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TRAVEL MARQUETTE


MICHIGAN BREWERS GUILD

Supporting MI Breweries ~ Promoting MI Beer

BECOME AN ENTHUSIAST MEMBER for VIP access to

all MBG festivals including special beer offerings! For more info visit MiBeer.com

U.P. FALL 12th ANNUAL

BEER FESTIVAL SEPTEMBER 12 SATURDAY 1 – 6 p.m .

Mattson Lower Harbor Park • Marquette, MI Tickets on sale

JUNE 25 at 10 a.m. at MiBeer.com

BEER TOKEN POLICY

#UPFBF #MiBeer

To comply with Michigan Liquor Control Commission rules, tokens must be exchanged for beer samples. Any attempt to obtain beer samples without the appropriate exchange of tokens is a violation of MLCC rules and may result in removal from the festival.

MiBeer.com


From fine food and brews to wallet-friendly shops and stays—Marquette County pairs small-town feel with big city taste. Featuring tons of urban options just minutes from miles of singletrack and shoreline.

RECENT PRAISE AND ACCOLADES: Orbitz named among 12 of America’s most charming lake towns Matador Network listed among best places to travel in January

RYAN STEPHENS / RYANSTEPHENSPHOTO.NET

TripSavvy titled Michigan the best place in the world for outdoor enthusiasts in 2020

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EXECUTIVE EDITOR Katie Shimp

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Trinity Carey Katie Shimp COVER PHOTO Cameron Wilcox

LAYOUT + DESIGN Gail Snable MyNorth Media

ADVERTISING SALES Julie Parker MyNorth Media jparker@mynorth.com

VISIT US 117 W. Washington Street Marquette, MI 49855

CONTACT US 906.228.7749 / 800.544.4321 Susan Estler / Executive Director susan@travelmarquette.com Tony Boyle / Visitor Experience Manager anthony@travelmarquette.com Kristi Mills / Office Manager kristi@travelmarquette.com Mike Bradford / Events Marketing Manager mike@travelmarquette.com Katie Shimp / Digital Marketing Manager katie@travelmarquette.com Travel Marquette is published annually. Copyright 2020 by Travel Marquette. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in whole or in part, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means without prior written approval of the Publisher. The Publisher reserves the right to reject or edit any manuscripts received for publication.

travelmarquetteMichigan

events calendar P. 06 road trip P. 08 made in marq. P. 10 foodie faves P. 14 hoppy hangouts P. 17 brew passport P. 19 cool beans P. 20 views + hues P. 22 keep marquette special P. 24 big bay getaway P. 27 hikes of all types P. 29 biking P. 31 northern lights P. 32 fresh coast P. 35 days of play P. 36 waterfall map P. 38 our true colors/fall INSERT county map (following pg 40) P. 41 climbing P. 42 scenic drive season P. 43 fishing hotspots P. 44 for the chill of it / winter P. 46 gone skiing P. 47 cross country skiing P. 49 snow biking P. 51 surfing P. 53 totally pawsome P. 54 a magical place for a magical day P. 56 historic walking tour P. 58 accommodations P. 04

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travelmarquetteMichigan

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Event information is correct at the time of publication and is subject to change.

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APRIL Angry Bear 4/4 APRIL WAY UP Music Festival 4/16–4/18 MAY Big Bay Relay 5/16 MAY Farmers Market Starts 5/16 JUNE Music on Third Street Kickoff 6/18 JUNE Pride Fest 6/20 JUNE Art Week 6/22–6/27 JUNE Trails Fest 6/26–6/28 JULY Marquette Fireworks Display 7/4 JULY Hiawatha Music Festival 7/17–7/19 JULY The Crusher 7/18–7/19 JULY Art on the Rocks 7/25–7/26 JULY Blueberry Festival 7/31 AUGUST Ore 2 Shore 8/8 AUGUST Ensign National Champ Regatta 8/8–8/13 AUGUST Marquette Trail 50 Ultramarathon 8/14–8/15 AUGUST Classic Cars on Third 8/15 SEPTEMBER Marquette Blues Festival 9/4–9/6 SEPTEMBER Marquette Marathon 9/5 SEPTEMBER Craft Beer Week 9/8–9/13 SEPTEMBER UP Fall Beer Fest 9/12 SEPTEMBER Marji Gesick 9/18–9/20 OCTOBER Marquette Mountain Bike Enduro 10/3 OCTOBER UP200 Dryland Dash 10/11–10/12 OCTOBER Fresh Coast Film Festival 10/15–10/18 OCTOBER Local Food Fest 10/24 NOVEMBER Ladies Night 11/12 NOVEMBER REVOLVE CC 11/7 DECEMBER Farmers Market Ends 12/19 DECEMBER NYE Ball Drop Bash 12/31 JANUARY 2020 The Fat-Ish Weekend 1/9–1/10 JANUARY Heikki Lunta Winter Festival 1/15–1/16 JANUARY Ishpeming Ski Jump Tournament 1/19 JANUARY Noquemanon Ski Marathon 1/22–1/24 FEBRUARY Honey Bear Classic 2/6 FEBRUARY UP200 2/11-2/15 FEBRUARY Polar Roll TBD MARCH Restaurant Week 3/1–3/7 MARCH U.P. Builders Show 3/5–3/7 MARCH Spring Holistic Health Fair 3/27

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MAKE GETTING TO OUR DESTINATION A PART OF YOUR VACATION THE DRIVE TO MARQUETTE COUNTY IS CHOCK-FULL OF ATTRACTIONS FROM EVERY DIRECTION … HERE ARE A FEW FAVES THAT ARE WORTH HITTING THE BREAK FOR.

PICTURED ROCKS // MUNISING, MI Located in Alger County, Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore is a national treasure. A mere 45-miles from Marquette, this popular UP destination is a definite must-visit. From scenic waterfalls, dunes and beaches to impressive sandstone rock formations, you’ll shorely want to make this trek part of your road trip. KITCH ITI-KIPI // MANISTIQUE, MI Kitch Iti-Kipi, meaning “big cold water” is Michigan's largest natural freshwater spring. Located in Palms Book State Park, this 88-mile drive from Marquette, Mich. is worth every extra minute in the car. Note: though you can’t take a refreshing dip, you can definitely snap some awesome pics. CANYON FALLS // L'ANSE, MI Deemed by many “The Grand Canyon of the U.P.” this 59-mile drive from Marquette, Mich. definitely deserves to make your road trip bucket list. Not only is this spot along the Sturgeon River scenic and serene, but it also features impressive canyons, rushing falls, and fun for all. PORCUPINE MOUNTAINS WILDERNESS STATE PARK // ONTONAGON, MI Whether it’s part of your road trip or its own day trip, Michigan’s largest state park definitely deserves a visit. This 60,000-acre attraction is home to locations that are as iconic as they are scenic, including Lake of the Clouds, Presque Isle River corridor, the Summit Peak observation tower, and so much more.

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OUR LOCALS AREN’T JUST OUTDOOR ENTHUSIASTS AND ADVENTURERS, THEY’RE MAKERS, ARTISANS, AND ARTISTS. FROM CLOTHING AND ARTWORK TO PHOTOGRAPHY AND JEWELRY, THERE’S SOMETHING MADE IN MARQUETTE JUST FOR YOU.

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MADGOODIES This studio might be small, but it’s brimming with goods made by folks with big dreams. Owner and Northern Michigan University Alumnus Madeline Goodman showcases not only her own unique metalwork but the paintings, jewelry, photography, ceramics and more of fellow alum and Midwest artists. Her business was founded with the promotion of local artists in mind. It’s a one-stop-shop for a mad-cool keepsake you can only find here. 1

BETH MILLNER JEWELRY With miles of shoreline and expansive treelines, our outdoor playground is sure to leave you feeling inspired. This same inspiration can be seen in each piece crafted by metalsmith Beth Millner. She combines elements of the local landscape like agates, greenstones, and even the popular Pictured Rocks with everyday jewelry. If you’re looking for a way to remember a favorite destination or view from your trip, her nature-themed, eco-friendly jewelry captures the awe of the Upper Peninsula. 2

BECAUSE MARQUETTE Visiting and wondering why us Yoopers stick around despite the cold and snow? Because Marquette has all the answers. For starters, it’s breathtaking, filled with the best people and has good beer and the best sunsets, just like the poster says. That Girl Amber, designer of Because Marquette, will show you why we love where we live and you will too. Think koozies, Ts, 3

stickers and cards, but with clever and contemporary designs. Want to support your favorite local landmark? A portion of all Ore Dock, Presque Isle and Blackrocks apparel will be donated to the Marquette City Parks Program. U.P. SUPPLY CO. If this shop’s plaid interior doesn’t catch your eye, the U.P. pride of the man behind the counter will. Whether it’s gathering the community for a celebration of plaid on Plaidurday (Oct. 2, 2020) or taking a photo of every Superior sunrise for a year to remind us of Marquette’s immense beauty, store owner and Official Unofficial Upper Peninsula Ambassador Bugsy Sailor celebrates our peninsula in everything he does. His original artwork, prints, apparel and gifts will attest that you love the U.P. just like the locals… and Bugsy. 4

ZERO DEGREES ARTIST GALLERY Perhaps the area with the largest culmination of local artists’ work is Zero Degrees Artist Gallery located on Third Street. This artist’s cooperative showcases the work of over 40 Marquette artists. Timeless handmade jewelry, photographs of the auroras dancing above the Superior shoreline, metal sculptures, felted lampshades, and so much more fill the gallery space. When you stop in, be sure to say hello to the artist working behind the counter; you might just be purchasing one of their pieces. 5

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FOODIE FAVES FIND LOCAL FLAVORS THAT WILL DELIGHT YOUR PALATE AND WALLET ALIKE.

BRUNCH

A L F R E S CO E AT S

Woke up hungry? Whether you’re looking for something to grab on the go, a classic breakfast or a culinary creation you’ve never experienced anything quite like, we’ve got you covered.

Enjoy the great outdoors and your tasty eats at these outside spots DIGS GASTROPUB // The sidewalk seating at Digs is prime real estate in the summertime. Before you dig into your mouthwatering plates, spend your time watching on the corner of Washington St. and sipping down refreshing cocktails and craft beers.

JAVA BAY // If you can’t decide if you want breakfast or lunch, stop by the Bay. The Java Bay menu has everything from omelettes, breakfast sandwiches and corned beef hash to reubens, grilled mushroom sandwiches and burgers. But their most famous item is the breakfast burrito stuffed with eggs, sausage, hash browns, cheddar and salsa. Open 7:00 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays.

THE DELFT // Dine in the heart of downtown Marquette at one of The Delft’s outdoor tables where you’ll be seated right under the old marquee on Washington Street. The new American fare restaurant features food like falafel, porcini tortellini, sea bass, and fried brussel sprouts with a focus on eating in season with many locally sourced ingredients.

DAS STEINHAUS // Country-fried schnitzel, wurst and eggs, heavenly vegetarian hash, and handcrafted cocktails—brunch at the Stein will leave your taste buds satisfied and you begging to come back for their dinner service. It’s made from scratch, German-inspired fare with a unique element in every dish. As they say, it’s the wurst restaurant in town. Brunch service runs Fridays and Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. LAGNIAPPE // Cajun Creole cuisine right in downtown Marquette. Each week the restaurant features a different take on eggs benedict like the Crispy Boudin Ball Benedict served with bacon braised collard greens, buttermilk biscuits and a creole mustard spiked hollandaise or try their other offerings like Chicken n’ Waffles and hot beignets with praline sauce. Brunch service runs Thursday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. CAFÉ BODEGA // The only thing better than brunch is breakfast served ALL DAY, which is how they do it at Café Bodega. Start with the basics: eggs, taters, and toast. Or check out some of their specialties like the Spud Plate, Huevos Rancheros, or Biscuits and Gravy. They also serve up some tasty vegan and gluten-friendly options, too. Stop in on Mondays and Tuesdays from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., and Wednesdays through Sundays, 8 a.m. to 10 p.m.

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IRON BAY // Eat with the historic Ore Dock in sight at Iron Bay’s patio located right along the lakeshore. The restaurant combines Marquette’s rich iron ore history with great food like poutine and whitefish caught just feet from its doors. Oh, and don’t forget to do dessert, made by the Iron Bay bakers and Peace Pie Company. PORTSIDE INN // Ask to eat on this long-time local fave’s quaint deck and enjoy some of their “famous” foods like their breadsticks brushed with butter, topped with cheese and served with garlic cheese spread or their many seafood offerings like the citrus sea scallops and Friday Fish Fry. The Portside Inn menu even incorporates Marquette products such as Lake Superior Whitefish from Thill’s Fish House, fresh bread from Huron Mountain Bakery and meat from Marquette Meats. SOL AZTECA // Talk about food with a view. The balcony seating at Sol Azteca overlooks the big lake, the breakwall, and the Lower Harbor Ore Dock, all from one striking spot. And to top it off, their extensive menu offers authentic Mexican fare at a fair price. Although with a view like that, your experience will likely be priceless.

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KIDS CHOICE

DAH PRETZEL GUYS // Serves specialty soft pretzels and pretzel sandwiches. Check out DaH Pretzel Guys on Facebook.

DONCKERS // While all our eateries are family-friendly, your little one’s face is sure to light up at Donckers. This old-time candy store and restaurant has been a downtown staple since 1914. Enjoy delicious food upstairs focused on local and all natural ingredients or head downstairs for hand-crafted confections like their famous fudge, truffles, caramels and other candies. Donckers tradition lives on at their Soda Fountain which serves sweet treats such as old-fashioned colas, milkshakes and malts, ice cream sodas and floats.

FO O D T R U C K F R E N Z Y Make your meal mobile and grab a bite from one of our faves in Marquette’s ever growing food truck scene. You’ll have to track ‘em down, but the food and experience makes it oh so worth it. BURGER BUS // If you’ve spotted this big green school bus, you’re in luck. Stop by the bus for a juicy chicken sandwich with pickled red onions, spinach, pickles and garlic aioli or a breakfast burger topped with eggy goodness. Veggie lovers can indulge in rotating offerings like the falafel burger made up of fried chickpeas, spinach, caramelized onions and a cucumber tzatziki sauce. Still not satisfied? Grab a shake or side of bus-cut fries. This old school bus has been renovated to fulfill all your burger dreams. Find out where it's at daily by checking out @the_burger_bus on Instagram. SMELTED // Formerly Copper Crust Pizza Co., the Smelted crew has upgraded from a food trailer to a food truck, but they’re still serving up their beloved wood-fired pizzas. The smell wafting from the brick oven alone will draw you in, but their unique pizza combinations will have you savoring each slice. Smelted’s Goat Yoga is topped with olive oil, fresh mozzarella, goat cheese, fig and a balsamic glaze. With 10 other pizza combinations, Smelted sticks and super fresh salads, eating on the go has never been so good. Check smelted.com for their live location. OTHE R FOOD TRUCK OFFE RINGS Señors Food Truck // Serves up authentic Mexican food. Find the truck by visiting Senors Food Truck on Facebook. ROLLIN’ SMOKE BARBECUE // Serves slow smoked pit barbecue. Visit Rollin’ Smoke Barbecue on Facebook.

SMOKD. // Tentatively serving up smoked meat dishes in Spring of 2020. Check out SMOKD. on Facebook for upcoming updates.

T H E SW E E T LI F E Finding something to satisfy your sweet tooth here is a piece of cake. TOWNERS PASTRY & CHOCOLATE SHOPPE // Classic French pastries can be found just outside of the city. Head to the little town of Gwinn for goodies like lemon tarts, cinnamon rolls, macarons and truffles, all made with eggs just down the road from this small shop. Enjoy your croissant sweet—dipped in chocolate—or savory—made into a breakfast sandwich. HURON MOUNTAIN BAKERY // With two separate shops, this one might just be our most famous bakery. A full case of the softest cookies, assortment of donuts, fresh bread and bagels, tarts, deli sandwiches, muffins and croissants is seen upon entrance and you won’t be leaving without one, or many. And if you head out to the Huron Mountain Bakery in Ishpeming you can also pick up a wood-fired brick oven pizza. MARQUETTE BAKING COMPANY // The Marquette Baking Company reopened in the area in 2019 and is baking old favorites along with new recipes. At this bakery you can find the perfect loaf of ciabatta or sourdough bread to compliment your meal or sit down to enjoy a scone or lemon raspberry muffin. COOKIE JAR // This cookie jar is filled with Greek sweets and treats. Try an authentic Greek dessert like Baklava, rice pudding, shortbread cookies and a variety of breads or stop in for some of your favorites baked fresh daily such as sugar cookies, molasses cookies, bars and cupcakes. You can even grab a pasty, a Yooper staple. 231 WEST PATISSERIE // Marquette’s newest pastry shop doesn’t just have delicious treats, it also offers an amazing atmosphere. The chic and contemporary patisserie and its sweet curated creations like macarons, tarts, and salted butter croissants will leave you feeling like you’ve stepped into an overseas bakery, but the smell of coffee sourced from Velodrome Coffee Co. and the fresh local ingredients featured on the lunch menu will bring you right back to lovely little Marquette.

Wild Blue BBQ // Serves Kansas City style barbecue. Visit Wild Blue LLC on Facebook.

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DRIFA (MARQUETTE BREWING COOPERATIVE) Newest to Marquette’s growing list of breweries is Drifa. The brewery, whose name comes from the Norse word for snow drift, is the first brewing cooperative in Michigan, meaning its owned by hundreds of community members who have partial ownership of the brewery. Despite its status as a cooperative, Drifa’s ready to pour for any beer lover who comes through the door. The brewery has a 12-beer draft system featuring a rotating selection of various beers like the Lower Harbor Light, Witbier, Blame It on the Juice IPA and even Beermosas. “Every type of beer drinker can find something they'll like no matter what the season,” said Heather Ludwig, general manager of Drifa. Drifa is all about good beers in a comfortable atmosphere, perfect for relaxing after a long outdoor adventure. Between events like live music, food truck Fridays, educational presentations and monthly yoga, you can do more than just stop by for a beer at Drifa.

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BLACKROCKS BREWERY Perhaps Marquette’s most popular brewery is Blackrocks Brewing Company. This little yellow house on the corner of West Michigan and North Third Streets has been a staple for local beer drinkers since its inception. “We are in an old renovated house, and that 'homey' feel has definitely stayed with the building,” said Steve Farr of Blackrocks. “We have always been a bit limited on space, however, this adds to the atmosphere, new introductions, and conversations spontaneously ignite. We love the diverse customers that come in, you may find yourself sitting next to a junior in college on one side and a retired surgeon on the other.” With the hook and ring game, cornhole boards, a bonfire on the back patio and heated outdoor igloos in the winter, having a beer at Blackrocks is never boring. While Blackrocks features many faves like the Mykiss IPA, Grand Rabbits cream ale, Coconut Brown, and its beloved Honey Lav in the summer months, perhaps its most well-known ale is the 51k IPA. The Blackrocks motto says it all, “We love beer, you love beer, let’s get together.” ORE DOCK BREWING COMPANY Ore Dock is where “craft beer and community meet.” The brewery is known not only for its variety of beers, but the events that take place in its open space like live music, Science On Tap, Hops for Help, Culture of Cult art show and the annual Festival of the Angry Bear each April. The base of every Ore Dock beer is fresh water from Lake Superior sourced just feet from its door. Since the brewery opened, the Reclamation IPA has been a well-loved ale. This perfectly balanced beer features Michigan and Pacific Northwest hops with aromas of resinous pine and citrus, all supported by a malt backbone, explained Lizzie Corser, Ore Dock Taproom and events manager. The ale’s name is a nod to the brewery space. “Built within a two-story reclaimed mechanic’s garage in a building over 100 years old, our brewery, tap room and upstairs event and music venue are steeped in the character of Marquette’s history," Corser said. "Named after the iconic iron ore dock steps away from the brewery, the sandstone walls, reclaimed wood and industrial feel coat the atmosphere with an air of moving forward without forgetting where we’ve been. While there may be plenty of nods to the past, the beer is anything but. With 15 rotating taps, the brewery produces both a variety of traditional and experimental craft beers and hard seltzers, each with its own unique take using ‘Superior Sourced’ water.”


SUPERIOR CULTURE In this tap room you won’t just find beer, but a variety of “funky ferments.” The brewery focuses on small batch brews made with natural ingredients. Organic tea and sugar are added to a symbiotic culture of bacteria and yeast to produce the non alcoholic drink kombucha, known for its numerous health benefits. Their most popular kombucha brews are the blood orange basil and strawberry lemonade. But unique beers also flow from these tap lines. Best selling brews include an orange chocolate porter made with organic orange juice and cacao and their ginger beer, an organic, gluten free beer wild fermented with a house made ginger bug. You’ll come for the unique drink menu and stay for the atmosphere that keeps up with the time of day, explained Superior Culture Owner Alex Rowland. “We fluctuate in the daytime, during the week it's more of a coffee shop vibe," Rowland said. "We have people in here doing some work on the computer and people stopping in for fills, so it's more of a relaxed feel in the daytime. Then nighttime and weekends we've been doing live music, so things will get a little bit louder and kind of segway into that bar type of atmosphere.” Get a fresh poured kombucha to enjoy on the Third Street shop's front porch or head to the backlot this summer to have a drink in the beer garden. BARREL + BEAM It’s Northwoods meets Belgian farmhouse at Barrel + Beam. “We are housed in the old Northwoods Supper Club which dates back to 1933, so a lot of history,” said co-owner Marina Dupler. “I think people really enjoy that aspect of it. It’s a destination and an experience with beer to boot.” Not only does the atmosphere and decor set it apart from other area breweries, so does its location. Adding to its woodsy and cozy feel, this brewery is just a short 10 minute drive from downtown. “It’s off the beaten path, but on the bike path,” said Dupler. Here, the brewing is done in barrels, specifically french wine oak barrels. In most ales you can find fresh ingredients like apples, pears, cherries and Great Lakes pale malt. “We love celebrating Michigan agriculture,” Dupler said. “Our beers most often feature ingredients that are grown or produced here in Michigan.” If you make your way out to this cozy cabin in the woods, order their most famous ale, the Blanc du Nord, from the wooden bar. This classic witbier is light, herbaceous, wheaty, citrusy and a house yeast strain gives it a bit of spice.

ZEPHYR WINE BAR + CAFE If you’re not big on beer, head over to the Zephyr, a casual and modern wine bar on Front Street. “We offer Michigan’s largest by the glass wine list for people to try,” said owner Daniel Rutz. “It’s a great way to explore wine without having to buy whole bottles. We’ve got staff that knows the wine very well and listens to the people that come in, so they are able to make really strong suggestions and make it easy to find new and different things to try that folks will still like.” Whether you’re a red, white or rosé person, the Zephyr menu covers it all at affordable prices. As each of the 140 plus wines from around the world are chosen, uniqueness and quality are the focus while mass produced wines are avoided. Enjoy European-inspired fare made from simple ingredients sourced as locally as possible. Snack on the cheese and charcuterie slate which is a Zephyr fan favorite. Make sure you opt to sit on the patio on the warmer days. “When we designed it, we were trying to create the wine bar we’d want to happen upon in a big city somewhere, but one that really worked and was relevant here in Marquette.” Rutz said. And don’t worry if you’re not a self-proclaimed sommelier, they’ve got beer and cocktails too.

• Keep an eye on the former Book World location at 136 W. Washington Street. A new distillery is expected to open late 2020. • Looking for other great local takes? Don’t miss the Vierling & Marquette Harbor Brewery on Front Street. This historic building with epic views is Marquette’s original brewery. In 1995, the Vierling became one of Michigan's first brew pubs with the addition of a five barrel micro-brewing system. If you’re here in the summer, you can’t beat their beloved Blueberry Wheat. Then head out to Harvey to the Lake Superior Smokehouse Brewpub for their made in-house brews and barbeque. • Exploring in Ishpeming? Check out Jasper Ridge Brewery & Restaurant or Cognition Brewing Company for even more locally-made beers. • U pper Peninsula Brewing Company is expected to open in Negaunee in 2020 with plans to offer both brews and food.

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ethical. artisan crafted. inspired by nature.

bethmillner.com | 521 W. Washington St., Marquette | 906.226.3540 | Open Mon-Sat

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Jasper Ridge Brewery 1075 Country Ln. Ishpeming, MI 49849

The Vierling Restaurant & Marquette Harbor Brewery 119 S. Front St. Marquette, MI 49855

Cognition Brewing Company 113 E. Canada St. Ishpeming, MI 49849

Ore Dock Brewing Company 114 W. Spring St. Marquette, MI 49855 Ma

Barrel + Beam Brewery Bar 260 Northwoods Rd. Marquette, MI 49855

Drifa Brewng Company 501 S. Lake St. Marquette, MI 49855

Blackrocks Brewery 424 N. 3rd. St. Marquette, MI 49855

Lake Superior Smokehouse Brewpub 200 W. Main St. Harvey, MI 49855

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Superior Arts Youth Theatre 202 W Washington St. saytheater.org 888.785.0512 Marquette Maritime Museum 300 Lakeshore Blvd. mqtmaritimemuseum.com 906.226.2006 DeVos Art Museum 1401 Presque Isle Ave. art.nmu.edu/devosartmuseum 906.227.2235

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Peter White Public Library 217 N Front St. uproc.lib.mi.us 906.228.9510 Lake Superior Theatre 270 N Lakeshore Blvd. lakesuperiortheatre.com 906.227.7625 Beaumier Heritage Center 7th St. / Lee Dr - Gries Hall nmu.edu/beaumierheritagecenter 906.227.3212

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City of Marquette Arts and Culture Center 217 N Front St. facebook.com/CityofMarquetteArtsandCultureCenter

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Marquette Regional History Center 145 W Spring St. marquettehistory.org 906.226.3571 Upper Peninsula Children’s Museum 123 W Baraga Ave. upchildrensmuseum.org 906.226.3911


COOL BEANS WHEN IT COMES TO COFFEE, WE’VE GOT A LATTE TO LOVE—MORE LOCALLY-OWNED SHOPS PER CAPITA THAN SEATTLE, TO BE EXACT. GET YOUR MORNING CUP OR MID-DAY PICK UP FROM ONE OF THESE LOCAL SPOTS.

VELODROME COFFEE COMPANY Velodrome is a splendid blend of sustainable and ethical practices, a contemporary, quiet space and a particularly tasty cup of joe. With Velodrome coffee in your cup, you can feel good knowing that your coffee was made mindfully. Owner Brice Sturmer travels internationally to source the beans behind Velodrome’s roasts from the farmers themselves. The shop’s interior is a minimalist’s dream and the perfect place to chat with a friend or sit down with a really good read. CONTRAST COFFEE CO. Contrast is the perfect place to catch up with a friend or enjoy a picture-worthy latte in a spacious seating area with lots of light. Whatever your caffeine craving, they’ve got it—from espresso, pour-overs and lattes to chai, matcha teas, and cold brews. Treat yourself to a Dirty Snowball, a blended ice drink with espresso, caramel, chocolate, milk, and peanut butter. You can even get a light bite, like a sweet or savory crepe, made to order.

RACHEL HAGGERTY

THE CRIB One of Marquette’s newest coffee shops, The Crib, is home to “Crappie” coffee—Crappie Coffee Roasters that is. This big blue house on Third Street is the best place to head when you’re not sure if the day calls for a cup of coffee or a cocktail. The menu ranges from full-bodied pour-overs, tea, and soup to wine and pints of local beer. Stop by in the evenings to catch a live show from a local punk or folk band. Whatever mood you’re in, The Crib can cater to it. CRUISE-N-COFFEE Drive or walk up to this to-go-only, little coffee shop. Cruise-N-Coffee will make your cup any way you like it, whether that means a delicious black cup of coffee or a latte with regular, oat, almond or soy milk. Try a specialty drink for something extra flavorful to take with you while you shop the local businesses along Third Street. We’d recommend the gingerbread latte, available year-round.

BABYCAKES Macarons, muffins, croissants, scones, quiche, salads, soups, sandwiches, enough said? Add awesome specialty coffee drinks to the mix. It’s no secret why Babycakes has been a downtown staple since 1988. This cozy little shop on Washington Street is a great place to get your caffeine fix and a quick bite with a friend or to stop in for your morning cup and a light breakfast on the go. DEAD RIVER COFFEE ROASTERS The smell of freshly brewed coffee wafting from this shop will call you in from the Baraga Street sidewalk. If you want to spend your day relaxing with a good read or you’re trying to finish up some assignments, Dead River Coffee Roasters is where you can get it all done with a crazy good cup of coffee in hand. Nitro, cold brew, Americano, chai—Dead River is simple, delicious, consistent coffee all served by friendly staff in an intimate environment. You might even find yourself playing a game of cribbage with the patrons before you part. CAFE ALLENATORE You’ll feel at home at Cafe Allenatore. After you order your coffee, you won’t be headed anywhere except back up to the counter for a refill. The warm, familiar atmosphere will remind you of a quaint living room or personal library, making it the perfect spot to crack open the book you’ve been meaning to read with a good cup of coffee. This European-style coffee shop serves up authentic coffee drinks and other goods you can’t get anywhere else in Marquette, like a gelato cup, sparkling water, a variety of crepes and flavored espresso.

www.TravelMarquette.com

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CAMERON WILCOX

WHILE WE’RE FIRM BELIEVERS THAT MARQUETTE COUNTY IS JUST AS GORGEOUS WITH SOME SUNSHINE, RAIN OR SNOW, WE ALSO KNOW THAT SOMETIMES IT’S THE HUES THAT MAKE THE VIEWS.

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#273057 superior sapphire

@BUCKY CALLOWAY

JAKE MILLER PHOTOGRAPHY

#2c432c marquette market green

@BRI_RAS

#aa4d36 ore dock umber

MICHAEL ALVARADO

RACHEL HAGGERTY

@A.R.T_DESIGNS

#f606b6 sugarloaf sunset

#605827 michigamme moss green

#c73732 harbor light red

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If he can do it, so can you. Bigfoot. Zero trace.

S Q U ATC H S AY S .. . Plan Ahead Before you pack, check the forecast. Based on that, your pack may include a trash bag, refillable water bottle, snacks, umbrella, insect repellent, non-toxic sunscreen, cap and sunglasses, GPS, compass or map.

Pack In, Pack Out Inspect your rest area for wrappers, trash or spilled food. Pack out all litter. Strive to leave the site in better condition than when you arrived.

Stay On The Trail Use existing trails and rest sites. Walk single file in the center of the trail.

Leave What You Find Preserve the past. Simply observe rocks, plants, and historical artifacts.

Respect Wildlife Watch wildlife from a distance and never feed or handle wild animals. Keep an eye and leash on your pups at all times.

Be Courteous Respect other visitors and be trail-friendly. Let the sounds of nature prevail.

Enjoy Last but definitely not least, wherever you go, appreciate the scenery of Marquette County.

Vow to respect and protect Marquette on your next visit? Sign our Marquette Effect pledge to let us know, and you’ll be entered for the chance to win fun and eco-friendly pledge perks. www.travelmarquette.com/explore-like-a-local www.TravelMarquette.com 23


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A BIG BAY GETAWAY THIS SMALL TOWN CALLS FOR BIG ADVENTURE. SPEND SOME TIME IN THE NATURAL BEAUTY OF BIG BAY, MICHIGAN WITH THIS TWO-DAY ITINERARY. A 30-MINUTE DRIVE FROM MARQUETTE WILL TAKE YOU TO THE TRANQUIL RETREAT TOWN, WHERE THE ROAD QUITE LITERALLY ENDS. YOU WILL HAVE ACCESS TO UNCROWDED NATURE TRAILS, SCENIC STRETCHES OF LAKE SUPERIOR, AND HOMEGROWN BUSINESSES WITH LOCAL CHARM.

MORNING WALK TO YELLOW DOG FALLS Head down County Road 510 to the Yellow Dog Community Forest. This charming slice of scenery is a favorite local hiking spot found along an unassuming county gravel road. Park in the small lot and walk down towards the water to find the trailhead. The hike starts out by the Yellow Dog River and winds underneath tree canopies and forest on the path to Yellow Dog Falls. About a mile into the trail, you will find the waterfalls off to your left, which you can view from above or below. Once you reach the falls you can choose to turn around or continue along the trail to see a series of smaller falls and rapids. ENJOY BREAKFAST OR LUNCH AT HUNGRY HOLLOW CAFE When you’re done with your hike, head over to Hungry Hollow for a bite. This down-to-earth cafe feels like a little history museum, featuring historic photos of Big Bay upon the tables and walls. As you peruse the photos of lumberjacks and early residents, the friendly servers will come by and serve up heaping helpings of diner favorites like chili, hamburgers, and breakfast. If you’re in town on a Friday, be sure to try their Friday Evening Fish Fry. LOOK OUT ON SUPERIOR FROM THE THOMAS ROCK SCENIC OVERLOOK Thomas Rock Scenic Overlook has simply been described by visitors as not to be missed. It affords stunning views of Lake Superior and Lake Independence. Park in the designated lot and head up the wheel-chair accessible, crushed-gravel trail to the top. The trail slowly gets steeper as you pass colorful trees on your way to the peak. Stop to admire the vast views from the top or take a seat at the picnic tables soak it all up. TOUR THE BIG BAY POINT LIGHTHOUSE Perched on a rocky point overlooking Lake Superior, the picturesque Big Bay Point Lighthouse has guided ships and sailors along Michigan’s coastline for more than a century. This notable lighthouse is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and has since been converted into a bed and breakfast, which also offers tours. Climb the lighthouse steps to the top of this beautiful beacon to peep the panoramic views.

FOOD AND A SNOOZE AT THE THUNDER BAY INN End the day at the historic Thunder Bay Inn, once the setting of famous James Stewart’s 1959 film “Anatomy of a Murder.” Grab dinner at the restaurant and bar, paneled with wood and decked in Michigan memorabilia. Order from their eclectic menu featuring everything from sandwiches and pizza to fresh-caught fish and Mexican food. After dinner, head into the charming inn, which was once a retreat for traveling Ford executives visiting the local automotive plant. You can even stay in renowned car magnate Henry Ford’s actual guest room with period furniture and views of Lake Independence. MORNING HIKE ON THE BIG BAY PATHWAY Described as groomed wilderness, the Big Bay Pathway has several trails for hikers, walkers, and outdoor enthusiasts. From the trailhead, start out on the 4-mile Hidden Grin Loop, which winds through hardwood stands, a beautiful hemlock forest, and a gentle creekside. In the winter, the Big Bay Pathway is a pure backcountry skiing experience with various loops for skiers of all levels. LUNCH AT THE LUMBERJACK TAVERN No trip to Big Bay would be complete without a trip to the iconic Lumberjack Tavern. The casual bar and restaurant was also featured in “Anatomy of a Murder” and was captured in actor-musician Jeff Daniels’ song the “Big Bay Shuffle.” A popular local haunt, the Lumberjack Tavern has a rustic wooden interior and serves drinks and American eats. GO FISHING ON LAKE SUPERIOR WITH SORE ARMS CHARTERS Get out on the water with Sore Arm's Fishing Charters. Based at the historic Big Bay Harbor, Sore Arms specializes in trophy fishing and full-day trips to Stannard Rock, a lighthouse 45 miles north of Marquette. You can also go on a half-day charter and fish for Lake or Brown trout and Steelhead, Coho, and King salmon.

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@TYLER JORR

PA N O R A M I C P E A K S

WO O D L A N D WA L K S

SUGARLOAF // Whether it’s your first trip to Marquette or twenty-fifth, Sugarloaf Mountain is repeatedly on the must-visit list. This half-mile hike is a mere 15 to 30 minutes to the top, depending on which way you take, but both routes lead you to the same sweet view.

TOURIST PARK TRAILS // Looking for something leisurely that doesn’t lack scenery? Start at the tourist park trailhead (part of the Noquemanon Trail Network) to roam through tree-lined trails, and bask along the Dead River Basin.

HOGBACK // The first thing you should know about Hogback—because of its lack of markings, making it to its summit isn’t a sure thing. Hogback highlights narrow, twisting trails through groves and rugged grounds. The last half-mile of the climb can be quite strenuous and features a nearly vertical rock face that demands four points of contact. One thing that is for sure—the view is worth the feat.

SUBLIME SHORELINE WETMORE LANDING BEACH // Whether it’s spring, summer, winter or fall, Wetmore Landing Beach is always a treat. Plus, there are tons of awesome trails to choose depending on your mood. From the parking lot, head east towards the lake, once you hit the steps, keep to the trails on your right if you’re feeling relaxed, or trek to the left to take on some tougher terrain. LITTLE PRESQUE TRACT // With about 18 miles of hiking trails and over 4 miles of Superior shoreline, it’s a hard fact that you’ll love the Little Presque Tract. If you’re hiking in the summer months, do yourself a favor and pack a beach towel and some bug spray for along the way.

PRESQUE ISLE PARK // Known for being quick and picturesque, this scenic 2-mile stretch is easily one of the best—and while you can conquer the loop in one fell swoop, you’ll want to make some extra time to take in the view.

H I S TO R I C // S C E N I C CO N V E R G E IRON ORE HERITAGE TRAIL // This 47-mile, multi-use trail is referred to as an outdoor linear museum where you exercise your body and mind. The trail crosses through the historic communities of Marquette County, including Republic, Ishpeming, Negaunee, Harvey, and Marquette. Featuring informational signage and other fun finds along the way, you can experience over 160 years of mining’s rich history in the Marquette Iron Range. NORTH COUNTRY TRAIL // The NCT traverses seven states throughout the nation from New York to North Dakota. Located about a mile north of Sugarloaf Mountain, Wetmore Landing is a recommended stretch that delivers striking views of Lake Superior.

www.TravelMarquette.com 27


NI NOI NRG T&H L O D P U D TA V E AL ER GE N TH CASU Home of the “Almost” World Famous BBQ Ribs

WORT H T H E D R I VE

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SKILL LEVEL We’d say Todd’s an expert, but if you ask him, “No one is an expert.” LOCATION RECOMMENDATIONS 6 M  ountain bikers seeking an extreme, old school experience should visit the RAMBA Trails nestled in the hills around Negaunee and Ishpeming (rambatrails.com). They’ve been building trail for thirty years by hand! It won’t take long for you to pick up on the west end’s mining heritage. Abandoned towns reclaimed by mother nature, leave unexpected foundations and staircases scattered about the trail system. The Iron Range will leave you tired, out of breath—and beaming. 6 G et away from the crowds and explore the Harlow Lake area. Ride up and over rocky granite outcroppings and take in view after view of Lake Superior. The trails are rugged, rocky, and unforgiving. Take your time and pick good lines. Cell service can be spotty if not non-existent. An excellent place for adventurers. 6 N  orth Marquette Trails offer an array of single and double track options for riders of all ages and abilities. For those seeking an extensive

adventure, you can connect a ride through the North Trails to Harlow Lake for the true Marquette experience. I’d recommend this area to families and folks seeking beginner to intermediate trails as there’s a ton of variety when it comes to distance and terrain. DEGREE // DIFFICULTY 6 I ron Heritage Trail // Beginner. Great for all riders. 6 R  AMBA Trails // Intermediate to Expert. Rocks, a lot of climbing, cliffs. 6 H  arlow Lake Area // Intermediate to Expert. Rocks, a lot of climbing, remote. 6 N  orth Trails // Beginner to Intermediate. Some elevation gains and tight single-track. DISTANCE // ELEVATION Marquette County hosts trail systems meticulously cared for by volunteer organizations. You could spend weeks riding new loops without riding the same trail twice. Visitors can ride from Marquette to Negaunee and Ishpeming on the West End via the Iron Ore Heritage Trail for the ultimate single-day experience, or they could sign up for the

Marji Gesick (marjigesick.com)—a onehundred-mile mountain bike event that has been dubbed the hardest single-day mountain bike race in America. *V  isitors will immediately note feeling as though they are constantly climbing. It’s common to log 1,000+ feet of elevation gain in a 7-10 mile ride. Riding in Marquette County will challenge even the most experienced of riders. It’s a great place to visit and find your limits. ONE WORD OF ADVICE Once you visit Marquette you’ll want to live here – approach with caution. Also, feel free to follow the 906 Adventure Team on Facebook, or get ahold of Todd at todd@906adventureteam.com for “expert” help planning your next adventure. LOCAL RENTALS // RETAILERS Marquette 6 Sports Rack of Marquette 6 Downwind Sports 6 Lakeshore Bike 6 Quick Stop Bike Shop Ishpeming 6 West End Ski & Trail

www.TravelMarquette.com 29


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THE BEAUTY SPEAKS FOR ITSELF… BUT WHEN IT COMES TO HUNTING THE AURORAS, WE HAVE SOME HINTS THAT MIGHT HELP.

RYAN STEPHENS / RYANSTEPHENSPHOTO.NET

Tips to track the northern lights + top spots to watch: While there’s a chance you can catch the northern lights here at any time of year, there’s said to be higher solar activity around the autumn and spring equinoxes. We recommend checking out sites like Space Weather, NOAA, or even the Great Lakes Aurora Hunters Facebook group to find the evening’s predicted Kp (4 or higher means good odds). Then pull up your weather app to ensure there will be clear skies for the night. Once you have those vital checks in place, find a nice north-facing location with little to no light pollution—Sugarloaf Mountain, Wetmore Landing and M-28 beach are some pretty stellar spots from where we like to watch. Happy hunting!

www.TravelMarquette.com

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JOHN HILL

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MAKE THE MOST OF THE FRESH COAST WITH THE ULTIMATE SUMMERTIME ITINERARY

TAKE TO THE TRAILS Marquette County is home to some of the best mountain biking terrain in the Midwest, and with 12,000 feet of elevation and over 150 miles of singletrack—once you ride here we know you’ll be back. If mountain biking isn’t quite your scene we also have excellent paved-paths for cycling, too. GO CHASING WATERFALLS With 77 waterfalls, Marquette County has more falls than any other county in the state of Michigan. You can find a map of those most popular and accessible on pg. 36. MOSEY OVER TO THE FARMERS MARKET If you’re in town for the weekend or a Wednesday evening, don’t miss the Downtown Marquette Farmers Market-every Saturday at the Marquette Commons from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. (May 23-December 19), and as of last year, Wednesday evenings, starting sometime in June through September from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Whether you’re there to enjoy the fresh air or explore the various vendors, you’re sure to have a good time and score some great finds. TRACK DOWN A FOOD TRUCK When you’re looking for food on-the-go, food trucks are definitely the way to go. Not to mention, they’re typically quick, affordable, and especially delicious. With a handful of options to choose, you’re sure to find a truck that will cater to your mood.

ATTEND AN AWESOME OUTDOOR EVENT The start of summer signifies the kickoff of festival season, which means from mid-June until September both your schedule and glass will likely be full. Check out the long list of summer fests and events on pg. 5 or at travelmarquette.com/events SPLISH SPLASH AND RELAX From the sandy shores of McCarty’s Cove’s to the ancient bluffs of Black Rocks, when it comes to beaches, Marquette County has 83 miles of Superior coverage. So, what are you waiting for? Set up your umbrella and towel and soak it up. JUMP OFF THE POPULAR BLACK ROCKS On a hot summer’s day, the Black Rocks are the perfect spot for a quick cool off. Located at the picturesque Presque Isle Park, these ancient rock formations are only about 10-15 feet high, but you’re sure to catch an adrenaline rush from this brisk dip. GRAB SOME FOOD OR BREWS ON A PATIO The only thing better than dining out on vacation is eating out outside. Whether you’re feeling a meal, a couple of beers or a cocktail or coffee, there are over a dozen establishments with patio seating to suit your tastes. KEEP CALM AND FLOAT ON If you’re looking for places to paddle, the Cove at Presque Isle Park is a perfect launching spot on Superior—or if you’d prefer something a little less adventurous, explore the Au Train River by kayak, canoe or innertube.

www.TravelMarquette.com 33


HAMPTON INN MARQUETTE/WATERFRONT 461 SOUTH LAKESHORE BLVD MARQUETTE, MI MARQUETTEWATERFRONT.HAMPTONINN.COM

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YOUR GREAT LAKES ESCAPE 3 Hotels. All Different. All Amazing. THE BEST OF MARQUETTE

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SHAY CRONIN / @SHAYCATHLEENPHOTOGRAPHY

DAYS OF PLAY UPPER PENINSULA CHILDREN’S MUSEUM

Isle Park Deer. It’s an easy way to enjoy the outdoors while

The perfect place for family fun no matter the weather. The

learning more about nature and spotting local wildlife, right

U.P. Children’s Museum is filled with hands-on, interactive

along the lakeshore.

displays that are equally as educational as they are fun. Kids can learn about the human body with a trip down the “stom-

EDGE OF REALITY VR ARCADE

ach slide” or a climb up the “skin wall.” Crawl through the

Rain or shine, spend your afternoon at the Edge of Reality.

“fantastic forest” and stop at the touch tank to interact with

The virtual reality arcade offers dozens of virtual experiences

the museum’s real turtles and other reptiles. Turn into a tiny

from plank walking and fighting zombies to walking down the

actor, grocery store clerk, chef, firefighter and more in the

streets of international locations. Book a station for the whole

museum’s Micro Society. The UPCM is a playground for your

family to enjoy exploring outside realities right in downtown

imagination and an inclusive environment for all. Check their

Marquette.

website upchildrensmuseum.org for a schedule of museum events like Pajama Day and Craft Day.

RIPPLING RIVER RESORT’S PUTT-PUTT GOLF COURSE There’s fun to be had at Rippling River Resort’s 9-hole putt-

LAKENENLAND

putt golf course. Try to sink a hole-in-one on this green while

A playground and park filled with junkyard art? At Lakenenland,

surrounded by Marquette’s gorgeous greenery at this outdoor

your child will be as enamored as you at all there is to see and

course. The cost is $3 for guests of the resort and $5 for the

do. Walk, ride or drive through this interactive sculpture forest.

public.

Follow the trail to step on a giant scale, climb through the elephant clubhouse, head over to the jungle gym or just check

HOTPLATE POTTERY & ART STUDIO

out Tom Lakenen’s wacky, cool creations. In August, catch the

Whether’s it’s a sunny, chilly or rainy day, Hot Plate is the perfect

Free the Music Fest, a free-admission music festival held at

place for your kids to create. It’s simple, pick and paint from

Lakenenland featuring live bands and vendors. Admission to

fun pieces of pottery like mugs, bowls, figurines, or banks and

Lakenenland is free, though donations are accepted.

Hot Plate will handle the rest. Be sure to check out their site beforehand for weekly specials and upcoming events that

FROSTY TREATS

might be of interest.

Signs of spring in the city of Marquette are shorter snowbanks, driving through the Presque Isle Park loop, and the opening

MCCARTY’S COVE

of Frosty Treats for the season. It doesn’t matter if it’s a brisk

The Marquette Harbor Lighthouse sits above this beach located

35 degrees out on the first day of business after a long winter

on the shores of Lake Superior and is a sight to see in any

or a hot summer’s day, there will always be a crowd gathered

season. In the summer, the bright red lighthouse can be the

outside this walk-up only ice cream shop. With tons of tasty

beautiful backdrop of your beach day and in the winter, a

options, you’re sure to satisfy the whole family.

pop of color on your walk amidst all the white. Stop by the Marquette Maritime Museum to learn about the history of the

PRESQUE ISLE PARK BOG WALK

lighthouse, the wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald and other

When you take your obligatory trip around the peninsula

area maritime history. You might even be able to catch a tour

in Presque Isle Park, stop by the Bog Walk before you head

of the lighthouse if you’re in town around opening day in May

out. While you walk this urban bog and follow the wooden

through mid-October.

boardwalks you just might spot some birds, turtles or a Presque

www.TravelMarquette.com 35


WATER FALLS DID YOU KNOW MARQUETTE COUNTY IS HAPPILY HOME TO MORE WATERFALLS THAN ANY OTHER COUNTY IN MICHIGAN? PROTIP: YOU CAN VISIT IN WINTER. SPRING. SUMMER. FALL. THEY’RE ALL MAGICAL.

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JOHN HILL PHOTO

@KUBIE02

CARP RIVER FALLS

1

WRIGHT STREET FALLS ✦ DRIVE 4 MI, 10 MIN » 46.56588, -87.44576

DEAD RIVER FALLS

5

→ Head west on W Washington St toward N 4th St (1,145 ft) → Turn right onto N 4th St which becomes Presque Isle Ave (1.4 mi) → Turn left onto Wright St (2.29 mi) → Park on the right side of Wright St, walk over the ridge and up a short path to the falls under the aqueduct (450 ft) 2

DEAD RIVER FORESTVILLE FALLS ✦ ✦ DRIVE 7 MI, 16 MIN » 46.56861, -87.47833

6

MORGAN CREEK FALLS ✦ ✦ DRIVE 5 MI, 9 MIN » 46.50737, -87.44516

CARP RIVER FALLS ✦ ✦ ✦ DRIVE 5 MI, 9 MIN » 46.50367, -87.44668 → Head West on Washington St (1.3 mi) → Turn left onto McClellan Ave/M-553 (2.37 mi) → There will be a dirt road (Marquette Mtn Rd) to the right heading west, the last road before the river crossing and the ski area → Go 1.4 miles on the dirt road and park in the parking area → Follow the foot trail SW → From Morgan Falls you can cross Morgan Creek above the falls and follow the trail upstream along the banks of the Carp River (.5 mi). → The trail goes high above the river, and there are no good views from the rim, so to see the falls, you need to climb down

8

10

11

CANYON FALLS ✦ 58 MILES, 65 MIN DRIVE » 46.62255, -88.47649 → Travel west on US41 (57mi) → You’ll cross the Sturgeon River and on your left you’ll park at Canyon Falls Roadside Park → Follow the trail SW to the falls (.4 mi)

BIG PUP CREEK FALLS ✦ DRIVE 45 MI, 35 MIN » 46.71166, -87.70388 → Head north on N Front St (0.925 mi) → Turn right onto E Fair Ave (761 ft) → Turn left onto Pine St (0.322 mi) → Turn left onto N Lakeshore Blvd (0.759 mi) → Turn left onto Hawley St (0.650 mi) → Hawley becomes Big Bay Rd/Co Rd 550 (22.6 mi) → Turn left onto Co Rd 510 (2.6 mi) → After 2.6 miles you’ll turn left off the paved road onto the dirt portion of County Road 510 which heads SE (4.1 mi) → Cross the Yellow Dog River and head south on Co Rd 510 for Big Pup Creek Falls another 1.81 mi and a short hike northeast of 510

PINNACLE FALLS ✦ ✦ ✦ DRIVE 35 MI, 55 MIN » 46.70631, -87.80679 → Head north on N Front St (0.925 mi) → Turn right onto E Fair Ave (761 ft) → Turn left onto Pine St (0.322 mi) → Turn left onto N Lakeshore Blvd (0.759 mi) → Turn left onto Hawley St (0.650 mi) → Hawley becomes Big Bay Rd/Co Rd 550 (22.6 mi) → Turn left onto Co Rd 510 (2.6 mi) and go straight where the paved road becomes AAA road. (Don’t turn left onto unpaved 510) → Stay on paved AAA Road (4.8 mi) → Turn left on dirt AAC Road (1.35 mi) → Drive straight onto a two track road just after a truck parking area. Follow all signs marked “FALLS.” Park in small lot and hike SSW of the parking area to the falls (.35 mi)

LITTLE GARLIC FALLS ✦ ✦ ✦ DRIVE 15 MI, 25 MIN » 46.6677, -87.57874 → Head west on W Washington St toward N 3rd St (1,145 ft) → Turn right onto N 4th St which becomes Presque Isle Ave (1.22 mi) → Turn left onto Hawley St, which becomes Big Bay Rd (11 mi) → You’ll cross the Little Garlic River and go 1000 ft around the bend → Turn left onto a forested dirt road (1.68 mi) → Park and find the hiking trail heading north. Hike along the east and north bank of the River to the falls (.92 mi)

→ Head West on Washington St (1.3 mi) → Turn left onto McClellan Ave/M-553 (2.37 mi) → There will be a dirt road (Marquette Mtn Rd) to the right heading west, the last road before the river crossing and the ski area → Go 1.4 miles on the dirt road and park in the parking area → Follow the foot trail 1000 ft west to the falls

YELLOW DOG RIVER FALLS ✦ DRIVE 43 MI, 32 MIN » 46.72863, -87.70672 → Head N on N Front St (0.925 mi) → Turn right onto E Fair Ave (761 ft) → Turn left onto Pine St (0.322 mi) → Turn left onto N Lakeshore Blvd (0.759 mi) → Turn left onto Hawley St (0.650 mi) → Hawley becomes Big Bay Rd/Co Rd 550 (22.6 mi) → Turn left onto Co Rd 510 (2.6 mi) → After 2.6 miles you’ll turn left off the paved road onto the dirt portion of County Road 510 which heads SE. (4.1 mi) → Cross the Yellow Dog River. Park on the left and walk NE along the river to the falls (.35 mi). Return by the same route, or continue on 510 to see Big Pup Creek Falls, too

BLACK RIVER FALLS ✦ DRIVE 26 MI, 38 MIN » 46.39351, -87.78621 → Head south on S Front St (0.339 mi) → At the traffic circle exit west on US-41 N M-28 (17.4 mi) → Turn left onto Randall Dr (302 ft) → Turn right onto Rd PI (1.59 mi) → Turn right onto Co Rd 581/Saginaw St (6.52 mi) → Turn right onto Island Lake Rd (164 ft) → Slight right onto Seasonal Rd (0.456 mi) → From the parking area you’ll find a trail heading north and east to the falls (600 ft)

7

4

9

→ Head south on Front St (0.339 mi) → At the traffic circle exit west on US-41 N (0.523 mi) → At the next traffic circle, take the 3rd exit onto Grove St (2.21 mi) → Turn left onto Co Rd 492 (4.33 mi) → Turn left on M-35 South (8.16 mi) → Park on the right side of M-35, the falls are a short trail hike west

→ Head west on W Washington St toward N 4th St (1,145 ft) → Turn right onto N 4th St/Presque Isle Ave (1.4 mi) → Turn left onto Wright St (3.12 mi) → Turn right onto Forestville Road (2 mi) → Park to the right of the power station and see a gate with a gravel road going up the hill. The way to the falls is well marked with carved tree stumps, up the hill and then climbing down to the river. You can hike along the river and see several sets of falls along this stretch 3

WARNER FALLS ✦ DRIVE 16 MI, 22 MIN » 46.43333, -87.59888

12

LAUGHING WHITEFISH FALLS ✦ DRIVE 26 MI, 32 MIN » 46.38383, -87.06847 → Go South on Front St and stay on it as it turns into US41 (16.6 mi) → Turn left M-94 E (6.35 mi) → Turn left Co Hwy 327 (2.32 mi) → Co Hwy 327 turns right and becomes Laughing Whitefish Falls Rd (0.429 mi)

Drive time based on downtown Marquette starting location.

www.TravelMarquette.com 37


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JULIA BOLTON


SNEHAL PATEL /@TR1CKYSHUTTER

OUR TRUE COLORS Between the bright, colorful scenery and comfortable sweater weather, when it comes to autumn, it really doesn’t get much better. For starters, pick from a fun list of fall festivities like UP Fall Beer Fest, UP200 Dryland Dash, Marquette Mountain Bike Enduro, or Fresh Coast Film Fest. Then check out some of our favorite autumn attractions like the scenic CR510 Bridge, Iron Ore Heritage Trail or Mt. Marquette to experience them in all of their colorful glory.

www.TravelMarquette.com 39


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@ELLIOTJKENNEDY

CL I M

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SKILL LEVEL Intermediate LOCATION RECOMMENDATIONS 6️M arquette has some great places to trad climb (traditional climbing). Most crags will have trad routes or routes that can be trad climbed, but even more so Marquette is a potential gold mine for bouldering. The land around Sugarloaf and Hogback Mountain called “The Sugarcube” is littered with hundreds of beautiful and technical undeveloped boulders. Find a crew and start making Marquette climbing history! This land also holds a Marquette climbing hidden gem, an apparently never-completed 5.14 route called “The Sugar Bowl.” 6️The best free climbing location in the U.P. is by far Silver Mountain in Houghton County. It is a 140-foot tall basalt cliff roughly an hour and a half drive from Marquette and consists of 52 main wall climbs, 6 backside climbs and endless hiking trails, making it easy to make a weekend or day trip out of it.

NG 6️The best places to train for climbing are Hangdog Climbing, the Marquette Climbers Co-op, and for you Northern Michigan University students, the PEIF. Each place provides a different type of climbing: Hangdog is great for those technical boulder problems, the Co-op is great for a few friends to get together and work on individual moves in the “Boulder Cave,” and the PEIF is the place to train for free climbing during those winter months. DEGREE // DIFFICULTY The difficulty of rock climbing depends on the route grade. Free climbing routes are graded with the Yosemite Decimal System starting at 5. Beginner grades are from 5.0-5.7, intermediate grades are from 5.8-5.10d, advanced grades are from 5.11a-5.12a, and the expert grades are from 5.12b to the only 5.15d in the world. Marquette has a variety of crags with grades for all difficulties. Cheese and Crackers (Big Bay) 5.7, Fine Wine (Big Bay) 5.10a, and Between a Block and a Hard Place (Houghton) 5.10c/d are a few of the most famous and popular climbs in the Upper Peninsula. Each and

every crag that you can visit will have climbs in several different difficulties. DISTANCE // ELEVATION Most of the Marquette climbs vary from 30-60 feet with some outliers like the 140-foot cliffs at Silver Mountain. ONE WORD OF ADVICE Mountain Project (mountainproject.com) is a great website for in-depth directions, beta, and route information for the established crags in the Upper Peninsula. LOCAL RENTALS // RETAILERS Downwind Sports is the place in Marquette for anything climbing. The owner Bill Thompson is a local Marquette climbing legend and his staff is extremely knowledgeable and helpful in all aspects of climbing. They have just about every piece of gear or can order it for you. They also do rock climbing tours in the summer months and ice climbing tours in the winter months.

www.TravelMarquette.com

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SNEHAL PATEL / @TR1CKYSHUTTER

SCENIC DRIVE SEASON YOU HAVEN’T TRULY EXPERIENCED FALL FOLIAGE UNTIL YOU’VE WITNESSED AN UPPER PENINSULA AUTUMN. HERE’S HOW TO TAKE IT ALL IN, EASY.

MOUNT MARQUETTE // There’s no better way to see all of fall’s colors than from above the treeline and Mount Marquette places you at 1,200 feet up—The perfect point for incredible leaf-peeping. While the road’s a little rough, it’s just a quick drive up for a view unlike any other. Experience Marquette from a different perspective and take in the all-encompassing view of the city and Superior from one of the scenic overlooks. Follow Mt. Marquette Road and wind up the mountain. Park at the top and head to the outlook area. You’ll be left in autumnal awe. PRESQUE ISLE PARK // No trip to Marquette is complete without a drive around the “Island.” The loop around Presque Isle Park, located on Peter White Drive, is stunning in any season, but fall beats them all. Once you’re done wave watching and seeing Superior’s strength at the breakwater, take a cruise around the peninsula. You’ll be enveloped in a canopy of trees displaying their brick-red, fiery-orange and amber-yellow hues upon entering. Follow the picturesque path and stop at some of the sights along the way, like the lake overlook where you can take in Superior’s stunning blue-green waves as they lap against the incredible red-rock outcroppings. Don’t miss the road to Blackrocks to see the lake wrapped in autumn’s arms from another vantage point. Walk down from the Blackrocks parking area to stand at the shore of the cove and do some of the best beach glass hunting in the city. Catch the last pull off on the path, Sunset Point, to watch the sun slowly set and the leaves fall around you. The perfect way to end your Marquette Day.

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MARQUETTE TO MUNISING // It’s just a 45-minute drive from Marquette to Munising and it’s almost all parallel to the lakeshore. When there’s not beautiful blue views of the expansive Superior, there are trees sporting leaves of every color. If your car window just isn’t cutting it, pull off on one of the many roadside scenic overlooks along the way to view the leaves and lake. The waterfalls you’ll find en route, like Scott Falls and Laughing Whitefish Falls, look even better amidst the autumnal array. • Start at Travel Marquette, head east on W Washington St. and turn right onto S Front St. • At the traffic circle, stay on S Front as it becomes US-41S. • In 1.6 miles, turn left onto M-28 E and continue for 38 miles to Munising. HEAD WEST FOR WONDER // If you’re looking to spend a crisp fall day cruising around the county with a cup of coffee, just head west for prime color viewing. The color change typically occurs first in the west making the drive through Negaunee and Ishpeming full of fall foliage. • Start at Travel Marquette, head east on Washington St., turn right onto S Front St. • At the traffic circle, stay on S Front St. as it becomes US-41 S. In about 6.1 miles, turn right onto Cherry Creek Rd. and turn right on 480. • H ead west for about 18 miles to M-28 in Negaunee and Ishpeming to US-41.


G LIK

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IN YO U

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FI SH LOCATION

LAKE SUPERIOR LAKE INDEPENDENCE →B  IG BAY TEAL LAKE → NEGAUNEE DEAD RIVER STORAGE BASIN DEER LAKE BASIN → ISHPEMING

@ELISABETHGENESEO

GREENWOOD RESERVOIR → ISHPEMING

SHORE

BOAT

CATCH THIS

THE RUNDOWN

Chinook, Coho, Splake, Whitefish, Steelhead, Menominee

From shore: Gaines Rock, Lower Habor Breakwall, Wetmore Landing, Presque Isle.

Walley, Bass, Perch, Pike

Fifty-year record for largest perch (3.75 lbs/21 in). Shore fishing south of the campground and off the boat launch area.

Walley, Bass, Perch

Walley, Bass, Perch, Pike Walley, Northern Pike Perch, Pike, Bass, Walleye, Crappie, Pumpkinseeds, Bluegill

No gas motors allowed. From shore: Good Walleye fishing in summer from the south shore. Can also fish off north shore rock. Lots of dead trees and stumps, deep water, drop-offs, and little vegetation. Strictly a catch-and-release trophy lake. Big fish. Lots of fun. No live bait allowed. Lots of structure, weeds, and stumps.

GOOSE LAKE

Perch, Walley, Northern Pike

Lots of algae in late season. Best in June + July.

HARLOW LAKE

Bluegill, Perch, Pike, Sunfish

Good for kids fishing at the NW corner of the peninsula and off the rock on the north end.

THREE LAKES

Bluegill, Sunfish, Bass

ALMOST ALL U.P. STREAMS

Brook Trout

Lots of Bluegill action for kids near shore. Trains still run by at times. Good size Bass. Some larger rivers have Trout, spring and fall Salmon runs, Rainbow, and German Browns.

For more info on Michigan fishing and inland lake maps visit Michigan.gov/dnr or call the Marquette office at 906.228.6561 www.TravelMarquette.com 43


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@IZZY.MATHEWS20

@SAMWILLIAMSMQT

@HEATHER.OUTDOORS

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1-800-544-4321 MADI MCCLEES

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ANNIKA BOROVICH

@IANEHPHOTO


WIN

TER

OUR WAY

@ELLIOTJKENNEDY

Experience a place like snow place else —a place where winter is not just faced but embraced and where there’s a running list of reasons why it is so much more than just a season. So why winter? Because you can attend an annual classic like the UP200, Noquemanon Ski Marathon or Ishpeming Ski Jumping Tournament. Or perhaps explore your favorite outdoor attractions with a pair of snowshoes, cross country skis or a fat tire bike. Or maybe, simply sit and warm-up with some hot cocoa in the ski lodge or with a cold brew inside an igloo.

www.TravelMarquette.com

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@ELLIOTJKENNEDY

YOU'VE PROBABLY HEARD ABOUT UPPER PENINSULA WINTERS AND THE RUMORS ARE TRUE—WE KNOW SNOW, AND NOTHING STOPS YOOPERS FROM SPENDING THEIR DAYS OUTDOORS. MORE SNOW JUST MEANS MORE SCENIC SPOTS TO EXPLORE AND MORE OPTIONS FOR OUTDOOR ADVENTURE. WHILE YOU'RE HERE, DON'T LET THE WEATHER STOP YOU—THE BEST WAY TO STAY WARM IS TO STAY ACTIVE. PLUS, TONS OF FRESH POWDER MEANS THE PERFECT CONDITIONS FOR SHREDDING.

If you’re into downhill skiing, we’ve got it down pat. Marquette Mountain, just five minutes from downtown Marquette, has terrain for all types on its 170 acres with 20+ runs. Carve into corduroy on well-groomed runs, hit more rugged riding on backcountry trails or test your skills at the newly rebuilt Terrain Park full of rail sets and tabletops. With three chairlifts and a tow rope, you’ll catch fresh views of the city and Superior on your way up the slopes. Get a full ski gear set up at the rental shop and after you shred the gnar hit the T-Bar, Marquette Mountain’s restaurant featuring burgers, wraps, sandwiches, pizza, poutine and quick eats. Check the Marquette Mountain website or its trail conditions page for daily

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updates in the winter, and in the summer hit the same trails you skied on your mountain bike. Marquette County is also home to the U.S. Ski and Snowboard Hall of Fame Museum. The museum is located in the birthplace of organized skiing — Ishpeming, a roughly 20-minute drive from Marquette. If you pass the 18-foot ski jumper statue, you’ve gone too far. The museum recognizes notable skiers throughout history and showcases the evolution of ski equipment throughout time. See skiers soar in January at the 134th annual Suicide Hill Ski Tournament. Local and international skiers meet in Negaunee at the Suicide Ski Bowl to

launch off a 90-meter ski jump and go for the greatest distance. You’ll be in awe of the courage and technique of these flyers, and have an awesome time tailgating around some of the biggest bonfires you’ve probably ever seen. If you need any gear before braving the temps or hitting the slopes, check out Down Wind Sports, The Compound, Sports Rack and Getz’s in Marquette, and West End Ski & Trail in Ishpeming. We hope to ski you soon.


ANDY GREGG / MQTPHOTO.COM

S S O CRCOUN T R Y

G N I I SK

SKILL LEVEL Expert LOCATION RECOMMENDATIONS I have watched the local trail systems develop and expand. We are fortunate to have good, long winters to enjoy them. The Noquemanon ski marathon spawned into the Noquemanon Trail Network (NTN) and has since changed the ski culture in Marquette. Before the Noquemanon system was developed, there wasn't even a place to ski with a warming hut at the trailhead. I enjoy skiing at the Forestville trail system (NTN) because of the quality of grooming. They groom so regularly you can count on good conditions. For classic ski, I hit the Blueberry Ridge pathway, (DNR) 5 miles south of Marquette. They have two trailheads: The North trailhead is for classic skiing only. It’s unique because it’s the only trail in the county that has two classic tracks groomed side-by-side, so you can ski and visit with friends and family at your side. The South trailhead is groomed for classic and skate skiing. There’s also a warming cabin and a short lighted loop at the south trailhead.

In the winter, one of my family's favorite things to do is ski the Saux Head Lake system which is halfway between Marquette and Big Bay and managed by the NTN. It has a real wilderness feel out there which we love. It’s so quiet and peaceful that you’ll feel like you’ve stepped back in time. The Marquette Fit Strip, located in the center of Marquette, is fun for a few laps on the lighted loops after work. We are also lucky to have access to the Forestville trail system from the NMU trailhead as of this year. DEGREE // DIFFICULTY All of the trails are clearly marked and mapped, so it’s easy to select a loop or loops to take you as far as you feel like skiing. Each of the systems offers a good variety of beginner and advanced terrain. DISTANCE // ELEVATION 6 NTN // Has over 65 miles of singletrack trail, 35 miles of groomed winter single track and over 125 km of nordic ski trails. 6 Forestville // This 50K system features a point to point and loop trails including a range of difficulty from beginner to expert.

6 B  lueberry Ridge Pathway // This pathway highlights 13.67 miles of trail for cross country skiing and hiking. 6 Marquette Fit Strip // The strip is a 1.6-mile loop open to year-round recreational activity. ONE WORD OF ADVICE I would suggest dressing in layers while out on the trails. Shed a layer once warmed up and avoid sweating/getting chilled. LOCAL RENTALS // RETAILERS 6 Down Wind Sports sells, services and rents Nordic skis. Plus you can pick up a map of the local trails here, too! 6 Forestville Trailhead Warming Building also has a wide selection of rental equipment, but call (906.235.6861) before hitting the trails to make sure staff is present to provide rental equipment.

www.TravelMarquette.com 47


Good Food Fresh Fast! &

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1983

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Deli Items Made from Scratch

Sandwiches Vegan & Gluten Free Items

Local & Organic Produce / Full Service Deli Fresh Meat & Seafood / Specialty Cheese Beer & Wine / Natural Health & Body Care 502 W Washington St Downtown Marquette, MI Everyone welcome! • 906.225.0671 • www.marquettefood.coop

POURING ONLY MICHIGAN CRAFT BEERS ON TAP! “GREAT FOOD, GREAT BEERS, GREAT SERVICE — A U.P. HIDDEN GEM.” Michigan Brewers Guild

HAPPY HOUR 3-6PM

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48 1-800-544-4321


W O SN

G N I K BI

SKILL LEVEL Expert LOCATION RECOMMENDATIONS The best snow biking in the country comes down to Marquette County. I don’t just say this as a local, but rather because of the expertise, options, terrain, and passion the community has for it. Marquette County is a leader in fat bike grooming and has helped develop methods and devices specifically for fat bike grooming that has made the trails consistently the best on most occasions. When I first started riding, groomed trail was hit or miss but now it is almost guaranteed to have wellgroomed/rideable trails. Riders take this for granted, but shouldn't be expected. This is especially true because out of most fat biking destinations, we receive the most snowfall to keep up with. Marquette County offers “panked” (packed down) rock riding in the Harlow Lake area, flow riding on the Noquemanon Trail Network’s North Trails, consistent elevation flow on the NTN’s South Trails and undulating terrain with history on the RAMBA trails. DEGREE // DIFFICULTY 6 H  arlow Lake Area // Expert because the trail is narrow, climbs are difficult and surface is unpredictable.

6 N  orth Trails // Beginner because it is well maintained, has a lot of traffic, incredible sights, and favorable low-grade terrain. 6 South Trails // Experienced/Novice riders because hills and terrain are a bit more difficult and loops are longer, but conditions are consistent. 6 R  AMBA // Beginner/Experienced because terrain is very favorable and conditions are most always rideable because they are so well maintained. DISTANCE // ELEVATON 6 The North Trails // Include over 30 miles of singletrack that follow the Dead River. Begin at one of the three North Trail trailheads located in town: the BLP, Forestville and Tourist Park. 6 The South Trails // Include 45 miles of singletrack. Bikers can ride flow trails and take in scenic views of waterfalls along the way. 6 Harlow Lake Area // Be prepared to climb to take in the incredible vistas Hogback, Sugarloaf, Top of the World and Bareback on this ride. Most of the trails are built on rock outcrops with technical climbs and steep downhills. 6 R  AMBA // Offers a 9-mile main loop and a 5-mile additional loop. The main loop is less than 500 feet of elevation gain and the 5-mile loop will provide about 500-1000 feet

of elevation gain. Depending on the conditions, snow amount and weather, you may find additional bonus loops in the system. ONE WORD OF ADVICE Keep an eye on the NTN and RAMBA Facebook pages for trail condition reports. It’s best to check before you ride. The best time to hit a trail is when temperatures are at their lowest and sub 30 degrees. This usually provides the most enjoyable experience. But the most ideal conditions are when there are bluebird skies and low 20 degree temperatures. Dress so that you are cold in the first 10 minutes of your ride. If you are hot within the first minute or two, you are overdressed and will be uncomfortable the remainder of your ride. Most importantly, keep your hands, feet, and core warm. LOCAL RENTALS // RETAILERS We have incredible bike shops in Marquette County. Each of these bike shops rent snow bikes and the appropriate equipment: Marquette 6 Quick Stop Bike Shop 6 Sports Rack of Marquette 6 Downwind Sports 6 Lakeshore Bike Ishpeming 6 West End Ski & Trail

www.TravelMarquette.com 49


VISITTHEWESTEND.COM

Discover the West End

Dedicated to building great businesses, great neighborhoods, and great places to experience in Western Marquette County www.gincc.org | 910 U.S. Hwy 41 W | Ishpeming, MI 49849 | 906.486.1111

50 1-800-544-4321


@ELLIOTJKENNEDY

S UR F I NG SKILL LEVEL Intermediate LOCATION RECOMMENDATIONS 6 You can surf anywhere on Lake Superior that has catchable waves, but there are a few popular locations that make for great surf. The most popular being, “The Zoo,” or Presque Isle, due to the ability to jump in past the breaks rather than paddling through them. With a strong south wind, you may be surfing 3-12 footers depending on the wind speed. Mccarty’s Cove and South Beach are the two other popular surf spots. These locations typically require a more southeast wind and can create gorgeous big waves.

DEGREE // DIFFICULTY Great Lakes surfing has its own difficulties compared to ocean surfing. Surfing in Lake Superior often calls for 20-degree air temperature, water temperatures in the mid-thirties, icicle beards, and the (necessary) bone-chilling wind storms that create the waves. For perspective, I started surfing on a $200 8’6” board and a $120 used 7mm wetsuit from eBay. It took me several sessions to get the feel of the board, Lake Superior, paddling and actually surfing, but like anything, with experience, you learn the right methods. The first wave I ever caught was at South Beach in the spring of 2019. Choppy four-foot waves made for a difficult and tiring paddle past the break. I paddled on an upcoming wave, caught it, pushed up and stood… for 4 seconds. I was hooked.

ONE WORD OF ADVICE My one word of advice is to experience surfing but in a safe manner. Jump in and go all out, but don’t push your limits. Lake Superior does not play around and one can find themselves in a lot of trouble if not prepared. Great Lakes surfing, (Superior especially), like any extreme sport, has its dangers and definitely isn’t for all, but if you check out those popular surf spots on days with big waves, just watching can be almost as exhilarating. LOCAL RENTALS // RETAILERS Although Marquette doesn't have a surf shop, Downwind Sports does sell some surf equipment. There are also several incredible Great Lakes surfing shops surrounding the region such as Third Coast Surf Shop, Sleeping Bear Surf And Kayak, and Great Lakes Surf Shop.

www.TravelMarquette.com

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Grouse and Woodcock hunting Fishing on Lake Superior and inland lakes for Trout, Salmon, Pike and Smallmouth bass. Fine dining and shopping nearby

Heated Indoor Pool, Spa & Steam Sauna Continental Breakfast | Pool-Side Rooms Cable TV & HBO | Air Conditioning Winter Plug-Ins | Long-Term Stays Dog-Friendly Rooms By Request Ski Waxing Room | Wireless Internet All Rooms Non-Smoking 43 rooms & Cottage Suites | Wi-Fi

2523 US Hwy 41 West, Marquette, MI. 49855 | www.cedarmi.com

Reservations: 906.228.2280

See why Stucko’s Pub & Grill has become a destination!

fre sh whitefish daily • full menu available until midnight every day • late night menu available after midnight

Open 7 days a week www.stuckospub.com 900 N. Third Street | Marquette, MI | 906-226-1112

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1-800-544-4321


@THEMITTENMUTT

TAKING A TRIP WITH YOUR FURRY FRIENDS IN TOW CAN BE CHALLENGING, BUT WITH 15+ PET-FRIENDLY PLACES TO STAY, MARQUETTE’S A GETAWAY WHERE YOU CAN TAKE YOUR GOOD DOG WITH. YOUR PUP WILL ENJOY THE BREWERIES, RESTAURANTS, HOTELS, TRAILS AND VIEWS ALMOST AS MUCH AS YOU.

DOGGY DO’S & DONT’S Do keep your dog on leash in public 6 Don’t bring your pooch to Presque Isle Park Do pick up after your pet 6 Don’t let your dog explore off trail Do ensure your dog is up to date on their vaccines 6 Don’t forget your pup’s paperwork STRUTT AROUND TOWN WITH YOUR MUTT AND VISIT THESE ESTABLISHMENTS WITH PET-FRIENDLY PATIOS: Contrast Coffee The Barrel + Beam Beer Garden Third Street Bagel Zephyr Wine Bar Iron Bay Restaurant & Drinkery The Delft Bistro HIKIN’ AROUND WITH YOUR HOUND? CHECK THESE SPOTS OUT: Tourist Park Little Presque Isle Recreation Area Sugarloaf Mountain The Noquemanon Trail Network UPAWS Paws Park

www.TravelMarquette.com 53


KATHERINE JARVI PHOTOGRAPHY


A MAGICAL PLACE FOR A MAGICAL DAY WHEN WE FIRST STARTED TALKING ABOUT OUR LOW-KEY WEDDING, WE HAD A FEW REQUIREMENTS: 1) A MICHIGAN DESTINATION WE COULD VISIT ANNUALLY ON OUR ANNIVERSARY. 2) A PLACE WE COULD HIKE AND EXPLORE. 3) IT MUST HAVE A DARN GOOD BREWERY (WE ARE BEER LOVERS + MY HUSBAND OWNS A BREWERY IN SUTTONS BAY, MI)

Marquette was always at the top of our list since neither of us had been there and we were big fans of Blackrocks Brewery. Once I did some research and stumbled upon the stunning historical courthouse in downtown Marquette, I knew we had found the place to elope. From there, we planned our entire wedding from our Traverse City home. Honestly, it was pretty easy as the attendee list was small—as in just the two of us! Before you ask: Our parents already gave us their blessings to elope, they were just happy we were finally tying the knot. We arrived in Marquette on the evening before our wedding, a Wednesday. We decided to get married on Thursday, September 20, because it was cheaper and it worked out great for our schedule (this marriage thing is already off to a great start, eh?). Our first stop in town was, of course, Blackrocks Brewery. Neither of us had pre-wedding jitters (likely because we didn’t have 200 people ready to watch us tie the knot), so we shared a few beers and watched a band from the cozy space. Beer recommendation: Nordskye. The next day was our wedding day! Our courthouse ‘appointment’ wasn’t until 1 p.m. and we had some time to kill. First things first—bagel sandwiches from Third Street Bagel. No wedding diet here!

Breakfast was solid fuel for hiking Sugarloaf Mountain—because nothing relaxes you before you take the most important vows of your life like a good hike. We climbed to the mountain’s top and spent a few minutes surveying the city. We didn’t have much time, but we vowed to come back and climb it year after year. Back downtown Marquette, it was time to get down to business. We got into our wedding gear, picked up my bouquet and headed to Presque Isle Park where we met our photographer, Katherine Jarvi, and her husband (coincidentally also our wedding witnesses!). At this point, the early fall weather caught up with us and it began to pour. (If I had a dollar for every time I heard, “Rain on your wedding day is good luck.”) But my almost-husband and I didn’t care. We posed for photos in the rain, scampered on the *actual* Black Rocks, chased each other through the forest and got completely soaked. We arrived at the Marquette County Courthouse early and were immediately floored by the beauty—wall-to-wall marble, solid oak. We paid our $10 marriage ceremony fee(!) and headed into the courtroom. Again, our breath was taken away. The stained-glass dome and high ceilings were incredible. In the end, we were married. Yay!

from the courthouse gate sits Ore Dock Brewing Company. We headed in and appropriately ordered two “I Do PAs” and called our parents to let them know we are officially husband and wife. Later on, we wrapped up our magical day at the Steinhaus (still in our wedding attire!) where we slurped huge steins of German beer and dove into the Wurst Plate and Wiener Schnitzel. The next day, before departing on our mini-moon to Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore, we strolled along Washington and Front streets and peeked into some shops for wedding souvenirs. We came away with a charming print of the Lower Harbor Ore Dock and also found a handpainted ornament with the courthouse to commemorate our special day. As we drove off, we were filled with gratitude to the city that started the first day of the rest of our lives together. We already can’t wait for our first-anniversary trip to explore more of Marquette’s restaurant scene and stay a few nights in one of the city’s unique hotels.

Following the ceremony, it was time to celebrate. Just steps (as in 500 feet)

www.TravelMarquette.com 55


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HISTORIC WALKING TOUR 1.2 miles (on paved sidewalks)

1

THE MARQUETTE REGIONAL HISTORY CENTER 145 W SPRING STREET

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This the place to learn all about Marquette County history and more about the places you will see on this walking tour. The History Center is home to a museum with interactive kiosks, rotating special exhibits and a unique gift shop. → July Historic Marquette Bus Tours/Tickets $20 → All tours meet at MRHC → 1:00 p.m. tours: July 14 & 28, August 3 & 11 → 6:00 p.m. tours: July 22 & 29, August 4 & 12 → Hop on and take in historical characters and stories of Marquette! 2

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SAVINGS BANK BUILDING 101 S FRONT STREET Built in 1891 by architects Barber and Barber, this building was a 21st birthday gift for Peter Kaufman from his father, Louis G. Kaufman. The base of the building is Jacobsville sandstone and the upper level is brick. The building is an eclectic mix of architectural styles, with a Gothic clock tower and Romanesque sandstone carvings.

SAINT PETER CATHEDRAL 311 W BARAGA AVENUE The first structure was built in 1864. The church was destroyed by fire in 1879 and partially destroyed again in 1935. Each time it was rebuilt. The current structure was made with Marquette brownstone and ornate stone carvings. The roof is edged with copper and gold-leaf crosses adorn the church’s two domes. The interior features beautiful stone and marble work with a vaulted ceiling rising to 67 feet. The tomb of Bishop Baraga, known as the “Snowshoe Priest,” is located here.

FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING 101 W WASHINGTON STREET After a major fire in 1924 destroyed the original bank, Louis G. Kaufman, the fifth president of the bank, donated the present site to rebuild the structure. Ground was broken in 1926. The building is Roman Corinthian in architecture and constructed of buff Indiana limestone. The heavy bronze doors were made in Long Island, New York. The counters are made of solid imported marble. Inside is a satellite exhibit of rare coins and paper bills from the Marquette Regional History Center collection.

360 S THIRD STREET

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PETER WHITE PUBLIC LIBRARY 217 N FRONT STREET Completed in 1904, the library is an example of neoclassical architecture. The Bedford limestone building has a raised foundation, arched windows with decorative keystones and stained glass panels, four Doric columns with an egg and dart design and a hipped roof.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 120 N FRONT STREET Completed in 1935 after a fire destroyed the original structure, it is constructed of Lannon Stone quarried in Wisconsin and is English Gothic architecture. The windows were modeled after stained glass from the 13th century, known as the Golden Age of Stained Glass. Look for the gargoyle water spouts on the south-facing roof.

The Father Marquette Statue was dedicated on July 15, 1897, gifted to the city of Marquette from local businessman Peter White. The brass statue was sculpted in Florence, Italy by renowned sculptor Gaetano Trentanove. The Park was redesigned in 2018 to include an arched gateway, stone benches, and perennial gardens.

MARQUETTE COUNTY COURTHOUSE The Marquette County Courthouse completed in 1904 is a fine example of neoclassical revival architecture. Designed by Charlton and Gilmore of Marquette, the building is constructed of Portage Entry sandstone from the Keweenaw Peninsula. The dome ceiling is lined with stained glass. The courthouse has been the site of many well-known trials, including a suit brought by Theodore Roosevelt against an Ishpeming newspaper for slander. He was awarded six cents.

FATHER MARQUETTE STATUE AND PARK S FRONT STREET AND BARAGA AVENUE

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FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 111 E RIDGE STREET The brownstone building features narrow lancet windows, rounded windows, an arched entrance and asymmetrical hexagonal spires on top of square buttressed towers. It was built by C.F. Struck in 1873.

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SAINT PAUL’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH 201 E RIDGE STREET In 1856, the congregation began meeting in a small wooden structure at this very location. Constructed of Upper Peninsula brownstone, the Morgan Memorial Chapel was built in 1887 featuring a large Tiffany stained glass window. The large, square tower was added in 1902. The houses along E Ridge and E Arch Streets are part of the Marquette historic homes district. Grab a walking tour brochure at the History Center gift store to learn more about the impressive architecture.

Marquette Regional History Center 145 W Spring Street, Marquette, MI // 906.226.3571 This Information has been provided to us by the Marquette Regional History Center.

www.TravelMarquette.com 57


AMERICA’S BEST VALUE INN 906.249.1712

ECONO LODGE LAKESIDE 906.225.1305

BIRCHMONT MOTEL 906.228.7538

FAIRFIELD INN & SUITES BY MARRIOTT COMING SOON

BLUEBERRY RIDGE B&B 906.251.0219

HAMPTON INN BY HILTON MARQUETTE WATERFRONT 906.228.6001

1010 M-28 E / Marquette (Harvey)

2090 US-41 S / Marquette

193 Oakridge Dr / Marquette (Sands Township)

2050 US-41 S / Marquette

800 S Lakeshore Blvd / Marquette

461 S Lakeshore Blvd / Marquette

BRENTWOOD MOTOR INN/BUDGET HOST 906.228.7494 2603 US-41 / Marquette

HOLIDAY INN OF MARQUETTE 906.225.1351 1951 US-41 W / Marquette

CEDAR MOTOR INN 906.228.2280

2523 US-41 W / Marquette

IMPERIAL MOTEL 906.228.7430

2493 US-41 W / Marquette

COMFORT SUITES OF MARQUETTE 906.228.0028 2463 US-41 W / Marquette

LANDMARK INN 906.228.2580

230 N Front Street / Marquette

COUNTRY INN & SUITES BY RADISSON 906.225.1300 2472 US-41 W, Marquette MI 49855

MY PLACE ECONOMY EXTENDED STAY 906.232.1111 2383 US-41 W / Marquette

DAYS INN OF MARQUETTE 906.225.1393 2403 US-41 W / Marquette

QUALITY INN 906.228.8100

1275 US-41 W / Marquette

58

1-800-544-4321


@ELLIOTJKENNEDY

RAMADA BY WYNDHAM 906.228.6000

BIG BAY MOTEL 906.345.9444

RIPPLING RIVER RESORT 906.273.2259

BIG BAY POINT LIGHTHOUSE B&B 906.345.9957

STAYBRIDGE SUITES 906.225.9901

THUNDER BAY INN 906.345.9220

SUPERIOR STAY 906.273.1800

TALL PINES MOTEL 906.475.6608

UP MOTOR LODGE 906.249.1404

JASPER RIDGE INN 906.485.2378

VALUE HOST MOTOR INN 906.225.5000

MAGNUSON HOTEL COUNTRY INN 906.485.6345

412 W Washington St / Marquette

4321 M-553 / Marquette

855 W Washington St / Marquette

1301 N. Third St / Marquette

5057 US-41 S / Marquette (Harvey)

1101 US-41 / Marquette

96 Bensinger St / Big Bay

3 Lighthouse Rd / Big Bay

400 Bensinger St / Big Bay

349 US-41 E / Negaunee

1000 River Parkway / Ishpeming

850 US-41 W / Ishpeming

MODEL TOWNE INN 906.346.7901 190 M-35 / Gwinn

TOWER VACATION HOMES 906.346.7911 4430 Electra St / Gwinn

www.TravelMarquette.com 59


Daily 2 hour Tours:

Fully narrated, viewing 2 shipwrecks, majestic rock cliffs, & the East Channel Lighthouse

60 1-800-544-4321


BRENTWOOD MOTOR INN/BUDGET HOST

40

CEDAR MOTOR INN

43

COMFORT SUITES OF MARQUETTE

83

COUNTRY INN AND SUITES BY RADISSON

84

DAYS INN OF MARQUETTE

65

ECONO LODGE LAKESIDE

46

FAIRFIELD INN & SUITES BY MARRIOTT

92

HAMPTON INN BY HILTON MARQUETTE WATERFRONT

84

HOLIDAY INN OF MARQUETTE

191

IMPERIAL MOTEL

43

LANDMARK INN

62

MY PLACE ECONOMY EXTENDED STAY

63

QUALITY INN

80

RAMADA BY WYNDHAM

full/efficiency kitchen

3

906.249.1712 1010 M-28 E / Marquette (Harvey)

906.228.7538 2090 US-41 S / Marquette

on-site bar

BLUEBERRY RIDGE B&B

on-site restaurant

barrier-free*

wifi available

29

bike friendly

BIRCHMONT MOTEL

pet friendly*

meeting space

fitness room

pool

34

whirlpool

cont. breakfast

AMERICAS BEST VALUE INN

sauna

# of rooms

ACCOMMODATIONS // MARQUETTE

906.251.0219 / 193 Oakridge Dr Marquette

• •

906.228.7494 / 2603 US-41 Marquette

906.228.2280 / 2523 US-41 W Marquette

906.228.0028 / 2463 US-41 W Marquette

906.225.1300 / 2472 US-41 W Marquette

906.225.1393 / 2403 US-41 W Marquette

906.225.1305 / 2050 US-41 S Marquette

800 S Lakeshore Blvd Marquette / COMING SOON

• •

• •

• •

112

RIPPLING RIVER RESORT

26

STAYBRIDGE SUITES

102

SUPERIOR STAY

39

UP MOTOR LODGE

29

VALUE HOST MOTOR INN

52

906.228.6001 / 461 S Lakeshore Blvd Marquette

• •

906.225.1351 / 1951 US-41 W Marquette

• •

906.228.2580 / 230 N Front St Marquette

906.232.1111 / 2383 US-41 W Marquette 906.228.8100 / 1275 US-41 W Marquette 906.228.6000 / 412 W Washington St Marquette

• •

906.273.2259 / 4321 M-553 Marquette

906.225.9901 / 855 W Washington St Marquette

906.273.1800 / 1301 N Third St Marquette

906.249.1404 / 5057 US-41 S Marquette

• •

906.228.7430 / 2493 US-41 W Marquette

906.225.5000 / 1101 US-41 W Marquette

www.TravelMarquette.com

61


BREAKFAST, LUNCH & DINNER

CANDY & ICE CREAM SHOP Made From-Scratch Menu Healthy, All-Natural & Delicious

137 W. W A S H I N GTO N S T . D OW N TOW N , MQT 906. 226.6110

LUNCH, DINNER & DRINKS WEEKEND BRUNCH Fresh, Seasonal Menu Hand-Crafted Cocktails & Drinks

139 W. W A S H I N GTO N S T . D OW N TOW N , MQT 906. 2 7 3. 2 4 55

MYPLACE

906.232.1111

DAYS INN

9 0 6 . 2 2 5 . 1 39 3

COMFORT SUITES

9 0 6 . 2 2 8 . 0 02 8

SuperiorOasis.com

One Location, Four Awesome Properties 62 1-800-544-4321

HUDSON’S

CLASSIC GRILL & BAR 906.225.5119


BIG BAY MOTEL

12

BIG BAY POINT LIGHTHOUSE B&B

7

THUNDER BAY INN

14

TALL PINES

16

JASPER RIDGE INN

26

MAGNUSON HOTEL COUNTRY INN

59

906.346.7901 / 190 M-35 Gwinn

906.346.7911 / 4430 Electra St Gwinn 906.345.9444 / 96 Bensinger St Big Bay

906.345.9957 / 3 Lighthouse Rd Big Bay

• • •

full/efficiency kitchen

on-site bar

on-site restaurant

barrier-free*

15

bike friendly

TOWER VACATION HOMES

pet friendly*

fitness room

whirlpool

sauna

18

pool

MODEL TOWNE INN

# of rooms

wifi available

meeting space

cont. breakfast

ACCOMMODATIONS // GWINN // BIG BAY // NEGAUNEE // ISHPEMING

906.345.9220 / 400 Bensinger St Big Bay 906.475.6608 / 349 US-41 E Negaunee

• •

906.485.2378 / 1000 River Parkway Ishpeming

906.485.6345 / 850 US-41 W Ishpeming

SO CLOSE YOU CAN SMELL IT! 20 craft brews on-tap Self-pour tap system U.P.s best BBQ, smoked low and slow Full-bar, growlers, & beer to-go

200 W Main St. Harvey, MI

(906) 273-0952

www.TravelMarquette.com 63


855 W. Washington, Marquette*906.225.9901*www.staybridgesuites.com/marquettemi

Explore the U.P. all day long. We’ve got your nights covered. Staybridge Suites, Marquette 1110 Century Way, Houghton *906.486.1066* www.holidayinnexpress.com/houghtonmi

Country Inn and Suites, Marquette Holiday Inn Express, Houghton Veridea Group Properties

2472 US 41 West, Marquette * 906.225.1300* www.countryinns.com/marquettemi


117 W. Washington St / Marquette, MI 49855

Presorted Standard U.S. Postage PAID Permit #177 Marquette MI 49855

The most beautiful place in Michigan. - Conde Nast Traveler

Take an adventure cruise along Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore! Explore these rainbowcolored sandstone formations up close— cruising along miles of shoreline in America’s largest and deepest Great Lake.

Book now at

PicturedRocks.com (906) 387-2379

PL A N YOU R TRIP AT M U NISING .ORG

Profile for MyNorth

Travel Marquette 2020  

Travel Marquette 2020  

Profile for mynorth