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August 14, 2013

Peaches By The Truckload Recipes

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Peach-Infused Treats

Around Town

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Cardinal Party & Bingo

Business

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Girl Scouts’ New CEO

Photo courtesy Pere Marquette Lodge

Dylan Ringhausen of Tom Ringhausen Orchard and Market out of Hardin, IL, shows off Calhoun peaches at last year’s festival.

Pere Marquette Lodge set to host the 6th Annual Peach Festival A great peach migration takes place each year in Grafton, Illinois. Local farmers and their families bring truckloads of fresh produce to the Pere Marquette Lodge’s Annual Peach Festival, which this year is happening on August 25 from 11am – 3pm. This will be the 6th year for the festival, and it will feature more attractions than ever before. Local farmers will be displaying their produce such as tomatoes, watermelons, famous Calhoun County Peaches and more. There will be craft and art vendors, a wine tasting, restaurant specials, and an educational exhibit that includes a documentary showing. Festival goers will enjoy live music which will be provided by a band from Alton who specializes in 70’s rock: Eastside Acoustic Duo. “These guys are great musicians, and they’re just a ton of fun,” says the Lodge’s Director of Marketing and Events Leslie Franklin. Docents will be giving tours of the historic Lodge that was built by hand by

the Civilian Conservation Corps in Pere Marquette State Park. The building is an impressive structure of limestone. Also, while you’re at the festival, you could hike McAdams Peak or try horseback riding. Visitors can walk to the authentic, historic Indian mounds on the park grounds or bring your bike and ride on the bike trail all the way to Alton. New to the peach festival this year is the opportunity to enjoy a River Rambler cruise on the Hakuna Matata tour boat or experience the river like never before while parasailing high above it. The cruise is a 45-minute guided tour of the river’s historical and geographical points of interest. To ride, tickets cost $16 for adults, $14 for seniors and $9 for children ages 17 and under. If you miss them during the festival, they’ll be doing cruises every Saturday beginning in January 2014 to spot bald eagles along the river. If parasailing is more your speed, a

crew will be waiting at the marina to take you on a 90-minute parasailing excursion. A maximum of eight people are See PEACHES page 2

Learn & Play

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Special Education Services

Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters photo courtesy of 20th Century Fox

Movie

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August 14, 2013 • Community News • www.mycnews.com

Vol. 92 No. 33

In This Issue... Around Town

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your guide to good news and events like the Eat Healthy, Be Active Community Workshop

Business

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business news from North County

6 School

St. Louis Community College Hosts Career Exploration Sessions and more school news

Learn & Play

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Book Buzz, Sudoku, and What You Should Know About Special Education Services

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Movie

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Sports

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Recipes

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What’s Happening

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Classifieds

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Over the Fence

Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters “is such a high-quality piece of work that it should have opened much earlier in the summer movie season.” Local sport authority Gary B fills you in on the weekend’s sporting events. Peach-Infused Treats the only events calendar you need to stay entertained all week long

Joe Morice is to Community News readers what Wilson was to Tim Taylor: enjoy a fresh perspective from our in-house blue-collar philosopher. This week: “By, For and Of the People: Our Threatened Miracle”

PEACHES from cover allowed in the boat per trip, and the cost is $75 per person. Two people can parasail at a time for approximately 15-20 minutes each. There is not age limit, but there must be at least 100 pounds between the two people that go up. The Peach Festival is free and open to the pub-

lic. There is free parking at the lodge or the marina after the Lodge’s parking fills up. Visit www. pmlodge.net or call 618.786.2331 for more information. Pere Marquette Lodge is located just across the Illinois River from St. Louis at 13653 Lodge Blvd, Grafton, IL.

Get your event or good news published in Community News: email your information in calendar and article formats to editor@mycnews.com.

Around Town City of Olivette Celebrates Community in Fall Festival; Add Talent Contest, Car Show As the summer months slow, the City of Olivette welcomes fall with an all-out festival, “Olivette on the Go” September 27 - 29. The event takes place in Stacy Park on the corner of Olive Boulevard and Old Bonhomme Road. The festival features a wide array of live music, local food, games and carnival rides. Kim Massie, popular blues diva, will headline on the main stage Saturday evening, followed by the Grateful Dead tribute band Jake’s Leg on Sunday. This year, The City of Olivette announces the first-ever “Olivette’s Got Talent” contest. The contest is open to all. Selected participants will advance to compete live at the festival. Round one will take place on Saturday, Sept. 28, with the final round and award ceremony on Sunday, Sept. 29. Entrants can submit a short video or audio file under two minutes at www.olivetteonthego. com/olivettes-got-talent. Submissions are due by midnight on Sept. 1. The festival also launches its first annual car show taking place Saturday, Sept. 28 from 12 -

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3pm. The first 75 cars will receive dash plaques. Trophies will be awarded to the winners. To register, visit www.olivetteonthego.com/carshow or call the Olivette Parks and Recreation Department at 314.991.1249. The deadline to enter is Sept. 20. Festival traditions, including a chili cook-off on Saturday and a 5K run and Fun Run on Sunday, return for the third year. Attendees can look forward to the big Friday night kick-off with interactive DJ Reggie, walkers and dances. The festival continues with taekwondo and karate demonstrations by St. Louis Black Belt Academy, performances by Everyday Circus, balloon sculpting, juggling, and even a demonstration by the World Bird Sanctuary. Although the “Olivette on the Go” festival celebrates the residents and businesses that reside in Olivette, organizers invite everyone in the region to attend. For a complete listing of events, including updated schedules, free on-site parking areas and maps, visit www.OlivetteOnTheGo.com. Community members are encouraged to volunteer and engage with the city throughout the planning process. Join the conversation through the “Olivette on the Go” Facebook page and receive event updates as the festival draws near. Call Jeff Wade, director of parks and recreation, at 314.991.1249 or visit www.OlivetteOnTheGo.com for additional information.

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www.mycnews.com • Community News • August 14, 2013

Homes for Heroes Formed shortly following the tragic events of September 11, 2001, and bolstered by a shared admiration for the “Heroes” employed as Law Enforcement Officers, Firefighters and EMT’s, a group of Minnesota business owners created an innovative network of real estate professionals called Homes for Heroes. The network of Affiliate Realtors, Lenders and Title Companies were established to offer considerable discounted savings to Heroes when they buy, sell or refinance a home. It is a way for them to say “Thank You.” Their definition of a hero is someone who selflessly serves their community, making it a safer and better places to live. “Because of that philosophy the program has expanded to include educators, military (past and present) and the healthcare industry. Our heroes,and their family members can now take advantage of the program benefits in the St. Louis market area.” said Jeff Fellows of Keller Williams Realty in O’Fallon. “We have already help many of our own St. Louis Heroes”, he added. Affiliates offer the same professional real estate services at a discounted rate. “We offer he-

Low-Income Residents Care About Their Communities

roes these discounts because we just feel it’s the right thing to do. When we found out about the program it was an automatic for us to become an affiliate,” said to St. Louis-based lender, Patrick Agnew of Access Capital Funding. The Homes for Heroes Promise is “No forms, No red tape, No fine print, No hidden fees, No catch.” Through the full service Realtors and Mortgage Lenders, you will receive discounted home selling fees, mortgage and title services. If you are purchasing a home, Homes for Heroes will make a donation to your favorite charity, like Backstoppers, after the closing on your behalf. Homes for Heroes has strict affiliate membership requirements to ensure you will be represented by the best in the industry. Their affiliates receive ongoing training and coaching to ensure they are knowledgeable in how to provide you with the best possible service. You will have an opportunity to complete a survey after the sale and Homes for Heroes affiliates must maintain excellent survey results. To learn more about your available benefits go to www.StLouisHERO.com or call 636.388.8440.

Around Town

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Eat Healthy, Be Active Community Workshop Come learn how healthy eating and physical activity work hand in hand in order for you to live healthier lives. Join us for some fun learning and good foods to taste. Leaders are Kristen Thompson, R.N., and Nicki Reynolds, R.N., both parish nurses from Lutheran Church of the Atonement. They have been teaching healthy lifestyle classes for over three years. This event will happen at the James J. Eagan Center on Wednesdays from September 9 through October 16 from 6 – 7:30pm and is free. However, it does require pre-registration. For more information call 314.921.4466 or 314.921.4250.

Doggie Pool Party

Have you always wanted to take your dog swimming but didn’t know where? Here is your chance. We will be having a Doggie Pool Party at the Koch Park Family Aquatic. Dogs must be up to date on their vaccinations and recently bathed. • All dogs must wear an ID tag and be on a leash unless swimming. • All current vaccination records, including DHLPP or DHLP and Rabies shots are required to swim. These must be written records. Tags are not proof. • All humans must sign a waiver. • Owners must clean up after their dog. Date: August 16 at 6:30 - 8:30pm & August 17 at 10am – 12pm Cost: $10 for dog and owner & $3 for each additional guest. Location: Koch Park Family Aquatic Center high levels of self-esteem. More work is needed to improve low-income areas into healthy environments so individuals’ well-beings can improve.” The study, “Which Factor has More Impact? An Examination of the Effects of Income Level, Perceived Neighborhood Disorder, and Crime on Community Care and Vigilance Among LowIncome African American Residents,” was published in Race and Social Problems. Co-authors included Ronald Pitner from the University of South Carolina and Edna Brown from the University of Connecticut. Yu teaches in the School www.elanestevenbeautycollge.com of Social Work, part of the MU College of Human Environmental Sciences, and in the MU Master of Public Health Program.

Some may assume that low-income residents of run-down, crime-ridden neighborhoods do not care about their communities. However, research from the University of Missouri suggests otherwise. Mansoo Yu, an assistant professor of social work and public health at MU, studied levels of community care and vigilance among residents living in high-crime, low-income areas. Community care and vigilance refer to individuals’ desires to improve their communities, to take pride in their neighborhoods and to monitor and report unwelcome happenings, such as crimes, near their homes. “We hypothesized that individuals with higher incomes would have higher levels of community care and vigilance, but the opposite was true,” Yu said. “Residents with lower incomes were more likely to care about their communities than their higher-earning neighbors.” Yu said he and his colleagues were somewhat surprised by the findings that lower-income residents cared more about their communities. “One possibility is that, because these individuals had such low incomes, they were more likely to stay in the same area for a long time,” Yu said. “Low-income residents might lack the resources to move to other communities, whereas their neighbors with relatively higher incomes might be more able to move to better neighborhoods with safer environments.” Yu said community workers and organizers as well as public health professionals should find ways for residents to develop pride in their neighborhoods and encourage them to take actions, such as volunteering, to improve their communities. “Healthy local environments are related to overall well-being and good mental and physical health,” Yu said. “Individuals www.villaatriverwood.com tend to feel safer in their local communities when they have low levels of depression and

www.searshometownstores.com


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Around Town

August 14, 2013 • Community News • www.mycnews.com

Eco-Conscious App St. Louis Green celebrated the official launch of its new mobile application that connects users to green resources in the St. Louis area. Developed in association with AT&T*, the St. Louis Green mobile application is a central hub for recycling locations, eco-friendly businesses, green events and more—helping users stay educated and informed about everything Green in the St. Louis region. The app in its entirety was developed locally in association with AT&T. Drawing upon the technological expertise of AT&T, the process spanned several months and required input and resources from both organizations. The St. Louis Green app features include: Green Dining Locations, Recycling Locations, EV or CNG Fueling Locations, Upcoming Green Events, Green Companies, Green Job Listings The St. Louis Green mobile app is immediately available to download for free and is compatible with Apple devices using iOS 5 and newer and Android devices using version 2.3 (Gingerbread) and newer. You can download the St. Louis Green mobile app by visiting the Google Play store or iTunes App store. To celebrate the launch of the app, AT&T is challenging St. Louisans to recycle their old cellphones at its stores during July with a goal of recycling at least 1,000 phones. AT&T is currently offering consumers at least $100 off the purchase of a new smartphone** when they trade in a previous smartphone that is less than three years old and in good, working condition. Consumers with older phones can still trade in their device for a promotional card with the device’s current value, or

donate the phone to Cell Phones for Soldiers, an AT&T designated charity providing calling cards to military members serving overseas. About St. Louis Green St. Louis Green, Inc. was founded to address a need in the St. Louis community for information about green businesses, green products, and green events. Founder and Executive Director, Craig Jung, noticed that people were looking for information and education about sustainable lifestyles. In 2007, he created stlouisgreen.com, a resource for everything green in the St. Louis region. The mission of the 501(c)3 non-profit organization is to empower others to learn about and implement sustainable lifestyles. This is accomplished through programs that educate, support, and empower citizens and businesses of the St. Louis area to make changes in their daily living toward a greener, more sustainable world. *AT&T products and services are provided or offered by subsidiaries and affiliates of AT&T Inc. under the AT&T brand and not by AT&T Inc. **Requires a 2-year agreement with minimum monthly voice and data or Mobile Share plan. Early termination and other fees and conditions apply.

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Find local, In-season Produce with New App from MU Extension Finding fresh, locally grown fruits and vegetables just got easier, thanks to an app developed by University of Missouri faculty and students. The free app, Seasonal and Simple, helps consumers find, choose, store and prepare fresh produce. The content for the app is based on the longstanding MU Extension publication of the same name. DeBlauw approached campus colleagues Dale Musser**, associate teaching professor of computer science, and Mike McKean, director of professional programs for the MU School of Journalism, to see if students in their co-taught class could develop an app based on the material in the book. The class consisted of journalism students, who helped develop and edit content, and computer science and engineering students, who programmed the app. To download the free application for iPhone, iPad and Android devices, visit: extension.missouri.edu/p/MP909.

Suicide Prevention Awareness Fundraiser The Suicide Prevention Awareness Fundraiser includes a 1-mile Walk-A-Thon as well as a Men’s and Co-ed Softball Tournaments. There will also be a barbeque hosted by the Florissant Youth Advisory Commission. All proceeds from the tournament, walk, and barbeque will go to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. This event is held in loving memory of Alex McArthur at St. Ferdinand Park on Saturday September 21. Registration is in progress. Walk-A-Thon: $15 entry fee. All participants will receive a t-shirt. 1 mile distance, all ages welcome Softball Tournament: Co-ed and Men’s, $100 entry fee per team, 18 and over For additional information www.byerlyrv.com call the City of Florissant Park & Recreation Department Eagan Center front desk at 314.921.4466.


www.mycnews.com • Community News • August 14, 2013

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Around Town

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St. Louis Cardinal Party & Bingo

Pets A-Lone Sanctuary (PALS) Has Animals Available For Adoption PALS is a no-kill animal shelter in its 24th year. PALS’ approximately 40 volunteers and two part-time employees work to keep the county’s lost, abused, and abandoned animals safe until adopted. The animals are brought to PALS by citizens who find them on the streets or by people who surrender their animals for many different reasons. Also, animals are abandoned at the shelter during the night. There are many different stories to tell as to how they received an animal. “Recently we received a call from a gas station about a pregnant stray cat. After 24 hours at the shelter, she had nine kittens,” said Jennifer Raeker Bickel, volunteer president of PALS. Jennifer said, “A stray dog was brought to us that could hardly even walk because she was so malnourished and dehydrated. It took us two months to nourish and love her back to good health before she was available for adoption.” PALS is asking for the community’s help. Right now they have about 50-60 kittens and cats with room for only 40. They have cats being fostered because of the lack of space in the cat room. “We are in desperate need for cats to be adopted,” Jennifer appealed. Every kitten that is adopted from the shelter is feline FeLV-FIV tested, then spayed or neutered, vaccinated and microchipped. The process to adopt a kitten or a cat is relatively simple. First, families fill out a Pre-Adoption Questionnaire at the shelter or online at www.pals-pets.com. Once the questionnaire is approved, they need to read and sign the Adoption Agreement and pay the adoption fee. Then they are able to take home their new pet. The Adoption Agreement is a contact that families sign to agree to be responsible pet owners by caring for the animal and keeping them current on vaccinations. The adoption fee for kittens 6 months and younger is $110 and for cats 7 months and older is $55. This fee helps to cover veterinary costs, food, utilities, and other costs to keep the shelter running. PALS is offering special adoption prices through the month of August only: cats will cost $48 and kittens are $68 to adopt. All of the shelter’s operating expenses that the fee does not cover come from donations and fundraising activities. PALS is a certified 501(c)(3) charity, so any donation is tax deductible to the extent allowed by law. Donations are needed and greatly appreciated. PALS has a wish list on their website of items they need from cat litter to HE laundry detergent. Monetary donations can be sent to P.O. Box 462 Troy, MO 63379 or through PayPal. For more information on PALS and their animals, please call 636.338.1818, email shelter@pals-pets.com, or visit their website at www.pals-pets. com. The shelter is located at 4287 Hwy 47 West, Hawk Point, MO.

The City of Florissant Senior Citizen St. Louis Cardinal Party & Bingo was held at the James J. Eagan Center on August 1. The Famous MUNY KIDS from Forest Park performed for the crowd of over 300 Senior Citizens. Entertainment, lunch, wonderful attendance prizes and a surprise visit from FRED BIRD topped off the wonderful afternoon of festivities.

www.stygar.com


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Business

August 14, 2013 • Community News • www.mycnews.com

Local Red Cross Honors Volunteers and Community Partners The American Red Cross St. Louis Area Chapter recently recognized volunteers at its annual Volunteer and Community Partner Recognition event at Grant’s Farm. Hundreds of volunteers and their families and friends braved the heat to enjoy a meet and greet with a Clydesdale, carousel rides, deer park tram rides, baby goat feeding and a buffet dinner. During the evening’s program, the Red Cross recognized individuals and organizations in a variety of areas. Here is a partial list of this year’s winners: Disaster Response Volunteer Award: Jammie Fuller, Ferguson Jamie Fuller is a key disaster services volunteer who serves as a Disaster Team Leader and volunteer partner, accepting staff responsibilities in Client Services. She is also a national disaster volunteer who has deployed to Illinois, Kentucky, Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana and New York. Good Neighbor Award: Sheila Harris Wheeler, Crider Health Center, Wentzville Shelia Harris Wheeler has worked as the Crisis Response Coordinator at the Crider Health Center, a Red Cross community partner since 1993. With Red Cross response teams, Sheila helped displaced families after the ’93 floods and after Hurricane Katrina. New and Outstanding Volunteer Award: Mara Lynne Badolato, St. Peters As a registered nurse and first year volunteer, Mara Lynne Badolato assists disaster clients with mental and behavioral health needs and has helped to build community partnerships with Crider Health Center and St. Charles County Ambulance District. She served in Mississippi after tornadoes hit in February. The American Red Cross Greater St. Louis Region is a proud member agency of the United Way, which makes significant investments every year in Red Cross services. To learn more about Red Cross programs and how you can help, call 1.800.RED.CROSS (733.2767) or visit redcross.org.

NCI Salutes 30 Leaders in Their Thirties The 2013 NCI Salutes 30 Leaders in their Thirties campaign will recognize leaders who are making a significant positive impact on North County through their profession and/or community involvement and are in their thirties. The 30 leaders chosen will be honored at the NCI Salutes 30 Leaders in their Thirties reception and luncheon. The public is invited to attend this event on Friday, September 27 at Norwood Hills Country Club at 11:30am. Reservations are required; the cost is $40 per person. If a company is interested in sponsoring this event and supporting North County’s young leaders, sponsorship packages are available. To make a nomination, reservations, or sponsor this event please contact the NCI office at 314.895.6241 or go to www.NorthStLouisCounty.com for more information.

Recent Greater North County Chamber Ribbon Cutting: Mobil on the Run The Greater North County Chamber of Commerce held a ribbon cutting ceremony on Thursday, August 1 for the newly remodeled Mobile on the Run located at 4132 N. Hwy. 67. Pictured in the photo cutting the ribbon is Shelly Gerber, store manager along with owners, management, staff, family and chamber representatives.

Girl Scouts New CEO The Board of Directors of Girl Scouts of Eastern Missouri announced today that Bonnie Barczykowski (BAR-cha-kow-ski) has been selected as Chief Executive Officer, effective August 1. Barczykowski, 47, has served as Chief Operating Officer at Girl Scouts of Eastern Missouri since March 2012 and has been at the helm of further deepening the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. During her leadership at Girl Scouts of Eastern Missouri, Bonnie led the 2014-2016 Strategic Planning Process and restructured the Membership, Volunteer Training and Program departments to improve the leadership development experience for girls and adults. Girls play an integral role in the development of the program. Girl Scouting is girlled—girls drive the experience they participate in by informing us about what they need. Prior to joining Girl Scouts of Eastern Missouri, Barczykowski owned and operated five Curves fitness franchises in the St. Louis area. As an entrepreneur, she worked for Curves and was responsible for driving the performance of all five locations. She grew her centers to be the largest in the world. Before that, she held sales leadership roles with US Airways. Barczykowski has a bachelor’s degree in education and a master’s degree in business administration from Lindenwood University. She has served on numerous boards and committees for organizations throughout St. Louis.

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www.sarahcare.com/bridgeton


www.mycnews.com • Community News • August 14, 2013

School

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St. Louis REALTORS® Donate Bins of School Supplies to Ferguson/Florissant School District When individuals think to donate items to families in need, many choose to purchase food and/or personal care items. What is often forgotten about are school supplies, products that are needed for children to participate and succeed in school. There are nearly 1,000 displaced children throughout North St. Louis County

who start the school year filled with anxiety while facing many academic challenges. The St. Louis Association of REALTORS® (SLAR) sought to relieve this pressure for children in need by collecting school supplies at offices throughout the Greater St. Louis area all summer. In partnership with

Ann Gibbons a Missouri Pioneer in Education The Department of Elementary and Secondary Education will formally recognize Ann Gibbons, director, HSD Board of Education, as one of five 2013 Missouri Pioneers in Education as part of the 52nd annual Cooperative Conference for School Administrators. More than 500 school district leaders will be in attendance. Missouri Pioneers in Education are recognized for their distinguished careers and unique contributions to public education, either at the state or local levels. Since the inception of the award in 1974, only 252 individuals have been named to the select group of Pioneers. This group included outstanding and long-serving school teachers and administrators, dedicated local board of education members, college and university dean and presidents, and former legislators and governors. This year, Gibbons will be joined by Christopher “Kit” Bond, Carl Fisher, Jack Kinder and Roberzene Price. State Board of Education President Peter F. Herschend and Commissioner Dr. Chris Nicastro will present the awards. Gibbons was elected to the HSD Board of Education in 1981. While serving on the board, Gibbons helped to restore the 150-year-old one-

room Old Coldwater Schoolhouse, advocated for more than $300 million in bond issue improvements and assisted with the implementation of full-day kindergarten. She has been active in the PTA for 43 years, has served on attendance area committees, was a Key Communicator and has been active in Hazelwood Booster Clubs. She was a coordinator for YFU International Student Exchange Program for 25 years and was awarded the YFU Volunteer Excellence Award. As the 2003 recipient of the Community Service Award for St. Louis, Commerce Bank and the William T. Kemper Foundation awarded $10,000 to the charities of Gibbons choice – the Hazelwood Scholarship Fund and the Girl Scouts. Gibbons received the Missouri School Board Association’s (MSBA) Gold Boardmanship Award for Outstanding Participation, and she is a Master Certified Board Member. In 2011, she won the MSBA Paul Morris Community Service Award. She and her husband, Tom, who recently passed away, have lived in HSD for more than 50 years, have five children, and have been the Host Parents of 12 exchange students. All have graduated from Hazelwood Central or East High Schools. Ann and Tom have 11 grandchildren.

STLCC to Host Career Exploration Sessions Whether you’re just starting out, looking to re-enter the workforce or wanting to switch careers—but you’re not sure about an area of study—St. Louis Community College has the answer. STLCC is hosting New You Career Exploration Sessions Sept. 19, Oct. 16, Oct. 24, Nov. 7 and Nov. 14 that are designed to help you identify your interests, discover your passion and point you toward the career that’s right for you. The sessions will be conducted 6 - 7pm at the Florissant Valley, Forest Park, Meramec and Wildwood campuses. Participants will: • Discover how your interests can lead to good career decisions. • Learn how your interests relate to STLCC career programs. • Hear about resources to pay for school. • Find out how to get started at STLCC. Those who register for the

Room 102B at Wildwood, 2645 Generations Drive • Wednesday, Oct. 16, in Business Administration Room 105 at Meramec,11333 Big Bend Road • Thursday, Oct. 24, in Café West in the Student Center at Forest Park, 5600 Oakland Ave. • Thursday, Nov. 7, in Training Center Rooms 105-107 at Florissant Valley, 3400 Pershall Road • Thursday, Nov. 14, in Room 102 at Wildwood, 2645 Generations Drive Sessions are free; however, registration is required. Register now at www.stlcc.edu/visit. For more information, call 314.539.5002. St. Louis Community College is committed to providing access and reasonable accommodations for individuals with disabilities. If you have accommodation needs, call 314.539.5002 within two working days of the scheduled event to request needs. Documentation of disability may be required.

event will receive a link to a free interest inventory that will help identify your primary interest areas and link them to jobs and industries where those interests apply. A career counselor will explain the results of your interest inventory at the event. Sessions are scheduled as follows: • Thursday, Sept. 19, in Training Center Rooms 105107 at Florissant Valley, 3400 Pershall Road • Thursday, Sept. 19, in

www.lwcs.us

Office Depot, the Association collected backpacks filled with notebooks, pencils, loose-leaf paper, index cards, and other grade-appropriate school supplies. Visit www.stlrealtors.com/backpacks for more information.

Dear Ritenour Students, Parents, Staff and Community Members, Since I last updated you in July, the conversation about students from unaccredited school districts transferring to accredited districts has become a fixture in the news media as new information evolves. In Ritenour, we are now preparing to welcome new transfer students as well as new resident students to start the 2013-2014 school year on Wednesday, Aug. 14. As of Friday, Aug. 2, we were assigned 71 transfer students from the Normandy and Riverview Gardens school districts by Cooperating School Districts (CSD). We do believe we will be accommodating some additional students as CSD finalizes its process and all students are placed. According to the available space we currently have in our district and our commitment to adhere to our class size policy set by our Board of Education, we will be able to accommodate students without expanding our educational capacity. Ritenour resident students will not be displaced from a school to which he or she would otherwise be enrolled. We are contacting our new Ritenour transfer families and beginning the enrollment process today. Families from Normandy and Riverview Gardens will be responsible for transporting students to school. Our district will receive tuition for each student enrolled from an unaccredited school district. The funds we will receive from tuition payments will defray any additional costs for this school year. We do expect to receive funding based on the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education’s guidelines. As always, we will continue our dedication and commitment to helping all new students feel welcomed as new members to the Ritenour family. We want all of our students to be successful and fully participate in activities that our schools and community offer. Our mission is, and will continue to be, to educate every student, every day. Thank you for your trust, confidence and patience during this process. Sincerely, Dr. Chris Kilbride, Superintendent


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Learn & Play

SUDOKU:

August 14, 2013 • Community News • www.mycnews.com

Fill in the blank squares in the grid, making sure that every row, column and 3-by-3 box includes all the digits 1 through 9.

See solution on page 13

Middle Pick:

“This Moose Belongs to Me”

Hold on to your antlers, there’s a moose on the Community News is loose, and with author/ proud to offer our readers “Book Buzz.” illustrator Oliver Jeffers This column will leading the chase, you can feature great books expect offbeat fun in This for children in three Moose Belongs to Me. categories: Wilfred has always Youngest Pick: early childhood to wanted a moose, so he’s the first or second thrilled beyond compare grade, Middle Pick: when a proud specimen elementary school appears in his neck of the children, and woods. Wilfred names Oldest Pick: middle school children. Enjoy! him Marcel, fitting for a magnificent animal. Looks aren’t everything, though. Marcel doesn’t obey Wilfred’s rules for being a good pet. The moose is great at knocking apples down from trees, but he has a mind of his own when it comes to listening. Marcel also Reprinted with has a bad case of wanderlust, and he’s fickle. When an old lady claims the moose permission, as her own, Marcel turns his tail on Wilfred, which makes the boy hopping mad. Missourian Wilfred takes off in a huff—not a good idea for a kid who’s geographically Publishing Company. challenged and clumsy. Within minutes he’s totally strung out. Never fear, it’s Copyright 2013. marvelous Marcel to the rescue, an unassuming hero if ever there was one.

What You Should Know About Special Education Services Is your child making poor grades? Struggling to retain or use information? With the new school year upon us, it is important to remember that there are resources available for families who have children with special education needs. The following are some legal checkpoints to help your child get off to a good start in school this year: Communication with your child’s school is critical. No one will ever know your child as well as you. To be the best advocate you can for your child, you and your child’s teacher need to exchange information regularly. You and your child’s teacher are a team.

your child qualifies for special education services, an Individualized Educational Plan will be written for your child’s special educational needs. Getting your child special education services is only the beginning of the process. Ensuring that promised services are provided and that your child is making progress with special education services requires dedication and attention to detail by the parent. If your child doesn’t qualify for an Individualized Educational Plan, ask your child’s school about a Section 504 plan to protect your child from discrimination in instruction and programming due to a disability. Public schools have an obligation to test and make accommodations and modifications for children with disabilities. Legal Services of Eastern Missouri (LSEM) has provided high quality legal assistance in civil cases to the low-income community for more than 50 years. In 2011, LSEM helped over 21,000 people (including clients and their household members) in 21 counties of eastern Missouri. LSEM is a registered 501(c)(3) organization, and as a private, charitable non-profit, receives and appreciates financial support from members of the public. If you would like to support our mission, please visit www.lsem.org and click on “donate now.” www.something-printed.com Legal Services of Eastern Missouri provides legal assistance to low-income persons. If you are interested in interviewing a Legal Services of Eastern Missouri attorney on this topic or other subjects, please contact Greg Severin at 314.968.3060 or gseverin@lentsandassoc.com.

Special education services are available at no cost to qualifying students under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act. To qualify for special education services, your child must have a disability that impacts school performance. If you think your child needs special education testing, make your testing request in writing. Schools have a legal duty to locate and test all children who may need special education services. Be patient but persistent; the testing process can take quite awhile. The decision regarding special education eligibility is up to your child’s special education team, not your child’s doctor. If

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www.mycnews.com • Community News • August 14, 2013

Movie

“Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters”

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By Steve Bryan - Rated: PG

Three years ago, Percy Jackson and the It is such a high-quality piece of Olympians: The Lightning Thief arrived in work that it should have opened theaters with little or no fanfare. A modmuch earlier in the summer est box office success based on a popular movie season. young adult book series, the film was enjoyable, but gave no indication that a sequel would ever arrive. Sea of Monsters, the latest film in the series, recently landed in theaters, but it is such a highquality piece of work that it should have opened much earlier in the summer movie season. Logan Lerman returns as Percy Jackson, a young demigod and the son of Poseidon, god of the sea. Percy has several good friends, but Clarisse La Rue (Leven Rambin), daughter of Ares, thinks he is a waste of space. Though things have been quiet for the young warriors, an old enemy disables the mystical pro- Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters photo courtesy of 20th Century Fox tection around Camp half-brother who arrives without warning at Camp Half-Blood, the only safe haven for the children of the gods. Percy and his Half-Blood. Another son of Poseidon, Tyson is halffriends must embark on a quest to find the only thing Cyclops, and he is very happy to meet his brother. Percy feels a little sibling rivalry that can save them: the legendary Golden Fleece. In the hands of director Thor Freudenthal, the latest because their father seems more receptive Percy Jackson adventure far exceeds the original mov- and in tune with his one-eyed brother. Tyie. Over the last few years, Logan Lerman grew into son is such a likeable guy that it is imposthe role of a reluctant demigod. Alexandra Daddario, who plays Percy’s best friend Annabeth, also seems quite comfortable returning for a second movie. The two performers have an easy give-andtake here, which bodes well for future sequels. Douglas Smith steals the show, though, as Tyson, Percy’s

sible to hate him, though. Brandon T. Jackson also makes a great return appearance as the satyr named Grover. Though he’s used to Percy’s behavior by now, Grover still isn’t happy about being dragged into dangerous situations. Grover is brave, faithful, and really knows how to think on his clovenhooved feet. Director Thor Freudenthal skillfully picked up the storylines from the books and the first movie to craft a sequel that is funny, exciting, and charming. In a summer filled with disappointing, big budget films, Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters comes as a very welcome surprise. Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters, rated PG for fantasy action violence, some scary images, and mild language, currently is playing in theaters. Born and raised in South St. Louis, Steve Bryan is now based in Anaheim, California, and has been allowed access to movie and television sets to see actors and directors at work. Though his writing has taken him far from St. Louis, Steve is, at heart, still the same wide-eyed kid who spent countless hours watching classic movies at neighborhood theaters.

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This Months Shelter: PALS - Pets Alone Sanctuary 4287 Hwy 47, West Hawk Point, MO 63349 • 636-338-1818 • www.Pals-Pets.com If you’ve adopted a new family member that you saw in Community News, send us a picture of you and your new pal. Also include a brief story about your pet’s background and how they’re doing now. We’d love to share your happy story with other readers! Community News, 2139 Bryan Valley Commercial Dr., O’Fallon, MO 63366 or editor@ mycnews.com.

The U.S. Humane Society estimates 6 to 8 million dogs and cats enter shelters each year, and 3 to 4 million are euthanized. Please do your part to control overpopulation and to limit the number of unwanted animals. SPAY AND NEUTER YOUR PETS!

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August 14, 2013 • Community News • www.mycnews.com

Sports

Guest Columnest Earnest Hart, Jr. Important Safety Tips Female High School and College Students Must Know to Protect Themselves from Sexual Violence According to the US Dept. of Justice, National Institute of Justice and Bureau of Justice Statistics, nearly 25% of young women attending college are victims of rape or attempted rape. Remember, these are only the reported attacks. More than half of college rape victims tell no one of their victimization. Statistics also show 90% of acquaintance rapes involve alcohol. And, according to the National Institute of Justice, 84% of the college women who reported a sexual assault experienced the incident during their freshman or sophomore years. “In today’s world, there are no guarantees,” Sensei Earnest Hart, Jr. states. “Despite our best attempts to protect ourselves from crime, bad things happen. I have worked with and proactively educated young people my entire career. I am on a mission to educate young women about sexual violence and its prevalence in America’s high schools and on our college campuses. I train young women how to recognize dangerous scenarios and how to avoid putting themselves in compromising situations...both on and off campus. Further, I teach them how to safely remove themselves from such dangerous scenarios when they feel vulnerable or threatened. I have conducted a lifetime of study into criminal behavior and there are behavioral warning signs about which our daughters, our young women and their parents must be educated.”

1. Practice, practice, practice being in the moment, being truly aware of your surroundings, ESPECIALLY when you are alone. Learn to look at the world from a DEFENSIVE POINTOF VIEW…learn to assess potential threatening situations and BE PREPARED TOACT if necessary….ACT, depending on the circumstances, preferably entails quickly removing yourself from the perceived or potential threat in a confident and controlled manner if possible…or…ACT may mean physically defending yourself against an attacker. 2. ALWAYS look in your car, front and back seat areas, before you enter it…day or night. 3. Whenever possible, travel in groups of 2 or 3 when on campus and off campus, especially at night. 4. Make certain the exterior entrance and emergency exit in the home/building you reside are well-lit. 5. Have 911 on speed dial on your cell phone. 6. When in doubt, call campus security to escort you to your place of residence after dark. Campus police’s number should be on speed dial next to 911. 7. If you find yourself walking alone at night, maintain awareness of your surroundings, but call a friend on your cell phone and keep talking with them until you reach your destination. 8. Carry yourself with confidence and dignity…look passersby in the eye. 9. When walking, carry a whistle in your hand or on a band about your wrist. 10. Always carry a small ,metal flashlight. 11. Check with local/campus ordinances and, when lawful, carry some type of pepper spray where it is easily accessible on your person.

12. When dating, double date and even then, meet your date(s) at a predetermined location. Valet park if possible and let one or two other friends know exactly who you’ll be meeting on the date and where. 13. Invest in yourself and your own safety by taking a self-defense course specifically for women. 14. Stay away from alcohol. If you feel the need to experiment with alcohol when in college, understand that losing control of your faculties and inhibitions makes yo umore likely to become a victim of sexual assault. If you must go out on the town: A. Arrange for a taxi or car service to pick you up at a pre-planned location and time to convey you back to your place of residence…being safe IS NOT being a drag or a “spoil-sport” B. NEVER accept a ride home from a new acquaintance or from ANYONE who has been drinking alcohol C. Limit yourself to 2 drinks to stay in control D. ALWAYS obtain your own drinks from the bartender/barmaid…ALWAYS hold your drink in your hand and keep it in your possession until finished with it E. ALWAYS inform a 3rd party (not in your group) where you are going and what time you intend to be back for the evening F. No matter where you are or what you are doing, KNOW that calling a parent or relative is NEVER a bad decision Martial arts expert, author and four-time World Kickboxing Champion calls on parents, principals and college administrators to educate today’s young women to recognize the warning signs of impending danger. Visit www.earnesthart. com for more information. Also, you can listen to Hart on 590AM every Saturday from 11am – 12pm.

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www.mycnews.com • Community News • August 14, 2013

Recipes:

Peach-Infused Treats

For a limited time only, Piccione Pastry, St. Louis’ newest Italian pastry shop, will add a variety of peach-infused treats to the menu. The treats will be available throughout the month of August. Executive Pastry Chef Martin Lopez will create peaches and cream cannoli using cream infused with peaches and toasted hazelnuts; peach and almond tarts (using a shortbread crust, the tart is filled with almond frangipane and topped with fresh, local peaches and toasted candied almonds); roasted peach and raspberry melbas (layers of raspberry coulis, vanilla bean gelato and roasted peaches garnished with almond biscotti), and the shop will also serve peach sorbet from Gusto Gourmet Creamery. Piccione Pastry is the only late-night Italian pastry shop of its kind in St. Louis. Located in the Loop at the corner of Delmar Boulevard and Skinker, Piccione Pastry specializes in single-serve Italian desserts and rich Italian coffees. Recently, Piccione Pastry began serving locally handcrafted gelato and sorbet by Gusto Gourmet Creamery. The shop is open from 11am - 9pm Tuesday, Wednesday and Sunday, and until 11pm Thursday through Saturday. Aspiring chefs can try to make the roasted peach and raspberry melbas at home with this recipe from Piccione:

Throughout August, Piccione Pastry serves a variety of peach-inspired desserts. Roasted peach and raspberry melba with layers of raspberry coulis, vanilla bean gelato and roasted peaches garnished with almond biscotti

Roasted Peach and Raspberry Melbas You will need: Your favorite prepared Vanilla gelato or ice cream Your favorite prepared biscotti (the chef suggests almond-flavored) Raspberry coulis (recipe, below) Roasted peaches (recipe, below)

Raspberry Coulis Recipe Ingredients: 1 pound fresh raspberries 4 ounces granulated sugar 2 ounces raspberry jam 4 ounces water

Directions: Combine all ingredients in a pot. Heat on lowheat, bringing to a boil. Blend with an immersion blender. Strain sauce through a fine mesh sieve. Allow sauce to cool. Refrigerate. Layer

the sauce with vanilla bean gelato and roasted peaches. Garnish with an almond biscotti for the ultimate roasted peach and raspberry melba.

Roasted Peaches These peaches can be served in many different ways besides this melba. Try them alone, with pound cake, or ice cream. Ingredients: 2 peaches 1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract 2 tablespoons granulated sugar 1/4 teaspoon lemon juice Directions: Preheat oven 350F degrees. Peel skin off of peaches. Lightly score an “x” in the bottom of the peaches. Submerge them in boiling water for 10 seconds. Remove

from boiling water and submerge in a bowl filled with ice and water. Rub peaches with a dry paper towel or kitchen towel to remove skin. Run knife around the seam and halve and pit the peach. Combine remaining ingredients in small bowl. Coat peaches in the mixture. Place peaches on a sheet pan sprayed with non-stick spray. Roast in the oven for 15-20 minutes.

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What’s Happening

August 14, 2013 • Community News • www.mycnews.com

Send your event to editor@mycnews.com and we'll print it! Church September 6 & 20: Fish Fry At Bellefontaine Methodist Church, 10600 Bellefontaine Rd. Children under 6 free. Single: $7.50, Double: $8.50. 314.867.0800 Events Now: Meals on Wheels Needs Volunteers Meals on Wheels, North County needs volunteers to work a few hours a week. The all-volunteer program delivers hot nutritious meals Monday through Friday to approximately 150 people generally limited by medical conditions. The service allows some of our residents to live at home who might otherwise have to make other arrangements. Volunteers usually drive once a week and deliver meals on one of 23 different routes in North County. It takes about an hour and a half and drivers are usually done by 12:30. For more information call 314.953.6800. August 14: Free Harmonica All-Star Show 7pm. At the Renaissance St. Louis Airport Hotel, 9801 Natural Bridge Rd. Performers are

professional players attending the 50th Anniversary Convention of SPAH (Society for the Preservation and Advancement of the Harmonica) . No tickets required: just contact 636.532.1032 or wedpmshow@ gatewayharmonicaclub.org to register and get free parking pass for hotel lot. August 15: Saint Louis Crisis Nursery 23rd Annual Celebrity Waitresses & Waiters’ Night 4-10pm. Plaza Frontenac, 1701 South Lindbergh Blvd. 314.292.5770 or www.crisisnurserykids.org. August 15 & 29: Free ADHD Seminars 7 – 8pm, 11710 Old Ballas Rd. Ste. 205, Creve Coeur. Saint Louis Neurotherapy Institute. 314.983.9355. www.stlneurotherapy.com August 16: Spaghetti Dinner Florissant Valley VFW Post 4105 from 5pm - 8pm. Please join us, all profits go to support Veterans. 314.503.1303 August 16: Kids Get Free Harmonica Lesson from the Pros 9 - 11:30am. At the Renaissance St. Louis Airport Hotel,

9801 Natural Bridge Rd. Ages 7 and up. Program includes free harmonica, free song book, free lunch and free lesson plus entertainment by professional harmonica players. Limited enrollment; reservations required. Contact 314.302.3219 or kids@gatewayharmonicaclub.org to make reservations and get free parking pass for hotel lot. August 17: Country/Gospel Free Harmonica Concert Showcases Big Stars 10am - Noon. At the Renaissance St. Louis Airport Hotel, 9801 Natural Bridge Rd. “How Sweet the Sound” program includes Buddy Greene, Charlie McCoy, Jimi Lee, Steve Baker, Todd Parrott and Phil Duncan. No tickets required: just contact 636.477.0354 or satamshow@gatewayharmonicaclub.org to register and get free parking pass for hotel lot.

August 20: Old Time Barbeque 5pm, Bellefontaine Neighbors Recreation Center, 9669 Bellefontaine Rd, St. Louis. Delicious buffet with your choice of either barbequed pork steak or chicken breast and all the trimmings, including dessert. Tickets $11. 314.867.0700. August 22: Veterans Benefits for Seniors Sponsored by Veterans Home Care, Complimentary Breakfast. 9am. 3350 St. Catherine St. (near the Eagan Center) RSVP 314.838.3877. August 22 – 25: Overland Lions Community Fair At Norman Myers Park, 8700 Midland Ave., Overland. Rides, Car Show, food vendors including Bar-B-Q by Presentation Holy Name, musical entertainment, 314.749.1885 or overlandlions@outlook.com

August 17: Johnny Londoff Chevrolet Tailgate Party Celebrating the release of the all new Silverado. 10am – 5pm, Kitty at 314-595-6567

August 25: Free Square Dance Night At Florissant Valley Christian Church, 1325 N. Highway 67, 7 - 9pm. 314.839.2134

August 18: Open House at Nature Lodge at Sunset Park 12 – 2pm, 2300 Sunset Park Dr. in Florissant, 314.921.4250

August 27: Senior Care Fair 10am - 1pm, Garden Villas North 4505 Parker Road, 314.355.6100 , life line screenings, flu vaccinations, blood pressure checks, diet tips, balance testing, BMI testing, healthy treats and more.

August 18: Florissant Community Open House Nature Lodge in Sunset Park, 12pm - 2pm. Crafts and kids’ activities, tour the park, refreshments. 314.921.4250. August 20: Driver Safety Program SSM DePaul Health Center AARP Driver Safety Program, 9am – 1pm, 314.776.3627

August 27: Happy Hour Comedy Act “Camping with Marge” 10:30am, Complimentary Lunch, 3350 St. Catherine St. (near the Eagan Center) RSVP 314.838.3877. August 28: Citizen Police Academy Course

Starting August 28 thru October 16 from 6:30-9:30pm. Florissant Police Station. For more information call Officer Andy Haarmann at 314-8306042 August 30: Chicken Dinner Florissant Valley VFW Post 4105 from 5m to 8pm. Please join us, all profits go to support Veterans. 314.503.1303 September 6: 11th Annual Charity Golf Scramble At the Golf Club of Florissant. Benefiting the Backstoppers of St. Louis & Responder Rescue. For more information call 314.486.6305 September 9: Valley Industries First Annual Golf Outing At Spencer T. Olin Golf Course, Alton, Ill. Four-person Scramble, Flight A, B, and C, with optional Skin Game. Registration 11:30am, lunch at noon, shotgun start at 1pm. $125 per person/$500 per team includes lunch, dinner and cart. www. valleyind.net or 314.731.771. September 27: 13th Annual North County Gala Dance 7-10pm at the James J. Eagan Center. Dress-up event is $15 per person with an 18-Piece Big Band, hors d’oeuvres and a cash bar. City of Florissant Senior Office at 314.839.7605. Mondays: Karaoke at DeLeo’s Cafe & Deli 2782 North Hwy 67, Florissant, 8 - 10:30pm, 314.839.3880. Mondays: Free Line Dancing 6:30pm, beginners welcome, RSVP 314.838.3877, St. Catherine Retirement Community, 3350 St. Catherine St.


www.mycnews.com • Community News • August 14, 2013

Mondays and Wednesdays: Seniors: Exercise with Melanie FREE. Classes are led by a licensed Physical Therapist. 1 pm. 3350 St. Catherine St. (near the Eagan Center) RSVP 314.838.3877 Every Sunday: Tours at Old St. Ferdinand Shrine #1 Rue St. Francois St., Florissant, 1 – 4pm, through October. Donations accepted. Docents needed. 314.921.7582, vicray01@aol.com Bridgeton Trails Library Branch Programs: 3455 McKelvey Rd., St. Louis, 314.994.3300. Story Time: Wednesdays, 10:30 a.m. 9 months to 2 yrs. Room 1 (Lap Time); Wednesdays, 10:30 a.m. Ages 3–5. Room 2; Thursdays, 10:30 a.m. Ages 3–5. Room 1. Florissant Senior Citizens’ Bingo Clubs: 314.839.7604. Last Saturdays: Writers Workshop: 10am - 1:30pm, Baden Liberary, 8448 Church Rd., 314.388.2400 Health Third Tuesdays: Alzheimer’s Association At Lutheran Senior Services at Hidden Lake, 10 – 11am, 11728 Hidden Lake Dr., St. Louis, 314.292.7504 2nd Tuesday of Every Month: Alzheimer’s Association Caregiver Support Group Meeting Meeting to be held at Sarah Care of Bridgeton Adult Day Center 11977 St. Charles Rock Road, Suite 121-124, Bridgeton, MO 63044. Join our Support Group for Mutual, Emotional Support and Education.

You are not alone. For information, contact Deborah Mabrie at 314-291-5210 or Ferd Fetsch at 314-291-3021 Email: dbland@sarahcare.com ferdfetsch@sbcglobal.net. Diabetes Basics: 314.344.7024 for info 314.344.7220 to enroll.

or

Nutrition Education: SSM DePaul registered dieticians can help you make sure your diet is right for you, 314.344.6157 Crisis Nursery: Committed to preventing child abuse and neglect, the Crisis Nursery provides short-term, safe havens to children, birth through age 12, whose families are faced with an emergency or crisis. Care is available year-round and serves families throughout the greater St. Charles region. 24-hour helpline: 314.768.3201. Or 636.947.0600, www.crisisnurserykids.org Groups at Christian Hospital To register call 314.747.9355 June 3 – Oct. 7: EMT-B Course At Christian Hospital open to the public. The Emergency Medical Technician—Basic (EMT-B) course is designed for students interested in providing patient care to their community. This is the entry-level course required to work on an ambulance. The cost is $1,500. Register online at http://www. christianhospital.org/EMSAcademy. For more information, contact Shannon Watson at 314.653.5271. Tuesdays: Alcohol and Drug Information Meeting Christian Hospital Building 2, Suite 401, 6:30 – 8pm,

Business Spotlight A place to find out a little more about your local businesses!

314.839.3171, free and open to the public. Sundays: Alcoholics Anonymous Group 109 11th floor conference room at Christian Hospital, 10am, 11133 Dunn Road. Wednesdays: STEPS Schizophrenia Support Group 6:30 - 7:30pm, 314.839.3171. Center for Senior Renewal: Day treatment programs for older adults dealing with anxiety, depression, grief, loss and early signs of dementia, 314.653.5123. Christian Hospital Recovery Center: Outpatient mental health and substance abuse treatment for adults, 314.953.8100. Volunteers Needed at Christian Hospital: Call 314.653.5032 SSM DePaul Healthy Happenings

What’s Happening

tions available and how important physical activity really is. Please call to register at 1.877.477.6954. Diabetes Self-Management Training: Call 314.344.7220 Smoking Cessation Classes: Free ongoing 8-week sessions, 866.SSM.DOCS to register or for more information. SSM DePaul Wellness Center: Classes available on strength training, nutrition and smoking cessation, 314.344.6177 SSM St. Joseph Hospital Healthy Happenings Free Mammogram Screenings: SSM Health Care free mammogram screenings to women who have no health insurance. Appointments at 300 First Capitol Drive in St. Charles and SSM St. Joseph Hospital West, 100 Medical Plaza in Lake Saint Louis, 636.947.5617

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Speaker’s Bureau: SSM speakers available for organizations, clubs, community and church groups for up to one hour free of charge, 636.949.7159 Ongoing Support Groups Thursdays: Celebrate Recovery 7-9pm. Christcentered recovery program for those dealing with hurts, hangups and harmful behaviors. Salem E-Free Church, 2490 Pohlman Road, Florissant. 314.837.5600 or www.salemefree.org. Sundays: Support Group for Women Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse 6:30 - 8pm, 7401 Delmar Ave. in University City, 314.993.5421. First and Third Tuesdays: Support Group for Women Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse 12:30 - 2pm, 320 Forsyth Blvd., Clayton, 314.968.3477.

Every Mon. & Tues. in August: Healthy Meal Replacement (HMR) Program Orientation Mondays: 6–7pm Tuesdays: Noon–1pm SSM DePaul Wellness Center. Attend a free orientation to learn: the Five Success Variables needed to lose weight, different diet opwww.squaredancestcharles.com Answers from page 8


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August 14, 2013 • Community News • www.mycnews.com

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www.mycnews.com • Community News • August 14, 2013

CLASSIFIEDS

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Vol 9 No 28

July 11, 2007

Vol 9 No 28

Mosquito Season

Mosquito Seas on

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Hum ans measures including mosquito control malaria, yellow the elimination gue, and encephal swamp areas, fever, denof to keep road and maintenance efforts itis; and dogs ditches clear heartworm. may get have done and water free Most of these much to control the exception mosquito diseases, with for disease of transmission.” canine heartwor human encephalitis and m, have been toes: floodwater eliminated and permanent fairly well If you believe mosquitoes. from you have a mosquito water ing Floodwater problem on mosquitoes their eggs on breedHealth officials the entire United States. your property, lay sure, damp soil where but please call will occur said outbreak flooding the Department are not ‘Light Up Your or, in some munity Hea to borne encephal s of mosquicases, above of Comwater line lth and the the in tree holes, Environme itis have periodica tainers, or artificial con- ficials will make an inspection nt. Ofinvites Women Life’ Contest occurred in other small and evaluabodies of water. tion appointment, When rain lly Missouri to Honor Friends and then recommend fills these areas (ARA) and floods the possible solution. “Canine heartwor . a - National hips St. Charles in the larval County residents m is an Friendship stages, broods problem, with can upload endemic have the of mosquitoes greatest prevention methods Day is Aufingertips. a two-minright at their toes are mainly ers escalating costs to animal owngust 5 and - property Proper maintenance of the pest variety, ute video the first to of the is the first step each and are in light of emerge in the toward mosquito describing warned. “Effective year,” health officials spring months. prevention. All trash Many of these a recent and refuse that mosquitoes how a close ers and may are strong flycould ISSUE survey that measures including mosquito control range property should friend lights IN THIS up to ten miles or more drained, be adequately i n d i c ate s the eliminati up their life graded and a blood meal to prevent any .3 swamp areas, women to lay..................... pools or puddles on of water that may to www.raanda grand story............ eggs. of last maintenance place high Cover to keep roadentry into County mosquitoten days or longer. dianceribtheir eggs directly ....................6 efforts beauty basv a l u e as well as automatic Talk control officer ditches McCauley on a personal bons.com. Schneider.... – the clear and water surface, Movie Barry lists several Shelly havedrawing 9 on prize things their may do to done of JCPenney. cies in this Florissant ..........8, much to control water free keep mosquitoes homeowners friendships, group do ket courtesy - their summer: test closes from ruining Old Olay is offering theirTown breeding sites. not venture mosquito ...10,far11from a chance to nine mini-semiAug. treat themselves women Charles........ 31, gives participants including infortrip to New fairdisease Explore St. with a in for from York .......12 October. care, City. choose transmiss See MOSQUITO No Olay is hosting nars to City tness, breast . . . . ...................... Town page 3 ion.sursary. For official purchase is neces........ exercise, fi ” a summer On the . . 414 called “Light mation on School . . , and plastic Up Your Life. contest www.radiancer contest rules, visit Chamber. . . . . .Baute......... and ...... ........ ” Women with Gary ibbons.com. urinary incontinenceimprovement Religion. 5 ....... toes: Sports ........ and Cheese . . 16 Other personal 7 . . . .... bra fitting ........ gery. floodwat Movie . . . 6 er and ...... St. Peters.......... ........ topics include If you believe Better You permanent for holiday ...... 9 mosquito awareness ........ It’s About Sports . . . 12 and “dos” ... 17 you have a mosquito ...... “ups”Floodwat water ing ..... es. “spirit Coupon Crazy 10 2139 Bryan..................... ........ easy, and the Real Estate/Autom. . . . . . . . . 14 problem on er mosquito ....... theirwardrobe, breedMovie Review Valley Commercial What’s Happening makeup made otive . . . . 16 eggs hair, your property, es lay ..22, 23Dr. • O’Fallon, MO on damp soil 15 ........ 63366 P: 636.379.1775 Classifieds . 18 but are notClassifieds ..................... Dr. where flooding sure, please call the ........ will occur F: 636.379.1632 ....... topics to Department the spirit. or, in some 22 Commercial E: ofcnews@centur munity Hea sessions (threetimecases, frame) ytel.net of Com- 2139 Bryan ValleyMO 63366 water line Seminar lth each above the www.mycnews.com 2 in during O’Fallon, from tree10:40holes, a.m., and 1:30 ficials will makeand the Environment s tainers,choose artificial 9:30 a.m., . Of- P: 636-379-1775 • FX: 636-379-163 an inspectio begin orat other con- tion n and evalua- E-Mail: cnews@centurytel.net 1:15 p.m. appointment, When rain a.m. and small runs untilbodies of water. and fills atthese - 2007 at 11:45 then possible solution. Wonderland recomme ENT page 17 ( A R A ) 8:30 a.m. areasthe lunChristmas in and Doors open Film Group’s See ENTERTAINMnd a - National y feature duringigh-energfloods theand CarmenSt. Electra in Yari A special Charles County ill b e a h Chris Kattan in the larval this year w Friendship cheonstages, Dan Coughlin. residents have by author greatest preventio broods 3 can upload presentation of mosquito FAIR page the n methods Day is AuSee WOMEN’S es fingertips a two-minright at their toes are mainly . gust 5 and - property Proper maintenance of the pest variety, ute video the first to of the is the first step and are in light of emerge in the toward mosquito describi ng spring months. prevention. All trash Many of these a recent and refuse that mosquitoes how a close ers and may are strong flycould survey that range up to property friend lights ten miles or more drained, should be adequately i n d i c ate s up their life graded and a blood meal to prevent any women ................3 to lay eggs. pools or puddles water that may to www.rastory.................. of last ten days place high Cover .6 or County diancer longer. their eggs directly mosquito control ibv a l u e er....................... McCauley lists bons.com. officer Barry Shelly Schneid on the water surface, several things 9 on their may do to cies in this Florissant ..........8, keep mosquito homeowners friendships, group do es from ruining test closes Old Olay is offering venture0,far theirTown 11from their summer: breeding sites. not...........1 a chance to Aug. treat themselv women Charles 31, trip to New es with a Explore St. York City. in October. ...............12 See MOSQUIT No Olay is hosting City . . . . .............. O page 3 Town sary. For official purchase is neces........ a summer On the . .......414 called “Light School . . Up Your Life. contest www.radianceribbcontest rules, visit Chamber. . . . . .Baute... ...... ........ ” Women s with Gary ons.com. Religion. 5 ..... Sport o busy, e it gets to to dies, befor is the time corner. La for you. Now ovement and take a day impr se for selffun in the set a cour s and to have answers self-awarenes will find the process! Women health, family, career, on at the 2007 to questions and more image, fashion, – Fun, Fit, and FabuSt. Fair Nov. 17, at Women’s for Saturday, lous – set College. Charles Community in partnership the college St. Joseph sented by and SSM take with JCPenney ital West, will StuHealth Center-Hosp p.m. in the 8:30 a.m.-3 Campus, 4601 place from on the SCC Center Cottleville. dent in Mall Drive the area Mid Rivers throughout reWomen from day of education, for a fun, includwill gather food, and show laxation, prizes, rs, a fashion 50 ing nine mini-semina and more than speaker, serand keynote products and vendors displaying vices. a continental seminars and exhibits and a fashion tickets include cial $20 VIP speaker, and full-course in keynote show, Grappa Grill catered by exhibits, and luncheon the breakfast, consecutive addition to For the fourththe lunchtime seminars. will host ages year, JCPenney with styles for all fashion show,

U FAB

Huneke Publications, Inc. offers fou publications: two weekly newspape and two news magazines, eac covering a unique market segme within St. Louis County and S Charles County. As a member the Missouri Press Association, a of our publications feature verifie circulation and an earned credibili among our peers.

direct mail, home delivery, and voluntary circulation S! methods. LOU Voluntary refers to a circulation method ABU where readers FOUR GREATFPUBLICATIONS Our publications use a combination of online subscription, Inc. offers four “voluntarily” choose to pickHuneke up Publications, a publication to read. This St. Louis St. Charles Combined publications: two weekly newspapers direct mail, home delivery, and voluntary circulation methods. method is powerful because are carefully chosen and locations two news magazines, each Voluntary refers to a circulation method where readers covering a unique market segment “voluntarily” choose to pick up a publication to read. This and newsstands are monitored for 100% pick up. Community within St. Louis County and St. methodGREAT is powerful PUBLICATIONS because locations are carefully chosen FOUR Charles County. As a member of and newsstands are monitored forNews 100% pickhas up. Community developed a network of over 650 convenient the Missouri Press Association, all Our publications use a combination of online subscription, Huneke Publications, Inc. ofoffers four News has developed a network over 650 convenient our publications feature verified including every ofmajor supermarket chain. Our locations including majorlocations supermarket chain. Our publications: twoevery weekly newspapers direct mail, home delivery, and voluntary circulation methods. circulation and an earned credibility voluntary method is powerful for voluntary three reasons: method is powerful for three reasons: among our peers. Movie Talk Louis St. Charles Combined and 1 two news magazines, QUALITY READERS A voluntary readereach is an interested Voluntary refers to a circulation method whereSt.St. readers Louis St. Charles Combined 1 insegment QUALITY READERS A voluntary reader is an interested reader, actively outside of the home, stores, seeking out covering a unique market “voluntarily” choose to pick up a publication to read. This information about the community reader, actively outside of the home, in stores, seeking out within St. UTILITY Louis 100% County 2 TOTAL pick up and assuresSt. no wasted method is powerful because locations are carefully chosen COMMUNITY NEWS COMMUNITY NEWS - St. Charles County papers. Every paper reaches an interested reader, yielding a the community Charles County. As a information member ofabout First published in 1921, Community News is the longest Published weekly with a powerful circulation combination of and newsstands are monitored for 100% pick up. Community full value for the entire print run. published weekly in the St. Louis newsstands, home throw, and online subscription. 2 runTOTAL UTILITY 100% picknewspaper up assures nometropolitan wasted the Press Association, 3Missouri EXPANDING SET Every print reachesall a unique area and has established a large audience of loyal readers. The St. Charles County edition features countywide coverage News has developed a network of over 650 convenient COMMUNITY NEWS group of readers, Community circulates across a broadyielding geographic region including the cities of: St. Charles, St. Peters, Cottleville, papers. Every paper reaches an News interested reader, a of our publications feature verified because the majority locations including every major supermarket chain. Our with newstands, home throw and online subscription. Weldon Spring, O’Fallon, Dardenne Prairie, Lake St. Community Louis, First published in 1921, New circulation and an earned of voluntary fullcredibility value for readers the entire print run. and Wentzville, plus Troy. voluntary method is powerful for three reasons: published weekly newspaper in the St. L occasional readers. among our peers. 3 are EXPANDING SETOUR Every print run reaches a unique Over time, these unique CROSSROADS MAGAZINE TOWN MAGAZINE area and has established a large audienc 1 QUALITY READERS A voluntary reader is an interested groups add up to a Published bi-monthly, Our Town is direct to all business This monthly lifestyle magazine covers the fast-growing group of mailed readers, Community News circulates Wentzville and Lake St. Louis areas. It is direct mailed with across a br addresses in its service area, plus online subscribers. It is a readership size about reader, actively outside of the home, in stores, seeking out additional copies available in newsstands, unique business-to-business magazinethe featuring chamber of because majority three times greater with newstands, home throw and online information about the community plus online subscribers. commerce news plus articles on the economy, technology, than the print run. voluntary readers human resources, and of marketing. 2 TOTAL UTILITY 100% pick up assures no wasted are occasional readers. COMMUNITY NEWS COMMUNITY NEWS - St. Charles County papers. Every paper reaches an interested reader, yielding a Over time,weekly these unique First published in 1921, Community News is the longest Published with a powerful circulation combination of OUR TOWN MAGAZINE full value for the entire print run. published weekly newspaper in the St. Louis metropolitan newsstands, throw, subscription. groups addhome up to a and onlinePublished bi-monthly, Our Town is direc 3 EXPANDING SET Every print run reaches a unique area and has established a large audience of loyal readers. The St. Charles County edition features countywide coverage addresses in its service area, plus online readership size about group of readers, Community News circulates across a broad geographic region including the cities of: St. Charles, St. Peters, Cottleville, unique business-to-business magazine three times greater because the majority with newstands, home throw and online subscription. Weldon Spring, O’Fallon, Dardenne Prairie, Lakenews St. Louis, commerce plus articles on the eco than the print run. of voluntary readers and Wentzville, plus Troy. human resources, and marketing. are occasional readers. Over time, these unique CROSSROADS MAGAZINE OUR TOWN MAGAZINE 58206_CirMap.indd 2 groups add up to a Published bi-monthly, Our Town is direct mailed to all business This monthly lifestyle magazine covers the fast-growing Wentzville and Lake St. Louis areas. It is direct mailed with addresses in its service area, plus online subscribers. It is a readership size about additional copies available in newsstands, unique business-to-business magazine featuring chamber of three times greater plus online subscribers. commerce news plus articles on the economy, technology, than the print run. human resources, and marketing. By Shelly A.

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St. Louis

Annual The 16th Fair cnews@centurytel.net Women’s Fun, Fit will be ofcnews@centurytel.net lous! and Fabu

14, 2007 November 46 Vol. 86 No.

Follow thes e tips to keep your family and pets safe from mosquitoes.

for 86 Years 1921 - Weekly d Established s & Operate Family Owned & St. Charles Countie Louis Serving St.

Annual

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St. Louis

N C RAZY

Inside...C OUPO

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Schneider

o busy, e it gets to to dies, befor is the time corner. La for you. Now ovement and take a day impr se for selffun in the set a cour and to have self-awareness will find the answers process! Women health, family, career, s on at the 2007 to question and more image, fashion, – Fun, Fit, and FabuFair at St. Women’s , Nov. 17, for Saturday lous – set nity College. Commu Charles hip in partners the college St. Joseph sented by y and SSM take with JCPenne ospital West, will StuHealth Center-Ha.m.-3 p.m. in the 8:30 Campus, 4601 place from on the SCC lle. dent Center in Cottlevi Mall Drive out the area Mid Rivers through reWomen from day of education, for a fun, includwill gather food, and laxation, prizes, inars, a fashion show 50 ing nine mini-sem and more than speaker, s and serand keynote g product vendors displayin vices. tal a continen seminars and and exhibits a fashion tickets include rse cial $20 VIP speaker, and full-cou in show, keynote Grappa Grill and catered by t, exhibits, luncheon the breakfas consecutive addition to For the fourththe lunchtime seminars. y will host ages year, JCPenne with styles for all show, fashion

a grand ic entry into l beauty basas well as automat – a persona prize drawing JCPenney. of ket courtesy iants nine mini-sem fair gives participfrom including inforcare, nars to choose tness, breast exercise, fi plastic surmation on ence, and and urinary incontin l improvement persona and bra fitting gery. Other topics include for holiday awareness “dos” “ups” and and the “spirit wardrobe, made easy, hair, makeup

IN THIS ISSUE

St. Charles

St. Charles

2139 Bryan Valley Commercial Drive O’Fallon, MO 63366

‘Light Up Your invites Wom Life’ Contest en to Hono r Friendship

s

E

IN THIS ISSU

IN THIS ISSUE

St. Louis

St. Louis

P 636.379.1775 F 636.379.1632

14, 2007 November 46 Vol. 86 No.

It’s About

........ . . 6 16 Peters...............

St.

2139 Bryan........................

17

Cheese . . .. 7 ........ ...... Better You 9 ........ ...... 10

Movie Review Valley Commercia l Dr. • O’Fallon, ..........22, 23 MO 63366 fieds .............

Classi cial Dr. topics to the spirit. Valley Commer sessions (threetime frame) 2139 Bryan Seminar MO 63366 during each O’Fallon, a.m., and 1:30 choose from 636-379-1632 s a.m., 10:40 -1775 • FX: begin at 9:30 P: 636-379 centurytel.net 1:15 p.m. E-Mail: cnews@ and runs until - 2007 at 11:45 a.m. 8:30 a.m. page 17 Wonderland at Christmas in AINMENT the lunDoors open Film Group’s See ENTERT feature duringigh-energy Electra in Yari and Carmen A special ill b e a h Chris Kattan w r a n. e y s i cheon th Dan Coughli by author 3 presentation ’S FAIR page See WOMEN

Movie . . . ........ ...... Sports . . . 12 ........ . . . . . . 14 Real Estate/A utomotive . . . . 15

P: 636.379.17 75 F: 636.379.16 32 E: ofcnews@ centurytel.net

May/June

2011

Coupon Crazy .... What’s Happeni . . . . . . . . . . . 16 ng . . . . . . . . . 18 Classifieds ........ ....... 22

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16

August 14, 2013 • Community News • www.mycnews.com

Over the Fence

Joe Morice

By, For and Of the People: Our Threatened Miracle While considering the future of my grandchildren, I became more aware of the demise of the middle class. I hate gloom and doom predictions but this one was hard to ignore years ago when my father waxed prophetic and warned, “The rich will get richer, and the poor will get poorer.” George Orwell’s book, 1984, portrayed the life of a dissenter of what was called “Big Brother,” a totalitarian government that put televisions in everyone’s home for watching government propaganda and for the government to watch them. Dissenters were subject to futuristic torture methods that used their victims’ worst fears to brainwash them. Orwell’s book was published in 1949. This was before omnipotent mega-corporations and billionaires simply bought the government and proved there was no need for torture unless you included starvation or the threat of it as a type. Our parents also told us, “Get your education, kids. They can’t take that away from you.” Like most parents, they believed their children should have it easier than they did. The next generation actually did have it easier and even the next. Many obtained college degrees and then advanced degrees as job markets be-

www.stcparks.org

came more competitive. While it was true that education couldn’t be taken away from us, big business eventually rendered it almost pointless for today’s generation of youngsters. Simply put, a few monster corporations became bigger monsters by sending American jobs to starving countries where people worked for pennies thus forcing competing corporations to follow suit. The resulting cheap goods were imported, and American jobs went the way of autonomous news media. Jobs for ordinary high school graduates that had already become obsolete were soon joined by those of college graduates. CEO’s who were paid millions in salaries and bonuses to make big business bigger either ignored concern for working Americans’ plight and invested in foreign enterprise, or they were replaced by executives who would. The complaints from people about this gigantic ruse that threatened the American Dream fell on deaf ears in state and federal legislatures where candidates relied on millions in campaign donations to get elected, a feat that required playing ball with pernicious billiondollar interests. The Mom and Pop stores on Main Street in my hometown went broke and unemployment numbers soared. The baby boomers retired along with many others and

the costs of Medicare and Social Security skyrocketed. To make matters worse, the middle class taxpayers that supported the country suffered employer downsizing and decreasing wage scales. What I find baffling are the numbers of people in that brainwashed category in Orwell’s book. They actually go on supporting the charlatans who are selling the taxpaying, constitution-protected working Americans down the river of broken dreams in favor of billion-dollar interests supporting shameless elected puppets of political parties bearing little resemblance to those we once valued. When big business pushed the “global economy” concept decades ago, our elected officials ignored prophetic warnings that it would bring wage levels of working Americans down to the level of starving countries instead of the reverse. The prophets should have also warned that our democracy would eventually be bought by soulless, irresponsible billion-dollar interests that starkly resemble the plutocrats that our forefathers booted out of the country in the 18th century. I can now understand, better than ever, that our constitution was in itself a divine miracle composed by extremely brave, farsighted men...a document I once thought inviolate. The future appears bleak for my grandchildren and our divided nation because we were listening to what we wanted to hear instead of finding and dealing with the truth. Joe Morice is Community News’s blue-collar philosopher. He was born and raised in Missouri and spent most of his childhood on a farm and adulthood operating big machines. He has no formal training as a writer, unless 60 years of writing about any and everything counts.

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CN: August 14, 2013  

The Original North County Weekly Community News. Community News, Greater North County, Florissant, Hazelwood, Black Jack, Bellefontaine Nei...

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