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FEBRUARY 2017 CELEBRATING 80 YEARS OF TRAVEL

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CELEBRATING CHINESE HERITAGE VALENTINE’S DAY SHOPPING AT SHREVE & CO.

Leave Your Heart in

San Francisco The Most Romantic Things To Do in the City


150 POST STREET, SAN FRANCISCO (415) 421-2600 STANFORD SHOPPING CENTER, PALO ALTO (650) 327-2211 SHREVE.COM


San Francisco CONTENTS

02.17

SEE MORE OF SAN FRANCISCO AT WHERETRAVELER.COM

the plan

the guide

7 Editor’s Itinerary

20

Looking for an insider's perspective? We've got it.

SHOPPING

Valentine's Day gifting near Union Square.

10 Ask the Expert Lex Fukumitsu Tips from the Hyatt Regency San Francisco chief concierge.

26

MUSEUMS+GALLERIES

Diane Arbus at SFMOMA.

12 Hot Dates SF Beer Week, the SF Symphony Lunar New Year Concert and more.

WINE COUNTRY DINING | ATTRACTIONS | CULTURE | WINERIES | MAP

A Journey to

Remember BEST WINERY EXPERIENCES ASK A WINEMAKER WINE MEETS ART

1/11/17 8:22 AM

special insert: 64 Your San Francisco For families, history buffs and GLBTQ tavelers. Unique recommendations curated by Where and fit to match personal travel styles.

Where® magazine’s guide to exploring Wine Country’s food, culture and events.

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An immersive, Prohibitionera theater experience.

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FEBRUARY 2017 CELEBRATING 80 YEARS OF TRAVEL

ENTERTAINMENT

®

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CELEBRATING CHINESE HERITAGE

Dine in style at Hotel Zeppelin.

VALENTINE’S DAY SHOPPING AT SHREVE & CO.

Leave Your Heart in

San Francisco The Most Romantic Things To Do in the City

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DINING

1/11/17 3:35 PM

ON THE COVER

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“Dynasty Memory No 8" by artist Pop Zhao is part of the 2017 Hearts in San Francisco series. ©IRJA ELISA PHOTOGRAPHY

where now 14 Romance in the City

CONNECT WITH US

Endless San Francisco activities for couples, just in time for Valentine's Day. BY RENEE BRINCKS

18 Chinese San Francisco READ US ON MAGZTER

Where to experience the city's enduring and pervasive Chinese legacy. BY DEREK SHAW

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ATTRACTIONS + TOURS

The return of the Hearts in San Francisco series.

MAPS

Explore the city from north to south and A to Z page 60-63

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP CENTER: COURTESY SF TRAVEL/©SCOTT CHERNIS; ©KASSIE BORRESON; CHOUX BAKERY; SF SYMPHONY

Board the Napa Valley Wine Train for a scenic ride through Napa and Sonoma.

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CHRISTOPHER¯CLARK FINE ART


Final Weeks! Closes Feb 26, 2017

Frank Stella, Lac Laronge III, 1969. Acrylic on canvas, 108 x 162 in. (274.3 × 411.5 cm). Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, Gift of Seymour H. Knox, Jr., 1970. © 2016 Frank Stella / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York


YOUR TRAVELING COMPANION SINCE 1936®

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F R A N C I S CO

PUBLISHER Nikki Wood 415.901.6262 EDITOR, SAN FRANCISCO Rachel Ward

CELEBRATING THE BEATLES’ TOURING YEARS

ADVERTISING & CIRCULATION ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Nanci Davies (415.901.6267) Mary Goll (415.901.6266) Enitan Medl (415.901.6263) CIRCULATION, MARKETING & EVENTS MANAGER

Catherine Pastuhov

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Megan Simmons

EDITORIAL & DESIGN EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Zachary Clark ART DIRECTOR Jennifer Keller Vaz

MORRIS VISITOR PUBLICATIONS MVP | EXECUTIVE PRESIDENT Donna W. Kessler CHIEF STRATEGY OFFICER Reab Berry CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER Dennis Kelly VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS Angela E. Allen VICE PRESIDENT, INTERNAL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

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GENERAL MANAGER, WHERE MAPS

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DIRECTOR OF CIRCULATION Scott Ferguson NATIONAL MARKETING MANAGER Melissa Blanco © Shahrokh Hatami

© Jim Marshall Photography LLC

MVP | CREATIVE CHIEF CREATIVE OFFICER Haines Wilkerson SENIOR EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Margaret Martin DESIGN DIRECTOR Jane Frey DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY Isaac Arjonilla CREATIVE COORDINATOR Beverly Mandelblatt MVP | NATIONAL SALES VICE PRESIDENT OF NATIONAL INTEGRATED SALES

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VICE PRESIDENT, NATIONAL MARKETING

Adeline Tafuri Jurecka

DIRECTOR OF PARTNERSHIPS & NATIONAL DIGITAL SALES Bridget Duffie 706.821.6663 NATIONAL SALES COORDINATOR David Gately

In 1962 John, Paul, George and Ringo played their first live concert as The Beatles. Four years later they performed their last live concert — right here in San Francisco. Ron Howard’s new documentary, “The Beatles: Eight Days a Week”, beautifully covers those remarkable few years and we are honored to have acted as photographic consultants on this important film. We currently have a remarkable collection of Beatles photographs on display this month, some quite rare. Admission is free. Open to the public Monday thru Saturday, 10AM to 6PM.

San Francisco Art Exchange LLC

458 Geary Street San Francisco California 94102

800 344 9633 info@sfae.com sfae.com

MVP | PUBLICATION SERVICES PUBLICATION SERVICES DIRECTOR Kris Miller PUBLICATION SERVICES MANAGER Mickey Kibler DIGITAL IMAGING Erik Lewis MVP | MANUFACTURING & TECHNOLOGY DIRECTOR OF MANUFACTURING Donald Horton TECHNICAL OPERATIONS MANAGER

Tony Thorne-Booth

E-mails for all of the above except contributors: firstname.lastname@morris.com

MVP | SAN FRANCISCO

555 Montgomery St., Ste. 600., San Francisco, CA 94111 415.901.6260; 415.901.6261 (fax) MORRIS COMMUNICATIONS CHAIRMAN William S. Morris III PRESIDENT & CEO William S. Morris

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Where® magazine is produced by Morris Visitor Publications (MVP), a division of Morris Communications Co., LLC. 725 Broad St., Augusta, GA 30901, morrismedianetwork.com. Where magazine and the where® logo are registered trademarks of Morris Visitor Publications. Where makes every effort to ensure the accuracy of the information it publishes, but cannot be held responsible for any consequences arising from errors or omissions. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part strictly prohibited. MVP is a proud sponsor of Les Clefs d’Or USA

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EDITOR’S ITINERARY RACHEL WARD NEWS TO TRAVEL BY

Mood for Love Welcome to San Francisco! This month we have the ultimate guide to the most romantic things to do in the city (p. 14). We also have some insider tips for anyone curious about the city's rich Chinese heritage (p. 18). Happy exploring! 90 MINUTES IN:

Ghirardelli Square When you arrive in the square, pause to admire the view over Aquatic Park Cove and the bay. Buy a freshly pressed juice in a reusable glass bottle from the Juice Shop, a local favorite with charming kiosks around town. Then shop for a keepsake trinket at Mashka Jewelry, a boutique selling handmade designs by a Serbianborn local artisan. Sip a glass of wine made in San Francisco at Bluxome Street Winery before indulging in an exquisite French pastry at local bakery Le Marais. Find something luxurious at the ElizabethW flagship, which stocks the full line of bath body and home goods, all crafted in San Francisco. Before you leave, pause at the fountain to enjoy a bit of live music. Get going! Explore the city at wheretraveler.com.

COURTESY JAMESTOWN

in the world

Where is an international network of magazines first published in 1936 and distributed in over 4,000 leading hotels in more than 50 places around the world. Look for us when you visit any of the following cities, or plan ahead for your next trip by visiting us online at wheretraveler.com. UNITED STATES Alaska, Atlanta, Baltimore, Boston, Charleston, Charlotte, Chicago, Dallas, Indianapolis, Jacksonville/St. Augustine/Amelia Island, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Maui, Miami, Minneapolis/St. Paul, New Orleans, New York, Oahu, Orange County (CA), Orlando, Philadelphia, Phoenix/Scottsdale, San Diego, San Francisco, Seattle, St. Louis, Tampa, Tucson, Washington, D.C. ASIA Hong Kong, Macau, Singapore AUSTRALIA Brisbane, Melbourne, Sydney CANADA Calgary, Canadian Rockies, Edmonton, Halifax, Muskoka/Parry Sound, Ottawa, Toronto, Vancouver, Victoria, Whistler, Winnipeg EUROPE Berlin, Budapest, Istanbul, London, Madrid, Milan, Moscow, Paris, Rome, St. Petersburg

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HIPPIE MODERNISM THE STRUGGLE FOR UTOPIA

Radical art. DIY architecture. Experimental design. Fifty years after the Summer of Love, the counterculture’s legacy is as provocative as ever. FILM SERIES

Hippie Modernism: Cinema and Counterculture, 1964 – 1974 Find out about more groovy Summer of Love 50th anniversary events at visitberkeley.com Clay Geerdes: Cockettes Go Shopping, 1972; digital print; 42 × 28 in.; courtesy David Miller; Estate of Clay Geerdes.

February 8 – May 21

UC BERKELEY ART MUSEUM . PACIFIC FILM ARCHIVE bampfa.org

Center and Oxford Streets, Downtown Berkeley


Ask the Expert YOUR CONCIERGE

Lex Fukumitsu Chief Concierge, Hyatt Regency San Francisco; Member, Northern California Concierge Association Q: What do you consider the most romantic place in San Francisco? A: In my youth, Fort Point was my go-to spot. Driving through the Presidio and by the Main Post sets the mood of a bygone era, with the Civil War buildings and parade grounds. Continue down Marine Drive, which opens up to a striking view of the bay, the Golden Gate Bridge and Fort Point nestled under the Joseph Strauss arch. Stand under the bridge, looking out at Alcatraz and the city, with the waves crashing in over the rocks, the fog just starting to creep under the bridge and the required chivalrous arm around the shoulder. Q: Any tips for visitors who want to check out the Chinese New Year Parade? A: An urban legend that's true more often than not is that it always rains on the parade. So, no matter what the weather forecast is, prepare for rain. In the drought year of 1978, the only day it rained in January and February was on the parade. Other than reserving seats in the stands, anywhere along the route is good for viewing. Grab a spot early, but first go to Golden Gate Bakery on Grant Avenue for the best egg custard tarts in Chinatown. My favorite is the coconut buns. Be sure to buy extras, or you may be tempted to lose your spot when you go back for more. Q: What neighborhood would you recommend visitors explore and why? A: Haight-Ashbury, not only because it's now a vibrant shopping area surrounded by fully restored Victorians, shops and hip restaurants, but also because you can still feel what it was in 1967’s Summer of Love. This was hippie central. There was the first free clinic taking care of the uninsured, Janis Joplin, the Grateful Dead, Jefferson Airplane, the Pork Store Cafe and teenagers straight from Ohio smoking dope on the sidewalks. The Pork Store Cafe is still there, and the photos are worth the stop. The teenagers are there. Janis, Jerry and the others are gone, but you can buy their music at Amoeba Music. 10 W H E R E S A N F R A N C I S CO I F E B R UA R Y 20 17


WHERE CALENDAR FEBRUARY 2017 Search the full San Francisco calendar at wheretraveler.com

EXHIBITS +THEATER

HOT DATES

SF BEER WEEK:

Feb. 10-19

This massive festival features hundreds of events hosted by celebrated breweries, restaurants, bars and retailers. The opening gala at Pier 48 kicks off Feb. 10, and the following nine days are packed with events taking place all over the greater Bay Area, from San Jose to Santa Rosa. Expect special beer releases, beer festivals, meet-the-brewer opportunities, beer dinners, tastings, lectures, panel discussions, home-brewing demonstrations and educational events. sfbeerweek.org

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Great Things Not to Be Missed

Magnificent Magnolias caption here

Lunar New Year Concert

There’s a lot more going on this month. Visit us online: wheretraveler.com

1 SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY’S LUNAR NEW YEAR CONCERT AND IMPERIAL DINNER > FEB. 4 SF Symphony’s annual concert and feast includes a pre-concert reception with lion dancing, Chinese calligraphy, ribbon dancing, tea bars, children’s entertainment and lucky red envelopes. Davies Symphony Hall, 201 Van Ness Ave., 415.864.6000, sfsymphony.org

2 “RENT: THE 20TH ANNIVERSARY TOUR” AT THE GOLDEN GATE THEATRE > FEB. 719 The Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award-winning musical inspired by Puccini’s “La Bohème” returns to the stage for this anniversary touring production. “Rent” is one of the longest-running shows in Broadway history;

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the original production ran for 12 years and 5,123 performances. 1 Taylor St., 888.746.1799, shnsf.com 3 NOISE POP FESTIVAL > FEB. 1727 This indie music, arts and film festival has hosted countless up-and-coming acts before they became household names, including The Flaming Lips, Frank Black of The Pixies and The White Stripes. Events take place at venues around San Francisco and Oakland. noisepop.com

4 “MONET: THE EARLY YEARS” AT LEGION OF HONOR > FEB. 25MAY 29 This is the first major U.S. exhibition devoted to Claude Monet’s formative years of 1858 to 1872, including his first painting, which he completed at the age of 18. The exhibit showcases Monet’s landscapes, still lifes, portraits and genre scenes. 100 34th Ave., 415.750.3600, legionofhonor.famsf.org

FEB. 8MAY 21 “HIPPIE MODERNISM: THE STRUGGLE FOR UTOPIA” AT BAMPFA In celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Summer of Love, this exhibition at the Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive provides an overview of the counterculture movement, featuring experimental furniture, alternative living structures and alternative printed material. 2155 Center St., Berkeley, 510.642.0808, bampfa. berkeley.edu ALL MONTH “CARY LEIBOWITZ: MUSEUM SHOW” AT CONTEMPORARY JEWISH MUSEUM This exhibit of New York-based contemporary artist Cary Leibowitz features original artworks from 1987 to the present, including paintings, fabric work, installations, documentation and photography. 736 Mission St., 415.655.7800, thecjm.org

FROM TOP: GAMMA NINE POHOTGRAPHY; COURTESY FAR OUT FLORA; COURTESY SF SYMPHONY

FEB. 126 ACT PRESENTS “A THOUSAND SPLEN DID SUNS” This production is the world-premiere theatrical adaptation of Khaled Hosseini’s bestselling novel, “A Thousand Splendid Suns.” It is adapted for the stage by playwright Ursula Rani Sarma and features live music from renowned composer David Coulter. Geary Theater, 415 Geary St., 415.749.2228, act-sf.org


OUT+ABOUT MAGNIFICENT MAGNO LIAS AT SAN FRANCISCO BOTANICAL GARDEN San Francisco’s Botanical Garden is home to one of the largest magnolia collections outside of China. This month, nearly 100 magnolias bloom, many of which are rare. The garden offers a variety of special events, including Magnolias by Moonlight walks and a Valentine’s Day celebration. 1199 9th Ave., 415.661.1316, sfbotanicalgarden.org

01-28

Pacific Orchid & Garden Exposition

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SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS FAN FEST The annual event allows Giants fans to roam the field, snap photos with the World Series trophies and meet stars like Madison Bumgarner and Buster Posey. Free. AT&T Park, 24 Willie Mays Plaza, sfgiants.com

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SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE WINE COMPETITION Judges from every major American wine region select winners from over 7,000 entries, making this the largest competition of American wines in the world. Join over 5,000 wine enthusiasts for the public tasting. Festival Pavilion, Fort Mason Center, 2 Marina Blvd., winejudging.com

23-25

ZINFANDEL EXPERIENCE The only three-day event devoted entirely to Zinfandel, the Zinfandel Experience brings together winemakers and enthusiasts for dinners, a grand tasting and seminar-style tastings and auctions at three San Francisco venues: One Market, Bently Reserve and Pier 27. 530.274.4900, zinfandelexperience.com

©RON PARSONS

24-26

PACIFIC ORCHID & GARDEN EXPOSITION This is the largest orchid show in the United States, featuring thousands of orchids and a range of new spring and seasonal plants for the garden as well as garden-related products and services. Hall of Flowers, San Francisco County Fair Building, 1199 9th Ave., orchidsanfrancisco.org 13


where now San Francisco

Spend quality time with someone special and explore the city’s Chinese heritage

INSIDER’S GUIDE

In San Francisco, romance means many things. For some, it’s a candlelight dinner at a trendy bistro or bling by a local jeweler. For others, it means exploring this landscape of summits, scenic coastline and swoon-worthy sunsets. This Valentine’s Day, sample San Francisco’s intoxicating blend of dreamy date options. Whether you and your darling are starry-eyed sweethearts or a couple celebrating a lifetime of love, you’ll find something sure to set your hearts aflutter. BY RENEE BRINCKS 14 W H E R E C I T Y N A M E I M O N T H Y E A R

PHOTO CREDIT GOES HERE

Romantic San Francisco


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FOR WINE AND COCKTAILS

OPPOSITE PAGE: SF TRAVEL/©JACK HOLLINGSWORTH; THIS PAGE FROM TOP: COURTESY MASON PACIFIC; PRESS CLUB; ©CONNOR NORRIS

After dinner, relax over thoughtful wine and dessert pairings in a quiet corner at Noeteca. For wines on tap and elevated small plates, try SoMa’s Jamber Wine Pub. Nearby, Bluxome Street Winery offers an urban take on the traditional Wine Country experience, and Press Club pours an ambitious wine and craft beer selection in sophisticated quarters. Looking for an only-inSan Francisco option? Order the House Cappuccino or White Nun at North Beach’s buzzy Tosca Cafe. noeteca.com, jambersf.com, bluxomewinery.com, pressclubsf.com, toscacafesf.com

Mason Pacific

FOR FINE DINING

Press Club

Celebrate with Food & Drink

San Francisco has no shortage of upscale restaurants known for local ingredients, sought-after wines and warm service. Longtime favorites like Foreign Cinema, Jardinière and the Cliff House present memorable menus and one-of-a-kind experiences. Choose a window seat at Mason Pacific and dine with a cable car view, or opt for a more modern setting at Michael Mina’s RN74. Cozy L’Ardoise brings elevated French fare to Noe Valley, while La Ciccia earns high marks for its Sardinian spin on seafood, pasta and dessert. Over in the Castro, Canela Bistro & Wine Bar takes its cues from Spanish traditions. foreigncinema. com, jardiniere.com, cliffhouse.com, masonpacific.com, michaelmina.net, ardoisesf.com, canelasf.com, laciccia.com

FOR CASUAL EATS For flirtation without the formality, grab an outdoor table and enjoy brunch at Cole Valley’s charming Zazie. Then, get cozy at the neighboring Ice Cream Bar and split a milkshake (or splurge on boozy dessert drinks) in old-school soda fountain style. Bi-Rite Creamery is another favorite for creative scoops, while a cable car ride to Swensen’s Ice Cream on Russian Hill is classic San Francisco. In the Mission, 20 Spot serves wine and small bites in a stylishly renovated 1885 Victorian. zaziesf.com, theicecreambarsf.com, biritecreamery.com, swensens.com, 20spot.com

The Ice Cream Bar

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WHERE NOW San

Francisco FOR SCENERY AND SUNSETS

While Twin Peaks is a popular favorite for panoramic vistas, Tank Hill offers a quieter alternative with Instagramworthy shots of Golden Gate Park, the Presidio and downtown San Francisco. Ascend a colorful mosaic stairway to access Grandview Park, or take the pups out to dogCupid’s Span friendly Bernal Heights Park. Bustling Dolores Park and Lafayette Park, a quieter Pacific Heights spot, provide pretty backdrops for picnics, as do Inspiration Point and Baker Beach in the Presidio. Russian Hill’s Ina Coolbrith Park in Russian Hill is a hidden gem with sweeping San Francisco Bay views. Walk along the Embarcadero at night to take in the twinkling Bay Lights display on the Bay Bridge. By day, don’t miss the Cupid’s Span sculpture, south of Pier 14. sfrecpark. org, presidio.gov, thebaylights.org Palace of Fine Arts

FOR CULTURAL EXCURSIONS Put a spirited spin on the traditional museum trip by at-

For a memorable coastal ramble, park at the Paltending after-hours parties like the Exploratorium After ace of Fine Arts and head toward the Crissy Field Dark or NightLife at the California Academy of Sciences. shoreline. Or, rent a tandem cycle from Blazing During daytime hours, one ticket provides same-day Saddles and pedal across the Golden Gate Bridge general admission to both the Legion of Honor and the de to Sausalito. Angel Island also offers picturesque Young Museum. While in Golden Gate Park, don’t miss the biking and hiking trails, and the ferry over to the secluded Shakespeare Garden. To explore the city’s tastier island ups the adventure quotient. Adventure side, book a chocolate tour neighborhood food outing with Cat Sailing Charters welcomes guests on sunset Gourmet Walks. exploratorium.edu, calacademy.org, legionsailing outings, and Seaplane Adventures runs ofhonor.famsf.org, deyoung.famsf.org, goldengatepark.com, sunset sightseeing flights with Champagne. Back gourmetwalks.com on land, explore a fern-lined trail in Golden Gate Park on your way to the gardens at the Conservatory of Flowers, and follow that with rowboat trip around Stow Lake. On rainy days, take your date indoors with an afternoon of rock climbing at Mission Cliffs or a round of mini golf Embrace and cocktails at Urban Putt. sfrecpark.org, Adventure blazingsaddles.com, parks.ca.gov, seaplane. com, adventurecat.com, goldengatepark.com, conservatoryofflowers.org, stowlakeboathouse. com, touchstoneclimbing.com, urbanputt.com de Young Museum 16 W H E R E S A N F R A N C I S CO I F E B R UA R Y 20 17

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: COURTESY PALACE OF FINE ARTS; SF TRAVEL (2)

FOR ACTIVE EXPLORATION


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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: COURTESY CHOUX BAKERY; ©RAQUEL VENANCIO PHOTOGRAPHY; GALLERY OF JEWELS

FOR SPA TREATMENTS AND RELAXATION Onsen, one of San Francisco’s newest spa retreats, brings a classic Japanese bathIndulge & house experience to the Unwind city—complete with a steam room, sauna and several private treatment rooms. Tucked in the Scarlet Huntington Hotel, the Nob Hill Spa has an infinity pool, fireplace reflection lounge, whirlpool and a full menu of treatments, including options for couples. Kabuki Springs & Spa is another popular oasis with communal baths and several pampering packages. After a treatment, couples can take in a movie at the nearby SunChoux Bakery dance Kabuki, or catch a lively sing-along screening at the FOR LOCAL TREATS Castro Theatre. onsensf.com, Spoil your favorite chocolate lover with some small-batch candies this Valentine’s nobhillspa.com, kabukisprings. Day. Charles Chocolates carries truffles, caramels and other decadent offerings com, sundancecinemas.com, in a cute Mission neighborhood spot with outdoor seating, while Dandelion Chocolate also serves pastries and hot chocolate in its cafe and retail space. castrotheatre.com For macarons, cookies and elegant cakes, try Tout Sweet Patisserie, or choose Choux Bakery for authentic French cream puffs. Not into chocolate? Visit 24th Street Cheese Co. for cheese, wine and gourmet goods, and bundle that with a bouquet from one of the city’s locally owned flower shops. charleschocolates.com, dandelionchocolate.com, toutsweetsf.com, chouxsf.com, 24thstreetcheese.com

Gallery of Jewels

FOR LUXURY GOODS For distinctive jewelry by independent designers, look to neighborhood standouts like the Mission’s Love & Luxe and No. 3, along the Powell-Hyde cable car line. Gallery of Jewels displays the work of more than 100 artists across its three San Francisco galleries. At Aricie, look for lingerie and hosiery by several high-end European labels. loveandluxesf.com, shopno3.com, gallery-of-jewels.com, ariciesf.com

Onsen

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Chinese New Year Parade

Celebrating All Things Chinese It’s the Year of the Rooster and the perfect time to visit San Francisco— home to one of the world’s largest Chinese New Year celebrations. The festivities culminate with the Grand Parade on Saturday, Feb. 11, starting at 5:15 pm at the corner of Market and 2nd streets. The streets sparkle with glittering floats, red lanterns, colorful flags and giant dragons stretching for blocks. Don’t forget to pass through North America’s only authentic Chinatown Gate—the giant green guardian of Grant and Bush adorned with dragons and lions. And that’s just for starters. From downtown to the Mission District, the treasures and curiosities of Chinese culture await explorers. But you’d better start practicing using those chopsticks now. BY DEREK SHAW

Sweet Start GOLDEN GATE BAKERY No trip to Chinatown is complete without a taste of Golden Gate’s world-famous $2 egg tarts. The only problem with this local landmark is you never know when it will actually be open. 1029 Grant Ave., 415.781.2627, goldengatebakery.com FANCY WHEAT FIELD BAKERY Fancy Wheat Field is unquestionably the most pristine bakery around Chinatown and decidedly less authentic, offering classic Chinese pastries like pineapple buns and pork sung buns. Check out the additional locations if you’re around Excelsior or the Outer Sunset. 1362 Stockton St., 415.982.1368

Chow Down HOUSE OF NANKING Situated at the cusp of North Beach, House of Nanking is one of the most popular and appetizing spots in San Francisco, featuring complex flavors, affordable prices and no frills service. You can’t miss the sesame chicken, chili eggplant and the stunning hot blossoming flower tea. 919 Kearny St., 415.421.1429, houseofnanking.net

Mister Jiu’s

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MISSION CHINESE FOOD Many locals swear this is the best Chineseinspired food in town despite being in the heart of the Mission. The sign outside says Lung Shan

FROM TOP: ©KNIGHT LIGHTS PHOTOGRAPHY; ©KASSIE BORRESON

OUT+ABOUT


WHERE NOW San

Asian Art Museum

Restaurant, but nobody calls it that, so it’s easy to miss. The tea smoked eel, thrice cooked bacon and kung pao pastrami are crowd favorites. 2234 Mission St., 415.863.2800, missionchinesefood.com LAI HONG LOUNGE This expansive dining room is as authentic as it gets. In addition to the heavy rotation of dim sum, other popular dishes include the baked pork buns, shrimp noodle rolls and crispy duck buns. 1416 Powell St., 415.397.2290, lhklounge.com

FROM LEFT: COURTESY ASIAN ART MUSEUM; ©YUET LEE

MISTER JIU’S Mister Jiu’s sets the bar for elevated Cantonese cuisine. Every dish is a work of art, with inventive twists on Chinese classics. The impeccable service lends to the romance and helps justify the sizable check. 28 Waverly Place, 415.857.9688, misterjius.com

Truck Stop THE CHAIRMAN This cult favorite originated as a food truck and expanded into a brick and mortar location in the Tenderloin. The Chairman is renowned for its signature bao. Imagine exotic proteins like Coca-Cola braised pork and miso cured tofu stuffed in a chewy bun—available baked (heartier) or steamed (cheaper). 670 Larkin St., 415.813.8800, hailthechairman.com

Francisco

TOUR

Chinatown Dining

wheretraveler.com FOR MORE SAN FRANCISCO INSIDER TIPS!

Lounging

See the Sights

LI PO COCKTAIL LOUNGE Li Po is a hot spot among hipsters and locals alike. It’s known for having funky decor, a relaxed vibe and arguably the city’s best Chinese Mai Tai. This quirky dive bar is endorsed by Anthony Bourdain, which just about sums it up.

CHINESE CULTURAL CENTER This extensive visual arts and community center offers an evolving array of modern art exhibitions. It also offers a popular two-hour democracy walking tour through Chinatown. 750 Kearny St., 415.986.1822, c-c-c.org

916 Grant Ave., 415.982.0072, lipolounge.com

BUDDHA LOUNGE Just across the street from Li Po is Chinatown’s second coolest bar, complete with a signature beer that comes in a green Buddha-shaped bottle. The service is consistently solid with knowledgeable, friendly bartenders.

ALL ABOUT CHINATOWN TOURS Get insight into the city’s rich Chinese heritage on this two-three hour daily excursion with an optional dim sum lunch. The tour departs from Old St. Mary’s Cathedral, which was the first Asian church constructed in North America. 660 California St., 415.982.8839, allabout chinatown.com

901 Grant Ave., 415.362.1792

Up Your Alley ROSS ALLEY Recognized as the oldest alley in San Francisco, Ross Alley was once notorious for brothels and gambling houses. Check out the Golden Gate Fortune Cookie Factory and get a free sample fresh off the press. WAVERLY PLACE Stroll down this picturesque alley into another era, seemingly another country. Waverly Place is lined with temples and brightly painted balconies adorned with ornamental iron railings. It’s most notably featured in the Amy Tan novel “The Joy Luck Club.”

Down to an Art CHINESE HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA For a deep and intimate perspective on American Chinese culture, check out the extensive historical archives and impressive art museum. 965 Clay St., 415.391.1188, chsa.org ASIAN ART MUSEUM Located in the heart of Civic Center, the Asian Art Museum boasts a wealth of Chinese art in its permanent collection. A new exhibition called “Tomb Treasures” opens on Feb. 17, showcasing recently unearthed artwork from the Han Dynasty. 200 Larkin St, 415.581.3500, asianart.org 19


the guide Shopping February Valentine’s Day Shopping A San Francisco institution since 1852, Shreve & Co. recently opened a new, 15,000 square foot flagship store off Union Square. The store’s two floors of selling space feature a dedicated diamond room, private viewing suites, a VIP entertaining room and a showroom for renowned watchmaker Patek Philippe. Suspended from the 30-foot ceiling designed by Yellow Goat are three chandeliers and a variety of crystals, reflecting indoor and natural light throughout the store’s interior. In addition to Patek Philippe’s collection, Shreve offers watch brands including Rolex, Bell & Ross, Tudor and Jaeger-LeCoultre along with jewelry brands such as Mikimoto. 150 Post St., 415.421.2600, shreve.com

FURLAThis pop-up shop boutique from the

Italian accessories brand is located within a 1909 townhouse in the heart of Union Square and stocks bags, shoes, scarves, jewelry and small leather goods for both men and women. www.furla.com. 216 Stockton St., 855.895.8300. Map 1, D6 GOORIN BROTHERS Founded in 1895, this family

business dedicated to the art of hatmaking is now in its fourth generation of ownership. Stop by the neighborhood shops to peruse the bold, timeless styles for men and women. www.goorin.com. 1612 Stockton St., 415.402.0454. Map 1, C3; 1446 Haight St., 415.436.9450. Map 2, G5; 111 Geary St., 415.362.0036. Map 1, D6 RICKSHAW BAGWORKSA leader in the local manu-

facturing movement, Rickshaw Bagworks designs bike-friendly messengers as well as backpacks, iPad sleeves, totes and accessories in a wide range of fabrics. Stop by the storefront in the Dogpatch, where you can take a tour of the factory operation and design your own bag. www.rickshawbags.com. 904 22nd St., 415.904.8368. Map 2, K6

20 W H E R E S A N F R A N C I S CO I F E B R UA R Y 20 17

RIMOWA Find Europe’s leading manufacturer

of high-quality, luxury luggage at this expansive store in Union Square. Rimowa is known for its four-wheeled, lightweight, hard-cased luggage that makes carting around belongings while traveling easy and safe. www.rimowa.com. 259 Post St., 415.230.2688. Map 1, D5 SHINOLA Founded in 2011, Detroit-based Shinola

was conceived with the belief that products should be well made and built to last. As makers of modern watches, bicycles, journals and leather goods, Shinola stands for skill at scale, the preservation of craft and the beauty of industry. www.shinola.com. 53 Hotaling Pl., 415.513.1640. Map 1, E4 TIMBUK2 A bike messenger founded this bag com-

pany in a garage in the Mission District in 1989, and the factory is still located in the same neighborhood. The flagship Hayes Valley boutique carries messengers, laptop bags, backpacks, luggage, totes and accessories in limited-edition designs. Customers can choose their own color combinations and play with specialty fabrics. All designs are guaranteed to last a lifetime. www.timbuk2.com. 506 Hayes St., 415.252.9860. Map 2, H5

Apparel ACRIMONY This Hayes Valley boutique draws from

art, music and fashion in its expertly curated collection of exclusive men’s and women’s labels from around the globe. A stop here will challenge you to evolve your style. www.shopacrimony.com. 333 Hayes St., 415.861.1025. Map 1, A8 AZALEA BOUTIQUE This youthful, trendy boutique

in Hayes Valley offers designs for men and women by the likes of Found Made New, Vince, A.P.C. and James Perse, as well as an impressive inventory of denim. You might find a modish handbag, stylish sneakers or a hip denim jacket. www.azaleasf.com. 411 Hayes St., 415.861.9888. Map 2, I5 GOODBYES Nestled in the heart of Laurel Heights,

this popular consignment shop has been offering great deals in designer men’s and women’s apparel for more than 20 years. www.goodbyessf.com. 3464 Sacramento St., 415.346.6388. Map 2, G3 MARINE LAYER This casual clothing company

sells luxuriously soft sweatshirts, tees and scarves that are sustainably made right here in San Francisco. The custom fabric is a blend of two yarns, pima cotton and MicroModal, which is a bio-based material that comes from recycled

COURTESY SHREVE & CO.

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THE GUIDE

beechwood. www.marinelayer.com. 2209 Chestnut St., 415.346.2400. Map 2, G2; 498 Hayes St., 415.829.7519. Map 2, H4 THE VOYAGER SHOP A retail collaboration from

a group of artistic businesses, Voyager features menswear from Japanese and Italian lines, premium denim, American footwear, women’s basics from French lines, ocean gear, books and art. www.thevoyagershop.com. 365 Valencia St., 415.795.1748. Map 2, I6

Books, Music, & Electronics AMOEBA MUSIC This Haight-Ashbury institution

has one of the largest selections of CDs, DVDs, videos, vinyl records and vintage rock posters anywhere. www.amoeba.com. 1855 Haight St., 415.831.1200 Map 2, F5; 2455 Telegraph Ave., Berkeley, 510.549.1125. OMNIVORE BOOKS ON FOOD Featuring new, an-

tiquarian and collectible books by and for culinary gurus, this bookstore is a wonderland for readers interested in food and drink. It features books on everything from the traditions of colonial India to the kitchens of 1950s America and hosts numerous events with high-profile chefs and authors. www. omnivorebooks.com. 3885A Cesar Chavez St., 415.282.4712. Map 2, H8

Children’s Shops 826 VALENCIA Writer Dave Eggers opened this

pirate supply store that serves as a front for a tutoring center. You can buy eye patches, message bottles and spy glasses. It’s worth a visit just to see the clever interior and pick up student publications, books or magazines. The center also hosts interesting events and creative activities for the whole family. www.826valencia.org. 826 Valencia St., 415.642.5905. Map 2, I6 SMALL FRYS CHILDREN’S STORE This Noe Valley

favorite carries a selection of babywear by designers such as OshKosh B’gosh, Catimini, Zutano and local favorite Tea, as well as the most sought-after carriers by Baby Bjorn and Ergobaby, diaper bags from Petunia Picklebottom and Skip Hop and Baby Jogger strollers. Also find a collection of ecofriendly and organic clothing, toys and skin care products for the little ones. www.smallfrys.com. 4066 24th St., 415.648.3954. Map 2, H7

Department Stores BARNEYS NEW YORK Fashionistas rejoiced when

this mecca of luxury opened in September 2007. Find high-end clothing, shoes and accessories for men and women plus personal shopping services. www.barneys.com. 77 O’Farrell St., 415.268.3500. Map 1, D6 BLOOMINGDALE’S Located in Westfield San Fran-

cisco Centre, this is the second largest Bloomingdale’s store in the country, offering the latest fashions for women, men and kids, plus home decor. A 140-year history of fashion, special events and the iconic Little Brown Bag make Bloomingdale’s like “No Other Store in the World.” Begin your day at the first floor visitor center with special offers. www.bloomingdales.com. 845 Market St., 415.856.5300. Map 1, D6 GUMP’S Founded in 1861, this bi-level Union

Square retailer is a legendary destination for luxury gifts, jewelry and home decor. Find sumptuous pearls, jade, fine jewelry and china 22 W H E R E S A N F R A N C I S CO I F E B R UA R Y 20 17

Alden Shop for Gentlemen 170 Sutter Street, San Francisco, CA 94104 800-273-7463 415-421-6691 www.AldenShop.com


SHOPPING

on the first floor. The collections of crystal and silver are upstairs. www.gumps.com. 135 Post St., 415.982.1616. Map 1, D5 MACY’S The flagship store is housed in two build-

ings between O’Farrell and Geary streets on either side of Stockton Street. Encompassing an entire city block, the west building features womenswear and accessories, watches, cosmetics, jewelry, the visitor center and a post office. Menswear and accessories are located across Stockton Street in the east building. Pick up your visitor savings pass at the visitor center on the cellar level. www.macys. com. 170 O’Farrell St., 415.954.6271. Map 1, D6 NEIMAN MARCUS This shopping mecca features

couture and accessories departments for men and women, plus excellent selections of high-end lingerie and cosmetics. Enjoy a lobster club sandwich or high tea inside the Rotunda restaurant overlooking Union Square. www.neimanmarcus.com. 150 Stockton St., 415.362.3900. Map 1, D6 NORDSTROM The grand Market Street location

occupies four floors of the Westfield San Francisco Centre and features a huge shoe department as well as clothing and accessories, cosmetics and a full-service spa. www.nordstrom.com. Westfield San Francisco Centre, 865 Market St., 415.243.8500. Map 1, D6; Stonestown Galleria, 285 Winston Dr., 415.753.1344. Map 2, D9 SAKS FIFTH AVENUE The San Francisco location

offers an extensive selection of high-end casual, evening and businesswear for women. Down the street is the Saks men’s store, located at 220 Post St. www.saksfifthavenue.com. 384 Post St., 415.986.4300. Map 1, D6 WILKES BASHFORD This high-end specialty

retailer boasts six floors brimming with men’s and women’s clothing, accessories, jewelry, shoes and housewares. In the city for more than 40 years and owned by the Mitchell Family of Stores, Wilkes Bashford offers truly unique and unexpected style that is San Francisco, with service that’s unparalleled. www.wilkesbashford.com. 375 Sutter St., 415.986.4380. Map 1, D5

Home & Design ALESSI The Italian houseware brand’s flagship

Union Square location is filled with an array of products for the home, including iconic 20thcentury industrial design masterpieces like the Michael Graves whistling bird teakettle, the “Juicy Salif” citrus squeezer by Philippe Starck and the “Anna G” corkscrew by Alessandro Mendini. Bridal registry, gift certificates, complimentary gift-wrap and shipping are available. www.alessi.com. 424 Sutter St., 415.434.0403. Map 1, D5 THE ANTIQUE TRADERS This shop specializes in

stained-glass lamps and windows, estate jewelry, cut crystal, bronzes and furniture, primarily from the Art Nouveau period. Worldwide shipping is available. www.theantiquetraders.com. 4300 California St., 415.668.4444. Map 2, F4 ATYS The modern household and personal

items at this store are designed by architects and industrial designers, a practice that lends a high-art feel to everyday items. Most of the sleek pieces are imported from Scandinavia, Germany, France and Italy. www.atysdesign.com. 2149B Union St., 415.441.9220. Map 2, H2

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THE GUIDE

BRITEX FABRICS San Francisco’s landmark fabric

store on Union Square bills itself as four floors of fabulous. Family-run since 1952, this fashion designer’s wonderland carries the finest selection of fabrics, buttons, trims and laces from design icons to new fashion stars. Visit for one of the many workshops, classes or events or stop by for a group tour of the store (held every other Saturday). www.britexfabrics.com. 146 Geary St., 415.392.2910. Map 1, D5 HEATH CERAMICS One of the few remaining mid-

century American potteries still in existence today, Heath has been making tableware and tile for over a half-century in its Sausalito factory. The shops sell artisan pottery that emphasizes design, handcrafted techniques and the reinvigoration of the company’s designer-maker legacy. www.heathceramics.com. 1 Ferry Building, 415.399.9284. Map 1, F4; 2900 18th St., 415.361.5552. Map 2, J6; 400 Gate Five Rd., Sausalito, 415.332.3732. NEEDLEPOINT INC. For the best in hand-painted

needlepoint designs, visit this shop in the heart of Jackson Square. Needlepoint Inc. carries a wide assortment of original canvases, fibers and stitching accessories. M-F 9 am-5 pm, Sa 10 am-4 pm. www. needlepointinc.com. 326 Jackson St., 415.392.1622. 800.345.1622. Map 1, E4

Jewelry GALLERY OF JEWELS Enter any of the store’s

three locations and you’ll find cases of designer jewelry handcrafted by local, regional and international artists. Featuring collections by more than 100 designers, the boutiques offer all price points and a variety of metals, stones and mediums. www.galleryofjewels.com. 4089 24th St., 415.285.0626. Map 2, H7; 2115 Fillmore St., 415.771.5099. Map 2, H3; 427 Post St., 415.617.0007. Map 1, C5 HUBLOT Located in the heart of Union Square

in the historic 180 Geary St. building, Hublot San Francisco offers an extensive selection of timepieces for ladies and men. Hublot timepieces merge classic Swiss horological complications with modern design and materials, redefining what a Swiss watch looks like. You’ll also find hard-to-find, limited-edition pieces as well as a small selection of accessories including cuff links and belt buckles. The elegant boutique features a discreet bar and lounge below the sales floor. www.hublot.com. 174 Geary St., 415.981.2200. Map 1, D6 LANG ANTIQUES This quaint little shop in the heart

of downtown has been specializing in fine antique and estate jewelry since 1969. Find an array of fine jewels from every important design period, including Victorian, Edwardian, Art Deco and more, as well as a large selection of estate diamond engagement rings. www.langantiques.com. 309 Sutter St., 415.982.2213. Map 1, D5

Lingerie ALLA PRIMA Exclusive lingerie and swimwear

from top international designers, including Prima Donna, La Perla, Dolce & Gabbana, Andres Sarda and Eres. www.allaprimalingerie.com. 539 Hayes St., 415.864.8180. Map 1, A7 LES CENT CULOTTES This lingerie boutique houses

silk imports from France including Simone Perele, Cervin, Huit and Chantelle. www.lescentculottes. com. 2200 Polk St., 415.614.2586. Map 1, C4

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Men’s Apparel THE HOUND CLOTHIERS A haberdasher of fine

clothing for gentlemen, The Hound is located on the ground level of the historic glass-front Hallidie Building in the heart of the Financial District. Known for its exceptional customer service and large inventory of classically styled business clothing, accessories and sportswear, this shop has been dressing professional men for more than 40 years. www.thehound.com. 140 Sutter St., 415.989.0429. Map 1, D5 JOHN VARVATOS Occupying a unique place in

the landscape of American design, John Varvatos unites Old World craftsmanship and refined tailoring with modern innovations in textiles and a rock ‘n’ roll sensibility. The brand represents an entire men’s lifestyle that includes tailored clothing, sportswear, footwear, bags, belts, eyewear, limited edition watches, men’s fragrances and John Varvatos Star USA Collection, as well as Converse by John Varvatos. www.johnvarvatos.com. 152 Geary St., 415.986.0138. Map 1, D6 SUI GENERIS CONSIGNMENT  MEN’S Named for

the Latin expression meaning “of its own kind,” this award-winning designer store in the Castro sells new, vintage and consignment merchandise with a focus on high-end fashion. It stocks ready-to-wear and formalwear and an expansive collection of leather goods and shoes from designers including Comme des Garcons, DSquared2, Gucci, Louis Vuitton, Prada and Hermes. A new sister store, Pop Sui Generis, is steps away from the men’s designer store and carries brand new apparel, footwear and accessories from local designers and past seasons of Sui Generis Consignment at discounted prices. Deals abound. www.suigenerisconsignment.com/ home.php. Men’s Consignment: 2231 Market St., 415.437.2231. Map 2, H6; Pop: 2265 Market St., 415.437.2265. Map 2, H6

Shoes THE ALDEN SHOP Established in 1884, this shoe

company offers classic men’s footwear that represents New England’s tradition of old-school, custom boot-making at its finest. Find a complete line of shoes, from wingtips to slip-ons, carefully hand-worked with painstaking attention to detail using premium calfskins, luxurious suedes and genuine shell cordovan. www.aldenshop.com. 170 Sutter St., 415.421.6691. Map 1, D5 CONVERSE The 8,200-square-foot store features

two floors showcasing the largest assortment of Converse footwear, apparel and accessories globally. The store is home to women’s, kids and premium footwear collections, the latter of which is located in a gallery-like space alongside the work of local artists. Become a designer with Converse Customization, an interactive process for creating one-of-a-kind sneakers and clothing. www.converse.com. 838 Market St., 415.433.1174. Map 1, D6 ECCO SHOES Denmark-based ECCO is the only

major shoe company that owns and controls its entire production process, starting with the tanneries that produce the premium leather. This store carries the best selection of ECCO shoes in San Francisco. www.ecco.com. 40 Grant Ave., 415.772.9053. Map 1, D6; 865 Market St., 415.615.0375. Map 1, D6 FREDA SALVADORA duo of local designers sells

their fashion-world lauded line of boots and other footwear at this Union Street boutique.

The well-made styles, from rocker-chic to classic, are all made in Spain and designed for walking. www.fredasalvador.com. 2416 Fillmore St., 415.872.9690. Map 2, H3

Shopping Destinations ANCHORAGE SQUARE This is the biking, touring,

shopping and dining hub of Fisherman’s Wharf, with more than 35 activities, stores and restaurants to explore. Validated parking is available at Anchorage Square Garage on Beach Street. www.anchoragesquare.com. 500 Beach St., 415.673.7762. Map 1, B2 EMBARCADERO CENTER The office towers stretch-

ing west from the foot of Sacramento Street, known as 1, 2, 3 and 4 Embarcadero, also house more than 100 retailers, 30 restaurants and a movie theater. Restaurants include Sens for Mediterranean favorites and Osha Thai for some of the best curry around. www.embarcaderocenter.com. 415.772.0700. Map 1, E4 WESTFIELD SAN FRANCISCO CENTRE This

nine-story shopping mall features Nordstrom, Bloomingdale’s and more than 200 shops and restaurants, including the fine-dining Restaurant Collection Under the Dome. www.westfield.com/sanfrancisco. 865 Market St., 415.495.5656. Map 1, D6

Specialty Foods DANDELION CHOCOLATE Dandelion is a bean-to-

bar chocolate factory. The tasting bars are a labor of love, and consecutive Good Food Awards serve as proof of concept. They are made of two ingredients, beans and sugar, and do not contain the fillers like vanilla, cocoa butter or lecithin found in most formulas, even premium bars. The beans are meticulously sourced from farms that are selected for quality and commitment to the environment and to the workers. The Mission District factory features a cafe that serves hot and cold chocolate beverages and mochas as well as a bakery. www.dandelionchocolate.com. 740 Valencia St., 415.349.0942. Map 2, I6; 1 Ferry Bldg. Map 1, F4 SPICE ACE Considered by some to be one of the

best spice shops in the world, this locally owned store on Steiner Street has more than 400 of the finest spices, herbs, blends, salts, peppers, chiles and extracts from around the globe. Tasting jars offer a chance to experience every spice. Try the customer favorites: Pacific Heights spice blend, Calabrian sea salt and smoked sweet paprika from Spain. www.spiceace.com. 1821 Steiner St., 415.885.3038. Map 2, H3

Women’s Apparel AMOUR VERT Founded by a husband and wife

team in 2010, this eco-fashion brand is now sold in 350 stores worldwide. Based in the Dogpatch neighborhood, the company opened its first freestanding boutique in Hayes Valley in 2014 and is gearing up for a rapid expansion that will set a new standard for socially responsible clothing. www.amourvert.com. 437 Hayes St., 415.800.8576. Map 1, A8 AMY KUSCHELAfter making and selling high-end

wedding gowns in her lovely Union Square studio for 20 years, Amy Kuschel has branched out with her first ready-to-wear collection. The new designs are a nod to the 1960s. www.amykuschel.com. 415.956.5657. Map 1, D6


SHOPPING

The Antique Traders LARGEST SELECTION OF ORIGINAL ART NOUVEAU ITEMS

CUYANA Meaning “to love” in Quechua, Cuyana

celebrates a philosophy of fewer, better things. The brand creates premium apparel and accessories, designed with a classic, modern aesthetic, sourced from the world’s highest quality materials and crafted to last a lifetime. The pieces combine timeless design with premium materials to tell unique stories of heritage, craftsmanship and travel. www.cuyana.com. 291 Geary St., Ste. 201, 844.326.6005. Map 1, D6 ERESTrendsetting and daring, Eres has been a

force in the world of swimwear for over 40 years thanks to its iconic style and technical flair. The lingerie collections, always an elegant balancing act between style and technique, reveal another facet of creativity. www.eressanfrancisco.com. 471 Gough St., 415.757.0781. Map 1, A8 THE GROCERY STORE No ordinary corner market,

Tiffany lamps • Galle and Daum Nancy pieces Stained Glass Windows • Handel Lamps Pairpoint and other lamps 4300 California St. at 5th Avenue

San Francisco

(415) 668-4444

this is a hip European fashion oasis featuring cool clothing with a rock-star twist. Jeans and more jeans and a world-class selection of tees hang on simple rolling racks lining both sides of the huge space. Designer shoes and jewelry round out the merchandise mix. 3687 Sacramento St., 415.928.3615. Map 2, F3 SUI GENERIS CONSIGNMENT  WOMEN’SThis

award-winning designer store located inside of a cozy courtyard in the Cow Hollow neighborhood carries an excellent selection of cocktail dresses, gowns, high heels and handbags by designers like Chanel, Gucci, Lanvin, Louis Vuitton, Prada and Hermes. suigenerisconsignment.com. 2147 Union St., 415.800.7584. Map 2, H2 SUSAN This elegant storefront offers fine European

WIN A TRIP TO NYC

and Japanese apparel, shoes and accessories, including the latest styles by Comme des Garçons, Simone Rocha, Junya Watanabe and other avant-garde designers. 3685 Sacramento St., 415.922.3685. Map 2, F3

Bay Area BAY AREA PREMIUM OUTLETS Save 25-65 per-

cent every day at five Premium Outlet locations throughout the Bay Area: Gilroy, Livermore, Napa, Petaluma and Vacaville. The indoor and open-air centers are home to impressive collections of designer and name-brand outlet stores, including Banana Republic, Burberry, Calvin Klein, Coach, Cole Haan, Lacoste, Michael Kors, Nike, Tommy Hilfiger and more. www.premiumoutlets.com. 681 Leavesley Rd., Gilroy, 408.842.3729; 2774 Paragon Outlets Dr., Livermore, 925.292.2868; 629 Factory Stores Dr., Napa, 707.226.9876; 2200 Petaluma Blvd., North Petaluma, 707.778.9300; 321 Nut Tree Rd., Vacaville, 707.447.5755. PREMIUM OUTLET LOOPThis shuttle service

Escape for 2 nights/3 days to the city that never sleeps! Win airfare for two, round-trip airport transfer, 2-night stay at the Muse Hotel and more. Also receive two round-trip tickets on Acela Express Business Class service to travel to/from New York City and any other Amtrak Northeast Corridor station. Enter daily through February 28 at wheretraveler.com/contest

provides hourly round-trip service from downtown San Francisco to San Francisco Premium Outlets in Livermore. www.premiumoutletloop.com. 415.299.5595. WESTFIELD VALLEY FAIR This center is Silicon

Valley’s shopping destination, with more than 240 retailers, a plethora of sit-down restaurants and a gorgeous new Dining Terrace featuring more than 16 eateries and outdoor fire pits. The ever-expanding Luxury Collection includes Giorgio Armani and Balenciaga. With brands like Zara, Uniqlo, Nordstrom, Apple and first-to-market shops, you’re guaranteed to find something for every age, taste and style. www.westfield.com/valleyfair. 2855 Stevens Creek Blvd., Santa Clara, 408.248.4451. w w w.wh e re t rave le r. com 25


THE GUIDE

Museums + Galleries A new exhibit entitled “Diane Arbus: In the Beginning” at San Francisco’s recently renovated Museum of Modern Art highlights the first seven years of the photographer’s career. The photographs on display (over 100) were taken between 1956 and 1962, and while Arbus created nearly half of her life’s work during this period, many of these photographs are little known or have never been displayed before. The exhibit includes New York streetscapes and portraits of pedestrians and street performers, largely in Times Square, the Lower East Side and Coney Island. It also traces Arbus’ transition from the 35mm format to the distinctive square format she adopted in 1962. 151 3rd St., 415.357.4000, sfmoma.org

Art Galleries 111 MINNA GALLERY This hip arts space on

an alley just two blocks south of Market Street doubles as a bar and club and features work in all media by emerging and alternative artistic talent. www.111minnagallery.com. 111 Minna St., 415.974.1719. Map 1, E5 49 GEARY The remarkable building that once

housed the entire West Coast operation of Western Union is now home to about 20 art galleries and four rare-book dealers. Holding what may be the largest single concentration of art, photography, prints and rare books anywhere in the country, 49 Geary will keep any art lover entertained for hours. 49 Geary St.. Map 1, D6 ARTHAUS Celebrating 20 years in San Francisco,

ArtHaus specializes in contemporary works (paintings, sculpture, works on paper and photography) by established and mid-career Bay Area and New York artists. This SoMa gallery shows a broad, museum-quality sampling of subject matter, media and styles. Tu-F 11 am-6 pm, Sa noon-5 pm. www.arthaus-sf.com. 411 Brannan St., 415.977.0223. Map 1, E7 ASIAN ARTS CENTER Located near Union Square,

the Asian Arts Center features traditional Asian artwork exhibits including silk embroidery art, Tibetan metalwork, Burmese jade and Hetian nephrite. Open daily. www.asian-arts-center.com. 45 Kearny St., 415.296.8508. Map 1, D5

BRIAN GROSS FINE ART This spacious

There’s a lot more going on this month. Visit us online:

CANESSA GALLERY Associated with the gallery in the up-and-coming Potrero Bay Area’s rich poet-artist scene for more than 45 years, this Financial District gallery Hill arts district hosts about nine exhiwheretraveler.com bitions a year, showcasing contempohoused in the small, brick bohemian-era rary painting, sculpture and photograCanessa Building has presented works by phy by artists like Ed Moses and Phil Sims as more than 600 new and established sculptors, well as emerging talents. www.briangrossfineart. painters, photographers and performance and com. 248 Utah St., 415.788.1050. Map 2, J6 literary artists, including Chico MacMurtrue and Trudy Myrrh Reagan. W 12-3 and by appointBUSACCA GALLERY Artist and design consultant ment. www.canessa.org. 708 Montgomery St., Mark Busacca creates a luxurious collection of 415.296.9029. Map 1, D4 contemporary and historic paintings, sculpture, CATHARINE CLARK GALLERY Housed in a former photography, antiques, design objects and more door factory in the Potrero Hill gallery gulch, this is by global masters in his Russian Hill gallery. Busaca gallery with attitude. It specializes in contemca is dedicated to a broad-based approach to porary painting and new media installation art by art, with an eye to the creative energy and output emerging artists, often with social and political unique to the collector. Beautifully photographed, themes. www.cclarkgallery.com. 248 Utah St., edited, designed and written, the website is itself 415.399.1439. Map 2, J6 an ongoing carousel of moving art that serves as a consignment gallery. Open daily. www.busaccagalCCA WATTIS INSTITUTE FOR CONTEMPORARY lery.com. 2010 Hyde St., 415.776.0104. Map 1, B3 ARTS California College of the Arts provides two CALDWELL SNYDER GALLERY Caldwell Snyder is floors of contemporary exhibition space that are a leading contemporary art gallery representing free for the public in addition to its artist residency many of the most significant international painters and research programs and event space, which and sculptors of the 21st century. It has consistently features talks, performances, screenings and a been a vital force in the art world by introducing bar. Closed Su-M. www.wattis.org. 360 Kansas St., many renowned artists to the Bay Area for the 415.355.9670. Map 1, C9 first time. www.caldwellsnyder.com. 341 Sutter St., CHLOE FINE ARTS GALLERY This exquisite 415.392.2299. Map 1, D5; 1328 Main St., St. Helena, and spacious gallery represents American and 707.200.5050. international modern and contemporary masters including Amy Nelder, Robert Bissell, Daniel Merriam and Gil Bruvel, as well as offering se-

SFMOMA RECENTLY DOUBLED its exhibition space, making it a 460,000-squre foot home to one of the world’s greatest collections of modern and contemporary art. 26 W H E R E S A N F R A N C I S CO I F E B R UA R Y 20 17

LADY ON A BUS, N.Y.C. 1957; COURTESY THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART, NEW YORK/COPYRIGHT ©THE ESTATE OF DIANE ARBUS, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Photographer on the Fringe


THE GUIDE

MUSEUMS + GALLERIES

lected works from Matisse, Miró, Moore, Pollock, Picasso, Vasarely, Warhol and many more. Open daily. www.chloefinearts.com. 645 Beach St., 415.749.1000. Map 1, B2 CHRISTOPHERCLARK FINE ART This premier San

Francisco gallery features paintings, drawings and original prints by European masters. Find engravings and etchings by Dürer and Rembrandt; French Barbizon paintings; Impressionist works by Pissarro, Renoir, Manet and Cassatt; and art of la belle epoque from Toulouse-Lautrec, Cheret and Tissot. Twentieth century masters Picasso, Matisse, Chagall and Dali are also represented. Open daily. www.clarkfineart.com. 377 Geary St., 415.397.7781. Map 1, C6 CK CONTEMPORARY This new and beautifully

renovated gallery space is home to a collection of original paintings by noteworthy American and European contemporary artists. In addition to mounting exhibitions, the gallery works closely with new and experienced collectors, locating works of art, managing commissions and assisting designers and clients to find the perfect pieces for their home. www.ckcontemporary.com. 357 Geary St., 415.397.0114. Map 1, D6 COHEN ABEE GALLERY An eclectic collection of

contemporary paintings by emerging and established artists. Open daily. www.cohenresegallery. com. 454 Geary St., 415.781.4278. Map 1, C6; 420 Sutter St. Map 1, D5 CREATIVITY EXPLORED Artists with developmental

disabilities create art for sale and exhibition here. The gallery offers remarkable art at surprisingly affordable prices and hosts exhibitions on a variety of engaging themes. www.creativityexplored.org. 3245 16th St., 415.863.2108. Map 2, I6 DOLBY CHADWICK GALLERY Represents inter-

national emerging and mid-career artists who specialize in oil painting, drawing, printmaking, sculpture and photography. A recurring theme is optical effects that explore and redefine visual perception. Closed Su, M. www.dolbychadwickgallery. com. 210 Post St., Ste. 205, 415.956.3560. Map 1, D5 THE DRYANSKY GALLERYThis gallery pres-

ents an array of visual artists who work across all mediums, with a selected emphasis on 21st century photography. A family-run endeavor with an extensive international network and lifelong devotion to the arts, The Dryansky shows a fresh and curated program of artists with a unique approach to the way artwork is exhibited and encountered. www.thedryansky.com. 2120 Union St., 415.932.9302. Map 2, H2 FOULADI PROJECTS This newer gallery on Mid-

Market offers relevant and inspiring contemporary fine art complemented by carefully curated functional works in an inviting setting. Works span a wide range of mediums including painting, drawing, conceptual sculpture and installation. The owners welcome novice and seasoned art enthusiasts and encourage community engagement by hosting studio visits, artist dinners and performances as well as participating in art fairs. www.fouladiprojects.com. 1803 Market St., 415.621.2535. Map 2, I5 FRAENKEL GALLERY Founded in 1979, this world-

class gallery at 49 Geary focuses on photography, with rotating shows of various genres that span the medium’s beginnings to new works. Closed Su, M. www.fraenkelgallery.com. 49 Geary St., 4th fl., 415.981.2661. Map 1, D5 28 W H E R E S A N F R A N C I S CO I F E B R UA R Y 20 17

FRANKLIN BOWLES GALLERIES Fine art by artists

GALLERY 444 Celebrating more than 20 years in its

including Eduardo Arranz-Bravo, Pierre Boncompain, Pierre Marie Brisson, Marc Chagall, Salvador Dali, Larry Horowitz, Claude Lazar, LeRoy Neiman, Pablo Picasso, Rembrandt van Rijn and many French artists of the 19th century. Open daily 10 am-10 pm. www.franklinbowlesgallery.com. 765 and 799 Beach St., 415.441.8008. Map 1, B2

location, this family-owned gallery exhibits original paintings, prints and sculptures. It features more than 20 international and local artists. www.gallery444.com. 444 Post St., 415.434.4477. Map 1, C6

GALLERY 16 A wide range of contemporary work

in all media, as well as artist workshops and lecture series, define the gallery’s open attitude and investigative approach to art. Closed Su, M. www. gallery16.com. 501 3rd St., 415.626.7495. Map 1, E7

GALLERY WENDI NORRIS This bold and modern

5,100 square-foot gallery in SoMa is known for its surrealist network. It hosts exhibitions that are emblematic of its transcultural nature and works to integrate its contemporary artists into the global community of art professionals, institutions and collectors. www.gallerywendinorris.com. 161 Jessie St., 415.346.7812. Map 1, E6


THE GUIDE

GREGORY LIND GALLERY Established in 2002, this

gallery specializes in challenging, boundary-pushing works by emerging and midcareer artists primarily from California, New York and Boston. Lind also exhibits a variety of feature paintings, drawings, sculpture and photography by contemporary artists. Closed Su, M. www.gregorylindgallery.com. 49 Geary St., 5th fl., 415.296.9661. Map 1, D5 HACKETT MILL This gallery presents rare works

from the 1950s and 1960s by important American, European and Asian artists. The gallery focuses on historical movements that took place in the mid20th century including American Modern, Post-War Abstract Expressionism and California/Bay Area Figurative Art. Closed Su, M. www.hackettmill.com. 201 Post St., Ste. 1000, 415.362.3377. Map 1, D5 HAINES GALLERY Cheryl Haines, the owner of this

gallery at 49 Geary, has a sharp eye for new talent and relationships with major museums that allow for siginificant exhibitions. The space showcases diverse contemporary works, including minimalist, abstract, conceptual and multimedia. Closed Su, M. www.hainesgallery.com. 49 Geary St., 415.397.8114. Map 1, D5 HASHIMOTO CONTEMPORARY Located in Nob

Hill, Hashimoto Contemporary is home to an eclectic blend of new contemporary artists. With monthly rotating exhibitions, the gallery focuses on a range of painting, sculpture and installationbased work. www.hashimotocontemporary.com. 804 Sutter St., 415.655.9265. Map 1, C6 JENKINS JOHNSON GALLERY Features contempo-

rary photography, painting, video, performance and glass sculpture by emerging, mid-career and established artists. With an emphasis on content-driven art, international artists challenge the traditional use of materials to produce work that focuses and reflects on societal issues. www.jenkinsjohnsongallery.com. 464 Sutter St., 415.677.0770. Map 1, D5 JESSICA SILVERMAN GALLERY Founded in 2008 by

a young curator, this gallery in the gritty Tenderloin neighborhood is already known for discovering emergent artists of all ages and bringing them to an international audience. The gallery has a strong concept-driven roster that embraces all mediums and hosts exhibitions that explore the intersection of art and design. Closed Su-M. www.jessicasilvermangallery.com. 488 Ellis St., 415.255.9508. Map 1, D6 JOHN BERGGRUEN GALLERY Established in 1970,

this world-class, bi-level gallery hosts new exhibitions monthly, showcasing works by young contemporary artists as well as major 20th century modern and contemporary American and European painters and sculptors including Willem de Kooning, Roy De Forest, Georgia O’Keeffe, Henri Matisse and Jim Dine. Bay Area artists and tastes are well represented. Closed Su. www.berggruen.com. 228 Grant Ave., 415.781.4629. Map 1, D5 MARK WOLFE CONTEMPORARY ART This all-media

gallery offers a good mix of hip young urbanism and new traditional media. It focuses on exposition in art, choosing to show works that encourage audiences to perceive visuals in new ways. The gallery has hosted the debut shows of several rising and established artists from around the world and has showcased works at SFMOMA and Civic Gallery in Milan. Open M-F and every second Sa of the month. www.wolfecontemporary.com. 1 Sutter St., Ste. 300, 415.369.9404. Map 1, E5 30 W H E R E S A N F R A N C I S CO I F E B R UA R Y 20 17

MARTIN LAWRENCE GALLERIES Founded in

1975, Martin Lawrence Galleries specializes in original paintings, sculptures and limited-edition graphics. The gallery features works by Pablo Picasso, Marc Chagall, Rembrandt, Andy Warhol and Keith Haring along with the best emerging artists. www.martinlawrence.com. 366 Geary St., 415.956.0345. Map 1, C6 MEYEROVICH GALLERY One of the country’s

leading galleries, specializing in American and European paintings, works on paper, graphics and sculpture by modern and contemporary masters such as John Baldessari, Guy Dill, Alex Katz, Roy Lichtenstein, Robert Motherwell, Robert Rauschenburg, Frank Stella, Donald Sultan, Bernar Venet and Russian artist Grisha Bruskin. Closed Su. www.meyerovich.com. 251 Post St., Suite 400, 415.421.7171. Map 1, D5 MICHAEL FINE ART AND ANTIQUES More than

20,000 pieces of exquisite art and antiques fill five floors of this gallery and showroom which display elegant bronze works, crystal chandeliers, art deco pieces, furniture and more at discounted prices. www.michaelfinearts.com. 400 Grant Ave., 415.445.9958. Map 1, D5 MISHIN FINE ARTS Inspired by the exhibition of

the St. Petersburg nonconformist artists, “The Avant-Garde on the Neva,” which was organized by the State Tretyakov Gallery in Moscow, this gallery houses work by acclaimed contemporary Russian and American artists. www.mishingallery.com. 445A Sutter St., 415.391.6100. Map 1, D5 MODERNISM WEST Housed inside the French

restaurant Foreign Cinema, stop at this tiny art space for, you guessed it, modernist works from 1950 to the present. M-F 6-10 pm, Sa-Su 11 am-10 pm. www.modernismwest.com. 2534 Mission St., 415.541.0461. Map 2, H7 MODERNISM For more than three decades

Modernism has shown a variety of challenging, museum-worthy paintings, works on paper, photography and sculpture by contemporary and historic American, European and avant-garde Russian artists. This was the first Bay Area gallery to show Andy Warhol, and it introduced the nation to Austrian artist Gottfriend Helnwein. Closed Su, M. www.modernisminc.com. 685 Market St., Ste. 290, 415.541.0461. Map 1, E5 MONTGOMERY GALLERY Since 1984, this schol-

arly Jackson Square gallery has specialized in important 19th and early 20th century European Post-Impressionist and modern paintings, as well as American Impressionist and early Californian works. It’s known for an extensive international network of collectors and its participation in art and antiques fairs around the world. Closed Su-M. www.montgomerygallery.com. 406 Jackson St., 415.788.8300. Map 1, D4 PAUL THIEBAUD GALLERY Located in historic

North Beach, this contemporary gallery mounts six shows each year that feature representational paintings and works on paper by established national midcareer artists such as Tom Birkner and Grace Munakata as well as talented emerging artists. The gallery is the primary dealer for California painter Wayne Thiebaud. Tu-Sa. www. paulthiebaudgallery.com. 645 Chestnut St., 415.434.3055. Map 1, C3 RENA BRANSTEN GALLERY Founded in 1974 as a

space devoted to California ceramic sculpture, this gallery evolved to exhibit contemporary painting,

photography and video by established and emerging artists. It relocated to an project-oriented space in 2014 in order to focus on site-specific installations and non-traditional exhibition models. Closed Su, M. www.renabranstengallery.com. 1275 Minnesota St., 415.982.3292. Map 1, D5 ROBERT KOCH GALLERY Offers a wide range of

exemplary photography that spans the history of the medium from the 19th century to the present, exhibiting masterworks by renowned artists such as Ansel Adams, Man Ray and Edward Weston. Closed Su, M. www.kochgallery.com. 49 Geary St., 5th fl., 415.421.0122. Map 1, D5 SAN FRANCISCO ART EXCHANGE San Francisco

Art Exchange is a worldwide leader in art and photographs from rock ‘n’ roll and pop culture. The gallery features original photographs, paintings, drawings and limited-edition prints of The Beatles, Rolling Stones, Jimi Hendrix and more. Open M-Sa 10 am-6 pm. www.sfae.com. 458 Geary St., 415.441.8840. Map 1, C5 SAN FRANCISCO CENTER FOR THE BOOK This gal-

lery and studio showcases every artistic aspect of books, from the antique to the experimental. Ponder exhibitions on censorship and literary forms from various cultures or take a peek at binding and printing workshops. www.sfcb.org. 375 Rhode Island St., 415.565.0545. Map 2, J5 SANDRA LEE GALLERY This downtown gal-

lery showcases original, innovative paintings, sculptures and photographs for art lovers and collectors. Representing both emerging and established local and international artists, it features superior art at affordable prices. Closed Su, M. www.sandraleegallery.com. 251 Post St., Ste. 310, 415.291.8000. Map 1, D6 SCOTT NICHOLS GALLERY This friendly Union

Square gallery shows vintage and contemporary photographs by established and emerging artists. It’s home to one of the largest private collections of Brett Weston photographs as well as an extensive inventory of photographs by iconic California photographers such as Ansel Adams, Dorothea Lange, Imogen Cunningham, Ruth Bernhard and William Garnett. Closed Su, M. www.scottnicholsgallery. com. 49 Geary St., Ste. 415, 415.788.4641. Map 1, D5 SCOTT RICHARDS CONTEMPORARY ART Ex-

hibiting works that present new approaches to traditional media, this popular Union Square gallery located on the fourth floor of the prestigious Art Galleries Building at 251 Post Street presents a notable collection of paintings, photography and sculpture by museum-level American and European artists. It presents nine solo artist exhibitions annually in addition to participating in acclaimed international art fairs and offering step-by-step consulting services to collectors, with a focus on the acquistion of works by 20th century modern and contemporary masters. www.srcart.com. 251 Post St., Ste. 425, 415.788.5588. Map 1, C6 SERGE SOROKKO GALLERY A stalwart in the local

arts scene since 1984, this gallery features post-war and contemporary sculpture, paintings and graphics by modern masters like Henri Matisse, Joan Miró, Pablo Picasso, Damien Hirst, Andy Warhol and many others. The gallery has advanced the careers of many promising painters and helped organize the 1989 museum exhibition of acclaimed New York artists in Moscow. International shipping is available. Closed Su, M. www.sorokko.com. 55 Geary St., 415.421.7770. Map 1, D5


MUSEUMS + GALLERIES

SFMOMA ARTISTS GALLERY This two-story

SFMOMA satellite houses more than 800 emerging and established Northern California artists. The non-profit gallery offers rentals and sales. Tu-Sa. www.sfmoma.org. 2 Marina Blvd., Fort Mason, Bldg. A, 415.441.4777. Map 2, H2 SHOOTING GALLERY This low-brow art gallery

houses unpretentious work by local emerging contemporary artists in a streamlined, white-walled space with skylights and exposed beams. Owner and curator Justin Giaria founded the gallery as a reflection of his Southern California youth, which gave him a predilection for pop and street art, and based it on the notion that art is for everyone, not just the wealthy. It has exhibited major shows in pop surrealism, figurative realism and color abstraction and participated in international art fairs. Closed M. www.shootinggallerysf.com. 886 Geary St., 415.931.1500. Map 1, B6 STEVEN WOLF FINE ARTS This 2,000-square-foot

gallery on the border of the Mission and Potrero Hill specializes in the show and sale of post-war and contemporary American art. Artists include Derek Boshier, Lance Letscher, Norman Zammitt, Stephen Hull, Soo Kim and Molly Springfield. Closed Su-Tu. www.stevenwolffinearts.com. 2747-A 19th St., 415.263.3677. Map 2, J6 TAKADA GALLERY Since 1987, Takada Gallery has

specialized in contemporary, museum-quality Japanese paintings, drawings, prints and sculpture. The gallery mounts solo and group exhibitions

by major artists as well as newcomers. Sa and by appointment. www.takadagallery.com. 251 Post St., 6th fl., 415.956.5288. Map 1, D5 TANGENT Stroll by this Union Square landmark, and

a remarkable and visually enticing work will likely catch your eye. The gallery showcases works from American and international artists that present new approaches to traditional media. Past exhibits have included candy sculptures, photomosaics and three-dimensional paintings. M-Sa, Su by appointment. www.tangentart.com. 373 Geary St., 415.956.9999. Map 1, C6 THOMAS REYNOLDS GALLERY This small gallery

housed in a restored Victorian near the Fillmore Street shopping district specializes in contemporary landscapes and cityscapes by emerging Bay Area artists. Open Th-Sa. www.thomasreynolds. com. 2291 Pine St., 415.441.4093. Map 2, H3 V. VORRES GALLERYThis gallery specializes in

contemporary painting, photography and works on paper. The work ranges from representation to abstraction, with a unifying theme of formal soundness, the achievement of originality and aesthetic excellence. The diverse artists presented range from strong emerging talent to established modern masters. www.vorresgallery.com. 3681 Sacramento St., 415.423.4345. Map 2, F3 VELVET DA VINCI Named for an old “Perry

Mason” episode, this gallery of contemporary crafts specializes in art jewelry and metalwork. It regularly organizes exhibitions of contemporary

craft, representing more than 75 artists from around the globe. Tu-Sa 11 am-6 pm, Su 11 am-4 pm. www.velvetdavincigallery.com. 2015 Polk St., 415.441.0109. Map 1, A4 WEINSTEIN GALLERY This gallery’s collection is

dedicated to rare works of 20th century masters including Picasso, Chagall, Calder and Miró. It represents several important artists’ estates from the schools of early non-objective painting, Surrealism and Abstract Expressionism, as well as a collection of contemporary figurative painters. www.weinstein.com. 444 Clementina St., 415.362.8151. Map 1, C6 WHITE WALLS Over the past decade, this

Tenderloin hipster art gallery has evolved into a destination for urban and contemporary art reflecting culturally diverse subjects, artists and current political themes. The quality of the culturally significant street art exhibited has elevated the gallery to fine art status and earned it a reputation for supporting ultra-progressive artists. It shares a stunning 5,000-square-foot white space with its sister gallery, Shooting Gallery. Closed Su-M. www.whitewallssf.com. 886 Geary St., 415.931.1500. Map 1, B6

Museums ASIAN ART MUSEUM Home to more than 18,000

exquisite art objects spanning 6,000 years of history and culture throughout Asia, this museum is one of the largest in the Western Hemisphere de-

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THE GUIDE

MUSEUMS + GALLERIES

voted exclusively to Asian art. Free first Su of each month. Closed M. www.asianart.org. 200 Larkin St., 415.581.3500. Map 1, B7 BEAT MUSEUM Dedicated to the poetry and social

movement that made San Francisco a part of literary history, this museum showcases artifacts from authors such as Jack Kerouac and Lawrence Ferlinghetti. Located across the street from City Lights Books. Open 10 am-7 pm daily. www.kerouac.com. 540 Broadway St., 415.399.9626. Map 1, D3 CABLE CAR MUSEUM Unravel the mystery of

exactly how the cable car, one of San Francisco’s greatest attractions since 1873, actually works. Located in the historic Washington-Mason cable car depot and powerhouse in Nob Hill, the small museum houses a collection of historic cable cars, photographs and mechanical displays. www.cablecarmuseum.org. 1201 Mason St., 415.474.1887. Map 1, C4 CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES The acade-

my is an international center for scientific education and research and the only museum in the world to house an aquarium, planetarium and natural history museum under one (living) roof. See what’s shaking at “Earthquake,” an exhibit exploring how seismology has shaped earth’s past and present. “Human Odyssey,” a dramatic addition to Tusher African Hall, traces the milestones of our species’ fascinating history. Thursday nights: “Nightlife,” the museum’s weekly 21-and-older event, invites visitors to drink, dance and experience world-class exhibits with topics ranging from the science of sex to the cosmos. 6-10 pm; $12. www.calacademy. org. 55 Music Concourse Dr., Golden Gate Park, 415.379.8000. Map 2, E5 CALIFORNIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY An entertain-

ing way to learn about California during your trip, the CHS gallery in the Yerba Buena District hosts rotating exhibitions that reflect the environmental, economic, social, political and cultural heritage of the entire state. A 2012 remodel brought in a bookstore and community gathering space, and the exterior was painted international orange, the color of the iconic Golden Gate Bridge, to commemorate the structure’s 75th anniversary. Noon-5 pm, closed M. www.californiahistoricalsociety.org. 678 Mission St., 415.357.1848. Map 1, E5 CHILDREN’S CREATIVITY MUSEUM This hands-on,

multimedia arts and technology experience for kids of all ages is located in San Francisco’s Yerba Buena neighborhood. The museum promotes 21st century skills—creativity, communication and collaboration—to inspire new ideas and a spirit of invention. www.creativity.org. 221 4th St., 415.820.3320. Map 1, D6 CHINESE CULTURE CENTER OF SAN FRANCISCO A

non-profit organization fostering the understanding and appreciation of Chinese and ChineseAmerican art, history and culture in the United States. www.c-c-c.org. 750 Kearny St., 3rd fl., 415.986.1822. Map 1, D4 CONTEMPORARY JEWISH MUSEUM Located in

a stunning Daniel Libeskind-designed building, the CJM engages audiences of all ages and backgrounds through dynamic exhibitions and programs that explore contemporary perspectives on Jewish culture, history, art and ideas. Closed W. $8 Th after 5 pm. Free first Tu of the month. www.thecjm.org. 736 Mission St., 415.655.7800. Map 1, D6

32 W H E R E S A N F R A N C I S CO I F E B R UA R Y 20 17

DE YOUNG MUSEUM Founded in 1895, the impres-

sively varied museum is currently housed in an architectural masterpiece designed by the Swiss firm Herzog and de Meuron. It showcases collections from the Americas, Pacific Islands and Africa and features a tower observation deck. AprilNovember: “Friday Nights at the de Young” are weekly after-hours art happenings that include a mix of live music, dance performances, screenings, hands-on art activities and specialty cocktails. Free general admission first Tu of each month. Closed M. deyoung.famsf.org. 50 Hagiwara Tea Garden Dr., 415.750.3600. Map 2, E5 EXPLORATORIUM Relocated to a spectacular

waterfront location on Pier 15 as of 2013, this educational center offers an array of interactive scientific exhibits and hands-on displays that stimulate the senses and minds of the young and old alike. Ongoing: “After Dark,” the Exploratorium’s 18-and-up event from 6-10 pm on the first Thursday of the month features cocktails, exclusive performances, films and cutting-edge technology exhibits. Closed M. www.exploratorium.edu. Pier 15, 415.528.4444. Map 1, E3 GLBT HISTORY MUSEUM Celebrating 100 years

of the San Francisco gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender community’s history through dynamic and surprising exhibitions and programming, this museum is the only one of its kind in the U.S. and the second in the world. Located in the heart of the Castro, it features long-term and changing multimedia exhibitions. A display of Harvey Milk’s personal belongings pays tribute to the late San Francisco supervisor, who was the first openly gay politician elected in California. www.glbthistory. org. 4127 18th St., 415.621.1107. Map 2, H6 HAASLILIENTHAL HOUSE This exuberant 1886

Queen Anne-style Victorian is the only intact private home of the period open regularly as a museum, complete with authentic furniture and artifacts. The house has elaborate wooden gables, a circular corner tower and luxuriant ornamentation. W and Sa noon-3 pm, Su 11 am-4 pm. One-hour tours leave every 20 to 30 minutes. All visits to the house must be guided. Reservations not required. www.sfheritage.org/haas-lilienthal-house. 2007 Franklin St., 415.441.3000. Map 1, A5 INTERNATIONAL ART MUSEUM OF AMERICA En-

counter Eastern and Western style artwork like never before at the International Art Museum of America (IAMA). Discover a unique collection of calligraphy, sculpture and painting from the classic to the contemporary. The museum offers free guided tours, art classes and gallery sketching. Free admission daily. Tu-Su 10 am-5 pm. www. iamasf.org. 1025 Market St., 415.376.6344. ext. 7001 Map 1, C7 LEGION OF HONOR High on the headlands above

the Golden Gate—where the Pacific Ocean spills into the San Francisco Bay—stands this grand museum, the gift of Alma de Bretteville Spreckels to the city of San Francisco. A three-quarter-scale adaptation of the 18th-century Palais de la Légion d’Honneur in Paris, the museum was built to commemorate California soldiers who died in World War I. The collection includes works by European masters and major holdings of Rodin sculptures. The grounds offer spectacular views of the Pacific Ocean, Golden Gate Bridge and San Francisco. Closed M. legionofhonor.famsf.org. 100 34th Ave. in Lincoln Park, 415.750.3600. Map 2, B3

MUSEE MECANIQUE Before television and video

games, there were arcade machines and coinoperated musical instruments. Come see how it all began at one of the world’s largest privately owned collections of coin-operated mechanical music boxes and antique arcade games in working condition. Play the games, snap a picture in the photo booth and visit the gift shop. Free admission daily. www.museemecaniquesf.com. Pier 45 at Taylor St. on Fisherman’s Wharf, 415.346.2000. Map 1, B2 MUSEO ITALO AMERICANO The only museum

in the country devoted entirely to Italian art and culture, its collection and rotating exhibitions showcase paintings, sculptures, photography and crafts. Free. www.museoitaloamericano. org. Fort Mason Center, 2 Marina Blvd., Bldg. C., 415.673.2200. Map 2, H2 MUSEUM OF CRAFT AND DESIGN One of the few

museums of its kind in the country, MCD develops and presents unconventional and compelling exhibitions of contemporary work in craft and design. The exquisite Museum Store features jewelry, toys, ceramics and more. Its full calendar of public programs is part of the blossoming Dogpatch neighborhood’s art scene. Closed M. www.sfmcd. org. 2569 3rd St., 415.773.0303. Map 2, K6 MUSEUM OF THE AFRICAN DIASPORA This

recently renovated cultural institution reminds visitors that Africa is the birthplace of humankind and celebrates the global contributions of people of African decent. www.moadsf.org. 685 Mission St., 415.358.7200. Map 1, E6 SAN FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF MODERN ART After

a three-year hiatus, SFMOMA has unveiled a Snohetta-led expansion that makes it the largest modern art space in the nation, easily housing entire floors of abstract American art and minimalist and pop art. There’s an entire gallery devoted to Alexander Calder, with a focus on his work between the 1920s and 1960s. The Pritzker Center for Photography dedicates about 15,000 square feet to photography, more than any other U.S. art museum. The open-ceiling seventh floor houses nothing but contemporary art. Nearly 45,000 square feet of the museum’s ground floor galleries are free and open to the public, and admission is free for visitors 18 and under. www.sfmoma.org. 151 3rd St., 415.357.4000. Map 1, E6 SAN FRANCISCO RAILWAY MUSEUM This museum

near the Ferry Building celebrates the history of San Francisco rail transit with historic artifacts, displays, archival photography, historical interpretation and audio-visual exhibits. Kids can play pretend on a full-sized replica of the motorman’s platform of a 1911 San Francisco streetcar. Open M-Su 10 am-6 pm. Closed M during winter months. www. streetcar.org. 77 Steuart St., 415.974.1948. Map 1, F4 WALT DISNEY FAMILY MUSEUM Storytelling was

Walt Disney’s specialty, and now this museum tells the story of the man behind the Disney magic. The tale of Walt Disney’s life and career comes to life in interactive galleries full of voice clips, home videos and family photographs not seen anywhere else. Catch a glimpse of Disney’s early drawings, animation and live film camera inventions as well as the steam-powered miniature train Disney built in his backyard in 1950 that eventually inspired the life-size train in Disneyland. www. waltdisney.org. 104 Montgomery St. in the Presidio, 415.345.6800. Map 2, F3


YERBA BUENA CENTER FOR THE ARTS This

contemporary art center highlights multicultural issues through the artworks displayed in its two main gallery spaces, high-tech gallery and video screening room. Past exhibits have focused on the Dalai Lama, Anna Halprin and the political nature of contemporary women’s art. www.ybca.org. 701 Mission St., 415.978.2787. Map 1, D6

Bay Area BAMPFA UC Berkeley’s visual-arts center reopened

early 2016 after a $112 million renovation by worldrenowned firm Diller Scofidio + Renfro, known for for projects including NYC’s elevated High Line park and LA’s Broad Museum. The 83,000 squarefoot museum includes an expansive permanent collection with a dynamic schedule of rotating art exhibitions that range from classical Chinese painting to abstract expressionism to provocative multimedia work by emerging artists. The film archive has more than 450 public screenings each year of rare and restored movie classics, new and historic foreign films and experimental cinema. www.bampfa.berkeley.edu. 2155 Center St., 510.642.0808. BAY AREA DISCOVERY MUSEUM Located in Marin

County, this award-winning interactive learning center is designed for children up to age 8. Kids can operate their own fishing boat, crawl beneath a simulated ocean and experiment with currents in the “Wave Workshop.” “Your House, My House” allows them to step into three model homes from faraway cultures. www.baykidsmuseum.org. 557 McReynolds Rd., Sausalito, 415.339.3900. BERKELEY ART CENTER This leading local gallery

showcases regional artists who experiment with diverse media, exhibiting a variety of visual art that encompasses a wide array of perspectives. www. berkeleyartcentre.org. 1275 Walnut St., Berkeley, 510.644.6893. THE BLACKHAWK MUSEUM Located in the East

Bay, The Blackhawk Museum features two exhibition galleries: the automotive gallery displays 55 rare and one-of-kind 1920s and 1930s classic cars and vintage sports cars from the 1950s and 1960s, and The Spirit of the Old West gallery presents the American Westward Expansion from the mid 1700s through early 1900s. www.blackhawkmuseum.org. 3700 Blackhawk Plaza Circle, 925.736.2280. BUBBLE STREET GALLERY From the bizarre to the

romantic, Bubble Street Gallery offers an eclectic mix of fine arts and crafts. Contemporary surrealist Daniel Merriam’s collection of paintings, prints, ceramics, jewelry and more reflect a variety of styles ranging from Steampunk to Neo-Victorian and pop surrealism. www.bubblestreetgallery.com. 565 Bridgeway Blvd., Sausalito, 415.339.0506. OAKLAND MUSEUM OF CALIFORNIA The OMCA

brings together collections of art, history and natural science under one roof to tell the extraordinary stories of California and its people. www.museumca.org. 1000 Oak St., Oakland, 510.318.8400. SFO MUSEUM These rotating exhibition galleries

include the San Francisco Airport Commission Aviation Library and the Louis A. Turpen Aviation Museum located in a pre-security area in the International Terminal, as well as public art displayed throughout the airport in the form of paintings, sculptures, mosaics and environmental works. www.flysfo.com/museum. Located throughout SFO terminals, 650.821.6700. w w w.wh e re t rave le r. com 33


THE GUIDE

Entertainment

Clandestine Show Go underground to be transported to Prohibition-era San Francisco in the Boxcar Theatre Company’s blockbuster immersive theater experience, “The Speakeasy.” The North Beach subterranean labyrinth of a venue includes a bar, casino, 1920s cabaret and secret passageways and entrances. Order cocktails at the bar, eavesdrop on the drama from room to room and take in the vaudeville acts and live jazz. Check the website for tickets and don’t forget your period dress. 644 Broadway St., 415.891.9744, thespeakeasysf.com

15 ROMOLO One of the best bars in the city for

a perfectly crafted, creative cocktail, this dim, hidden spot in an alley off the North Beach strip also serves well-priced carnival-themed bar bites. www.15romolo.com. 15 Romolo Pl., 415.398.1359. Map 1, D4 ALCHEMIST BAR & LOUNGE This bar and lounge

mixes SF’s famed speakeasy-style bar scene (classic cocktails served in an off-the-beaten-path second story location) with a hipster vibe (shuffleboard, board games) in the SOMA district. www.alchemistsf.com. 679 3rd St., 415.746.9968. Map 1, F7 ALEMBIC Offering a long list of both classic cock-

tails and original concoctions, this Haight Ashbury restaurant and bar is a great place to try something new, like the Blood and Sand. Homemade brews and local food are the specialty, making it a true San Francisco experience. www.alembicbar.com. 1725 Haight St., 415.666.0822. Map 2, F5 ANCHOR DISTILLING COMPANYYou may already

be familiar with the historic Anchor Brewing Company, but you probably didn’t know that the iconic brewery is also the home of Anchor Distilling Company. Established in 1993 as a top secret project, Anchor Distilling Company has recently opened its doors to the public with the launch of a new tasting room. The company offers a one-hour, intimate tasting experience, in which a beverage expert guides you through Anchor’s production process and helps you explore the

flavors and aromas of Anchor spirits, including Old Potrero 18th Century Whiskey, Hophead vodka, Genevieve gin and more. Reserve ahead. www. anchordistilling.com. 1705 Mariposa St., 415.863.8350. Map 2, J6

There’s a lot more going on this month. Visit us online:

BIERGARTEN Located in Hayes Val-

ley, this traditional beer garden offers a variety of German beers on tap and serves up locally sourced food like sausages and salaten—all to be enjoyed alfresco. www.biergartensf.com. 424 Octavia St., 415.252.9289. Map 2, H4

wheretraveler.com

AUDIO DISCOTECH With a nod to the past but

an eye to the future, this dance club combines state of the art lighting and sound with a retro aesthetic reminiscent of a ‘70s Cadillac. It features a Funktion One sound system, a centrally located sunken dance floor and two bars. The downstairs sister restaurant, Bergerac, offers handcrafted cocktails and pan-global inspired pub food in a bohemian setting. www.audiosf.com. 316 11th St., 415.481.0556. Map 2, I5 BARREL HEAD BREWHOUSEThe first thing you’ll

notice when you walk into this modern brewpub is a giant torpedo behind the bar, which serves as the base of the bar tap. A must-visit for any beer aficionado, Barrel Head offers 30 rotating microbeers on tap, along with cocktails and a full menu of high-end pub fare. The brewhouse also offers a weekend brunch menu. www.barrelheadsf.com. 1785 Fulton St., 415.416.6989. Map 2, G5 BENJAMIN COOPER Located within Hotel G in

Union Square, this intimate and contemporary oyster bar with a vintage San Francisco feel is for the serious cocktail aficionados. www.benjamincoopersf.com. 398 Geary St., 415.654.5061. Map 1, C6

BIMBO’S 365 CLUB The atmosphere at this all-

purpose event space brings you back to the era of smoking lounges and big bands. Check the web site for performances from major rock and roll acts to comedy to live jazz. www.bimbos365club.com. 1025 Columbus Ave., 415.474.0365. Map 1, C3 BOURBON & BRANCH This Tenderloin speakeasy

offers strong Prohibition-era cocktails in a 1920s private club atmosphere. Imbibe Champagne or bourbon-heavy libations at the library or book a booth in the main bar in the back. Check the website for reservations and read the rules before you go. www.bourbonandbranch.com. 501 Jones St., 415.346.1735. Map 2, J4 BURRITT ROOM Named after the Nob Hill alley

off Bush Street that was the scene of the murder in “The Maltese Falcon,” the Burritt Room at the Mystic Hotel brings well-crafted cocktails to the Union Square neighborhood. Pull up a red velvet bar stool and watch as expert mixologists shake and stir some of the best drinks around, like the Smoked Peach and Weissen Sour. www.burrittroom.com. 417 Stockton St., in the Mystic Hotel, 415.400.0561. Map 1, D5

NEARLY 600,000 PEOPLE HEAR OVER 220 concerts and presentations by the world-renowned San Francisco Symphony at Davies Symphony Hall in Civic Center each year. 34 W H E R E S A N F R A N C I S CO I F E B R UA R Y 20 17

©PETER LIU

Bars & Nightclubs


E N T E R TA I N M E N T

CASK Sip boutique bourbons, hard-to-find whis-

keys and more at this bar specializing in artisanal distillers. Created by the people behind Bourbon and Branch, this is the place to find a well-crafted drink, and with engraving services at hand, maybe even a thoughtful gift. www.caskspirits.com. 17 3rd St., 415.424.4844. Map 1, D6 CERVECERIA DE MATEVEZA This tiny place on

the northeast corner of Mission Dolores Park brews its beers with yerba mate for a caffeine-rich punch and also peddles piping-hot, Argentinian-style empanadas and assorted bottled beers. www.cerveceriasf.com. 3801 18th St., 415.273.9295. Map 2, H6 COMSTOCK SALOON Named after Henry

Comstock and the famed Comstock Lode, which brought mining fortunes to the City by the Bay, this bar is a throwback to the city’s Barbary Coast era, located in a site that’s served as a San Francisco watering hole since 1907. Sip on carefully crafted classic cocktails and nibble on turn-of-thecentury saloon fare. www.comstocksaloon.com. 155 Columbus Ave., 415.617.0071. Map 1, D4 EL TECHO Located in the Mission District, this

expansive rooftop bar offers sweeping views of the city skyline. Drinks range from pisco-based cocktails to esoteric Brazilian beer. Dig into tasty nibbles like empanadas, ceviche and meat skewers or visit the downstairs dining room for a more serious, meat-focused menu. www.eltechosf.com. 2516 Mission St., 415.550.6970. Map 2, I7 ELIXIR This Mission Dolores bar—part pub, part

sports bar, part lounge and part certified green business—offers a taste of the Old West. Serving its neighbors since 1858, there’s no better spot for handmade fresh fruit cocktails. Tuesday nights are a hit with bar trivia, and weekends bring a makeyour-own Bloody Mary bar. www.elixirsf.com. 3200 16th St., 415.552.1633. Map 2, I6 LOCAL EDITION Beneath Market Street, the local

bar superstars behind Bourbon & Branch have created this classy underground cocktail bar that provides a sophisticated addition to the city’s nightlife scene. Inspired by the 1950s and ’60s newspaper industry, the vintage décor includes typewriters and archived news clippings that let you relive San Francisco’s past, and even the waitresses are dressed in time-period perfect outfits. And the drinks are equally on point: highballs, Gibsons and other updated classics rule here. www.localeditionsf.com. 691 Market St., 415.795.1375. Map 1, D6 MATRIX FILLMORE Once housing some of San

Francisco’s most legendary rockers like Jefferson Airplane and The Grateful Dead, Matrix Fillmore is a refreshing integration of modern nightlife and history. While the DJ spins, sip a cocktail and revel in the swank ambiance. www.matrixfillmore.com. 3138 Fillmore St., 415.563.4180. Map 2, H3 MIKKELLER BAR Located on the ground floor of

a 1907 Victorian building, this beer bar features 40 taps from some of the best breweries in the world, two cask handles, exclusive house beers and a full kitchen serving up tasty bar bites that pair perfectly with beer. The cellar is home to the Tivoli Sour Room, where lambics and sour beers are on tap. www.mikkellerbar.com. 34 Mason St., 415.984.0279. Map 1, D6 MONK’S KETTLE This cozy Mission gastropub spe-

cializes in craft beer, serving 24 draughts and over 120 bottles of Belgian and Californian brews. The

kitchen is open every night until 1 am for upscale pub food. Be prepared to wait—they do not take reservations. www.monkskettle.com. 3141 16th St., 415.865.9523. Map 2, I6 MR. TIPPLE’S RECORDING STUDIOThis

spirit-driven jazz bar with bar bites is tucked away in a cozy back alley of the city’s Mid-Market neighborhood. The bar features live jazz nightly with no cover, a sharp list of rotating cocktails and under-$10 snacks. On your first visit, try the Dizzy cocktail (East India sherry, terroir gin, cynar) and the patty melt (swiss cheese, riddled onions, spread). www.mrtipplessf.com. 39 Fell St., 415.851.8561. Map 2, I4 NIHON Nihon is as much a delicious Japanese

restaurant as it is a seductive whiskey bar, serving over 400 selections of whiskey. The servers are attentive and the bartenders know exactly which whiskey to pour, either straight up or sour. www.nihon-sf.com. 1779 Folsom St., 415.552.4400. Map 2, I5 NOIR LOUNGE This spot in the Hayes Valley neigh-

borhood is part wine bar, part brewpub and part movie lounge, showcasing Noir films in a private screening area. It has a 1940s jazz-era feel and serves an extensive menu of bar bites and entrees along with a changing array of flights of popcorn, both savory and sweet. www.noir-sf.com. 581 Hayes St., 415.431.6647. Map 1, A8 NOVELA Serving cocktails with character, Novela

is a book-themed bar where classic literary references present themselves in new and intriguing ways. From our chromatically classified book collection, to the names of our house cocktails— which are taken from characters in beloved literary works—Novela offers a compelling and unique ambiance that juxtaposes classic with contemporary design. The cocktail menu is filled with original house libations and historically inspired punches on tap. www.novelasf.com. 662 Mission St., 415.896.6500. Map 1, E6 PLAYERS SPORTS GRILL & ARCADE This water-

front sports bar features more than 35 HDTVs, 200 sports channels, 85 arcade games and 15 beers on tap. The menu offers bar bites and American fare. Luau Lounge, located inside, is San Francisco’s only waterfront tiki bar, with spectacular views of Alcatraz and the San Francisco Bay. www.playerssf.com. Pier 39, 415.981.6300. Map 1, C1 REDWOOD ROOM Ian Schrager left the redwood

walls of this legendary lounge intact when he remodeled the Clift Hotel and Philippe Starck designed the rest. The result: ultra-chic. You can soak in the scene from along the etched-glass bar, or lounge on the plush sofas that adorn the space. www.clifthotel.com. 495 Geary St., 415.929.2372. Map 1, C6 RICKHOUSE Step into this bustling saloon and

the sweet, musky odor of bourbon slaps you across the face. And for good reason. Launched by the owners of Bourbon & Branch, this place draws bourbon lovers from across the area. Groups of four should throw in their cards and order the Pisco Punch Bowl, a guaranteed party maker. www.rickhousebar.com. 246 Kearny St., 415.398.2827. Map 1, D5 RYE Expert mixologists at this chic and art-

fully decorated lounge work hard to perfect their craft—and we think they’re pretty darn close. www.ryesf.com. 688 Geary St., 415.474.4448. Map 1, B6

SHOTWELL’S First opened in 1891 as the Schlich-

tmann & Bredhofy Grocery Saloon, this location still serves as a place for San Franciscans to meet and drink. With a decadent design, it offers visitors an old-time feel with local, regional and international beers. www.shotwellsbar.com. 3349 20th St., 415.648.4104. Map 2, I6 SMUGGLER’S COVE Taste the past, present

and future of rum here, from traditional drinks of the Caribbean islands to classic libations of Prohibition-Era Havana to exotic cocktails from legendary tiki bars. Modeled after both a pirate ship and a tiki hut and featuring a waterfall, this bar offers a whole new approach to rum, showcasing more than 400 varieties from around the world, including rare and vintage finds. The drink menu includes more than 70 cocktails made from premium spirits and liqueurs, house-made ingredients and fresh citrus juiced in-house daily. www.smugglerscovesf.com. 650 Gough St., 415.869.1900. Map 1, A7 TONGA ROOM AND HURRICANE BAR A landmark

Nob Hill restaurant and club with exotic decor, this is one of the oldest tiki bars in the nation. If you’re lucky, you might even see it rain indoors while sipping your drink from a ceramic coconut. www. tongaroom.com. Fairmont Hotel, 950 Mason St., 415.772.5278. Map 1, D6 TOP OF THE MARK A Nob Hill landmark, this sky

lounge perched on the 19th floor of the InterContinental Mark Hopkins hotel affords wraparound vistas of the city, including views of the Golden Gate Bridge, Marin Headlands, Alcatraz, Fisherman’s Wharf and the sparkling skyline at night. Don’t miss the famed 100 Martinis menu. Live music several nights a week. www.topofthemark.com. 999 California St., 19th fl., 415.616.6916. Map 1, C5 TORONADO If your hopes and prayers are

dedicated to hops and ales, you might want to consider having Toronado’s address tattooed somewhere on your body. Permanently. This pub offers more than 45 beers on tap and hundreds more bottled. So grab a sausage from Rosamunde next door, stake out a stool, and get ready for a wild ride. www.toronado.com. 547 Haight St., 415.863.2276. Map 2, H5 TRICK DOG Local bar stars The Bon Vivants

opened this hot spot in the Mission District, focusing on hand-crafted, inventive drinks and latenight nibbles. The converted warehouse space features a dimly lit, downstairs bar with retro decor, and a small, loft-like restaurant upstairs serving multicultural elevated bar food. www.trickdogbar.com. 3010 20th St., 415.471.2999. Map 2, J6 VESUVIO This historic North Beach dive bar,

fittingly located just next door to City Lights Bookstore, used to quench the thirst of Jack Kerouac and Neal Cassady of “On the Road” fame. These days, it can be packed on the weekends with a healthy mixture of locals and tourists. www.vesuvio.com. 255 Columbus Ave., 415.362.3370. Map 1, D4 WHITECHAPEL Featuring the largest gin selec-

tion in North America, Whitechapel’s cocktail menu celebrates the history and traditions of this versatile spirit. The extensive drink offerings are by no means limited to gin, and the food menu features pub fare and several Indian dishes. www.whitechapelsf.com. 600 Polk St., 415.292.5800. Map 1, B7

w w w.wh e re t rave le r. com 35


THE GUIDE

E N T E R TA I N M E N T

Bowling

Live Music

LUCKY STRIKE BOWLING For a less conventional

BOOM BOOM ROOM Self-proclaimed as “San Fran-

night out, try Lucky Strike, which offers drinks, DJs and bowling for the 21+ crowd. Lucky Strike is not your average bowling alley, with a luxurious vintage-mod interior, a 40-foot bar and giant projection screens. Make sure to stop by for happy hour, with reduced prices for drinks and half off the menu, M-F 4-7 pm. www.bowlluckystrike.com. 200 King St., 415.400.8260. Map 1, F8 MISSION BOWLING CLUBThis boutique bowling

alley offers six lanes (with automatic scoring) and leather sofas, and the kitchen serves up elevated comfort food along with specialty cocktails. www.missionbowlingclub.com. 3176 17th St., 415.863.2695. Map 2, I5

Breweries 21ST AMENDMENT BREWERY Within walking dis-

tance of AT&T ballpark, this brewpub is a fun place to visit before or after a Giants game. The airy, multi-level SoMa space delivers reasonably priced, home-brewed beer in unique flavors alongside dependable standards like cheeseburgers and house-made chili. www.21st-amendment.com. 563 2nd St., 415.369.0900. Map 1, E6 THIRSTYBEAR BREWING CO. The oldest brewery-

restaurant in the city (and the only organic brewery) serves house-made ales that complement Spanishinspired cuisine, with dishes served primarily in tapas-sized portions. There’s also a full bar and pool tables and darts upstairs. www.thirstybear. com. 661 Howard St., 415.974.0905. Map 1, E6

Classical Music & Dance SAN FRANCISCO BALLET America’s oldest profes-

sional ballet company performed one of the first American productions of both “Swan Lake” and “The Nutcracker,” as well as the first 20th century “American Coppélia.” A vital ensemble, it is one of the three largest ballet companies in the United States. www.sfballet.org. War Memorial Opera House, 301 Van Ness Ave., 415.861.5600. Map 1, B7 SAN FRANCISCO CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC This

professional school in the Civic Center neighborhood offers an array of musical programs, many of them free to the public. www.sfcm.edu. 50 Oak St., 415.864.7326. Map 1, A8 SAN FRANCISCO OPERA Located in the historic

War Memorial Opera House since 1932, this is the second largest opera company in North America, bringing exciting performances to the stage each season. www.sfopera.com. War Memorial Opera House, 301 Van Ness Ave., 415.864.3330. Map 1, B7 SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY Founded in 1911,

the symphony is widely considered to be among the country’s most artistically adventurous art institutions, well known for its acclaimed conductor Michael Tilson Thomas. www.sfsymphony.org. Louise M. Davies Symphony Hall, 201 Van Ness Ave., 415.864.6000. Map 1, B7 SMUIN BALLET Known for sassy dance numbers set

to Bach, Gershwin and The Beatles, Michael Smuin founded this contemporary company in 1994, aiming “to infuse ballet with the rhythm, speed, and syncopation of American popular culture.” www. smuinballet.org. Yerba Buena Center for the Arts Theater, 700 Howard St., 415.912.1899. Map 1, E6

36 W H E R E S A N F R A N C I S CO I F E B R UA R Y 20 17

cisco’s home to blues, boogie, soul, groove and funk,” this sultry hot spot in the heart of the famed Fillmore District is the oldest blues club west of the Mississippi. Boogie to live music seven nights a week. www.boomboomroom.com. 1601 Fillmore St., 415.673.8000. Map 2, H4 BOTTOM OF THE HILL This cramped, funky little

joint has been lauded by Rolling Stone as “the best place to hear live music in San Francisco.” Open seven nights a week and showcasing an array of styles from hard rock and punk to folk and pop, the Bottom comes equipped with a full bar, pool tables, and a kitchen staff that stays up as late as you do. www.bottomofthehill.com. 1233 17th St., 415.626.4455. Map 2, K6 SFJAZZ CENTER This is the first stand-alone

performance venue of its kind in the country built specifically for jazz. The 35,000-square-foot glass structure seating 300 to 700 people, located in bustling Hayes Valley a block from Davies Symphony Hall, boasts the acoustic qualities of a great concert hall and the relaxed intimacy of a jazz club. Snack and sip at the in-house cafe South, created with celebrated local chef, Charles Phan. Performances most weekends Th-Su. www.sfjazz. org. 201 Franklin St., 866.920.5299. Map 1, B8

Theater AMERICAN CONSERVATORY THEATER Offering

classical and contemporary theater productions, the A.C.T. is a large, highly respected nonprofit theater company located just outside Union Square. www.act-sf.org. 405 Geary St., 415.749.2228. Map 1, C6 BEACH BLANKET BABYLON No trip to San Fran-

cisco is complete without seeing Steve Silver’s “Beach Blanket Babylon,” the hilariously campy revue that has been a local favorite since 1974, known for its hats and wigs and spoofs of current events and celebrities in ever-evolving numbers. Persons under 21 not admitted to evening performances. www.beachblanketbabylon.com. 678 Green St., 415.421.4222. Map 1, C3 MAGIC THEATRE This theater’s two intimate spaces

are home to America’s most adventurous writers, directors and actors who stage new works by new and established playwrights. www.magictheatre. org. Fort Mason Center, 2 Marina Blvd., Bldg. D, 415.441.8822. Map 2, H2 SF PLAYHOUSE Located on the second floor of

the charming Kensington Park Hotel, this theater company is dedicated to presenting criticallyacclaimed works in an intimate setting that allows the audience to really connect with the performance, whether it’s a world premiere or an invigorated classic. www.sfplayhouse.org. 450 Post St., 415.677.9596. Map 1, D5 SHN For more than 30 years, this has been the pre-

eminent theatrical entertainment company in San Francisco, owning and operating two of the city’s major venues: the historic Orpheum and Golden Gate theaters. It delivers a range of theatrical experiences: original Broadway cast productions, preBroadway world premieres and current hits fresh from Broadway. Thanks to SHN, San Francisco has launched the world-premieres of “Wicked,” “Mamma Mia!,” “Legally Blonde” and more. www. shnsf.com. 1182 Market St., 888.746.1799. Map 1, C7

THE MARSH Best known for its provocative

one-person shows, this breeding ground for new performance hosts new work from emerging artists in an intimate theater space. www.themarsh.org. 1062 Valencia St., 415.282.3055. Map 2, I7

Wine Bars AMELIE This modern French-style wine bar has

a happy hour that can’t be beat, offering a $10 customized flight with any three wines by the glass. Try the thoughtfully paired small plates to complement your wine. www.ameliesf.com. 1754 Polk St., 415.292.6916. Map 1, B4 FERRY PLAZA WINE MERCHANT Attached to

the store of the same name, this wine bar offers visitors the opportunity to sample a rotating selection of 15-20 wines. Grab some cheese from Cowgirl Creamery, a loaf of bread from Acme Bakery, a seat at the bar and let the knowledgeable guide you. www.fpwm.com. 1 Ferry Building, 415.391.9400. Map 1, F4 PRESS CLUB Located in the luxurious cellar space

of the Four Seasons Hotel, this chic urban tasting room offers a wine country experience right in the middle of the city, uncorking an array of wines direct from acclaimed California wineries. It features social sipping lounges, rare and specialty beers on tap and light bites for delicious pairings. www.pressclubsf.com. 20 Yerba Buena Ln., 415.744.5000. Map 1, D6 THE HIDDEN VINE Like a fine Zinfandel, this

sophisticated Jackson Square wine bar offers a complex and satisfying bouquet of flavors for the discerning palate. The staff is knowledgeable, the atmosphere unpretentious and the menu thorough. Come taste with someone you’re trying to impress or just nestle with friends in a cozy alcove. www.thehiddenvine.com. 408 Merchant St., 415.674.3567. Map 1, E4

Bay Area BARREL HOUSE TAVERNThis Sausalito spot mixes

artisan cocktails, or you can build your own soda to sip while taking in the views from the waterfront bar seats. www.barrelhousetavern.com. 660 Bridgeway, 415.729.9593. BERKELEY REPERTORY THEATRE Born in a

storefront on College Avenue, Berkeley Rep has moved to the forefront of American theater. It gained renown for an adventurous combination of work, presenting important, new dramatic voices alongside refreshing adaptations of seldom-seen classics, and sends its productions to Broadway on a regular basis. www.berkeleyrep.org. 2025 Addison St., Berkeley, 510.647.2949. GRATON RESORT & CASINO The behemoth $825

million, 340,000-square-foot resort is home to 3,000 slot and video poker machines, as well as 144 table games and an elegant dedicated poker room. As much a dining as a gaming destination, the complex packs in more than a dozen eateries, ranging from casual favorites like The Habit Burger Grill, La Fondita and Boathouse Asian Bistro to high-end options like Tony’s of North Beach and 630 Park Steakhouse. www.gratonresortcasino.com. 288 Golf Course Dr. W, Rohnert Park, 707.588.7100.


THE GUIDE

Dining Ramble in for Dinner Looking for a restaurant near Union Square? Consider The Rambler located in Hotel Zeppelin. The two-level spot’s leather booths, midcentury chairs and bubble glass chandeliers give it a luxe feel to match the convivial atmosphere. The chef, who has a Wine Country fine dining pedigree, turns out tasty dishes like the popular grilled Spanish octopus with Manila clams, chorizo, early girl tomatoes and charred lemon salsa verde along with the equally crowd-pleasing beef short rib with creamed spinach, carrots and cipollini. The bar program is equally strong. 545 Post St., 415.549.8008, ramblersf.com $$$

CANELA BISTRO AND WINE BAR Spanish/Tapas.

This elegant restaurant in the Castro neighborhood serves traditional tapas and modern Spanish dishes, sourcing ingredients from sustainable California markets, farms and fisheries. The wine list is carefully curated to pair with the extensive menu, and the dim, thoughtfully decorated dining room has a romantic feel. Brunch (Su), D (nightly), closed M. www.canelasf.com. 2272 Market St., 415.552.3000. Map 2, H6 FRANCES California. Serving modern California

cuisine in a neighborhood setting, acclaimed Frances serves delights like chestnut soup with roasted ciopollini and house-cured pancetta; slow-roasted beef with creamed winter greens; and ling cod crusted with Boccalone lardo, squash and apples. D (nightly). www.frances-sf.com. 3870 17th St., 415.621.3870. $$$ Map 2, H6

Chinatown R&G LOUNGE Chinese. This bustling spot has a col-

orful lounge and cheerful, modest decor in the dining room downstairs. The Hong Kong-style menu includes tank-fresh seafood. The Travel Channel’s “No Reservations” host Anthony Bourdain visited the restaurant on his show and raved about the salt and pepper crab. L, D (daily). www.rnglounge.com. 631 Kearny St., 415.982.7877. $$ Map 1, D4

Civic Center/ Hayes Valley

There’s a lot more going on this month. Visit us online:

MONSIEUR BENJAMIN French. Inspired

by the great Parisian bistro culture and traditions of French cooking, Monsieur Benjamin is the latest restaurant by acclaimed chef Corey Lee who has become one of the Bay Area’s most respected chefs for his cooking at restaurants like the French Laundry and Benu. The menu is a modern take on traditional dishes with seasonal ingredients. Standouts include the lobster ragout, frog legs glazed in sweet-sour sauce and escargot with garlic butter and mushroom duxelles. L (Sa-Su), D (nightly). www.monsieurbenjamin.com. 451 Gough St., 415.403.2233. Map 1, A8

wheretraveler.com

ALTA CA New American. Wind down at

this modern bar and restaurant, which offers specialty cocktails, a great hamburger and crunchy beef tendon puffs that melt in your mouth. The atmosphere is almost as good as the food, with a floor-to-ceiling industrial metal bookcase lining the back wall and local artwork. www.altaca. co. 1420 Market St., 415.590.2585. Map 1, B8 ESPETUS BRAZILIAN STEAK HOUSE Steaks. Pace

yourself: This authentic Brazilian steakhouse offers all-you-can-eat skewers (“espetus” in Portuguese) of slow-roasted beef, lamb, pork, chicken and shrimp for a fixed price. The giant salad buffet is included. L, D (daily). www.espetus.com. 1686 Market St., 415.552.8792. $$$ Map 1, A8; 710 S B St., San Mateo, 650.342.8700. 4505 BURGERS & BBQ Barbecue. This is the flag-

ship restaurant of the San Francisco-based meat company. Equipped with one of the area’s last remaining wood-fired barbecue pits, 4505 serves up classic favorites like the Best Damn Grass Fed Cheeseburger (which is on just about every list of best burgers in town), slow-roasted brisket, smoked whole chickens, pulled pork sandwiches and even vegetarian options. www.4505meats. com. 705 Divisadero St., 415.231.6993. Map 2, G4

NOPA American. Named for its location North

of the Panhandle, this expansive, hip restaurant serves wood-fired rustic cuisine that epitomizes the best of San Francisco’s current food scene. One of the city’s best late-night dining options, it’s also popular for its brunch, burger and pork chops. Brunch (Sa-Su), D (nightly until 1 am). www. nopasf.com. 560 Divisadero St., 415.864.8643. $$$ Map 2, H5 RICH TABLE American. Named one of the country’s

top 50 new restaurants by Bon Appetit magazine in 2012, this James Beard Award-nominated hot spot is owned by a husband-and-wife team who serve unfussy, market-driven food in a lively atmosphere. Must-order items include innovative snacks like sardine chips and porcini doughnuts and creative cocktails. D (daily). www.richtablesf.com. 199 Gough St., 415.355.9085. $$$ Map 2, I4

THE SLANTED DOOR IN THE FERRY BUILDING is California’s highest-grossing independently owned restaurant, bringing in about $16.6 million in annual sales. 38 W H E R E S A N F R A N C I S CO I F E B R UA R Y 20 17

©KELLY PULEIO

Castro/Upper Market


The Franciscan Crab Restaurant is the crown jewel of Fisherman’s Wharf and has the best food that the wharf has to offer. It sits right on the water with the picture perfect view of Alcatraz and the Golden Gate Bridge.

Osso Steakhouse, voted #1 steak in the country

The Stinking Rose: A Garlic Restaurant

Pier 43 ½ | 415.362.7733 franciscancrabrestaurant.com

1177 California at Jones on Nob Hill | 415.771.6776 ossosteakhouse.com

325 Columbus Avenue in North Beach | 415.781.7673 thestinkingrose.com


THE GUIDE

SOUVLA Greek. Located in the heart of Hayes

Valley, this Greek sandwich shop is inspired by the casual neighborhood souvlaki joints found throughout Greece. The sandwiches are made with spit-roasted all-natural meats on warm pita bread with spiced yogurt sauces and fresh herb salads. The “Greek fries” are spiked with Mizithra cheese, oregano, olive oil and sea salt. www.souvlasf.com. 517 Hayes St., 415.400.5458. Map 1, A8 ZUNI CAFE Mediterranean. Three words: Get the

chicken. This San Francisco institution has been in business for more than 35 years and is most famous for its cooked-to-order roast chicken for two (allow an hour), a true stand-out on the Mediterraneaninspired menu of roasted and grilled goodness. Watch the vintage street cars roll down Market Street through the floor-to-ceiling windows while you wait. Brunch (Su), L, D (daily), closed M. www. zunicafe.com. 1658 Market St., 415.552.2522. $$$ Map 1, B8

Financial District AKIKOS RESTAURANTSushi. Changing daily, the

menu at this popular downtown sushi restaurant features an eclectic range of local and seasonal seafood with an emphasis on raw fish. It can be hard to get a reservation at the intimate, 30-seat restaurant, but you’ll find incredible sashimi and some of the most unique rolls in town, and odds are they won’t be on the menu next visit. The interior features imported rosewood floors and exposed brick walls, and the place settings and tableware are made by Sausalito’s Heath Ceramics. L (M-F), D (M-Sa). Closed Su. www.akikosrestaurant.com. 431 Bush St., 415.397.3218. Map 1, D5 KUSAKABEJapanese. For the ultimate in sushi,

look no further than Kusakabe, a Michelin-starred restaurant that offers a prix fixe menu inspired by traditional Japanese “Kaiseki” cuisine. At $95 per meal, the Kusakabe experience isn’t cheap, but it is worth it—this is one of the few sushi restaurants in the Bay Area that offers an “Omasake” menu chosen specifically by the chef and prepared to order. kusakabe-sf.com. 584 Washington St., 415.757.0155. Map 1, E4 ONE MARKET American. This ever-popular restau-

rant on the Embarcadero waterfront across from the Ferry Building offers contemporary presentations of American classics from chef/partner Mark Dommen, showcasing farm-fresh ingredients, heritage meats, artisanal cheeses and an allAmerican wine list. www.onemarket.com. 1 Market St., 415.777.5577. $$$ Map 1, F4 PABUJapanese & Sushi. Michael Mina and Ken

Tominaga’s modern Japanese pub, or izakaya, offers sushi, robata and small-plate menus complemented by more than 100 premium sake selections and a variety of wines, Japanese whiskies, cocktails and Asian beers. www.michaelmina.net. 101 California St., 415.668.7228. Map 1, E5 PROSPECT California. From the same team behind

the enormously popular Boulevard restaurant, this polished and spacious spot, also helmed by executive chef Nancy Oakes, serves California cuisine in an elegant yet comfortable environment. The enormous square bar and communal dining options cultivate a lively atmosphere, perfect for happy hour or an after-work dinner. Couples can sit at a cozy booth by the large windows and watch the world go by. www.prospectsf.com. 300 Spear St., 415.247.7770. $$$$ Map 1, F5 40 W H E R E S A N F R A N C I S CO I F E B R UA R Y 20 17

SCHROEDER’S German. Founded in 1893, the

most recent iteration of this traditional German beer hall is from the team behind one of the city’s most successful wine bars, Press Club. The vast 5,000 square-foot space now has a modern feel, yet it still oozes character, with 1930s-era Herman Richter murals adorning the walls. The front area is a casual drink hall serving bar bites, and beyond that is a dining room with a full menu of Bavarian classics with a California sensibility. The impressive beer offerings, selected by a master cicerone—are mostly German and available on draft. L (M-F), D (M-Sa). www.schroederssf.com. 240 Front St., 415.421.4778. Map 1, E4 SUPER DUPER BURGERS American. With loca-

tions all over the San Francisco Bay Area, Super Duper is becoming famous for its fast food style burgers, fries and shakes. The burgers are made with 100 percent Niman Ranch all natural beef ground fresh each day and the shakes are made with organic Straus cream from Petaluma. In addition to burgers, Super Duper offers a free range chicken breast sandwich and an organic veggie burger. www.superdupersf.com. 2201 Chestnut St., 415.931.6258. Map 2, G2; 721 Market St., 415.538.3437. Map 2, J3; 2304 Market St., 415.558.8123. Map 2, H6; 346 Kearny St., 415.677.9936. Map 1, D5; 783 Mission St., 415.882.1750. Map 1, D6; 98 Mission St., 415.974.1200. Map 1, F5 WAYFARE TAVERN American. Step inside celebrity

chef Tyler Florence’s handsome three-story restaurant and be transported back in time. Built with bricks salvaged from the streets of the devastated city after the 1906 quake, the eatery channels the Barbary Coast era with American fare inspired by the San Francisco restaurant scene of the late 1800s. The menu features a raw bar and dishes like grilled sardines, salt-roasted bone marrow, organic fried chicken and the classic Hangtown Fry. Don’t miss the banana pudding for dessert and the hand-crafted cocktails. L, D (daily). www.wayfaretavern.com. 558 Sacramento St., 415.772.9060. $$$ Map 1, D4

Fisherman’s Wharf/Waterfront ALIOTO’S Seafood. One of San Francisco’s oldest

restaurants run by one of the city’s most prominent families, this Fisherman’s Wharf landmark has magnificent views of the San Francisco Bay and a reputation for great cioppino and fresh seafood. Don’t mess around with the menu: Get the Dungeness crab. Cracked, caked, stuffed or stewed, it’s impossible to get your fill. L, D (daily). www.aliotos.com. 8 Fisherman’s Wharf, 415.673.0183. $$ Map 1, B2 BEACH STREET GRILL ORGANIC RESTAURANT American. Known for its warm hospitality and

all-day breakfast, the key word at this diner is homemade, from melt-in-your-mouth blueberry pancakes to gravy-smothered biscuits. The outside patio is a great spot to enjoy a break from city life. B, L (daily), D (Sa-Su). www.sfbeachstreetgrill.com. 380 Beach St., 415.867.1711. $$ Map 1, C2 THE BUENA VISTA CAFE American. This wharf

institution by the Hyde Street cable car turnaround is famous for first introducing Irish coffee to the U.S. in 1952, and it has served millions of the hot cocktails since. B, L, D (daily). www.thebuenavista. com. 2765 Hyde St., 415.474.5044. $$ Map 1, B2

COQUETA Spanish/Tapas. This stylish spot on the

Embarcadero waterfront is celebrity chef Michael Chiarello’s first restaurant in San Francisco, serving his take on regional Spanish plates from Madrid, Catalonia and the Basque Country that highlight the Bay Area’s bounty of fresh ingredients from land and sea. L (Tu-Su), D (nightly). www.coquetasf. com. Pier 5, 415.704.8866. $$$ Map 1,F4 FOG CITY American. There’s something very San

Francisco about this upscale diner, and it’s more than just the name. An eclectic and cheerful mix of locals and visitors converge at the warm and welcoming space to indulge in crowd-pleasers like Dungeness crab cakes and macaroni and gouda cheese with black forest ham and English peas. Try to grab a window seat. L, D (daily). www.fogcitysf. com. 1300 Battery St., 415.982.2000. $$ Map 1, E3 FRANCISCAN CRAB RESTAURANT Seafood. Floor-

to-ceiling windows provide spectacular bay views from every table in this three-tiered, spacious midcentury modern gem. Menu highights include fish and chips, sizzling iron skillet mussels and whole roasted Dungeness crab. Free parking with validation. L, D (daily). www.franciscancrabrestaurant. com. Pier 43 1/2, 415.362.7733. $$$ Map 1, C1 HOG ISLAND OYSTER COMPANY Seafood. This

lively and attractive waterfront spot in the Ferry Building is known for its happy hours and unconventional, exceptional clam chowder with whole manila clams and a light, flavorful broth. Although fresh raw oysters are the star, the po’ boy sandwich, grilled cheese and grilled oysters also shine. L, D (daily). www.hogislandoysters.com. 1 Ferry Building, 415.391.7117. $$ Map 1, F4 LA MAR CEBICHERIA PERUANA Latin American.

The traditional Peruvian dishes at this attractive, modern space on the waterfront showcase fresh seafood with influences from China and Japan. Signature offerings include ceviches, causas, empanadas and anticuchos, as well classic and updated main courses. Pair them with a pisco sour cocktail. L, D (daily). www.lamarsf.com. Pier 1 1/2 415.397.8880. $$$ Map 2, K2 THE SLANTED DOOR Vietnamese. In a swank

waterfront location in the Ferry Building, this restaurant from star chef Charles Phan serves modern interpretations of Vietnamese cuisine and is famous for its shaking beef dish. One of the most profitable dining establishments in the city, it won the James Beard Outstanding Restaurant Award in 2014. L, D (daily). www.slanteddoor.com. 1 Ferry Building, 415.861.8032. $$$ Map 1, F4

Haight-Ashbury MAVEN New American. Located in the Lower

Haight neighborhood, Maven is best known for its paired menu, which couples creative cocktails with small plates like duck sliders and mussels cooked with Korean chili powder and absinthe. A redwood bar top and a living wall lend an elegant, natural feel to the space. www.maven-sf.com. 598 Haight St., 415.829.7982. Map 2, H5 PADRECITO Mexican. Located In the heart of the

Cole Valley neighborhood, Padrecito is a seasonal Mexican restaurant that sources produce from the chef’s grandmother’s Sonoma farm. Staples include carefully crafted ceviches, enchiladas and tacos made with sustainably raised lamb, duck, beef and goat. The bar program features over 80 house tequilas and mezcals. www.padrecitosf. com. 901 Cole St., 415.742.5505. Map 2, G6


DINING

Jackson Square COTOGNA Italian. This casual cousin to the ac-

claimed two Michelin star Quince restaurant next door opened under the same chef-owners. The rustic Italian eatery serves a seasonally changing menu that features spit-roasted meats and game birds, wood-oven pizzas, house-made pastas and fresh local seafood. All wine bottles on the prix fixe wine menu are under $40, and the floor-to-ceiling windows afford abundant natural light and dramatic views of the Transamerica Building. L (M-Sa), D (nightly). www.cotognasf.com. 490 Pacific Ave., 415.775.8508. $$ Map 1, D4

QUINCE Italian. Elegant without being stuffy, this

intimate two Michelin star restaurant with a superb wine list serves sophisticated Italian fare, such as a silky ricotta-filled ravioli in butter sauce and sole roasted on a fig leaf. A five-course tasting menu is available, and dining a la carte is also an option. D (nightly), closed Su. www.quincerestaurant.com. 470 Pacific Ave., 415.775.8500. $$$$ Map 1, D4

Japantown/Lower Fillmore 1300 ON FILLMORE American. This spot in the

heart of the Fillmore District serves up soulful American cuisine. Signature dishes include black

skillet-fried organic chicken, shrimp and grits and maple syrup slow-braised short ribs. Don’t miss the Heritage Wall paying homage to the neighborhood’s legendary jazz history. Gospel Brunch on Sundays. D (nightly). www.1300fillmore.com. 1300 Fillmore St., 415.771.7100. $$$ Map 2, H4 THE PROGRESS New American. Named after the

Progress Theater that occupied the same building over a century ago, this is the second restaurant from the team behind the national smash-hit State Bird Provisions, and it’s located just next door. The boundary busting, international menu is served family style (choose six dishes for $62 per person) and features dishes like lamb merguez with yellow eye beans, octopus and crispy squid. If you don’t manage to snag a reservation, the bar is walk-in only. The Progress is a 2015 James Beard Award winner. www.theprogress-sf.com. 1525 Fillmore St., 415.673.1294. Map 2, H4 STATE BIRD PROVISIONS American. It’s worth the

effort to get a reservation at Bon Appetit magazine’s 2012 Restaurant of the Year (and the 2013 James Beard Award winner for Best New Restaurant), run by one of Food and Wine magazine’s Best New Chefs of 2013, Stuart Brioza, along with his wife Nicole Krasinski. This creative and innovative Michelin star restaurant does dim sum, Americanstyle. Carts wheel around small plates, and diners can point to choose what they’d like. The menu changes frequently based on seasonal availability, but the house specialty remains the eponymous “state bird,” a crispy half quail served with seasonal “provisions.” D (M-Sa). www.statebirdsf.com. 1529 Fillmore St., 415.795.1272. $$$ Map 2, H4

Marina/Cow Hollow A16 Italian. This Marina neighborhood hot spot

combines the cuisine of Campania with the pizzas of Naples and pours small-production wines from California and Southern Italy. L (W-F), D (nightly). www.a16sf.com. 2355 Chestnut St., 415.771.2216. $$$ Map 2, G2 ATELIER CRENN French. This modern upscale

restaurant from the world’s only two Michelin-star female chef blends the line between food and art, presenting garden-centric dishes that are as pleasing to the eye as they are to the palate and menus that read like poetry. Giving center stage to the food, the 40-seat dining room has an earthy, minimalist appearance with teak tables, fig trees and glass orbs that provide soft lighting. Diners can select from one of two multi-course tasting menus. D (Tu-Sa). www.ateliercrenn.com. 3127 Fillmore St., 415.440.0460. $$$$ Map 2, H2 BLUE BARN GOURMET American. Love your

STEP INTO TRACE AND EXPERIENCE FARM TO TABLE DISHES FROM EXECUTIVE CHEF JASON REA, CRAFTED COCKTAILS, AND HONEY FROM OUR ROOFTOP BEEHIVES. TRACE RESERVATIONS AT 415 817 7836 TRACE-SF.COM @TRACEWSF 181 THIRD STREET, SAN FRANCISCO

veggies? Passionate about eating organic and supporting local farmers? If you answered yes to either, then Blue Barn is the place for you. Heaping, fresh salads take center stage here, as do made-to-order sandwiches and Blue Bottle Coffee. www.bluebarngourmet.com. 2105 Chestnut St., 415.441.3232. $ Map 2, H2 MEL’S DRIVEIN American. A classic since 1947,

this diner is known for staples such as chicken pot pie, meatloaf, burgers and milkshakes. It’s open late, serves breakfast all day and even has a fresh-squeezed fruit juice bar. The vinyl and chrome decor, jukebox and cheerful servers make for a fun, nostalgia-filled dining experience. The Lombard Street and Geary Street locations offer free parking. www.melsdrive-in.com. 2165 w w w.wh e re t rave le r. com 41


THE GUIDE

Lombard St., 415.921.2867. Map 2, H2; 3355 Geary Blvd., 415.387.2255. $ Map 2, F4; 801 Mission St., 415.227.0793. Map 1, D6; 1050 Van Ness Ave., 415.292.6357. Map 1, C5

Mission District

SA RA S STARTS AT AR T

AL’S PLACE California Cuisine. Named America’s

best new restaurant of 2015 by Bon Appetit magazine, Al’s Place is a casual, 46-seat restaurant located on an unassuming corner in the outskirts of the Mission District. Chef and owner Aaron London, a Sonoma native who’s worked at acclaimed restaurants like Ubuntu, creates vegetablefocused and seafood main dishes, offering meat as a side. www.alsplacesf.com. 1499 Valencia St., 415.416.6136. Map 2, I7 CENTRAL KITCHEN California. The creative minds

behind the wildly popular Flour + Water restaurant left Italian food behind in this venture, instead focusing on Northern California cuisine. The succinct, frequently updated menu features simple, fresh preparations of locally sourced meats and seasonal produce. Dishes may include chilled tomato soup; seared squid with avocado, celery and pine nut mousse; and slow baked halibut with fried mussels, tomatoes and nasturtium. The airy, spacious dining room and patio exude rustic warmth. Brunch (Su), D (nightly). www.centralkitchensf.com. 3000 20th St., 415.826.7004. $$$ Map 2, J6 COMMONWEALTH American. Named after the

concept of organizing for the common good, you can feel good about dining here—and not just because of the harmoniously layered, delectable dishes. This progressive eatery donates $10 from each tasting menu to local nonprofits. D (nightly). www.commonwealthsf.com. 2224 Mission St., 415.355.1500. $$$ Map 2, I6

“Top Ten American Restaurants in the U.S.” – Gayot Guide 1 MARKET STREET SAN FRANCISCO 4 1 5 .7 7 7. 5 5 7 7 O N E M A R K E T.CO M

CRAFTSMAN & WOLVES Bakery. This modern and

sleek patisserie in the hip Valencia corridor from James Beard-nominated chef William Werner features a rotating menu of breakfast pastries, cakes, confections, confitures, desserts, lunch and other savory fare. The bakery is famous for the Rebel Within, a savory breakfast muffin with asiago cheese, green onion and breakfast sausage baked into the mix and a full soft-cooked farm egg in the center. craftsman-wolves.com. 746 Valencia St., 415.913.7713. Map 2, I6; 1643 Pacific Ave., 415.855.1414. Map 1, A4 DELFINA Italian. This bustling neighborhood trat-

toria is a local favorite that pioneered San Francisco’s farm-to-table movement. It has received rave reviews since its opening in 1998 and still packs the house (and outdoor patio) each night. D (nightly). www.delfinasf.com. 3621 18th St., 415.552.4055. $$$ Map 2, I6 FLOUR + WATER Italian. A haven (or heaven) for ar-

tisan pizza and pasta lovers, this incredibly popular, welcoming spot serves exceptional Neopolitanstyle, wood-fired pizzas and house-made pastas. D (nightly). www.flourandwater.com. 2401 Harrison St., 415.826.7000. $$$ Map 2, J6 FOREIGN CINEMA California. Never was the old

dinner-and-a-movie done so artfully, or so deliciously. The vast, bohemian-chic space suits the always excellent California-Mediterranean cuisine. A heated, covered patio screens a rotation of classic, foreign and independent films projected onto one of three walls, and speakers on each table allow you to adjust the volume. Meandering through the changing exhibits in the adjacent gallery is the 42 W H E R E S A N F R A N C I S CO I F E B R UA R Y 20 17

WWW.CAFÉZOETROPE.COM | (415) 291-1700


DINING

perfect way to wait for a table. Brunch (Sa-Su), D (nightly). www.foreigncinema.com. 2534 Mission St., 415.648.7600. $$$ Map 2, I7 ICHI SUSHISushi. Celebrated as one of San

Francisco’s top sushi destinations and izakayas, Ichi Sushi is the place to go for traditional nigiri, sashimi and an extensive sake list. Sustainability is a huge focus here, and the recently renovated space features a wall-sized mural with playful instructions on how to eat sushi correctly. D (M-Sa). www.ichisushi. com. 3282 Mission St., 415.525.4750. Map 2, I8 LAZY BEAR New American. This popular Mission

District restaurant describes itself as a “modern American fine-dining dinner party.” It started as an underground venue in 2009 and opened its first permanent location in 2014. The tasting menu changes weekly and ranges from $100-150 per person and features about 12 courses. Past menus featured dishes like halibut with asparagus, Perigord truffle and fingerling potatoes; and lamb with mustards, farro and garum. www.lazybearsf.com. 3416 19th St., 415.874.9921. Map 2, I6 LITTLE STAR PIZZA Italian. Famous for its deep

dish, Chicago-style pizza with a slightly sweet, cornmeal crust, this place draws a stream of addicted regulars. Valencia St.: L, D (daily). Divisadero St.: L (F-Su), D (nightly). www.littlestarpizza.com. 400 Valencia St., 415.551.7827. Map 2, I5; 846 Divisadero St., 415.441.1118. $$ Map 2, H4 LOCANDA Italian. The masterminds behind the

acclaimed Delfina and Pizzeria Delfina opened this modern trattoria that’s a local hotspot. Start off with antipasti like fried olives, then dig into saucy pastas like rigatoni alla carbonara and charcoalgrilled dishes featuring lamb, quail and spareribs. The wine and cocktail offerings are excellent, too. D (nightly). www.locandasf.com. 557 Valencia St., 415.863.6800. $$ Map 2, I6 LOLINDA Steaks. The team behind Beretta and

Starbelly has created a new kind of steakhouse, one that marries the flavors of Argentina with the culinary sensibility of California. This stylish and moody Mission spot offers Latin-inspired small plates, but the real draw here is the assortment of grilled meats. D (nightly). www.lolindasf.com. 2518 Mission St., 415.550.6970. $$ Map 2, I6 LOLÓ Mexican. Step into a world of color and

pattern when you visit one of the two locations for this eclectic Mexican restaurant in the Mission. Inspired by Jaliscan-Californian cuisine, don’t miss the Taco Tropical, which includes jicama tortillas, spice-dusted shrimp, an exotic fruit relish and spicy aioli. www.lolosf.com. 974 Valencia St., 415.643.5656. Map 2, I6 MISSION CHINESE FOOD Chinese. Named one

of the top 10 restaurants in the country by GQ Magazine in 2012, this trendy spot operating out of the former Lung Shan serves fiery Szechuaninfluenced, Americanized Chinese food from rock-star chef Danny Bowien. The music is loud, the servers are cool and the Ma Po Tofu is deliciously screaming hot. www.missionchinesefood.com. 2234 Mission St., 415.863.2800. $ Map 2, I6 NAMU GAJI Korean. Started by three brothers, this

elegant yet casual spot serves creative dishes with as much Korean as California influence. Popular dishes include the vegetable-focused okonomiyaki, beef tongue served with summer squash and chili oil and a burger served with kimchee relish and hand-cut fries. D (Tu-Sa), Br (W-Su). www.namusf.com. 499 Dolores St., 415.431.6268. Map 2, H6 w w w.wh e re t rave le r. com 43


THE GUIDE

TARTINE BAKERY & CAFE Dessert/Coffee. This

popular artisan bakery serves fresh-from-the-oven pastries all day, as well as pies, cakes, artisan bread and coffee. Breakfast quiches, gourmet sandwiches, classic pastries and an addictive bread pudding keep folks lining up. B, L (daily). www.tartinebakery. com. 600 Guerrero St., 415.487.2600. $ Map 2, I6

Nob Hill 1760 American. Created by the family behind the

acclaimed Acquerello, this spinoff highlights Italian and California-influenced dining in a sleek, casual atmosphere with Art Deco touches, expansive windows and a youthful slant. The service is polished, the atmosphere is lively and the presentation is beautiful. D (nightly). www.1760sf.com. 1760 Polk St., 415.359.1212. Map 2, I3 BOUCHE French. The creation of a Provence native,

this rustic new spot above the Stockton Tunnel is warm and inviting, offering a seasonally inspired French-Calilfornian menu with a focus on small plates. The beer and wine list is centered on small producers from both France and California. Ask your server about the frequently changing menu, but the ceviche-style sardines with grapefruit and mint is a standout, as is the marinated salmon, perched atop a nest of phyllo and a delicate, runny poached egg. D (M-Sa). www.bouchesf.com. 603 Bush St., 415.956.0396. $$ Map 1,D5 MASON PACIFIC New American. Named after its

location at the intersection of Mason and Pacific along the cable car line on Nob Hill, this intimate bistro offers a seasonal menu of small plates and a few main courses that incorporate Italian, French and Asian flavors. The bar is a great spot to enjoy a glass of wine from the affordable wine list and watch the cable cars pass by. www.masonpacific. com. 1358 Mason St., 415.374.7185. Map 1, A4 OLEA California. This intimate, romantic neighbor-

hood restaurant on the cable car line features a weekly-changing menu with a seasonal focus and dishes made with fresh organic produce, Niman Ranch meats and sustainable, wild-caught seafood. Locals line up for the weekend brunch featuring challah French toast and a cazuela baked egg dish. Dinner brings pappardelle pasta with lamb meatballs and pan-seared duck breast with German butterball potatoes, delicata squash and sauteed broccolini. D (Tu-Sa), Brunch (F-Su). www.oleasf. com. 1494 California St., 415.202.8521. Map 1, B5 OSSO STEAKHOUSE Steaks. This swanky, sprawl-

ing steakhouse with a striking Art Deco interior is located just across the street from Grace Cathedral in the storied Nob Hill neighborhood. Menu standouts include dry-aged steaks and buttery Dungeness crab. D (nightly). www.ossosteakhouse.com. 1177 California St., 415.771.6776. $$$ Map 1, C5 SWAN OYSTER DEPOT Seafood. Founded in 1912,

this seafood market and oyster bar is a San Francisco institution. There’s almost always a wait at this intimate, 18-stool oyster bar, but you’ll be rewarded with a pint of Anchor Steam beer and a lunch of a dozen oysters on the half shell. L (M-Sa), closed Su. 1517 Polk St., 415.673.2757. $$$ Map 1, A6

Noe Valley CONTIGO Spanish/Tapas. Changing nightly, the

menu at this beloved California-style tapas spot in Noe Valley highlights the Bay Area’s farmers, ranchers, fishermen and artisans. The sleek design and friendly service make for a festive evening. Pick 44 W H E R E S A N F R A N C I S CO I F E B R UA R Y 20 17


DINING Classic Brasserie Fare in Union Square

a glass of sparkling Cava or Rioja from the all-Spanish wine list and stay for the chocolate and churros dessert. D (nightly), closed M. www.contigosf.com. 1320 Castro St., 415.285.0250. $$ Map 2, H7 FIREFLY American. Adored by locals, this neighbor-

hood spot with a homey feel has been a destination since its 1994 opening. The food is comfortable and creative, and vegetarians will find at least two meatless main courses on every menu in addition to multiple appetizer options. D (nightly). www.fireflysf.com. 4288 24th St., 415.821.7652. $$$ Map 2, H7

North Beach CAFE ZOETROPE Italian. Owned by legendary film

director and winemaker Francis Ford Coppola, this neighborhood Italian restaurant is named after his famous production company and located in the same steel-framed structure, the Sentinel Building. L, D (daily). www.cafecoppola.com. 916 Kearny St., 415.291.1700. $$ Map 1, D4 DON PISTO’S Mexican. A fresh take on tradi-

Open Daily: 7am–10pm Happy Hour: 4–7pm (everyday) Weekend Brunch: 7am–3pm e

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Where do you want to go? Find the best of the city

tional Mexican street food, this hip spot serves up spectacular tacos, tortas and ceviche that are inspired by the border towns of Baja California all the way to the Yucatan peninsula. The menu changes along with the seasons, and the sangria and margaritas are popular. B (F-Su), D (nightly), Closed M. www.donpistos.com. 510 Union St., 415.395.0939. Map 1, D3 FIOR D’ITALIA Italian. Dubbed America’s oldest

Italian restaurant, Fior d’Italia has been serving authentic Northern Italian cuisine since 1886. It has has more than 20 varieties of pastas to choose from, most of them made in-house. L, D (daily). www.fior.com. 2237 Mason St., 415.986.1886. $$ Map 1, C2 IL FORNAIO Italian. This upscale Italian restaurant

serves house-made pasta, roasted meats and wood-oven pizzas. The San Francisco location is a multiple-time recipient of Wine Spectator’s Award of Excellence. Brunch (Sa-Su), L, D (daily). www.ilfornaio.com. Levi’s Plaza, 1265 Battery St., 415.986.0100. $$ Map 1, E3; 327 Lorton Ave., Burlingame, 650.375.8000; 223 Corte Madera Town Center, Corte Madera, 415.927.4400; 520 Cowper St., Palo Alto, 650.853.3888. NORTH BEACH RESTAURANT Italian. This classic

restaurant serves generous portions of hearty Tuscan cuisine from its extensive menu. The awardwinning wine list boasts over 500 bottles to pair with house specialties such as chicken al mattone with Italian herbs, filet of lamb alla Bruno and cioppino alla pescatora. The four dining rooms cater to a variety of occasions, from a power lunch to a first date. www.northbeachrestaurant.com. 1512 Stockton St., 415.392.1700. $$$ Map 1, C3 ORIGINAL JOE’S Italian. Revived after a devastat-

ing fire, this 79-year-old local favorite offers a taste of San Francisco’s history. Saloon-styled waiters serve some of the best (and largest) Italian dishes in the city—and mix some of the strongest and most reasonably priced drinks. Brunch, L, D (daily). www. originaljoessf.com. 601 Union St., 415.775.4877. $$$ Map 1, C3 PARK TAVERN American. A fashionable yet com-

fortable American bistro and bar, Park Tavern sits on the eastern edge of Washington Square Park. (Some tables have a direct view of the church steps where Joe DiMaggio and Marilyn Monroe were

married.) The spacious brasserie boasts a marketdriven menu of shareable plates, boldly flavored seafood and meat dishes and unique-cum-classic cocktails. Small plates are divided by raw, fried and smoked offerings. Valet parking. Brunch (Sa-Su), L (F), D (nightly). www.parktavernsf.com. 1652 Stockton St., 415.989.7300. $$$ Map 1, C3 SOTTO MARE OYSTERIA & SEAFOOD RESTAU RANTSeafood. One of Tony Bennett’s favorite

San Francisco restaurants, Sotto Mare is an authentic Italian North Beach experience. The seafood restaurant serves up oysters and clams on the half shell, Boston-style clam chowder, baccala, crab cioppino, Louis salads, seafood pastas and more. Sotto Mare’s daily fresh fish can also be purchased retail if you feel like cooking yourself. L, D (M-Sa), close Su. www.sottomaresf.com. 552 Green St., 415.398.3181. Map 1, D3 THE STINKING ROSE Italian. Follow your nose to

one of the city’s most interesting dining experiences, where garlic is king. This restaurant goes through more than 5,000 pounds of the pungent ingredient each month. Specialties include 40 clove garlic chicken, pork chops, roasted Dungeness crab and even garlic ice cream. L, D (daily). www.thestinkingrose.com. 325 Columbus Ave., 415.781.7673. $$ Map 1, D4 TONY’S PIZZA NAPOLETANA Italian. Dubbed

the best pizzeria in America by Forbes magazine, Tony Gemignani’s pizzas are authentic, with ingredients imported from the pizza capital of the world, Naples. The diverse array of styles, from the famous pizza Margherita to the savory Cal Italia, require seven different ovens. L, D (W-Su). www. tonyspizzanapoletana.com. 1570 Stockton St., 415.835.9888. $$ Map 1, D3 TRATTORIA PINOCCHIO Italian. This family-owned

restaurant with sidewalk seating serves Sicilian fare, including housemade pastas, cioppino, fresh fish, steaks and lamb. Inside, the floor-to-ceiling windows make for great people watching. L, D (daily). www.trattoriapinocchio.com. 401 Columbus Ave., 415.392.1472. $$ Map 1, D3

Richmond/Ocean Beach CLIFF HOUSE American. Near Ocean Beach and

Lands End Trail, this iconic historic site located on a headland above the coastal cliffs is home to two restaurants and spectacular views of the Pacific Ocean (whale and sea lion spotting is a possibility) and Sutro Baths. The camera obscura on the deck is on the National Register of Historic Places. Sutro’s offers an upscale setting, while The Bistro offers a more casual experience, with burgers, sandwiches and other California favorites. B, L, D (daily). www.cliffhouse.com. 1090 Point Lobos Ave., 415.386.3330. Map 2, A4 OUTERLANDS New American. The reclaimed

wood interior of this Outer Sunset restaurant is as celebrated as its food. The owners designed the space themselves, and a recent renovation has made the intimate space formerly notorious for long lines that much more accessible. The grilled cheese sandwich served with housemade levain bread is the menu standout, but the regular lineup of pastries, soups and cold and open-face sandwiches is always worth the trip. www.outerlandssf. com. 4001 Judah St., 415.661.6140. Map 2, B6

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THE GUIDE

DINING

Russian Hill STONES THROW New American. This inviting

casual-chic spot has one of the city’s most talented restaurant teams (including three Michael Mina alums). The seasonal menus here are outstanding—order the perfectly grilled, melt-in-your mouth octopus and the puffed potato and eggs if they’re in the lineup. The artfully presented desserts are playful riffs on childhood classics, like peanut butter and jelly doughnuts. Neighborhood foodies rave about the Sunday brunch. www.stonesthrowsf.com. 1896 Hyde St., 415.796.2901. Map 1, A4

South of Market (SoMa) ALEXANDER’S STEAKHOUSE Steaks. Housed in a stylish brick and glass building, this fine interpretation of the classic American steakhouse reveals hints of Japanese influence throughout the menu. The dry-aged steaks are some of the best in the city, and a three-story wine wall showcases an awardwinning 400-bottle collection. L (Tu-F), D (nightly). www.alexanderssteakhouse.com. 448 Brannan St., 415.495.1111. $$$$ Map 1, E7; 19379 Stevens Creek Blvd., Cupertino, 408.446.2222. AMERICAN GRILLED CHEESE KITCHEN American. Not many cities can claim a restaurant solely

devoted to grilled cheese sandwiches, but here, we are lucky. Stop in for lunch and order up sandos like the Jalapeño Popper and Wild Turkey with basillavender pesto and ancho chile jam. Cheese is still, of course, the star, so choose between a wide variety of artisan cheeses, like sharp Tillamook cheddar, smooth mozzarella or tangy gruyere. L (M-Sa). www.theamericansf.com. 1 South Park Ave., Suite 103A, 415.243.0107. $ Map 1, F7 AQ California. This modern, lovely and expan-

sive restaurant and bar prides itself on changing with the seasons. The menu is characterized by inventive combinations of new and traditional Mediterranean flavors, cutting-edge cooking techniques and the exceptional seasonal bounty of Northern California. The term “AQ” (as quoted) often appears on classic restaurant menus to describe fresh, seasonal or specialty items; this spot takes it a step further by transforming its interior to reflect the palette and tone of the current season. D (Tu-Sa). www.aq-sf.com. 1085 Mission St., 415.341.9000. Map 1, B8 ARCHIVE BAR & KITCHENAmerican. Housed in the

historic, pre-earthquake Atlas Building, Archive offers a menu designed with sharing and socializing in mind. Pizzas are the focus, but the restaurant and bar hybrid is also known for its sliders, salads and charcuterie as well as seasonal cocktails and local and craft beers. www.archivebarsf.com. 602 Mission St., 415.987.5770. Map 1, E6 BAR AGRICOLE California. With roots in agriculture,

Bar Agricole (Farm Bar) is a contemporary tavern serving ingredient-driven dishes, excellent wines and some of the best artisan cocktails around. Nose-to-tail Northern California cuisine prepared with the day’s foraged produce is washed down with traditional mixed drinks from spirits that celebrate the tradition of farmhouse distilling or wine from more than 20 estates. D (nightly), closed M. www.baragricole.com. 355 11th St., 415.355.9400. $$ Map 1, C9 BENU American. This three Michelin star restaurant

distills fine dining down to the elements most relevant to modern diners: exquisite ingredients, 46 W H E R E S A N F R A N C I S CO I F E B R UA R Y 20 17

unique flavors, precise technique and attentive service. It offers inspired, progressive American cuisine in a historic, cleanly designed space. The a la carte menu allows for individualized customization, and the tasting menu varies between 8-12 courses, reflecting seasonality and evolution. D (Tu-Sa). www.benusf.com. 22 Hawthorne St., 415.685.4860. $$$$ Map 1, E6 BLUESTEM BRASSERIE California. This upscale

urban neighborhood restaurant in the heart of the museum district is a modern interpretation of the classic American brasserie. The menu features fresh, simple fare emphasizing a nose-to-tail cooking philosophy. Local ingredient sourcing extends to the wine list. Dishes include grass-fed beef burgers and steaks, apple-fed pork with cheddar grits and several selections of house-made charcuterie and salumi. L, D (daily). www.bluestembrasserie.com. 1 Yerba Buena Ln., 415.547.1111. $$$ Map 1, D6 BUCA DI BEPPO Italian. This fun and rambunc-

tious spot caters to the art of group dining. Drop in without a reservation for giant portions from the Southern Italian menu that are meant to be shared. Made from scratch, the traditional fare includes chicken cacciatore, veal parmigiana and linguine with clam sauce. L, D (daily). www.bucadibeppo. com. 855 Howard St., 415.543.7673. $$ Map 1, D7 DIRTY HABITAmerican. Located on the fifth floor

of the Palomar Hotel, Dirty Habit is a sexy, glamorous bar and restaurant with a film noir-inspired dining room and rooftop patio. While known for its craft cocktail menu (with an emphasis on brown spirits) and seasonal bar bites, it also features a limited dinner menu with options like fried snapper and aged rib eye. www.dirtyhabitsf.com. 12 4th St., 415.348.1555. Map 1, D7 THE KEYSTONEAmerican. Named after the 1913

building in which this restaurant and bar is housed, The Keystone serves up sophistated American fare including bar bites or lunch and dinner options ranging from Thai style fried chicken to New York steak. The beverage program highlights hand-crafted cocktails as well as a large selection of whiskeys. www.thekeystonesf.com. 68 4th St., 415.777.1200. Map 1, D6 MARLOWEAmerican. This popular neighborhood

bistro (sister restaurant to the acclaimed Park Tavern) just moved into sleak new digs in the SoMa district. The market-driven menu is known for upscale comfort foods like the famous burger, crispy brussel sprout chips and deviled eggs. L (M-F), D (nightly). www.marlowesf.com. 500 Brannan St., 415.777.1413. Map 1, E8 SAISON American. The inspired contemporary

cuisine at this superlative three Michelin star restaurant is derived from obsessively sourced ingredients and integrated into the nightly prix-fixe menu with upwards of 20 courses. The pristine tuna loin is smoked for 30 days, the squab salted and air-dried for three weeks and the fresh herbs foraged daily. Come for a special occasion. D (Tu-Sa). www.saisonsf.com. 178 Townsend St., 415.828.7990. $$$$ Map 1, F7 TRACE California. Named after its traceable

ingredients, this restaurant in the W Hotel serves up a thoughtful culinary experience with a dedication to socially responsible food, prepared from locally sourced and sustainable ingredients. The menu includes a selection of items that are farmed, foraged and crafted, as well as small plates to

share and large plates to savor yourself. Breakfast, lunch and weekend brunch, too. B, L, D (daily). www.trace-sf.com. 181 3rd St., in the W Hotel, 415.817.7836. $$$ Map 1, E6

Union Square 398 BRASSERIE French. Located inside Hotel G

in Union Square, this bustling brasserie serves up classic French and American dishes ranging from eggs Benedict to steak frites to duck leg confit. The flashy interior featuring Mexican tile, Corinthian columns and contemporary chandeliers is worth the visit alone, and an impressive wine and cocktail list makes this a standout happy hour spot as well. www.398restaurantsf.com. 398 Geary St., 415.654.5061. Map 1, D6 E&O KITCHEN AND BAR Asian. Located in the

heart of downtown, just steps away from Union Square, E&O has a festive atmosphere and serves shareable bites and creative cocktails featuring bold and dynamic flavors. The happy hour includes favorites like the Blushing Geisha cocktail and pu pu platter. L (M-Sa), D (nightly), happy hour (M-Sa 3-6 pm) www.eosanfrancisco.com. 314 Sutter St., 415.693.0303. $$ Map 1, D5 FARALLON Seafood. This classic Pat Kuleto

restaurant in Union Square has been enchanting guests for 18 years with carefully crafted details that capture the life aquatic. Blending casual and high-end coastal cuisine, Farallon offers fresh seafood options and simple raw preparations from the oyster bar. Beyond the welcoming spot’s dinner menu, find an approachable wine list, one of the largest collections of single malt whiskeys in the city and inventive desserts. D (nightly). www. farallonrestaurant.com. 450 Post St., 415.956.6969. $$$ Map 1, C6 JOHN’S GRILL American. Founded in 1908, this

casual steakhouse is one of the city’s oldest restaurants, steeped in San Francisco history. It served as a setting for the classic book and movie, “The Maltese Falcon.” The framed black-and-white photographs and news clippings hung throughout serve as a veritable museum of San Francisco memorabilia. Live jazz every night. L, D (daily). www.johnsgrill. com. 63 Ellis St., 415.986.3274. Map 1, D6 NEW DELHI RESTAURANT Indian. Decorated

like a Maharajah’s private banquet room, this regal restaurant serves northern Indian food, with recipes culled from royal menus dating back 400 years. Chef-owner Ranjan Dey creates daily specials with his six gourmet spice blends. The bar has drawn downtown professionals since the ‘80s with its Double-Happiness-Happy Hour, 5:30-7:30 pm and 10 pm-midnight. Try the Madras Madness or Oh! Calcutta. L (M-Sa), D (nightly). www. newdelhirestaurant.com. 160 Ellis St., 415.397.8470. $$ Map 1, C6

Van Ness Corridor HARRIS’ STEAKHOUSE Steaks. This iconic res-

taurant represents classic steakhouse dining, but chef Michael Buhagier adds a California sensibility, The Kobe rib eye, cut from select Japanese cattle reared for optimal marbling, has a rich and delicate texture. A red cabernet butter melts on its seared surface, typifying a subtle flair for the unexpected. www.harrisrestaurant.com. 2100 Van Ness Ave., 415.673.1888. Map 1, A4


TASTE OF THE CITY BEACH STREET IL FORNAIO GRILL IlThe Fornaio’s authentic Italian cuisine a favorite Beachaward-winning Street Grill serves up some of the bestis breakfast in San Francisco. Il Fornaio chefs, who are trained in use and home-made comfort food around. Outside Italy, seating, authentic and(with seasonal Italian recipes. Specialties include organic food gluten free options), fresh squeezed OJ housemade pastas, grilledhomemade fish, wood-fired pizza, and mimosas, and even organic dogauthentic biscuits risotto, Freshonpastas are made daily. for your and dog rotisserie make this meats. a true gem Fisherman’s Wharf. Try Each month a special menu from a different region of Italy is one of the five different kinds of Eggs Benedict, including featured. Adjacent to Levi’s with Other covered patio dining, their signature Crab Eggs plaza, Benedict. favorite menu and private dining areas, this restaurant is perfect for itemsthree include organic strawberry and blackberry pancakes, business events, rehearsal dinners or wedding receptions. house-made corn beef hash, house-made biscuits and An eventgravy, coordinator on-site to plan Come your event. sausage and wildis seafood dishes. by for Repeat Happy recipient Wine Spectator’s “AwardBreakfast of Excellence. ” $6 Hour, Sat of & Sun 2pm-4pm Jun-Oct. served all until day. 6 Happy Hour is celebrated 4 - 6pm, Mon-Fri. Restaurant hours Jun-Oct: 7am-4pm Mon-Fri, 7am-8pm Sat & Sun; Nov-May: 7am-2pm Mon-Sun. oc ted t

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ALIOTO’S Alioto’s offers one of the most spectacular views of Fisherman’s Wharf, the Golden Gate Bridge, & the fishing harbor. The restaurant was established in 1928 & is now run by the fourth generation of the Alioto family. Alioto’s offers classic Italian recipes passed down from the Alioto family, plus the freshest seafood, & of course, fresh Dungeness Crab year-round. Enjoy favorites like seafood ravioli, crab louie salad, salmon sicilian, or our famous crab cioppino. Full bar & wine list. Also try Alioto’s Waterside Cafe, for more casual dining indoors & out. Alioto’s Restaurant open daily from 11am until 10pm & our Cafe from 10am to 10pm. All major credit cards accepted, 2 hours of free parking with validation. For info, visit Aliotos.com. Fishe

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HISTORIC JOHN’S GRILL John’s Grill, a San Francisco tradition since 1908, is a must when in the city. It is a favorite with locals and national celebrities (most recently the Presidents of Mexico and Greece, Matt Dillon, Johnny Depp, Renee Zellweger, and Olympia Dukakis), who enjoy the great steaks, fresh seafood, salads and pastas with excellent service at honest prices in a casual atmosphere of dark panel walls, antiques and pictures of old San Francisco. John’s Grill is a setting in the novel “ The Maltese Falcon” and was featured in Gourmet and chosen one of the Top 10 by Esquire. Walking distance from downtown hotels and theatres. Private banquet rooms are available on short notice. Open Mon.– Sat. 11am–10pm Sun. 12noon–10pm All major cards. is t

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C O breakfast R AYsome The Beach Street Grill serves B up L theHbest AR Cof I EA ASOutside SIC CE seating, and home-made comfort food around. CO SF N RE organic food (with gluten free options), fresh OJ CIEsqueezed RG STAU and mimosas, and even homemade organic dog E biscuits RA N for your dog make this a true gem on Fisherman’s Wharf. Try T one of the five different kinds of Eggs Benedict, including their signature Crab Eggs Benedict. Other favorite menu items include organic strawberry and blackberry pancakes, house-made corn beef hash, house-made biscuits and sausage gravy, and wild seafood dishes. Come by for Happy Hour, Sat & Sun 2pm-4pm Jun-Oct. Breakfast served all day. Restaurant hours Jun-Oct: 7am-4pm Mon-Fri, 7am-8pm Sat & Sun; Nov-May: 7am-2pm Mon-Sun.

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TASTE OF THE THECITY CITY TASTE OF THIRSTYBEAR ORGANIC BREWERY ThirstyBear Organic Brewery is San Francisco’s only organic brewery and a Certified Green business. This craft beer mecca offers ales, lagers, Belgian-inspired, cask-conditioned, and barrel-aged beers – all hand-crafted for you! Pair your beer with exceptional Spanish tapas, paella, artisan cheeses and charcuterie, which takes a contemporary approach to traditional Spanish cuisine. ThirstyBear uses organic ingredients and the freshest seasonal meats and produce sourced from local farmers. In addition to craft beer, ThirstyBear’s full bar offers artisanal cocktails and California and Spanish wines. ThirstyBear Organic, Small Batch Beers Are Available Fresh, Only On Draught, Only At ThirstyBear! 661 Howard Street, San Francisco 415.974.0905 ThirstyBear.com

TRATTORIA PINOCCHIO Trattoria Pinocchio is the ultimate taste of Italy and displays the Q (Quality) award from IACCW. It’s located on a bustling corner of North Beach’s famed Little Italy across from St. Francis of Assisi church. Chef Giovanni brings you the best of his native Sicily. Savor authentic cioppino, ossobucco, crab-lobster or Italian-sausage ravioli. The gnocchi, fettucine, lasagna, pizza and Italian specialty desserts are made in house fresh daily. The menu also offers veal, lamb, steak, vegetarian & brunch daily plus a superb wine list & signature cocktails. Dine al fresco on the heated sidewalk café, in the chic Venetian interior, or watch sports at the sleek marble bar, while listening to the beautiful, Italian serenades sung by Chef Giovanni, himself!. Open floor to ceiling windows offer perfect people watching. The cuisine & atmosphere create a favorite must-visit dining experience for both locals and tourists alike. o b s e t eo n F ncisco t tto i inocchio co

SOTTO MARE Tony Bennett says that Sotto Mare is one of his favorite places to dine in San Francisco. Located at 552 Green St., in the heart of North Beach, Sotto Mare provides an authentic Italian North Beach experience. We are proud to serve you the freshest fish and shellfish in town. Oysters and clams on the half shell, Boston style clam chowder, baccala, crab cioppino, Louis salads, seafood pastas and seafood risotto are just a few of the items we offer. We feature a selection of fresh fish daily. Both our restaurant and banquet room are available, seven days a week, for private parties. And, for the convenience of those who like to cook, we also sell our fresh fish retail. Open MondaySaturday 11:00 am -10:00 pm. een t

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TASTE OF THE CITY BUENA VISTA As rich in history as the City itself, the Buena Vista Café has served warming libations and hearty meals along Fisherman’s Wharf since 1886. It’s famously known as home of the “original” Irish Coffee. Though “the BV” has attracted celebrities and sports stars, and has featured in films and television, it remains an authentic and welcoming favorite of locals and visitors who enjoy the opportunity for convivial conversation with new friends met over shared tables. Still serving bountiful meals - all-day breakfasts, as well as lunch and dinner, and of course, its famous Irish Coffee. Mon-Fri: 9am- 2am | Sat- Sun: 8am- 2am A1l-day breakfast and full bar..

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NEW DELHI RESTAURANT Take a spicy culinary adventure exploring our newest monthly menu series featuring, “Curries Chutneys & Cocktails” created by chef/owner Ranjan Dey star of documentary show “My India”. Voted the Best Indian Restaurant and decorated like a Maharajah’s private banquet room this regal restaurant serves up cuisine of northern India and recipes culled from royal Indian menus dating back 400 years using the freshest local ingredients. Located within walking distance of major downtown hotels, New Delhi Bar has been the favorite hot spot for many working downtown for 25 years. Well known for “The Double-Happiness Happy Hour” from 5:30pm to 7:30pm & 10pm to midnight, it is the place to drink & frolic. L (M-Sat) D(nightly) Bar(nightly until 2am). 160 Ellis St. 415.397.8470 www.NewDelhiRestaurant.com

CLIFF HOUSE Since 1863 the Cliff House has been famous for fine food, excellent service, and unparalleled ocean views. For your dining pleasure we offer the casual Bistro and the elegant Sutro’s at the Cliff House. Sutro’s offers stunning panoramic ocean views with floor-to-ceiling windows that soar two stories high in the open dining room. Sutro’s menu focuses on organic produce, fresh seafood, and local ingredients. The Bistro features classic San Francisco fare for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Warm fresh popovers and our award-winning clam chowder are local favorites. The Sunday Champagne Brunch Buffet in the Terrace Room is a quintessential San Francisco experience with freeflowing champagne and a wide selection of seasonal fresh brunch items.

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THE GUIDE

Attractions + Tours Eyes Out for Hearts

Attractions & Sights ALCATRAZ CRUISES This is the only way to get to

“The Rock,” the famous former federal penitentiary that housed some of the nation’s most notorious criminals from 1934-1963. Now one of San Francisco’s most popular visitor attractions, ferries depart regularly for the island from Pier 33 starting at 8:45 am. The dynamic 45-minute cellhouse audio tour, offered in 11 languages, features the voices of former Alcatraz prison guards and inmates who recount escape attempts, prison riots and solitary confinement. The night tours include a narrated boat ride around the island. Tours sell out quickly, so be sure to make reservations in advance. www.alcatrazcruises.com. Pier 33, 415.981.7625. Map 1, D2 AQUARIUM OF THE BAY Visit San Francisco’s only

waterfront aquarium to get up close and personal with the bay’s amazing marine life. Walk through crystal-clear tunnels of water filled with more than 20,000 aquatic animals, including sevengill sharks, the bay’s largest predators. You can touch leopard sharks, rays and sea stars. Daily events include animal feedings and naturalist presentations. Don’t miss the permanent river otter exhibit, where you can watch otters playing, swimming and eating. www.aquariumofthebay.org. Pier 39, 415.623.5300. Map 1, C1 AT&T PARK Home of the San Francisco Giants,

AT&T Park boasts breathtaking city views and a classic design. The stadium features a nine-foot

There’s a lot more going CONSERVATORY OF FLOWERS The botall statue of America’s greatest living on this month. tanical wonderland in Golden Gate Park is ballplayer, Willie Mays, at the entrance, Visit us online: the oldest wood and glass conservatory in home runs that splash into McCovey wheretraveler.com North America. The striking white exterior Cove, an 80-foot Coca-Cola bottle with is as eye-catching as the inside, which housplayground slides, a miniature AT&T es nearly 2,000 plant species in five galleries. Park for kids and diverse dining options Closed M. www.conservatoryofflowers.org. 100 within the stadium. You can also take tours of the JFK Dr., Golden Gate Park, 415.831.2090. Map 2, F5 ballpark that allow fans to explore areas normally closed to the public. www.sfgiants.com/tours. 24 CRISSY FIELD A nationally protected former U.S. Willie Mays Plaza, 415.972.2400. Map 1, F7 Army airfield, this strikingly scenic waterfront recreBAKER BEACH This mile-long beach lies at the ation area is now a favorite among active locals and base of the rugged cliffs west of the Golden Gate. visitors. A wide (stroller and wheelchair-friendly) No swimming here, but bring your camera for trail between Marina Green and Fort Point is pergreat views of the Golden Gate Bridge, the Marin fect for an easy walk, jog or bike ride. Offering unHeadlands and Lands End. www.parkconservancy. paralleled views of the Golden Gate Bridge in one org. 415.561.4323. Map 2, D2 direction and the city in the other, the shoreline is home to sandy beaches, picnic tables, tidal marsh COIT TOWER Upon her death in 1929, socialite and overlooks and a nationally renowned windsurfing art patron Lillie Hitchcock Coit bequeathed funds site, as well as cafes, bookstores and an environfor the “beautification of the city.” Her heirs used mental education center. www.parksconservancy. the money to build Coit Tower on Telegraph Hill. org. 415.561.7690. Map 2, E2-G2 Completed in 1933, the fluted column provides DOLORES PARK This generous square of grass on bird’s-eye views from an observation deck near the Mission District’s west side is a great place to the top. Local artists commissioned by the Works soak up some sun on most days and an even better Progress Administration (a New Deal agency place to get a glimpse of real San Francisco culture. employing millions of unskilled workers to carry out Kids play on the monster playground, dogs romp public works projects) painted the murals inside in together and adults in couples and groups lounge 1934. Admission to the ground-floor gift shop and on the grass with picnics. Rallies and organized murals is free. Open daily 10 am-6:30 pm. Guided community events are not uncommon sights. 18th mural tours 11 am Sa. 1 Telegraph Hill Blvd., and Dolores streets, 415.554.9521. Map 2, H6 415.249.0995. Map 1, D3

THERE WAS ONCE A FREERANGE ZOO in 1,017-acre Golden Gate Park home to elk, bears, goats and bison. Today, only bison remain. 50 W H E R E S A N F R A N C I S CO I F E B R UA R Y 20 17

©IRJA ELISA PHOTOGRAPHY

Chances are you’ve noticed at least one of the colorful heart sculptures on display around town. These five-foot tall sculptures, each created by a different artist, have adorned the city’s plazas, parks, businesses and street corners since 2004, when the Hearts in San Francisco art project began. This month, 32 new sculpture designs—including large hearts, table top hearts and mini mosaic hearts—will be auctioned off to benefit the San Francisco General Hospital. While there’s no official list of the heart locations around town, many are easy to find, including Tony Bennett’s design entitled “America’s Greatest City By the Bay,” permanently installed on the corner of Powell and Stockton streets as well as table top hearts at Macy’s Union Square. sfghf.org


THE GUIDE

FERRY BUILDING MARKETPLACE The historic, ren-

ovated ferry terminal at the foot of Market Street is now a world-class food market with more than 40 shops and restaurants featuring some of the area’s most prized artisanal treats: rich Cowgirl Creamery cheese, buttery Miette Patisserie madeleines and Recchiuti chocolates redolent of lavender and ginger. It is also the spot for one of the nation’s best and biggest farmers markets on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday mornings, featuring colorful displays of local produce, meat, cheese, flowers, cooking demos, food trucks and more. www.ferrybuildingmarketplace.com. 415.983.8030. Map 1, F4 FISHERMAN’S WHARF You’ll find crab stands along

the sidewalks, seafood restaurants and a bevy of souvenir shops in the historic heart of the city’s fishing industry. Several bay charter boats depart from the piers. Nearby is the bustling food and shopping center Ghirardelli Square, scenic Aquatic Park and historic Hyde Street Pier. www.visitfishermanswharf.com. 415.673.3530. Map 1, B1 FORT POINT This powerful fort guarded the Gold-

en Gate Bridge entrance for almost half a century until its original cannons were removed. Visitors can explore its brick casemates, grand arches and spiral stairs and even participate in a cannon drill. www.nps.gov. Long Ave. and Marine Dr., Bldg. 999, 415.556.1693. Map 2, E1 GHIRARDELLI SQUARE The renovated former

chocolate factory site is now home to boutiques, restaurants and the original Ghirardelli Ice Cream and Chocolate Shop. Find gifts and souvenirs at Lola Toy Shop, Gigi + Rose, Jackson & Polk and Elizabeth W then sit down for a meal at McCormick & Kuleto’s, Lori’s Diner or The Pub. www.ghirardellisq.com. 900 North Point St., 415.775.5500. Map 1, A2 GOLDEN GATE BRIDGE One of the most iconic

landmarks in the world, let alone San Francisco, the magnificent international orange Golden Gate Bridge defines the city. The 4,200-foot suspension bridge was completed in 1937 after four years of construction to a rowdy, week-long celebration. Even today, Golden Gate Bridge’s two 746-foot-tall Art Deco towers stand as proud testaments to the ingenuity and grace of the structure’s design. A stroll down the east side offers stunning views of the city and boats in the bay—if you can withstand the wind. A drive across the Golden Gate Bridge leads directly to a breathtaking vantage point in Marin County. www.goldengatebridge.org. Lincoln Boulevard, near Doyle Drive and Fort Point, Presidio, 415.921.5858. GOLDEN GATE PARK Bigger than New York’s

Central Park and encompassing over 75,000 trees, this horticulturally diverse urban oasis is home to countless attractions, including the de Young Museum; California Academy of Sciences; Japanese Tea Garden; Botanical Gardens; Stow Lake; Conservatory of Flowers; Garden of Shakespeare’s Flowers; two historic windmills; a bison paddock; and a rose garden. It’s also the city’s recreational headquarters, featuring polo, baseball and soccer fields; a nine-hole golf course; an 18-hole disc golf course; tennis, handball and basketball courts; an archery field; horseshoe pits; lawn bowling; fly-fishing; a running track; and more. Come here and join the city’s runners, cyclists, hikers, skaters, yogis, picnickers and swing dancers. www.parks. sfgov.org. Pick up a park map at McLaren Lodge at the east park entrance at Stanyan St. and JFK Dr., 415.831.2700. Map 2, A5-F5 52 W H E R E S A N F R A N C I S CO I F E B R UA R Y 20 17

TEL: (415) 440 8687

www.citysightseeing.us 1331 Columbus Ave, San Francisco


AT T R A C T I O N S + T O U R S

GRACE CATHEDRAL A famous San Francisco land-

mark, this cathedral inspired by the architecture of Paris’ Notre Dame serves as a diverse gathering place for worship, celebration and conversation. It is known for its striking architecture, stained glass, De Rosen mosaics and replica of Ghiberti’s “Gates of Paradise.” It’s also home to an Interfaith AIDS Chapel, well-attended free community yoga classes on the labyrinth and three choirs, including one of the last Episcopal men and boys cathedral choirs. Guided tours available. www.gracecathedral.org. 1100 California St., 415.749.6300. Map 1, B5 JAPANESE TEA GARDEN Take a slow stroll among

bonsai trees and koi fish in the oldest public Japanese garden in the United States. Originally built as the Japanese Village for the 1894 California Midwinter International Exposition, the Japanese Tea Garden boasts traditional monuments, bowed bridges, native Japanese plants and trees, serene ponds and some of the best photo opps in the city. Conclude your visit with a cup of tea or snack at the teahouse. www.japaneseteagardensf.com. 75 Hagiwara Tea Garden Dr., Golden Gate Park, 415.752.1171. Map 2, E5 LANDS END Known for its shipwrecks and land-

slides, this is San Francisco’s wildest and rockiest coast, located on the edge of the continent. The headlands connect popular landmarks the Cliff House and the Palace of the Legion of Honor. The crown jewel is the jaw-droppingly scenic (and dogfriendly and partially wheelchair accessible) Coastal

Trail, with postcard views of the Pacific coast and Golden Gate Bridge framed by windswept cypresses. Start the 3.5-mile out-and-back hike with an introduction to the area’s history and wildlife at the beautiful Lands End Lookout visitor center, complete with a gift shop, cafe and restrooms. Also located here are the historic Sutro Baths and a memorial to a WWII cruiser that sustained 45 hits and 25 fires during the Battle of Guadalcanal. www.parksconservancy.org. 680 Point Lobos Ave., 415.561.4700. Map 2, B2 LOMBARD STREET Eight hairpin switchbacks and

the downward pitch of the so-called “crookedest street in the world” have made this block a must-drive for visitors. The quarter-mile downhill stretch is lined with gorgeous gardens and barriers to ensure that drivers maintain a speed of five miles per hour. Those who simply walk to the top of the hill are rewarded with sweeping views of Russian Hill and Coit Tower. Lombard and Hyde streets. Map 1, B3 MADAME TUSSAUDS SAN FRANCISCOAt the Fish-

erman’s Wharf location of this London-based chain of wax museums, about one third of the figures depict Bay Area locals, including a barefoot, crosslegged Mark Zuckerberg. It also features scenes from “Bullitt” and “Dirty Harry” and sculptures of George Clooney, Rihanna and Barack Obama. Each figure takes about four months to make. www. madametussauds.com/sanfrancisco. 145 Jefferson St., 866.223.4240. Map 1, C2

MARINA GREEN The Marina Green is a beautiful

74-acre expanse of grass between Fort Mason and the Presidio, surrounded by the historic mansions of the Marina neighborhood. Running along the San Francisco Bay, it provides good views of the Golden Gate Bridge, Angel Island, Alcatraz Island, downtown and parts of Marin County. The adjacent marina is home to the St. Francis Yacht Club and the Golden Gate Yacht Club. Map 2, H2 MISSION DOLORES Completed in 1791, Mission

Dolores is the oldest intact building in San Francisco, the city’s first church and the sixth of 21 missions built along the El Camino Real from Mexico to Sonoma. Visit to learn about the mission’s unique historic, religious and architectural significance and enjoy its tranquil garden. www.missiondolores.org. 3321 16th St., 415.621.8203. Map 2, H6 NATIONAL AIDS MEMORIAL GROVE Deep within

Golden Gate Park, the National Aids Memorial Grove pays quiet tribute to the millions of people who lost their lives to AIDS. The first memorial of its kind in the United States, the Grove stands as a constant reminder of how this disease devastated the San Francisco community and why the struggle against AIDS must continue today. www.aidsmemorial.com. Golden Gate Park, Nancy Pelosi Dr. & Bowling Green Dr., 415.765.0498. Map 2, F5 OCEAN BEACH The widest and longest expanse of

sand on San Francisco’s shores, this beach extending from the Cliff House to Fort Funston along the Pacific Ocean is a destination for seaside drives,

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THE GUIDE

jogs, sunset walks and bonfires. Often windy and foggy, the notorious currents attract serious surfers who brave the frigid waters. www.parksconservancy.org. Map 2, A5 PAINTED LADIES This row of seven perfectly

pastel, ornate Victorian homes from the 1890s (made famous by the opening credits of the sitcom “Full House”) lines the eastern side of Alamo Square park. Victorian and Edwardian-style houses are among San Francisco’s most recognizable architectural features. From the top of the park, you’ll be treated to a view of the Painted Ladies in the foreground of downtown San Francisco that’s popular with photographers. This little stretch of homes is often also called Postcard Row. 710-720 Steiner St. Map 2, H5

noteworthy of which is the Heritage Gallery, which features multi-media displays on the area’s history, much of which has been discovered by local archeologists who staff an active research center for Presidio artifacts. The building is also home to Arguello, a new Mexican restaurant from acclaimed chef Traci Des Jardins. Inside are original pendants and wall sconces as well as a bar made from the reclaimed wood of a demolished Presidio building. Adjacent to the restaurant is the latest sculpture from nature artist Andy Goldsworthy, which incorporates local eucalyptus trees. www.presidio.gov. 50 Moraga Ave., 415.561.4440. Map 2, F2

PALACE OF FINE ARTS Originally designed for

the 1915 Panama Pacific International Exposition, this domed rotunda is all that remains from eight identical structures built to show the world that San Francisco had risen from the ashes after the devastating 1906 earthquake. The world’s fair honored the completion of the Panama Canal, and the construction of the Palace of Fine Arts turned the dilapidated Marina District into an exhibit of architectural beauty. Featuring a lagoon with swans, today this is a popular spot to stroll and take photos. www.palaceoffinearts.org. 3301 Lyon St., 415.567.6642. Map 2, G2

PRECITA EYES MURAL ARTS & VISITORS CENTER

Precita Eyes is the starting point for tours encompassing more than 80 murals in an eight-block walk in the Mission District. The center is a multipurpose, community-based arts organization that has played an integral role in the city’s cultural heritage and arts education. www.precitaeyes.org. 2981 24th St., 415.285.2287. Map 2, J7 THE PRESIDIO A patchwork of eucalyptus groves,

freshwater creeks, wildflower-splashed sand dunes and coastal prairie covers the Presidio, a historic former military post and modern-day national park in the northwest corner of the city. Exploring the 1,491-acre playground starts with 24 miles of trails and eight scenic overlooks with postcard-worthy views of the Golden Gate Bridge and San Francisco Bay. Three installations by nature artist Andy Goldsworthy grace the park, inspired by 300 acres of pine, cypress and eucalyptus trees planted there in the late 1800s. The Presidio also draws outdoor enthusiasts with gems such as Baker Beach, Presidio Golf Course and Rob Hill Campground. Perched atop the park’s highest point, the latter is San Francisco’s only overnight campsite. www. presidio.gov. Accessed via Washington Blvd., 15th Ave., 25th Ave., Arguello Blvd., Presidio Ave. and Chestnut St. Map 2, E2 PRESIDIO OFFICERS’ CLUBSan Francisco’s old-

est building (Spanish colonists built its adobe walls in 1776) and the crown jewel of the Presidio reopened fall 2014 after a $30 million renovation. The 38,895-square foot cultural destination is home to permanent and rotating exhibits, the most 54 W H E R E S A N F R A N C I S CO I F E B R UA R Y 20 17

internationally recognized urban oasis and selfdescribed outdoor classroom includes 55 acres of gardens displaying more than 8,000 different kinds of plants, plus a library, bookstore, family activities and guided walks. The Bay Area’s mild temperatures, wet winters and dry summers, coupled with San Francisco’s famous coastal fog, provide this garden with a rare and advantageous range of climatic conditions that allow it to grow and conserve plants from all over the world. www.sfbotanicalgarden.org. 1119 9th Ave., 415.661.1316. Map 2, D5

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THE SAN FRANCISCO DUNGEONThis theatrical ex-

perience retells the city’s dark and sordid Barbary Coast and Gold Rush era history through a cast of actors and special effects and a drop ride called Escape Alcatraz. This is the first such attraction in the United States, although seven European cities already have their own. sanfrancisco.thedungeons. com/en/san-francisco/home/. 145 Jefferson St., 415.563.8891. Map 1, C2 SAN FRANCISCO MARITIME NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK The historic park offers opportunities to

tour several historic ships, including the meticulously restored square-rigger “Balclutha” (open

daily 9:30 am-6 pm; $5 adults, children under 16 free). The visitors center in the nearby Argonaut Hotel (499 Jefferson St.) features interactive exhibits. Join the free pirate party called Chantey Sing at 8 pm on the first Saturday of each month. www.nps. gov/safr. Hyde St. Pier, 415.447.5000. Map 1, B2 SEA LION CENTER The sea lions that hang out at

the docks by Pier 39 have become a world-famous tourist attraction, getting millions of visitors each year. Now sightseers have the chance to not only see (and hear and smell) the 650 giant mammals, which started appearing at the pier out of the blue about 25 years ago, but also learn about

the creatures at the Sea Lion Center, operated by the nearby conservation-focused Aquarium by the Bay. Located above the dock and staffed by naturalists who give free presentations, this educational hub features a classroom and an interactive exhibit space with a sea lion skeleton, a great white shark replica and informative films. www.sealioncenter.org. Embarcadero at Beach St., 415.262.4734. Map 1, C1 SS JEREMIAH O’BRIEN Of the 2,710 Liberty ships

built during World War II, this is the only unaltered, historically accurate Liberty ship remaining. After supporting the D-Day invasions of 1944, the ship is now an interactive museum moored at Pier 45. You can explore just about every deck and room, from the cargo bay to the captain’s quarters and engine room. This 441-foot ship’s interiors and sounds were also integral to James Cameron’s capture of three Academy Awards for his movie “Titanic.” Guided tours are available for groups of 10 or more; self-guided tours are offered to smaller groups. www.ssjeremiahobrien.org. Pier 45, 415.544.0100. Map 1, B1 STOW LAKE One of the gems of Golden Gate

Park, this serene, man-made lake has provided an escape from city living since 1893. Rent a rowboat, pedal boat or electric boat and gently cruise under the many bridges and visit the waterfall. This is a scenic and relaxing retreat for couples and families alike. www.stowlakeboathouse.com. 50 Stow Lake Dr., 415.386.2531. Map 2, D5 YERBA BUENA GARDENS The large complex next

to Moscone Center has much to offer in the way of theater, restaurants, public art and formal gardens. Facilities include an ice rink, a 12-lane bowling alley and a historic carousel. Nearby museums include the Contemporary Jewish Museum, SFMOMA, the Museum of the African Diaspora, the Cartoon Art Museum and the Children’s Creativity Museum, an interactive art and technology center. The Yerba Buena Center for the Arts offers visual, performing and film arts, plus educational programs. The area also hosts the annual Yerba Buena Gardens Festival, offering free outdoor multicultural performances throughout the summer. www.yerbabuenagardens.com. 750 Howard St., 415.978.2787. Map 1, D6 THE SAN FRANCISCO ZOO A vast array of wildlife

awaits at this facility near the far edge of Ocean Beach. The attractions include a children’s petting zoo and a lemur forest. www.sfzoo.org. Sloat Blvd. at Great Hwy., 415.753.7080. Map 2, B9

Bay Cruises ADVENTURE CAT SAILING CHARTERS Take in

While in the Bay Area, don’t miss Marin County’s Sunny Side of the Golden Gate Bridge...

the sights of the San Francisco Bay while cruising aboard a 55-foot catamaran with an enclosed cabin. Excursions include the Bay Sail, a 1.5-hour cruise that glides under the Golden Gate Bridge and past Alcatraz, and the romantic Sunset Sail, which includes hors d’oeuvres and two beverages. Reservations required. March-November. www.adventurecat.com. Pier 39 at J Dock, 800.498.4228. Map 1, C2 RED AND WHITE FLEET Founded in 1892, this

historic fleet is legendary for its breathtaking San Francisco cruises. Sail under the Golden Gate Bridge and around Alcatraz aboard the one-hour Golden Gate Bay Cruise, narrated in 16 languages with up to 13 sailings daily. Enjoy gorgeous sunsets, twilight views, an appetizer buffet, complimentary beverages and live music aboard the relaxed w w w.wh e re t rave le r. com 55


THE GUIDE

Premium Outlet Loop Premium Outlet Shuttle

2-hour California Sunset Cruise (check the schedule online for seasonal times). The 90-minute Bridge 2 Bridge Cruise highlights San Francisco’s history, architecture and Native American culture on a sailing route past city icons from the Bay Bridge to the Golden Gate Bridge. www.redandwhite.com. All tours depart from Pier 43 1/2, Fisherman’s Wharf, 415.673.2900. Map 1, C2

Bike Rentals BLAZING SADDLES Bike the bridge with this

professional and accessible biking adventure company, offering eight San Francisco locations at Fisherman’s Wharf and a fun, family friendly way to combine sightseeing and fresh air. www.blazingsaddles.com. 2715 Hyde St., 415.202.8888. Map 1, C1

Discount Tickets CITYPASS Save 46% at the Bay Area’s major attrac-

tions. Valid for nine days from first use, each prepaid ticket booklet includes a week-long unlimited San Francisco Muni and cable car passport and a Blue & Gold Fleet bay cruise, as well as admission to California Academy of Sciences, Aquarium of the Bay and either the Exploratorium or the de Young Museum and Legion of Honor. $94 adults, $69 children ages 5-11. www.citypass.com.

Private Transportation TIDELINE WATER TAXI Tideline Marine Group’s

water-taxi service is an on-demand, all-weather, 24/7 alternative to driving or limited schedule ferry services. Luxurious small passenger boats pick up and transport passengers at authorized public and private locations throughout the Port of San Francisco, Marin County and even Napa Valley. www.tidelinesf.com. 415.339.0196.

Public Transportation 511 This is a free mobile and web source for up-to-

the-minute transportation information, covering the nine-county San Francisco Bay Area. Just dial 511 or check the website. www.511.org. BART Bay Area Rapid Transit trains serve the city of

San Francisco as well as San Francisco and Oakland International airports, Berkeley, Oakland and other Bay Area destinations. Trains run until midnight daily. www.bart.gov. 415.989.2278. BAY AREA BIKE SHARE These bikes are part of a

bike-sharing initiative that launched in 2013. The program entails 700 (and rising) bikes docked at 70 stations throughout the Bay Area, conveniently located near transit terminals. Simply check out one of the sturdy, adjustable bikes with your credit or debit card, ride to your destination and dock it at a nearby station. Although it targets residents with annual passes, visitors can also take advantage of the bikes with day passes or three-day passes that include unlimited rides of up to 30 minutes. www. bayareabikeshare.com. BUSES Golden Gate Transit provides regional

fixed-route bus service from San Francisco to Marin and Sonoma counties. AC Transit offers frequent transbay connections to and from San Francisco and the East Bay, as well as service within Oakland, Berkeley and other East Bay cities. Dial 511 and request either Golden Gate Transit or AC Transit. www.511.org.

56 W H E R E S A N F R A N C I S CO I F E B R UA R Y 20 17

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AT T RA C T IO NS + T O U R S

CABLE CARS These moving National Historic

Landmarks run on three lines 6 am-12:30 am daily: Powell-Hyde (line 60), Powell-Mason (line 59) and California Street (line 61). The Powell-Mason and Powell-Hyde lines run between Union Square and Fisherman’s Wharf; the California car runs between Market Street and Van Ness Ave. $6; Muni Passports and Clipper Cards accepted. www.sfmuni. com. 415.673.6864. CALTRAIN Offering commuter rail service along

the San Francisco Peninsula, through the South Bay to San Jose and Gilroy. 800.660.4287. www. caltrain.com. CLIPPER CARD Available for use on Muni, BART,

CalTrain and more, this is an all-in-one transit card that keeps track of any passes, discount tickets, ride books and cash value loaded onto it. www. clippercard.com. FERRIES The Golden Gate Ferry fleet offers daily

ferries to two Marin County destinations: Sausalito and Larkspur. The Blue and Gold Fleet offers ferry service to Sausalito, Tiburon, Angel Island, Vallejo and Alameda/Oakland. The East Bay Ferry provides ferries between San Francisco, Alameda and Oakland (with Angel Island added May through October). The Alameda Harbor Bay Ferry offers service strictly between San Francisco and Alameda at rush hours. Bay Link Ferry offers ferries between Vallejo, the Ferry Building and Fisherman’s Wharf. www.watertransit.org. GOLDEN GATE PARK SHUTTLE Now it’s easier

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than ever to explore the many different attractions located throughout the 1,017 acres that make up Golden Gate Park. Drive to the free parking at Ocean Beach to catch the shuttle, which runs every 15 to 20 minutes and stops at the Conservatory of Flowers, de Young Museum, California Academy of Sciences, National AIDS Memorial Grove, Stow Lake and more. https://goldengatepark.com/. Point Lobos Ave., Great Hwy., Map 2, B5 MUNI Citywide bus and light-rail service includes

the restored, brightly colored F-line streetcars that run from the Castro District to Pier 39 and back. Light-rail trains run above ground on tracks and also below ground to make stops at various destinations on Market Street. Muni Passports, good for unlimited rides for one, three or seven consecutive days, are available at the Visitor Information Center at the BART station on Powell and Market streets. www.sfmuni.com. 415.673.6864.

Sports HOUSE OF AIR Jump to your heart’s content at

this expansive indoor trampoline park, located in a historic airplane hangar in the Presidio. Not only does it afford some of the best views of the city and the bay, but the park includes large trampoline decks with trampoline walls (dodgeball, anyone?) and a children’s bounce house for ages 6 and under. www.houseofairsf.com. 926 Mason St., in the Presidio, 415.345.9675. Map 2, F2

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SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS The NFL team has moved

to Santa Clara to play at the new state-of-the-art Levi’s Stadium, nearly two million square feet of cutting-edge technology, sustainable design, gourmet concessions and art exhibits that redefine the fan experience. www.sf49ers.com. 4900 Marie P. DeBartolo Way, Santa Clara, 415.464.9377.

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THE GUIDE

SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS One of the longest-

established professional baseball teams, the 2010 and 2012 MLB World Series champions attract 3 million fans annually. Watch star players Matt Cain, Tim Lincecum and Buster Posey play ball at the beautiful waterfront 43,000-seat AT&T Park, which frequently sells out. www.sfgiants.com. 24 Willie Mays Plaza, 415.972.2000. Map 1, F7

FEB

39

Tours AT&T PARK TOUR Home of the San Francisco Gi-

24

WEEKS OF CELEBRATION

ants, AT&T Park offers a grand slam attraction for its fans when the dugout is empty. Walk through the places only the players and coaches go, including the Giants’ dugout, the visitors’ clubhouse and the field. www.attpark.com. 24 Willie Mays Plaza, 415.972.2400. Map 1, F8

MOVIE NIGHT

FEBRUARY

AVITAL TOURS Visit some of the city’s best eateries

11–19

and bars and take in the sights along the way as your guide shares engaging historical anecdotes. Stops on the Mission District tour include Bi-Rite Creamery and Hog & Rocks, the city’s first ham and oyster bar. On the Union Square cocktail tour, you’ll take a jaunt through former speakeasy territory and find out why San Francisco is now considered one of the top cocktail destinations in the world. At each stop you’ll spend time with a chef, bartender or owner tasting, chatting and maybe even baking. www.avitaltours.com. 415.355.4044.

TULIPMANIA

BIG BUS TOURS Take a tour through San Francisco

aboard an open-top bus and learn about its rich history and culture, hopping on and off at any of the 20 stops located throughout the city. Choose between a 24 or 48-hour ticket and live tour guides or recorded commentary in 10 languages. www. bigbustours.com. 99 Jefferson St., 855.854.8687. CITY KAYAK Docked near AT&T Park, this company

offers all the gear you need for a day on the bay, regardless of your ability level. You can even paddle to McCovey Cove behind the park and try to catch a home-run ball. Guided tours available. www. citykayak.com. South Beach Harbor, Embarcadero at Townsend St., 415.357.1010. Map 1, G7

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vintage double-decker buses feature live guides. The downtown loop is hop-on, hop-off, and tickets are valid for 48 hours. www.city-sightseeing.us. 2800 Leavenworth St., 415.440.8687. Map 1, B2 EDIBLE EXCURSIONS Epicurean concierge Lisa

Before you travel,

Rogovin offers intimate culinary excursions in San Francisco, Berkeley and Oakland for foodies looking to get a behind-the-scenes taste of the Bay Area’s remarkable food culture with a local expert. www.edibleexcursions.net. 415.806.5970. ELECTRIC TOUR COMPANY  SEGWAY TOURS Sign

up for fully guided Segway tours of Fisherman’s Wharf and the waterfront, Golden Gate Park, Chinatown and Little Italy. Experienced Segway riders can try the Advanced Hills & Crookedest Street tour. Participants must be 12 years of age or older and weigh 100-250 pounds. www.electrictourcompany.com. 757 Beach St. Map 1, C1; Golden Gate Park office located behind the stage in Music Concourse near Japanese Tea Garden, 415.474.3130. Map 2, E5

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MISSION MURAL WALKS The Precita Eyes Mural

Arts & Visitors Center, a multipurpose, community-based arts organization that has played an integral role in the city’s cultural heritage and arts education, organizes a variety of artist-led cultural 58 W H E R E S A N F R A N C I S CO I F E B R UA R Y 20 17

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AT T R A C T I O N S + T O U R S

and historical walking tours. Explore more than 80 gorgeous murals and the stories behind them in an eight-block walk in the Mission District. www.precitaeyes.org. 2981 24th St., 415.285.2287. Map 2, J7 SAN FRANCISCO CITY GUIDES Volunteers from

the San Francisco Public Library lead dozens of free neighborhood tours. There’s a tour for just about every interest or passion, including Alfred Hitchcock’s San Francisco; various 1906 retrospectives about the earthquake and fires that leveled the city a century ago; and a Golden Gate Bridge walk, to name just a few. www.sfcityguides.org. 415.557.4266. Map 1, D6

SAN FRANCISCO HELICOPTER TOURS These

narrated tours offer bird’s-eye views of the city and popular attractions such as the Golden Gate Bridge, Alcatraz, Treasure Island and more. Tours range from 20-minute flights over the city to halfday excursions to wine country, as well as dinner flights and Sausalito lunch flights. Complimentary shuttles pick up passengers from Fisherman’s Wharf, Union Square and Nob Hill. Flights depart from the executive terminal at SFO and Sausalito. Reservations required. www.sfhelicopters.com. 800.400.2404.

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SEAPLANE ADVENTURES Get a bird’s-eye view

of the city and the bay on this flying tour, which takes passengers soaring above the Golden Gate Bridge, San Francisco skyline, Alcatraz and the Pacific coastline. Sunset Champagne flights are available. Daily departures on the hour from Sausalito, four miles north of the city. Reservations recommended. www.seaplane.com. 242 Redwood Hwy., Mill Valley, 415.332.4843.

Bay Area ANGEL ISLAND This small island just off the

Tiburon Peninsula offers hiking and biking trails, campsites, picnic facilities and spectacular views of the city. Bike rentals, open-air tram tours and concessions are offered daily. www.angelisland.org. Blue and Gold Fleet ferries depart from Pier 41, 415.773.1188; Angel Island-Tiburon Ferry departs from 21 Main St., Belvedere Tiburon, 415.435.2131. MARIN HEADLANDS Windswept ridges, protected

valleys and beaches offer opportunities for hiking, biking and picnics. Start at Marin Headlands Visitor Center and see an exhibit showcasing the history of the indigenous Miwok people. If you brought a canine friend, check out the dog-friendly Rodeo Beach for beautiful ocean views and a perfect picnic spot. Nestled at the end of Rodeo Beach is Fort Cronkhite, an old military fort now housing the Golden Gate Raptor Observatory, Marine Mammal Center and Headlands Center for the Arts. Perched on a nearby cliff, the still-active, 150-year-old Point Bonita Lighthouse is accessible via a hiking trail. www.nps.gov. 948 Fort Barry, Sausalito, 415.331.1540. MARINE MAMMAL CENTER This nonprofit organi-

Fisherman’s Wharf

757 Beach St. @ Hyde 417 Beach St. @ Taylor (Advanced Tour)

Wharf & Waterfront Tour Night Tour: Chinatown & Little Italy Tour • Advanced: Crooked Street & Hills Tour * • •

Golden Gate Park Behind stage, near entrance to Japanese Tea Garden

Golden Gate Park Tour • Advanced: Golden Gate Park Tour* •

*Previous experience required on Advanced Tours

ElectricTourCompany.com 415-474-3130

zation in the majestic Marin Headlands rescues and nurses back to health more than 600 distressed animals each year, including elephant seals, harbor seals and California sea lions. One of the largest hospitals of its kind to combine rehabilitation with a research lab, the center welcomes visitors, who can observe the animal care and work quarters. Exhibits and tours explore the interdependence between marine wildlife and humans. www. marinemammalcenter.org. 2000 Bunker Rd., Fort Cronkhite, 415.289.7325. MOUNT TAMALPAIS Known foremost as Mt. Tam,

Marin County’s highest mountain is ideal for hiking, cycling, horseback riding and even hang gliding. Views from the summit include the snow-capped Sierra Nevada mountain range, the Farallon Islands and San Francisco high-rises. www.parksconservancy.org. 415.561.3000. MUIR WOODS NATIONAL MONUMENT The world’s

most famous grove of virgin redwoods, this forest is full of trees that are 400-800 years old and grow to more than 250 feet high, as well as a plethora of other wildlife. Activities include a leisurely (wheelchair accessible) hike alongside a salmon-filled creek. A Muir Woods shuttle runs on weekends and holidays during peak season, with pickups in Sausalito and Shoreline Highway. www.nps.gov/ muwo. 1 Muir Woods Rd., Mill Valley, 415.388.2595. STINSON BEACH This popular beach is located on

scenic Highway 1, just north of San Francisco. The three-and-a-half mile stretch is ideal for swimming, surfing and sun bathing. A 51-acre park adjacent to the beach has more than 100 picnic tables and a snack bar. www.stinsonbeachonline.com.

ASK ABOUT PRIVATE AND GROUP TOURS w w w.wh e re t rave le r. com 59


THE GUIDE

PIER 27

ST

BR Y

ST

S

M

PIER 30

BR AN NA N

6

49 MILE SCENIC DRIVE

PIER 36

ST

HA RR IS ON

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Caltrain Depot

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VARA ST

280

h

SF Giants

N

49 MILE SCENIC DRIVE

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SH SO CL IPL M S AR EY T A ST ST

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BR AN NA N

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60 W H E R E S A N F R A N C I S CO I F E B R UA R Y 20 17

Children's Creativity Museum

ALAMEDA ST

C

ST NE OR TH ST W D HA 3R

80

101

15TH ST

D

Moscone Center

ST

ST

14TH ST

B

ST

ST

WOODWARD ST

CEN TRA L FWY

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San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

ST

ST

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14

ST NA 1 TI ST N E ST EM CL XS T 2N

ST SIE JES

T ER LB GI

10 TH

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Montbomery St.

NA 5 TI TH EN ST EM CL

7T H

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ST

ST

Crocker Galleria

Moscone Center West

14

ST

ST

D AR

W LA HO FA YE TT ES T

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5

ST

A M TO A N

ST

Centre

Powell St.

H 8T

14

ST

ST

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PARK

12

N ST HERMAN

F

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J

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9

IA BLVD OCTAV

ST HAIGHT

TH

101

ST

M San Francisco

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Civic Center

19

A Westfield

ST IET RR T HA S S ST S ST RU OSS N M TO NG LA

11 TH

OAK ST

Scenic Drive

1

F Justin Herman Plaza

38

ST BUSH

H 4T

N SO J VEN E ST

L

ST

T KE AR M

FRONT ST

5

ST LINDEN

PAGE ST ROSE ST

Y ST BATTER

ST TAYLOR

GROVE ST

ST HICKORY

HAYES VALLEY

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ST HAYES

IVY ST

A

JONES ST

City Hall

Hallidie Plaza

F

CENTER TER ST Asian Art MCALLIS Museum Civic LTON ST Center FU

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SF War Memorial & Performing Arts Center

BIRCH ST

10

ST WORTH LEAVEN

S VAN NES

N ST FRANKLI

ST GOUGH

ST LAGUNA

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5

EDDY ST

TURK ST

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Patricia's Green

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Glide Memorial

ELM ST

Margaret S Hayward Playground

8

LITTLE SAIGON

POLK ST

7

101

HYDE ST

ELLIS ST

Jefferson Square

38

TENDERLOIN

L ST OFARREL

St Mary's Cathedral

ST WILLOW

38

ST LARKIN

JAPANTOWN

Union Square

LANE MAIDEN

Union Square

ST SUTTER POST ST

O ER AD RC ST BA DAVIS M EE TH FRONT ST

BUSH ST

GEARY ST

Hospital

Embarcadero

PINE ST

E GRANT AV

PINE ST

Chinatown Dragon Gate

ST KEARNY

Grace Cathedral

ST OMERY MONTG

RNIA ST CALIFO

IA ST CALIFORN

49 MILE SCENIC DRIVE

Shopping Area

Ferry to: Oakland er ero Cent

Embarcad

CLAY ST

FINANCIAL DISTRICT

49 MILE SCENIC DRIVE

ENTO ST SACRAM

6

Information

Ferry Building

CIAL ST COMMER

JOICE ST ST POWELL

5

Bike Route

Interstate

R1 PIE

Walton Square

TON ST WASHING

UNNEL ON ST T STOCKT

CLAY ST

Train Station

Ferry to: Sausalito, Vallejo, Larkspur & Angel Island

E IFIC AV PACSydney G

Transamerica Pyramid

NOB HILL

49 MILE SCENIC DRIVE

WAY ST BROAD

30

N ST JACKSO

Lafayette Park

ST VALLEJO

CHINATOWN

19

TON ST WASHING

Cable Car

ME ST SANSO

AVE

AV E

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GRANT

ST POWELL

ST TAYLOR

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AVE

ST

ST WORTH LEAVEN

HYDE ST

ST LARKIN

POLK ST

S VAN NES

N ST FRANKLI

GOUGH

ST OCTAVIA

4

Polk Street Russian Hill

ST MASON

101

49 MILE SCENIC DRIVE

ICH ST GREENW ST FILBERT

RUSSIAN HILL

10

BART Stop

ST KEARNY

101

MUNI Metro

Ferry Line

ST KEARNY

UT ST CHESTN Lombard ST Street LOMBARD

COW HOLLOW 3

WATER ST

O ST FRANCISC

MUNI Bus

38

Museum Univ./College To get around San Francisco, public transportation is recommended. James R. Herman For information, call 511, or visit 511.org. Clipper Cards are all-in-one transit cards available for use on MUNI, BART, CalTrain and more, Cruise Ship F clippercard.com. Terminal ST T U ST TN CHES PFEIFFER Embarcadero ST LOMBARD 23 39 Pioneer Park ICH ST PIER 9 S a n F r a n c i s c o GREENW R1 COIT NORTH PIE T B a y 7 Exploratorium Tower 1 FILBERT S BEACH R PIE ST 5 1 FILBERT TELEGRAPH UNION ST R PIE CO Washington 39 HILL LU Square ST R9 GREEN M PIE

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F

ST

38

the Bay

ST POWELL

30

19

CO ST FRANCIS

JONES ST

ST KLIN FRAN

Ghirardelli Square

ST POINT NORTH

Ferry to: Alcatraz Island

Fisherman’s Wharf Aquarium of Pier 35

ST TAYLOR

Anchorage The Square Cannery BEACH

Aquatic Park

Pier 41

ST MASON

T HYDE S

Cable Car

Pier 39

THE EM BARCADERO N ST SO 39 ER FF JE

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Hyde Street Pier

F

PIER 33

Hyde St. Pier Historic Ships

E

ST

SS Jeremiah O’Brien Pier 45 USS Pampanito

D

Ferry to: Oakland

RK ET

1

2

C

Ferry to: Sausalito,Tiburon and Angel Island

.25mi .5km

Fort Mason

MAP 1 Downtown

B

PIE R3 1

A

10 G


JOICE ST

MAPS

MAP DETAIL Union Square A

B

Dollar Rent Alamo Rent a Car a Car

O’FARRELL ST

Johnny Foley’s Irish House

Hilton SF Union Square

N

Crate & Barrel H&M

Barney’s Ghirardelli

Ben Sherman Disney Armani Exchange

Forever 21

UE

Mezzanine

SI

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A

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10

N

ST

A

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IN

B

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ST

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Intercontinental San Francisco

ST

HO

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Blue Bottle Cafe Hampton Inn

T ES

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Moscone Center South

H

S

Moscone Center West

ST

ST

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Old Mint Building

ST A

M

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7

Moscone Center North

Jillian’s

H

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Mel’s Drive-In

4T

N

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ST

6

Yerba Buena Gardens

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The Pickwick Hotel

EN

Dottie’s True Blue Cafe

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Bloomingdale’s

5T

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Super Duper Burgers

Hotel Zetta The Cavalier

ST

AR M CVS Pharmacy

Yerba Buena Center For The Arts

ST

TURK ST

T KE

D

Nordstorm Rack Saks Off 5th Ave

5

Contemporary Jewish Museum

SF Marriott Marquis

Westfield San Francisco Centre

SF CityPass SF Visitor Information Center

Farmer Brown Hotel Metropolis

The Warfield

Hotel Zelos

Hallidie Plaza

Mikkeler Bar 7

GAP

Forever 21

EDDY ST

Levi’s Walgreens

Four Seasons Hotel

ST

JE

LN

Hotel Bijou

Bluestem Brasserie

Old Navy

ALDO

Sephora

6

8

John’s Grill Converse

Urban Outfitters Puccini & Pinetti

Kin Khao Parc 55

IE SS

3R

NA

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Enterprise Rent-A-Car

S

N VE

E

ST

Marshalls

AB

New Delhi

Crocker Galleria

SO

RB

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Union Square

YE

TAYLOR ST

5

Kuleto’s Bartlett Hall

National Car Rental

Powell St Cable Car

4

Union Square

Handlery Hotel CK Contemporary Lori’s King George Diner Hotel

Geary Theater Pinecrest Diner

Curran Theatre

Post The Alden Office Shop The Hound Clothiers

1

Park Galleria Park Hotel Taj Campton Hotel Banana Gaspar Brasserie Walgreens Place 2 Vidal Sassoon Republic DB Brooks Brothers Dolby Shoes Crocker Chadwick Galleria Apple John Berggruen Gallery Gallery Tiffany Store Cole Haan & Co Saks Fifth Wells Fargo Saks Fifth Coach North Face Willams-Sonoma Nike Zara Avenue Avenue Hespe Gallery Johnston Christian Dior Citibank Shreve & Co & Murphy Oliver Peoples Nine West Rimowa Asian Arts Sandra Lee Gallery Tory Burch 3 Gucci Gump’s Center 1 24 Meyerovich Gallery MIADEN LN Arthur Beren Hublot Hermès Ritz-Carlton Ghiradelli Club Chocolate Britex Fabrics Valentino G-Star Paul Dior Smith ST Bottega Veneta Hawthorn Bvlgari Chanel T E K John Varvatos Palace AR Hotel Hakkasan Swatch Rotunda Nespresso Cuyana M Neiman Marcus Swarovski Goorin Louis Vuitton Ted 49 Geary 4 Brothers Baker Art Galleries Steve Madden Gallery Walgreens Macy’s Local Edition Wendi Macy’s Men’s Store Norris Boudin Wells Fargo Cask Emporio Armani Bakery T

Academy of Cop Copine Victoria’s Art University Secret Gallery of Jewels Westin St Francis Ruby Skye Martin Lawrence Hotel G Galleries BCBG

GEARY ST

Clift Hotel

MONTGOMERY ST

3

Margaret O’Leary

Benefit Cosmetics

Topsy’s Fun House Rickhouse Cable Car Clothiers

a Prad rry e Burb f Graf Ilori Pink

POST ST

Donatello Hotel Post Hotel The Commonweath Club Blazing The Saddles European SF Art Bike Rentals Exchange Warwick Colibri Mexican Hotel Aveline Bistro Hotel Diva

Gitane

Calvin Klein Performance

G

KEARNY ST

JW Marriott Hotel Hertz Rent a Car

American Apparel Lululemon E&O Kitchen Jos. A. Bank and Bar

Cafe Claude

Hotel Triton

ette Bab ord ashf es B Wilk ture Cou

Bohemian The Club Olympic Club

SF Marriott Union Square

Starbucks

F

Orchard Garden Hotel

GRANT AVE

SUTTER ST

Hotel Rex

Orchard Hotel

E

Chinatown Cafe de Dragon Gate la Presse

STOCKTON ST

Lori’s The Diner Cartwright Hotel Golden Gate Hang Art Tap Room Sears Fine Food Akiko’s Chancellor Sushi Bar Hotel Inn at SF Playhouse The Union Square Farallon Morton’s Kensington Steakhouse Park Hotel

Hotel Beresford Marines’ Marines’ Memorial Memorial Theatre Hotel

2

Golden Gate Hotel

D

BUSH ST

The Cornell Hotel Grant De France Hotel

POWELL ST

MASON ST

Petite Auberge Metropolitan Club Academy of L’Ottavo Art University Ristorante

1

C

Children's Creativity Museum

8

9

ST

T

10 D

E

F

G

ST

w w w.wh e re t rave le r. com 61


THE GUIDE

MAP 2 San Francisco To: To:Sausalito Sausalito&& Wine WineCountry Country

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To To get get around around San San Francisco, Francisco, public public transportation transportation isis recommended. recommended. For For information, information, call call 511, 511, or or visit visit 511.org. 511.org. Clipper Clipper Cards Cards are are all-in-one all-in-one transit transit cards cards available available for for use use on on MUNI, MUNI, BART, BART, CalTrain CalTrain and and more, more, clippercard.com. clippercard.com.

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w w w.wh e re t rave le r. com 63


[WHERE INSIDE]

San Francisco Your Way

Families

It’s free to visit the Maritime Museum and wander down Hyde Street Pier on Fisherman’s Wharf (near Ghirardelli Square) and admire the historic ships, including the towering 1886 “Balclutha.” The views of the bay and Golden Gate Bridge are spectacular here. In SoMa, lush Yerba Buena Gardens is home to the Children’s Creativity Museum, an interactive, multi-media arts and technology museum that's designed to inspire little imaginations with animation and music studios. From downtown, you can catch the outbound Muni L-Taraval train and take it all the way to the 100-acre San Francisco Zoo out by the Pacific Ocean. In 2014, the zoo welcomed the baby red panda Tenzing, who lives in a specially designed treehouse. 64 W H E R E S A N F R A N C I S CO I F E B R UA R Y 20 17

History Buffs

GLBTQ Travelers

Nearly 80 years after the “Ellis Island of the West” shut down, the refurbished Angel Island Immigration Station on the small island just off the Tiburon peninsula now offers tours. Leading up to WWII, one million immigrants were detained on the island for months, sometimes years, trying to get into the United States. The San Francisco Maritime National Historical Park offers opportunities to tour 19th and 20th century schooners, ferryboats and tugs. HaasLilienthal House, an 1886 Queen Anne-style Victorian, is the only intact private home of the period open regularly as a museum, complete with authentic furniture and artifacts. The house has elaborate wooden gables, a circular corner tower and luxuriant ornamentation.

Learn fascinating facts about San Francisco and its transformation into one of the world’s most diverse cities on the Cruisin' the Castro Tour (founded in 1989) that explores one of the oldest and largest gay neighborhoods in the country. The GLBT History Museum celebrates 100 years of the San Francisco gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender community’s history. A display of Harvey Milk’s personal belongings honors the late San Francisco supervisor, who was the first openly gay politician elected in California. The Castro is a prime destination for revelry, where you’ll find a gay bar with thumping beats at any time of the day or night. One of the most popular places to see and be seen is The Lookout, a second story bar and restaurant with a wrap-around patio.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: COURTESY NPS; VISIT MARIN; CRUISIN' THE CASTRO TOURS; GLBT HISTORY MUSEUM; ©SCOTT RICHARDS; ©DOUGLAS KEISTER; ©JESSIE GREGER; CHILDREN'S CREATIVITY MUSEUM; NPS

UNIQUE TRAVEL RECOMMENDATIONS, FIT TO MATCH YOUR PERSONAL STYLE. FIND THE CITY CURATED FOR YOU AT WHERETRAVELER.COM/SAN-FRANCISCO.


Destination: All in.

Introducing California’s newest resort experience. Spend the night with us and discover more ways to play, with new luxury accommodations, world-class spa and pool, plus great dining, gaming and entertainment in the heart of Sonoma County wine country.

Book your room today.

288 Golf Course Drive West | Rohnert Park, CA P 707.588.7100 PLAY WITHIN YOUR LIMITS. IF YOU THINK YOU HAVE A GAMBLING PROBLEM, CALL 1-800-GAMBLER FOR HELP. ROHNERT PARK, CA. © 2017 GRATON RESORT & CASINO

ROHNERT PARK @ 101 EXIT 484


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Where San Francisco February 2017  

The most romantic things to do in the city

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