping Yi Secondary School

Bukit View Primary School

Henderson Secondary School

Pioneer Secondary School

Chua Chu Kang Secondary School

Jurong West Secondary School

Sembawang Secondary School

Clementi Primary School

Marsiling Primary School

Seng Kang Secondary School

East View Secondary School

Mayflower Secondary School

Shuqun Primary School

Fajar Secondary School

North View Secondary School

Yishun Primary School

Farrer Park Primary School

Pasir Ris Primary school

Woodlands Ring Primary School


MAXIMISING EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES FOR ALL

Impact of STEP (2009)

AFTER joining STEP

English 63.3% scored a B grade or better 4.5% failed

Mathematics 28.8% scored a B grade or better 55.6% failed

Mathematics 42.3% scored a B grade or better 32.1% failed

PSLE

English 45.6% scored a B grade or better 18.8% failed

Science 58.8% scored a C grade or better 41.2% failed

Science 77.8% scored a C grade or better 22.2% failed

Mathematics 24.3% scored a B grade or better 62.7% failed

Mathematics 40.8% scored a B grade or better 31.1% failed

‘O’ LEVEL

Secondary 4 Exams

Primary 5 Exams

BEFORE joining STEP

Household Income Project Teach students

160 14.7%

309 28.5%

247 22.8% 147 13.5% 222 20.5%

Number of Households

1085

$1,000 and below

$2,001 - $2,500

$1,001 - $1,500

$2,501 and above

$1,501 - $2,000

Project Teach Project Teach is a school-based programme launched in 2001. The programme aims to help Indian students in primary schools to perform better in English, Mathematics and Science. Experienced tutors conduct the programme either before or after school hours. The tutor-to-pupil ratio is one to seven; hence, students get individualised attention. The tutors motivate students and see to their different learning needs. Parents are also engaged through workshops to encourage them to play an active role in maximising their children’s potential. Project Teach was conducted in 51 schools in 2010. 1,085 Indian students from these schools benefited from the programme. 330 students received full or partial fee waivers.

SINDA CEO with Project Teach students

Minister Tharman at a STEP Centre

15


Annual Report 2010

2010 PROJECT TEACH SCHOOLS Anderson Primary

Gan Eng Seng Primary

Qihua Primary

Ang Mo Kio Primary

Greenridge Primary

Sembawang Primary

Balestier Hill Primary

Greenwood Primary

Shuqun Primary

Bendemeer Primary

Haig Girl’s School

Si Ling Primary

Boon Lay Garden Primary

Huamin Primary

Stamford Primary

Bukit Panjang Primary

Jiemin Primary

Saint Anthony’s Primary

Canossa Convent Primary

Lakeside Primary

Tanjong Katong Primary

CHIJ (Katong) Primary

Lianhua Primary

Teck Ghee Primary

CHIJ Our Lady Of Good Counsel

Marsiling Primary

West Grove Primary

CHIJ Our Lady Of the Nativity

Marymount Convent

White Sands Primary

Chua Chu Kang Primary

Meridian Primary

Woodlands Ring Primary

Compassvale Primary

Montfort Junior

Xingnan Primary

Concord Primary

New Town Primary

Yew Tee Primary

Edgefield Primary

Ngee Ann Primary

Yio Chu Kang Primary

Evergreen Primary

North View Primary

Yishun Primary

Farrer Park Primary

Pasir Ris Primary

Yuhua Primary

First Toa Payoh Primary

Pei Tong Primary

Zhangde Primary

Customised materials for Mathematics were prepared for upper Secondary students in the Normal Academic and Express streams. Students use these materials during lessons.

In 2010, 312 STEP and Project Teach students took Primary 3 Science.

New Initiatives to enhance STEP and Project TEACH Reading Programme This fun-filled structured programme was introduced in 2009 for Primary 1 and 2 students attending STEP and Project Teach. In 2010, 333 students engaged in games and other activities to improve on their reading skills through this programme. Curriculum Materials Generally, all students attending both STEP and Project Teach receive curriculum materials. This will include published materials and assessment books for each subject taken.

Flexible Choice of Subjects Unlike previous years, in 2010, we allowed STEP and Project Teach students to choose only the subjects in which they required help. Previously, students had to enrol for two or three subjects. This new initiative applied across all levels. 845 students chose to enrol in just the specific subjects they needed help in. Primary 3 Science Science has been introduced to Primary 3 students at STEP and Project Teach centres mainly for two reasons; to be aligned with MOE and to also give students an early start in the subject.

June Holiday Revision Classes and Enrichment Classes In 2010, a total of 2,055 STEP and Project Teach students attended the June holiday classes which included academic or enrichment programmes. These were conducted at STEP centres and Project Teach schools. MORE FOCUS ON MATHS Maths Kits for Primary Students Maths Kits were first introduced in 2008 for STEP and Project Teach students to help students understand key Mathematics concepts through interactive and fun hands-on activities during the STEP and Project Teach classes.

I got a grade ‘E’ for my PSLE Science. However, since I started STEP tuition, I’ve been scoring ‘Bs’ for Science. Joyce d/o Thomas, STEP Student


MAXIMISING EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES FOR ALL

17

Mr Sat Pal Khattar at the Eagle’s Eye Programme

In 2010, the following Maths Kits were rolled out: Primary 1: Numbers Primary 2: Fractions Primary 3: Weights Primary 4: Volume In all, 1,931 students used these kits. Maths Interactive Kits for Secondary students The Algebra kit was introduced as a tutor resource to motivate students to learn concepts in a fun manner. Tutors used the kit to teach Algebra to lower Secondary students. Some 400 students benefited from these kits. Primary 6 Intensive Maths Revision In 2010, we embarked on a pilot project for a group of Primary 6 students from STEP who almost failed the subject in their mid-year examinations. The intensive maths revision was conducted over eight Sundays leading up to the PSLE. This group of students showed significant improvement in the landmark examinations. Intensive Mathematics Programme The first Mathematical/Scientific programme for ‘O’ level students was established at Woodlands Secondary School. It rolled out a 10-week intensive programme that reinforces

Mathematics and Science concepts. 44 students benefited from the programme in 2010.

support as well as provide a meaningful platform for RIJC students to contribute to the community.

Mathematics Centres were first introduced in 2009 through collaboration with Radin Mas Indian Activities Executive Councils (IAECs) and Yishun Secondary School.

Winning Strategies Primary 5 and 6 students enjoyed the ‘Winning Strategies in PSLE Maths 2010’ workshop, organised by SINDA. Mr Vijayan Nambiar, a wellknown motivator and MOE-trained educator took the students through the main PSLE Mathematics topics, as well as strategies to enhance their Mathematics skills. The 241 students who attended the seminar went back with a winning mindset.

Vedic Maths In 2010, SINDA introduced a new medium for learning Mathematics known as Vedic Maths. 25 students aged between 10 to 14 years were coached on basic skills of Vedic Maths. MOTIVATION/ ENRICHMENT Study Smart Series Workshop (NEW) Students helping students – that is the underlying philosophy behind a series of workshops piloted in 2010. Raffles Institution Junior College (RIJC) students coached 40 students from Primary 5 and 6 levels in English, Mathematics and Science. Both Primary 5 and 6 students attended four weeks of workshops each. These students were from Project GuidE. Through this collaboration with RIJC Indian Cultural Society, SINDA aims to help upper Primary students who need additional

SINDA STEP Futsal SINDA’s inaugural STEP Futsal Challenge was held on 26 June 2010 at the Indian Association. The objective of the Futsal Challenge was to cultivate sportsmanship amongst STEP students. The event has proved to be a vibrant platform for the holistic development of students beyond the classroom setting. 11 teams, involving 77 students, from seven STEP centres participated in the event.


Annual Report 2010

ENGAGING STEP & Project Teach Tutors Tutor Orientation Programme SINDA organised its annual Tutor Orientation Programme (TOP) on 23 January 2010 at Umar Pulavar Tamil Language Centre for STEP and Project Teach tutors. SINDA’s CEO briefed 173 tutors on SINDA’s mission and goals. He also elaborated on why it is important for tutors to ‘Teach the child and not just the subject.’ He engaged STEP Centre Principals in a dialogue session about improving the performance of Indian students. Tutors were informed of SINDA’s new initiatives and were also engaged through interactive discussions with curriculum writers and distinguished educationists. MAP the MIND— A Training Session for Tutors Organised as part of the training sessions for STEP and Project Teach tutors, the programme helped tutors learn how to impart mind mapping skills to their students. The session, conducted by Mr Atraju Kanan Ramdas, Centre Principal of Sembawang STEP Centre and Ms Sunu Ghani, a Senior Teacher at Sembawang Secondary School, saw active participation from 25 tutors. Passion with Purpose— Dialogue Session with President’s Award Teachers Two President’s Award Teachers, Mrs Mohana Eswaran (HOD – Mathematics, Regent Secondary School) and Mr Devindra Sapai

(Dean, Pupil Development, Seng Kang Primary School) shared their teaching experiences and secrets to effective teaching with 40 STEP and Project Teach tutors. Magik Life coach Reena Nath conducted MAGIK, a self-awareness programme for 26 tutors on 13 November 2010. The tutors were inspired by the programme and were keen on conducting a similar programme to motivate their students and peers. On 20 November, Reena engaged 18 students from Secondary schools through the MAGIK workshop. Reaching Out Project GuidE—Guiding to Excel A pilot initiative in 2010, Project GuidE identifies students who underperform in Mathematics, English and Science, and do not have any tuition assistance. A close collaboration with Tamil language teachers is instrumental in making this project a success. Students from Primary 5 and 6 are identified in this programme. In 2010, 60 Tamil language teachers identified more than 400 students. About 200 students benefited from the Examination Peak Performance Seminar run by Adam Khoo Learning Technologies Group. Coined as an extension of Project GuidE, the seminar was to impart study skills and confidence building tactics amongst students.

P1 Starters The P1 Starters Programme was conducted on 22 May 2010 at OnePeople. sg. 40 parents benefited from the expert advice of professionals in the relevant fields. The workshop covered life skills that children will need when entering primary school. The 31 children who attended were engaged through Mathematics-based activities. Other Tuition Programmes Collaborative Tuition Programme (CTP) The four Self-Help Groups – Chinese Development Assistance Council, the Eurasian Association, Yayasan Mendaki and SINDA – jointly run 65 CTP centres islandwide. With these centres, tuition classes are more accessible to students of all ethnic groups. In 2010, about 173 Indian students benefited from this joint effort. STU—STAR Programme Singapore Teachers Union (STU) has been running the Special Tutorial and Revision (STAR) programme for Primary 4 to 6 students since 2007. There are 12 centres offering tuition classes in English, Mathematics and Science. SINDA provided subsidies of up to 50% of the total tuition fees for deserving students. In 2010, 59 students benefited from this programme. Community Tuition Fee Subsidy Scheme 64 students from SINDA benefited from the Community Tuition Fee Subsidy Scheme in 2010. First piloted in 2008 by 20 Residents’ Committees, the fee subsidy is co-funded by the four Self-Help Groups and the North West Community Development Council (CDC). In May 2009, 139 RCs and 26 CCs participated in this scheme.


MAXIMISING EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES FOR ALL

Kip McGrath OnePeople.sg, the national body championing Racial Harmony, has set up a Multi-Racial Education Centre (MREC), in collaboration with the Self-Help Groups, Central Singapore Community Development Council (CSCDC) and Kip McGrath Worldwide Education Centre (KMWEC). This initiative helps underachieving students from low-income families as well as strengthening bonds between children from the various ethnic groups. Six students from SINDA took part in 2010. NUSTLS ‘A’ Level Tuition Programme—Saadhana Saadhana is a non-profit project run by the National University of Singapore Tamil Language Society (NUSTLS). With qualified tutors and a small class size, Saadhana provides quality tuition for all core ‘A’ level subjects at affordable rates. This project is supported by the Singapore Indian Education Trust (SIET), and SINDA. In 2010, the tuition sessions

were conducted from May to October at Yio Chu Kang Secondary School. 77 students enrolled in Saadhana in 2010. Students were given additional fee subsidies based on their household income. Scholarship Institutional Scholarships SINDA offers a range of scholarships in collaboration with well-known organisations and institutions. In 2010, SINDA partnered four organisations to jointly award 10 scholarships for diploma and certificate courses. The institutions were: • Management Development Institute of Singapore (MDIS), • Informatics Academy Pte Ltd, • Singapore Airlines (SIA), and • Singapore Institute of Materials Management.

Project Teach students participating during a lesson

In 2010, SINDA, Singapore Indian Chamber of Commerce and Industry (SICCI) and Nanyang Technological University (NTU) awarded a scholarship for the Global Immersion Programme (GIP). Ng Lao Chik-SINDA Secondary Study (NLC SSS) Awards The Ng Lao Chik-SINDA Secondary Study (NLC SSS) Award, introduced in 2009, is attributed to Mr Ng Siak Heng. Mr Ng donated $5,000 towards this new study awards scheme. The study award is for deserving Indian students from mainstream secondary schools, who are doing well in education as well as in sports or the arts. In 2010, 10 students were awarded the NLC SSS awards.

SINDA Excellence Awards 2010

19


NURTURING MORE ENLIGHTENED FAMILIES


SINDA annual report 2009 “Nurturing More Enlightened Families” is SINDA’s second thrust. SINDA attends to the needs of low-income families, jobseekers, and families who may struggle with strained relationships, emotional burdens and other challenges. We also help families benefit from national schemes that address these issues. This is to ensure that students from disadvantaged family backgrounds do not lose out in today’s competitive arena. SINDA assists the family to become a cohesive unit capable of supporting the educational pursuits of the child.

While community organisations like SINDA can play an important role in the development of a child, I . . . stress that nurturing a child in need of help also falls on the family. President S R Nathan


Annual Report 2010

Helping Families Achieve Personal and Financial Well-being Household Income SINDA FSC Clients 23 5.41%

SINDA Family Service Centre (FSC) SINDA FSC provides social work and counselling services to individuals and families experiencing difficulties in their personal, marital and family lives. Experienced and professionally-trained officers assess problems, conduct home visits, and provide the necessary assistance.

14 3.29% 9 2.12%

SINDA FSC also assists those who seek information and assistance regarding national assistance schemes and plans. Clients are referred to the appropriate agencies where necessary.

73 17.18%

SINDA FSC handled 425 cases in 2010. Of these cases, 296 (69.65%) involved female clients, and 129 (30.35%) involved male clients.

306 72.0%

Number of Households

425

$1,000 and below

$2,001 - $2,500

$1,001 - $1,500

$2,501 and above

$1,501 - $2,000

Nurturing More Enlightened Families

PROBLEMS PRESENTED

No. of Cases %

Financial Shelter/Housing Family Youth Marital Employment Mental health Counselling Interpersonal Elderly Others

310 72.94 34 8.00 23 5.41 17 4.00 9 2.12 8 1.88 6 1.41 5 1.18 2 0.47 1 0.24 10 2.35

Total

425 100

EDUCATION LEVEL

No. of Cases %

No formal education Primary Secondary Post-Secondary University

14 3.29 131 30.82 232 54.60 38 8.94 10 2.35

Total

425 100

SINDA FSC provides social work and counselling services to individuals and families experiencing difficulties in their personal, marital and family lives. Experienced and professionally-trained officers assess problems, conduct home visits, and provide the necessary assistance.


Nurturing More enlightened families

Household Income SPMF Recipients

SINDA Bursary SINDA’s Bursaries are for deserving full-time students from primary to pre-university levels, enrolled in government schools/educational institutions and independent schools. SINDA Bursaries complement other financial schemes such as the Kindergarten Financial Assistance Scheme and pre-school bursaries.

8 1% 52 5.8%

Straits times school pocket money fund (Spmf) Just like all FSCs, SINDA FSC too leverages on government schemes to assist low-income families. We disburse SPMF to deserving clients.

138 15.5% 389 43.7%

303 34% Number of Households

890

In 2010, SINDA disbursed 633 SINDA Bursaries worth $423, 525 and 890 SPMF worth $381, 435.

Recipients of both SINDA Bursary and SPMF are eligible for subsidised tuition at our STEP centres. Case officers also assess if the bursary recipients’ families need other assistance such as Neu PC, financial assistance and support for job placement/job upgrading.

Household Income SINDA Bursary Recipients 15 21 2.4% 3.3%

118 18.6% 283 44.7%

196 31% Number of Households

633

$1,000 and below

$2,001 - $2,500

$1,001 - $1,500

$2,501 and above

$1,501 - $2,000

Recipients of both SINDA Bursary and SPMF are eligible for subsidised tuition at SINDA STEP centres. Case officers also assess if the bursary recipients’ families need other assistance such as Neu PC, financial assistance and support for job placement/job upgrading.

23


Annual Report 2010

Helping Families Achieve Personal and Financial Well-being

Nurturing More Enlightened Families

Preschool Bursary SINDA provides Preschool Bursaries to help Indian children from low-income families build a strong foundation in basic learning skills before entering Primary 1. This bursary is in addition to the Centre Based Financial Assistance Scheme and other subsidies provided by the Ministry of Community Development, Youth and Sports (MCYS). Low-income families with children, aged 18 months to six years, enrolled in non-profit childcare centres are eligible for the Preschool Bursary. To qualify, the mothers must be willing to seek employment to supplement the family income.

Before and After School Care (BASC) Subsidy SINDA provides financial assistance to parents who enrol their children in non-profit Before and After School Care (BASC) centres. The BASC subsidy, provided to low-income families with children aged 7 to 14, augments the subsidies provided by MCYS, Community Development Councils and Student Care Centres. In 2010, 160 children benefited from BASC subsidies amounting to $41,030.07.

In 2010, 230 children benefited from the Preschool Bursary Scheme, amounting to $65,361.33.

In 2010, 230 children benefited from the Preschool Bursary Scheme, amounting to $65,361.33. $1,000 and below $1,001 - $1,500 $1,501 - $2,000 $2,001 - $2,500 $2,501 and above

Household Income BASC Recipients

Household Income Preschool Bursary Recipients

9 5%

11 5% 13 6% 43 18%

29 18% 101 44%

62 27%

76 48% 46 29% Number of Households

230

Number of Households

160


Nurturing More enlightened families

NEU PC Programme SINDA’s objective is to place a computer in every low-income Indian home. SINDA has collaborated with the Infocomm Development Authority of Singapore from 1998 to enable Indian students and their families to own personal computers with affordable Internet connection.

Legal Clinic The Legal Clinic is an initiative where volunteer lawyers offer free legal advice to low-income Indian families. These free sessions are held once a month at SINDA. Lawyers help to explain to clients the legal procedures and terms and also highlight legal costs that may be incurred in resolving issues.

These families are encouraged to attend basic IT training, which helps to make the entire family computer literate.

In 2010, 19 families attended and sought the services of the Legal Clinic.

Since the start of the programme, more than 4,151 new PCs have been placed in homes. In 2010, 269 families benefited from the programme.

Household Income Neu PC Programme Beneficiaries

31 12% 45 16%

110 41%

83 31%

Number of Households

269

$1,000 and below

$1,501 - $2,000

$1,001 - $1,500

$2,001 - $2,500

Since the start of the programme, more than 4,151 new PCs have been placed in homes. In 2010, 269 families benefited from the programme.

25


Annual Report 2010

Equipping Families and Youth with Skills

Nurturing More Enlightened Families

FAMILY AND YOUTH PROGRAMMES Project Victory (PV) and Senior Victory (SV) PV and SV are school-based motivational programmes. PV is for Primary 4 to Primary 6 pupils while SV is for Secondary students. Both programmes enhance the self-esteem of students through fun and interactive activities which also spur them towards better academic performance. They also encourage the practice of positive life skills. Trained facilitators run the sessions; they customise the sessions to cater to the specific needs of students. The programmes are conducted weekly in two hour sessions for a maximum period of six months. The facilitators also continually update parents on their children’s progress and address the concerns that parents may have. In 2010, 422 students benefited from PV and SV. Household Income PV students 6 3.5% 49 19.5%

Bedok West Primary Farrer Park Primary Jiemin Primary Jing Shan Primary Jurong Primary Xingnan Primary Zhonghua Primary

2010 SENIOR VICTORY CENTRES Bartley Secondary Bendemeer Secondary Bukit View Secondary Deyi Secondary East View Secondary Green Ridge Secondary Ping Yi Secondary Riverside Secondary Yishun Secondary Yuan Ching Secondary Yuhua Secondary

Household Income SV students

25 14.6%

2010 PROJECT VICTORY CENTRES

69 27.5%

81 47.4% 60 23.9% 59 34.5%

Number of Households

171

$1,500 and below

$2,001 - $2,500*

$1,501 - $2,000

$2,501 and above*

73 29.1%

Number of Households

251

* Admitted under special circumstances including large family size

As we interact with them, we help them process life experiences so they can grow emotionally and gain inner strength to stand on their own. Lolita Pillai, Senior Victory Facilitator


Nurturing More enlightened families

Youth Empowerment Programme (YEP) YEP is a mentorship programme, reaching out to upper Primary and Secondary students, to boost their confidence and self-esteem. Volunteer mentors are paired with students on an individual or group basis for about eight months. The mentors give a listening ear to the students and advise them on the issues that these students may be facing. Peer pressure and relationship issues are among the typical problems they face. All mentors are screened and trained by SINDA. In 2010, 98 volunteers mentored 175 students in the programme.

Since its inception, SYC has organised various youth programmes including workshops and dialogue sessions with prominent community leaders and outstanding industry practitioners from various fields. SYC has reached out to more than 900 youths to date.

• Involve Indian youth in a range of meaningful enrichment activities that keep them engaged and proactive in their studies and/ or professional lives,

16 9%

• Build a sense of mutual support and community spirit among participants through various activities and programmes, and

68 39%

44 25%

SYC provides Indian youth with developmental and enrichment programmes with a strong educational agenda that inspires them to have positive aspirations.

SYC aims to: • Nurture vibrant Indian youths aged 13-35 with esteem and confidence to contribute to their community and nation,

Household Income YEP students

47 27%

SINDA YOUTH CLUB (SYC) The idea for SYC was mooted in 2008 and initiatives were rolled out in late 2009. SYC was officially launched on 28 August 2010 by Deputy Prime Minister Mr Teo Chee Hean at Republic Polytechnic.

Number of Households

• Provide Indian youth with access to networks of mentors, role models and other sources of positive reinforcement.

175

$1,500 and below

$2,001 - $2,500*

$1,501 - $2,000

$2,501 and above*

Students at the SINDA Youth Club Launch

27


Annual Report 2010

Some signature programmes organised by SYC include: • Pathways Workshops – The workshops enlighten youth in Junior College, Institute of Technical Education,Polytechnic or University on the future academic and career paths they can pursue, • In-Conversation Series – The sessions are led by industry experts. They share about the career opportunities in their industries and their own experiences in the field. Industries which are traditionally not popular among Indian youth (e.g. Advertising, Graphic Designing) are introduced to encourage them to consider economically- viable careers, • Distinguished Speaker Series – At SINDA’s Distinguished Speaker Series, distinguished professionals engage Indian undergraduates and working professionals through a dialogue session, and • SINDA Young Leaders Programme (SYLP) is an experiential programme to develop a network of young leaders among Indians. The programme is targeted at promising youth aged 17 to 25, who have the conviction and commitment to be a catalyst in our community and inspire other youth to be active contributors to society.

PROGRAMME AND OUTREACH

No. of YOUTHS

Thought Leadership Series

Information Technology (IT) Lifestyle The IT Lifestyle programme encourages families to gain basic IT literacy and benefit from IT in their daily lives. It mainly targets families who have acquired a personal computer through a Neu PC scheme. As part of the programme, volunteers visit the homes of these families once a week for an hour to teach children basic PC skills such as how to use the Internet, operate Microsoft Office applications and set up email accounts. In 2010, 32 students benefited from the programme. IT Workshops In 2010, SINDA started IT workshops to enhance the IT skills of adults and senior citizens. Volunteers conduct the classes at Community Centres to teach basic PC skills such as using the Internet and operating Microsoft Office applications. Such training enables adults to assist their children/ grandchildren with school work that requires the use of a PC. In 2010, 160 Indian adults benefited from 10 workshops.

Household Income Information Technology

171

(In Conversation Series, Ministerial Dialogue and Distinguished Speaker Series)

Pathways Workshops for Junior Colleges

42

Pathways Workshop for Institute of Technical Education(ITE)

35

SINDA Young Leaders Programme

26

Networking Session

16

Futsal Knockout 2010

120

Play, Stop, Imagine Sports Activity

50

Heritage Trail

66

Official Launch

400 Total programmes

9

4 12.5%

15 46.9% 13 40.6%

$1,500 and below Number of Households

32

$1,501 - $2,000 $2,001 - $2500

* Admitted under special circumstances including large family size

Total youths

926

Students interacting with the Minister at SYC


Nurturing More enlightened families

Project Athena

Project Athena Project Athena empowers single mothers to be confident individuals. The project provides a support network for mothers and increases their employability through skills upgrading. Their children’s educational needs are met as well. Project Athena also helps them to benefit from many enrichment activities.

Nurturing More Enlightened Families

EDUCATION LEVEL OF THE MOTHERS

No.

Primary 84 Secondary 22 Post-Secondary

Total 47

Total 106

19 and below 20-29 30-39 40-49 50-59 Total

6 13%

EDUCATION LEVEL OF THE CHILDREN

Primary 17 Secondary 27 Post-Secondary 3

AGE GROUP

Household Income Project Athena

No.

No. of MOTHERS

%

- 8 17 25 53 12 26 2 4 47 100

MARITAL STATUS

No. of MOTHERS %

Divorced 29 62 Separated 6 13 Widowed 7 15 Spouse 4 8 Imprisoned Unwed 1 2 Total 47 100

41 87% Number of Households

47

$1,500 and below

$2,001 - $2,500*

* Admitted under special circumstances including large family size

MP Hri Kumar Nair and Minister Tharman Shanmugaratnam at Project Athena visit

29


Annual Report 2010

Equipping Families and Youth with Skills

Nurturing More Enlightened Families

Project SPARK Project SPARK (Successful Parents and Resilient Kids) is a collaborative effort between Temasek Cares (a charity arm of Temasek Holdings) and the four Self-Help Groups. It is a holistic and integrated intervention programme to help single parents rebuild their lives, and overcome their challenges. Temasek Cares provided Self-Help Groups with $600,000 to support single mothers through this project. In 2010, 30 mothers participated in the programme. Project Read Project Read, a volunteer-driven programme, equips Indian children aged four to eight with basic reading skills and inculcates the reading habit in them at an early age. Each child is matched to a volunteer, who visits the child’s home for an hour each week for up to six months. Most of the children on Project Read are pre-schoolers facing reading difficulties. They are mainly from low-income families.

Household Income Project Read Beneficiaries 5 9 2.4% 4.3%

45 21.6% 149 71.7%

In 2010, 208 children benefited from Project Read.

Number of Households

208

$1,500 and below

$2,001 - $2,500*

$1,501 - $2,000

$2,501 and above*

* Admitted under special circumstances including large family size

Project Read, a volunteerdriven programme, equips Indian children aged four to eight with basic reading skills and inculcates the reading habit in them at an early age.

Project Read


Nurturing More enlightened families

Volunteer befrienders are matched to a family for six months to offer support and encouragement.

Group-Based Reading Programme The group-based reading programme is a school-based initiative targeted at Indian students in pre-schools. A group of volunteers reach out to these students and equip them with basic reading skills and inculcate the reading habit in them at an early stage. 44 students from The Global Indian International School (Queenstown campus) volunteered to read to students at the Saraswathy Kindergarten, Vithya Junior City and Jamiyah Childcare Centre.

Befrienders Programme Families that have challenges and are unable to run their lives in a positive manner benefit from the Befrienders programme. The programme also assists them in setting realistic goals and attaining them. Volunteer befrienders are matched to a family for six months to offer support and encouragement. In 2010, 17 families benefited from this programme.

Home-Based Tuition SINDA’s Home-Based Tuition programme is offered to primary and secondary students from less-privileged families. These students are unable to travel to STEP classes and their schools do not offer Project Teach. They are considered on a case-by-case basis. Unlike STEP and Project Teach which are conducted by paid tutors, HomeBased Tuition is conducted by volunteer tutors. These volunteers visit the students’ homes once a week for an hour and tutor them for a minimum of six months. 39 students benefited from this programme in 2010.

Group-Based Reading Programme

31


Annual Report 2010

Bringing Jobseekers One Step Closer to Skills Upgrading and Gainful Employment Career Development and Resource Centre (CDRC) SINDA’s CDRC serves as a onestop information and referral service centre for skills upgrading and career advancement for lowskilled adult Indian workers. CDRC underscores the importance SINDA places on skills upgrading and continuous learning. From January to December 2010, 1,011 enquiries were made at the CDRC. In all 469 job seekers received referrals for employment placement, of which 180 were successfully placed in jobs. Another 189 clients were referred to other agencies for training. The following services are available at the CDRC: • Training Referral, • Job Referral,

AGE RANGE

No. OF PLACEMENTS

20-30 57 31-40 44 41-50 43 51-60 28 61 and above 8 Total 180

Nurturing More Enlightened Families

• Practical Guide on Interview Skills and Personal Effectiveness Workshop, • Job Preparation Exercises, • Industry Previews, and • Career and Training Roadshows. Partners CDRC’s partners include: • Singapore Workforce Development Agency (WDA), • Community Development Councils (CDC), • The People’s Association Indian Activity Executive Committees Co-ordinating (PAIAEC) Council, • National Trades Union Congress (NTUC), • Employment and Employability Institute (e2i),

EDUCATION

No. OF PLACEMENTS

Primary 37 Secondary 45 ‘N’/‘O’ level 62 ‘A’ level 1 Diploma 11 Degree 7 ITE 17 Total 180

• CareerLink Plus (CLP), • Other Self-Help Groups(SHG), • National Environment Agency (NEA), • Little India Shopkeepers and Heritage Association (LISHA), • NTUC Union for Casual & Contract Workers (NTUC-UCCW), • Ministry of Manpower, • Central Provident Fund (CPF) Board, and • Singapore Manufacturer’s Federation (SMa). Schemes Available at CDRC • Employability Skills System (ESS), • Workforce Skills Qualification (WSQ), • Surrogate Employer Scheme (SEP), and • Place & Train Scheme (P&T). CareerLink Plus (CLP) Careerlink Plus, funded by the Workforce Development Agency (WDA) and run by the Self-Help Groups, is a job matching and placement service to help the long term unemployed. This programme has been part of the holistic client-centric assistance that is provided by SINDA, Yayasan Mendaki, Chinese Development Assistance Council (CDAC), Eurasian Association (EA) and Association of Muslim Professionals (AMP).


Nurturing More enlightened families

Jobseekers at the SINDA- Narpani Career Roadshow

33


STRENGTHENING PARTNERSHIPS, COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT AND OUTREACH


SINDA annual report 2009

SINDA cannot improve Indian students’ academic performance on its own. We act as a catalyst by drawing on the community’s resources and partnering several organisations in this collective effort. SINDA actively collaborates with schools, grassroots organisations, Indian Activity Executive Committees, self-help groups and other civic organisations to reach out to students, families and the community at large. Through direct ground outreach as well as mass media, the Internet and social networking platforms, we inform the community about our programmes and services.

The Community cannot rest until the Mission [of leveling up results at landmark exams] is accomplished Action Committee on Indian Education’s (ACIE) letter to Members of Parliament, 1991


Annual Report 2010

Working with Individuals Who are Willing to Lend a Helping Hand

Strengthening Partnerships, Community Engagement and Outreach

SINDA Volunteers It’s been another busy and successful year for the Volunteer Relations Department (VRD). Tasked with promoting volunteerism and providing support to volunteers, we have made positive strides by developing innovative resources and providing meaningful volunteer opportunities that our beneficiaries and the community seek. Volunteers make a positive difference in many lives by nurturing the love for reading among young children, mentoring youth, befriending a family, imparting IT skills to both the youth and the adults, providing legal advice to families and tutoring under-performing students. None of this would be possible without the tireless dedication and commitment of our volunteers. Key Information on SINDA Volunteers: • In 2010, 2,713 volunteers contributed their time to SINDA, • 555 new volunteers registered with SINDA in 2010, • 1,285 volunteers contributed to our ad hoc projects, activities and events. On an average, each volunteer contributed about 9 hours throughout the whole year,

Volunteers make positive differences in many lives by nurturing the love for reading among young children, mentoring youth, befriending a family, imparting IT skills to both the youth and the adults

• 428 volunteers were engaged in long term programmes in 2010; contributing an average of 24 hours each in the year, • 52.8% of volunteers engaged in long term programmes are aged 30 years and below, • 46.8% are degree or higher degree holders, and • 460 appointed volunteers served on Board, Executive Committee, various sub-committees and as SINDA liasion officers and school coordinators.

Minister Tharman Shanmugaratnam presenting an award at Volunteers Tea 2010


Strengthening partnerships, community engagement and outreach

I remember my mum used to read to me and I wanted to bring that experience to another kid. Sushmitha Changroth, recipient of the Outstanding Volunteer Rookie Award at the Volunteers Tea 2010

I feel happy when I see the children reading better. Sarada Nair, recipient of the Silver Award at the Volunteers Tea 2010

Launch of ‘Volunteers- Our Shining Stars’ book at Volunteers Tea 2010

37


Annual Report 2010

Reaching Out to the Community

Strengthening Partnerships, Community Engagement and Outreach

Outreach effort SINDA connections The SINDA connections newsletters are circulated three times a year to some 65,000 households that contribute to the SINDA CPF Fund. The newsletters were also distributed to various educational institutions, Indian organisations, community and grassroots leaders, the Community Development Councils (CDCs), National Library Board (NLB) branches and religious organisations. Advertisement support was solicited from various advertisers for both the June and November 2010 editions to help defray the cost of designing and printing the newsletter. Television Interstitials SINDA produced 10 two-minute television interstitials in 2010. The interstitials based on family themes were broadcast on Mediacorp’s Vasantham channel from February to July 2010. Two interstitials were televised weekly. The interstitials aimed to educate and equip parents with responsible parenting skills and create positive relationships within the family. In addition, another 10 separate twominute thematic interstitials, carrying key educational and social messages, were aired on Vijay TV from August to December 2010. These dramatised segments featured popular television celebrity Vadivalagan PVSS communicating the message.

Radio Programme From September to December 2010, SINDA commissioned a radio programme on Oli 96.8FM, entitled ‘Family Tips’. These were one-minute message capsules with family-based themes that provided families with simple tips on parenting styles. This programme was aired three times a day, five times a week. The Radio Jockey (RJ) elaborated on the themes through the use of interesting anecdotes. It was also a platform to publicise key SINDA programmes. Media Coverage The role of the media in SINDA’s outreach efforts was significant in 2010. Through SINDA’s collaboration with the broadcast and print media, SINDA received more than 140 mentions in the year. SINDA’s programmes and services were brought to the attention of the public through the use of new media.

Advertorials From May to September 2010, SINDA placed advertorials on tabla! to feature our events, programmes and initiatives. tabla! is a weekly newspaper that reports news from India and Singapore, catering particularly to ethnic Indian readers. The full-page advertorials were published every fortnight, featuring SINDA’s programmes, as well as parenting and education tips. eNewsletter Since January 2010, SINDA has engaged more than 2,000 individuals through a monthly eNewsletter. It served to keep the public aware of SINDA’s programmes and services. In addition, this eNewsletter was a good platform to highlight upcoming events and invite participation from students, youths and adults.

Since January 2010, SINDA has reached out to more than 2,000 individuals through a monthly eNewsletter. It served to keep the public aware of SINDA’s programmes and services.


Strengthening partnerships, community engagement and outreach

Project Give offers a wonderful opportunity for organisations and individuals to come together with a common spirit of community and purpose to ensure that no child’s education is compromised due to financial constraints. Project Give 2010 Project Give is SINDA’s annual fundraising campaign to raise funds to support the educational needs of school-going children from lowincome families. Initiated in 2001 as a community-wide effort, Project Give offers a wonderful opportunity for organisations and individuals to come together with a common spirit of community and purpose to ensure that no child’s education is compromised due to financial constraints. SINDA and Vasantham jointly organised the Project Give Charity Show 2010 ‘Kai Kodupom’ on 27 November 2010. The charity show featured several popular Vasantham personalities. It also showcased SINDA’s beneficiaries and

Project Give ‘Live’ Charity Show

families to convey the message that the entire community needs to work in unison to bring about a brighter future for those who need help. The innovative fund-raising techniques, the assistance of our partners and volunteers, along with the generosity of the public helped SINDA raise $1.14 million for Project Give 2010. Festive Gift Packs This year, 1,200 festive gift packs were distributed by volunteers and organisations to low-income families during the Hari Raya Puasa, Deepavali and Christmas seasons.

Networking Sessions One of SINDA’s key objectives is to bring its educational agenda to the Indian community at large and ensure ‘buy-in’ for its programmes and services from the community. In line with this, SINDA held several networking sessions with Indian religious organisations and other sub-ethnic communities. Through these sessions, SINDA was also able to collaborate with various organisations to reach out to a greater number of Indians, build partnerships and identify the issues faced by Indians.

Festive Gift Packs presentation during Hari Raya Puasa

39


Annual Report 2010

Vadi PVSS interacts with the students at the SINDA-ITE Roadshow


Strengthening partnerships, community engagement and outreach

SINDA is doing “Narpani” and Narpani Pearavai is doing its part in Indian development. In a large and practical way we overlap considerably. This partnership is powerful! Mr T Raja Segar, CEO, SINDA * Narpani means “Working for the common good”

SINDA-Narpani Engagement Forum SINDA and Narpani Pearavai, the People’s Association Indian Activity Executive Committees’ Coordinating Council held an engagement forum titled ‘Achievements and Aspirations’ on 20 February at the Grassroots Club. The late Dr Balaji Sadasivan, Senior Minister of State for Foreign Affairs, President of SINDA and Advisor to Narpani Pearavai, graced the event as the Guest-of-Honour. The forum reviewed the progress made with regards to the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) that was signed between Narpani Pearavai and SINDA in 2009. The MOU paved the way for the two organisations to address the continuous skills training and employment issues faced by the Indian community.

SINDA-ITE RoadShow SINDA and the Institute of Technical Education (ITE) jointly organised the SINDA-ITE Roadshow on 26 February 2010 at ITE College East campus. Titled ‘Secrets to Success’, the road show was targeted at first-year ITE students to motivate them to believe in themselves, set high goals and most importantly, complete their ITE education. This road show was first held in 2009 and helps create an avenue for students to understand the advantages that an ITE education accords and gave them tips on how to persevere through their stint in ITE.

Motivational Talks SINDA partnered schools and IAECs to organise motivational talks for parents and students regularly. To ensure that the topics are relevant to the needs of the Indian community, topics were revised to include more talks on Mathematics and the resource speaker pool was widened. Other Outreach Efforts As a part of its outreach efforts, SINDA set up booths at partner organisations events and provided information on SINDA’s programmes, services and initiatives as well as details to Indian families at these events.

41


Annual Report 2010

Students seated at the Indian Community Bursary Awards Ceremony

Indian Community Bursary Awards Ceremony (ICBAC) and Back To School Festival (BTSF) SINDA held its annual ICBAC and BTSF on 4 December. Dr Vivian Balakrishnan, Minister for Community Development, Youth and Sports, graced the event as the Guest-of-Honour. The ICBAC was held in collaboration with the Singapore Indian Education Trust (SIET) and Tamils Representative Council (TRC). Of 1,000 bursary recipients, 80 students received their awards at the ceremony. As part of the BTSF, 600 Back to School kits were distributed to needy students to prepare them for the school year ahead. Each kit, worth $100, contained a school bag, BATA vouchers for shoes and socks, POPULAR Bookstore vouchers for stationery and books. The students who received the Back to School kits came from families with a per capita income of between $250 and $350. During the festival, workshops on parenting, nutrition and arts were also held. Several games and activities such as penalty strike, dunking machines and carnival games were organised to make the day fun and memorable for the students. More than 1,000 parents and students attended the event.

LET’S REACH OUT From May to September 2010, SINDA volunteers reached out to over 200 students through ‘Let’s Reach Out’. SINDA engaged students through motivational talks, workshops, and seminars, as well as house visits by trained volunteers. The aim was to get more students to enrol in SINDA’s educational programmes.

Corporate Services Division (CSD) CSD provides the back end administrative, human resource, IT, logistical and building maintenance supports to SINDA.

We also engaged the parents of SINDA bursary recipients who came to SINDA for the mid-year bursary review exercise in June. We encouraged them to enrol their children in STEP.

Cost Savings and Cost Avoidance Mindful that the delivery of direct financial and indirect aid to our beneficiaries in our community should be at maximum level, CSD strives hard to save on all costs and/or avoid costs altogether.

MOE-SINDA SEMINAR The MOE-SINDA seminar aims to help parents and children cope with the transition from kindergarten to primary school.

A key strategy adopted by SINDA to minimise operating costs is to constantly strive to leverage on national resources and review its systems and processes to achieve greater productivity.

The seminar on primary school education featured a Parent Ambassador, School Principal and a Master Mathematics Teacher who shared their expertise.

In 2010, SINDA achieved $259,000 in terms of cost avoidance and savings. These savings/avoidance were channelled back into our programmes and services.

Held at the MOE Edutorium, 91 parents attended the event.


Strengthening partnerships, community engagement and outreach

SINDA would like to thank all our partners, donors and volunteers for their valuable contributions in 2010.

43


Annual Report 2010

EDUCATIONAL INDICATORS 2009 Source: Ministry of Education


EDUCATIONAL INDICATORS 2009

PERCENTAGE OF STUDENTS WHO PASSED PSLE

100

95.8 91.6

96.7 93.7

96.3 93.2

95.0

97.2

95.5

97.4

96.1 97.8

95.9

97.7

96.2 97.7

95.5

97.1

95.0

97.1

90 80

70

60

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

Percentages are based on all students. The first batch of students under the adjustment of the promotion criteria from P5 to P6 sat for PSLE in 2001.

PERCENTAGE OF PSLE STUDENTS WHO SCORED A* – C IN STANDARD ENGLISH LANGUAGE

100

99.4 98.9

98.2 97.6

98.7

97.9

97.5 97.5

98.0

97.5

98.5 97.5

98.3 97.5

98.6 97.9

98.2 97.5

98.0 97.5

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

90 80

70

60

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

The first batch of students under the adjustment of the promotion criteria from P5 to P6 sat for PSLE in 2001.

Indian

Overall

45


Annual Report 2010

Educational Indicators 2009

PERCENTAGE OF PSLE STUDENTS WHO SCORED A* – C IN STANDARD MOTHER TONGUE LANGUAGE

100

96.4

98.7

95.5

97.8

97.0 98.3

97.0 98.1

96.6 97.9

96.4 98.0

96.8 98.0

97.1 98.0

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

96.7 98.1

97.1 97.6

90 80

70

60

2000

2001

2008

2009

The first batch of students under the adjustment of the promotion criteria from P5 to P6 sat for PSLE in 2001.

PERCENTAGE OF PSLE STUDENTS WHO SCORED A* – C IN STANDARD MATHEMATICS 100

90

86.5 82.8

83.0

83.3

83.9

83.2

84.1

80 72.3 70

60

2000

69.0

2001

69.6

2002

72.4

2003

73.7

2004

73.2

2005

74.7

2006

74.0

2007

83.8

83.1

83.2

76.3 72.9

2008

2009

The first batch of students under the adjustment of the promotion criteria from P5 to P6 sat for PSLE in 2001.

Indian

Overall


EDUCATIONAL INDICATORS 2009

PERCENTAGE OF PSLE STUDENTS WHO SCORED A* – C IN STANDARD SCIENCE

100 93.3 90

86.2

85.4

84.1

91.3

91.4

90.5

87.7

90.9 85.5

90.7 85.5

90.5 84.8

90.9

90.3 85.8

84.4

90.8 86.6

80

70

60

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

The first batch of students under the adjustment of the promotion criteria from P5 to P6 sat for PSLE in 2001.

PERCENTAGE OF GCE ‘O’ LEVEL STUDENTS WITH AT LEAST 3 ‘O’ LEVEL PASSES 100 92.3 90

87.2

94.2

93.5 89.1

90.1

94.7 91.8

95.0 91.3

92.6

95.4

92.9

95.2 91.3

94.7

94.8 91.3

95.1 91.8

80

70

60

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

Figures from 2005 onwards exclude IP students.

Indian

Overall

47


Annual Report 2010

Educational Indicators 2009

PERCENTAGE OF GCE ‘O’ LEVEL STUDENTS WITH AT LEAST 5 O-LEVEL PASSES

100

90 77.8

80

70

60

80.0 71.3

70.3

82.7

81.6

80.0 73.5

73.7

82.0

81.1 72.9

75.0

72.6

81.9

81.3

80.8 73.0

73.0

66.2

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

Figures from 2005 onwards exclude IP students.

PERCENTAGE OF GCE ‘O’ LEVEL STUDENTS WHO PASSED MOTHER TONGUE LANGUAGE 100

90

94.6

93.5

96.2

96.7 96.5

97.1 97.4

2002

2003

96.0 95.5

96.1 96.0

2004

2005

96.5

98.1

96.8 97.6

96.3

97.5

96.7 97.1

89.2

80

70

60

2000

2001

2006

2007

2008

2009

Figures from 2005 onwards exclude IP students.

Indian

Overall


EDUCATIONAL INDICATORS 2009

PERCENTAGE OF GCE ‘O’ LEVEL STUDENTS WHO PASSED ENGLISH LANGUAGE

100

90

87.1

86.1

83.7

81.4

79.8

80

90.3 86.5

86.0

85.0

84.1

92.4

92.2

89.9

88.5

91.1

90.2 86.8

86.1

86.9

76.3

70

60

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

Figures from 2005 onwards exclude IP students.

PERCENTAGE OF GCE ‘O’ LEVEL STUDENTS WHO PASSED MATHEMATICS 100

90

87.1

80 73.3

73.5

75.6

89.0

87.7

87.5

86.6

76.1

77.3

88.4

88.3

76.8

79.0 75.9

88.9

87.8

87.0

77.7

77.6

70

60

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

Figures from 2005 onwards exclude IP students.

Indian

Overall

49


Annual Report 2010

Educational Indicators 2009

PERCENTAGE OF GCE ‘A’ LEVEL STUDENTS WITH AT LEAST 3 ‘A’/’H2’ PASSES AND PASS IN GENERAL PAPER OR KNOWLEDGE AND INQUIRY 100

90 80

80.6 81.6

85.8 84.8

85.2

87.3 87.2

86.6

88.6 84.2

81.1

87.2

82.2

81.6

87.6

87.1

87.0

85.4

87.8

82.7

70

60

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

Figures from 2007 and 2008 include students taking either the new or old syllabus.

Percentage of GCE ‘A’ Level Students who Passed General Paper or Knowledge and Inquiry 100

90

94.0

93.0

92.1 87.1

89.3

96.5

95.5 90.8

91.9

94.2

94.0 93.2

94.3

92.2

91.4 91.4

92.7 91.9

2007

2008

94.3

92.3

80

70

60

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2009

Figures from 2007 and 2008 include students taking either the new or old syllabus.

Indian

Overall


EDUCATIONAL INDICATORS 2009

PERCENTAGE OF GCE ‘A’ LEVEL STUDENTS WHO PASSED MOTHER TONGUE LANGUAGE AT ‘AO’/‘H1’ LEVEL

100

96.2 92.6

93.6

96.2

96.2 96.7

96.7 97.6

96.6

94.7

93.1 89.0

90

91.7

94.6

95.9 92.2

92.8

95.4

94.9 90.6

80

70

60

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

Figures from 2007 and 2008 include students taking either the new or old syllabus.

Percentage of P1 Cohort Admitted to Post-Secondary Institutions 100

90

86.2

83.8 80 74.9

77.7

88.0

87.6 80.1

91.0

89.5 85.1

82.0

84.9

90.4 85.9

91.2 86.6

92.6 89.8

89.5

92.6

70

60

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

Junior Colleges, Centralised Institute, Polytechnics, ITE, LaSalle College of the Arts, Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts and other private educational institutions offering courses at post-secondary level. Figures for 2005 – 2009 are preliminary. Figures include participation in LaSalle College of the Arts, Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts and other private educational institutions, and also take into account students who have left the country. Indian

Overall

51


Annual Report 2010


General Information

Financial Statements Year ended 31 December 2010

53


Annual Report 2010

54

Income at a glance

Total Income 2010

2% 2%

Donations – CPF Scheme

$6,911,805

Donations/sponsorships

$1,471,512

Government subvention

$1,700,000

MCYS Funding/NCSS & STB FSC Grant/SPMF

$2,739,070

Tuition Programme fees received

$308,981

Interest income

$215,318

21%

52% 13% 11%

Total Income

13,346,686 Total Income 2009

3%

Donations – CPF Scheme

$6,338,121

Donations/sponsorships

$1,376,753

Government subvention

$1,700,000

MCYS Funding/NCSS & STB FSC Grant/SPMF

$2,684,687

Tuition Programme fees received Interest income

Total Income

21%

51%

14%

$416,967 $10,437

12,526,965

11%


Independent auditors’ report

Expenditure at a glance

Total Expenditure 2010 9% 13%

54% 24%

Education

$7,030,607

Family and Youth Development/ Volunteer Relations

$3,201,142

Corporate Communications & Community Engagement

$1,678,592

Other operating costs

$1,218,142

Total Expenditure

13,128,483 Total Expenditure 2009 7% 16%

57% 19

%

Education

6,873,513

Family and Youth Development/ Volunteer Relations

2,331,047

Corporate Communications & Community Engagement

1,951,038

Other operating costs

Total Expenditure

806,858

11,962,456

55


Annual Report 2010

56

Statement by President, Chief Executive Officer and the Treasurer

We, Indranee T. Rajah, T. Raja Segar and R. Subramaniam Iyer, do hereby state that in our opinion: (a) the financial statements of the Singapore Indian Development Association (the ‘Association’) set out on pages 59 to 92 are properly drawn up to present fairly in all material respects, the state of affairs of the Association as at 31 December 2010 and the income and expenditure, changes in funds and cash flows of the Association for the year ended on that date in accordance with the Singapore Financial Reporting Standards; and (b) at the date of this statement, the Association will be able to pay its debts as and when they fall due. The Executive Committee has, on the date of this statement, authorised these financial statements for issue.

On behalf of the Executive Committee

Indranee T. Rajah President

T. Raja Segar Chief Executive Officer

R. Subramaniam Iyer Treasurer 8 March 2011


Independent auditors’ report

Independent auditors’ report

Members of Singapore Indian Development Association (Registered under the Charities Act, Chapter 37 and the Societies Act, Chapter 311)

Report on the financial statements We have audited the accompanying financial statements of Singapore Indian Development Association (the Association), which comprise the balance sheet as at 31 December 2010, statement of comprehensive income, statement of changes in funds and cash flow statement for the year then ended, and a summary of significant accounting policies and other explanatory information, as set out on pages 59 to 92. Executive Committee’s responsibility for the financial statements The Executive Committee is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of these financial statements in accordance with the provisions of the Charities Act, Chapter 37 (the Act) and Singapore Financial Reporting Standards, and for such internal control as the Executive Committee determines is necessary to enable the preparation of financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error. Auditors’ responsibility Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance with Singapore Standards on Auditing. Those standards require that we comply with ethical requirements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free from material misstatement. An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. The procedures selected depend on the auditor’s judgement, including the assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor considers internal control relevant to the entity’s preparation and fair presentation of these financial statements in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the entity’s internal control. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our audit opinion. Opinion In our opinion, the financial statements of the Association present fairly, in all material respects, of the state of affairs of the Association as at 31 December 2010, and of its income and expenditure, changes in funds and cash flows of the Association for the year then ended in accordance with Singapore Financial Reporting Standards.

KPMG LLP 16 Raffles Quay #22-00 Hong Leong Building Singapore 048581

Telephone +65 6213 3388 Fax +65 6225 0984 Internet www.kpmg.com.sg

57


Annual Report 2010

58

Independent auditor’s report (Cont.)

Report on other legal and regulatory requirements In our opinion: (a) the accounting and other records required by the regulations enacted under the Societies Act to be kept by the Association have been properly kept in accordance with those regulations; and (b) the fund-raising appeal held during the year ended 31 December 2010 has been carried out in accordance with Regulation 6 of the Societies Regulations issued under the Societies Act, Chapter 311 and proper accounts and other records have been kept of the fund-raising appeal. During the course of our audit, nothing has come to our attention that cause us to believe that: (a) The Association did not comply with the requirements of Regulation 15 of the Charities (Institutions of a Public Character) Regulations 2007. (b) The donation monies have not been used in accordance with the objectives of the Association as an Institute of a Public Character.

KPMG LLP Public Accountants and Certified Public Accountants

Singapore 8 March 2011


Balance Sheet

Balance sheet

As at 31 December 2010

Note 2010 2009 $ $ Non-current asset Property, plant and equipment 4 598,856 587,750 Current assets Government Subvention receivable 12 1,700,000 1,700,000 Donations receivable – Central Provident Fund Board Scheme 593,993 544,184 Donations receivable – Singapore Totalisator Board 1,025,000 500,000 Deposits, prepayments and other receivables 5 826,157 844,245 Financial assets – Investments 6 24,930,684 20,575,049 Cash and cash equivalents 7 5,225,408 5,816,338 34,301,242 29,979,816 Total assets 34,900,098 30,567,566 Representing: Funds Unrestricted funds Accumulated fund 9 7,658,427 7,301,853 Sinking fund 10 1,000,308 1,074,619 8,658,735 8,376,472 Endowment fund 8 20,891,108 Total funds 29,549,843 Current liabilities Other payables and accrued expenses 871,907 Unutilised specific grants/donations 11 4,478,348 Total liabilities 5,350,255 Total liabilities and funds 34,900,098

The accompanying notes form an integral part of these financial statements.

19,309,387 27,685,859

962,511 1,919,196 2,881,707 30,567,566

59


Annual Report 2010

60

Statement of comprehensive income

Year ended 31 December 2010

‹--------------------- Unrestricted Funds ----Financial activities/Income and expenditure Note Accumulated Fund Incoming resources $ Incoming resources from generated funds (i) Voluntary income: Donation- Central Provident Fund (CPF) Contribution 6,911,805 Donation from Singapore Totalisator Board (STB) 525,000 Donations/Sponsorships 810,924 Other donations 135,588 Income from School Pocket Money Fund (SPMF) 381,435 (ii) Investment income: Dividend income 51,981 Interest income - debt securities 3,062 - fixed deposits and bank balances 4,233 Incoming resources from charitable activities (i) Income from approved projects: Tuition programme fees 308,981 (ii) Government Grants: Ministry of Community Development, Youth and Sports (MCYS), Temporary Occupation Licence (TOL) Fee Grant 13 431,270 Government Subvention 12 1,700,000 GST Offset Package Grant 162,000 National Council of Social Service - STB Funding 467,981 Grant from Central Singapore Community Development Council (CSCDC) 470,357 MCYS Family Services (FS) Funding 333,528 Other Funding 78,580 MCYS – Additional Funding 360,000 Jobs Credit Scheme 46,792 Temasek Care Funding 7,127 Other incoming resources Investment gains/(losses): Net gain on disposal of trading securities 93,137 Exchange loss – Unrealised gain on trading securities 62,905 Total incoming resources 13,346,686 The accompanying notes form an integral part of these financial statements.


Statement of Comprehensive Income

--------------------------------------› ‹----------------------------------------- Endowment Funds--------------------------------------------› General Vijay and Padma and Hari Harilela 2010 Sinking Fund Endowment Fund Amar Trust Fund Scholarship Fund Total $ $ $ $ $ – – – – 6,911,805 – – – – 525,000 – – – – 810,924 – – – – 135,588 – – – – 381,435 15,595 273,705 14,676 4,384 360,341 916 10,016 864 258 15,116 734 571 – – 5,538 – – – – 308,981

– – – – 431,270 – – – – 1,700,000 – – – – 162,000 – – – – 467,981 – – – – 470,357 – – – – 333,528 – – – – 78,580 – – – – 360,000 – – – – 46,792 – – – – 7,127 27,942 578,857 26,296 7,854 734,086 – (360,827) – – (360,827) 18,873 997,485 22,534 5,048 1,106,845 64,060 1,499,807 64,370 17,544 14,992,467

61


Annual Report 2010

62

Statement of comprehensive income (Cont.)

Year ended 31 December 2010

‚--------------------- Unrestricted Funds ---- Resources Expended Note Accumulated Fund Cost of generating funds $ Cost of generating voluntary income: CPF Agency Charges 108,826 Charitable activities: Education programmes 13 6,649,172 Family and Youth Development/Volunteer Relations 13 3,201,142 Corporate Communications & Community Engagement 13 1,678,592 School Pocket Money Fund (SPMF) programme 381,435 Governance costs Administrative expenses 13 1,109,316 Total resources expended 13,128,483 Net surplus of income over expenditure 218,203 Other comprehensive income for the year, net of income tax Total comprehensive income for the year

The accompanying notes form an integral part of these financial statements.

– 218,203


Statement of Comprehensive Income

--------------------------------------› ‹----------------------------------------- Endowment Funds--------------------------------------------› General Vijay and Padma and Hari Harilela 2010 Sinking Fund Endowment Fund Amar Trust Fund Scholarship Fund Total $ $ $ $ $ – – – – 108,826 – – – – – 6,649,172 – – – – 3,201,142 – – – – 1,678,592 – – – – 381,435 – – – – 1,109,316 – – – – 13,128,483 64,060 1,499,807 64,370 17,544 1,863,984 – 64,060

– 1,499,807

– 64,370

– 17,544

– 1,863,984

63


Annual Report 2010

64

Statement of comprehensive income

Year ended 31 December 2009

‹--------------------- Unrestricted Funds ----Financial activities/Income and expenditure Note Accumulated Fund Incoming resources $ Incoming resources from generated funds (i) Voluntary income: Donation- Central Provident Fund (CPF) Contribution 6,338,121 Donation from Singapore Totalisator Board (STB) 500,000 Donation/Sponsorships 406,098 Other donations 470,655 Income from School Pocket Money Fund (SPMF) 687,395 (ii) Investment income: Dividend income – Interest income - debt securities – - fixed deposits and bank balances 10,437 Incoming resources from charitable activities (i) Income from approved projects: Tuition programme fees 416,967 (ii) Government Grants: Ministry of Community Development, Youth and Sports (MCYS), Temporary Occupation Licence (TOL) Fee Grant 13 368,880 Government Subvention 12 1,700,000 GST Offset Package Grant 184,500 National Council of Social Service - STB Funding 275,377 Grant from Central Singapore Community Development Council (CSCDC) 201,092 MCYS Family Services (FS) Funding 263,071 Other Funding 124,374 MCYS – Additional Funding 360,000 Jobs Credit Scheme 219,998

Other incoming resources Investment gains/(losses): Net loss on disposal of trading securities – Exchange loss – Unrealised gain on trading securities – Total incoming resources 12,526,965

The accompanying notes form an integral part of these financial statements.


Statement of Comprehensive Income

--------------------------------------› ‹----------------------------------------- Endowment Funds--------------------------------------------› General Vijay and Padma and Hari Harilela 2009 Sinking Fund Endowment Fund Amar Trust Fund Scholarship Fund Total $ $ $ $ $ – – – – 6,338,121 – – – – 500,000 – – – – 406,098 – 2,000 – – 472,655 – – – – 687,395 – 249,243 – – 249,243 – 16,212 – – 16,212 4,014 – 1,886 1,513 17,850 – – – – 416,967 – – – – – – – – –

– – – – – – – – –

– – – – – – – – –

– – – – – – – – –

368,880 1,700,000 184,500 275,377 201,092 263,071 124,374 360,000 219,998

– (2,264,725) – – – (34,559) – – – 5,257,817 – – 4,014 3,225,988 1,886 1,513

(2,264,725) (34,559) 5,257,817 15,760,366

65


Annual Report 2010

66

Statement of comprehensive income (Cont.)

Year ended 31 December 2009

‚--------------------- Unrestricted Funds ---- Resources Expended Note Accumulated Fund Cost of generating funds $ Cost of generating voluntary income: CPF Agency Charges 103,565 Charitable activities: Education programmes 13 6,186,118 Family and Youth Development/Volunteer Relations 13 2,331,047 Corporate Communications & Community Engagement 13 1,951,038 School Pocket Money Fund (SPMF) programme 687,395

Governance costs Administrative expenses 13 703,293 Total resources expended 11,962,456 Net surplus of income over expenditure 564,509 Other comprehensive income for the year, net of income tax – Total comprehensive income for the year 564,509

The accompanying notes form an integral part of these financial statements.


Statement of Comprehensive Income

--------------------------------------› ‹----------------------------------------- Endowment Funds--------------------------------------------› General Vijay and Padma and Hari Harilela Sinking Fund Endowment Fund Amar Trust Fund Scholarship Fund $ $ $ $ – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

2009 Total $

103,565

6,186,118 2,331,047 1,951,038 687,395

– – – – 703,293 – – – – 11,962,456 4,014 3,225,988 1,886 1,513 3,797,910 – – – – – 4,014 3,225,988 1,886 1,513 3,797,910

67


Annual Report 2010

68

Statement of Changes in Funds

Year ended 31 December 2010

‹--------------------- Unrestricted Funds ---- Accumulated Fund $ At 1 January 2009 6,541,654 Total comprehensive income for the year Surplus of income over expenditure 564,509 Other comprehensive income – Total comprehensive income for the year 564,509

Transfer from Sinking Fund to Accumulated Fund# 195,690 Transactions with members, recorded directly in funds Contributions by and distributions to members – At 31 December 2009 7,301,853 At 1 January 2010 7,301,853 Total comprehensive income for the year Surplus of income over expenditure 218,203 Other comprehensive income – Total comprehensive income for the year 218,203 Transfer from Sinking Fund to Accumulated Fund# 138,371 Transactions with members, recorded directly in funds Contributions by and distributions to members – At 31 December 2010 7,658,427 #

Transfer of $138,371 (2009: $195,690) from the Sinking Fund to the Accumulated Fund was approved by the Executive Committee.

The accompanying notes form an integral part of these financial statements.


Statement of Comprehensive Income

--------------------------------------› ‹----------------------------------------- Endowment Funds--------------------------------------------› General Vijay and Padma and Hari Harilela Sinking Fund Endowment Fund Amar Trust Fund Scholarship Fund $ $ $ $ 1,266,295 14,853,080 975,175 251,745 4,014 – 4,014

3,225,988 – 3,225,988

1,886 – 1,886

Total $ 23,887,949

1,513 – 1,513

3,797,910 – 3,797,910

(195,690) – – – – – – – 1,074,619 18,079,068 977,061 253,258 1,074,619 18,079,068 977,061 253,258

64,060 1,499,807 64,370 17,544 – – – – 64,060 1,499,807 64,370 17,544 (138,371) – – – – – – – 1,000,308 19,578,875 1,041,431 270,802

– 27,685,859 27,685,859 1,863,984 – 1,863,984 – – 29,549,843

69


Annual Report 2010

70

Cash flow statement

Year ended 31 December 2010

Note 2010 2009 $ $ Cash flows from operating activities Surplus of income over expenditure for the year 1,863,984 3,797,910 Adjustments for: Dividend income (360,341) (249,243) (Gain)/loss on disposal of trading investment securities (734,086) 2,264,725 Unrealised gain on trading investment securities (1,106,845) (5,257,817) Loss on foreign exchange 360,827 61,913 Depreciation 4 285,420 176,771 Interest income - debt securities (15,116) (16,212) - fixed deposits and bank balances (5,538) (17,850) 288,305 760,197 Changes in working capital: Donations, grants and subventions receivables (574,809) (7,958) Deposits, prepayments and other receivables 18,088 (44,980) Other payables, accrued expenses and unutilised grants 2,468,548 1,495,274 Net cash from operating activities 2,200,132 2,202,533 Cash flows from investing activities Purchase of property, plant and equipment (296,526) (428,139) Purchase of investments (12,846,468) (8,359,571) Proceeds from sale of investments 8,694,771 7,975,647 Interest received - debt securities 15,116 16,212 - fixed deposits and bank balances 5,538 17,850 Dividend received 360,341 249,243 Net cash used in investing activities (4,067,228) (528,758) Net (decrease)/increase in cash and cash equivalents (1,867,096) 1,673,775 Cash and cash equivalents at 1 January 9,469,946 7,796,171 Cash and cash equivalents at 31 December 7 7,602,850 9,469,946

The accompanying notes form an integral part of these financial statements.


Notes to the financial statements

Notes to the financial statements

Year ended 31 December 2010

These notes form an integral part of the financial statements. The financial statements were authorised for issue by the Executive Committee on 8 March 2011.

1

Domicile and activities Singapore Indian Development Association (the “Association�) is a society registered with the Registrar of Societies under the Societies Act, Chapter 311. Its registered office is located at No. 1 Beatty Road, Singapore 209943. The Association’s Vision and Mission includes the following:

Vision To build a strong and vibrant Singaporean Indian community together.

Mission To build a well educated, resilient and confident community of Indians that stands together with the other communities in contributing to the progress of multi-racial Singapore. In order to achieve its vision and mission the Association has articulated three Strategic Thrusts as follows: i) Maximising educational opportunities for all ii) Nurturing more enlightened families iii) Strengthening partnerships, community engagement & outreach The Association runs a range of programmes, services and initiatives aligned to its three Strategic Thrusts. The Association has been approved as an Institution of Public Character under the provisions of Income Tax Act for a period of 5 years with effect from 16 December 2006. The Association is also registered as a charity under the Charities Act, Chapter 37.

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72

Notes to the financial statements (Cont.)

Year ended 31 December 2010

2

Basis of preparation 2.1 Statement of compliance

The financial statements are prepared in accordance with Singapore Financial Reporting Standards (FRS).

2.2 Basis of measurement

The financial statements have been prepared on the historical cost basis except for certain financial assets - investment trading securities, which are measured at fair value.

2.3 Functional and presentation currency

The financial statements are presented in Singapore dollars which is the Association’s functional currency. All financial information is presented in Singapore dollars, unless otherwise stated.

2.4 Use of estimates and judgements

The preparation of the financial statements in conformity with the FRSs requires management to make judgements, estimates and assumptions that affects the application of accounting policies and the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, income and expenses. Actual results may differ from these estimates. There are no significant assumptions or estimation uncertainties that have a significant risk of resulting in a material adjustment to the financial statements within next financial year.

2.5 Changes in accounting policies

On 1 January 2010, the Association adopted the new or amended FRS and Interpretations to FRS that are mandatory for application from that date.

The adoption of these new or amended FRS and Interpretations to FRS did not result in substantial changes to the Association’s accounting policies and had no material effect to the amounts reported for the current or prior financial years.


Notes to the financial statements

3

Significant accounting policies The accounting policies set out below have been applied consistently to all periods presented in these financial statements. 3.1 Foreign currency transactions Transactions in foreign currencies are translated into Singapore dollars at foreign exchange rates ruling at the dates of the transaction. Monetary assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies at the balance sheet date are retranslated into Singapore dollars at foreign exchange rate ruling at that date. Non-monetary assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies that are measured at fair value are retranslated to Singapore dollars at the exchange rate at the date on which the fair value is determined. Foreign currency differences arising from retranslation are recognised in income and expenditure. 3.2 Property, plant and equipment Property, plant and equipment are stated at cost less accumulated depreciation and impairment losses. Cost includes expenditure that is directly attributable to the acquisition of the asset. Purchased software that is integral to the functionality of the related equipment is capitalised as part of that equipment. When parts of an item of property, plant and equipment have different useful lives, they are accounted for as separate items (major components) of property, plant and equipment. The cost of replacing part of an item of property, plant and equipment is recognised in the carrying amount of the item if it is probable that the future economic benefits embodied within the part will flow to the Association and its cost can be measured reliably. The costs of the day-to-day servicing of property, plant and equipment are recognised in income and expenditure as incurred. Depreciation is provided on a straight-line basis so as to write off items of property, plant and equipment, over their estimated useful lives as follows: Computer equipment Furniture and fittings Office equipment Office renovation

3 years 5 years 5 years 3 years

Depreciation methods, useful lives and residual values are reviewed, and adjusted as appropriate, at each reporting date.

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74

Notes to the financial statements (Cont.)

Year ended 31 December 2010

3.3 Financial instruments Non-derivative financial assets The Association initially recognises loans and receivables on the date that they are originated. All other financial assets including investments are recognised initially on the trade date at which the Association becomes a party to the contractual provisions of the instrument. The Association derecognises a financial asset when the contractual rights to the cash flows from the asset expire, or it transfers the rights to receive the contractual cash flows on the financial asset in a transaction in which substantially all the risks and rewards of ownership of the financial asset are transferred. Any interest in transferred financial assets that is created or retained by the Association is recognised as a separate asset or liability. Financial assets and liabilities are offset and the net amount presented in the balance sheet when, and only when, the Association has a legal right to offset the amounts and intends either to settle on a net basis or to realise the asset and settle the liability simultaneously. Loans and receivables are financial assets with fixed or determinable payments that are not quoted in an active market. Such assets are recognised initially at fair value plus any directly attributable transaction costs. Subsequent to initial recognition, loans and receivables are measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method, less any impairment losses. Loans and receivables comprise government subvention, donations, other receivables and cash and cash equivalents. Financial assets - Investments at fair value through income and expenditure Financial assets - investments are classified as at fair value through income and expenditure if they are held for trading or is designated as such upon initial recognition. Financial assets are designated as fair value through income and expenditure if the Association manages such investments and makes purchase and sale decisions based on their fair value. Upon initial recognition, attributable transaction costs are recognised in the income and expenditure as incurred. The Association’s investment which are classified as financial assets at fair value through income and expenditure are measured at fair value, and changes therein are recognised in income and expenditure.


Notes to the financial statements

Non-derivative financial liabilities Financial liabilities are recognised initially on the trade date at which the Association becomes a party to the contractual provisions of the instrument. The Association derecognises a financial liability when its contractual obligations are discharged or cancelled or expire. Financial assets and liabilities are offset and the net amount presented in the balance sheet when, and only when, the Association has a legal right to offset the amounts and intends either to settle on a net basis or to realise the asset and settle the liability simultaneously. The Association’s non-derivative financial liabilities comprised trade and other payables. Such financial liabilities are recognised initially at fair value plus any directly attributable transaction costs. Subsequent to initial recognition, these financial liabilities are measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method. 3.4 Impairment Financial assets (including receivables) A financial asset is assessed at each reporting date to determine whether there is any objective evidence that it is impaired. A financial asset is impaired if objective evidence indicates that a loss event has occurred after the initial recognition of the asset, and that the loss event had a negative effect on the estimated future cash flows of that asset that can be estimated reliably. Objective evidence that financial assets are impaired can include default or delinquency by a debtor, restructuring of an amount due to the Association on terms that the Association would not consider otherwise, indications that a debtor will enter bankruptcy. The Association considers evidence of impairment for receivables at both a specific asset and collective level. All individually significant receivables are assessed for specific impairment. All individually significant receivables found not to be specifically impaired are then collectively assessed for any impairment that has been incurred but not yet identified. Receivables that are not individually significant are collectively assessed for impairment by grouping together receivables with similar risk characteristics. In assessing collective impairment, the Association uses historical trends of the probability of default, timing of recoveries and the amount of loss incurred, adjusted for management’s judgement as to whether current economic and credit conditions are such that the actual losses are likely to be greater or lesser than suggested by historical trends.

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76

Notes to the financial statements (Cont.)

Year ended 31 December 2010

An impairment loss in respect of a financial asset measured at amortised cost is calculated as the difference between its carrying amount and the present value of the estimated future cash flows discounted at the asset’s original effective interest rate. Losses are recognised in income and expenditure and reflected in an allowance account against receivables. Interest on the impaired asset continues to be recognised through the unwinding of the discount. When a subsequent event causes the amount of impairment loss to decrease, the decrease in impairment loss is reversed through income and expenditure. Non-financial assets The carrying amounts of the Association’s non-financial assets are reviewed at each reporting date to determine whether there is any indication of impairment. If any such indication exists, then the asset’s recoverable amount is estimated. The impairment loss is charged to income and expenditure. Impairment losses recognised in prior periods are assessed at each reporting date for any indications that the loss has decreased or no longer exists. An impairment loss is reversed if there has been a change in the estimates used to determine the recoverable amount. An impairment loss is reversed only to the extent that the asset’s carrying amount does not exceed the carrying amount that would have been determined, net of depreciation or amortisation, if no impairment loss had been recognised. 3.5 Provisions Provisions are recognised if, as a result of past events the Association has a present legal or constructive obligation that can be estimated reliably, and, it is probable that an outflow of economic benefits will be required to settle the obligation. Provisions are determined by discounting the expected future cash flows at a pre-tax rate that reflects current market assessments of the time value of money and the risks specific to the liability. 3.6 Employee benefits

Defined contribution plan Obligations for contributions to defined contribution plans are recognised as an expense in income and expenditure as incurred. Short-term accumulating compensated absences Short-term accumulating compensated absences are recognised when employees render services that increase their entitlement to future compensated absences.


Notes to the financial statements

Short-term benefits Short-term employee benefit obligations are measured on an undiscounted basis and are expensed as the related service is provided. A provision is recognised for the amount expected to be paid under short-term cash bonus or profit-sharing plans if the Association has a present legal or constructive obligation to pay this amount as a result of past service provided by the employee and the obligation can be estimated reliably. 3.7 Income recognition Donations from Central Provident Fund scheme and Singapore Totalisator Board are recognised on accrual basis. All other donations are recognised on a receipt basis. Tuition programme fees income is recognised on the accrual basis. Grants for specific purposes are recognised to the extent the related expenditure has been incurred and the grant is receivable. Government Subvention and grants are recognised on the accrual basis. Government grant – Jobs Credit Scheme Cash grants received from the government in relation to the Jobs Credit Scheme are recognised as income upon receipt. 3.8 Resources expended on charitable activities The costs of these activities comprise direct expenditure including, direct staff costs attributable to the activities. In addition, it also includes support costs (costs relating to central functions) and other costs that have been allocated on the basis consistent with the use of the resources. Governance costs Governance costs comprise all costs attributable to the general running of the Association, in providing the governance infrastructure and in ensuring public accountability. 3.9 Finance income and expenses Finance income comprises interest income on funds invested, dividend income, gains on the disposal of investments, net foreign currency gains and changes in the fair value of investments at fair value through income and expenditure. Dividend income from equity investments is recognised when the dividends are received. Interest income is recognised on the accrual basis using the effective interest method. Finance expenses comprise interest expense on borrowings, unwinding of the discount on provisions, net foreign currency losses, changes in the fair value of financial assets at fair value through income and expenditure and impairment losses recognised on financial assets that are recognised in income and expenditure.

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78

Notes to the financial statements (Cont.)

Year ended 31 December 2010

3.10 Leases When the Association is a lessee of an operating lease Where the Association has the use of assets under operating leases, payments made under the leases are recognised in income and expenditure on the straight-line basis over the term of the lease. Lease incentives received are recognised in the income and expenditure as an integral part of the total operating expenses. 3.11 New standards and interpretations not yet adopted A number of new standards, amendments to standards and interpretations are effective for the annual periods beginning after 1 January 2010, and have not been applied in preparing these financial statements. None of these are expected to have a significant effect on the financial statements of the Association.

4

Property, plant and equipment Computer Furniture Office Office equipment and fittings equipment renovation Total $ $ $ $ $ Cost At 1 January 2009 691,322 577,924 278,562 413,539 1,961,347 Additions 199,340 42,328 25,622 160,849 428,139 Write off (453,741) – – (283,322) (737,063) At 31 December 2009 436,921 620,252 304,184 291,066 1,652,423 Additions 71,704 44,727 27,217 152,878 296,526 At 31 December 2010 508,625 664,979 331,401 443,944 1,948,949 Accumulated depreciation At 1 January 2009 581,615 433,073 253,801 356,476 1,624,965 Depreciation charge for the year 74,319 40,639 7,703 54,110 176,771 Write off (453,741) – – (283,322) (737,063) At 31 December 2009 202,193 473,712 261,504 127,264 1,064,673 Depreciation charge for the year 129,419 48,563 12,528 94,910 285,420 At 31 December 2010 331,612 522,275 274,032 222,174 1,350,093

Carrying amount At 1 January 2009 109,707 144,851 24,761 At 31 December 2009 234,728 146,540 42,680 At 31 December 2010 177,013 142,704 57,369

57,063 163,802 221,770

336,382 587,750 598,856


Notes to the Financial Statements Notes to the financial statements 79

5

Deposits, prepayments and other receivables

Deposits GST Offset Package grant receivable from Ministry of Community Development, Youth and Sports (MCYS) Other receivables Loans and receivables Prepayments

6

2010 2009 $ $ 130,216

123,091

162,000 494,431 786,647 39,510 826,157

184,500 512,360 819,951 24,294 844,245

Financial assets – Investments

Held for trading: - Equity securities - Debt securities - Commodities/Precious Metals Trust Funds - REITS/Real Estate Funds - Absolute return funds - Private equity funds - Cash at bank investment account held with fund manager/custodian

2010 2009 $ $ 7,426,600 7,244,771 7,842,961 4,642,630 1,905,323 1,571,762 3,914,940 963,814 475,063 1,653,179 988,355 845,285 22,553,242 16,921,441 2,377,442 3,653,608 24,930,684 20,575,049

At the balance sheet date, the Association had commitments contracted for amounting to S$1,153,967 (2009: S$1,876,933) in relation to its investments.


Annual Report 2010

80

Notes to the financial statements (Cont.)

Year ended 31 December 2010

7

Cash and cash equivalents

Note 2010 2009 $ $ Cash in hand and at bank 1,797,999 3,880,538 Fixed deposits 3,427,409 1,935,800 5,225,408 5,816,338 Cash at bank investment account 6 2,377,442 3,653,608 Cash and cash equivalents for cash flow statement 7,602,850 9,469,946

8

Endowment fund

Endowment funds are represented by the following assets: 2010 2009 $ $ General Endowment Fund - Investments 17,397,245 16,921,441 - Cash at bank investment account 2,181,630 1,155,627 Vijay and Amar Trust Fund - Investments 873,425 – - Fixed deposits 100,038 521,492 - Cash at bank 34,797 84,988 - Cash at bank investment account 33,171 372,581 Padma and Hari Harilela Scholarship Fund - Investments 260,893 – - Fixed deposits – 253,258 - Cash at bank investment account 9,909 – 20,891,108 19,309,387 The general endowment fund is a form of restricted fund, held in Association’s trust where the capital is required to be invested, or retained for approved purposes.


Notes to the financial statements

From time to time the Association will transfer the income of the general endowment fund to the accumulated fund for the Association’s general activities. Transfers in and out of the fund are subject to the approval of the trustees. The Vijay and Amar Trust Fund was set up to provide assistance and support to children from disadvantaged and dysfunctional families. The Padma and Hari Harilela Scholarship Fund was set up to provide scholarships for needy students

9

Accumulated fund The accumulated fund is represented by the following assets and liabilities:

Note 2010 2009 $ $ Property, plant and equipment 598,856 587,750 Government subvention receivable 1,700,000 1,700,000 Donations receivable – Central Provident Fund Board scheme 593,993 544,184 Donation receivable – Singapore Totalisator Board 1,025,000 500,000 Deposits, prepayments and other receivables 826,157 844,245 Fixed deposits 3,290,388 557,731 Cash at bank investment account 117,486 1,654,100 Cash at bank and in hand 1,763,202 3,795,550 Accrued operating expenses (871,907) (962,511) Unutilised specific grants 11 (4,478,348) (1,919,196) Investments 3,093,600 7,658,427 7,301,853 The accumulated fund is the Association’s general operating fund and can be used for any of the Association’s activities.

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82

Notes to the financial statements (Cont.)

Year ended 31 December 2010

10 Sinking fund The sinking fund is represented by the following assets: Fixed deposits Cash at bank investment account Investments

2010 2009 $ $ 36,983 35,246 928,079 1,000,308

603,319 471,300 – 1,074,619

The sinking fund is designated to fund the upkeep and maintenance of the premises. There was a drawdown of $138,371 (2009: $195,690) from the sinking fund during the financial year mainly to defray the costs of the renovation and other works undertaken.

11 Unutilised specific grants / donations These comprise specific grants/donations for: 2010 2009 $ $ (i) Tamil Language Learning and Promotion Committee (TLLPC) 389,645 430,689 (ii) School Pocket Money Fund (SPMF) – 41,319 (iii) Project Give Donations 1,143,151 787,100 (iv) Single Parent Programme/sponsorship 825,946 593,924 (v) Singapore Indian Education Trust (SIET) 84,883 66,164 (vi) Project Spark 34,723 – (vii) Youth Development Programmes 2,000,000 – 4,478,348 1,919,196

(i) Tamil Language Learning and Promotion Committee (TLLPC) Tamil Language Learning and Promotion Committee (TLLPC) is a committee set up by the Ministry of Education (MOE) to promote the learning and use of the Tamil language. The Association provides support to TLLPC in the administration of the TLLPC grant. Grants and donations are the main sources of income with MOE providing a matching grant for funds raised by the TLLPC.


Notes to the financial statements

(ii) School Pocket Money Fund (SPMF) The Association receives yearly grant from the National Council of Social Service (NCSS) pertaining to SPMF. All bursary payments made under this service will be paid out from SPMF based on criteria set out by NCSS. (iii) Project Give donations Project Give is a community fund raising campaign to raise money for the bursaries for students from needy families. It typically runs through the various festivities such as Hari Raya Puasa, Deepavali and Christmas. Funds are raised via direct cheque donations, donation boxes placed with partner retailers, on-line, at the booth during Deepavali Fair at Campbell Lane and through tele-poll in conjunction with the “Live” Project Give Charity Show on Vasantham. (iv) Single Parent programme/sponsorship Single Parent programme provides holistic assistance to the parent and the children. Children of single parent would receive assistance from all SINDA’s programmes including tuition, Neu PC, enrichment while parents receive assistance on skills upgrading, financial planning and family support to help build their self esteem and become self sufficient. Sponsorships were received for specific programmes like Financial Assistance, Bursary, Educational programmes. (v) Singapore Indian Education Trust (SIET) Singapore Indian Education Trust (SIET) is a registered charity offering solutions to the needs and challenges impacting the educational performance of the Indian Community. SINDA’s programmes are designed to focus mainly on the education of students from pre-primary to secondary while SIET focus is on tertiary level education. Both the organisations recognise the immense opportunity to leverage on the synergy between the two organisations. The collaborative arrangement has been set to manage SIET donations and its disbursements to students who qualify for financial assistance for their course of study at the tertiary institution and other schemes administered by SIET. (vi) Project Spark Project Spark (Successful Parents and Resilient kids) is a collaborative effort between Temasek Cares (a charity arm of Temasek Holdings), Yayasan Mendaki, Chinese Development Assistance Council, SINDA and Eurasian Association. It aims to provide a more holistic and integrated intervention progamme to help single parents rebuild their lives and overcome their disadvantage. Funding support of $600,000 over a period of two years will address the provision of an assistance package consisting of employment assistance programmes and a starter kit.

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84

Notes to the financial statements (Cont.)

Year ended 31 December 2010

(vii) Youth Development Programmes Youth Development Programmes are specific programmes under the funding support of $2,000,000 from Kewalram Group of Companies which focuses mainly on the following 3 key programmes: • Project Victory/Senior Victory; a school based motivational programme that aims to bring out leadership qualities and encourage the practice of positive life skills through structured activities and trained facilitators. • Youth Empowerment Programme; a one-to-one mentorship programme to engage “at-risk” youth and who have low self-esteem or other behavioural problems. • Mentorship programme for Institute of Technical Education (ITE) students; a programme to engage students of ITE through interest-based mentoring. The funding will be channelled towards the content development, programme evaluation tools, motivational camps and workshops for the above mentioned programmes. The balances shown above represents grants/donations that were unutilised as at the end of the financial year.

12 Government subvention receivable This represents the annual “dollar for dollar” matching grant receivable, subject to a maximum of $1,700,000 (2009: $1,700,000), from the Ministry of Community Development, Youth and Sports.

13 Resources expended on charitable activities and governance costs Note 2010 2009 $ $ (i) Charitable activities Education programmes Tuition programmes: - STEP programme 2,416,904 2,315,489 - Project Teach 937,162 908,241 Other education programmes: - Enrichment Programmes 311,892 286,671 - Bursary/Scholarships 729,554 588,240 - Education staff costs 1,112,400 857,289 - Support costs 14 1,141,260 1,230,188 6,649,172 6,186,118


Notes to the financial statements

Family and Youth Development/Volunteer Relations - Casework and Counselling 261,350 - Career Development and Resource Centre 34,514 - Single Parents Programme 75,192 - Children and Youth programmes 267,301 - Family and Youth services staff costs 1,295,640 - Volunteer Programmes 151,503 - Volunteer Relations staff costs 297,946 - Support costs 14 817,696 3,201,142 Corporate Communications & Community Engagement (CCCE) - Corporate Communications 576,491 - Community Engagement 134,129 - CCCE Staff costs 625,135 - Support costs 14 342,837 1,678,592 (ii) Administrative and Governance costs - Temporary Occupation Licence (TOL) Fee* 431,270 - Support costs 14 678,046 1,109,316

278,560 57,640 44,559 263,027 913,680 118,230 203,366 451,985 2,331,047 720,461 215,651 568,453 446,473 1,951,038 368,880 334,413 703,293

* The Association occupies government land at 1, Beatty Road, Singapore 209943 and pays a monthly Temporary Occupation Licence (TOL) fee. The Grant from the Ministry of Community Development, Youth and Sports (MCYS) of $431,270 (2009: $368,880) is for the full reimbursement of the TOL fee paid by the Association. The resources expended have been summarised as follows: ‹---------------------- 2010 -------------------› ‹----------------------- 2009 ---------------------› Direct costs Support costs Total Direct costs Support costs Total (note 14) (note 14) Programmes $ $ $ $ $ $ Education 5,507,912 1,141,260 6,649,172 4,955,930 1,230,188 6,186,118 Family and Youth Development/ Volunteer Relations 2,383,446 817,696 3,201,142 1,879,062 451,985 2,331,047 Corporate Communications & Community Engagement 1,335,755 342,837 1,678,592 1,504,565 446,473 1,951,038 Administrative and Governance Costs 431,270 678,046 1,109,316 368,880 334,413 703,293

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86

Notes to the financial statements (Cont.)

Year ended 31 December 2010

14 Support costs Education Family and Youth Corporate Administrative Basis of Development/ Communications & allocation Volunteer Community Governance Relations Engagement Costs $ $ $ $ Staff costs 669,001 468,300 200,700 334,500 Usage in terms of time spent Maintenance and administrative expenses 361,079 268,084 107,289 277,364 Floor area in terms of floor area occupied and usage Depreciation expenses 111,180 81,312 34,848 58,080 Usage in terms of assets acquired Total for 2010 1,141,260 817,696 342,837 678,046 Total for 2009 1,230,188 451,985 446,473 334,413

15 Total resources expended Total expenditure includes the following: 2010 2009 $ $ Staff costs 5,003,622 3,807,659 Central Provident Fund contributions (included in staff costs) 524,895 402,530 Depreciation 285,420 176,771


Notes to the financial statements

16 Taxation The Association is an approved charity organisation under the Charities Act, Chapter 37 and an Institution of Public Character under the Income Tax Act, Chapter 134. No provision for tax has been made in the financial statements as the Association is exempt from income tax.

17 Key management personnel 2010 2009 $ $ Remuneration paid/payable to key management personnel - Short-term employment benefits 705,439 518,473

The key management personnel remuneration comprise remuneration paid to the top four (2009: four) key executives including Chief Executive Officer (CEO). The Trustees and Executive Committee members do not receive any remuneration. In previous year, the CEO was seconded from the MOE to the Association till 14 December 2009. The Association reimbursed the MOE for services rendered by the CEO to the Association.

18 Financial risk management Overview The Executive Committee has an overall responsibility for the establishment and oversight of the Association’s risk management framework. The Association’s activities expose it to a variety of financial risks: credit risk, liquidity risk and market risk (including currency risk, interest rate risk and price risk). The Association has policies and processes for measuring and managing these risks. The Executive Committee reviews and approves the policies for managing each of these risks. This note presents information about the Association’s exposure to each of the above financial risks. Further quantitative disclosures are included throughout these financial statements. There were no significant changes to the Association’s financial risks during the year.

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Notes to the financial statements (Cont.)

Year ended 31 December 2010

Credit risk Credit risk is the risk of financial loss to the Association if the counterparty to a financial instrument fails to meet its contractual obligations, and arises principally from the Association’s receivables from various sources and investments. The Association’s exposure to credit risk in receivables arises principally from receivables, investments and cash and cash equivalents. The maximum exposure to credit risk is represented by the carrying amount of each financial asset in the balance sheet. The Association establishes an allowance for impairment that represents its estimate of incurred losses, only when required. The main components of this allowance are a specific loss component that relates specifically to individually significant exposures. Receivables The Association’s exposure to the credit risk is low as most of its receivables are from government agencies. Approximately 78% (2009: 77%) of the Association’s receivables are due from 3 counterparties (2009: 3 counterparties). At the balance sheet date, all receivables of the Association are not past due. There is no allowance for receivables required as at 31 December 2010 (2009: Nil). Investments/Cash and cash equivalents The Association strives to invest a portion of its funds in bonds of good credit quality, whenever possible. For investment operations, the Investment Committee adopts very stringent quantitative and qualitative criteria, including financial statement analysis, type of securities, credit ratings and quality of management in selecting issuers of financial instruments that the Association invests in. Investments in debt securities are assessed using stringent investment criterion and this includes, but is not limited to, a thorough analysis of each debt security’s terms and conditions, the availability and quality of the guarantor, as well as financial strength of the issuer. The Association’s cash and cash equivalents are placed with banks and financial institutions which are regulated and rated A and above on Standard & Poor’s financial strength ratings. The Association’s debt securities consist of debt securities rated B and above on Standard & Poor’s financial strength ratings or debt securities of Singapore government related entities. There is no significant concentration of credit risk in relation to these investments. The Association’s cash and cash equivalents are placed with three (2009: two) financial institutions.


Notes to the financial statements

Liquidity risk Liquidity risk is the risk that the Association will not be able to meet its financial obligations as they fall due. The Association’s approach to managing liquidity is to ensure, as far as possible, that it will always have sufficient liquidity to meet its liabilities when due, under both normal and stressed conditions. Typically, the Association ensures that it has sufficient cash on demand to meet expected operational demands excluding the potential impact of extreme circumstances that cannot reasonably be predicted. Based on the contractual maturities, the Association’s financial liabilities mature within one year from the balance sheet date, and the fair values approximate their carrying amounts. Market risk Market risk is the risk that changes in market prices, such as foreign exchange rates, interest rates and equity prices will affect the Association’s income or the value of its financial instruments. The objective of market risk management is to manage and control market risk exposures within acceptable parameters, while optimising the return on risk. Market risk is managed by the Investment Committee by closely monitoring the market data and by setting up detailed investment policies. Currency risk Currency risk is the risk that the fair value of future cash flows of a financial instrument will fluctuate because of changes in foreign exchange rates. By virtue of its investment activity to optimise return, the Association is exposed to the effects of foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations, principally in currencies such as United States Dollar. The Association does not use derivative financial instruments to hedge its foreign currency risks. The Association’s foreign currency exposures are as follows: US Dollar Euro Hong Kong Dollar Other currencies

2010 2009 $ $ 12,117,537 12,434,360 1,350,448 1,280,034 1,016,196 885,613 2,159,154 2,187,127

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90

Notes to the financial statements (Cont.)

Year ended 31 December 2010

Sensitivity analysis A 10% strengthening of the Singapore dollar against the following currencies at the reporting date would (decrease) or increase the surplus of income over expenditure by the amounts shown below. This analysis assumes that all other variables, in particular interest rates, remain constant. Surplus of income over expenditure $ 31 December 2010 US Dollar (1,211,753) Euro (135,045) Hong Kong Dollar (101,620) 31 December 2009 US Dollar Euro Hong Kong Dollar

(1,243,436) (128,003) (88,561)

A 10% weakening of the Singapore dollar against those currencies at 31 December would have had the equal but opposite effect on the above currencies to the amount shown above, on the basis that all other variables remain constant. Interest rate risk The Association’s exposure to market risk for changes in interest rates relates to the interest-bearing cash and cash equivalents and debt securities. At the balance sheet date, the interest rate profile of the interest-bearing financial instruments was: 2010 2009 $ $ Fixed rate instruments Fixed deposits with banks 3,427,409 1,935,800 Debt securities 3,958,892 142,480 7,386,301 2,078,280


Notes to the financial statements

Sensitivity analysis At the balance sheet date, management assessed that an increase/(decrease) of 25 basis points in the interest rates would have no significant impact to the results of the Association. Price risk Price risk is the risk that the fair value or future cash flows of a financial instrument will fluctuate because of changes in market prices (other than those arising from interest rate risk or currency risk), whether those changes are caused by factors specific to the individual financial instrument or its issuer, or factors affecting all similar financial instruments traded in the market. Sensitivity analysis The Association’s investments are designated as held for trading investments. A 10% increase or decrease in the underlying market prices at the reporting date, with all variables held constant would increase or decrease income by $2,255,324 (2009: $1,692,144). Capital/Funds Management The Association is a society with no share capital. The Association builds up its Capital/Funds from donations received and also through prudent management of its financial resources. The capital of the Association includes reserve funds in its Accumulated Fund, Sinking Fund, General Endowment Fund and other funds. The Associations’ Funds are closely monitored to ensure that there are sufficient funds to support its programme and activities. The Association is not subject to externally imposed Capital/Funds requirements.

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92

Notes to the financial statements (Cont.)

Year ended 31 December 2010

Fair values Estimation of fair values Investments The fair value of investments in trading securities is determined by reference to their quoted bid prices at the reporting date. The fair value of investments that are not traded in an active market are determined by reference to their dealer quotes/net asset valuation report/fair value provided by the fund manager at the reporting date. Other financial assets and liabilities The carrying amounts of other financial assets and liabilities with a maturity of less than one year (including trade and other receivables, grant and donations receivables, cash and cash equivalents, trade payables, other payables and accrued expenses) are assumed to approximate their fair values because of the short period to maturity. Fair value hierarchy The table below analyses financial instruments carried at fair value, by valuation method. The different levels have been defined as follows: Level 1: quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities Level 2: inputs other than quoted prices included within Level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly (i.e., as prices) or indirectly (i.e., derived from prices) Level 3: inputs for the asset or liability that are not based on observable market data (unobservable inputs). Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Total $ $ $ $ 31 December 2010 Financial assets designated at fair value through profit or loss 14,486,030 8,067,212 – 22,553,242 31 December 2009 Financial assets designated at fair value through profit or loss 14,136,640 2,784,801 – 16,921,441


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SINDA Annual Report 2010  

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