Page 1

April 10, 2019 | Midwestern State University | thewichitan.com | Your Campus. Your News. | Vol. 83 No. 24

PHOTOS BY BRIDGET REILLY | THE WICHITAN

Gamma Phi Beta teammate digs the ball to win a point at the Greek Week volleyball tournament. April 8. | Member of Delta Sigma Theta and nursing senior Abigail Derosier attends the Greek Week study night. April 9. | Alpha Phi teammate serves the ball at the Greek Week volleyball tournament.

Greeks geek over Greek Week BRIANNE FOURNIER REPORTER

D

uring Greek Week, members of the sororities and fraternities come together for competitions and bonding experi-

ences. “Greek Week builds Greek unity and allows everyone to learn more about the other chapters we wouldn’t know otherwise. It brings together Panhellenic, Inter-fraternity Council and Multicultural Greek Council with the intent of working toward one common goal,” Rachel Morgan environmental science and Gamma Phi Beta senior said.

VOLLEYBALL TOURNAMENT

“I played in the dodgeball tournament last

year, and I wasn’t the best, but it was a lot of fun. This year it’s volleyball and I’m excited because that’s more up my alley,” Camille Blanton, special education and Alpha Phi sophomore said.

GREEK STUDY NIGHT

“This isn’t the most exciting event during Greek Week, but it’s a reminder of why we’re all here. It’s also nice that we all get together and show other students that even Greeks care about grades,” Braxton Allen, kinesiology and Tau Kappa Epsilon senior said.

FOOD-EATING CONTEST “Last year the eating competition was so exciting but my mouth was burning from the

jalapeños, it would be so hard to do it again,” Destiny Hurd, special education and Gamma Phi Beta sophomore, said.

GREEK SYNC AND PAGEANT “My favorite part was being able to perform in front of everyone and make them laugh. I’m excited to see all the new faces in the Greek community come together and put on a show,” Victor Venegas, political science and Sigma Nu sophomore, said.

GREEK OLYMPICS “My favorite part about Greek Olympics last year was my team because we won, and I thought it was probably the best bonding

experience in Greek Week, there’s nothing like competing, sweating and winning to bring a group together,” Trevor Snyder, mechanical and petroleum engineer and Kappa Alpha junior, said.

GREEK AWARDS CEREMONY MaClay Wilson, President of Chi Omega and marketing junior said, “I’m most excited to witness all of the Greeks come together to have a full week of fun. It’s very rare that you see so many different organizations come together to support one another, but that’s exactly what Greek Week is. I can’t wait to get involved,” Wilson said.


2 | April 10, 2019| S TAF F E DI T O R I A L

Volunteering benefits students and the community OUR VIEW: The Wichitan staff believes the university has done a great job at providing volunteer opportunities for students. Volunteering builds character and a willingness to help others in students.

S

exual Maverick’s Day of Service is an annual event for students, faculty and staff to help local non-profit organizations. This year, 28 non-profit organizations including Wichita Falls Food Bank, Leadership Wichita Falls and Meals on Wheels participated in the day of service. Two-hundred students, faculty and community members took time to help out these organizations. The volunteering on campus has shifted from who is helping to who is being helped. After all the years of going out and giving time to others, the community looks to the university for a helping hand. They reach out to the campus and ask for volunteers. This provides more than 50 volunteer opportunities to students by the campus each semester. With this opportunity, students are able to stay active within the community and build their character. We think that Volunteer MSU and Student Leadership & Involvement has done a tremendous job of gathering and advertising opportunities for students. Providing these opportunities to students will help them in the future by teaching them team building and communication skills.

wichitan Vol. 83 | No. 24

Midwestern State University Fain Fine Arts Bldg., Room D201 3410 Taft Blvd. | Wichita Falls, Texas 76308 (940) 397-4704 wichitan@mwsu.edu | thewichitan.com @wichitanonline

ALBUM RE V I E W

I Prevail nails it with ‘Trauma’ T

he development of I Prevail is incredible. Going from a really good metalcore album to a potential game changer. I rememJustin ber telling a friend Garner right after we heard the Heart vs. Mind EP, “These guys are going to be one of the biggest bands on the planet by their third album.” This did nothing but make me believe that even more. Trauma, released March 29, is another step forward in the life of I Prevail. All the way from a Taylor Swift cover, to headlining massive shows, the boys from Michigan nail it again.

BOW DOWN

Honestly, I’m not huge on the song. It’s good, and I will probably continue to listen to it, but out of everything else here, it’s probably my least favorite. | 8/10

GASOLINE “Let’s burn it f***ing down!” This song just makes me feel warm inside. | 10/10

HURRICANE It’s extremely powerful and uplifting, and it also brings us that I Prevail sound you could expect to hear. | 9.5/10

LET ME BE SAD I Prevail - Trauma

PHOTO COURTESY BY IPREVAILBAND.COM

Bow Down starts us off strong. This is the perfect song to lead off the album. | 9.5/10

PARANOID With Paranoid, they take us in a different direction. The third single released ahead of the album, we get a much different sound than anything they have done before. And it works. | 10/10

Another slow song, but I’m not complaining. It’s great. And, as I said before, one of I Prevail’s stronger points is the writing. | 8.5/10

LOW This continues the idea that this album was nothing but from the heart. Great. | 9/10

GOODBYE (INTERLUDE) Short, beautiful and emotional. Not grading.

EVERYTIME YOU LEAVE

DEADWEIGHT

It’s soft, but it’s still I Prevail. It’s great, I like it, but it’s not my favorite. | 8.5/10

Going closer to Bow Down again, I Prevail continues to put something for everyone in their album. It’s a great song, but not the best here. | 8.5/10

RISE ABOVE IT The different elements thrown into this song do nothing but add to each other, and I am so happy to see them expand how much they’re willing to do. | 9/10

BREAKING DOWN Writing has always been a strong part of I Prevail, and they nail everything here. This is my favorite song from the album. | 10/10

DOA

I DON’T BELONG HERE Great, emotional song, and a great way to close out an incredible album. | 9.5/10 Overall, the album gets a 9/10. This is a great sophomore album from a great band that continues impress me. It’s so easy for a band to go for a shift, and they lose who they were before, but I Prevail doesn’t do that. It also could have been hard to balance so much variety in one album, but damn it, they made it work. They didn’t reinvent the wheel, but they did modify it. I Prevail rolls through stronger than ever.

EDITORS: Alyssa Mitchell, Chloe Phillips

Copyright ©2018.

COPY EDITOR: Bridget Reilly

First copy free. Additional copies 25¢ each.

DESIGNER: Brittni Vilandre ISSUE STAFF: Brianne Fournier, Justin Garner, Brian Lang, Mica Victorian, Khirstia Sheffeild, Naomi Ann, Alana Earle, Andrew Murray, Taylor Anderson, Taylor Henson, Joseph Rader, Sharome Burton

ADVISER: Bradley Wilson

The Wichitan is a member of the Texas Intercollegiate Press Association and the Associated Collegiate Press. The Wichitan reserves the right to edit any material submitted for publication. Opinions expressed in The Wichitan do not necessarily reflect those of the students, staff, faculty, administration or Board of Regents of Midwestern State University. The Wichitan welcomes letters of opinion from students, faculty and staff submitted by the Friday before intended publication. Letters should be brief (250 words or fewer) and without abusive language or personal attacks. Letters must be typed and signed by the writer and include a email address, telephone number and address.


| April 10, 2019 | 3 MOVIE REVIEW

PHOTO BY MICA VICTORIAN | THE WICHITAN

Students destress before finals during Fire Pit Saturday on April 6.

Students chill at ‘Fire Pit Saturday’ L Colin Farrell, Eva Green, Nico Parker, and Finley Hobbins in Dumbo (2019).

‘Dumbo’ tries to soar but sputters W

hen a little elephant with big ears took flight 80 years ago, the world watched with awe. Since then, Disney’s animated classic Dumbo has been largely ignored until it was slated to be remade as a live-action film, just like half a dozen other Disney hits. The modern “Dumbo” starts with the same Brian idea as its predecessor: an orphaned, big-eared Lang elephant still learns to fly, but this installment adds human characters to help keep the story moving and branch off of the original plot. World War I vet and amputee Holt Farrier (Colin Farrell) returns to the Medici Circus after the war where he and his wife had a famous equestrian double act, but after the flu epidemic ravaged the camp, his two kids are the only family he has left. Tasked with managing the elephants, the Farriers quickly learn that Dumbo, the newest member of the circus family, can use his oversized ears to fly. Dumbo becomes an overnight celebrity within the circus. It’s not long before word about the amazing flying elephant gets around and the slimy entertainment mogul V. A. Vandevere (the creator of a knock-off Disneyland called Dreamland played by Michael Keaton) shows interest in buying Dumbo out from Medici (Danny Devito). Vandavere’s French paramour Colette Marchant (Eva Green), a talented trapeze artist, trains with the Farriers to learn to fly with Dumbo and bring even more crowds to the theme park. Tensions run high as Colette and the Farriers fight for Dumbo’s freedom and try to reunite him with his mom. The star of the big top is the adorable CGI Dumbo himself. His bright blue eyes light up the screen and he’s an easy hero to cheer for. Unfortunately for us, he doesn’t get the screen time he deserves and is used as a pawn for the less interesting hu-

PHOTO CURTESY IMBD

man characters to discuss and fight over with little autonomy for himself. The other nice part of this film is its great visuals and effects. Even with a bad story, Burton can still salvage scenes with enough CGI and good camera angles that nearly make up for the two-hour runtime. His bright, saturated colors in the Dreamland sequences contrast well with the bland, washedout tone of the first half of the film, but still fails to brighten the story itself. The human characters play closely along the lines of typical archetypes with Michael Keaton’s perfectly despicable Vandevere contrasting well with Devito’s earnest Max Medici. Eva Green’s steely, yet kind Colette is one of the other highlights of the second half. The two kids, John and Milly, do their best with a clunky script and are strong role models for younger audiences. It’s easy to see that this story has evolved into something much more complicated than the source material, but not necessarily better. The moments that stay true to the original are poignant and well-done, and when “Dumbo” does succeed, it feels like magic. The new storyline, though, isn’t as compelling and there’s a dark undercurrent running throughout the film that strips the heart away from the original story. “Dumbo” seems to ignore the spirit of the original (except for thankfully removing the character literally named Jim Crow), and replaces a simple, heartfelt story with something that’s much more commercialized. It’s a ham-fisted moral lesson about the immoralities of circuses and commercialism, which is ironic considering the commercial empire that Disney has created. “Dumbo” is one of those films that you might watch if you’re bored and it’s on Netflix. “Dumbo” doesn’t fail to take off, but it can’t quite soar.

MICA VICTORIAN REPORTER

F

ree food, a blazing fire pit and good music streaming in the night air was an invitation from the Residence Hall Association to students to come out to Legacy Hall Courts April 6 to unwind before finals. “Fire pit Saturday” was a success with 45 students participating a little after 9 p.m. Residence hall project director and global studies senior, Tim Varner said. “We wanted to bring students together and out of there dorms for a little social fun. Members of the Residence Hall Association spent $330 to fund “Fire Pit Saturday.” April 6 the residence hall did community service work for different organizations throughout the community. Some students worked hard, we just wanted to give them a chance to relax before finals,” Varner said. Keona Rollerson, vice president and computer science senior helped to organize the gathering. Rollerson said, “Students are getting ready for exams this helps with stress fever.” Legacy Hall Court filled with a group of students sharing laughter and conversation. Volunteers served off the grill as students lined up awaiting a smoking hot footlong. Tables were lined with plates of dark milk chocolate, large marshmallows and graham crackers were supplied in white trays for students wanting to roast marshmallows over the fire pit and make smores. Jaye Surles, chair representative and general business freshman, said, “I participated in the Day of Service, and I worked hard directing traffic for people parking to attend Texoma Hellacious obstacle courses. There were over 20 different obstacle courses at Lucy Park. I would never try it, but some people enjoyed just watching others.” “It is likely that I will participate again next year. I enjoyed volunteering” said Surles. Although, Surles had an exhausting day volunteering. She was at “Fire Pit Saturday” burning the night oil. Varner called Fire Pit Saturday an “after party.” Students walked around like ants on an ant mound until the last marshmallow roasted. The event was scheduled to end at 11 p.m. but some students stuck around until the last song played.


4 | April 10, 2019| A DAY IN THE LIFE

PHOTOS CURTESY OF KHIRSTIA SHEFFIELD | NAOMI ANN | THE WICHITAN

Criminal justice freshman and defensive back Christopher Hawkins and psychology freshman and defensive back Jacolby Thomas celebrating after great defensive play during practice. April 9. | Christopher Hawkins | Criminal justice freshman and defensive back Christopher Hawkins running to tackle in practice with defensive coach David Toussaint.

CHRISTOPHER HAWKINS

‘I try to keep in mind that it’s a blessing that I am even able to play’ KHIRSTIA SHEFFIELD REPORTER

I

t’s 5 a.m. and while most students are sound asleep, his day has just begun. The ringing sounds of whistle blowing consume his ears, as he practices each play repeatedly like clock-work. Christopher Hawkins, criminal justice sophomore, has dedicated his life to football. “Football is my life. There aren’t many other things that bring me as much happiness as touching that field does,” said Hawkins. Juggling the demands of both football and school has become even harder tasks now that he’s tackling 16 hours of classes. “I usually wake up at 5 a.m. every day, and after beginning my morning with an intense workout, I have meetings for about an hour. After meetings, I rush to class at 9:30 a.m. and stay in class until 11 a.m.,” Hawkins said. After his 11 a.m. class, Hawkins has a small break until his next class begins. For him, there isn’t much time for lunch or homework because, he said, he’s so exhausted. Being a student athlete requires some sacrifice and

sometimes his sleep is put on the back-burner. “Balancing between being a student and athlete is hard. A lot of times I have to sacrifice eating or sleeping just so I can have time to do my homework. It’s important for me to make use of the little time I have. At the end of the day, I am here for my education,” Hawkins said.

WHO IS CHRISTOPHER HAWKINS? Christopher Hawkins, criminal justice sophomore, was raised in a large suburb outside of Dallas –Mesquite, Texas. Since he was five, Hawkins has always had a love for sports. He has played a variety of sports, including baseball, basketball, football and he ran track. Hawkins has one older brother and he enjoys spending quality time with his family, traveling and trying new places to eat. His favorite foods are burgers and fries, preferably curly fries. Hawkins spends a lot of time playing games on his Xbox, like 2k, Madden and Apex Legends. “Once class is over, I run to football meetings at 3 p.m. and then practice starts at 3:45

p.m. Practice normally lasts for a couple of hours. After practice ends I have class from 6-8:50 p.m. and this doesn’t even include the days I have study hall,” said Hawkins. By the end of the day, Hawkins said he feels exhausted as his body starts to feel like a piece of worn-out machinery. “Although I may feel extremely exhausted by the end of the day, I try to keep in mind that it’s a blessing that I am even able to play, especially when I look back on the struggles I’ve faced to get where I am today. It’s also people that wish they were in my spot, so I always have to stay on my toes,” Hawkins said. Despite his complete dedication and love for football, Hawkins said he feels like he has missed out on the true college experience. “Since I’ve been in college, I have never really been able to get involved in the different organizations I’m interested in. Football really takes up so much of my time and I don’t think other students truly understand how much of a commitment being an athlete is. My entire college experience is shared between football and school,” Hawkins said.

Hawkins’s dedication and passion for football is noticeable to those around him like Anthony Tennison, kinesiology sophomore and roommate. “Chris is one of those people that is always 100 percent committed to what he puts his mind to, when everyone else is playing around or slacking, Chris is on the field trying to improve his craft. I admire Chris, as a teammate and a friend, because you don’t find many people in our generation with that kind of work ethic. When he works hard, that pushes me to work harder, because we grind together,” Tennison said. According to his other teammate and roommate, Khalil Finley education sophomore, said Hawkins’s dedication to football outside of practice helps him succeed. “During any break, you can bet money that Chris is going to be working out back at home. This is what makes a true athlete. A lot of individuals only strive to do the bare minimum just to get some playing time, but you can tell Chris has a different kind of love for football” Finley said.

MSU student discounts $2 off any service USE CODE: 20221

Always hiring great stylists


| April 10, 2019 | 5 Q UES TION OF THE WEEK

How many times do you think you eat Chick-Fil-A in a week?

CHICK-FIL-A IS A WELL-LOVED FOOD CHAIN, ESPECIALLY AMONGST COLLEGE STUDENTS. THIS WEEK WE ASKED STUDENTS HOW MANY TIMES THEY EAT AT THE CAMPUS CHICK-FIL-A IN A WEEK. REPORTER| ALANA EARLE

Khadijah Moore, political science major smiling as she hands a customer their drink.

PHOTO BY ALANA EARLE | THE WICHITAN

LINDSEY SARABIA, EARLY EDUCATION JUNIOR | “Two to

TAYEISHA LAVILLE, GEOSCIENCE SENIOR | “I think five

VICKEH CALLAWAY, PSYCHOLOGY JUNIOR | “Maybe once

KENDI MALONE, EDUCATION JUNIOR | “I probably eat

three times a week. Depends on how busy I am.”

a month. I really try not to eat there at all because of the donations. They have a history of giving to anti-LGBTQI+ groups. Having one on campus is really convenient though when you’re in a hurry and hungry.” DARIA EMANUEL, PHYSIOLOGY FRESHMAN | “Unfortu-

times a week.”

Chik-Fil-A once or twice a week.”

MARIA CASTEDO, BIOLOGY SOPHOMORE | “I really can’t put a number to it but, I’d be willing to say maybe three times a week. It’s so good.”

nately I eat at Chick-Fil-A multiple times a week, it varies each week but, typically three to five times a week. What can I say, I’m addicted.”

IMANI HORTON, CRIMINAL JUSTICE | “I used to hardly

FAY AJALA, NURSING JUNIOR | “Probably like two to three

GERMIAMAH JUNKERE,

times [a week].”

LARISSA KANKAM, NURSING SENIOR | “When I used to

have a meal plan, I used to eat it everyday.”

ELIZABETH SPEIGAL, HISTORY SOPHOMORE | “A couple

times a week.”

CADEN CASTILLO, HISTORY FRESHMAN | “I try to go at

least once a day since it’s technically protein and their fries are amazing.”

ever eat there for a lot of reasons but, MSU has put me on to it. I eat there whenever I can.”

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING AND MATH SOPHOMORE | “I don’t. I usually bring my food from home or I go off campus to eat.” ONEIDA MIRELES, business management junior | “I prob-

ably eat at Chick-Fil-A twice, to maybe even four times a week.”

DIEGO PEREZ, PRE-MEDICAL SOPHOMORE | “I really eat

only Chick-Fil-A [laugh], it’s undeniably good. I would say I eat there maybe six times a week or more.”

Counseling center staff presents session on studying for finals ANDREW MURRAY REPORTER

S

taff members from the Counseling Center talked to the 12 students April 3 zeroing in on study skills focused on different styles of learning. In his presentation, Zachary Zoet, a licensed professional counselorintern, and friend of the Counseling Center said, “The goal for today is to empower you with knowledge of some studying skills and strategies. Another goal is to encourage you to cultivate your knowledge of what kind of study skills are best for you.” Zoet uses food to explain all the styles and skills. Zoet spoke about a platter called Smorgasbord, which is a platter filled with meats and cheeses. “You take what you want like meats and cheeses and that’s kind of the strategy today,” Zoet said. “There is probably going to be stuffed in this presentation that is not for you, that’s stuff like steamed brussels sprouts.” This presentation being done every year to help students get ready for finals and it covers a wide variety of topics.“Smorgasbord” referred to the big four learning styles consisting of visual, auditory, reading/writing and kinesthetic. “It’s helpful to know what kind of learner you are. That will inform which of the options will ‘taste’ good to you, and help you,” Zoet said. He presented a basic outline of what each one was and how they could be fitted with one or more of each type. Visual people are the ones that like to see symbols and different formats, like different fonts and colors to emphasize important points. His partner in this presentation, Vikki Chaviers, Counseling Center licensed professional counselor, chimed in to talk about how she is visual and used these skills to help pass her licensing test. “Going back to my source materials, which were my textbook and notes from classes and to color code these different sections we were being tested on,” Chaviers said. “Like theories and techniques, I remember I did a kind of a seafoam green color for those so everything I went back to in my textbooks I had a green pen and underlined things I thought that was important. Everything I found in my notes that I thought was important I got a green highlighter and highlighted.” Then Zoet began talking about the second out of the four which was auditory. These are the people that prefer to hear or talk the information. The third style is reading and writing and “it’s self-explanatory” in that you benefit from writing it down and reading it multiple times. “These are the people who like reading manuals and essays,” Zoet said during his presentation. The final form people could be grouped into is kinesthetics. These are the students that have to act out everything they do and “prefer to use [there] experiences and the things that are real” to help students study. Some examples he gave were labs, exhibits, and photographs. The last thing that he talked about was asking for help now this may be because they are part of the counseling center but Zoet talks about how the ones who ask for help are the ones that survive. “Don’t put your head in the sand and hope everything will be ok,” Zoet said. The Counseling Center staff thought to change this presentation they had been giving for a number of years into something for finals week. “Just recently we decided to change this up to say that you have the same topics generally, but you don’t study the same way for finals week as you do during the rest of the semester,” Chaviers said. “We have taken the three main topics the time management, the study skills, and the test anxiety and gear those in this very last section each semester fall and spring just to the upcoming finals.”


6 | April 10, 2019|

PHOTO BY TAYLOR ANDERSON | THE WICHITAN

Vocal instructor Don Maxwell dances and sings to vocal improv performance of Richtige Dauern by Karlheinx Stockhausen. April 4.

Conductor builds confidence through Heaven’s music this song as “fascinating, interesting and unique,” which alarents and friends lowed his students to gathered in the build something more Burns Chapel, than their voices. April 4 to listen to the “It builds individsweet melodies of the ual confidence. They Midwestern Singers. feel confident in their Preparing for two own vocal line because months and meeting First Last they are creating this three days-a-week, PHOTO BY TAYLOR ANDERSON | THE WICHITAN the audience was ser- Conductor Dale Heidebrecht joins his students music as we speak,” Heidebrecht said. enaded at no cost with at their concert, in the Burns Chapel. Heidebrecht said Stevie Wonder’s top hits, “Superstition” and “Don’t Worry ‘Bout he encourages his students to take a “leap of faith” but also wants to shed light on the aua Thing.” Conductor Dale Heidebrecht added a song dience. “I program not only music that my stuto the program that he said, most performance groups shy away from, “Richtige Dau- dents can sing and pushes them, but to eduern,” by Karlheinz Stockhausen. He describes cate the audience as much as I can,” HeideTAYLOR ANDERSON REPORTER

P

brecht said. Hancock sees vocal Haley Hancock, voimprovisation with a cal performance sophdeeper meaning, alomore, describes the lowing her to see a new preparation for the perspective and grow Stockhausen piece, as as a person. vocal improv meaning “Preparation is althere is “absolutely ways great but if you no preparation” and go in blindly to some“fly off the seat of your thing it could open pants.” PHOTO BY TAYLOR ANDERSON | THE WICHITAN up your perspective Vocal improv is Midwestern Singers and Conductor Dale to something new. If more than creating Heidebrecht close the concert with “Cells you try a different apsounds and rhythm Planet” by Erika Lloyd. proach to something it and having the ability could enable you to beto play off of others. come better as a person and grow,” Hancock “How do I play off everyone else, because said. you are suppose to listen to everyone else. It’s The concert closed with a classical piece, important to take that into consideration,” “Cells Planet,” by Erika Lloyd Hancock said.

Take Back the Night to be held April 10 TAYLOR HENSON REPORTER

T

he month of April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month and Take Back the Night is coming to campus April 10. Take Back the Night, is a program dedicated to creating a safe community and respectful relationships through awareness at Sikes Lake at 8 p.m. Sexual assault awareness month is a campaign to raise awareness and educate the com-

munity on sexual violence. Rachael Fornof, Title IX director said, “Take Back the Night started on college campuses in the late 80s, mostly for women, and they use the term take back the night because women couldn’t go out at night without fear of sexual assault.” Fornof said this will be the first Take Back the Night event at Midwestern and her hope is to bring the college community together. “These are events that college campuses

can hold that create and ignite a passion into the prevention of sexual violence while also providing a safe space for survivors to exist,” Fornof said. The event will consist of a 5K run, yoga, meditation and a vigil walk through campus at the end of the night. There will also be snacks and T-shirts for the first people who arrive. Fornof said, in the past year, the university has tried to do a lot to show students they

are aware of issues of sexual violence, and are committed to preventing acts of sexual violence. Fornof said she hopes people attending receive the feeling of support. “One of the most important things is helping people feel supported. When survivors say why they didn’t make a report or made a late report, a lot of the reasons are they don’t feel supported in their community,” Fornof said. For more information visit nomore.org


| April 10, 2019 | 7

PHOTOS BY BRIDGET REILLY | THE WICHITAN

Christian Douglas, computer science senior, runs with open arms through the dry paint at the 5Kolor run at Sikes Lake for Wichita Falls Faith Mission on April 2.

5kolor Run

52 people run in support for Faith Mission JOSEPH RADER REPORTER

F

ifty-two people ran the 5kolor Run at Sikes Lake to show support for Sexual Assault Awareness Month and to donate to the Wichita Falls Faith Mission, a non-profit organization that benefits the homeless and abused women. “This was my first time running it, and it was really amazing to get the opportunity to support an amazing cause,” Kennedy Howard, education sophomore, said. Organizers set up a table for runners to donate things like clothes, tooth paste, toiletries and canned foods. “I love the fact that you get a chance to interact with other students and faculty on campus to get a chance to show others that you support them and others that have been sexually assaulted,” Howard said. Howard said she participated in the run because it felt like the right thing to do, and she would want somebody else to support her if she were in the same situation. “This is my second time coming to the color run. It’s an awesome event for a good cause,” Madi Eckeberger, nursing junior, said. “My favorite part is throwing the color at all of my friends and having a good time with everyone,” Rogelio Nunez, psy-

Austin Strode, general business freshman, and Erick Lopez, general business freshman, run through the dry paint at the 5kolor run in support for Faith Mission. chology junior said. Nunez also said participating in the color run was a good way for him to relieve stress. At the end of the race there were tons of smiles, grins and

giggles the children and some students running through the finish line twice to get more paint on them. “My favorite part is seeing people of all ages genuinely happy,” Eckeberger said.


8 | April 10, 2019|

Caribbean students bring cricket to campus

PHOTOS BY SHAROME BURTON | THE WICHITAN

Timon Thomas, alumnus drives powerfully during Caribbean Students Organization cricket competition. April 7. | Phelicia Scotland, chemistry senior and Jawan Liburd, special education graduate fumble a catch during Caribbean Students Organization cricket competition. | Joel Thomas, alumnus carried off field by Innis House player after being dismissed during Caribbean Students Organization cricket competition. | Jeremy Joseph, alumnus attempts cover-drive while wicketkeeper Naqash Tahir looks during Caribbean Students Organization cricket competition.

REPORTER | SHAROME BURTON THE CARIBBEAN STUDENT’S ORGANIZATION (CSO) BROUGHT A TASTE OF REGIONAL FLAVOR TO THE CAMPUS GROUNDS ON APRIL 7 WHEN IT HELD ITS ANNUAL CRICKET COMPETITION AT THE FREE-PLAY FIELDS NEAR THE D.L. LIGON COLISEUM. CRICKET, THE MAJOR SPORT IN MANY OF THE COMMONWEALTH COUNTRIES REPRESENTED BY CSO, WAS THE LATEST ACTIVITY USED TO PROMOTE FRIENDLY COMPETITION AMONG THE FOUR HOUSES CONSTITUENT OF THE ORGANIZATION (GLEAN, INNISS, THOMAS AND WILDMAN) WHICH ARE NAMED AFTER THE FORMER STUDENTS WHO FOUNDED IT OVER 25 YEARS AGO. INNIS HOUSE (PICTURED IN GREEN TOPS) EMERGED AS CHAMPIONS, AFTER DEFEATING WILDMAN (BLUE) AND THOMAS (YELLOW) IN THE FINAL.

PHOTO BY SHAROME BURTON | THE WICHITAN

Umpire Alec Roberts looks on as Dr. Randy Glean, director of international student services bowls during Caribbean Students Organization cricket competition.

Location: Pyramid Center 2910 Kemp Blvd Suite 118 Wichita Falls, TX 76308

10% discount with ad (one per person)

April 10, 2019  

The Wichitan

April 10, 2019  

The Wichitan

Profile for msuwaikun