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FREE WEEKLY

June 14, 2017

THE POLK COUNTY

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1168 Hwy 71 S • Mena, AR 71953 • 479-243-9600 ...............................................................................................................................................................................

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Maddox Markets Area to Arkansas EDC

T our s N I D E C &

Mena I nt er m ount

ain M un

ic ipal A ir por t

BY LEANN DILBECK • editor@mypulsenews.com

Colors are Soaring in Reviving Downtown Arts District

rkansas conomic evelopment ommission irector Mike reston and egional Man ager ody later toured rkansas’ istrict on Monday by invitation of tate epresentative ohn Maddo . I re uested Mr. reston come to my district and see what we have to offer. In my opinion, we have some great local employers and we need to do everything we can to support them and help them grow. I also wanted to show them our area and all that we have to offer for any other employers who may be looking to e pand, relocate etc., e plained ep. Maddo . can and is instrumental in the retention and ac uisition of business and industry to the state. s ep. Maddo e plained, I have been contacting and speaking with them CONTINUED ON PAGE 3

Filing Dates are Open for Prospective School Board Candidates BY MELANIE BUCK • news@mypulsenews.com iling dates for school board candidates are now open, says olk ounty lerk erri Har rison. Monday, une , marked the first official day that candidates can begin circulating petitions to be considered. o be an official candidate on the ticket, you must have the ffidavit and etition with at least signatures from your respective school district and one. It is advised to gain at least five more in the case that some signatures are dis ualified. he petitions cannot be filed until uly , . he deadline to file as an official candidate for a school board is uly , , CONTINUED ON PAGE 7

Town of Hatfield Receives Rural Community Grant

BY MELANIE BUCK • news@mypulsenews.com he own of Hatfield has been awarded a , grant through the rkansas ural e velopment ommission that will allow them to build restroom areas in their city park. rkansas Governor sa Hutchinson, ecutive irector Mike reston, ec utive ice resident of perations my echer, and ural ervices irector le ohnston presented , . to rural communities at a recent awards ceremony held at the Hot prings onvention enter. he communities were selected for funding through the rkan

Yet anot er eye at ing addition to Mena’s re i ing Downtown rts Distri t is a new ural t at as been o issioned or t e eri an rtisans building o al artists Set Stewart and i ra e are using t eir reati e talents to paint a ull lengt ural s nu erous downtown de elopers a e said e downtown area is a re e tion o t e ealt o a o unity Mena’s Downtown Partners ontinue to ollaborate to pro ote t e area to residents and tourists as well as additional businesses RE D F S RY P E

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Farm Family of the Year Polk County

See the full section on pages 13-24!


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Guns-N-Hoses Blood Drives to be Held in Hatfield and Mena

BY MELANIE BUCK • news@mypulsenews.com

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he annual Guns Hoses blood drives are back, with both Mena and Hatfield taking part in the friendly competition. uring the Guns Hoses drives, local firefighters battle’ local police officers to see who can have more blood donated to benefit patients across the state through the Arkansas B lood Institute ( AB I) . C hristina C astorena of AB I says summer time is a crucial time to donate, as blood is in high demand. “P eople are more active during the summer and are more prone to accidents,” said C astorena. She also said it is a bit harder to collect donations during the summer due to local schools being out of session. “High schools are huge blood donors,” she exp lained. o help combat low blood supplies, firefighters and police ask donors to choose a side, the guns’ or the hoses,’ and at the end of the day, donors are counted up to see who wins the battle of the Guns N Hoses and gets bragging rights until next year. he first of the two battles will include Hatfield olunteer ire epartment and the P olk C ounty Sheriff’s D epartment. To support either department, they will set up in the old school auditorium on June 2 1 st from 2 : 30 p.m. – 6 p.m. Mena F ire D epartment will battle Mena P olice D epartment on June 2 6 th at the National Guard Armory on North Morrow Street from 1 2 : 1 5 p.m. – 6 : 30 p.m. C astorena hopes to get at least 4 0 good donors. Especially needed are those with O-negative type blood because in emergency cases where a blood type is unknown, O-negative can be used. o speed up the process, you can log onto www.arkbi.org to fill out the application and have it ready when you get to the blood drive. “It is so important to give blood. Mena Regional Health System uses some of the blood donated, along with nearly 30 hospitals and medical facilities in the state. Every donor can save up to three people’s lives.” Also, as an added bonus, each donor at the Guns-N-Hoses drives will receive free tickets to Magic Springs and a blood donor t-shirt.

Letter

Editor

5 00 years ago Martin Luther wrote, “I am much afraid that the schools will prove the very gates of hell, unless they diligently labor in exp laining the Holy scriptures and engraving them in the hearts of youth.” We C hristians, as unfaithful stewards, were negligent – even derelict – when not objecting to the taking of B ible reading/ study and prayer out of public school. Hosea 4 : 6 “My people are destroyed for lack of knowledge [ P roverbs 1 : 7 The fear of the LORD is the beginning of knowledge] because thou hast rejected knowledge, I will also reject thee, that thou shalt be no priest to me seeing thou hast forgotten the law of thy God, I will also forget thy children.” I was encouraged reading the “B reathe” article is last weeks P ulse that the Lord is raising up workers for the harvest of youth. ( Matthew 9 : 37 -38 ) May He prosper their undertaking. Sharon C hristopher Letters to the Editor are not edited for grammar or spelling and are printed exactly as they are received. Letters to the Editor Policy - The Polk County Pulse reserves all rights to reject submissions. Anonymous letters are not permitted. All letters to the editor must be signed, include author’s town of residence, and be free of the threat of libel. Letters must be 300 words or less. We prefer they stay in the bounds of sensibility and good taste. We reserve the right to authenticate letters before publishing.

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June 14, 2017

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on the phone since my election but it is nice to get them here and let them see all we have to offer. The AED C provides support and assistance to employers in Arkansas. There are tax credits available for exi sting employers who are looking to exp and, and they are available to provide other assistance.” Assisting Maddox with the tour was P olk C ounty Judge B randon Ellison. The tour began in Norman, Ark. at the C G Roxa nne water plant. They then travelled to Mena and spent just over 9 0 minutes at NID EC , attending a detailed plant overview from P lant Manager Mark K inder, followed by a tour of the , s uare foot facility that was first built in Mena in . he large manufacturing facility is one of the area’s largest employers with a current work force of approxi mately 37 0 people. K inder exp lained that NID EC , a Japanese based company, acq uired the plant from Emerson lectric in early and e plained that I ’s founder, Mr. higenobu agamori breathes electric motors. inder further e plained that the plant enjoys being positioned as a growth engine” and shared that approxi mately $ 37 million had been invested into the plant by NID EC in the last four years, making important and necessary upgrades. Mr. agamori is very high on . . manufacturing. [ …] He thinks American manufacturing is the goal line. That’s where you want it at its best. [ …] saying the productivity and innovation here is what they want to be.” K inder was proud to report that the plant is enjoying an uptick in activity after a brief downturn in demand, e are now beginning to feel pressure from the market and that’s good. He added that the strongest differentiator for I is their speed to market. nce capital has been approved, time is money. peed to market is certainly our secret to securing orders. He added that I is the best in the industry in lead times and contributes that to being able to remain competitive against both foreign and domestic companies. He also credited I ’s strategy of minimal outsourcing and their fle ible vertical integration in helping their speed to market. P reston inq uired about local suppliers and K inder exp lained that such products as steel are a global buy but they do utilize regional distributors and they are also utilizing the local terling Machinery for supplemental manufacturing components. P reston shared with K inder that he and Governor Asa Hutchinson will be visiting Japan in the fall and plan to visit with NID EC leadership to thank them for doing business in Arkansas. inder commended them for those efforts. reston e plained, he governor is very, very aggressively trying to carry the Arkansas message all around the world where we have foreign and domestic presence… we’re sitting down and saying ‘ thank you’ and saying what can we do to help you guys hen you look at that growth trajectory, we will do whatever we can to help you grow… eq uipment, machinery, people… whatever it may be… we want to be there to help you guys.’” hen reston asked what his commission could do to assist the local I plant, inder, without a moment’s hesitation, replied, the highway, which did not seem to be a surprise to reston or later. inder never mentioned it by name as I , but everyone was well aware of what ‘ highway’ he was referring to. inder boasted about the plant’s low utility cost. It’s very attractive and we want to keep it there… it really helps to keep the overhead down.” P reston also asked K inder about what challenges his plant is facing and K inder ex plained, … the growth challenges. e have several growth platforms that we’re trying to crack that have a lot of barriers. he oil industry is one of them… it is very difficult and is receiving a lot of attention. e want this place to have twice as many people. e want

January 6, 2016

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National F amily C areg iver Su pport P rog ram

Caregiver Support Meeting • June 15, 2017 at 11:15 am

If you are a caregiver of an adult 60 years and older please come join us. This information could be extremely helpful to you. The topic will be “Medication Management” presented by Sherri McCourtney, Nursing Supervisor, Visiting Nurses. For information call Taryn Jinks 870-385-2373. Hope to see you there. Refreshments will be served.

The Cossatot Senior Center

7366 Hwy 71 S • Wickes, AR 71973 • Office: 870-385-2373


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Thespians Honored at Benson Awards

ith the festive air generated by the Hawaiian theme and the anticipation of the nominees and the audience, the 2 01 5 -2 01 6 season B enson Award C eremony got underway Saturday at the OLT. Thirty five awards were up for grabs. he evening started with music provided by the Ouachita Strings, as the attendees snacked on Hawaiian themed finger foods. At the appointed time OLT P resident, Rudi Timmerman, welcomed the attendees and thanked Linda Johnson for her hard work organizing the event. He then introduced the evening’s master of ceremonies, D on Martin. The awards were announced interspersed with D on’s q uips and humor, as well as short video clips from the nominated shows. One thing became abundantly clear: There are many talented people in our area who are willing to give of their time to provide a variety of q uality entertainment. F urthermore, these talented folks have a place to showcase their talent through the generosity of OLT’s members and donors. Here are the results of the 2 01 5 -2 01 6 B enson Awards: F irst recognized were all the youth who participated in all the OLT productions during the seasons. They received a medal for their efforts. B rad Story was presented the Lifetime Achievement award for his 2 0 years of service to the OLT. This one award is voted on by the OLT B oard. The rest of the categories are voted on by the 1 8 0 current members of the Ouachita Little Theatre who returned their ballots. Nominees for the awards are selected by the directors of the shows and subseq uently placed on the ballot sent to all the members. B est Overall P lay for the 2 01 5 and 2 01 6 Season D ixi e Swim C lub Ouachita Little Theatre F amily of the Year - The B urt

F amily SP RING P LAYS D ixi e Swim C lub and D early B eloved B est Leading Actor - Lamar Austin in D early B eloved B est Leading Actress - D enni Longoria in D early B eloved B est Supporting Actor - C hris K uskie in D early B eloved B est Supporting Actress - Jessica K ropp in D ixi e Swim C lub B est Set D esign - TJ Thompson in D early B eloved B est Lighting - Robby B urt for D early B eloved B est D irector - Judy K ropp for D ixi e Swim C lub B est Spring P lay - D ixi e Swim C lub MU SIC AL P LAYS You’re a Good Man C harley B rown and Oliver B est Overall P erformance - April B urt in Oliver B est Leading Actor - Scotty Jenkins in Oliver B est Leading Actress - Alexa Night in Oliver B est Supporting Actor - Will Hose in Oliver B est Supporting Actress - Amanda B aker in Oliver B est Set D esign - Rudi and Lorraine Timmerman for Oliver B est Lighting - Robby B urt for Oliver B est C ostumes - Logan Sweeten for Oliver B est Sound - Ruby Green for Oliver B est C horeography - Gini B urt for Oliver B est Stage Manager - Jessica K ropp for Oliver B est D irector - Rudi Timmerman for Oliver B est Musical P lay - Oliver F ALL AND WINTER P LAYS The F oreigner, The P enultimate P roblem of Sherlock Holmes, and Eb Scrooge B est Leading Actor - Scotty Jenkins in The F oreigner B est Leading Actress - Linor Thomas in Eb Scrooge

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Brad Storey receives Lifetime Achievement Award, The “LEDA”, from Judy Kropp.

B est Supporting Actor - Will Hose in Eb Scrooge B est Supporting Actress - K atelin Haines in The F oreigner B est Set D esign - Robby B urt for The F oreigner B est Lighting - Ruby Green for Eb Scrooge B est C ostumes - Judy Thompson The F oreigner B est Sound - Marvin Glenn for Eb Scrooge B est C horeography - Linda Johnson for Eb Scrooge B est Stage Manager - Makayla K enyon-Ortiz for Sherlock Holmes B est D irector - Robby B urt for The F oreigner B est F all P lay - The F oreigner In two years, the 2 01 7 -2 01 8 B enson Awards will showcase Southern Hospitality, Mary P oppins, Hamlet, 4 Weddings and an Elvis, Godspell, and Miracle Worker. It is hoped you will join OLT, attend all these great shows, and vote for your favorite in 2 01 9 .

Acorn Students Honored at Governor’s Scholastic Honors Day O n behalf of Governor Asa Hutchinson, the Arkansas D epartment of Education recently sponsored the Governor’s Scholastic Honors D ay. The event was held on May 1 3, 2 01 7 , at the Governor’s Mansion in Little Rock. Scholastic Honors D ay recognizes Arkansas’ best and brightest students. P ublic and private high schools were encouraged to select two students who best represent academic achievement in the senior class. Acorn High School was represented by V aledictorian Harly D earing ( pictured right) and Salutatorian Morgan F agan ( pictured far right) . Harly is a senior at Acorn High School and plans to attend Ouachita B aptist U niversity in Arkadelphia and major in Accounting. Harly is the eighteen year old daughter of Steve & F elita D earing of C ove. Morgan is a senior at Acorn High School and plans to attend The U niversity of Arkansas at F ort Smith and major in D ental Hygiene. Morgan is the seventeen year old daughter of K andy & D arrell P age and John F agan of Mena. B oth ladies are pictured with Governor Hutchinson and his wife, Susan.

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Posey Hollow ‘Brings the Farm’ to Rich Mtn. Nursing Residents

Attorney General to Host Local Mobile Office BY MELANIE BUCK • news@mypulsenews.com

Arkansas Attorney General Leslie Rutledge has announced mobile office locations across the state for June 2 01 7 . Attorney General Rutledge created the mobile office initiative during her first year in office to make the office accessible to everyone, particularly to those who live outside the capital city. In both 2 01 5 and , office hours were held in all counties assisting nearly 1 ,300 Arkansans. he ttorney General Mobile ffices assist constituents with consumer related issues in filing consumer complaints against scam artists. Staff will also be available to answer uestions about the office and the other services it offers to constituents. Rutledge believes there is no issue too small for her staff to

Rick and Lora Hosman of Posey Hollow Horsecamp recently visited Rich Mountain Nursing and Rehab Center in Mena. They brought their mule, Eddie, to visit the residents, as well as goats, rabbits, puppies, geese, and more. “We pretty much took a whole traveling petting zoo and the residents loved it. We did too,” said Lora.

HSO President Travels to Wisconsin LOGAN MCCOURTNEY • l.mccourtney@mypulsenews.com

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n early May, Michael P ovey, president of HSO, made a 2 ,000 trip to Appleton Wisconsin to visit with HSO’s transport partner, F ox V alley Humane Association. A partnership was started sometime back between the two organizations, a partnership that allowed for the HSO to transport dogs to a shelter where there is a need for dogs because of high adoption rates. “It was q uite astonishing, they bring in 4 ,000 dogs a year through transport and they adopt out almost 8 0 animals per week. B y partnering with them, we are able to open up more room in our facility to take care of the animals in need here in P olk C ounty and they receive enough animals to meet their adoption rate,” exp lains P ovey. The purpose of the trip was to ensure that HSO understood where their dogs were being transported and how they were being treated after arrival. “I wanted to be a in a position to assure our members and the public that we do care who receives the privilege of adopting our dogs. I came away with a feeling of trust and confidence that o V alley mirrors our thoughts and concerns for the wellbeing and safety of their animals,” says P ovey. Along with caring for animals that come through transport, F ox V alley also has an exp ansive volunteer base and facility to ensure q uality care for animals being adopted and for those being rescued. “They have a staff of 30 including a vet team of probably 1 0 vets. There are approxi amately 5 00 volunteers and they house about 2 00 animals. In addition, the police have 2 4 / 7 access to deposit animals.” eedless to say, the trip proved uite beneficial, not only did ovey receive the peace of mind that they are in a good partnership, fresh ideas for the HSO came as a result of the visit. Every two weeks F ox V alley sends a transport bus, appropriately named a B ark B us, to HSO to transport dogs. The bus is eq uipped with 2 4 crates, allowing for almost 4 0 dogs to be transported. “We are really thankful for our partnership with F ox V alley. We look forward to working with such a great organization in the future.” If you have any q uestions about HSO or are interested in donating time or monetary funds, contact HSO at 4 7 9 -39 4 -5 6 8 2 .

have a face-to-face conversation. Rutledge continues her partnership that began in 2 01 6 with local law enforcement across the State to offer prescription drug take back boxe s. Law enforcement will be at all mobile offices to handle a secure bo and properly dispose of the prescriptions collected. Rutledge encourages Arkansans to bring their old, unused or exp ired prescription medications to an upcoming mobile office. Rutledge’s staff will set up in P olk C ounty on June 2 7 th from 1 0 a.m. - 1 1 : 30 a.m., at the Mena-P olk C ounty Senior C enter, located at 4 01 Autumn D rive in Mena. or more information about services provided by the ttorney General’s office, visit ArkansasAG.gov.

January 6, 201

DABC VBS Students Egg the Pastor Dallas Avenue Baptist C ur C ildren’s Pastor Clint Bell, has eggs thrown at him on the last day of Vacation Bible School. Children ranging from Pre-K to 5th grade were present at the VBS. Throughout the week, children raised funds to donate to the Arkansas aptist C ildren’s Ho e in Montecello Arkansas. e C ildren’s Ho e provides residential childcare and counseling services to children and families in crisis. There were about 80 children that attended the VBS each day and they raised over $1,000 or t e C ildren’s Ho e Bell told the kids that if they raised over $1,000 t ey ould egg’ i


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American Artisans Beautifying Downtown with Mural BY MELANIE BUCK • news@mypulsenews.com

new look is coming to the wall of merican rtisans one that certainly brightens the arts district, but also highlights the area’s talent. Rick and D onna C hrisman, owners of American Artisans, said they wanted to improve the wall and plans began when they were inspired by another’s vision. ick e plains, e were inspired by architect d evy’s vision that was presented by the rkansas egional oalition of the uachitas and Mark eterson of the of tension ervice several years ago. ne idea among many was to paint murals on blank walls as an aesthetic improvement and draw to downtown. The C hrismans are no strangers to the idea of improving the downtown area. The couple have worked hard, both on their own in their artistic eatery, but also with other community minded groups such as and Mena’s owntown artners. t merican rtisans we felt like that idea evy’s vision fit what we were attempting to bring to downtown and kept it on our minds. hen, the hrisman’s happen to hear about some e citing beautifications happening in ort mith, in the way of murals. hen we heard about ne pected t. mith’s mural project and met local artist eth tewart, who had worked on the t. mith project, we knew the time was right. he couple has since been working with tewart’s concept for several months, putting their ideas together to bring about a full scale mural on the south wall of merican rtisans. tewart completed the first stage of the enormous project on unday with the help of local artist, im race. e are e tremely pleased with the e citement and positive reaction from the community. assers by stop regularly to look and ask uestions. ow eth is off to school for three weeks pursuing an education certification so he can use his art degree to teach art to young people. When he returns we’ll see the rest of the picture revealing the fantasy origin of the big bird. tay tuned, said hrisman.

Local artist Seth Stewart begins the large task of painting a mural outside of American Artisans Eatery & Gallery in Downtown Mena.

Conservation Kids Camp Held at Gillham Lake C

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ossatot Reefs C amp Ground at Gilham Lake was the setting for the 2 01 7 C onservation C amp held on June 1 st and 2 nd. This is the 1 1 th year that the Rich Mountain and C ossatot C onservation D istricts organized this event for students entering 6 th – 9 th grades. C ampers participated in programs focused on conservation, ecosystems, and stewardship while learning plant and animal identification, navigation with G and compass, ATV safety, outdoor survival and more. Activities included seining for fish, a fishing derby, a nature hike, snorkeling, and a scavenger hunt. rograms were put on with the help of the Natural Resources onservation ervice, rkansas Game and ish C ommission, U niversity of Arkansas Ext ension 4 -H, and rkansas tate arks.

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•394-1938• Owner : Stacy & Julie Nash


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Candidates

CONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE at noon. lso due at the time of filing are olitical ractices ledge, ffidavit of ligibility, and otice of C andidacy. Other documents are due as well, although not by the filing date. he tatement of inancial Interest is due July 1 7 , 2 01 7 , unless you are an incumbent office holder, which filed their statements in anuary. If a candidate receives contributions or made ex penditures in ex cess of $ 5 00, the C ampaign C ontribution and Ex penditure Report is due seven days prior to the election. final report is due by ctober , , regardless of whether you received contributions or made ex penditures in ex cess of $ 5 00. olk ounty has three public school districts ossatot River, Mena, and Ouachita River. To be eligible to serve on the respective board, ualified candidates must reside within the district’s designated area. The 2 01 7 School B oard Elections will be held on eptember . or more information, or to pick up filing forms, contact C ounty C lerk Terri Harrison at 4 7 9 39 4 -8 1 2 3.

Hatfield

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sas Rural C ommunity Grant rogram’s ycle II of fiscal year 2 01 7 . Mayor D enton and husband, Larry, who is also a member of the city council, were in attendance at the ceremony to receive the grant award on behalf of the own of Hatfield. AED C ( Arkansas Economic D evelopment C ommission) Rural Services works in partnership with the Arkansas Rural D evelopment C ommission to administer the Arkansas Rural C ommunity Grant P rograms in two cycles each year. Incorporated cities and towns and unincorporated communities in rural areas Pictured from left to right are: Bob Williams, ARDC Commissioner; Mike Preston, of less than 3,000 in population AEDC Executive Director; Ashley Garris, Mayor Linda Denton, Larry Denton, Governor Asa Hutchinson, Tracee McKenna, Amy Fecher, AEDC Executive Vice President of are eligible to apply for assisOperations; Lynn Hawkins, ARDC Chairman. tance through the mayor or county judge’s office. F or more information about Rural Services and their grant programs contact Rural Services at 1 -8 8 8 -RU RAL-AR.

January 6, 2016

Maddox has the following job openings Custodian Supervisor Registered Dental Assistant Dental Sterilization Technician LPN 340B Pharmacy Coordinator HC I is a non-profit organization providing medical, dental and other social services to the citizens of this area. If you are interested in becoming a part of a q uality organization with a history of success, please apply by email with a letter of interest and referenc es to apply@ healthy-connections.org. No phone calls please. HCI is an Eq ual O p p ortunity Emp loyer. F or c omp lete j ob desc rip tions and a full list of av ailable j obs please visit

www.healthy-connections.org

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it to grow. We’re only like 5 % of our market… there’s huge growth opportunity.” K inder said that they have a waiting list of people for jobs when asked about the workforce and exp lained they need people with machinist skill sets as well as welders but said they are hiring more and more people for general employment with degrees from M. inder e plained that hiring ualified people for their more professional positions in engineering and I is difficult, but indicated that the new highway’ could help alleviate that challenge. ollowing the I tour, the caravan continued on to the Mena airport. verall, ep. Maddox said he was very pleased with the visit. “The need for I-4 9 was brought up by the local employers and how it was stifling their growth. he ability to move goods and people in an efficient manner is vitally important to the long term growth of any region, in my opinion. I was very pleased with the meeting… we have to continue to promote this area and let people see all we have to offer.”

Same location for over 45 years

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. . .June . . . . 14, . . . 2017 ......................................................................................................................

obituaries

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Weekly Publication

RANDALL R. MASTERS

Randall R. Masters, Jr., age 56, of Mena, Arkansas, passed away Sunday, June 11, 2017 in Ft. Smith. Randall was born in West Stewartstown, New Hampshire on January 29, 1961 to Randall Ray Masters, Sr. and Judy Washburn Masters. He was an avid fisherman, en oying ust being on or around the water. Randall was a member of CMA at one time and had a great enthusiasm for riding motorcycles. He was a loving son and will be dearly missed. He is survived by mother, Judi Masters; step-father, Philip Haley. Randall was preceded in death by his father, Randall Ray Masters, Jr., and a brother, Bruce E. Masters. Randall was sent for cremation under the direction of the Beasley Wood Funeral Home of Mena.

L.J. HOBBS

L. J. Hobbs, age 81, of Mena, Arkansas passed away Saturday June 10, 2017 in Mena. L. J. was born in Santa Maria, California on February 25, 1936 to the late George Hobbs and Myrtle Launders Hobbs. He proudly served his country in the United States Coast Guard. He was married to Evelyn O. ncer: Hobbs his wife of 40 years. Together they en oyed camping, fishing and trail rides. He had a love for horses, dogs, BB ’s with friends and family, as well as dancing. He retired from Sales profession for Aramark. He towas get a loving husband, father, grandfather, great-grandfather, brother and friend to all. He is survived by wife, Evelyn Hobbs of Mena, Arkansas; daughter, Maureen Gehring of Ft. Worth, Texas; son, Steven Hobbs of

Please make The Cole Team Bold & larger than the address & phone numbers below it. Omit the 800 number and the e-mail address and substitute www.FarrellCole.com instead.

479-394-7301

In the web address across 1102 Crestwood Circle the bottom, capitalize the in Mena, the R in Mena,MAR 71953 Real & the E in Estate.

Los Alamos, California; grandchildren, Jessica Allen, Justin and Cody Sauerwein; six great-grandchildren; brother, William Hobbs and wife Wilma of Paso Robles, California; sisters, Joan Rosa of Maro Bay, California. He was preceded in death by his parents, two daughters, Lisa Yvonne Hobbs and Shelly Hobbs, and siblings, Alice Hobbs, George Hobbs, Jr., Dorothy Hobbs, and Jean Farrell. Mr. Hobbs was sent for cremation under the direction of the Beasley Wood Funeral Home of Mena. A Celebration of Life will be planned at a later date. The family extends a thanks to Mena Manor for the love and care they gave to L.J. and family. www.beasleywoodfuneralhome@yahoo. com

CLIFTON ‘DALE’ NEWSOM

Clifton “Dale” Newsom, age 83, of Mena, Arkansas passed away Wednesday, June 7, 2017 in Mena. Dale was born in Acorn, Arkansas on March 20, 1934 to the late Clyde Newsom and the late Rena Anderson Newsom. He was married to Mary Huff Newsom until her death and was in the logging business. Dale en oyed the outdoors, cutting wood, and gardening. He en oyed spending time with his family and friends. He was a loving father, grandfather, great-grandfather uncle and friend to all who knew him. He is survived by son, Neyland Newsom and wife Nora of Mena, Arkansas; daughter, Betty Lairamore and husband Jeff of Booneville, Arkansas; six grandchildren and several great-grandchildren, nieces, nephews and a host of friends. Dale was preceded in death by his parents, Clyde and Rena Newsom, wife, Mary Newsom, an infant daughter, Marilyn, sister,

MENA REAL ESTATE

Farrell & Sharon Cole

The Cole Team

816 S. Mena St. Mena, AR 71953 Office: (479) 394-5000 www.FarrellCole.com www.MenaRealEstate.com

Betty Jo Hardesty, and brothers, Jimmy Newsom and Kenneth “Pete” Newsom. Graveside service was Saturday, June 10, 2017, 2:00 p.m. at Gann Cemetery in Potter, Arkansas under the direction of the Beasley Wood Funeral Home of Mena. Visitation was at Gann Cemetery two hours prior to service. Pallbearers werr Chris McMellon, Traven Lane, Jonathan Musgrave, Brandon Terrell, Nathaniel Brown, and Jordan Wells.

DANNY R. POTTER Danny R. Potter, age 66, retired Safety Instructor, Valero Oil Refinery, passed away Friday, June 9, 2017. Visitation 4:30 - 6:30 p.m., Tuesday, June 13. Funeral Service 10:00 a.m., Wednesday, June 14, both at Broadway Mortuary, Wichita, Kansas. Graveside service 3:00 p.m., Thursday, June 15, Pleasant Hill Cemetery, Hatfield, AR. Preceded in death by parents, Frank Potter and Betty Evans; son, Ricky Potter; brothers, David and Gerald Potter; and one

great-grandchild. Survivors include son, Russell Burr; daughter, Michelle Robert Dolloff; fiance, Vicki Giles; brother, Jerry (Linda) Potter; sisters, Betty Hall and Judy (Robert) Moon; 11 grandchildren and one great-grandchild on the way. www.CozineMemorial.com. Broadway Mortuary.

PAUL ROSE Paul Rose, age 77, of Mena, Arkansas died Saturday, June 10, 2017 at the Hot Springs National Park Medical Center. He was born on Sunday, July 16, 1939 to Guy Lloyd and Grace Eleanor Hathaway Rose in Baker, Arkansas. Paul was a true man of God with faithfulness to his Lord, family, and others he met on a daily basis; he had a true servant’s heart. He pastored churches, preached revivals, and held camp meetings for over 60 years being a minister in the Assemblies of God Churches. Paul was known as preacher man. His family was his second passion in life; loving them no matter the circumstances they faced and his grandchildren were

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very special to him. Paul was also a truck driver for 38 years and was awarded a 3 million mile safe driver award. Paul loved going fishing, going to the beach, and spending time with his family and friends. Paul was a loving husband, father, brother, uncle, grandfather, great grandfather, and a friend to many and will be missed by all who knew him. He is preceded in death by his parents; his brother, Floyd Rose; and one sister, Cora Touchton. Paul is survived by his loving wife of 60 years, Billie Rose of Mena; two sons and daughter, Tim Rose, Sr., of ocana and Philip Pete Rose and wife, Leilani, of Mena; his daughter, Debbie Hunt and husband, Buck, of Poteau, klahoma; seven grandchildren, Misty Bradley and husband, Heath, of Mena, Tim Rose Jr. and wife, Casi, of Mena, Josh Hunt of Huntsville, Alabama, Jessica Hunt of Norman, klahoma, acie Rose of Mena, Natalie Ledbetter and husband, Jake, of Mena and Austin Rose of Mena; seven great grandchildren, Teagan Rose, Brynten Rose, Lexi Bradley, Trevin Bradley, Hank Rose, Hae leigh Rose and soon-to-be born, Rhett Taylor Ledbetter; one brother, Elmer Rose, of Irving, Texas; several nieces and nephews and a host of other relatives and friends.

A funeral service was held Monday, June 12, 2017 at 2 00 P.M. at the First Assembly of God in Mena with Brother Tim Rose and Brother Ron Tilley officiating. Interment followed at Concord Cemetery in Mena under the direction of Bowser Family Funeral Home in Mena. A visitation was held Sunday, June 11, 2017 from 6-8 P.M. at the Bowser Family Funeral Home Chapel in Mena. In lieu of flowers memorials can be made to the Board Camp Assembly of God, P. . Box 1, Board Camp, Arkansas 71932.

MARVIN JUNIOR WOLFENBARGER Marvin Junior Wolfenbarger, age 85,of Mena, Arkansas died Wednesday, June 7, 2017 at his home. He was born on Thursday, May 12, 1932 to Marvin Driggers and Pearl Leona Foster in Eagleton, Arkansas. Marvin served in the nited States Army during the orean Conflict. He believed in setting goals in life and he achieved them. ne of Marvin’s passions was working on and restoring old cars and he was very proud of his accomplishments. He also loved traveling and deeply cared for his family and friends. Marvin worked for the Dale Rodgers’ Family

I would like to thank our wonderful community for all the support and care given to me and my family when Bethany, my daughter, Reilly and Acelyn, my grandchildren and Steve, my brother were murdered. Thank you to Scott Sawyer and all the officers in the search for them. Brian Bowser in the help given in planning the funeral, CMA in letting us use their building, Janssen Avenue Florist for the casket spray, Holly Harshman Elementary and students that made the wonderfull cards for Reilly, Union Bank for setting up the benefit fund, my wonderful PCDC family, including our customers that were so caring, the lady that set up the prayer balloon release and candle light ceremony. I have never seen anything like this community. It is indeed a very loving, caring and supportive community. The DVA for the honor guard and flag for my brother, Steve. Thanks to all for the flowers and food. This has been devastating to lose 4 members of family in just a matter of days. Please hold your loved ones close to you, you never know when they will be taken from you.

Thank You! Carrie Scarbrough

businesses for over 70 years before retiring. His hobbies included woodworking, maintaining his home, and spending time with his grandchildren. Marvin was a loving husband, father, brother, uncle, grandfather, great grandfather, and a great friend and will be missed by all who knew him. He is preceded in death by his parents; his stepfather, Ben amin Foster; and one sister, El ina Prather. Marvin is survived by his loving wife of 58 years, Mary Sue Wolfenbarger of Mena; one son and daughter in law, evin and Camilla Wolfenbarger of Mena; one daughter, Treva Wolfenbarger of Mena; one brother and sister in law, Dean and Beth Foster of Russellville; three grandchildren, laressa Hobbs of Mena, Dara Hensley of Hawaii, and Nick Wolfenbarger of Mena; three great grandchildren, riton Hobbs, Phoenix Hobbs, and Dexter Hensley; several nieces and nephews and a host of other relatives and friends. A funeral service was held Saturday, June 10, 2017 at 10 00 A.M. at the Bowser Family Funeral Home Chapel in Mena with Stokes Herod officiating. Interment followed at Pinecrest Memorial Park in Mena. A visitation was held Friday, June 9, 2017 from 6-8 P.M. at the Bowser Family Funeral Home Chapel in Mena. Pallbearers were Jay uillin, Robert uillin, Nathan Howard, Nick Wolfenbarger, Nick ent, and Tim Fagan. Honorary Pallbearer will be Ralph Wiles. nline Guestbook www.bowserffh.com

OPAL KABEL pal abel, age 86, of Hatfield, died Saturday, June 3, 2017 at home. She was born on Tuesday, July 15, 1930 to John Edgar and Stella Blevins Medlen in Fort Smith, Arkansas. pal loved traveling to different states with her husband and en oyed spending time with her children and grandchildren. She worked for over 30 years at the ak Glen Home in Coal alley, Illinois. She en oyed the people there. pal was a loving mother, grandmother, and friend and will be missed by all who knew her.

OTTO MUELLER, age 86, of Mena, passed away Sunday, June 4, 2017, at his home. Friends and neighbors are invited to a Potluck Memorial Gathering to be held on Saturday, June 17, 2017, from 1-5 pm at the Mena Housing Authority, 509 South Morrow St., Mena (across Hwy 8E from Mena Post Office).

She is preceded in death by her parents; her husband, Don abel and one sister, Bernice Brock. pal is survived by her son, John Myers of Hatfield; her daughter, Carolyn Bruce of Milan, Illinois; four grandchildren; four great grandchildren; several nieces and nephews and a host of other relatives and friends. No services are planned at this time with cremation entrusted to Bowser Family Funeral Home in Mena. nline Guestbook www.bowserffh.com

ROY GLENN MARTIN Roy Glenn Martin, age 76, of Hatfield, died Monday, June 12, 2017 at home. He was born on Sunday, December 28, 1941 to rvis Elmo and Ruby Cleo Almonrode Martin in Mena, Arkansas. Roy worked as a brick layer for forty years. His kids and family were most important to him. Roy en oyed river fishing, raising his Cur squirrel dogs, riding his 4-wheeler, and gardening. He was of the Methodist faith. Roy was a loving husband, father, brother, uncle, grandfather and friend and will be missed by all who knew him. He is preceded in death by his parents; and one brother, Rex Martin. Roy is survived by his loving wife, Glenda Martin of Hatfield; one son and daughter in law, Mitch and Amy Martin of Hatfield; one daughter and son in law, Christina and Brandon Burford of Hatfield; one brother and sister in law, Lamar and Linda Martin of Hatfield; four grandchildren, Brianne and Jordan Butterfield of Fayetteville, Coy Burford of Hatfield, Rhyen Martin of Hatfield, and oty Martin of Hatfield; several nieces and nephews and a host of other relatives and friends. Graveside services will be Thursday, June 15, 2017 at 10 00 A.M. at the Six Mile Cemetery in Hatfield, with Brother Troy Denton officiating. isitation will be general. Services are entrusted to Bowser Family Funeral Home in Mena. nline Guestbook www.bowserffh.com

January 6, 2016

C aring f or y our f amily since 1928 4 7 9 -3 9 4 -1 3 1 0 6 1 1 J a nssen Ave. Mena , AR 7 1 9 5 3 B ea sl eyWoodF unera l Home. c om


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University of Arkansas Rich Mountain Announces Spring 2017 Honor Recipients T

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he U niversity of Arkansas Rich Mountain has announced the students named to the C hancellor’s List and V ice C hancellor’s List who were enrolled for the spring 2 01 7 semester. Students named to the C hancellor’s List are full-time, current students who complete 1 2 semester credit hours or more, ex cluding developmental coursework, and earn a 4 .0 grade point average or higher. The C hancellor’s List for the spring 2 01 7 semester are as follows ( in alphabetical order by city) : C ove, AR – Shannon Jesse, D eQ ueen, AR – Tessa Gentry, Glenwood, AR – Shauna Martin, Grannis, AR – Mireya ope , Hatfield, ourtney Meador, Horatio, yra Gon ale , Mansfield, heyenne Garlin, Mena, AR – B riann Allen, Ron Anderle, Andrew B lackwell, B renda B lake, Sally C arnahan, C hrista, astillo, rystal avelli, indey eramus, Melody Hampton, riel a alle, erah ee, lgecca Gem, ewis, homas ewis, athryn Mc ntire, Maranda Meador, ordan owell, oseph ickman, ennifer, eit , llie essler, essica iler, orma ims, ony medley, shley ullivan, erusha edder, imberly ise, Mount Ida, ordan armer, acob Millwood, alista argett, orman, onnie oung, den, Mary orman, oteau, Meygan agner, aldron, arah scalanta, randon Mack, anni myth, atson, abrun ee, ickes, rooke Howell, Students named to the V ice C hancellor’s List are full-time, current students who complete 1 2 semester credit hours or more, ex cluding developmental coursework, and earn a 3.5 to 3.9 9 grade point average. The V ice C hancellor’s List for the spring 2 01 7 semester are as follows ( in alphabetical order by city) : B oles, AR – Jenna Shaddon, B ooneville, AR – April Norris, C onway, AR helby shcraft, ove, evon raig, eigha andall, e ueen, Haley Goss, Grannis, ndrew Mayo, Hatfield, riana rce, amantha lausen, anessa ice, Mena, dam nderton, Haley elknap, Morgan issell, ayla rown, hristopher loud, harity, ogburn, herri dmonds, heyenne airless, aura aubus, oss Graves, hristopher Henry, iffanie, elems, shton ogan, Hope yle, elena Maechler, onnor Mc onnell, hawn Mowdy, ohn hillips, eremy owell, rooke anche , onnie kipper, essica mith, amantha alamante , Morrisa ibbs, rista an elstyn Hicks, drianna olfenbarger, Mount Ida, rittany Mc ool, arks, haylee utton, aldron, shley ustin, shley ims, atson, hristy Green, ickes, u larcon, livia elgado.

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ce Sav ed Al w ays Sav ed ? There are those w ho say that " once you are sav ed you are al w ays sav ed " . ey say that it is im possib l e to fal l from God ’ s g race reg ard l ess of w hat you d o. This m ay sound g ood and forting , b ut l et’ s see w hat the B ib l e says. I n 1 Corinthians 9: 27 the apostl e Paul says, " N o, I strik e a b l ow y b od y and m ak e it m y sl av e so that after I hav e preached to others, I m ysel f w il l not b e d isq ual ified for priz e. " Paul said that it w as possib l e for him to b ecom e d isq ual ified . I f Paul b ecam e d isq ual ified he w oul d ost. 1 Corinthians 10: 12 Paul g iv es a w arning to the Christians at Corinth b y saying , " So, if you think you are nd ing firm , b e careful that you d o not fal l . " W hy such a w arning if it is im possib l e to fal l ? So the v ery pl e, w ho think they cannot fal l , are g iv en a w arning to b e careful that they d o not fal l . Gal atians 5: 4 w e read , " Y ou w ho are trying to b e j ustified b y the l aw hav e b een al ienated from Christ; hav e fal l en aw ay from g race. " I sn' t it strang e, that peopl e w ho say they b el iev e the B ib l e al so say that powered by THE POLK COUNTY PULSE cannot fal l from g race, w hen the B ib l e so pl ainl y says that w e can fal l from g race. W ho are w e to b el iev e, or m an? E v en thoug h m any rel ig ious b od ies say that you cannot fal l from g race, the B ib l e cl earl y says peopl e can fal l from g race. And w ithout God ’ s g race w e cannot b e sav ed . he d octrine of " once sav ed al w ays sav ed " and that you cannot fal l from God ’ s g race and b e l ost is a trine that orig inated w ith Satan. Satan w ants peopl e to b el iev e that they cannot fal l from g race and b e I n Genesis 2: 17 God tol d Ad am and E v e not to eat of the tree of the k now l ed g e of g ood and ev il , and ay they ate of it they w oul d surel y d ie. B ut in Genesis 3: 4 Satan tol d E v e, " Y ou w il l not surel y d ie" . an onl y ad d ed the w ord " not" to w hat God had said . J ust as Satan tol d a l ie to E v e, Satan is stil l eiv ing peopl e tod ay b y tel l ing them they canN OT fal l from g race, and once they are sav ed , they are ays sav ed . H e is trying to l ul l peopl e into com pl acency. Satan d eceiv es peopl e so they w il l b e eternal l y B ut 2 Peter 1: 10 says, " , m ak e ev ery effort to confirm your cal l ing and el ection. . . " od ' s prom ises are cond itional upon our d oing H is w il l . J esus says in Matthew 7: 21, " N ot ev eryone w ho s to Me, Lord , Lord , w il l enter the k ing d om of H eav en, b ut onl y the one w ho d oes the w il l of My F ather in av en. " H eb rew s 5: 9 says " H e b ecam e the author of eternal sal v ation to al l w ho ob ey H im . " e H atfiel d Church of Christ w el com es al l to w orship. 479-437-5276 al so on F aceb ook

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O N CE S A V ED A L W A Y S S A V ED ?

There are those w ho say that " once you are sav ed you are al w ays sav ed " . They say that it is im possib l e to fal l from God ’ s g race reg ard l ess of w hat you d o. This m ay sound g ood and com forting , b ut l et’ s see w hat the B ib l e says. I n 1 Corinthians 9: 27 the apostl e Paul says, " N o, I strik e a b l ow to m y b od y and m ak e it m y sl av e so that after I hav e preached to others, I m ysel f w il l not b e d isq ual ified for the priz e. " Paul said that it w as possib l e for him to b ecom e d isq ual ified . I f Paul b ecam e d isq ual ified he w oul d b e l ost. I n 1 Corinthians 10: 12 Paul g iv es a w arning to the Christians at Corinth b y saying , " So, if you think you are stand ing firm , b e careful that you d o not fal l . " W hy such a w arning if it is im possib l e to fal l ? So the v ery peopl e, w ho think they cannot fal l , are g iv en a w arning to b e careful that they d o not fal l . I n Gal atians 5: 4 w e read , " Y ou w ho are trying to b e j ustified b y the l aw hav e b een al ienated from Christ; you hav e fal l en aw ay from g race. " I sn' t it strang e, that peopl e w ho say they b el iev e the B ib l e al so say that w e cannot fal l from g race, w hen the B ib l e so pl ainl y says that w e can fal l from g race. W ho are w e to b el iev e, God or m an? E v en thoug h m any rel ig ious b od ies say that you cannot fal l from g race, the B ib l e cl earl y says that peopl e can fal l from g race. And w ithout God ’ s g race w e cannot b e sav ed . The d octrine of " once sav ed al w ays sav ed " and that you cannot fal l from God ’ s g race and b e l ost is a d octrine that orig inated w ith Satan. Satan w ants peopl e to b el iev e that they cannot fal l from g race and b e l ost. I n Genesis 2: 17 God tol d Ad am and E v e not to eat of the tree of the k now l ed g e of g ood and ev il , and the d ay they ate of it they w oul d surel y d ie. B ut in Genesis 3: 4 Satan tol d E v e, " Y ou w il l not surel y d ie" . Satan onl y ad d ed the w ord " not" to w hat God had said . J ust as Satan tol d a l ie to E v e, Satan is stil l d eceiv ing peopl e tod ay b y tel l ing them they canNOT fal l from g race, and once they are sav ed , they are al w ays sav ed . H e is trying to l ul l peopl e into com pl acency. Satan d eceiv es peopl e so they w il l b e eternal l y l ost. B ut 2 Peter 1: 10 says, " m ak e ev ery effort to confirm your cal l ing and el ection. . . " God ' s prom ises are cond itional upon our d oing H is w il l . J esus says in Matthew 7: 21, " N ot ev eryone w ho says to Me, Lord , Lord , w il l enter the k ing d om of H eav en, b ut onl y the one w ho does the will of My F ather in H eav en. " H eb rew s 5: 9 says " H e b ecam e the author of eternal sal v ation to al l w ho obey H im . " The Hatfield Church of Christ w el com es al l to W orship. 479-437-5276 al so on F aceb ook . T H IS A D P U R C H A S E D B Y H A T F IE L D C H U R C H

O F C H R IS T


Weekly Publication

Mena Middle School Academic Awards T

he 6 th grade students listed below have been recognized for their outstanding performance in the following subjects: A rt ( W ebb) - Jerrin P arsons, D usty D avis, K ristian P ellegrino, and C rissie Womack. Tools F or L earning ( Ellison) - Aiden B eck, D ayton Lane, Trevin P lunkett, Luis B asillio, B eau B ledsoe, Lex i Minzel, Emily Ryan, Emmi Hines, Emma Johnson, Emily Leonard, C armen P uckett. W ellness ( Tibbett) - B eau B ledsoe, Joey Slape, C ody B ollmeyer, Jaiden F elix , Nathan P hilpot, Gabe C orcoran, Michael D avis, Jarrod P arsons, Z ane Williams, and Alex Rocha. R esourc e ( W oodral) -Trent F ussell, Summer V enable, Taylor B rumley, and Haylie Harmon. R esourc e ( S helley) - Nathan Raney and Jamie Holt. B eginning B and- Layla Spenser, B ethany Sanders, Ranessa Ricker, Alex ia Minzel, Layla Sessler, Aaron F erguson, ddi ollar, u anne awrence, renden Heath, and livia utterfield. R esourc e ( S ex ton) - Haylie Harmon and Summer V enable. L iterac y ( J ewell) - C armen P uckett, Abby Smith, Alex ia Minzel, K ate McD onald, Emmi Hines, P aige P arnell, D usty D avis, Jayden F elix , Ranessa Ricker, and Layla Spenser. Math ( P onder) - Emmi Hines, B eau B ledsoe, P aige P arnell, Ranessa Ricker, Alex ia Minzel, Evelynn F arrier, C armen P uckett, Alex Rocha, Madi Lyle, and K ate McD onald. Music ( B radford) - Layla Sessler, D aniel McD onald, Aaron F erguson, Olivia B utterfield, endall osey, lade Hebert, iden eck, Hannah Medcalf, ddi ollar, and rey D ay. S c ienc e ( G ann) - Emmi Hines, Ranessa Ricker, Layla Spenser, P aige P arnell, Madilyn Lyle, Gabrielle P ierce, Silas McIntyre, K ate McD onald, C armen P uckett, D aniel McD onald. S oc ial S tudies ( Hall) - C armen P uckett, K eira Hall, Ranessa Ricker, Alex Rocha, P aige P arnell, Emily May, Layla Spenser, Emmi Hines, Olivana Ortiz, and D amiana Johnson. B e The G ood A wards ( Hall) - Emmi Hines, Emily Leonard, P aige P arnell, K atie V aldovinos, Addi D ollar, K eira Hall, Alex Rocha, C armen P uckett, Silas McIntyre, and Nevin

Cornerstone Pentecostal Church

invites you to hear testimonies from

this Father’s Day! Services at 10:45 with lunch following! Call Brenda for details 479-216-6753 Cornerstone Pentecostal Church 1129 Hwy 71, South • Mena, AR Pastors: Scott & Brenda Jones

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . June . . . . .14, . . .2017 ......

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F urr. Health ( Thig p en) - C armen P uckett, P aige P arnell, Emmalee Andrews, Layla essler, Hannah Metcalf, and livia utterfield. The 7 th students listed below have been recognized for their outstanding performance in the following subjects: F CS I ( S mith) - Annika Thompson, B reezy Hendrix , and Jaiden Milam. S c ienc e ( S wall) - Annika Thompson, C hristina Gragg, Emily Liles, C arleigh Smart, Alex is Harper, Abbey McC onnell, Whitney D ilbert, Avery P owell, Gage Gorden, and V anessa V ue. K eyboarding ( S ik es) - B rax ton C laborn , Abi McC onnell, and Hunter F rench. I ntro to Comp uters( S ik es) - V anessa V ue, Emily Liles, Avery P owell, and Jaiden Milam. East I- Jayden Harris, Whitney D ilbert, Gavin Gorden, and Samuel C ross. R esourc e ( S helley) - Tate Hunter, Abby P erez, C aitlyn Rode, Austin K irkendol, Mason C ooper ( AE) , Jonathan D iffee, and James Smith. R esourc e ( S ex ton) - Matthew Grossman. Math- Whitney D ilbert, Abby McC onnell, Sarah Simmons, Allison B ates, B reezy Hendri , Gage Mortimer, Grayson airless, atie enefield, athy Miller elle aren atherine Sherman-Miller) , and Austin Rose. A dv anc ed Math- Annika Thompson, C hristina Gregg, and Sarah Grenier. L iterac y- Annika Thompson, Emily Liles, C hristina Gragg, C arleigh Smart, K atie enefield, anessa ue, reeanna Hendri , achel ilson, Grayson airless, and arah Simmons. The 8 th grade students listed below have been recognized for their outstanding performance in the following subjects: K eyboarding ( S ik es) - Ivy urtis and am fird. I ntro to Comp uters ( L unsford) - am fird. A rt ( W ebb) - C aleb C row, Esmerelda Johnson, Laticia V asq uez, Z oie Goforth, and Archer P earce. R esourc e ( S helly) - Jessie Ezell, Sam C reason, Susan C ook, and C ameron McC auley. R esourc e ( W oodral) - Natalie Grossman, Jesse Riley, and D amon C lark. R esourc e ( S ex ton) - D amon C lark and Natalie Grossman. Health/ P E ( B ennett) - Madison B lair, Morgan P uckett, B lade C astor, Alex andra Hunter, Samuel C ude, Jesse Ezell, Marissa Ortiz, C auy House, Maddison Gunn, and Micah B rowning. K eyboarding ( L unsford) - Maddison Gunn. East I Lunsford) - Allea Rogers. East I I ( L unsford) - C hase Lyles, C ooper Andrele, and Jax om Hughes. Y earbook ( L unsford) - Maddison Gunn, C iara Lance, Gracie Lyle, Allie Martin, Thaddaeus Nance, Lauren Sikes, and B rianna Timms. J unior B and ( B radford) - Shylee Head, Ivy C urtis, McK enzie Arceneaux , Summer Loar, and Tori Evans. S c ienc e ( L uttmer) - Lauren Sikes, Maddison Gunn, B rianna Timms, C iara Lance, Esmerelda Johnson, Andrea Maechler, Madison B lair, Shylee Head, Emily Wagner, London C opelin, LuLu Q uebedeaux , Summer Loar, and V ivi Hooper. L iterac y ( Chaney) - Micah Smith, Emily Wagner, V ivi Hooper, Tabitha Levering, Morgan P uckett, Summer Loar, Andrea Maechler, C iara Lance, Lauren Sikes, and B rianna Timms. History ( J ohnson) - C iara Lance, V ivi Hooper, B rianna Timms, Gaven Hooper, C onnor Latham, B lake C astor, Allie Martin, Madison B lair, Esmerlda Johnson, and London C opelin. C areer Orientation ( Goodnight) - Jax on Hughes, Z oie Goforth, Z oe McP hearson, Maddison Gunn, Summer Loar, D avid McD onald, Jaci Allen, Shylee Head, Esmerelda Johnson, and London C opelin. A g ri ( G oodnig ht) - Makori Gabourel,London C opelin, Andrew D avis, C ooper Andrele, Gaven Hooper, K yleigh Johnson, Emily Handy, B ryce F airless, Jake Short, and Austin Shears. A lg ebra ( G ray) - B rianna Timms, Madison B lair, Andrew D avis, Logan Lawrence, K yleigh Johnson, Ivy C urtis, Leilani D ay, London C opelin, V ivi Hooper, Logan F airless, and B ryce F airless. A lg ebra I ( G ray) - Lauren Sikes, C iara Lance, and Grace Lyle. The following middle school students were recognized for their perfect attendance: Annika Thompson, Jordan Roberts, and K olbe Smith.

January 6, 2016


12

June 14, 2017

Weekly Publication

sports

................................................................................................................................

Morgan Fagan - Running for Another Day R

unning isn’t just hard… it is exh austing. It is just as much mental as it is physical. The best athletes are those that train their bodies to push past their breaking points, going further than they thought they could. F or many, running is hard work, and for some, running gives satisfaction and joy. F amous Olympian Eric Liddell, describes this feeling, “God made me fast. And when I run, I feel his pleasure.” Another runner, Morgan F agan from Acorn, enjoys the satisfaction of a good run. Morgan has graduated from Acorn as not only one of the most decorated track and cross country athletes, but also one of the most awarded athletes in school history … period. D espite the accolades, cross country running was not her first love, hen I grew up, I really didn’t know anything about sports. I didn’t like sports and certainly didn’t like running. I liked playing outside and playing with B arbies,” says Morgan smiling. In sixt h grade, Morgan was riding the bus when the bus driver, corn ross ountry and rack oach eith ilsey, approached her about running. t the time, her sister rysten, was running for oach ilsey on the junior high track team. I looked up to K rysten and thought that if she was running, I could, too. I was also small and so I thought I might be good at it.” Not only did Morgan compete in junior high cross country, she dominated the meets. “I was often so far ahead that I would just finish the race walking, recalls Morgan. uring her th and th grade seasons she only lost one race, while going one of those seasons undefeated. hile running in junior high competitions, she was training with her sister and other high school runners. “My sister and I were both competitive and it actually frustrated her that I could keep up so when I trained I just stayed like ten feet behind them,” exp lains Morgan laughing. Along with running with her sister, Morgan would run each day at school under the direction of oach ilsey. he attributes a lot of her success to his knowledge of the sport and running in general, “If it wasn’t for oach ilsey, I wouldn’t have been as successful as I have been. He really pushed me. here PHOTO COURTESY OF SANDY TULL were times that I didn’t want to run or practice, but C oach was always making me run anyways.” F or someone who has won so many races and has competed at such a high level, Morgan isn’t your typical ‘ go beat the world’ competitor. In fact, her biggest competition isn’t the other runners. Her biggest competition is herself. eople don’t know this, but I actually hate races. I would much rather run by myself and compete against myself. I want to always set a new personal record. I don’t like races because I don’t like losing. hen you race, you take a chance at losing, says Morgan with a smile. on’t let the smile fool you though, Morgan wants to win, and often she does. C ross country runners exp erience things that most other athletes or even track athletes don’t e perience. unning through the woods or a field as runners often do can be dangerous… or at the very least, comical, “I have tripped over a dog on the course while running and one time when I was running a 5 k that wasn’t for school competition, I was running along when looking to my left I saw a deer just in time before it hit me.” Morgan’s running career will continue as she heads to the niversity of rkansas at ort mith to run on the cross country team there. It is an honor to receive a scholarship to run and work towards a degree, but that may not be what Morgan is most exci ted about. “My sister K rysten is a runner on the team there and she is a captain. This upcoming year will be her last year to run in college and I will get the opportunity to run with her again. It’s going to be a lot of fun.” Morgan understands that running in college is a lot more serious than running in college and she will have to work and compete harder than she ever has, “The athletes are going to be good. e will run against people from the of , it will be e tremely tough. My goal is to constantly set a personal record and always be in the op . I think when I leave I might be able to get my mile down to minutes. hile running at , Morgan will work towards her ental Hygiene degree with the hopes to go to medical school afterwards.

BY LOGAN MCCOURTNEY l.mccourtney@mypulsenews.com

Western Ark. Bass Anglers Host Tourney on Lake Ouachita SUBMITTED estern Arkansas B ass Anglers held its 5 th tournament of 2 01 7 on ake uachita aturday, une . rent oon took th place with . lbs.; C urt B oyd placed 4 th with 9 .7 6 lbs.; ay ollard grabbed nd place with . lbs.; and Terry D avis claimed the win with 1 3.31 lbs. ay ollard also had the big bass of the tournament, with one fish weighing 4 .5 1 lbs. fter five tournaments, rent oon is leading the Angler of the year in points. he members of estern rkansas B ass Anglers are sponsored by U nion ank of Mena, terling Machinery, Minute Lube, and A& B Tire.


June 14, 2017

THE POLK COUNTY PULSE

13

Farm Family Polk County

of the Year

The Luke & Deedee Alston Family

A Special Supplement of the Online version available at MyPulseNews.com

MULTI-MEDIA

479-243-9600 • MyPulseNews.com 1168 Hwy 71 South • Mena, AR


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June 14, 2017


June 14, 2017

THE POLK COUNTY PULSE

15

HOLLY SPRINGS HOMESTEAD & IRONS FORK CATTLE COMPANY BY MELANIE BUCK • news@mypulsenews.com

T

394-3373

Corner of 4th St. & Hwy 71

he pride that comes from working on a fifth generation farm is an unexp lainable feeling, one that makes the chest burst and the heart swell, and one that creates a self sufficient gratification that you want to keep passing down for many more generations to come. In the case of uke and eedee lston and their sons, year old yan, and year old rey, they are using their Holly prings Homestead and Irons ork attle om pany operations as a place to pass down the agricultural culture, not just to their own children, but to neighbors and visitors alike. his is just one reason why the lston’s were named as rkansas arm ureau’s arm amily of the ear for olk ounty. heir implemen tation of commercial crops, cattle, pigs, bees, poultry production, and agri tourism is becoming a model for others in the agricultural industry. or the Alstons, it was a conscious choice to leave the corporate world behind and get back to the basics, tilling God’s earth, helping to feed the world’s families, and doing it all shoulder to shoulder with their family. uke and eedee both come from farming backgrounds and both left jobs in the corporate world to go back to their roots. his is just what I was born to do, said uke. I am living the dream. ut, they didn’t just go back to their roots they have e panded beyond anyone’s e pectations, becom ing a diversified commercial farming operation, and they aren’t finished yet. nd to the lston’s, diversification is a major key to their booming success, along with being very much a faith led operation, eedee e plained. e very much believe in managed growth, as she shot a coy smile e plaining that the family’s vision isn’t uite complete. sign adorned with scripture from cclesiastes sat on the porch that will soon hang above her green house, “ … a time to plant and a time to harvest.” uke jokingly e plained that eedee’s pri e greenhouse was her birthday, anniversary, and hrist mas present all rolled into one and just another e ample of how their opera tion develops one project after another. In , the couple started with the decision to leave their day jobs and build eight broiler houses to become poultry growers, with a much bigger

CONTINUED ON PAGE 16-17

Ouachita Equine Clinic

Serving all your small & large animal needs.

Congratulations to the Alston Family! 2017 Farm Family of the Year

Supercenter 67 • 600 Hwy 71 N, Mena

Congratulations to Luke & Deedee Alston! Proud to be your Vet of choice! Hours: Mon. Tues. Wed., and Fri. 8am-5pm Closed on Thurs.

479-394-7185

Randy J. Burgess D.V.M. • 2920 Hwy. 71 N, Mena, AR 71953


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THE POLK COUNTY PULSE

June 14, 2017

June 14, 2017

THE POLK COUNTY PULSE

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CONTINUED FROM PAGE 15

vision in mind. “They thought they would have four, but seeing the income potential, they doubled their amount of houses. “We have not one day regretted it,” Luke said. With eight broiler houses, they have all the litter they need for their own pastures and hay land and they sell the rest for supplemental income. e now can provide our cows with all the uality hay and forage they need and cut down on our feed costs. lso a benefit of the litter produced is more uality hay for us to sell, less acres covered with our machinery, which leads to less fuel costs and time spent in the field. It’s a win win for us, uke e plained. his philosophy of using one product for multiple benefits is evident throughout every facet of their farm. heir first batch of birds was delivered in anuary and uke says, he chicken houses have added cash flow we never had in years past, which has allowed us to e pand other portions of the farm. Many of those portions of the farm were created from eedee’s e pounding energy, vision, and creative imagination. uring the time we e perienced delays in the construction of our broiler farm, she became bored, said uke. hat’s when eedee began sowing seeds, plant ing berries and vegetables. he also began converting a cabin on the property into a mercantile type farm market, stocked with rkansas Made and rkansas Grown products that include handcrafted soaps, sauces, jewelry, jams and jellies, uilts, beeswa candles made on the farm, as well as snacks, drinks, coffee, seeds, and more items too numerous to count. n old shed out front was easily converted to their own farmer’s market where fresh fruits and vegetables can be obtained seasonally. Her marketing is personal, it reflects her heart, uke said. ne of eedee’s specialties is her ability to market the business throughout several mediums. In addition to advertising in local newspapers, tourism maga ines, and on social media, the lston’s have launched a Harvest ine’ where people

CONTINUED ON PAGE 18

Congratulations to the

Alston Family!

" P assing G as I s Not Ou r J ob , I t' s Ou r Life"

Ligon Oil Company Inc. • Mena Bulk Plant • 300 Maple Avenue • Mena, AR 71953 • 479-394-1543

Congratulations, to the Alston Family from all of us at

Congratulations, Polk County Farm Family 2017, The Luke & Deedee Alston Family! 515 Janssen, Mena

394-4140

710 4th Street • Mena, AR

Rex Dollar

1607 Hwy 71 N. 394-1027


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THE POLK COUNTY PULSE

June 14, 2017

Congratulations,

Luke jokingly explained that Deedee’s prize greenhouse was her birthday, anniversary, and Christmas present all rolled into one and just another example of how their operation develops one project after another.

From

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 16-17 can call in 24/7 to find out what is being harvested on the farm each day. The Harvest Line also gives updates on upcoming activities and special offerings. The number to call is 479-437-4069. Their website, www.hollyspringshomestead.com, is also helpful. Holly Springs’ fresh veggies and fruit are picked daily right on the farm and include a large assortment. They often add new items to their list of crops. Currently, the Alston’s have set aside various portions of their 7.25 acres cropland for specific plants, with large yields coming from each crop. On just one-quarter of an acre, they can grow three tons of strawberries; 240 bushels of sweet corn on 1.5 acres; three varieties of thornless blackberries that yield 1,500 lbs of produce; 2.5 acres of pumpkins yields 25,000 lbs; and one-half of an acre of muscadines produces 3,300 lbs. That is in addition to the two-acres they use for various tomatoes, okra, squashes, beans, peppers, cucumbers, watermelons, cantaloupes, and more, that produces 10,000 to 40,000 lbs. per

CONTINUED ON PAGE 19

Luke and Deedee!!

All Natural Protein

Mineral Tubs with Enzymes for Cattle and Horses Guaranteed Products

Guaranteed Results

918.658.8471

wannranch.org dbwann@windstream.net


June 14, 2017

THE POLK COUNTY PULSE

19

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 18 acre based on the crops planted there. hey also use acres for hay production, acres for pasture, and smaller portions for their honey bees, cut flowers, field corn and specialty crops. ith all that, comes a lot of work. he lstons work together to make sure it all gets done, with the added help sometimes of family, church family, and friends. In fact, the lstons just hired their first full time employee to assist with the poultry operation. till yet, the family’s operation has so much more. hey have head of ngus cows with calves and three herd bulls, one of which is uke’s pride and joy. uke and his father bred Hitch. He is the epitome of what an ngus bull should be. He said Hitch is our best herd sire that has ever graced the fields here. hat is say ing a lot when you are standing on a farm that began in . e strive to do our best to hold true to our roots and produce better than e pected animals. heir cattle company, Irons ork attle ompany formerly Irons ork ngus , is well known for their premium cattle. hey also provide cattle supplement and ova yme en yme protein lick tubs. uke also serves as ice resident on the board of the olk ounty attlemen’s ssociation, is a board member for the rkan sas tate attlemen’s ssociation, and is part of the oung attlemen’s eadership lass. It is a personal goal of mine to introduce as many younger folks to the cattle business as I can. ot everyone had a grandpa like mine or was raised knowing this stuff like I was and I want to share what I know in hopes of keeping

CONTINUED ON PAGE 20

Congratulations to the 2017 Polk County Farm Family of the Year! The Luke and Deedee Alston Family of Mena Rodney Lott Auto Repair

101 Ward Lane, Mena

479-394-1662

Congratulations!

LICENSED RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL CONTRACTOR

WE CAN DO IT ALL

2017 Polk County Farm Family of the Year

Luke & Deedee Alston Family

from The Polk County Cattleman’s Association

Congratulations to

Luke & Deedee Alston 2017 Polk County Farm Family

JAMES EARL TURNER (479) 234-6244 ERIC TURNER (479) 243-5549


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THE POLK COUNTY PULSE

June 14, 2017

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 19 people in this business.” D eedee serves as the P olk C ounty F arm B ureau Women’s C ommittee C hair. And indeed, through their educational programs and agri-tourism, they are teaching them in masses. They began their agri-tourism operation in 2 01 6 and was themed on old-time homesteading practices giving kids and adults, alike, the opportunity to see the way things were done in simpler times and when things were handmade and homegrown. To implement this philosophy, the family held their first annual arm our in May , which included hay rides around the property to view the transformation, hominy making demonstrations, D utch oven demonstrations, vendors such as the U ofA Ex tension Service, Master Gardeners, tension Homemakers, and eekeepers, set up tables with educational materials and gave demonstrations as well. They plan to host the 2 nd Annual F arm Tour on Saturday, June 1 7 , 2 01 7 with a day full of activities even larger than last year’s. Another teaching tool they have used was their six -acre corn maze. D eedee and their niece created game cards for the maze with agricultural facts that could be solved as visitors made their way through the tall golden corn stalks. In 2 01 6 , over 1 ,4 00 individuals paid to visit the corn maze and pumpkin patch, with group tours given to an additional 6 7 2 areas students of all ages. To keep the kids busy, the family created a K ids F arm. Luke said with the

CONTINUED ON PAGE 21

Congratulations to Luke & Deedee Alston, the Polk County Farm Family of the Year ® The Natural Choice for Community Banking

Mena

479-243-0123 diamondbanking.com

P olk C ou nty 30 9 S . M o r r o w , M e n a

479-394-36 5 0


June 14, 2017

THE POLK COUNTY PULSE

21

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 20 help of church friends, they “recreated my wife’s childhood with the simple, yet fun things she grew up playing as a child.” The K ids F arm includes the most popular, Adeline’s Mud P ie K itchen, bucking barrels, a climbing wall, slack line, old time tree swings, ladder ball, tether ball, photo booths and a hay maze mountain, C razy C roq uet, Yard D ominoes, a club house, and their own K ids’ P icking Garden, where they can harvest seasonal produce. They also give farm-to-table demonstrations, farm tours, and educational events for groups and universities, and are available for birthday parties, weddings, and photo shoots. “We love being able to be educators. P eople who visit our farm are hungry for that knowledge and we feel that planting these seeds about where food comes from, the importance of agriculture to our world, and the huge economic impact that agriculture has on our state, is something we enjoy and take pride in,” Luke ex plained. And, to add to their chore list, the Alstons also have a commercial hay and haylage operation that offers mowing, raking, baling, wrapping and stacking services. And still yet, they are bursting at the seams to ex pand further. Their goals include setting up an agricultural education display called The C rops of Arkansas to display and educate on the crops on the Eastern side of the state that are huge economic players in agriculture in

CONTINUED ON PAGE 22

Congratulations to the Alston Family for receiving the Farm Family honor!

Congratulations

Luke & Deedee Alston Family of Mena 2017 Polk County Farm Family of the Year

We appreciate your business! Same location for over 45 years 479-394-1351 • 800-394-1351 201 Hwy. 71 N., Mena Mon.-Fri. 7am-6pm, Sat. 8am-4pm

Mena’s ONLY locally owned and operated parts store

3357 Hwy 71 N • 394-1394


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THE POLK COUNTY PULSE

June 14, 2017

We feel everything we have done and been able to accomplish is because God has ordained it.

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 21

Arkansas, but that no one here ever sees - so now people can take the hay ride through this display and see it actually growing - peanuts, cotton, soybean, rice, sorghum, and pearl millett. e will be the first rice farmers in olk ounty, said a proud eedee. hey also want to develop a farmstay’ vacation rental, construct a , s . ft. high tunnel, e pand their benefit accepted products, e pand their berry farm, and much, much more. sing their officially recogni ed entury arm to bring their family together, teach others self sustainability, and feed the masses, the lston’s have taken their her itage and gone back to the simple life. e should’ve done it sooner, smiled uke, but it wasn’t God’s timing. ow, neither one of us has looked back. he lstons, like so many of today’s farmers, have not only preserved a way of life but have also embraced technology. eing the most diverse farmers in the state, the lstons stepped out and stepped up big, but admit they couldn’t have done it without God’s help. his was all born out of a delay in construction and the fact that I am high energy and needed something to do, so I started planting. he ne t thing you know, we’re putting up our own honey and selling it. he armstand was a carport, but made the perfect place for a market. ur niece is great at making signage. e feel everything we have done and been able to accomplish is because God has ordained it. heir niece, mily, comes from a long line of professional artists like yrone ewis, aul ewis, arba

CONCLUDED ON PAGE 23

J & B L IQ U ID F E E D & F E R T IL IZ E R

We proudly salute the

Farm Family of the Year

F E E D , F E R T I L I Z E R J erry &

The Luke and Deedee

Alston Family

Blackwell’s Poultry Bedding • 187 Polk Rd 86, Mena • 479-394-2706

&

M O R E

B arb ara H ansb rou g h

W

e s te r n L iv e s to c k M in e r a l • P r o E n e r g y C a ttle F e e d C u s to m S p r a y in g • P e s tic id e s • H e r b ic id e s

479-2 43-5 6 0 8 • 1 35 7 P o l k 74, M e n a www. j andb liq u idfeedandfertiliz er. com j andb liq u idfeedandfertiliz er@ g mail. com

C o n g r a tu la tio n s

L u k e & D e e d e e A ls to n F arm F amily of th e Year


June 14, 2017

THE POLK COUNTY PULSE

23

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 22

ra Lewis and she does all the graphic design on the property including the corn maze design and paintings on the farm. “Each component of our operation is important,” ex plained Luke Alston. “Raising cattle represents my family and a generation of Alston’s who took great pride in being cattlemen. Eq ually, the poultry houses provide a consistent revenue stream and a means of improving our land, while the agri-tourism business provides a whole other level of diversification that means we reduce the potential risks that come with investing in only one or two commodities.” Anyone familiar with the size and diversity of the Alston operation believes them to be very strong contenders to win at the state level. As for Luke, he said it would be incredible and sees it as an opportunity to honor their families that came before them that passed on the passion and appreciation the couple share for farming… and for that reason, Luke humbly says, “I want it. I want to be the State F arm F amily of the Year.” To see the success for yourself, visit Holly Springs Homestead at 2 1 7 P olk Road 1 8 4 , or just turn down P olk Road 7 4 ( also known as Holly prings oad , just past uke’s unction, and continue five miles down and look for signs on your left. The Alstons would be glad to have you!

Congratulations to the Alston Family! Waldron Complex • 442 Plant Street • 479-637-2121


. . . .June . . . . 14, . . .2017 .....................................................................................................................

health

24

Weekly Publication

Vitamin D Deficiency I

f you’ve ever looked closely at your milk’s label, you may have noticed that vitamin D is added to milk. Why is vitamin D added to milk? In the 1 9 00s, rickets, a childhood bone disorder caused by not getting enough vitamin D , impacted a large number of children. At that time it was found that 8 0 percent of children in B oston had rickets at that time in history. Rickets is a disease where softening of the bones and teeth occurs. Around that same time, scientists began to understand the roles milk’s nutrients play in the body. or e ample, they learned that milk’s minerals, specifically calcium and phosphorus, were key to bone and teeth development. In 1 9 2 2 , D r. E. V . McC ollum discovered that vitamin D could prevent rickets, because it was needed to help the calcium to get absorbed. It was a challenge to get vitamin D into the diets of American children. B ecause vitamin D is not prevalent in many foods, fortifying milk with additional vitamin D was a natural solution since it also contained key minerals for bone development. itamin fortified milk began to appear in the s and became more common by the s. oday the milk found in your supermarket is fortified with vitamin , which has played a role in making rickets a rare disease in the U nited States, almost a century later. Today, rickets is rarely seen in the U nited States. It would be easy to think that vitamin deficiencies are in the past. However, from research done, we know this is true. It is estimated that one billion people worldwide have vitamin deficiencies in all ethnic and age groups. The role of vitamin D is to regulate blood levels of calcium and phosphorus. Even if someone' s diet has adeq uate levels of calcium, without enough vitamin D to properly control calcium and phosphate levels in the blood stream, demineralization of the bones can take place. The sunshine vitamin? It s actually hard to get sufficient vitamin from a normal diet. It s found at the highest concentration in foods found in fatty fish such as tuna, mackerel, and salmon. itamin is also in egg yolks, animal based foods, beef liver, grain products, and food fortified with vitamin D . Some mushrooms are also high in vitamin D . Mushrooms level of the vitamin actually increases when ex posed to ultraviolet light. While the skin does make some of the vitamin D that we need, daily sun ex posure alone is usually not enough. F actors that affect the amount of sunshine the body absorbs includes such issues as the time of year, the angle of the sun, amount of cloud cover, pollution levels, and even the use of sunscreen can greatly limit the amount of vitamin D manufactured by the body’s skin. ome people that have a vitamin deficiency often have no noticeable symptoms. Those who do have symptoms may ex perience general fatigue, depression, inability to concentrate, joint pain, muscle cramps, pain, or weakness, restless sleep, headaches, constipation or diarrhea, and bladder problems. There are nine other serious medical conditions that have been linked to a vitamin D deficiency. hese medical conditions include asthma, depression, heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, cancer, and periodontal disease. ome groups of people are at greater risk of having a vitamin deficiency. hese groups include the following people. • The further from the eq uator a person lives, the greater the risk of having a vitamin D deficiency. • Spend a lot of time indoors during the day. • D arker skinned persons. lder people with thin skin may not be able to make vitamin . bese persons. • P eople that cover their skin with clothing or wear sunscreen all of the time. • P regnant ladies. • Infants that are breastfed and not given a vitamin D supplement. There are three ways to increase vitamin D in the body. 1 . Ex pose bare skin to the sun . at foods that vitamin occurs naturally in or fortified with.

CONTRIBUTED BY JOAN MANZELLA, APRN, HEALTHY CONNECTIONS, 3. Take vitamin D supplements he only accurate way to know if a person is deficient in vitamin is by doing a blood test. I would encourage people to talk to their provider if they think they may be vitamin D deficient. Article Resources itamin . , ovember . http: / / www.mayoclinic.org/ drugs-supplements/ vitamin-d/ evidence/ hrb-2 006 04 00 itamin . , ebruary . https ods.od.nih.gov factsheets itamin Health rofessional itamin on the double. , ovember . https www.healthychildren.org nglish healthy living nutrition ages itamin n the-D ouble.aspx itamin and health. n.d. . https: / / www.hsph.harvard.edu/ nutritionsource/ vitamin-d/ itamin deficiency contributes to spread of breast cancer in mice. , March . https med.stanford.edu news all news vitamin d deficiency contributes-to-spread-of-breast-cancer.html itamin deficiency, depression linked in G led international study. , ecember . http news.uga.edu releases article vitamin d deficiency depression hat are the risks of vitamin deficiency , une . http: / / www.mayoclinic.org/ healthy-lifestyle/ nutrition-and-healthy-eating/ ex pert-answers/ vitamin d deficiency fa hy is vitamin added to milk . http: / / dairygood.org/ content/ 2 01 5 / why-is-vitamin-d-added-to-milk

The Ole’ Farm House

Beth Polo Beckel RD LD CDE our local licensed nutrition educator will always be in one place...

1171 Hwy 71 S, mena

479-385-2151

Now Offering

$4.50

Local Grass-Fed Beef

per pound

Sunday - Friday 10 am - 5:30 pm Closed Saturday

Call 394.7301 to make your appointment! All ages WELCOME.


June 14, 2017

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POLK COUNTY BIRTHS AT MENA

#LOL

REGIONAL HEALTH SYSTEM Vanessa and Donnie Toon of Smithville, are the proud parents of a baby girl, born on June 2nd. Misty and James Harmon, of Mena, are the proud parents of a baby boy, born on June 5th. Chandra and Blake Warren, of Boles, are the proud parents of a baby girl, born on June 6th. Melissa Staggs and Charley Carroll, of Mena, are the proud parents of a baby girl, born on June 6th.

Upon entering a little country store, the stranger noticed a sign warning, “Danger! Beware of dog!” posted on the glass door. Inside, he noticed a harmless old hound dog asleep on the floor beside the cash register. “Is that the dog folks are supposed to beware of?” he asked the owner. “Yep, that’s him,” came the reply. The stranger couldn’t help but be amused. “That certainly doesn’t look like a dangerous dog to me. Why in the world would you post that sign?” “Because,” the owner explained, “Before I posted that sign, people kept tripping over him.”

CUTEST PET PIC

Rollie Mae

Rollie Mae is the 13 week old puppy of Bethany Rowell and Nano Faught. She was adopted from the Humane Society last week. Please share your favorite photo of your pet. You may drop it off or mail it to: The Polk County Pulse | 1168 Hwy 71 S. • Mena, AR 71953 or email: e.rowell@mypulsenews.com

This week’s Cutest Pet Pic made possible by your friends at:

Ouachita Equine Clinic Serving all your small & large animal needs. Hours: Mon. Tues. Wed., and Fri. 8am-5pm • Closed on Thurs.

479-394-7185

Randy J. Burgess D.V.M. 2920 Hwy. 71 N, Mena, AR 71953

At the root of it all...

BY LEANN DILBECK

editor@mypulsenews.com

I sunk my bare toes into the dirt. Ahhh… therapy. A busy life with a job full of deadlines and demands, two energetic teenagers and an even more energetic husband that all love to work hard and play hard, who would imagine that sinking my toes in fresh dirt would be so therapeutic? God knew. My son and I have always dabbled with a few vegetable plants but this year, we did a full fledge big garden. Well, big for us. We’re not ready to feed the world, but we do like having our own fresh veggies. And boy, has the Lord blessed our efforts! Not just in very fruitful healthy plants, but in our time together and our time with Him. It’s the little things that seem to bring me great joy and sinking my bare toes in that fresh dirt each day to see what pickin’s we will find is one of them. God tells us that He will provide everything we need, and I see that on a larger scale now. Yes, I’m enjoying the fruits of our labors but more importantly, I’m enjoying the time with my family in that garden. One by one, they each join me at different times and sometimes all together. Each of us looking and picking or pulling a weed and talking… talking about what’s on their sweet little minds or hearts. They share so openly in that setting… discussing their future, their dreams. And, they’re learning, too… learning about God’s goodness. How to plant a teeny tiny lettuce seed and watch it grow into nutrition and sustenance. They may not use the skills on their own for another 30 years… but the knowledge is there and I hope precious memories of time with Mom. And, then there are the rare moments that I’m in the garden alone… what wonderful chats God and I have. He filled my heart full, overwhelmingly, the other day when He reminded me that just like the talks from my children bring me such joy, my chats with Him bring Him that same joy. I think that’s one reason my time in the garden is so therapeutic. Some of my friends say I’m crazy to create more work… but it’s not work for me. It refills me and restores my soul. It grounds me. It keeps me rooted in what I know to be important and true. Remember, my friends, we don’t always have to be on our knees, or at the altar of a church, to have a little talk with Jesus. Like one of my most favorite old hymns, we all just need to have “a little talk with Jesus.”

January 6, 2016

479-394-4535 Open 7 Days a Week

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Weekly Publication

Jay ‘Gator’ Gisclair- Bringing Joy Through Music E

BY LOGAN MCCOURTNEY

l.mccourtney@mypulsenews.com

veryone has their favorite kind of music. Their music may help pass the time as they run, help them relax from the demands of life, and for many, music has a way of putting a smile on their face. Writing and singing music is an art form and music is an art that goes in the ears straight to the heart. Jay ‘ Gator’ Gisclair has played music all over America, all for one purpose: putting a smile on the face of those listening. Jay was born in Golden Meadow, Louisiana in 1 9 4 9 to Mr. Ebdon and Elize Gisclair. F rom the very beginning of his life, all Jay knew was music. His love of music was developed by his dad who was sang in local dance halls. “As long as I can remember I have loved music. My dad bought an old tv set, a black and white tv set that came in the big box. It broke and the repairman came and took everything out exce pt the box and the glass, and then I would get behind there at three years old with my Roy Rogers guitar and sing to my family like I was on television,” recalls Jay chuckling. As Jay got a little older he continued playing music, and when he was 1 5 , he and his cousins started a rock and roll band. A couple of years later Jay would start up another group, the C ountry B lue B oys, and this time they would travel all over Louisiana playing country music. Over the nex t several years, Jay would enjoy a plethora of music success. “In the 7 0’s I had the opportunity to record several songs. I recorded on Gypsie Label and then I recorded four songs with Sun D own Records in Nashville. I actually moved to Nashville and stayed there for a couple of years while I recorded,” exp lains Jay. After returning to Louisiana, Jay formed C ajun P ride, a six piece band that played country and C ajun music. In addition to travelling all over Louisiana, the band had several opportunities to play on big stages including serving as the house band for the LA C ruise Ship and they also opened for D oug K ershaw for the Harry Lee Inauguration on the River B oat P resident. “It was q uite a time. We got several opportunities to play in venues that were a lot of fun,” says Jay. In 1 9 9 5 Jay made a transition for a season of time and started singing and playing a lot more Gospel music. “I had a recording studio in Louisiana that I recorded Gospel music. One year I recorded 6 6 songs and we produced six cd’s. In , ay and his wife of years, arbara, moved to Hatfield rkansas to slow down and enjoy life in the mountains. ince moving, ay formed his current band, Gator and riends, a talented five piece group playing country, ajun, and Gospel music in a variety of settings. In ugust we are making our second tour in est irginia. e will play at county fairs, festivals, and sing Gospel music in churches,” ex plains Jay. Just as in the past, music is keeping Jay busy as he plays and sings in a variety of settings, “We are currently booked until January. We are staying busy and loving it.” One of Jay’s favorite places to play is the senior centers in P olk C ounty. F or the last two years, every Thursday, Gator and F riends can be found at the Mena Senior C enter playing music and singing to those in attendance. “I love being there at the center with everybody. I like seeing those people happy and honestly it has rejuvenated me. It reminds me of why I started playing music in the first place, I love seeing a smile on people’s faces. long with playing music, ay is seeking to be a voice for the community in Hatfield as he serves on the Hatfield ity ouncil. I love every moment of what we are doing. We are trying to improve our community and make it better for everyone involved.” Jay came on the council in 2 006 and ever since has been helping to positively affect the Hatfield community. hrough the council and our mayor, we have received different grants that allow us to improve our community. Not only have we added exe rcise eq uipment at the park, we are in the process of trying to install bathrooms there as well. After decades of singing and playing music, Jay is going to be recognized for his talents. Jay received word that he will be inducted in June 2 01 8 into the Louisiana Music Hall of F ame, an honor that is a pleasant surprise to Jay. “I had an old friend that I used to play with call one day and tell me that he thought I deserved to be in the Hall of F ame and so he entered my name for consideration. After a while, I received a call telling me they had reviewed my music and work and they were ext ending the invitation to me. I was honored.” Anyone who has heard Jay sing or play will know that he deserves such an accolade. “I am really blessed. I never did any of this for an award. I play music because I love it and it brings joy to people,” says Jay.

Williams Medical Clinic,

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Dr. Robert S. Williams, M.D. All Major Insurance Accepted 403-E N. Morrow St., Mena, AR 71953

479-243-9024

New Patients Welcome


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June 14, 2017

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K&K Dry Cleaners - Changing with the Times T

BY LOGAN MCCOURTNEY

l.mccourtney@mypulsenews.com

eachers, preachers, businessmen, attorneys, and ranchers…What do they all have in common? Each group of people are in the public eye daily and it is important that they are always looking sharp. Individuals from each of these professions are a part of the millions who utilize the services of a dry cleaner. In Mena, K & K C leaners has been the local cleaners serving the community since 1 9 7 2 . After K & K was under the leadership of Steve and Angie Graves, C arrie K elton, long time employee bought the business and became the owner in April 2 01 2 . C arrie has worked at the cleaners since 2 001 , and many in the community know her because of alterations that she has done for countless people. “Who would have thought that learning how to sew in home economics in high school would pay off? I never thought that it would pay one penny and yet it has allowed me to make a living,” says C arrie smiling. Through the years of serving the people of P olk C ounty, those working at K & K have developed relationships with people who are bringing shirts, jeans, or dresses in. Their customers are more like friends as they share a good laugh and stories. “This feels like home, I can’t imagine doing anything else. I love our customers and I really enjoy having the opportunity to talk with each of them,” states C arrie. Many of the customers that come in have been doing so for years and that is part of what makes their work so enjoyable, “I have been doing alterations for years. I can think of girls who brought their cheer uniforms in when they were in high school and now I am altering their kids clothes. It is really neat to see it come full circle,” exp lains C arrie. s continues to serve people in the community, they are seeking to do that in a more efficient and personal way. e are automating a lot of what we do. We now have a system that streamlines what we do a lot more. When a customer comes in, rather than writing a ticket, we go to the computer and q uickly put their order in. It prints out a receipt for them and for us. In many ways, this is making what we are doing incredibly efficient. In the past, tickets would be written with the order and then there were tags places on the clothes based on what services were needed. Over time, this became time consuming and even confusing at times. With everything now moving towards automation, the process not only becomes smoother for everyone at K & K , but the customers as well. “In the past, I would have to add up every item from the ticket and then if they were customers that we billed, I would have to do all that my hand. Now, the computer does all of that. The system is able to track all of those things,” exp lains C arrie. long with making the big automation change, is undergoing other changes as well. or years arrie has been well known as the altering specialist, and specifically, she may be best known for her alteration on wedding dresses. he cleaners is undergoing a bit of a face lift and there is a new space being created for those fittings. In the past, the girls trying on dresses have been in a small, tight room and it hasn’t been very private. We wanted to change that and so now we will have a large room that will have mirrors all the way around that is specifically for fitting dresses. I think people will really be pleased with this change,” says C arrie exci tedly. In addition to the changes mentioned, C arrie is exci ted to announce that they are going to start renting tuxe dos soon as well. 1114A Hwy 71S Mena, AR Keith & Sharon Aleshire, “We wanted something for the guys. We have something for all the girls that want Toll Free: 1-888-394-4200 Broker/Owners dresses, but nothing for the guys. Now, they can come in and pick out their tux from the Keith’s Cell: 479-243-5341 www.hollyspringsrealestate.com catalog and when they come in to pick it up, if any changes are needed, we can do it that very same day.” 3544 - Elegant Home Overlooking Lake Not only is K & K the main dry cleaner for Mena, but it is as well for surrounding Mena. Com pl etel y rem od el ed in contem pocounties. “P eople may not realize this, but we serve people from Waldron, Mt. Ida, and rary styl e, the 4963 sq ft hom e’ s hig h tray D eQ ueen as well. The closest dry cleaner is P oteau and so we are always thankful for ceil ing s are hig hl ig hted b y l ov el y archw ays, crow n m ol d ing and g l ass paned d oorw ays. the opportunity to have that business.” The Great Room is com pl ete w ith firepl ace, K & K has established itself not only as a q uality dry cleaner, but a place where friends custom shel v ing and an entertainm ent center. come to be served and heard. “We love what we are doing and we don’t plan on going The Office has b rig ht w ind ow s and custom anywhere,” C arrie says smiling. cab inetry as w el l . The Kitchen is an ab sol ute

January 6, 2016

HOLLY SPRINGS REAL ESTATE, LLC 394-4200

Chef’ s Del ig ht w ith its center isl and w ith ind uction rang e, b eautiful cab inetry, and hig h-end stainl ess steel appl iances. The hom e has a spl it fl oor pl an w ith 5 b ed room s, 3 ful l b aths, 2 hal f b aths, a util ity room pl us a craft room . The spacious Master Suite incl ud es a soak ing tub and a w al k -in show er. There’ s a l arg e 3 car g arag e, and a b rick terrace at the rear of hom e accessib l e b y l ov el y F rench Doors. MLS15019748 Call today for details about this wonderful home!!

Dallas Avenue Dental Care, Inc. Diane Marosy, D.D.S., F.A.G.D.

New Patients & Emergencies Welcome Monday, Wednesday 9-5 Tuesday, Thursday 10-8

Intersection of Dallas Ave. & Mena Street 479-394-7800 www.dallasavenuedental.com

Amy Thompson HAPPY BIRTHDAY,

AMY!!


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Thursday, 6/15 • 7:00 a.m. until sold out – The Polk County Far er’s Mar et is open next to the Mena Depot. • 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 a.m. – The Board Camp Baptist Church at 107 Country Road 63 will distribute food. • 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. – The Humane Society of the Ouachitas is open at 366 Polk Road 50. • 10:30 a.m. – Gator & Friends will be performing at The Mena Senior Center. • 11:15 a.m. – Cossatot Senior Center in Wickes will host a Caregiver Meeting on Medication Management. : a Rotary Club o Mena Pol County will meet at Papa’s Mexican Caf . Call Lisa Martin 216-3383 or Charles Pitman 2164882 for more info. • 12:00 p.m. – Polk County Library Board will meet in the Susanna Mosley Community Room at the Library. • 12:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. - The Cove Branch of the Polk County Library is open. • 12:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. - The Sonlighters in Action Card Shop will be open at 3671 Highway 8 West, one mile from Louise Durham. • 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. – Salvation Army Family Store helps families with utilities. • 3:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. – Wickes Pentecostal Church of God will have their Open Kitchen monthly meal. Menu is loaded baked potato and dessert. : p t Street Ministries will have a free dinner and fellowship in the 9th Street Ministries building. • 5:30 p.m. – The Humane Society of the Ouachitas will host their monthly meeting at the Limetree Restaurant. Call 479-243-0771 for more information. • 5:30 p.m. – Weight Watchers meets at Dallas Avenue Baptist Church Family Life Center. Call 479-234-2297 for more information. • 5:30 p.m. – Alcoholics Anonymous Women’s Meeting at the ABC Club across from Chopping Block, 1159 Hwy, 71, S., Mena. 479-

BEATS

H ES P R ER RE will be held on Saturday, June 17 at Queen Wilhelmina Lodge. Registration begins at 9 a.m. Bring scrapbooks and family records, also white elephant items for auction. HE R F SE S Class will be hosted by Mena Art Gallery on Saturday, June 24 at 12 p.m. Includes lunch of soup and bread, recipes, and many ideas on seasoning with herbs and spices. Cost is $15 per person. Space is limited. Call the gallery at 479-394-3880 to sign up.

216-4606 or 479-243-0297. • 6:00 p.m. – Acorn Water monthly meeting at the Water ffice. • 6:00 p.m. – Live Country, Bluegrass and Gospel music in the Daisy Room at Janssen Ave Florist. • 6:30 p.m. – Disaster Preparedness Group meets at Assembly of God Church, 2111 Sutherland Ave. in Mena. • 7:00 p.m. – Alcoholics Anonymous at the ABC Club across from Chopping Block, 1159 Hwy 71, S., Mena. 479-216-4606 or 479-2430297. : p Dallas Masoni odge meets at the Mena Lodge located in the Old Post ffice by Janssen Park. Friday, 6/16 : a : a Road tests are given at the Morrow Street Housing Authority Community Room unless the roads are wet. Written tests are given at 1:00 p.m. • 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. – The Humane Society of the Ouachitas is open at 366 Polk Road 50. • 12:00 p.m. – PCDC Board of Directors will meet in the MRHS Conference Room A. : p e ions Meetings are held in the Lions Club House on Highway 71 South. • 7:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m. - Gator & Friends will play at The American Legion in Acorn, admission $6. Potluck and 50-50 drawing, with door prizes. • 7:00 p.m. – Critter Signs and Tracks at Queen Wilhelmina State Park. Meet at the Amphitheater. : p l o oli s nony ous at the ABC Club across from Chopping Block, 1159 Hwy 71, S., Mena. 479-216-4606 or 479-2430297. : p Ma e a ree Coo ie e la e at Queen Wilhelmina State Park. Meet at the Amphitheater. Saturday, 6/17 • 7:00 a.m. until sold out – The Polk County Far er’s Mar et is open next to the Mena Depot. • 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. – The Humane Society of the Ouachitas is open at 366 Polk Road 50. • 12:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. – Fibers Arts Group meets at Mena Art Gallery. : p : p C ildren’s rt Class at the Mena Art Gallery, for children ages 5 to 9. Cost is $2. Call 479-394-3880 to reserve spot. • 2:00 p.m. – Wonder House Tour at Queen Wilhelmina State Park. Meet at the Wonder House. • 4:00 p.m. – Dutch Oven Demonstration at Queen Wilhelmina State Park. Meet in the Picnic Area. • 5:30 p.m. – 3rd Saturday Gospel Singing to be held at Janssen Park. Bring a lawn chair and cold drink. Musicians and singers welcome. For more information, contact Stanley or Jeanette Dreyer at 479-216-0533. • 6:00 p.m. – PCVO Bingo at American Legion Building, Hwy 71 N., Acorn. • 7:00 p.m. – Take a Silent Hike at Queen Wilhelmina State Park. Meet at the north side of the Lover’s Leap trail.

: p l o oli s nony ous at the ABC Club across from Chopping Block, 1159 Hwy 71 S., Mena. 479-243-0297 or 479-2164606. Sunday • 10:00 a.m. – Take a Wonder House Tour at Queen Wilhelmina State Park. Meet at the Wonder House. • 2:00 p.m. – Alcoholics Anonymous at the ABC Club across from Chopping Block, 1159 Hwy 71, S., Mena. 479-216-4606 or 479-2430297. • 2:00 p.m. – Bird Bingo at Queen Wilhelmina State Park. Meet in the Hearth Room. • 2:00 p.m. – Feed the Critters at Cossatot River State Park. Meet at the Visitor Center. • 3:00 p.m. – Worship Service at Sulpher Springs Church. • 4:00 p.m. – Frisbee Golf at Queen Wilhelmina State Park. Meet beside the Campground Bathhouse. : p nited Met odist Yout roup at the First United Methodist Church in Mena. Monday • 12:00 – 5:00 p.m. – The Cove Branch Library will be open. • 12:30 p.m. – Cossatot Senior Center will have a Board Meeting. : p : p Mena Se ent Day Adventist Church Food Pantry across from the Polk County Fairgrounds. Non-perishable food, personal care items, and nutritional help. No one will be turned away. • 5:30 p.m. – Polk County Republican Committee meets at Polk County Library, North Room. • 6:00 p.m. – PCVO Bingo at American Legion Building, Hwy 71 N., Acorn. • 6:30 p.m. – Boy Scouts of America Troop 92 meets at First United Methodist Church. Everyone is welcome. • 6:30 p.m. – The Lady Ouachitas will meet at the Bear State Bank Main Branch. • 7:00 p.m. – Alcoholics Anonymous at the ABC Club across from Chopping Block, 1159 Hwy 71, S., Mena. 479-216-4606 or 479-2430297. • 7:00 p.m. – Ouachita Beekeepers Association meeting at Union Bank. Tuesday, 6/20 • 7:00 a.m. until sold out – The Polk County Far er’s Mar et is open next to the Mena Depot. : a e Reynolds ardener Co unity Men’s rea ast at the First United Methodist Church in Mena. • 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. – Polk County Family Mission is open in the 9th Street Ministries Building. • 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. – The Humane Society of the Ouachitas is open at 366 Polk Road 50. • 11:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. – “Art Day” at Mena Art Gallery, 607 Mena St. Bring your current project and work with other artists. • 12:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. – The Sonlighters in Action Card Shop will be open at 3671 Highway 8 West, one mile from Louise Durham. : p : p e Hat eld Branch library will be open.

• 5:00 p.m. – T.O.P.S. will meet in the Union Bank Community Room for weigh-ins, followed by a meeting. : p e Regular Hat eld own Council will meet at the Town Hall in Hatfield. • 7:00 p.m. – VFW Post 4451 meeting at Veterans Park in Acorn. : p e Marine Corps eague Detachment will meet at Lighthouse Fitness. • 7:00 p.m. – Al-Anon for families of addicts and alcoholics meets at the ABC Club. • 7:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. – Bluegrass music at Morrow Street Housing Authority Community Room. : p Mountain Meadow Masoni odge will meet at the Hatfield Lodge. : p l o oli s nony ous meeting at First United Methodist Church, 9th & Port Arthur. 479-234-2887 or 479-234-3043. Wednesday, 6/21 • 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. – The Humane Society of the Ouachitas is open at 366 Polk Road 50. • 11:15 a.m. – Cossatot Senior Center will host a Blood Pressure Clinic. e E ergen y warning sirens will be tested in Mena at noon. • 12:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. – The Polk County Library Cove Branch is open. : p e Mena First nited Met odist Church Kidz will meet. • 6:00 p.m. – Warriors for Christ will meet at the Southside Church of God. : p Regeneration Yout Ministries at Mena Church of God Hwy 88 East. • 6:15 p.m. – Dallas Avenue Baptist Church hosts Discovery Kids – Kindergarten Thru 5th Grade; Collide Youth Ministry – 6th Thru 12th Grades; and Adult Bible Study. : p : p re and arsity for Middle and High School students at Grace Bible Church, 1911 Hwy 71 N. Mena. All Area Middle and High School students are welcome. • 7:00 p.m. – Alcoholics Anonymous at the ABC Club across from Chopping Block, 1159 Hwy 71, S., Mena. 479-216-4606 or 479-2430297. : p : p n uiry lasses into the Catholic Faith begins in the Parish Hall of St. Agnes Catholic Church at 203 8th St. No cost. Everyone invited. Call 394-1017.


June 14, 2017

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C H O I C E S ...A L W A Y S C H O I C E S !

Think about it for just a minute. You are visiting with an inmate in prison who is about to take that last journey: death! Execution by the state. You ask “why did you choose this?” His (or her) replay would be something like this: “I did not choose this! I would never have chosen this!” But here he (or she) is. Perhaps thirty or thirty-five years old, and leaving life in the manner. By choice? Now think about the drug addict whose life has gone completely crazy because of an insatiable need for “one more hit.” Life wasted. All of that potential gone. You ask “why did you choose this over what could have been a really good life?” The answer: “I didn’t choose this!” No, we suppose that he (or she) did not knowingly choose this. But here it is. In stark reality, here it is. How can it happen to otherwise intelligent people, who would never, never, have chosen this for the end of life? The truth is that even though one may not choose the kind of conclusion that I have written about, we always… always… choose the road that leads to that destination! “But my friend gave that to me and in order to be ‘cool’ I had to take it.” No! We may not choose the end, but we choose the road that leads there, And we do choose! We cannot choose all that happens to us in this life, but we can choose how we respond to it, and it is that response that can build or destroy us. Choice… always choices! All of this leads us to the real problem: can we always know? Are there guidelines to follow that will keep us headed in the right direction? Are guidelines dependable? Blueprints. That sheaf of papers with all the drawings and numbers, the drawings and numbers that, when faithfully followed, create something good, something with purpose and strength. The storm comes and the wind blows and rain bears down with violent force, but the building stands and protects all within, because the design was good and the blueprints were followed. Jesus told us something like that, about a house built on sand (check it out, Matthew 7:24-27). Choices. Always choices. Choices are real, choices have consequences. Throw the blueprint away and see what happens to the house. See what happened when the storm comes. And storms do come, to all of us… all of us. Blueprints. We all have One. But lip-service won’t do. It is so hard to see in the beginning but it is still true: we choose destinations by choosing the roads that we travel. “For he that soweth to his flesh shall of the flesh reap corruption, by he that soweth to the Spirit shall of the Spirit reap life everlasting.” (Gal 6:8). Old fashioned? Yes. Relevant? More so than any other document, ever. Ignoring Truth does not make it go away nor does it change it. Ignoring Truth is the most dangerous “game” one can play! Always choices. And there is One choice that we must not be wrong about! Some roads that are in fact terribly dangerous often look very inviting. “There is a way that seemeth right to a man but the end thereof are the ways of death” (Prov. 14:12; 16:25). No one ever chose to be a drug addict, or an alcoholic or a death-row inmate, but there are many of them. Why? Because they chose the road that took them there. B u t th ere is a B etter W ay: Jesus said “I am the Way, the Truth, and the Life. No man comes to the Father but by Me.” (John 14:6). This is the Choice that leads to life! Choices. Always choices. My name is Gene Stacks and I approve this message. T H IS P A G E P U R C H A S E D B Y G E N E S T A C K S


police

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June 14, 2017

Weekly Publication

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The following information was received from Polk County law enforcement agencies. The charges against those arrested are allegations and the cases are still pending in the courts. Individuals charged and whose names appear in this column may submit documentation to us at a later date that the charges have been dismissed, or that they have been found innocent, and we will include that information in this space in a timely manner.

Mena Police Department June 4, 2017 Report was made of several bundles of roofing shingles being stolen from a local residence. Case is pending. June 5, 2017 A local woman reported that someone had written on her vehicle with permanent marker. Case is pending location and interview of suspects. Report was made of someone stealing a cell phone from a vehicle at a local restaurant. Case is pending. Report was made of a couple having an altercation at a local apartment complex. No charges have been filed at this time. June 6, 2017 Johnny Howard, 53, of Mena was charged with disorderly conduct and public intoxication. The arrest followed a call to a local business. A local man reported that someone had stolen his backpack from the front of a local business. Case is pending. June 7, 2017 Bennie Lee Anderson 44, of Mena was arrested on an outstanding warrant for failure to pay fines and court costs. Debra Beshears, 46, of Mena was charged with felony possession of methamphetamine or cocaine and possession of methamphetamine or cocaine with intent to deliver, and misdemeanor possession of mari uana and possession of drug paraphernalia. Alban Robert Beckwith, 25, of Mena was arrested on an outstanding warrant for failure to appear. Jesse D. Hooks, 33, of Mena was charged with felony possession of drug paraphernalia. Miranda Harris, 37, of Mena was charged with possession of mari uana and possession of drug paraphernalia. Tiffany Chienne Marschall, 20, of Mena was arrested on an outstanding warrant for failure to appear. June 8, 2017 Ernest Allen Pennell, 41, of Mena was arrested on an outstanding warrant from the

Mena Police Department for failure to pay fines and court costs. Levi Luke Jeffery, 44, of Spiro, klahoma was arrested on an outstanding warrant for failure to pay fines and court costs. Erica Phillips, 19, of Mena was charged with fleeing and resisting arrest. She was also served an outstanding warrant. June 9, 2017 Michael Hook, 56, of Mena was charged with DWI III, driving left of center, fleeing in a vehicle, reckless driving, speeding, refusal to submit to a chemical test, and not wearing a seat belt. The arrest followed a call from an employee at a local business regarding a possibly intoxicated man. B’layne A. Frueh, 19, of Hot Springs, was arrested and charged with theft of property shoplifting , driving on a suspended license, having no liability insurance, and theft by receiving. The arrest followed a call to a local retail store. Christopher A. nebel, 20, of Pearcy was charged with theft of property shoplifting after a call to a local business. Report was made of a gas skip at a local convenience store. Case is pending. Robert Harrison Roberts, 26, of Mena was charged with violation of an order of protection, obstructing governmental operations, and second-degree criminal mischief after a call from a local resident. Employees at a local convenience store reported a gas skip. Case is pending. June 10, 2017 A local woman reported that someone had cut a large section from her children’s trampoline. Case is pending. Pol County S eri ’s Depart ent June 5, 2017 Report of a domestic disturbance on Heritage Lane near Hatfield. Deputy responded. Report from complainant on Hope Circle of being harassed by an acquaintance. Information has been provided to the Prosecuting Attorney’s ffice for further consideration. June 6, 2017 Request for a welfare check on Polk 246 near Grannis. Report of suspicious behavior led to a 13-year-old male being issued a Juvenile Citation for Criminal Mischief. The uvenile was released to the custody of a parent/ guardian. June 7, 2017 Arrested was Charles M. Turner, 42, of Altus, on a Warrant for Failure to Comply with a Court rder. June 8, 2017 Report from complainant on Polk 17 near Cove of two missing family members. Investigation continues

June 9, 2017 Report of an unattended death on Highway 88 East near ocana. Deputy responded. The scene was released to the Polk County Coroner. Arrested by an officer with the Grannis Police Department was elly W. McCarley, 38, of Cove, on a Charge of Fleeing. June 10, 2017 Arrested was arl . ann, III, 21, of Mena, on a Warrant for Possession of a Schedule II Controlled Substance and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia. Report from complainant of firearms and tools stolen from a vehicle that was left parked at Lake Wilhelmina. Investigation continues. Report of a barn on fire on Polk 10 near Wickes, with a vehicle parked inside, totaling losses at $13,000.00. Investigation continues into the origin of the fire. Arrested by an officer with the Grannis Police Department was Carlos A. Montoya, 35, of Mena, on Charges of DWI, Driving Left of Center and No Driver’s License.

June 11, 2017 Report of damage done to a building by a vehicle, on Highway 71 South in Cove, totaling losses at $10,000.00. Investigation continues. Report from complainant on Tabler Lane near Board Camp of damage done to vehicles and a fence, totaling losses at $5,000.00. Investigation continues. Report of a disturbance on Polk 93 near Rocky. Deputy responded. Complainant refused to press charges. Report from complainant on Polk 689 near Mena of unauthori ed persons on their property. Deputy responded. Complainant refused to press charges. Report from complainant on Polk 181 near Mena of suspicious occurrences on their property. Investigation continues. Polk County Sheriff’s ffice worked two vehicle accidents this week. Polk County Detention Center Jail Population 26 Incarcerated Inmates, with 3 Inmates currently on the Waiting List for a State Facility.


June 14, 2017

Weekly Publication

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UP TO 20 WORDS - $4 PER WEEK, $0.25 EACH ADDITIONAL WORD • BORDER $1 • ALL CLASSIFIEDS MUST BE PREPAID.

Ad deadline is 12 p.m. on Monday. Payment is due with ad. Publishing and distributing 8,000 copies weekly.

Extra Help Maintenance Assistant: Queen Wilhelmina State Park, Mena. This position is a part time Maintenance Assistant. Applicant must have experience with mowers, weed-eaters, tractors, and chainsaws. Duties include trail work, trash pickup, cleaning restrooms, mowing, tree/brush removal, log splitting, general landscaping, plumbing and electrical repair, and vehicle and equipment maintenance. Must be able to lift 50 pounds and traverse rough terrain on foot. Apply in person at Queen Wilhelmina State Park, 3877 Hwy. 88 West, Mena, AR 71953. EOE/AA/ADA - Women and minorities are encouraged to apply. 6/14 Clean and comfortable housing since 1969, J. Ray & Maria’s MH Park and Rentals. Hwy 71 North, Mena, AR. 479-216-3085 TFN Work Undone by a Builder. Contractor leaving work undone? If so, contact Kevin Wolfenbarger, Mena. Building Permits, at 479-234-1700. 6/21 Personal Care Aide state certified and EMT trained looking for new clients. Assist with daily tasks of elderly, mentally disabled, chronically ill, or physically challenged clients as well as hospice patients. Duties include light cleaning, cooking, running errands, and laundry. Assist clients with bathing, grooming, and other personal hygiene tasks. Please call Heather at 479-437-3270. 6/14 DVDs $1.00 – 10 or More. Retirement Sale. Dan’s Pawn Shop. 100 Hwy 71 S at 1st Street, Mena. 6/21

RYMER’S Mobile Park in Hatfield has a 2 bedroom with central heat and air, stove and refrigerator furnish. All electric for $325 a month with Hatfield City water. If interested, please call 479-234-8223 or 479-234-1502. 6/14 J&N Dozer- Trackhoe, Backhoe, Dump Truck, Ponds, Pads, Clearing, Roads, Hauling, Rich Top Soil, Fill Dirt, Shale, Gravel. Dozer operator Randy Egger, over 30 years’ experience. We appreciate your Business! Call 479-234-1357 TFN Dugan Lawn Care and Landscaping a complete ground maintenance company servicing both residential and commercial lots in Polk, Sevier, and Scott County. Call for a free estimate on any of your lawn care or landscaping needs. 479-394-2699. TFN For Sale: Clothes rack, cash register, wooden desk, bullet-proof glass and steel enclosure, large shopsmith dust collector, flashing sign/letters, and quarter sliding game to be picked up after June 23, 2017. Dan’s Pawn Shop 479394-5515. 6/21 May the sacred heart of Jesus be adored, Glorified, loved and preserved throughout the world. Sacred Heart of Jesus. Pray for us. St. Jude, Worker of Miracles, pray for us. St. Jude help for the hopeless, pray for us. Say this prayer 9 times a day, by the 9th day your prayer will be answered. Never known to fail. 6/14

Backhoe and concrete work. Licensed – dependable. Over 30 experience William J. (Jack) Barnes. 479-394-6175. 6/21 Daniel’s Carpentry and Painting, home repair, decks, fence rows, underpinning, etc. Also lawn and garden work. Call 479-216-1101 or 479-2162299. 6/21

classifieds

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House For Sale, 5 acres – 3 bedroom, 2 full bath with office space. Laundry room, Large walk-in pantry. Call for more details, 394-6429. 6/21 Mena Sound Company – Sound systems with professional technician. Small to medium large live shows. Indoor or Outdoor (weather permitting) Reasonable Rates. Rick Gerard 479-394-1617. 6/28 Dan’s Pawn Shop is closing. All pawned items must be picked up by June 23rd. Almost everything in the store is 20% off. 100 Hwy 71 S at 1st Street, Mena. 479-3945515. 6/21 For Rent: Remodeled Historic 1,650 sq. ft. commercial space; high traffic area, 711 N Mena Street; open floor plan, display windows, some shelving. Call” 479-2162724 for details. 6/14

January 6, 2016

House Cleaning and more. Call Winnie Cotter at 2343418. 6/7


32

THE POLK COUNTY PULSE

June 14, 2017

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June 14, 2017  
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