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DONATE AND VOLUNTEER IN THE PLACE WE LOVE!

2019

NORTHERN MICHIGAN

A supplement to


generosity for

generations

Like you, we love our communities and want to How will you care for the people and places that are most important to you? Leave a lasting impression through a planned gift to the Community Foundation.

see them thrive, forever.

HERE ARE THREE SIMPLE STEPS TO GET STARTED.

1

Talk to your family, friends and professional advisor.

2

Contact the Community Foundation.

3

Include a bequest in your will or trust.

GRAND TRAVERSE REGIONAL

GTRCF.ORG

| 231.935.4066


NORTHERN MICHIGAN

TABLE OF CONTENTS

A MyNorth Media Publication PRESIDENT/EDITOR IN CHIEF

Deborah Wyatt Fellows

CHIEF OPERATIONS OFFICER

Michael Wnek

EDITOR MANAGING EDITOR DIGITAL AND. CONTENT EDITOR PROOFREADERS REGULAR CONTRIBUTORS . . ART DIRECTOR PRODUCTION DIRECTOR ASSOCIATE ART DIRECTOR,. SPECIAL SECTIONS GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Emily Tyra Elizabeth Edwards Carly Simpson.

Elizabeth Aseritis, . Caroline Dahlquist. . Kim Schneider, . Tim Tebeau, . Andrew VanDrie Gail Snable Theresa Burau-Baehr Rachel Watson. Sarah Omen

WEB DIRECTOR

Jen Berigan

DIRECTOR OF SALES

Julie Parker

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES . . . . MARKETING DIRECTOR MARKETING COORDINATOR

Ann Gatrell. Jill Hayes. Meg Lau. Cyndi Ludka. Katie Wray Erin Lutke Kara Jarvis

MYNORTH TICKETS. CUSTOMER SUCCESS. SPECIALIST

. . Emily Oakes

MYNORTH TICKETS. ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Ken Knudsen.

OFFICE MANAGER BOOKKEEPER

Libby Stallman . Kim Stewart

Editor’s Note...................................................................................................................... 2 Happy Tails | Animal Adoption and Rescue Nonprofits..................................... 5 A Library Like No Other | Versiti Michigan............................................................ 7 Scout’s Honor | Grand Traverse Regional Land Conservancy........................... 7 All for One and One for All | United Way of Northwest Michigan.................9 Lasting Love | Grand Traverse Regional Community Foundation....................9 Rugged Restoration | The Nature Conservancy.................................................. 11 The Mix Masters | Grow Benzie............................................................................... 11 Nourishing the North | The Manna Food Project................................................13 Small Wonder | Traverse Area District Library.....................................................13 A New Hope | Child and Family Services of Northwest Michigan................ 15 Home at Last | Society of St. Vincent De Paul..................................................... 15 Women United | Impact 100.....................................................................................17 A Life-Changer | Eagle Village...................................................................................17 “Scout Me In” | Boy Scouts of America, Michigan Crossroads Council...... 19 A Healthier Up North | McLaren Northern Michigan Foundation................ 19 Kindness, Come What May | American Red Cross.......................................... 20 Directory Listing.............................................................................................................35

On the Cover ...

MARY REED, HOW DOES YOUR GARDEN GROW? A Supplement to

PHOTO BY DAVE WEIDNER

This Manistee county resident, volunteer and activist applies a lifetime of bringing people together to convene, listen and help the community. An avid environmentalist, Mary is active with a host of organizations that feed her desire to connect and work through priorities and issues with her neighbors. Here are just a few: Editorial & Advertising Offices 125 Park Street, Suite 155 Traverse City, MI 49684 . Phone: 231.941.8174 | Fax: 231.941.8391 Subscriber Services. Visit MyNorth.com/sub to change your . address or to review your account. Reprints Reprints available. Please call 231.941.8174. Please e-mail other subscription inquiries to . info@mynorth.com or call 800.785.8632 . between 10 a.m. and 8 p.m. EST.

Portage Lake Watershed Forever (a group dedicated to protecting the health of the Manistee County lake), PORTAGELAKEWATERSHED.COM Explore the Shores (an organization that provides water access to people of all ages and disabilities), EXPLORETHESHORES.ORG

Portage Lake Garden Club (founded in 1935 to cultivate knowledge of trees, plants and flowers, to foster a true friendship among its members, and to be stewards of the land), PORTAGELAKEGARDENCLUB.ORG Plant it Wild (a native plant group in Benzie and Manistee counties), PLANTITWILD.NET

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2

MyNorth.com


EDITOR’S NOTE

GIVE Northern Michigan is here in your hands because of a few simple truths: · Most of us generally want to donate and volunteer but it can be hard to navigate a way forward given busy lives and the enormity of need and efforts. · Local nonprofits representing diverse efforts don’t always have the budget to grab our attention with their story and commitment. · Giving locally not only eases challenges and offers opportunities close to home but our local donations recirculate in a critical way through our local economy. · Getting involved in local nonprofits by donating and/or volunteering allows us to find community with each other through the local causes we support. · And last, Northern Michigan nonprofits don’t have access to the large corporate donations that nonprofits in cities have: They have us, people who care deeply about this place. And without us, who? When creating GIVE Northern Michigan, I read that as our lives get busier and more isolated through technology, nonprofits need to do a better job of telling their stories in ways that make it easy to break through and connect with donors and volunteers. That’s what GIVE does; collects stories in a magazine that stands out in your mailbox and tells our region’s nonprofit stories in an approachable, relaxing and inspiring way. Some of you may find nonprofits you wish to support on the first read through. Others may turn down the corners on pages and revisit them all at your leisure, knowing you can easily return to these pages again to find everything you need to reach out with a donation or with your time. We know that when we reach into our pockets and to our calendars to help anywhere it brings rewards, both personally and to a larger community. But donating here brings additional rewards to Northern Michigan. All ships rise when charitable

giving is strong in a local community. When we donate here, the needs that exist in this place that we all care about so much are better met; some of the challenges faced by the staffs of our regional nonprofits who do such amazing work are eased, both through donations and volunteers; and your donations circulate again and again within our own region’s economy and take some pressure off things like local tax dollars to do it all. Northern Michigan has given each of us enriched lives, whether we’ve chosen to live here or spend only some precious time here. And like everything about our small region, we have to look to each other because there are no large corporations with mandated giving plans to make it happen. But that’s one of the reasons we love this place; we are genuinely and meaningfully connected. When we volunteer, we meet our neighbors and/or like-minded people. When we donate, we are the ones that insure a critical mission can go forward. We who care about the quality of lives and the landscape of this region will keep our nonprofits working to ease struggles, inspire, preserve, lift up, find solutions and so much more. Regardless of what you are able to donate, you will find such inspiration in the breadth of ways to make a difference locally on these pages. And know that there is no such thing as a “small donation.” Every collective dollar makes a difference and in our nonprofit world populated with small staffs, each dollar truly goes to the mission. So, sit back and be inspired. And on behalf of all the great efforts being made by so many, for so much good in Northern Michigan, thank you.

Deborah Wyatt Fellows is founder and editor in chief of Traverse Magazine/MyNorth Media. debwf@traversemagazine.com Do you know others who might like to give back to this place we love? Simply go to MyNorth.com, scroll to the bottom of the home page, click on GIVE and share the digital edition.

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Not all heroes wear capes.

Every nine minutes, volunteers help the American Red Cross bring help and hope to people in need. Join us and make a difference in your community.

Be a hero. Volunteer today. redcross.org/michigan (313) 833-4440 AmericanRedCrossMichiganRegion 82111J


Discover a few of the . adoption shelters and nonprofits making a . difference in the lives of Northern Michigan animals. Consider volunteering, . giving, fostering or . adopting a furry friend in need. Here are meaningful . ways to get involved. Cherryland Humane Society’s volunteer orientation program is the second Saturday of every month. This no-kill shelter cordially extends an invitation to join their volunteer team helping with animal care, dog walking, cleaning and education. CHERRYLANDHUMANE.ORG AC PAW has found forever homes for more than 9,500 homeless cats and dogs since 1995, and 94% of every dollar they raise is used for direct care (food, kennels, veterinarian care, etc.). Contact them to get involved. acpaw.org

PHOTO BY JON-PAUL ALLGAIER

H.A.N.D.D.S to the Rescue is a volunteerbased rescue in Traverse City that takes in abused, neglected, disabled and displaced dogs and places them in experienced foster homes until they’re ready for adoption. handdstotherescue.com Silver Muzzle Cottage Rescue & Hospice is a Michigan rescue and hospice on a mission to provide senior, disabled and hospice dogs the chance to live out their remaining lives with love and dignity. Enrich the lives of these senior dog rescues by taking them for hikes in the woods, strolls on the beach and the occasional swim. SMC volunteers also bring senior dogs to visit area nursing care facilities. This brings joy not only to the facility residents but also to the dogs! silvermuzzlecottage.com —MyNorth Staff

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You can help keep FISHTOWN here for everyone, every day, now and for future generations.

Connecting Our Community With The Enduring Magic Of Music Through Education And Discovery www.musichouse.org

Make your gift today.

231.256.8878 | FishtownMI.org | 501(c)(3) Nonprofit

Making Affordable Housing in the Grand Traverse Region a Reality Jonathan Stimson, HomeStretch Executive Director Crystal Dougherty, Recent Homebuyer Jessica Simmerman, Asst, Traverse Real Estate

We have a PIPELINE of projects that need your donation We have PEOPLE who need your help We have a PROCESS that maximizes your gift C.L. SOUTH CIVIC CENTER DRIVE

EXIST. BLDG

ZONED: C-1

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PARCEL INFORMATION: ADDRESS:

1210 E. Eighth Street Traverse City, MI 49686 TAX ID: 28-51-786-039-00 TAX DESCRIPTON: The East 100' of the West 219' of Lots 31 and 32, Block 1, Except the South 13.5' thereof, Oakwood Addition to the City of Traverse City, Grand Traverse County, Michigan. ZONED: C-1, Office Service District SETBACKS: Front = 25' Parking = 25' Side = 0' Parking = 5' Rear = 20' Parking = 20'

C.L. EIGHTH STREET (66')

CAUTION:

C.L. HASTINGS STREET (66')

FLAMMABLE AND/OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL

59'

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REMOVE EXISTING OAK TREE IN POOR CONDITION REMOVE AND/OR RELOCATE EXISTING GAS LEAD 219'

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REMOVE EXISTING CURB CUT PRESERVE AND PROTECT EXISTING OAK TREE

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400 Boardman Avenue Suite 10 400 Boardman Avenue, Suite 10 Traverse City, Michigan, 231-947-6000 Traverse City, MI 49684 231-947-6001 homestretchhousing.org homestretchhousing.org

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S. LINE LOT 31 AS PLATTED

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S89°33'11"E S. LINE LOT 32 AS PLATTED

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N89°33'55"W 9.00'

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REMOVE EXISTING STRUCTURES, GRAVEL AND CONCRETE LOT 31 EXIST.

S0°16'39"W 165.60'

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PARCEL A

COMMON LINE BETWEEN DEEDS 2010R-15137 AND LIBER 841, PAGE 242

PRESERVE AND PROTECT EXISTING TREE

GRAVEL

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N0°16'39"E 97.67'

PRESERVE AND PROTECT EXISTING OAK TREE, IF POSSIBLE

EAST LINE, WEST 60 FEET OF LOT 31, BLOCK 1

EXIST. BLDG

EAST LINE, WEST 219 OF LOTS 31 AND 32, BLOCK 1

CONC

ad sponsored by:

Traverse City property next in line to become a Homestretch multi-family development, Oakwood Townhouse Apartments


Scout’s Honor

LEFT PHOTO BY MARK HINES // RIGHT PHOTO BY DEKE LUDWIG, COURTESY GTRLC

A Library Like No Other Mitch Arnold is not a statistic; he’s a kid—he loves comedy improv and roughhousing with the family boxer dog. He was diagnosed at age 10 with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, a blood cancer, and after three grueling years of chemotherapy, he beat it. But at age 17 it returned. He now faces a more-toxic chemo regime or a bone marrow transplant and many months in the hospital for treatment. Versiti Michigan hopes that, with their help, kids like Mitch will soon be back cracking jokes and chucking tennis balls. As a national leader in innovative blood health solutions, Versiti is now part of a five-state organization that helps collect and deliver blood to patients who need it most, as well as providing research into blood diseases looking for better treatment and cures. The research arm was born out of blood collection— when you donate blood and check the box “yes” to allow a sample of your blood to go to research, that “blood library” has helped contribute to a blood research institute that is unique. “We have researchers from around the world who come to work here because of the access to blood for research,” says Kelley McCaskill, vice president of philanthropy for Versiti. The kind of research that looks to provide breakthroughs and cures for diseases like blood cancers or sickle cell anemia. Donations to Versiti don’t just fund research—they fund breakthroughs. “Our researchers, quite simply, can do more with philanthropic support,” McCaskill explains. “Philanthropic dollars allow for innovation and opportunity, because junior researchers and faculty aren’t eligible for funding from the National Institute of Health, a common funding source. But these are the very people who are there to look at things differently.” And if researchers do have NIH funding, they have to follow those grant requests to the letter—they can’t deviate from their proposed study, no matter what they discover along the way. “If we secure that critical philanthropic money for them,” says McCaskill, “they’re allowed to say, ‘I think that if we try this, we can achieve something different... Let’s take this path and see where it goes.’” versiti.org —Cara McDonald

Jennifer Jay is four years and 68 million dollars into an amazingly successful, five-year 71.4-million dollar campaign. So why can’t she sleep at night? “My greatest fear,” admits Jay, Grand Traverse Regional Land Conservancy’s director of communications and engagement, “is that the last three million will be the hardest to get in the door, and some of our biggest projects have the most remaining need.” Like Old Camp Tapico, the former Boy Scout camp, now called the Upper Manistee Headwaters Preserve—a 1300-acre treasure with a 130-acre lake, untouched and well protected by decades of the Boy Scouts’ stewardship. “We had to race to beat developers from Chicago and an angel loaned us the money to hold the property while we fundraised, but we can’t lose this,” Jay says. The project needs a remaining million dollars in funding to secure conservation. The sheer size in part makes the preserve amazing, but the fact that the lake is free of invasive aquatic species is nearly unheard of. The old camp has a tremendous variety of habitat home to threatened and endangered wildlife such as bald eagles, red shouldered hawks, smooth green snakes, and the massasauga rattler, as well as a diverse, high-quality population of native plant species. “We’ve had scientists up here that can’t believe this place, it’s that good,” says Jay. “When you walk on the property, you say to yourself, ‘this is what Michigan used to be like.’” Recognizing its value, donors Richard and Diana Milock both loaned money and donated an additional million dollars to secure the property temporarily, but the project has yet to be paid off or permanently protected. Jay believes the community will continue to rally behind them. “We’re exhausted. But we literally didn’t have an option,” Jay says of the fundraising effort. “Our phones were ringing off the hook and properties were coming online that were going to be lost. The only option was to go big. When you look at the map, we’d ask, ‘which ones are you willing to lose?’ And people got it.” gtrlc.org —Cara McDonald

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LASTING LOVE

All for One and One for All On a crisp fall day this year, the United Way of Northwest Michigan received a phone call from a woman in bit of a panic, asking for any programs that could help her. Her elderly dad was about to be released from Munson Medical Center, but he couldn’t come home— his house just wasn’t set up to be safe for him in his new restricted capacity. The repairs his home needed would have been more than $500, and he was on a fixed income. The only alternative: He would have to enter into long-term care. But not on the United Way’s watch. The office staff summoned one of their volunteer groups called the Tuesday Toolmen, a posse of handy folk who donate their skills, tools and time to making minor repairs that help people with restricted mobility stay in their homes safely. On a Thursday morning they put their tool belts and boots on; by Friday, the work was done. “We are so grateful he could wheel up the ramp to his home,” says executive director Ranae McCauley, “instead of through doors to strangers.” Many people think of the United Way as the head of an octopus with kindly arms, a sort of clearinghouse for soliciting and distributing funds to organizations in need. It’s also a mighty force for connection that works under three tenets: giving, volunteering, and advocacy—in particular to keep kids healthy, fight substance abuse, and to provide a safety net for vulnerable populations. “We advocate a lot for populations living in poverty,” McCauley explains. “Most of our population here are working, but not making enough to get by.” Even modest donations to the United Way can make a life-changing difference for a member of our community. And more volunteers are always needed. “We are so proud of volunteers here at United Way,” says McCauley. “We have 717 in our five-county area. The beauty of United Way is it’s community responsive—what the community needs in Emmet County may be different from what they want in Leelanau County—and we can make that happen.” Visit unitedwaynwmi.org. —Cara McDonald

Virg Mouch didn’t start out thinking about philanthropic legacies. The idea came to her simply: through a love of the natural places in Northern Michigan. When Mouch got involved in conservation work and the protection of Torch Lake, she learned about the multi-faceted work of the Grand Traverse Regional Community Foundation, which provides funding, grants and scholarships prioritizing youth philanthropy, health and well-being, early childhood education and Great Lakes protection. “Seeing the impact such an organization can have in so many different areas—and the singular focus on stewardship of endowments in perpetuity—inspired me to really become involved,” Mouch says. As she moved into retirement, Mouch says she, like many, faced the important question of how to ensure sufficient resources during her lifetime, but also meet her desire of continuing her community impact long into the future.

Seeing the impact such an organization can have in so many different areas— and the singular focus on stewardship of endowments in perpetuity—inspired me to really become involved.. —Virg Mouch

That’s the beauty of legacy gifts. “Many of us are giving every year to one or more nonprofits,” says Alison Metiva, vice president, strategic engagement and programs. “Planned gifts, especially to an endowment, allow an individual’s annual giving to continue once they are gone.” How it works? Most planned gifts are done through simple language in your will that names the organization that will receive your future gift. And it’s not just for the wealthy. Gifts can be designated as a percentage of remaining assets after other commitments—to family, for example—are met. “Legacy gifts of all sizes matter,” says Metiva. “Planned gifts allow us to be more effective because they build our endowment, the foundation from which we award grants and scholarships every year. Making plans for a future gift is an investment each of us can make today, that because of our model, will pay off for generations to come.” gtrcf.org —Cara McDonald

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AN EXCLUSIVE STATEWIDE FILM PREMIERE

SUPPORT

Happy. Healthy. Strong. www.elgruponorte.org

WEEK OF DECEMBER 8th, 2019 Date/Time to be confirmed by Sony Pictures

STATE THEATER 233 E. FRONT ST, TRAVERSE CITY, MI 49684

TICKETS ON SALE NOW $50 PER PERSON

Norte's mission is to help build stronger, better connected and more walk/bike friendly communities by empowering the young and young at heart.

FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TO PURCHASE TICKETS:

www.JUMANJI4ANCHORS.com ALL PROCEEDS BENEFIT

As a regional system of non-profit hospitals and organizations, Munson Healthcare wants to thank our donors for supporting the work we do for our patients and communities – helping them get back to the amazing everyday moments that mean so much to them. We are truly thankful to our donors, who play a vital role in keeping health care strong throughout northern Michigan. Please consider including us in your holiday giving. • • • •

Cadillac Hospital Charlevoix Hospital Grayling Hospital Manistee Hospital

• • • •

Munson Healthcare Hospice Munson Medical Center Otsego Memorial Hospital Paul Oliver Memorial Hospital

Visit munsonhealthcare.org/foundations to learn more.

MUNSON HEALTHCARE Foundations

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THE MIX MASTERS

LEFT PHOTO BY JASON WHALEN/BIG FOOT MEDIA // RIGHT PHOTO COURTESY OF GROW BENZIE

Rugged Restoration If you strike out on the North Country Trail southwest of Marquette in the Michigamme Highlands, your path winds through dense forests, past million-year-old rock formations in a swath of wild that seems as if it hasn’t been touched by time. Your boots will crunch down a section of the trail that passes through a 6,000-acre Nature Conservancy reserve—one of the most beautiful and rugged in the state, home to 26 lakes and 1,000 acres of wetlands. It’d be tempting to want to protect it, fence it off, never change a leaf. “The Wilderness Lakes property was privately owned prior to our acquisition,” explains Kari Marciniak, director of strategic communication for The Nature Conservancy in Michigan. “The opportunity for us to put it into protection was appealing, because there’s such an unknown with the timber industry up there.” Since The Nature Conservancy acquired the site in 2017, it has been steadily working to restore the forest by several methods, including one which may surprise: selective harvesting of timber. Why save it from the timber industry just to head in and do more cutting? To restore diversity and balance— both in age and species—to the forest, Marciniak explains. The sugar maple was so highly prized, for example, that it was cultivated and allowed to flourish, but it means many forests have developed a monoculture. The harvesting opens the forest canopy, allowing other species to thrive. “People don’t want to think about cutting trees,” she says, “but you walk through after a selective harvest and it’s hard to tell someone’s been there.” The Nature Conservancy’s mission encompasses four distinct areas: protecting land and water; tackling climate change; providing food and water in sustainable ways (such as restoring fisheries and protecting soil); and building healthy cities to provide habitats for wildlife and health for humans. Wilderness Lakes fulfills many of those missions, beyond just land protection. “Forests are the lungs of our natural systems, and we want them to be diverse, healthy and resilient to climate change,” Marciniak says. “There are big challenges ahead of us. Fortunately we’ve laid out a road map and we do think a better future is possible.” nature.org —Cara McDonald

It’s harvest time, and Farmer Carol Bontekoe nips away at the fruits of the edible trail system winding through Grow Benzie’s home base, a farmhouse/community center surrounded by acreage of producing farm fields. She’s in charge of the incubator farm here, which educates and launches aspiring farmers. Farmer Carol also runs a program here called New Dawn Fields, which helps heal and employ survivors of abuse and sexual assault through “dirt therapy.” The MSU ag extension uses her tomato crop to teach community cooking classes. But don’t stop here—this is no mere do-good farm. Keep wandering the paths. The bee boxes belong to the local beekeepers guild (they’ve got a honey-spinning party scheduled this week) and were made by kids in

Grow Benzie’s after-school program, which builds and sells them to local apiaries to fund the center’s wood shop and home ec classes. The bee guild teaches the kids how to care for the bees. Step inside now to the old farmhouse–turned-community center and down the stairs—here’s a sewing studio and a maker space. A local woman wanted to start a chapter of Days for Girls, making feminine hygiene kits for girls overseas who lose days of work each month because they lack basic hygiene supplies. Sixty people have met here and sewed 2,000 kits that were sent to girls in 10 different countries. It’s the work of inspired community building and a genius blend of hands on, hands off and connection making, all under the guidance of Executive Director Josh Stoltz. He’s tasked with the often-challenging job of systems building—and explaining what that is. “We’re recognizing our role in the community as more of a connector,” he says. “We put people where they shine the most.” Check out growbenzie.org. —Cara McDonald

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HUNGER

AFFECTS PEOPLE FROM ALL WALKS OF LIFE

From children to seniors, college students and single parents, hunger has many faces. Join us in our mission to make Northern Michigan a better, healthier place.

OUR FOOD PANTRY serves an average of 100 families each week

MANNA FOOD BANK distributes 1.7 million lbs. of quality food to over 50 agencies

FOOD RESCUE collects and redistributes over 650,000 lbs. of surplus food

"FOOD 4 KIDS" BACKPACKS help feed nearly 2,000 children each week of the school year

8791 McBride Park Court, Harbor Springs, MI 49740 231.347.8852 | mannafoodproject.org MICHIGAN-BASED 501(C)(3) NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION, FEDERAL ID NO. 38-2764533. MICHIGAN-BASED 501(C)(3) NONPROFIT TO ORGANIZATION, ID NO. 38-2764533. ALL DONATIONS ARE TAX DEDUCTIBLE TO THE EXTENT PROVIDED BY LAW. ALL DONATIONS TAX DEDUCTIBLE THE EXTENTFEDERAL PROVIDED BY LAW.


NOURISHING THE NORTH A child comes home from school and wanders into the kitchen, pops open the refrigerator door. The shelves are empty save for a few condiments and the last of a carton of milk. The bad news? It’s Friday, and the next hot meal on the horizon is Monday’s school lunch. She feels more than just hungry. Hunger and child development research shows that kids who live with food insecurity—like the one-in-five in Antrim, Charlevoix and Emmet counties—experience delayed development, risk of chronic illnesses like asthma and anemia, and behavioral problems like hyperactivity, anxiety and aggression. Thousands of our neighbors struggle every day to get by—the Manna Food Project helps provide healthy food for these families. The Manna Food Project has been feeding the hungry throughout the North since 1987, including the 2,000-plus area children who benefit from their Food 4 Kids program. Each week, volunteers fill and distribute backpacks tucked full of dried fruit, cereal, cheese, oatmeal and other nutritious food to help tide kids over through the weekend.

My mom never taught me . how to cook. Now, I can pass down . what I’ve learned to my daughter..

PHOTO COURTESY OF TRAVERSE AREA DISTRICT LIBRARY

—Manna Student

Other programs support healthy families, such as the food bank and food pantry, and Manna’s Food Rescue program. Manna trucks are on the road every day collecting food donations from local grocery stores and retailers—a total of more than 500,000 pounds each year— to stock community kitchens and area food banks with food that would have otherwise gone to waste. But they don’t just stop at providing food—it’s about helping shape lifelong healthy eating habits that transform the well-being of communities. Produce for People secures fresh, locally grown produce for food pantries, and Manna’s nutrition education and cooking classes teach clients how to prepare delicious and nutritious meals. Each client brings home a new crockpot or blender, a three-piece kitchen knife set, vegetable peeler, cutting board, measuring cups and spoons, colander, refrigerator thermometer, spatula and fresh ingredients to prepare several easy-to-make recipes. Said one recent student: “My mom never taught me how to cook. Now, I can pass down what I’ve learned to my daughter.” mannafoodproject.org —Cara McDonald

Small Wonder When you step into the Traverse Area District Library and head toward the sound of kids voices, you’ll find a youth services area that’s bright with new paint, shelving, carpet and furniture. A “Tween Scene” hangout caters to young readers, and a new computer bar awaits their research projects and videos. All of it was funded by gifts large and small from community donors and supporters. But what about the tiniest of library guests? The boardbook crowd had plenty of books, to be sure, but no place to call their own. “There was a space that we always had in mind as a play and learning area for toddler ages,” says outgoing Traverse Area District Library Director Gail Juett. “That’s what our next focus was. We got a bequest from William Engle and funding from our gala, plus so many individual gifts, we decided we had enough to embark on that project.” The now-completed preschool interactive learning area is a haven for toddler-age kids. There’s a play kitchen area, and tools for weighing and measuring, a lighthouse home to Goldilocks and the three bears, a boat built by MasterCraft Cabinets. And of course, there are books. “There’s more than one way to learn,” Juett says. “You can learn through doing as well as learning through reading; this is one component of encouraging children to learn and then continuing that through reading. And it helps them in their development.” Traffic in the youth services area has certainly picked up, all thanks to recent renovations and additions made possible by donors. “We appreciate gifts of all sizes,” says Juett. “I’d want donors to know that we seriously consider the best use for those gifts, the kind of project or materials that we feel would make the biggest impact for our community.” “I see all the little kids in there now—it brings tears to my eyes,” Juett adds. “It’s so satisfying to see them enjoying it.” More at tadl.org. —Cara McDonald

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Because CHILDREN MATTER

Leelanau Children’s Center

Providing high-quality early childhood education and advocating for children, parents, and families.

90% of the brain is developed by Age 5

Donate now and fund our children’s future

Hope Starts Here.

Give the Gift of Hope Please give at: pinerest.org/foundation Choose Designation: Patient Assistance Fund-Traverse City

www.leelanauchildrenscenter.org PO Box 317 • Leland, MI 49564 • (231) 256-7841

pinerest.org/traverse-city

Change Lives - Make a Difference Become a Tutor! The Northwest Michigan Works! Learning Labs help adults in Northwest Michigan to achieve their educational goals. You can help students achieve basic literacy in - Reading - Writing - Math - English as a Second Language Volunteer tutors are needed at the Learning Labs in Benzonia, Cadillac, Kalkaska, Manistee, Petoskey and Traverse City. No experience necessary, training provided.

Be part of our team and help make a difference! For more information contact Josh Anderson. 231-922.6940 josh.anderson@networksnorthwest.org

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HOME AT LAST

A New Hope Kyla was 18 and homeless. Although she had recently graduated from high school, she was having a hard time finding a place to live and spent nights cycling between friends’ couches, the Goodwill Inn and camping in a tent. That’s when youth counselor Jamie VanDuinen of Child and Family Services of Northwest Michigan began working with her. It was December, the temperature hovered around 20 degrees, and because she was living in a tent, Kyla needed urgent help. Throughout the two years they worked together, VanDuinen kept trying to locate resources for Kyla, who was able to keep jobs during that time. After a year and a half of having nowhere to call home, Kyla applied for and received housing through Northern Michigan Community Action Agency—and started a path to a new life. Child and Family Services supports the safety and well-being of children, youth, adults and families in times of crisis, challenge and life transition. From helping youth complete GEDs or access counseling to programs such as Pete’s Place, a safe haven for teens with nowhere to go, the nonprofit offers counseling, services and ongoing support that can be life changing for kids without resources and a stable place to call home. One of the grave challenges facing Michigan youth is suicide—it’s the second leading cause of death for those age 15 to 34. CFS provides community education and training programs to individuals and groups to help anyone become suicide-aware and provide support and intervention to those in crisis. Sometimes, a compassionate guide or a listening ear can make a difference that is life saving or life changing, and donors are a crucial part of providing that support. Kyla now has a job as a caretaker at Medilodge, and she continues to work, pay rent, and plans to attend NMC and pursue becoming a certified nursing assistant. She believes that if it weren’t for the support of her youth services counselor along the way, she would have given up. cfsnwmi.org —Cara McDonald

Last year, a Traverse Magazine reader was flipping through the pages of this very guide. Their loved one had passed away, earmarking a substantial amount of money to go to charity—one that had to be specifically Catholic. The reader paused on the page profiling the Society of St. Vincent De Paul, then picked up the phone. They were suddenly the beneficiary of a truly tremendous gift. A big donation requires big vision. But as part of the society’s mission, “big gifts can’t be hoarded for the future—they have to be utilized within the fiscal year,” explains Julie Ellalasingham, director at the Grand Traverse Area Society of St. Vincent De Paul. “So we bought a house with cash.” Ellalasingham is constantly being invited to public meetings on the issue of affordable housing. “We’re in touch with this huge need. There seem to be a lot of meetings, but not much happening. HUD has loans, but they are restricted. There just seems to be this gap that makes it hard for that person in need to reach out and grab that branch,” she says.

There just seems to be this gap that makes it hard for that person in need . to reach out and grab that branch.. —Julie Ellalasingham

The society realized that the clients they served were struggling to find Section 8 housing, due to the fact that most landlords would rather rent during the summer and make their money in a few short months and at far higher rates than Section 8 pays. They knew that this purchase would help give legs to community members who needed safe and secure housing and were already working hard to provide it for their families. By partnering with another organization who secured Section 8 vouchers and helped find tenants, the St. Vincent DePaul was able to open the home to a single mom and her two children. The society is entirely volunteer run, with income from its thrift shop helping to fund its operations. Gifts like this donation, however, enable them to vastly broaden their scope, allowing them to offer other programs where funds are earmarked to directly support families with housing and other needs. Visit svdptc.org. —Cara McDonald

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Sponsored by:

LIONS OF MICHI 5 7 3 0 E x e c L a n s i n g , M i i n f o @ l m s f . n e t

GAN FOUNDATION u t i v e D r i v e c h i g a n 4 8 9 1 1 – 5 1 7 - 8 8 7 - 6 6 4 0

The Lions of Michigan Foundation is one of only nine Michigan charities eligible to receive direct contributions from Michigan tax payers who file a Michigan Income Tax Return, Form MI-1040. Any Michigan tax payer can now support the Lions of Michigan Red Hot Red Hot Red Hot Foundation by simply checking the box, indicating the amount of their donation on Form 4642: Michigan Bestappropriate Best donation Best 2016 2017 Voluntary Contribution Schedule2015 and attaching Form 4642 to their Michigan Income Tax Return. Winner Winner Winner The Lions of Michigan Foundation is a public charity that was created in 1984 to help Michigan Lions Clubs provide community fine homes in member Michigan Lions Clubs and other organizations to address serious services. The foundation worksBuilding in partnership with its County human needs and improve qualityLeelanau ofFor life.41 Years MyNorth is the home of Traverse Magazine

The Lions of Michigan Foundation helps financially struggling Michigan residents whose options for affordable medical treatment biggsconst@gmail.com are limited. Primarily, the foundation provides vision, hearing and emergency services aimed at helping Michigan residents maintain their independence, excel in school and prosper in life. MICHIGAN Voluntary Contributions Schedule (Form 4642) – Michigan Department of Treasury Filer’s First Name

JOHN

If a Joint Return Spouse’s First Name

JANE 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

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M.I.

Last Name

Filer’s Full Social Security No.

R.

DOE

000-000-0000

L.

DOE

000-000-0000

M.I.

Last Name

Spouse’s Full Social Security No.

A. B. C. Other Amount American Red Cross Michigan Fund $5 $10 $ Animal Welfare Fund $5 $10 $ Children’s Trust Fund – Prevent Child Abuse MI $5 $10 $ Fostering Future Scholarship Trust Fund $5 $10 $ Kiwanis Fund $5 $10 $ Lions of Michigan Foundation Fund $5 $10 $ 25.00 Michigan World War II Legacy Memorial Fund $5 $10 $ Military Family Relief Fund $5 $10 $ United Way Fund $5 $10 $ Add Column D, lines 1 through 9. Enter total of column D here and carry amount to your MI-1040, line 22.

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D. Total Contribution 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

25.00

25.00


LEFT PHOTO COURTESY OF IMPACT 100 // RIGHT PHOTO COURTESY OF EAGLE VILLAGE

WOMEN UNITED About half of the women in the Impact 100 TC group can say this: They’ve never written a check for $1,000 to a charity before. Perhaps they’ve never even considered it, not yet, not until joining this group of lovely, engaging women. But here they are part of something bigger, something that’s bigger, even, than that $1,000. Because there are 99 other women and 99 other checks. And their donations, together, total an unbelievable sum that most can’t imagine giving. Welcome to Impact 100 Traverse City. Since their launch three years ago, the group has given over $800,000 in transformational grants to nonprofits in the five-county region. The giving culminates in an evening where, after review, non-profit grant finalists present to the membership while the women gather to break bread together and vote. One of Impact 100 TC’s first success stories was their donation to Peace Ranch to help fund the first experiential equine therapy center north of Grand Rapids that allows clients (foster children, veterans, etc.) to participate in active feedback with horses to heal their trauma. “It’s truly a no-guilt membership,” says Tonya Wildfong, Impact 100 TC 2019 president. “If you want to support the mission, but don’t have time to serve, no worries! It’s a simple vote at our annual meeting or by absentee ballot. For those who want a more indepth experience, several options are available to donate your time from reviewing grant applications, to planning events, to serving on the board. Many women, one mission.” impacttc.org —Kandace Chapple

A Life-Changer Eagle Village sits on 681 acres in rural Hersey, Michigan, where it’s been for the last 50 years, helping thousands of teens and children build a normal life. The mission of Eagle Village is to work with all people to reach their potential, regardless of their story. Children are placed there by the Department of Health and Human Services because of circumstances in their homes. Eagle Village provides normal childhood experiences for kids who haven’t had them, and teaches a standard of living most would consider normal. Kids go to school at the charter academy on campus, take field trips, eat meals together, and do chores and homework. For many children, Eagle Village is a new beginning and a place to work through their past. In addition to the residential programs, there is an assessment center and an intervention camp program. They also license foster care homes and provide adoption services. There are many ways to give at Eagle Village. Every year, the Eagle Fund goal is $500,000. The fund pays for things like transportation for the children, facility updates such as new refrigerators and mattresses, intervention camp scholarships and trade-focused education. Volunteers are always welcome. Eagle Village is a place of firsts, from a child’s first birthday cake to the first wrapped gift they ever receive. Whether you volunteer to teach kids how to make a meal, or present a class on wood-carving, or anything in between, you will change lives. Learn more at eaglevillage.org. —Kandace Chapple

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TOUR

THANK YOU: TOURGOERS, HOMEOWNERS, BUILDERS, AND VOLUNTEERS! WITH YOUR HELP WE RAISED OVER $10,000 FOR THE CHILD & FAMILY SERVICES OF NORTHWEST MICHIGAN. THANK YOU!

Child & Family Services o f No rth w e s te rn M i ch i gan

SAVE THE DATE FOR 2020! PETOSKEY TOUR: SEPTEMBER 19, 2020 TRAVERSE CITY TOUR: OCTOBER 17, 2020


“Scout Me In” Imagine your son or daughter spending the day outdoors with friends. They might be canoeing or hiking or camping. But–and this is the biggie–without any electronic devices in hand. Sounds impossible, doesn’t it? But that’s exactly the kind of experiences that youths get with the Boy Scouts of America (BSA). “Nature deficit disorder is a growing problem facing todays’ youth,” notes Brad Murray, director of outdoor programs for BSA’s Michigan Crossroads Council. “At our Michigan camps, our kids experience so many ‘firsts.’ First time trying new activities. First time facing independence and true character-building opportunities. First chance to develop real leadership skills. Scouts quickly overcome their need for constant parental dependency.”

LEFT PHOTO COURTESY OF BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA

A HEALTHIER UP NORTH

Michigan boasts eight camps throughout the state and the activities and camps offered are endless. Scouts might be found camping in Adirondacks (three-sided shelters) or taking part in farm-to-table projects. Others might try muzzle loading, paintball or throwing primitive spears and tomahawks. There’s also swimming, horseback riding and canoeing (some trips span four days and cover 75 miles!). But most of all: Scouts form friendships. “Scouts at camp are given the opportunity to develop skills, make true friendships and build lasting memories,” Murray says. There are different Scout programs from kindergarten all the way up to age 20. For the first time in its 100+ year history, the BSA is open to both young men and women. Donations fund resources for youth camps, recruitment, professional staff, training for volunteers and more. michiganscouting.org. —Kandace Chapple

The McLaren Northern Michigan Foundation has the privilege of partnering with benevolent community members who wish to make a difference in the lives of patients and those dedicated to their care. At any moment, throughout McLaren Northern Michigan, gifts are changing lives. For instance, at the same time that a hearing test is given to a newborn, a leading-edge surgery allowing for quick recovery is performed. While an oncology nurse navigator explains the next steps for cancer treatment, a patient being discharged is handed gas cards so he can drive home. And, as a scholarship recipient begins the first shift of her nursing career, a patient and his family are welcomed at the Hiland Cottage for compassionate end-of-life care. All of these moments, and countless others, are made possible through the act of giving; the desire to help others receive, or provide, the best care possible. The Foundation disburses millions of dollars each year to fund new technology, programs, education and facility enhancements, as well as to assist patients throughout the 22 counties it serves in Northern Michigan and the eastern Upper Peninsula. Gifts of every size make a difference. Donations can be made to the area of greatest need or to a variety of funding needs, including the Foundation’s current priority, the Building the Future of Health Care Campaign. This campaign supports construction of a new 170,000-sqare-foot wing and extensive renovations at the Petoskey Campus. Consider giving by calling 231-487-3500, texting GIVE to 231-487-6033 or visiting  mclarennorthernbuilds.org. —Kandace Chapple

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KINDNESS, COME WHAT MAY A few winters ago, a family in Leelanau County woke one night to a fire in their chimney while an ice storm raged outside. It spread so quickly that they escaped with their lives—and not much else. But as the fire department was dispatched, someone else was on their way to the family too: Red Cross volunteers. Strangers in the night, so to speak, they arrived and offered the family a warm place to process what had just happened, immediate financial assistance to buy what they needed to get through the next few days, and comfort. “A year later, a letter arrived from the family. They had rebuilt their home and moved forward,” says Cathy Anthofer-Fialon, executive director of the Northern Michigan Chapter. “They were amazed that Red Cross volunteers had come out on icy roads in the middle of the night to support them. But that’s what we do!” Home fires are the most common disaster in Northern Michigan, according to Anthofer-Fialon, and volunteers like those in Leelanau County make up 80 percent of the American Red Cross workforce. Donations fund many of their support items: $30 provides a four-person family with a comfort kit and blankets after a fire, $15 provides a smoke alarm installation and $100 provides “clean-up” kits for five families after a flood. “We were there when the straight line winds blew through Glen Arbor in 2015,” Anthofer-Fialon says. “Red Cross provided cleanup kits and tarps to families to begin the recovery process.” Visit redcross.org to learn more. —Kandace Chapple

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5044 175th Ave. Hersey, MI 49639 231.832.2234 www.eaglevillage.org

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—Cathy Anthofer-Fialon

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PO Box 601 Frankfort, MI 49635 231.352.7644 pointbetsie.org

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They were amazed . that Red Cross volunteers . had come out on icy roads . in the middle of the night . to support them. . But that’s what we do!.

Point Betsie Lighthouse Changing the future one life at a time

The Friends of Point Betsie Lighthouse, Inc. is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization dedicated to maintaining and operating the Point Betsie Light Station in support of Benzie County. Over the past 15 years the organization has raised funds for matching grants for the restoration of the historic buildings that are now completed. The focus now is on the other needed capital improvements, the “Eagle Village gave me an opportunity at life that I never thought I would have,” said Carissa, one of our Road End/Parking Project and the Shoreline Protection System. recent graduates. “They showed me I’m worth it.” The approved Road End/Parking Project design will provide 33 paved parking spaces, proper pedestrian flow surrounding Eagle Village . . . Offers life-changing solutions. Many youth comethe spaces, a turnaround and drop off area, a boardwalk to the to Eagle Village without hope or plans for the future. beach area, and improved drainage. The Friends are working Providing a safe haven and a place to thrive is just the beginning. Our treatment team develops an in cooperation with Benzie County and the Benzie County individual plan that considers each child’s current strengths and past struggles. Resilience and growth Road Commission on the project. The remainder of the road come through overcoming trials. Does meaningful work. Witnessing every child’s was resurfaced this past summer. A State grant is providing response to this genuine culture is a true reward, as those who have experienced extreme trauma begin tofunds to complete the engineering documents. The Friends make positive progress. Staff invest expertise, energy, have some funds in place but will need additional resources patience, and plenty of heart into each child’s life. Creates firsts for kids. Boys and girls who come to complete the project. The planning phase is underway for to Eagle Village have gone through experiences that are improvements to the Shoreline Protection System. hard for us to imagine. The majority were abandoned, abused, or neglected. Many children have never experienced the joys of childhood—such as receiving a birthday cake or a wrapped Christmas present. Strong donor support has been a key factor from the beginning, They have not felt valued, been told they are smart and talented, learned what a respectful relationship is, enabling the Friends group to secure matching grants to restore or had a true friend. These are authentic experiences we are able to create at Eagle Village, and they are and maintain this iconic site and its historic buildings for incredible to witness! future generations to enjoy. Changes lives. Difficult past circumstances do not need to determine a child’s future, and a loving family is the basic support system in a child’s life. Men and women who work and volunteer at Eagle Village, or give financially, believe this is true. They are investing in a program that changes lives through family


help make an

Since 2017, we’ve awarded more than $800,000 of transformative change to our Northern Michigan communities because of women like you.

JOIN US TO MAKE AN IMPACT.

M A N Y WO M EN, O N E M I S S I O N .

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Versiti is a fusion of blood donors and blood health innovators who recognize that the gifts of blood and life are precious. With eight permanent donor centers throughout Michigan and hundreds of blood drives held each day throughout our communities, we’re committed to giving back to Michiganders. Blood is precious, and it’s a life-saving gift we can only give each other. More importantly, the need for blood is constant. Every day, patients who are rushed into emergency surgery, who are undergoing chemotherapy treatments for cancer, and who suffer from life-altering blood disorders like sickle cell disease rely on the generosity of blood donors in Michigan. Every time these selfless donors roll up a sleeve to donate blood, they give the gift of life to a friend, neighbor or colleague in need. Versiti is committed to helping all patients with blood diseases and cancers. Our world-renowned Blood Research Institute brings together outstanding minds with unparalleled expertise in transfusion medicine, transplantation, stem cell and cellular therapy, oncology and genomics, diagnostic lab services, and medical and scientific expertise. Their combination of skill and knowledge results in novel treatments that greatly improve patient outcomes and give hope to those who are struggling. At Versiti, we are passionate about improving the lives of these patients, as well as helping our healthcare partners in Michigan thrive. A philanthropic gift to Versiti Blood Center of Michigan enables our team to spend more time researching better treatments and cures for blood disorders and cancers and brings these life-saving discoveries to patients more quickly. To make a gift to Versiti Blood Center of Michigan, visit versiti. org/financial-giving.


Meet Isaac Blood and bone marrow transplant recipient and Michigan native Isaac Walker is alive today because of the generosity of donors in our community. When he was 2, he was diagnosed with leukemia. During two years of treatment, he received numerous blood transfusions as his cancer went into remission. However, in 2015, Isaac’s leukemia returned and he underwent a successful bone marrow transplant that saved his life. These gifts of life allowed him to beat cancer and even travel to Texas to meet and thank his bone marrow donor. Now happy and healthy, Isaac wants to grow up and be a cancer researcher and give back to other patients just like him.

“I don’t want kids to go through as much pain as I had to,” he said.

Our Mission

Contact Us

Versiti was founded with the belief that by working together, our blood centers can better serve people’s urgent need for life-saving healthcare. That we can strengthen and restore the health of our communities while conducting groundbreaking research. That we can integrate scientific innovation, medicine and service in ways that no other blood health organization can match.

Versiti Blood Center of Michigan 1036 Fuller Ave NE Grand Rapids, MI 49503 866-642-5663 versiti.org/Michigan

Those beliefs are born of one of our greatest strengths: our commitment to the mission.

Blood Center of Michigan


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The Campaign for Generations 3860 N. Long Lake Road, Suite D Traverse City, MI 49684 231.929.7911 www.gtrlc.org MISSION STATEMENT Protecting significant natural, scenic and farm lands – and advancing stewardship – now and for future generations. EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Glen Chown BOARD OF DIRECTORS John Collins – Chair Cortney Danbrook – Vice Chair Greg Seman – Treasurer Paul Brink – Secretary Perry Adams Betsy Calcutt Linda Cline Don Coe Kathleen Guy Jim Huckle Jennifer Jaffe Chip May Barbara Nelson-Jameson Susan Palmer John D. Paul Jr. Kevin Russell Evan Smith Maureen Smyth Allen Taylor Terrie Taylor

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The Grand Traverse Regional Land Conservancy presses on with its Campaign for Generations, a six-year, $71.4-million campaign comprised of dozens of exciting land protection and recreation projects in the Conservancy’s service area of Antrim, Benzie, Grand Traverse, Kalkaska and Manistee counties. Read on to find out more about three of those projects (all to be wonderful new public nature preserves if fundraising is successful), and be sure to visit www.gtrlc.org to read about the campaign and the many other projects included!

1. Proposed Torch River Nature Preserve (Antrim County): A spectacular property with rich ecological value and substantial recreation potential, this dazzling 295-acre property along the Torch River represents one of the centerpieces of GTRLC’s campaign. Protecting this largely wooded property as a GTRLC-owned nature preserve would protect water quality in the Chain of Lakes, safeguard wildlife habitat and allow for a top-notch trail system in a relatively underserved area. While remarkable in its own right, this property combined with a private conservation easement on a neighboring 211-acre property form a “Ribbon of Protection” that encompasses more than 500 contiguous acres that stretch roughly a mile from Skegemog Lake to the Torch River. Total cost: $2,215,593 Remaining need: $1,247,145


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2. Proposed Lower Woodcock Lake Nature Preserve (Benzie County) This 230-acre property contains the entirety of undeveloped Lower Woodcock Lake, a picturesque 22-acre lake that’s in the upper reaches of the ecologically significant and much beloved Platte River watershed. GTRLC has completed dozens of land protection projects with appreciable portions of shoreline on lakes of various sizes, but the list of projects with entire undeveloped lakes is very short (and happens to include #3 as well). The Lower Woodcock Lake property also contains a rare half mile of undeveloped frontage on the Platte River. About 70 percent of the property – including portions of all four sides – borders state forest. Such contiguity is critical for wildlife corridors, forest health, water quality and passive recreation opportunities. Total cost: $2,495,254 Remaining need: $100,000

3. Proposed Upper Manistee Headwaters: The Milock Family Preserve (Kalkaska County) The nearly 1,300 acres that surround Grass Lake used to be home to Camp Tapico, a Boy Scout camp treasured by generations of scouts. Now, the Conservancy hopes to turn this property into a stunning new nature preserve. Along with providing habitat for rare and endangered species and protecting water quality in the north branch of the Manistee River, this is another property with tremendous passive recreation potential. GTRLC is working hard to raise the remaining funds in order to permanently protect this property and open it to the public as a nature preserve. All gifts help, so please consider supporting this (and other!) Conservancy projects. Total cost: $3,943,275 Remaining need: $1,522,491

2019

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Changing the future one life at a time 5044 175th Ave. Hersey, MI 49639 231.832.2234 www.eaglevillage.org

“Eagle Village gave me an opportunity at life that I never thought I would have,” said Carissa, one of our recent graduates. “They showed me I’m worth it.” Eagle Village . . . Offers life-changing solutions. Many youth come to Eagle Village without hope or plans for the future. Providing a safe haven and a place to thrive is just the beginning. Our treatment team develops an individual plan that considers each child’s current strengths and past struggles. Resilience and growth come through overcoming trials. Does meaningful work. Witnessing every child’s response to this genuine culture is a true reward, as those who have experienced extreme trauma begin to make positive progress. Staff invest expertise, energy, patience, and plenty of heart into each child’s life. Creates firsts for kids. Boys and girls who come to Eagle Village have gone through experiences that are hard for us to imagine. The majority were abandoned, abused, or neglected. Many children have never experienced the joys of childhood—such as receiving a birthday cake or a wrapped Christmas present. They have not felt valued, been told they are smart and talented, learned what a respectful relationship is, or had a true friend. These are authentic experiences we are able to create at Eagle Village, and they are incredible to witness! Changes lives. Difficult past circumstances do not need to determine a child’s future, and a loving family is the basic support system in a child’s life. Men and women who work and volunteer at Eagle Village, or give financially, believe this is true. They are investing in a program that changes lives through family involvement and processing past events. Together, we experience the joy of witnessing youth transform as they understand they are valued individuals who can make goals for now and for the future.

Why Should You Get Involved? “Why have Sallie and I supported Eagle Village? Simply because we believe every child of God is a special person who deserves to be cared for and nurtured to achieve their full potential. We see this happening every day at Eagle Village. The young people win and our society is improved by their positive participation.” —Kerm Campbell, Foundation Board President

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Summer field trip to Dow Gardens

Over the past ten years, Eagle Village has served approximately 161 children from the Grand Traverse area in our Residential and Intervention Programs, and many more through our respite camps. I first came into contact with Eagle Village sometime in the early seventies when I heard the founder, Kermit Hainley, speak at a lunch meeting. I remember how his description of Eagle Village impacted me as he spoke about their mission and the children they were serving. Up until that time, I hadn’t really thought about the issues these children faced each day. I thought all families were like mine.

A loving family is a child’s basic support system

It broke my heart and I wanted to help. It just didn’t seem fair and I felt obligated to get involved. Through my years of involvement and support, I was honored to serve on the Board of Directors. The difficult task of mending broken families—and giving neglected and abused children a decent shot at life—was worthy of my time, talents, and financial backing. It has always felt, to me, like the right thing to do. I couldn’t imagine growing up and not having anyone in the bleachers cheering me on. I couldn’t imagine having my relationships with my family severed because of how they treated me. In talking with the children over the years I realized how important nurturing and caring for them is, and how much every child needs a family. The very thing I took for granted growing up was so desperately needed—that is why I think the Village is important and relevant. When our business moved to a new location, donating the real estate from the former location was an easy decision for my wife, Cindy, and I to make. The Village could use it for counseling, foster care, adoption, and for carrying out their mission with kids and families. It was the perfect thing for us to do. I feel so good about my involvement with Eagle Village. I encourage everyone to give this place all their love and support—it will make you feel good also! —Denny Lerner, Foundation Board Member 2019

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Child and Family Services of Northwestern Michigan CHILD AND FAMILY SERVICES OF NORTHWESTERN MICHIGAN Traverse City Harbor Springs Gaylord 231-946-8975 cfs@cfs3L.org www.cfsnwmi.org SERVICE AREA 20+ Counties in Northern Michigan BOARD OF DIRECTORS Diane Emling, President Lisa Thomas, Vice President Ruth Gilmer, Treasurer Rick Summers, Secretary Krista Goldman Patrick Lamb Chris Mohrhardt Robert Needham Lauren Pfeil Kaylee Simerson Rachel Wasserman Melissa Erikson Joanie Hazelton

For over 80 years, Child and Family Services (CFS) has responded to the community’s changing needs through a wide range of programs. We are dedicated to helping people of all ages overcome life’s challenges.

CHILD WELFARE The Foster Care and Adoption programs connect foster and adoptive parents with children who have experienced abuse or neglect. Emergency, respite, short-term, and long-term placements are needed and available. Ongoing support and training is provided for foster and adoptive parents.

BEHAVIORAL HEALTH CFS’ licensed therapists provide individual and family counseling on a variety of issues to people of all ages. CFS works with many insurance plans, including Medicaid. Services are offered on a sliding fee scale. In addition, the Behavioral Health Program includes: •

Children’s Trauma Assessment Center, which provides comprehensive assessments and treatment to children and youth who have experienced significant trauma. Safe Haven, a supervised visitation and safe exchange program for families affected by high conflict and/or domestic violence, which is the only program of its kind in northern Michigan. Wraparound, an intensive program supporting the mental health needs of a child and their family members, that is offered with a referral from Community Mental Health.

THIRD LEVEL Third Level Services merged with CFS in 2014, allowing for more sustainable and comprehensive services, including: •

Youth Services Program, for youth ages 12-20 who are experiencing conflict at home and are at risk of running away or homelessness. Pete’s Place Youth Shelter, is a safe place to stay in Traverse City for youth ages 12-17. Pete’s place provides a place to go for youth who are couch-surfing, homeless, running away, or when it’s too hard to be home. Suicide Prevention and Community Education, customizable trainings by professional staff are available on an ongoing basis.

YOUTHWORK YouthWork partners with young adults ages 17-26 with service organizations and public agencies to complete environmental and conservation projects for communities. Youth receive stipends, educational awards, and on the job training while communities get critical work completed. It’s a win-win!

BOARD OF TRUSTEES Terry Paquet, President Ken Petterson, Vice President Warren “Bud” Cline III, Treasurer Erik Falconer, Secretary EmmLee Cameron Bob Cornwell Jeremy Hawke Galen Krupka Sheila Morgan Rob Tubbs

To learn more about how you can help: Call: 231-946-8975 Visit: www.cfsnwmi.org Like us on Facebook/Instagram: @cfsnwmi 28

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Scouting’s Positive Impact Teaches Life Lessons 1499 Business Park Dr, Traverse City, MI 49686 231-947-7071 michiganscouting.org/ dontate-friends-of-scouting

MONA SHORES – A difference of $60 stood between Mason Schlafer and his attempt for the second consecutive year to be the top seller in the nation following the conclusion of the Boy Scouts of America’s 2018 Popcorn sale. But, his sales total of $88,017 did earn him the top seller spot in the state of Michigan, again, and firmly cemented his reputation as a young man to watch – not only for his sales acumen, but for his ability to concede with grace. Not long after learning that another Boy Scout had garnered top national Popcorn sale honors, Mason called him, “so that we could congratulate him,” he said. Mason’s father, Matt, said it was the right thing to do. “It comes from mom and dad,” Matt Schlafer said. “There’s no scoreboard to watch. You can only do what you can do and pray and hope for the best. It goes back to the Cub Scouts when you’re in a Pinewood Derby, there’s no guarantee that your car will be fast, but you don’t want to see it too low or too high.” Mason, who lives in Norton Shores, was the top seller in the nation in 2017 after selling more than $57,000 worth of Popcorn. In 2016, he sold more than $20,000-worth, breaking the previous regional 13-state Popcorn sales record of $18,730 which earned him top seller honors in the Boy Scouts of America Central Region. Mason, 13, attends Mona Shore Middle School and is a member of Troop 1053.

His Troop is part of the President Ford Field Service Council which serves more than 10,000 youth – males and females – in 30 counties of Northern and Western Michigan with service centers in Grand Rapids and Traverse City. While breaking those records was important to him, what he was able to do with the money he earned from those sales was even more important. In 2016, he purchased 10 years’ worth of Pinewood Derby trophies for Troop 1053, which is the one he belongs to, and last year he purchased tents to replace 20-year-old tents that leaked when it rained, in addition to camp scholarships. In March, 2018, Mason’s troop paid the cost of renting a Feeding America food truck filled with donated food that was distributed to people in need in at St. Gregory’s Episcopal Church. In December, Mason used proceeds from his Popcorn sales to cover the cost of another food truck. “You ask for a certain amount of pounds to feed families,” Matt Schlafer said. “We got a truck that had capacity for 5,000 pounds of food and had close to 100 people go through the line to get food. Mason and his fellow Scouts unloaded the truck, arranged food on tables and helped people make their selections as they went through the line. “The boys get to see how blessed they are and the impact they’re making,” Matt Schlafer said. “Mason decided he wanted to spearhead this and wanted to make it part of his sales goal.” Mason said he discovered that when he was able to share how he planned to use the money he earned, customers felt more invested and liked the idea that they were supporting an effort that would benefit those in need. Those who know Mason, know that he tends to be a bit shy and very humble. He prefers to let his actions speak for him, but did say he thinks he is a role model for other Scouts. “I am somebody they can look up to because I’m successful at what I do and because of the model I have set with philanthropy and service.”

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The Society of St. Vincent de Paul-Grand Traverse Area 1207 Woodmere Ave. Traverse City, MI 49685 231-947-8466 svdpTC.org BOARD OF DIRECTORS David Baldwin, President Terry Rae, Vice President Jim Warren, Secretary Julie Ellalasingham, Executive Director Pat Cesere, Spiritual Advisor Joann Swogger, Board Member Larry Skendzel, Board Member

Become part of the Vincentian family. For more information visit us at 1207 Woodmere Ave, TC or call 231.974.8466 Store hours; MWF 10-3 Sat 10-4 For more information about the RIH Project, call Pat Elshaw at 231.392.6821

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Since 2015, the Grand Traverse Area Society of St. Vincent de Paul (GTA SVdP) has been offering monetary assistance to community members facing financial crisis. The mission of the Society is to prevent homelessness, promote employment and provide warmth. The bulk of the funds requested and distributed have prevented homelessness for over 800 families and individuals in the past four years. In late 2017, GTA SVdP was awarded a generous donation from the estate of the late Mr. and Mrs. Zambone. Many hours were spent on creative and appropriate options for use of the funds, as the National SVdP bylaws restrict its conferences from retaining funds for future giving. After long thoughtful and prayerful discussions, and a close look at the most frequent requests for aid, the Board decided to apply the funds towards the shortage of affordable housing in the community. Housing prices for both purchase and rentals are under strong upward pressure from the region’s resort and recreational appeal, leaving few housing options for the lower-income population. Although there are housing assistance subsidies available to renters via state MSHDA (Michigan State Housing Development Authority) and federal HUD (Housing and Urban Development) programs, the allowable voucher amounts are much lower than the fair market rental prices most landlords can obtain. As a result, the number of housing voucher recipients far outnumber the housing providers. Once a voucher is awarded, the recipient has 90 days to find housing before the voucher expires, which is too often the case, sending the message back to the state and federal programs that there is little demand for housing subsidies. A crisis in itself.

The Grand Traverse Area St. Vincent de Paul would like to thank GOD, the Catholic Gifts/Thrift store patrons, financial donors and volunteers for making this Catholic Mission possible. Since restructuring the organization in March 2015, SVdP has been blessed with the opportunity to serve over 5000 individuals facing financial crisis with over $500,000 in aid.

As a not-for-profit, organization committed to assistance, GTA SVdP decided that the purchase of a rental property dedicated to voucher recipients, seemed very appropriate. Area service agencies familiar with housing subsidies were sought to work with SVdP on making this project a success. Northwest Michigan Supportive Housing (NMSH) was the most suitable fit. NMSH assists persons experiencing homelessness and mental illness by offering support in locating housing, budgeting, employment retention, tenant responsibilities and more. NMSH also supports the landlords that house their clients. It’s a win for all involved. Thanks to the Zambone family, a single mother and her 2 children now have safe, secure housing, and the RIHP (Reduced Income Housing Project) has begun. “While easing the burden for one family with our three-bedroom home is a good place to start,” says SVdP Board President, David Baldwin, “SVdP is under no illusion that this is a substantial improvement in the overall problem of affordable housing. But if a small, all volunteer organization like ours can do this, then larger, more prosperous agencies can do likewise, and together we may make a difference in the availability of affordable housing in the Grand Traverse area.”


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McLaren Northern Michigan Foundation Building the Future of Health Care INVESTING IN THE FUTURE 360 Connable Avenue Petoskey, MI 49770 Phone: 231-487-3500 Email: info@northernhealth.org McLarenNorthernBuilds.org MISSION STATEMENT To receive and administer funds to support the mission of McLaren Northern Michigan and support programs that enhance the well-being of the community. SERVICE AREA A non-profit regional referral center, McLaren Northern Michigan serves 22 counties in the northern Lower Peninsula and eastern portion of the Upper Peninsula. BOARD OF DIRECTORS Elise F. Hayes, Chair Robert (Ham) Schirmer, Vice Chair Matthew J. Frentz, CPA, Treasurer Miriam Hollar, Secretary Kal Attie, MD Robbie Buhl Todd Burch, President & CEO McLaren Northern Michigan Steven C. Cross Arthur G. Hailand, III Ellen Hatch Patrick Leavy Rogan L. Saal James Schroeder, PhD Darcie Sharapova, MD Tracy Souder, MA, CCC-SLP Pamela L. Wyett

McLaren Northern Michigan strives to improve the health and quality of life for more than 430,000 permanent residents across 22 counties, while also serving a seasonal resident and visitor population migrating to and from the area throughout the year. As a nationally recognized acute and outpatient care provider of high-end clinical services including heart, cancer, orthopedics, and neurosciences, a primary goal of our non-profit hospital is to provide any patient, at any time, with immediate access to the health care he or she needs. The Petoskey facilities, which were designed to provide high standards of care in the 1930s, The Building the Future of Health Care project will 1950s, and 1970s, are aging and reaching their enhance the patient experience in numerous ways. limits to accommodate modern health care For example, private patient rooms will be equipped trends, advancements in technology, as well with leading edge technology, including virtual as critical workflow efficiencies, which all nursing — an addition to the bed side nurse that contribute to a safe patient care environment. increases communication and clinical resources for The Building the Future of Health Care the patient and their family. project involves renovating portions of the existing facility, as well as constructing a 170,000 sq. ft. wing that will offer 92 private patient rooms, including new Intensive Care and Cardiovascular Units, 12 observation beds, 10 new operating rooms, and centrally-located patient services with improved wayfinding. In addition to enhancing the physical environment, the Building the Future of Health Care project will improve patient privacy and overall experience, as well as aid in recruiting top physicians, nurses and clinicians.

HOW YOU CAN HELP More than 1,200 generous contributors have helped to build the future of health care by giving over $32 million to support the $158 million project. McLaren Northern Michigan Foundation invites you to join in its continuing commitment to serve the health care needs of northern Michigan. Every gift is important and has an impact for future patients.

The Building the Future of Health Care project aims to make McLaren Northern Michigan the best place for physicians to practices, employees to work, and most importantly, for patients to receive care.

CHIEF DEVELOPMENT OFFICER Patrick J. Schulte, CFRE

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610 Woodmere Avenue Traverse City, MI 49686 Phone: 231.932.8500 www.tadl.org LIBRARY DIRECTOR Michele P. Howard BOARD OF TRUSTEES Caroline Gersch, President Micheal Vickery, Vice President Joseph Jones, Secretary Jason Gillman, Treasurer Stephanie Mathewson Susan Odgers Carol Sullivan LIBRARY NETWORK LOCATIONS Main Library - Traverse City East Bay Branch Kingsley Branch Fife Lake Public Library Interlochen Public Library Peninsula Community Library SERVICE AREA AND POPULATION (More than 97,000 residents) Grand Traverse County, Elmwood Township in Leelanau County and Almira and Inland Townships in Benzie County

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Libraries are the foundation of the communities they serve. For 37 years and counting, the Traverse Area District Library (TADL) is the embodiment of service and enrichment for residents of and visitors to Traverse City and communities throughout Grand Traverse County. With a world-class professional staff, TADL daily fulfils its mission to provide dynamic resources and innovative services to stimulate intellectual curiosity, facilitate lifelong learning, promote literacy, and nurture personal enrichment.

BOOKS ARE JUST THE BEGINNING. Of course we offer fiction and nonfiction books for readers of all ages, infants to adults. Available in print, audiobooks and e-books, we encourage access to reading materials that fit your interests and lifestyle. TADL also offers CDs, DVDs, video games, vinyl records, puppets, STEM learning kits, Storytime kits, Book Club kits, and so much more. In recent months, we’ve added lending equipment such as musical instruments (guitar, ukulele, theremin, synthesizers and drums), plus telescopes, LCD projectors, image transfer devices, and record players.

A GATHERING PLACE FOR THE COMMUNITY. Our programs and events are always free and open to the public, with a variety of topics for audiences young and old, including annual signature programs like the Summer Reading Club and many others. Visit our website calendar for the events that make your TADL library location the magical place it has always been and will always be. Many of our locations have public meeting rooms, small to large, that are available on a firstcome, first-served reservation basis for community presentations, workshops and gatherings.

LIBRARY FUNDING. The Traverse Area District Library is supported by an Operating Millage levy of 0.94310 mils, expiring 2025, as approved by the voters of Grand Traverse County plus the City of Traverse City residents of Elmwood Twp. in Leelanau County. Public funding provides for day-to-day operations, but community support from additional donations allows us to flourish and grow!

HOW YOU CAN HELP. Use your library! Get or renew your library card and visit one or more of our six locations. • Talk about the library with your friends and family. Invite them to attend a program or event with you. • Become a Member of the Friends of the Traverse Area District Library. The Friends are an enthusiastic group of men and women who contribute their time, creativity, and fundraising proceeds to further TADL’s mission. Learn more and apply for membership online: tadl.org/friends. •

DONATIONS AND ESTATE GIFTS. Your donation will enrich, not replace, traditional tax-based funding and allows TADL to expand programming and services by adding transformational capacity to improve the library for children and adults of this region. Recent estate gifts have provided funding for early literacy computers and the preschool interactive learning area, new furniture for the children’s department at the Main Library and East Bay Branch, and expansion of other services. More information about donating can be found at tadl. org/donate or talk to your financial advisor or attorney about estate planning.


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Grow Benzie 5885 Frankfort Highway (M-115) Benzonia, Michigan 49616 231-882-9510 www.GrowBenzie.org COUNTIES SERVED Benzie Grand Traverse Leelanau Manistee Wexford EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Joshua Stoltz BOARD OF DIRECTORS Betsy Evans, President Mike Zielinski, Vice President Scott Harrison, Sec-Treasurer Joe Buechel Sally Blackburn Jessica Carland Bryan Langepfeffer Bernie Ware Elaine Walton

Culinary Demos with Prescription Foods

PAST & PRESENT Eleven years ago Grow Benzie was a small group of volunteers renovating an abandoned 4-acre commercial plant nursery. The greenhouse roofs were cracked and falling apart while the retail building was just a bare concrete floor with electrical hazards and a leaky roof. Years of sweat equity went into grant writing, work-bees and fundraisers. Today, Grow Benzie is a bustling social center with hundreds of volunteers and program participants that utilize the buildings and grounds daily. We have a full time director, part-time staff, volunteer coordinators, and up-and-coming entrepreneurs whom we help incubate their business. Grow Benzie’s mission is to foster positive activity that connects people to HEALTHFUL FOODS, JOBS, LIFE SKILLS, and EACH OTHER and provide a SPACE that nurtures this activity. PLACE & PEOPLE After several years of growth, Grow Benzie hired its first full time director to pursue a plan with three major strategies: leverage facilities and grounds, increase funding, and develop programs based on community needs without duplicating efforts. Today we partner with several organizations that utilize Grow Benzie for a wide range of activities, most which generate revenue through program fees or rent. The Benzie Bee Guild farms honey, Days for Girls has made 3000+ reusable feminine hygiene kits, 200+ participants received prescription foods, 500+ people attended discussion potlucks last winter, 4,000+ folks visited our Farmers Market this summer, and dozens of organizations utilize our shared studio space and event center for meetings and trainings throughout the year. After School Woodshop

YOUTH Our space is a model landscape for youth to learn job and life skills. We’re known for providing and coordinating after school activities like woodshop and cooking, but Grow Benzie is also ideal for job training. Partnering with several organizations, we provide students hands-on experiences helping grow vegetables, prepare and serve food in our kitchen, serve customers at the market, maintain facilities, and create an online story map of all the edible plants and learning stations at Grow Benzie. SUPPORT Grow Benzie is not reinventing any wheelswe’re capitalizing on our place and people to leverage resources and then maximize the collective benefits. Your donation helps us continue this leadership in providing a unique community space and coordinating efficiencies in systems like health and wellness, food, and education. Becoming a member, making a donation or legacy gift, and naming a building are all generous ways you can make a long term impact. For informational videos or to donate online, visit GrowBenzie.org. To schedule a tea and learn more about the impact of our systems work, contact director Josh Stoltz at 231-640-0200 or josh@GrowBenzie.org. Field Trip to Sewing Studio

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GIVING DIRECTORY

Addiction Treatment Services, Inc.

1010 S Garfield Ave., Traverse City, MI 49686 231.346.5216 • addictiontreatmentservices.org

American Red Cross of Northern Michigan

735 South Garfield Ave., Ste. B100, Traverse City, MI 49686 231.947.7286 • redcross.org/michigan Find out more on page 4

Benzie Area Historical Society and Museum 6941 Traverse Ave, Benzonia, MI 49616 231.882.5539 • benziemuseum.org

Boy Scouts of America- Presidential Ford Council

1499 Business Park Dr, Traverse City, MI 49686 231.947.7071 • michiganscouting.org/donate-friends-of-scouting Find out more on page 29

Grand Traverse Regional Community Foundation 223 Lake Ave Suite B, Traverse City, MI 49684 231.935.4066 • gtrcf.org Find out more on the inside front cover

Grand Traverse Regional Land Conservancy 3860 N Long Lake Rd # D, Traverse City, MI 49684 231.929.7911 • gtrlc.org Find out more on pages 24-25

Grow Benzie

5885 Frankfort Hwy, Benzonia, MI 49616 231.882.9510 • growbenzie.org Find out more on page 33

Habitat for Humanity-Harbor Springs 8460 M-119, Harbor Springs, MI 49740 231.347.8440 • northwestmihabitat.org

Child and Family Services of Northwestern Michigan

HomeStretch Nonprofit Housing Corp

Dennos Museum Center

Impact 100 TC

Disability Network Northern Michigan

Leelanau Conservancy

Traverse City, Harbor Springs, and Gaylord 231.946.8975 • cfsnwmi.org Find out more on page 28

Northwestern Michigan College 1701 East Front Street, Traverse City, MI 49686 231.995.1055 • dmc@nmc.edu • dennosmuseum.org

415 East Eighth Street, Traverse City, MI 49686 231.922.0903 • disabilitynetwork.org

Downtown T.C. Association

303 E. State St., Ste. C, Traverse City, MI 49685 downtowntc.com

Eagle Village

5044 175th Ave., Hersey, MI 49639 231.305.6511 • eaglevillage.org Find out more on page 26-27

Elizabeth Lane Oliver Art Center

132 Coast Guard Rd., Frankfort, MI 49635 231.352.4151 • oliverart.org

Fishtown Preservation

203 Cedar St, Leland, MI 49654 231.256-8878 • fishtownmi.org Find out more on page 6

Friendship Centers of Emmet County 1322 Anderson Road, Petoskey, MI 49770 231.347.3211 • emmetcoa.org

400 Boardman Ave Suite #10, Traverse City, MI 49684 231.947.6001 • homestretchhousing.org Find out more on page 6

526 W 14th St, #264 Traverse City, MI 49685 impacttc.org Find out more on page 21

PO Box 1007, 105 N First Street, Leland, MI 49654 231.256.9665 • leelanauconservancy.org Find out more on page 16

Lions of Michigan Foundation 5730 Executive Dr, Lansing, MI 48911 517.887.6640 • lmsf.net Find out more on page 16

Manna Food Project

8791 McBride Park Ct, Harbor Springs, MI 49740 231.347.8852 • MannaFoodProject.org Find out more on page 12

Northwestern Michigan College Foundation 1701 East Front Street, Traverse City, MI 49686 231.995.1021 • nmc.edu/give

Norte! Youth Cycling

1213 W Civic Center Dr, Traverse City, MI 49686 231.883.2404 • elgruponorte.org Find out more on page 10

Raymond James & Associates

13818 S West Bay Shore Dr, Traverse City MI, 49684 231.946.3650 • raymondjames.com/traverse-city/ Find out more on the inside back cover

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GIVING DIRECTORY Silver Muzzle Cottage

3785 Rice Rd NW, Rapid City, MI 49676 231.264.8408 • silvermuzzlecottage.com

Sleeping Bear Heritage Trail

PO Box 252, Traverse City, MI 49685 231.941.4300 • info@traversetrails.org • sleepingbeartrail.org

Society of St. Vincent de Paul

1207 Woodmere Ave. Traverse City, MI 49686 231.947.8466 • svdptc.org Find out more on page 30

Up North is the Greatest Gift !

TART Trails, Inc.

PO Box 252, Traverse City, MI 49685 231.941.4300 • info@traversetrails.org • traversetrails.org

The Friends of Point Betsie Lighthouse PO Box 601, Frankfort, MI 49635 231.352.7644 • pointbetsie.org Find out more on page 20

The Leelanau School

1 Old Homestead Rd, Glen Arbor, MI 49636 231. 334.5800 • leelanau.org

The Nature Conservancy

101 E César E. Chávez Ave, Lansing, MI 48906 517.316.0300 • nature.org/michigan Find out more on the back cover

The Salvation Army Traverse City 1239 Barlow St, Traverse City, MI 49686 231.946.4644 • SATraversecity.org

Traverse Area District Library

610 Woodmere Ave, Traverse City, MI 49686 231.932.8500 • tadl.org Find out more on page 32

Traverse Symphony Orchestra

300 E. Front Street Suite 230, Traverse City, MI 49684 231.947.7120 • traversesymphony.org

Share it with the ones you love this season.

480 W Mitchell St, Petoskey, MI 49770 231. 487.1006 • CharEmUnitedWay.org Find out more on page 8

Annual gift subscriptions to Traverse, Northern Michigan's Magazine as low as $24.95!

United Way Northwest Michigan

MyNorth.com/give

United Way Char-Em

202 East Grandview Parkway, Traverse City MI 49684 231.947.3200 • unitedwaynwmi.org Find out more on page 8

Versiti Blood Center of Michigan

1036 Fuller Ave NE, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 866.642.5663 • versiti.org/Michigan Find out more on page 22-23

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the transformative power of the arts. 13818 S West Bay Shore Dr • Traverse City, MI 49684 • (231) 946-3650 13818 S West Bay Shore Dr • Traverse City, MI 49684 • (231) 946-3650 Perhaps the most meaningful thing you can do with success is share it. And when you do that with care and conviction, giving can be an art form – one Raymond James has been practicing since 1962. Today, we carry on the charitable legacy of our founder Bob James in words and actions as we seek to go forward by giving back. L IFE WEL L P L A NNED.

Inspire.

In a word, we believe in the transformative power of the arts.

Jeff K. Pasche, CFA® Senior Vice President, Investments Traverse City Complex Manager Keith Carlyon Senior Vice President, Investments Susan Carlyon Senior Vice President, Investments Wealth Management Specialist®

© 2017 Raymond James & Associates, Inc., member New York Stock Exchange/SIPC.

Eric H. Palo Vice President, Investments James Spencer, ChFC®, AAMS® Associate Vice President, Investments Jim Stoops, AWMA®, CRPC® First Vice President, Investments Jennifer Youker, CFP®, CRPC® Financial Advisor

Perhaps the most meaningful thing you can do with success is share it. And when you do that with care and conviction, giving can be an art form – one Raymond James has been practicing since 1962. Today, we carry on the charitable legacy of our founder Bob James in words and actions as we seek to go forward by giving back. L I F E W E L L P LA N N ED.

© 2017 Raymond James & Associates, Inc., member New York Stock Exchange/SIPC.

Raymond James & Associates, Inc., member New York Stock Exchange/SIPC Chartered Retirement Plan SpecialistSM, AWMA®, Accredited Wealth Management AdvisorSM; CRPC®, Accredited Asset Management SpecialistSM and AAMS® are trademarks or registered service marks of the College for Financial Planning in the United States and/ or other countries. Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards Inc. owns the certification marks Certified Financial Planner™ and CFP® in the U.S., which it awards to individuals who successfully complete CFP Board’s initial and ongoing certification requirements.


MICHIGAN

It’s in Our Nature From our stunning landscapes to our sprawling skylines, Michigan is our home. And every inch of it deserves to be safeguarded for the next generation. Walk this path with us to help build a future where people and nature thrive together.

Every gift matters.

Donate today

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nature.org/ourmichigan

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MyNorth GIVE Northern Michigan 2019  

Donate and Volunteer in the Place We Love!

MyNorth GIVE Northern Michigan 2019  

Donate and Volunteer in the Place We Love!

Profile for mynorth

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