Page 1

GUIDE TO BOSTON

HEAR

TERENCE RYAN'S SOULFUL BOSTON

EAT

GLOBAL MASTERCHEF DANIEL BOULUD SPECIAL INSERT

DECEMBER 2017

wheretraveler.com

EXPLORE

BOSTON'S GROOVIEST ART GALLERIES


GIF T E XC EL L E N T LY. M A K E R’ S M A R K D I S T I L L E RY, LO R E T T O , K Y

SIP DEL IC IO USLY.

FROM THE HOME OF

WE MAKE OUR BOURBON CAREFULLY. PLEASE ENJOY IT THAT WAY. Maker’s 46® Bourbon Whisky, 47% Alc./Vol. ©2017 Maker’s Mark Distillery, Inc. Loretto, KY

makers46.com


Where Boston

04 06 08 64

ASK THE EXPERT EDITOR’S NOTE PUBLISHER’S PICK THE FIX

10 TOP 5

Amazing ways to connect with the city this month.

12 CALENDAR

Save the date and check out these must-do events.

14 INSIDER

The best of what’s trending in drinks and food.

18 IN THE ‘HOOD

Back Bay: Where to shop, eat, drink and have fun.

20 DAN LE MAN

Masterchef Daniel Boulud joins us for a bite and a chat.

22 GROOVY GALLERIES Where to find Boston’s fabulous hidden art spaces.

24 STEEL & SOUL

The tough but tender Boston heart of singer Terence Ryan.

27 EAT. DRINK.

Our special guide to Boston’s dining scene from hot openings to supercool bar food.

44 Art

54 Food

46 Sights

58 Shop

50 Explore 61 Be Well 52 Scene

62 Maps

ON THE COVER Boston singer Terence Ryan photographed by Brian Babineau.

COURTESY COPLEY SOCIETY OF ART

December


THE DAY-DATE 40 The international symbol of performance and success, reinterpreted with a modernized design and a new-generation mechanical movement. It doesn’t just tell time. It tells history.

OYSTER PERPETUAL DAY-DATE 40

rolex

oyster perpetual and day-date are ÂŽ trademarks.


Y O U R T R AV E L I N G C O M P A N I O N S I N C E 19 3 6 ®

Bill Taylor REGIONAL VICE PRESIDENT & GENERAL MANAGER, FOUR SEASONS HOTEL BOSTON

“For a top-tier city with a global reputation Boston is surprisingly intimate.”

BOSTON

REGIONAL VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Kristen Standish EDITOR Mike Hodgkinson A DV ERTISING & CIRCUL ATION ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Janelle Driscoll MARKETING & CIRCULATION MANAGER Sarah Dale EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT James Wegman EDITORI A L & DE SIGN ART DIRECTOR Chris Cardelli EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Alex Oliveira

MORRIS VISITOR PUBLICATIONS

Q: How does your job connect you to the city?

A: I love meeting visitors from out of town. The most important thing for me is that Four Seasons Boston feels like home for every person that walks in. Our restaurant and bar, The Bristol, has a reputation as being “Boston’s living room.” Q: What’s the best “secret thing” about Boston?

A: Proximity. We have so much at our fingertips in Boston, much more so than anywhere else I’ve lived or traveled. Q: Which cultural highlights do you most enjoy?

A: I could get lost in the Museum of Fine Arts for days, but I really find the Freedom Trail to be a uniquely special cultural attraction. I’ve learned so much about American history through the Freedom Trail. Q: What’s the best Boston experience for a first-time visitor?

A: Go to a game. Boston is the ultimate sports town. As an Englishman I may not fully understand everything there is to know about American 4

WHE RE I D E C E M B E R 2017

sports, but I absolutely appreciate the passion this city has for our sports teams. Q: What’s the most surprising thing about Boston?

A: For a top-tier city with a global reputation for so many things, Boston is surprisingly intimate, which is something I find to be very special. Q: What’s your favorite song for walking on the Common?

A: This is a tough one. I’m going to stick with my English roots and go with something by Sade.

M V P | E X ECUTI V E PRESIDENT Donna W. Kessler CHIEF STRATEGY OFFICER Reab Berry CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER Dennis Kelly VICE PRESIDENT OF AUDIENCE Kurt Caywood VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS Angela E. Allen VP, INTERNAL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT Karen Rodriguez DIRECTOR OF CIRCULATION Scott Ferguson NATIONAL MARKETING MANAGER Melissa Blanco M V P | CRE ATI V E CHIEF CREATIVE OFFICER Haines Wilkerson SENIOR EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Margaret Martin DESIGN DIRECTOR Jane Frey DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY Isaac Arjonilla CREATIVE COORDINATOR Beverly Mandelblatt M V P | N ATION A L SA LE S VICE PRESIDENT, INTEGRATED/DIGITAL SALES Rebekah Valberg VICE PRESIDENT, NATIONAL MARKETING Adeline Tafuri Jurecka SENIOR DIRECTOR OF DIGITAL OPERATIONS Bridget Duffie DIRECTOR OF NATIONAL SALES Liza Meneades MANAGER, INTEGRATED NATIONAL SALES David Gately M V P | PUBLICATION SERV ICE S PUBLICATION SERVICES DIRECTOR Kris Miller PUBLICATION SERVICES MANAGER Mickey Kibler DIGITAL IMAGING Erik Lewis M V P | M A NUFAC TURING & TECHNOLOGY DIRECTOR OF MANUFACTURING Donald Horton TECHNICAL OPERATIONS MANAGER Tony Thorne-Booth E-mails for all of the above except contributors: firstname.lastname@morris.com

Q: What’s your favorite neighborhood restaurant?

A: My go-to’s vary, but in Cambridge I think Waypoint and Alden & Harlow are always great.

M V P | BOSTON

45 Newbury St., Ste. 506, Boston, Mass., 02116 617.476.2646 MORRIS COMMUNICATIONS

BEST TIP I absolutely love the Boston Public Garden at any time of year—take advantage of such an oasis in our front yard.

CHAIRMAN William S. Morris III PRESIDENT & CEO William S. Morris IV CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER Derek J. May

Where® magazine is produced by Morris Visitor Publications (MVP), a division of Morris Communications Co., LLC. 725 Broad St., Augusta, GA 30901, morrismedianetwork.com. Where magazine and the logo are registered trademarks of Morris Visitor Publications. Where makes every effort to ensure the accuracy of the information it publishes, but cannot be held responsible for any consequences arising from errors or omissions. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part strictly prohibited.


December 2017

A

#SeizeTheStay

Great photo shoot with singer-songwriter Terence Ryan @hobboston @lvsnd #whereboston #wheretraveler #houseofblues #foundationroom wheretraveler.com/ seizethestay

mazing food, beautiful art and gorgeous, soul-stirring music are key ingredients for any memorable holiday season—and this year, Boston has delivered generously in all departments. The city’s collection of restaurants, galleries and live venues continues to astound visitors and locals alike, and in this issue we’ve doubled down on some of the highlights. Local singer-songwriter Terence Ryan vaulted into pole position for the cover after we heard his set at the House of Blues Foundation Room, and we’re delighted to champion his journey from the cultured fringes of rock into the mainstream. His songs are tough, but tender, and his ear for an ecstatic chorus is second to none. When it comes to world-class Boston food, we’ve gone big in this issue with a special Eat. Drink. Boston section—it’s a great way to get the inside track on our city’s stellar dining scene. We also bagged an interview with global masterchef and champion of our local cuisine, Daniel Boulud. Boston is lucky to count Bar Boulud at the Mandarin Oriental hotel on Boylston Street among its many outstanding restaurants. If you fancy browsing some tremendous art as you do your holiday shopping, take the time to check out our selection of the city’s grooviest small galleries. Many of them are hidden in plain sight and this guide will help you discover new cultural treasures. Feel free to take us with you as you explore the city—and we wish you all the best for a very happy new year.

Mike Hodgkinson Editor, Where Boston @where_boston connect with us

IN THE WORLD Where is an international network of magazines first published in 1936 and distributed in over 4,000 leading hotels in more than 50 places around the world. Look for us when you visit any of the following cities, or plan ahead for your next trip by visiting us online at wheretraveler.com. UNITED STATES Alaska, Atlanta, Baltimore, Boston, Charleston, Charlotte, Chicago, Dallas, Indianapolis, Jacksonville/St. Augustine/Amelia Island, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Maui, Miami, Minneapolis/St. Paul, New Orleans, New York, Oahu, Orange County (CA), Orlando, Philadelphia, Phoenix/Scottsdale, San Diego, San Francisco, Seattle, St. Louis, Tampa, Tucson, Washington, D.C. ASIA Hong Kong, Macau, Singapore AUSTRALIA Brisbane, Melbourne, Sydney CANADA Calgary, Canadian Rockies, Edmonton, Halifax, Muskoka/ Parry Sound, Ottawa, Toronto, Vancouver, Victoria, Whistler, Winnipeg EUROPE Berlin, Budapest, Istanbul, London, Madrid, Milan, Moscow, Paris, Rome, St. Petersburg

6

WHE RE I D E C E M B E R 2017


Hot Spot,

Ne�

Look.

100 SHOPS + RESTAURANTS APPLE CLUB MONACO FOREVER 21 SEPHORA J.CREW T.J. MAXX WORLD OF BEER SUPERDRY + MORE

FREE GIFT + COUPON BOOK Visit Welcome Center on Level 1.

�re� SANTA PHOTO

THROUGH DECEMBER 24

See CambridgeSide.com for details

100 CambridgeSide Place | Cambridge, MA


STANDING PROUD among local

enterprises that embody the essence of this incredible town is Boston Harbor Distillery, which now produces some of the country’s finest whiskey, rum and liqueurs—as I was delighted to rediscover at a recent Women Who Whiskey event hosted there by distillery founder, Rhonda Kallman. Tours and tastings are a festive must for residents and visitors alike during the Boston holiday season.

Kristen Standish Publisher, Where Boston

O UP T

60%

OFF

create priceless memories

OVER 100 SHOWS

NOW ON SALE plus dining deals and more

MAYORSHOLIDAY.COM CITY OF BOSTON Martin J. Walsh, Mayor

8

WHE RE I D E C E M B E R 2017


This is a haven, a therapist for mind and body, and the perfect ending to your day.

THIS IS HOME.

ColdwellBankerHomes.com Š 2017 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Operated by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. Coldwell BankerŽ and the Coldwell Banker logo are registered service marks owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.


PHOTO CREDIT GOES HERE

DECEMBER 2017

10

WHE RE I D E C E M B E R 2017


BOSTON

1

Big Map

The Mapparium at the Mary Baker Eddy Library will expand your horizons. 2

Bright Lights

See faces all aglow in Stoneham at Stone Zoo thanks to the perfect combination of critters and ZooLights. 3

Smooth Flow

Take the Holiday Jazz Cruise with Classic Harbor Line and just go with the rhythm. 4

5

Seasonal Nuts

The Boston Ballet transports us to Tchaikovsky’s land of toy soldiers and dancing snowflakes with ”The Nutcracker.”

COURTESY THE MARY BAKER EDDY LIBRARY

Holiday Pops

Seasonal favorites, wonderful sing-alongs and a visit from Santa Claus himself at Symphony Hall.


December Paul Oakenfold Long before the dawn of the superstar DJ and the coining of the acronym EDM, Paul Oakenfold was preparing the ground for greatness in magnificently eclectic fashion, first by exploring New York's club scene during the early hey-day of hip hop, then as a conquistador of island party-hub Ibiza and a remixer of the Happy Mondays. The rest is turntable history. Through Oakenfold, a three-decade history of truly outstanding dance music can be traced. See him at The Royale, 279 Tremont St., 617.338.7699 12

WHE RE I D E C E M B E R 2017

Dec. 21-23

The Hip Hop Nutcracker Tchaikovsky wasn’t thinking of break-dancers and electric violins when, in 1892, he composed “The Nutcracker”—but those elements put a terrific New York City spin on the much loved Christmas ballet, which can also be seen in traditional guise at the Boston Ballet. Shubert Theatre, 265 Tremont St., 866.348.9738.

(FROM TOP) ©ANTON NELSON; ©MIKE FITELSON

Dec. 8


IN DECEMBER Handel’s “Messiah” Dec. 1-3

The excellent Handel + Hayden Society electrifies Symphony Hall with one of the most joyful pieces of music ever composed.

Joe Andruzzi Foundation Dec. 4

(CLOCKWISE FROM TOP) COURTESY MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS; ©MATT BALDELLI PHOTOGRAPHY; COURTESY SOCIETY OF ARTS + CRAFTS

10th Annual Gratitude Gala hosted by three-time Super Bowl champ Joe Andruzzi to help cancer patients.

Editing Our Evolution Dec. 6

Head over to the Museum of Science to find out about gene editing techniques.

Dec. 1

MFA First Fridays

Morrissey Dec. 7

The only thing better than hanging out around great art is hanging out with like-minded people who love hanging out around great art—and the First Fridays series of events at the Museum of Fine Arts presents the perfect opportunity to do just that. Set in the spectacular, acoustically perfect, glass-enclosed Shapiro Family Courtyard, the evening involves music, cocktails, tapas, abundant merriment and occasional use of the phrase: “You can’t compare Rothko and Murakami: they’re chalk and cheese.” Why not get there early and pick up a Murakami T-Shirt (above) from the museum shop. 465 Huntington Ave., 617.267.9300 Dec. 14-17

Dec. 31

CraftBoston

The Beehive

The Holiday edition of the CraftBoston juried exhibition and art sale takes place at Hynes Convention Center in Back Bay. Become the toast of your family when you turn up a week later with the best holiday gifts they’ve ever seen. 900 Boylston St., societyofcrafts.org

The city’s favorite dinner w/music venue, The Beehive, brings a “modern-retro” vibe to its New Year’s Eve Speakeasy, including all the customary decadence plus the Lee Fish Orchestra and native Italian jazz singer Fabio Giacalone. 541 Tremont St., 617.423.0069

“All you need is me,” croons the English indie rock icon— and he’s at The Orpheum.

The Christmas Revels Dec. 8-27

A Venetian celebration of the Winter Solstice at the Sanders Theatre.

Swedish Yuletide Dec. 9

The Cyclorama in the South End hosts a celebration of all things Christmas-y and Swedish.

Heart of the Holidays Dec. 16

The audience joins the show at the Salvation Army Kroc Center during this family friendly celebration of song.

Boston Pops Dec. 31

New Year’s Eve celebration with the superb Pops at Symphony Hall. Cheers!

13


Three very crafty artisanal pizza places

Area Four

Pastoral Fort Point

FOOD

BOOKS N’ COOKS

This joint prides itself on an organic, community method of pizza-making and produces such beauties as the vongole fritte featuring local Ipswich clams.

Great food, amazing space—it all adds up at Ledger in Salem TALK OF financial

records is usually enough to destroy anyone’s appetite, but a short journey outside of central Boston—to North Shore hot spot and global hub of spooky tourism, Salem—a former bank is doing precisely the opposite. At Ledger, an inventive crew of chefs has transformed the space formerly occupied by the Salem Savings Bank with a tremendous contemporary overhaul, promising to give traditional New England fare a modern spin. So far, that plan is working like a treat, no fancy tricks required. Once you’ve soaked up the surroundings (original vault doors; combination locks on the napkin cupboards) there’s loads to enjoy on the menu, from perfect line-caught swordfish to smoky local mushrooms. A historical Salem experience that doesn’t involve witches but does cast a spell on the palate? Count us in. 125 Washington St., Salem, 978.594.1908 14

WHE RE I D E C E M B E R 2017

Waypoint

An offshoot of the always excellent Alden & Harlow, offering an especially delicious smoked whitefish pizza with mascarpone, dill and capers—and located in Harvard Square. For more great food in the city visit wheretraveler.com

(LEFT) COURTESY LEDGER; (FROM TOP) COURTESY AREA FOUR; COURTESY PASTORAL; ©GALDONES PHOTOGRAPHY

A proper “back to basics” approach to the craft pizza, involving hand-pulled mozzarella and expertly fermented dough. Yum.


Three seasonal reds from The Urban Grape

Chateau de Pibarnon Bandol

Dominated by the Mourvedre grape this rustic beauty goes well with festive herbs and ginger snaps.

Lail Vineyards Blueprint

AMERICAN RYE

Whiskey gets a world-class reboot at WhistlePig in Vermont CRAFT WHISKEYS are

everywhere these days, which begs the question: how crafty can you get? Out in the bucolic wilds of Middlebury, Vt., the answer is: very. WhistlePig distillery has full local control over the rye, water and barrel oak that form the cornerstones of a farm-to-bottle process christened Triple Terroir, and the end products are fabulous. Rye whiskey (rather than the stuff made from corn, barley or wheat, for example) demands a longer aging process, but can deliver both strength and finesse under just the right conditions. This has been the goal for WhistlePig since its inception in 2007, and the FarmStock 86 proof really hits the mark, with its complex swirl of caramel, vanilla, tobacco and baking spices. Among other WhistlePig offerings is the superlative Boss Hog IV: The Black Prince, finished in Armagnac barrels. 52 Seymour St., Middlebury, VT, 802.897.7700 16

WHE RE I D E C E M B E R 2017

Couly-Dutheil Chinon

This star from the Loire Valley is perfect with stuffing and cranberry. For more great, expertly chosen holiday wines check out The Urban Grape in the South End. theurbangrape.com For more great drink in the city visit wheretraveler.com

(LEFT) ©NINA LEA PHOTOGRAPHY; (SIDEBAR) ©MIKE HODGKINSON

DRINK

A classic Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon— rich, plush, velvety and well worth splashing the extra cash to impress in-laws during the holiday.


FIND THE BEST IN BACK BAY ONE BLOCK AT A TIME

 Bar Boulud

776 Boylston St., 617.535. 8800, barboulud.com  Davio’s 75 Arlington St., 617.357.4810, davios.com

The Corner Tavern is one of the best pubs in the area: the jukebox selection is vast and eclectic and it’s open until 2 am every night. Saltie Girl has a very appealing cocktail menu; and Parish Cafe is known city-wide for its sandwiches (all of them created by local chefs).

 The Corner Tavern

421 Marlborough St., 617.262. 5555, thecornerboston.com

 Saltie Girl

281 Dartmouth St., 617.267. 0691, saltiegirl.com

 Parish Cafe

361 Boylston St., 617.247.4777, parishcafe.com

A good bookshop is essential to any ’hood worth its salt and in Trident, Back Bay delivers a gem. The sneakerhead meets the secret agent at Bodega, which looks like a tatty convenience store until you activate the sliding door disguised as a drinks vending machine. A world of shoes is then revealed.

Don’t pass up the chance to see something great at the Lyric Stage, Boston’s oldest professional theater. The Mary Baker Eddy Library is well worth a diversion from the nearby Prudential Center; and for those of you who like a boogie, fun and funk can be found at Storyville.

617.267.8688, trident bookscafe.com  Bodega 6 Clearway St., shop.bdgastore.com

 The Mary Baker Eddy Library 200 Massachusetts

 Trident Booksellers & Café 338 Newbury St.,

(Clockwise from top) Squid

 Lyric Stage Company of Boston 140 Clarendon St., 617.585.5678, lyricstage.com

Ave., 617.450.7000, mary bakereddylibrary.org  Storyville 90 Exeter St., 617.236.1134, storyville boston.com

ink bucatini at Porto; Trident book store; The Mary Baker Eddy Library; cool mural at Parish Cafe.

18

WHE RE I D E C E M B E R 2017

For more things to do in Back Bay go to

wheretraveler.com

(CLOCKWISE FROM TOP) ©KEN RIVARD; ©MIKE HODGKINSON; COURTESY THE MARY BAKER EDDY LIBRARY; ©MIKE HODGKINSON

Porto is a chic, modern Mediterranean revelation with an outstanding seafood stew and much more besides. Bar Boulud gives French masterchef Daniel Boulud a smart-casual stage for his unshakeable excellence—from French regional specials to raw bar. For Northern Italian steaks and pasta, look no further than Davio’s.  Porto Ring Rd, 617.536. 1234, porto-boston.com


Anne Fontaine | Bistro du Midi | Bottega Veneta Christofle | Doretta Taverna & Raw Bar | Escada | Exhale | Hermès St. John | Skinner Auctioneers

WHERE GREAT TASTE IS always IN STYLE At Arlington and Boylston Streets across from Boston’s Public Garden 617.426.9500 | theheritageonthegarden.com


Daniel Boulud is one of the world’s great chefs—and he loves Boston. By Mike Hodgkinson 20

WHE RE I A P R I L 2017

PHOTO CREDIT GOES HERE

Dan Le Man


DANIEL BOULUD IS, quite simply, one of the best and most respected chefs in the world. Raised on a farm in Lyon, he hit the ground running as teenage finalist for the Best Culinary Apprentice in France (1972) and then made a series of three-Michelinstarred restaurants his training grounds. All roads would lead, via Copenhagen, to New York, where he made his name. His fine-dining flagship, Daniel (est. 1993) became the cornerstone of a global culinary empire that now spans London, Toronto, Montreal, Singapore and—of course—Boston. MAGNIFIQUE

(MAIN) ©E GILMORE; (TOP & BOTTOM) ©GEORGE APOSTOLIDIS; (MIDDLE) ©LEISE JONES

Long before he hosted the TV series “After Hours with Daniel Boulud” he had filmed episodes of “In Julia’s Kitchen with Master Chefs” alongside Boston-based culinary legend Julia Child. As local superstar chef Matt Jennings puts it: “Daniel’s the man.” We sat down with him at Bar Boulud on Boylston Street, while he finished preparing a “magnifique” seven-course meal inspired by the Rhone Valley. Where Boston: Lovely to meet you. Are you familiar with Where Boston? Daniel Boulud: I know it very well. “Where” is everywhere. WB: Tell us about your links to Boston. DB: I have known Boston chefs forever, back to when I was taping TV shows with Julia [Child] and going to eat together at Hamersley’s or Jasper’s—the 1980s. Boston has always been a very strong scene, blessed with the seafood, and you also have this great English, Irish and Scottish history. Italian, Hispanic, Greek—so many communities here: this has brought a lot of culture to the food here in Boston. WB: Conceptually, how does Bar Boulud fit into your collection of restaurants? DB: Restaurant Daniel is “gastronomy”— the flagship, comparable to the finest in the world. Café Boulud is a little more cosmopolitan French, it’s a little more urban, a little more Parisian. DB Bistro is an everyday place. At Boulud Sud, we elaborate [on] the cuisine of the Mediterranean. And Bar Boulud is the expression of a wine bar, a French bistro and here in Boston we are introducing an oyster bar. Bar Boulud has the real bistro French classics, but refined by us. WB: How would you refine, say, escargots? DB: We have a few different recipes: a recipe where we sauté the escargot with chicken oysters, and we add some mushrooms and shallots and finish it with some

Alsatian spaetzle: very delicious. Or it could be just the snail with butter—but the butter is the art of the escargot. It has almond inside, parsley, chervil, chives, tarragon, basil, and a lot of garlic also—all in proportion. We make it in a way that the butter is densely green and densely garlicky so when it bakes it gives this wonderful aroma. WB: What excites you about local New England ingredients? DB: The seafood, of course, from Maine to Massachusetts and all the way down to Martha’s Vineyard and Cape Cod, there’s an amazing array of oysters, scallops and clams and fish and shellfish and lobster. Rather than mix and match with a French bistro menu I felt, why don’t we make two menus? So there is a focus on the beautiful seafood of New England and also a focus on the French bistro of Bar Boulud. WB: Have you been inspired by any classic Boston dishes? DB: When we opened Bar Boulud I invited 20-30 chefs from Boston here for lunch and I made them the Boston Cream Pie and that was supercool. I made that for them just as a teaser, to say “I love your pie and I wanted to make one too.” It was my interpretation of that and I think I did a good job because [leading Boston chef] Barbara Lynch took one home. WB: Which dish instantly takes you back to your roots in Lyon, France? DB: My apple tart. They showed me how to make it the year I was 14. Sometimes we serve it in the restaurant: not only am I back to that moment I started cooking but also I always feel that classic cuisine will never go out of style. To me beautiful memories [come from] food you can taste again and be taken back. Like the vinaigrette of my grandmother. I was born and raised on a farm so for me going back home and having the simple things of the garden—the things we grow—that’s the best.

MASTERCHEF

(From top) Bar Boulud on Boylston St.; Georges Bank sea scallops; charcuterie and wine at Bar Boulud.

21


Groovy Galleries

22

WHE RE I D E C E M B E R 2017

FOR ART LOVERS, Boston really is the gift that keeps on giving. The city’s major art museums—including the ICA, the MFA, the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum and the Harvard Art Museums—are all world-class rabbit holes of wonderment: leaving them tends to render the real world rather flat and grey by comparison. The major players are, however, only part of Boston’s complete art picture. Explore the city’s side streets, innocuouslooking first-floor walk-ups and less-trodden alleyways, and you’ll soon uncover a matrix of alternative galleries every bit as marvelous as their big-name counterparts. Many of these one-room treasures belong to the various art and design districts that have planted firm roots over the past decade, from SOWA to the Fort Point Arts Community and the edgy studios of East Boston. Others seem to sprout up organi-

cally, attached to office spaces, cuttingedge restaurants or apartment buildings. Here are some of our favorites to get you started, but this list is by no means exhaustive—feel free to forge your own route and unlock Boston’s hidden universe of incredible art. PINKCOMMA You might think you’ve stumbled by accident into someone’s office space en route to the pinkcomma gallery (46 Waltham St., 617.426.4466)—and, in fact, you have. The diminutive gallery belongs to over,under (an architecture and design practice) whose eye for the remarkable has produced a string of great, small-scale exhibitions. LE LABORATOIRE CAMBRIDGE Part-restaurant (Cafe ArtScience), partgallery, part-futuristic head trip, Le Labora-

©SAMIR SAMMOUN

Boston has great artworks in cool and often hidden spaces—here’s how to seek them out. By Mike Hodgkinson


Explore the city’s side streets, alleyways and walk-ups to uncover a matrix of alternative galleries every bit as marvelous as the big museums. toire Cambridge (650 E Kendall St., Cambridge, 617.945.7515) is quite simply one of the coolest conceptual spaces in all of Boston. The brainchild of mercurial polymath (and former Where Boston cover star) David Edwards, it offers regular public lectures in addition to great food and art. “The Long Now Exhibition” runs through Dec. 16.

(FROM TOP) ©JIM MARSHALL PHOTOGRAPHY; ©MARK LAMSTER; COURTESY DTR MODERN GALLERIES

THE GALLERY AT ATLANTIC WHARF Housed in a high-rise of offices and urban lofts overlooking Fort Point Channel, The Gallery at Atlantic Wharf (280 Congress St., 617.603.7180) is a well-appointed showcase for the Fort Point Arts Community, a collective of more than 300 artists who work in a variety of media. “The Future of Work” runs through Jan. 6, 2018. MOAKLEY FEDERAL COURTHOUSE One of the great secrets of Boston’s art multiverse is the work on public view at the Federal Courthouse (One Courthouse Way, 617.261.2440) in Fort Point. “The Boston Panels”—a permanent installation by Ellsworth Kelly in the rotunda—is worth the visit here alone, and there’s an additional series of galleries spread across upper and lower floors. COPLEY SOCIETY OF ART The historical credentials of the Copley Society of Art (158 Newbury St., 617.536.5049) are immaculate: founded in the 1870s, Co|So is the oldest non-profit art association in the U.S., and in 1913 hosted an exhibition of promising modernists that included works by Duchamp, Kandinsky, Picasso and Van Gogh. Exhibits on show until Dec. 24 include “Spaces” by Kristin Stashenko and “Holiday Small Works.” LEICA GALLERY If you like to be blown away by amazing photography, head down to the Leica Store and Gallery (74 Arlington St., 857.305.3609),

home to recent exhibitions by EJ Camp and Alain Laboile. Leica legend Jim Marshall (1936-2010)—chronicler of the 1960s counter-culture—comes into focus through Dec. 31, in “Jim Marshall: Jazz Festival.” DTR MODERN GALLERIES Need a dose of Takashi Murakami—also the subject of a major show at the MFA—but you’re out shopping on Newbury Street? Look no further than DTR Modern Galleries (167 Newbury St., 617.424.9700) which hosts a solo exhibition of Murakami’s graphic works during December. You might also run into something by Matisse, Warhol, Koons or Hirst. INTERNATIONAL POSTER GALLERY A fixture on the Newbury Street scene for 23 years, the International Poster Gallery (460C Harrison Ave., Suite C20, 617.375.0076) has now joined the South End’s hub of very groovy galleries: SOWA Art + Design District. Rock up on site and enjoy their current themed exhibition. GALERIE D’ORSAY Opened in the year 2000 with an exhibition of Rembrandt etchings, Galerie D’Orsay (33 Newbury St., 617.266.8001) has gone from strength to strength—and enjoys a prime location near the Boston Public Garden. Highlights through the years have included shows featuring Chagall’s “Circus Suite” and Picasso’s hand-signed linocuts. In December, check out “Honored Traditions: Samir Sammoun & Gustavo Torres.” KRAKOW WITKIN GALLERY One of the great surprises of Boston’s small gallery scene is the cunning way this place (10 Newbury St., 617.262.4490) has secreted itself in a standard Newbury Street office building: prepare to have your perspective on the world forever altered by the likes of Ed Ruscha and Josef Albers.

P I CT U R E T H I S

(From top) Miles Davis by Jim Marshall at the Leica Gallery; Mark Lamster at pinkcomma; “And Then... (red)” by Takashi Murakami at DTR Modern Galleries.

23


Terence Ryan turns the core of Boston into sonic gold dust. By Mike Hodgkinson Photography by Brian Babineau

24

WHE RE I A P R I L 2017

PHOTO CREDIT GOES HERE

Steel & Soul


THE NEVERENDING QUEST for sublime, life-changing music doesn’t come with a map—but The Foundation Room at the House of Blues is as good a place to start as any. On a regular Tuesday night in early October this year, the venue hosted an extraordinary set by 26-year-old Terence Ryan, whose genre-defying sounds and heart-breaking stories draw from a deep well of emotion, honesty and talent. His album “Don’t Panic” is a journey through the light and the dark of ordinary lives towards that universal feeling of transcendence we all hope for but rarely glimpse.

©JESSE BARNETT PHOTOGRAPHY

BAY STATE MUSE In many ways, Ryan is a quintessential Boston artist. He knows the city from the roots up. He lives and breathes the southern suburbs where he was raised, and where he helped his parents run a warehouse. Like most Bostonians, he feels to his core the sky-scraping beauty and the sadness of the New England autumns. Against a Bay State landscape of backyards and sea walls he made plans to send his soulful, soaring, bittersweet songs out into the universe. No doubt about it, Ryan is plugged into the city, heart and soul. A couple of years ago he was far from Boston and close to penniless. Out west, in California, he was scraping the embers of his singer-songwriter dreams, looking for a spark. What kept him going, beyond his ingrained New England resilience, was the generosity of the human spirit. “I’m getting chills just thinking about it,” he says. “I didn’t really have any money so I was depending on the kindness of strangers. I was staying in campgrounds for free in exchange for work. People were cooking me dinners. Once, I ran out of gas outside San Luis Obispo, walked to a gas station, and the attendant said he had 21 dollars left for the week. He gave me 15 dollars worth of gas. So I got to L.A. from there, where I had a paycheck waiting. Makes me emotional thinking about it.” When friends’ sofas weren’t available, and when he was too polite or too proud to impose, Ryan lived out of his car. When he needed inspiration he looked eastwards, back to the Boston of his childhood, when he taught himself to play music by ear. He practiced in his home basement, started writing songs “age ten or 11,” got obsessed with Blink 182, then Coldplay, then Dr. Dre and Kanye West, soaked up the basics of songcraft, got a feel for melodies, chords, lyrics.

In California, everything was supposed to come together, but there he was, working odd jobs, scraping by. He dug deep, despite the lack of a fixed abode—or a recording studio. “I would go to a parking lot, hang the microphone from the rear view mirror, set up my mini keyboard and my laptop and record. I recorded half of the album in that time.” Ryan has thought long and hard about the ways in which his circumstances informed his creativity: “I don’t write when I’m suffering. Art is the afterthought to suffering. You go through something and after you experience it on a human level— face to face—that’s when I start to write.” After a year out west, Ryan drove back to Boston in the fall of 2016, and sought out the path that would lead—a year later—to the Foundation Room. He now has a solid global fanbase, despite his refusal to cave to the demands of social media. “I don’t care to self promote and try to get fans or followers or whatever. I hate that. If you look at my Spotify I have millions of listens, which is the music speaking for itself. But if you look at my Instagram I only have 700 followers. So in a way I’m really happy.” Fans often reach out, to return the connection made by the songs. “I get a lot of messages, which is nice. I had two brothers messaging me for the Netherlands: they were asking when the tour was and said they were going to bring me stroopwafels, which is like a Dutch cookie or something.” As with much of Ryan’s experience, channeled into great songs like “Soul Lay Open” and “Agoura, CA / A Particular Time in Eternity,” connections are vital. It all loops back the friends and family who helped set him on his way, to the strangers who helped him out in California, to the fans who send him messages. “If you really need help the universe will help you,” he says. “If you stay open to it.”

RYA N ' S TO W N We asked the singer how he’d entertain a newcomer in the city that shaped him.  SOUTHIE. We’d probably go to a few pubs, maybe go to Castle Island at the end of the night. It’s awesome to go get a beer down at the L Street pub, or The Seapoint right on East 8th—we used to live across the street—and you can walk down to the beach.  NORTH END. I used to stay in the North End for a while—it’s supercool. You gotta go to Bova’s (Bakery) late night: they used to have these two dollar little pastries and these 25 cent chocolate covered pretzel sticks. And Monica’s too— one of these little mercatos on the corner of Salem and Prince: the best Italian sandwich you ever had.  SEAPORT. The Seaport’s always fun, getting a drink on the Legal deck.  FENWAY. Obviously come catch a show here at the House of Blues or The Paradise down the street on Comm. Ave.

25


BOSTON

wheretraveler.com

Jamie Bissonnette at Little Donkey


ON TREND SIR SUDS

LORD HOBO BREWING COMPANY FOUNDER DANIEL LANIGAN RULES BOSTON’S CRAFT BEER SCENE One recent morning, Daniel Lanigan, who sports a bushy red beard, a T-shirt and a ball cap, sat at the bar in the Lord Hobo Brewing Company’s tap room, where craft beer lovers can sample the latest suds and buy cans and growler fills to take home daily. “I’ve been hand-selling things to consumers over the bar for 15 years,” he says. As Lord Hobo’s founder and CEO, Lanigan has been riding the wave of interest in food and drink that’s been sweeping America, particularly over the last decade. “I know what people want.” Lanigan has been in the beer business his entire adult life. The Everett native has opened seven beer bars up and down the East Coast and in Brussels, Belgium. These include the award-winning Moan & Dove in Amherst, Dirty Truth in Northampton and Lord Hobo Beer Bar in Cambridge. “The cat’s out of the bag, and it’s never going back in,” he says. “You don’t transition from Bud Light to Heineken to Sam Adams to Lord Hobo and then start going backwards. People want better things. People are willing to spend money on better

28

W H E R E E AT. D R I N K . I 2017  2018

quality ingredients—farm to table stuff—so people are choosing better beer.” The Lord Hobo Brewing Company in Woburn is at the epicenter of the American craft beer explosion. The 47,000-square foot building is located on a quiet street only minutes from Route 93. The actual brewery is a huge, high ceilinged, industrial-sized room filled with dozens of towering metal tanks and thousands of pallets of cans. Lanigan bought the property—a former post office—in July 2014 and opened the brewery one year later. Since then, Lord Hobo Brewing Company (“from the hills of Woburn” as it proudly proclaims on every can) has grown to 7,000 accounts, in 10 states and overseas. In 2015, Lord Hobo sold 3,000 barrels; in 2016, it sold 15,400 barrels, an increase of 413 percent. It is the fastest growing brewery in the country. Lord Hobo has made its reputation with hoppy India Pale Ales with clever names like Ball & Biscuit, Boomsauce, and Steal This Can. Lanigan says don’t look for that to change. “We (currently) make five IPAs and will add a sixth one. And two more next year,” he says. “We’re going to branch out a little bit: we’re going to do a wheat beer, a Pilsner. Maybe do a stout at some point. But we’re never going to have 40 or 100 beers.” Why mess with success?

(PREVIOUS PAGE) ©DAVID MA; (THIS PAGE) ©JOSEPH W BROWN

What’s red hot right now


ELEVATE YOUR

DATE


ON TREND

BAR MADE

Some people prefer to eat at the bar, whether dining alone or as a duo. You don’t need reservations, and service is usually more attentive than in the dining room because your server (aka the bartender) seldom leaves your sight. And, if you are dining alone, it’s your choice whether to interact with your fellow barmates or lose yourself in your Kindle. Good luck finding an empty barstool at Anchovies (433 Columbus Ave., 617.266.5088). This whimsically decorated South End watering hole serves strong, basic, and affordable drinks, with a meniscus on every martini. Patrons reflect the ‘hood— all ages, colors, genders and persuasions. The food is familiar and filling: fried mozzarella sticks, clams in red sauce, chicken parm and cheesesteak subs— the better to get a jump on tomorrow’s hangover. A few blocks away, Back Bay business types and hotel guests frequent the 83-foot-long, copper topped Oak Long Bar + Kitchen (138 St. James Ave., 617.585.7222) at the Fairmont Copley Plaza, famed for its martinis and Manhattans “served extra large and ice cold.” It also boasts a lengthy farm-totable menu that showcases dishes for sharing: avocado and crab toast,

30

beef tartare, and mushroom gnocchi. Working through dinner? There’s an electrical outlet every few bar seats so you can plug in your laptop or phone. A youthful Southie clientele hangs at Coppersmith (40 W. 3rd St., 617.658.3452), a former copper manufacturerturned-gastropub with back-to-back food trucks (welded together) parked in the dining room and a vintage airstream serving drinks and a lot of beer on the popular roof deck. The menu of global comfort fare includes barbecue, smoky pork pupusas with spicy slaw and a Savannahstyle grilled cheese sandwich made with pimento cheese: hearty, flavorful

W H E R E E AT. D R I N K . I 2017  2018

grub that won’t bust your wallet and will have you coming back for more. Enjoy an Aegean getaway at Seaport hotspot Committee (50 Northern Ave., 617.737.5051), where they serve Greek small plate meze, cool cocktails, ouzo, and retsina wine in an industrial chic setting. Moakley Courthouse and Vertex Pharmaceuticals employees come here after work to mingle with Financial District types, and to chow down on charred eggplant salad, stuffed dolmades grape leaves and spinach pie any Greek yiayia would love. National chain Mastro’s Ocean Club (25 Fan Pier Blvd., 617.530.1925) comes to Boston with big

aspirations, big steaks, big drinks, big prices and a panoramic view of the harbor. A supersized steak, rack of lamb, Alaskan King Crab legs, and/or Hawaiian Bigeye tuna—sashimi style—can be presented on a folded black linen napkin on the black marble bar, where you can eavesdrop on the new and old moneyed carnivores who appreciate courteous service and live entertainment seven nights a week. Mastro’s makes 40 signature cocktails—the bestseller is the Lemon Drop, a high-test libation of lemon vodka, sweet and sour mix, and Triple Sec, poured over dry ice in a sugar-rimmed, martini glass. It’s smokin’.

©COMMITTEE

DINING AT THE BAR MEANS GOOD FOOD WITHOUT ALL THE FUSS


ENJOY AMSTEL XLIGHT™ RESPONSIBLY. ©2017 AMSTEL XLIGHT™ BEER IMPORTED BY AMSTEL USA, WHITE PLAINS, NY.


Distillers, buyers, entrepreneurs, experts—these great Boston women are taking brown liquor to the next level

By Mat Schaffer (From left) Carri Wroblewski, Maura Connolly, Maggie Campbell, Rhonda Kallman, Kayla Quigley and Ilana Weiss

32

W H E R E E AT. D R I N K . I 2017  2018

©SCOTT NOBLES

Boston’s Whiskey Enigma

ILANA WEISS sits in a window seat at The Last Hurrah (60 School St., 617.305.1888), the wood paneled barroom at the Omni Parker House hotel, which boasts a selection of 150 whiskeys. She nurses a glass of Glenmorangie Nectar D’Or single malt scotch. “This is the best whiskey bar north of New York City,” she says. “It’s Boston’s best-kept secret.” Weiss would know. The women’s fashion executive is president of the Boston chapter of Women Who Whiskey, a self-described “experimental whiskey club for women.” With two-dozen chapters internationally, Women Who Whiskey offers regularly programmed opportunities to learn about strong spirits and cocktail culture with like-minded individuals. The interest is out there. Since Women Who Whiskey launched in Boston in 2015, Weiss has amassed over 800 names on her email list. Whiskey—by definition, a distilled alcoholic beverage made from fermented barley, corn, rye or wheat, typically aged in wooden barrels—is not a libation usually associated with women. It’s a drink that conjures up tartanwearing Scotsmen, Wild West saloons, warring Kentucky moonshiners, and Winston Churchill. If women had written the history of whiskey, you might think differently. “Don’t even get me started,” says Rhonda Kallman.


©PAT PIASECKI

Whiskey is like a woman; it’s complex.” “Women were the first distillers. Women were the brewers way back in Mesopotamia.” Kallman—founding partner and longtime executive vice president of Boston Beer Company (Samuel Adams)—is founder and CEO of Boston Harbor Distillery (12 R Ericsson St., 617.533.7001), which makes rye, single malt, and other spirits in a beautifully renovated, Civil War-era, brick warehouse, footsteps away from Dorchester Bay. “More women are drinking whiskey and making whiskey,” she says. “What we’re fighting for all over America is just equality. We want to be distillers, we want to be entrepreneurs, we want to be chefs. We don’t necessarily want to be a female entrepreneur or a female chef. The reality is women are just as good as men in this business: Our skills are very compatible.” “Being a woman has very little to do with my day-today work,” says Maggie Campbell, head distiller and vice president at the North Shore’s Privateer Rum (28 Mitchell Road, Ipswich, 978.356.0477), which plans to release American single malt whiskey (currently aging) and rye. Campbell received her diploma in craft distilling technologies from the Siebel Institute in Chicago and her Level IV diploma from the Wine & Spirit Education Trust. She sits on the board of directors of the American Craft Spirits Association and worked as assistant distiller at California brandy maker Germain-Robin. “There are a lot of women involved in distilling and there always have been,” says Campbell, “But visibility is always the issue… we don’t see them.” In 2011, Bostonians Maura Connolly and her husband John Egan opened a distillery on the grounds of their Burlington, Vermont, farm. Six years later, their Mad River Distillers (137 St. Paul St., Burlington, Vt., 802.489.5501) produces award-winning “grain to glass” bourbon, rye, and other spirits made from locally sourced ingredients. As national sales manager, Connolly keeps a close eye on the consumer side of the business. “There are so many fabulous women in the industry who are behind the bar and working for distributors that really have embraced whiskey and the cocktail scene,“ she says. “I see more and more women drinking brown spirits, and it’s really very exciting.” For over a dozen years, Carri Wroblewski and Klaudia Mally (aka “the BRIX chix”) have been selling wine and spirits at their BRIX stores in Boston’s South End and Financial District, and also on Nantucket. Wroblewski says recently there’s been a marked increase in the number of women buying whiskeys. “You’re seeing more women becoming aware,” she says, pointing to the growing trend for sophisticated cocktail programs at restaurants. “Women are seeing

whiskey on the menu. They’ll try a whiskey out and they come to us because they want to have it at home.” In an effort to expand patrons’ palates, Citizen Public House & Oyster Bar (1310 Boylston St., 617.450.9000) sponsors a whiskey club. If you sample all 120 club designated whiskeys, you’ll receive a bottle of single barrel (premium) whiskey and an engraved, silver-banded glass. “A lot of women have joined the whiskey club,” says bar manager Kayla Quigley, a graduate student at Simmons College in gender/cultural studies whose thesis explores masculinity in the saloon era and the resurgence of the contemporary saloon in Boston. “We’re seeing more women drinking whiskey for sure—because of the gender revolution and also because there’s a lot more women behind the bar.” Brown spirits, she says, have always had a masculine identity and energy because they were marketed as a masculine drink. “But if I say to a woman who’s never had whiskey before, ‘This is an extremely approachable spirit,’ it’s a very open dialogue.” Back at The Last Hurrah, Ilana Weiss lowers her nose into her glass of scotch and closes her eyes in concentration and/or enjoyment. “The first thing you want to do is smell it with your mouth slightly open,” she instructs. “Then take a sip. Hold it in your mouth; aerate it, and then swallow. It’s not meant to be gulped. Sip! The first sip, the alcohol hits you; the second sip is so much better.” Weiss adds a few drops of water to her glass. “Water has an actual chemical reaction with whiskey, and it changes the drink completely,” she says. “The Scots call it ‘releasing the serpent.’ See? It opens up. It’s smoother. Do you taste it? Whiskey is like a woman; it’s complex.”

33


PHOTO CREDIT GOES HERE


SERVING UP SENSATIONAL

Our subjective list of the 10 best restaurants to open in 2017

(CLOCKWISE FROM TOP) ©GALDONES PHOTOGRAPHY; ©BRIAN SAMUELS PHOTOGRAPHY; ©EMILY HAGEN; COURTESY SUMIAO HUNAN KITCHEN

BURRO BAR Looking for a 100-plusbottle tequila selection, emerald green guacamole and creative tacos? Chef/owner Joe Cassinelli (Posto, Osteria Posto) presides over this place, brightly decorated with edgy Mexican pop art. We recommend the beef tongue taco with crunchy hazelnut slaw and the sautéed mushrooms taco with spicy, carrot-habanero salsa. 1665 Beacon St., Brookline, 617.277.0427

CULTIVAR Iron Chef America’s Mary Dumont introduces patioto-plate dining at her new, stylish restaurant tucked into a corner of the boutique Ames Hotel. Feast on grilled yakatori beets with ricotta and poached egg, and homemade bucatini tossed with vegetables, lemon, miso and butter. The whole roasted chicken for two, stuffed with wild mushroom ragout is a knockout. 1 Court St., 617.979.8203

EAST COAST GRILL Shuttered for a year after a three-decade run, East Coast Grill has reopened under the management of

Highland Kitchen chef and owner Mark Romano. The notorious barbecue hot spot is as flavorful and fun as ever: Try Romano’s crisp skinned buttermilk fried chicken. Back too—the kitschy, plastic mermaids and animals on every cocktail glass. 1271 Cambridge St., Cambridge, 617.714.4662

FRENCHIE South Enders have warmly embraced this charming subterranean wine bar with its people-watching sidewalk seating and airy solarium out back. The menu from chef Alex Falconer (Josephine) includes Gallic inspired dishes like escargots toast, tuna tartare, salt-encrusted whole branzino for two, and classic steak frites. 560 Tremont St., 857.233.5941

GRE.CO Great dining doesn’t have to cost an arm and a leg. At Newbury Street basement take-out Gre. Co, the specialty is a gyro sandwich, made from marinated meats folded in pita flatbread with French fries, tomato and onion. Nothing costs more than 10 bucks. 225 Newbury St., 617.572.3300

LES SABLONS This chic hideaway, located in the long-abandoned MBTA Conductor’s Building in Harvard Square, offers high-end French fare with service and ambiance to match. Bliss out on fresh oysters, rye spaghetti and chanterelles tossed in arugula pesto, escargots in puff pastry, and roasted duck with cherries. The wine list is deep enough to dive into. 2 Bennett St., Cambridge, 617.268.8600

LOLA 42 It’s summer vacation year round at this Seaport sister of popular Nantucket restaurant LoLa 41—a selfstyled global bistro-cumsushi bar featuring foods from the 41st parallel. Here, this translates into creamy Havarti, Jarlsberg, cheddar and Parmesan mac and cheese, and assorted maki rolls. Think Nantucket minus the ferry. 22 Liberty Drive, 617.951.4002

RUCKUS Brian Moy (Shojo) continues his hipification of Chinatown with the opening of graffiti decorated, white tiled, hole-in-the wall noodle bar Ruckus downstairs from China Pearl, the

Moy family’s iconic dim sum palace. Don’t miss the black garlic mazemen (no broth ramen) with spiced lamb, grilled nori, and crunchy chili threads. 5 Tyler St., 857.305.3129

SUMIAO HUNAN KITCHEN The area’s first Hunanese restaurant showcases regional dishes like spicy crunchy cucumbers, shredded potato with green pepper and duo jiao salted chilies, and red braised pork. Owner Sumiao Chen, a Cordon Blue alum and Hunan native, has decorated the Kendall Square space in Fruit Loop colors with chic artwork. 270 Third St., Cambridge, 617.945.0907

TROQUET ON SOUTH It’s technically not ‘new’ new, but we can’t overlook the relocation of Troquet from the Theater District to the Leather District. Try roasted Vermont suckling pig with spoonbread and baked beans or wholewheat bigoli pasta with lamb shoulder ragu. Co-owner Chris Campbell knows every single bottle on what’s arguably Boston’s best wine list. 107 South St., 617. 695.9463

S O D E L I C I O U S (Clockwise from top) Gorgeously presented snail toast at Cultivar; Troquet on South serves up a marvel of flavor and color; perfect mussels at Les Sablons; communal dining table at Sumiao Hunan Kitchen.

35


Local chefowners shake up Boston’s restaurant scene

By Mat Schaffer

36

THE RESTAURANT BUSINESS is just that: a business. Which is why many restaurateurs play it safe with dishes that fill seats and make customers happy. Caesar salad, charcuterie, oysters on the half shell, pasta Bolognese: These are staples at many Boston restaurants. “It’s low hanging fruit, it’s something that everybody is going to eat, and it’s going to cast a wide net,” explains former chef Ed Doyle, now of Cambridge-based restaurant consultants RealFood Consulting. “I look at menus, and it’s almost like there’s a checklist of stuff that you have to have on menu, before you get to the things that you want to put on the menu. Part of that is driven by trend and part is driven by a lack of confidence in what you do.” In contrast, there are restaurants that dare to be different—helmed by chefs who push gastronomic boundaries in the

W H E R E E AT. D R I N K . I 2017  2018

pursuit of culinary excellence. Whether it’s creative locovorism, an overriding aesthetic, modern traditionalism, mastery of an international cuisine, or a kitchen predicated on playfulness, five such chef driven restaurants inspire the Boston dining scene. Michael Scelfo’s new, sophomore effort, Waypoint (1030 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, 617.864.2300), couples imagination with uncompromising commitment to seasonality and locally sourced ingredients, resulting in super fresh, unexpected food combinations that make your mouth pop. The ocean kisses almost everything on the menu. There’s spaghetti (well, technically, spaccatelli) and octopus meatballs, chopped clam and smoked white fish topped pizzas, chicken fried oysters and citrus grilled prawns with cilantro raita. Even the bread is on board in the form

©KRISTIN TEIG

COOKING CREATIVE


(FROM TOP) ©HUGE GALDONES PHOTOGRAPHY; ©DAVID MA

Different for the sake of different is no reason to be different of squid ink batard served with smoked seaweed butter. It’s been a decade since Tim and Nancy Cushman opened o ya (9 East St., 617.654.9900), a Zen-like Japanese restaurant in an old firehouse, a few blocks away from South Station, but the influence of their picture perfect, ingredient-centric small plates is ongoing. Cushman’s carefully constructed dishes—black sea bass tartare, torched local swordfish belly, avocado tempura, roasted beet sashimi, kushiyaki of strip loin with maple soy—are like a gallery of miniature paintings, each lovelier than the next. Tim plays at chef, while Nancy is the city’s first sake sommelier; both understand that we eat with our eyes as much as our palates. Where does tradition fit into the modern kitchen? Chef/partners Michael Lombardi and Kevin O’Donnell refuse to cut culinary corners at their Venetian bacaro SRV (Serene Republic of Venice) (569 Columbus Ave., 617.536.9500). They mill the flour to make their own pastas. Risotto is cooked to order. Polenta is slow simmered, the old fashioned way. More importantly, Lombardi and O’Donnell enthusiastically embrace the Italian gastronomic ethos that less is more. From whipped baccala mantecato and tender pork and beef polpette meatballs to snailshaped lumache pasta tossed with snails, shrimp, mussels, and vermouth, and a stew of striped bass in savory broth, these guys leave their egos in the kitchen and let the ingredients take center stage. Perhaps reincarnation can explain chefs who master a foreign cuisine so thoroughly that they make it their own. Ana Sortun (Oleana) acolyte Cassie Piuma follows in her mentor’s footsteps at Sarma (249 Pearl St., Somerville, 617.764.4464), Somerville’s Winter Hill neighborhood hotspot, which dishes up Eastern Mediterranean meze small plates designed to be shared. With ingenuity and intuition, precision and passion, Piuma uses New England foodstuffs to create riffs on Near Eastern

classics—crab and red lentil kibbe, scallop grape leaves, kohlrabi fritters, lamb kofta sliders, brisket shawarma, shrimp tagine. It’s what a Turkish usta sef (master chef) might make if she (or he) lived in Boston. And then there’s something exhilaratingly liberating when chefs have both the cheekiness and the checkbook to do whatever the hell they want, naysayers be damned. Enter James Beard awardwinning chefs Ken Oringer and Jamie Bissonnette and what they do at Central Square’s Little Donkey (505 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, 617.945.1008) with a menu that’s defiantly global gaga featuring small plates that travel from New Jersey to New Delhi and other parts unknown: matzo ball ramen, halibut biryani, lamb bacon BLT lettuce wraps, Istanbul meat ravioli, and snapper nachos. It’s an everchanging gustatory adventure that boasts more hits than misses. But for many restaurateurs, adventurousness doesn’t come easy. In the highly competitive Boston food world, steamed mussels, steak frites, Margherita pizza, and a burger on the menu can pay the rent. “Different for the sake of different is no reason to be different,“ cautions consultant Doyle. “You need to be confident in the fact that you can get people to reach a little bit, that you can do something different, and that you can take people a little outside their safety zone—but you’ve got to do that within a business environment.”

INSPIRED

(Left) Half-shell reinvented at o ya. (From top) Perfectly crafted pizza at Waypoint; cutting-edge small plates from Little Donkey.

37


The lobster

is

everything it’s cracked up to be.

www.legalseafoods.com


                                         


Seafood Craft Beer New England Classics LUNCH

DINNER

BRUNCH

LATE NIGHT

101 SOUTH MARKET STREET | BOSTON, MA 02109 ANTHEMKITCHEN | ANTHEMBOSTON.COM


LIVE ENTERTAINMENT · SOUL FOOD · DANCING CATERING · PRIVATE PARTIES

958 Tremont St. · Boston, MA 02120 617.442.4600 · sladesbarandgrill.com

HISTORIC

SOUTHERN SOUNDS AND FLAVORS IN THE SOUTH END, X2.

or contemporary

CATERING · SUNDAY JAZZ BRUNCH · LIVE MUSIC PRIVATE PARTIES · PATIO DINING

604 Columbus Ave. · Boston, MA 02118 617.536.1100 · DCBKBoston.com


W H E R E B O S T O N D E C E M B E R 2 017

Art

SE ARCH THE CIT Y / For more listings, see wheretraveler.com/boston

[un]expected families This absolutely stunning photographic exhibition at the MFA refracts the notion of family through the lenses of great American photographers, from the 19th century to the present day. By looking at the way people forged bonds over the decades, the viewer is forced to reconsider what it means to be a part of that most fundamental social unit, whether you’re related to those around you by blood or otherwise. Of special local interest are century-old portraits of women in “Boston marriages” (living together without a man, financially independent). Featured artists include Dorothea Lange, Nan Goldin and Carrie Mae Weems. 465 Huntington Ave., 617.267.9300

Always features varied, contemporary work by two Boston-area artists. Exhibitions: Kirsten Reynolds and Evan Jespersen, Dec. 13-Jan. 28, 2018. Open W-Su noon-6 pm. 486 Harrison Ave., 617.482.7781. CHILDS GALLERY

Since 1937. This gallery houses a diverse portfolio of fine American and European paintings, prints, drawings, watercolors and sculpture— from the Renaissance to the 1950s. Open M and Sa 10 am-5 pm, Tu-F 9 am-6 pm. 169 Newbury St., 617.266.1108. COPLEY SOCIETY OF ART

America’s oldest nonprofit art association with more than 500 member artists from student-level to world-renowned. Exhibitions: “Spaces” by Kristin Stashenko, Oct 12-Dec 24. Open Tu-Sa 11

44 W H E R E I D E C E M B E R 2017

am-6 pm, Su noon-5 pm. 58 Newbury St., 617.536.5049. DTR MODERN GALLERIES

DTR specializes in 20th-century masters and boasts a significant privately-held collection of works by artists including Picasso, Chagall, Basquiat, Dali, Botero and Warhol. Exhibition during December: Takashi Murakami. Open M-Sa 10 am-6 pm, Su noon-6 pm. 167 Newbury St., 617.424.9700. ETHELBERT COOPER GALLERY OF AFRICAN & AFRICAN AMERICAN ART

Located adjacent to Harvard University’s Hutchins Center for African & African American Research, this gallery celebrates diverse cultures and historical traditions. This month: “Wole Soyinka: Antiquities Across Times and Place,” through Dec. 21. Open Tu-Sa 10 am-5 pm. 102 Mount Auburn St., Cambridge, 617.496.5777.

GALERIE D’ORSAY

Galerie d’Orsay represents international art masters including Rembrandt, Matisse and Dali, as well as highly recognized contemporary painters and sculptors. Open M-Sa 10 am-6 pm, Su noon-6 pm. 33 Newbury St., 617.266.8001. INTERNATIONAL POSTER GALLERY

This poster nexus—recently relocated to SoWa—is globally recognized for its collection of 10,000 original vintage posters ranging from the 1890s to the post-war era. It also boasts the world’s largest collection of Italian posters, a series of 20th-century Swiss posters and one of the world’s finest arrays of Soviet posters. Open M-Sa 10 am-6 pm, Su noon-6 pm. 460C Harrison Ave., 617.375.0076. KINGSTON GALLERY

One of SoWa’s first galleries, this artist-run cooperative shows alternative and contemporary works by local art-

ists, including Julie S. Graham and Elif Soyer. This month includes: “Rose Olson: BRIGHT, COOL and HOT,” Nov. 29-Dec. 30. Open W-Su noon-5 pm. 450 Harrison Ave., 617.423.4113. KRAKOW WITKIN GALLERY

This gallery focuses on minimal and conceptually based work from international artists, including Sol LeWitt and Julian Opie, as well as many Boston artists. Open Tu-Sa 10 am-5:30 pm. 10 Newbury St., 617.262.4490. LEICA GALLERY

The Park Plaza Hotel ups its creativity with this gallery dedicated to the art of photography. A rotation of Leica photographer’s works are on display, showcasing both seasoned photographers and up-and-coming talent. Open M-Sa 10 am-7 pm, Su 10 am-6 pm. 74 Arlington St., 857.305.3609.

©MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, BOSTON

ART GALLERIES

BOSTON SCULPTORS GALLERY


Art M. FINE ARTS GALERIE

This gallery in the SoWa arts district features international contemporary artists, including Beth Carter, Marc Chalmé, Michel Delacroix and Xavier Rodés, many of whom are only represented in the U.S. here. Open Tu-Sa 10:30 am-5:30 pm. 61 Thayer St., 617.450.0700. RAFIUS FANE GALLERY

Contemporary works in multiple media, like paintings, sculptures and photography, are always on display here. “Jeffrey Schiff: DisInterRuptions,” Nov. 3-Dec. 15. Open W-F 1-5 pm, Sa-Su 11 am-4 pm. 460C Harrison Ave., Suite C24, 508.843.2184. THE SOCIETY OF ARTS AND CRAFTS

After 118 years in the Back Bay, America’s oldest craft organization moved to a brand new, 20,000-square-foot space

in Boston’s Seaport District. “From Minimal to Bling” cashand-carry group show, Nov 9-Jan 3. Open Tu-W and F-Sa 10 am-6 pm, Th 10 am-9 pm. 100 Pier 4, 617.266.1810.

ART MUSEUMS

HARVARD ART MUSEUMS

Featuring some of the nation’s foremost art collections, with holdings of Western art dating from antiquity, Islamic and Asian art, and European and American art since 1900. Exhibitions include: “Technologies of the Image: Art in 19th-century Iran,” through Jan. 7, 2018. Open daily 10 am-5 pm. Admission: $10-15. 32 Quincy St., Cambridge, 617.495.9400. THE INSTITUTE OF CONTEMPORARY ART/ BOSTON

This landmark fosters contemporary artists working in multidisciplinary forms.

Permanent collections include 21st-century sculpture, painting, video, photography and drawing. Exhibits include: “Gillian Wearing,” through Jan. 1, 2018. Also features lectures, family programs, dance and music performances, and film. Open Tu-W and Sa-Su 10 am-5 pm, Th-F 10 am-9 pm. Admission: $10-15, free ages 17 and under and to all Th 5-9 pm. 25 Harbor Shore Drive, 617.478.3100. ISABELLA STEWART GARDNER MUSEUM

Originally modeled after a 15th-century Venetian palazzo with a four-story interior courtyard garden and a modern wing in 2012, this museum gem showcases Isabella Stewart Gardner’s vast collection of more than 2,500 fine and decorative art objects, paintings, tapestries and furnishings and includes a venue for contemporary art-

ists and concerts. “Bharti Kher: Sketchbooks and Diaries,” through Sept. 6, 2018. Admission: $5-15. Open W and F-M 11 am-5 pm, Th 11 am-9 pm. 25 Evans Way, 617.566.1401. MIT LIST VISUAL ARTS CENTER

Exhibitions include: “Heimo Zobernig: Chess Painting,” through Dec. 31. Free admission. Open Tu-W and F-Su noon-6 pm, Th noon-8 pm. Wiesner Building, 20 Ames St., Cambridge, 617.253.4680.

ART WALKS/OPEN STUDIOS

SOWA FIRST FRIDAY

On the first Friday of each month more than 70 SoWa Artist Guild artists open their studios to the public, creating an art lover’s dream destination. Free event 5-9 pm. 450 Harrison Ave.

ORIGINAL PAINTINGS & LIMITED EDITION PRINTS AVAILABLE

61 THAYER STREET, BOSTON, MA 02118 617 450 0700 | MFINEARTS.COM

45


Sights Georgia O’Keeffe “O’Keeffe drew no line between the art she made and the life she lived,” explains Wanda M. Corn, guest curator of this wonderful, insightful traveling exhibition hosted by the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem. Going beyond—and adding context to—her iconic paintings, this show for the first time weaves in a selection of handmade garments and photographs of the artist, so that we can more fully understand the carefully orchestrated Georgia O’Keeffe phenomenon. East India Square, Salem, 866.745.1876

BANK OF AMERICA’S MUSEUMS ON US

Bank of America offers cardholders free admission to 150 participating cultural institutions across the U.S. on the first full weekend of each month. Seven in Massachusetts, three in the Boston area. MIT Museum, 265 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge 617.253.5927; Museum of Fine Arts, 465 Huntington Ave. 617.267.9300; Isabella Steart Gardner Museum, 25 Evans Way 617.566.1401. CITYPASS

Save 43 percent off admission and skip lines at four participating sites. Valid for nine consecutive days from first use March 1, 2017Feb. 28, 2018; purchase online or at each site. $56; $44 ages 3-11. New England Aquarium; Harvard Museum of Natural History, 26 Oxford St., Cambridge; Museum of Science, 1 Science Park; Skywalk Observatory, 800 Boylston St.; Boston Harbor Cruises, Long Wharf; For information, call 208.787.4300 or 888.330.5008.

ATTRACTIONS

MINDTREK VR

Jump down the rabbit hole of arena-based virtual reality

46 W H E R E I D E C E M B E R 2017

gaming at this hub for immersive fun—battle zombies and robots with like-minded players. Tickets available online. 34 Cummings Park Drive, 781.787.2600.

CITY SIGHTS

FANEUIL HALL

Boston merchant Peter Faneuil had this building constructed in 1742 and gave it to the city of Boston. It became known for being the breeding ground of the American Revolution, and thus called “The Cradle of Liberty.” Today, Faneuil Hall remains a symbol of freedom and houses a visitor center, the Great Hall and an armory museum. Free admission. Open daily 9 am-6 pm. Financial District, 617.523.1300. THE FREEDOM TRAIL

Focused on the American Revolution, from the Colonial period to the War of 1812, this 2.5-mile, red-painted and bricked path connects 16 historic sites, each of which has its own story. 617.357.8300.

larly hosting legendary talent. Harvard Square, Cambridge, 617.491.3434. LEGOLAND DISCOVERY CENTER

Kids ages 3-10 go absolutely crazy for this place, and its Assembly Row entrance marked by a giant yellow LEGO giraffe. Not only can children build to their hearts’ content they can tumble, climb and slide in LEGO City Play Zone or catch a movie at the 4D Cinema. Tickets: $18.95-$29.95. Open Su-Th 10 am-7 pm, F 10 am-8 pm, Sa 9 am-8 pm. 598 Assembly Row, Somerville, 866.228.6439. LOUISBURG SQUARE

Beacon Hill address that’s been home to some of Boston’s richest residents like Louisa May Alcott and the Kennedys. Many of the Greek Revival row houses remain single-family homes and surround a private, gated green. Between Pinckney and Mount Vernon streets.

HARVARD SQUARE

MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

Harvard Square pulses as the heart of Cambridge, Boston’s sister city here in the Hub. The square is noted for its great people watching, dozens of specialty book stores, eclectic shopping options, and also music clubs known for regu-

This preeminent bastion for higher learning focused on the practical application of technology, science and research for the 21st century extends over 168 acres along the Cambridge side of the Charles River Basin. The Great

Dome of Barker Library is perhaps the school’s most iconic structure, but a premium has always been placed on the entirety of the campus’ architecture, with sleek and modern buildings designed by the likes of Alvar Aalto, I.M. Pei and Frank Gehry. Visitor Center, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, 617.253.1000. NEW ENGLAND AQUARIUM

Explore the world’s waters from the Amazon rain forest to the Gulf of Maine. Come see the Giant Ocean Tank, a Caribbean coral reef environment boasting 2,000 sea creatures! Admission: $18.95-26.95. Open M-F 9 am-5 pm, Sa-Su 9 am-6 pm. NEAq’s IMAX Theater screens films daily; tickets: $7.95-9.95. 1 Central Wharf, 617.973.5200. OLD CITY HALL

This decadent structure was built 1862-1865 as one of the first buildings in the French Second Empire architectural style in the U.S and is now one of the only ones that survives. This is actually Boston’s third city hall, and it saw the service of 38 mayors through 1969, including Josiah Quincy and James M. Curley. 45 School St., 617.523.8678. OLD SOUTH MEETING HOUSE

Built in 1729 as a Puritan meetinghouse, this site is well

COURTESY TONY VACCARO STUDIO

ADMISSION/ DISCOUNT PASSES


SE ARCH THE CIT Y / For more listings, see wheretraveler.com/boston

known as the place of mass protest gatherings that led to the Boston Tea Party. Famous former congregants include Samuel Adams and Benjamin Franklin. Admission: $1-$6. Open daily 9:30 am-5 pm. 310 Washington St., 617.482.6439.

HISTORIC HOMES

COOPER-FROST-AUSTIN HOUSE

Built between 1681-1682 this “lean-to” style house is the oldest dwelling in the city of Cambridge. Despite alterations to the home over the years much of the original frame and materials remain. 21 Linnaean St., Cambridge, 617.994.6669. FREDERICK LAW OLMSTED NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE

National historic site commemorates the great American landscape artist. Free guided tours of Fairsted, Olmsted’s historic design

office and grounds, offered F-Sa between 9:30 am-4 pm. 99 Warren St., Brookline, 617.566.1689. GIBSON HOUSE

Formerly the home of widow Catherine Hammond Gibson and her son Charles, this six-level structure was designed by Boston architect Edward Clarke Cabot and built 1859-1860. Admission: $3-9. Open for guided tour only W-Su at 1 pm, 2 pm and 3 pm. 137 Beacon St., 617.267.6338. WILLIAM HICKLING PRESCOTT HOUSE

Twin Federal-era town houses named for the American historian who lived there in the mid-19th century. Features Prescott’s restored study, decorative arts and a costume collection. Open W-Th and Sa 1-4 pm. Admission: $8. 55 Beacon St., 617.742.3190.

LIBRARIES/CULTURAL CENTERS

BOSTON ATHENAEUM

One of the city’s largest and oldest membership libraries and its first museum of fine arts. Visitors may tour the first floor and galleries M-Th 9 am-8 pm, F 9 am-5:30 pm, Sa 9 am-4 pm, Su noon-4 pm. 10 1/2 Beacon St., 617.227.0270. BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY

America’s first municipally-funded public library houses millions of books, manuscripts, music scores and art and boasts a scenic courtyard, events and exhibits. Open M-Th 9 am-9 pm, F-Sa 9 am-5 pm, Su 1-5 pm. Copley Square, 617.536.5400.

MUSEUMS

BOSTON TEA PARTY SHIPS & MUSEUM

Live actors, tea-tossing reenactments, high-tech interactive exhibits, a film and

Sights

three authentically restored tea ships tell the full story of the Boston Tea Party and its aftermath. Guided tours every 30 minutes, daily 10 am-4 pm. Tickets: $18-28. 306 Congress St., 866.955.0667. DREAMLAND WAX MUSEUM

Famous historical faces come alive through the magic of wax and expert craftsmanship. Located near City Hall and Faneuil Hall Marketplace. Open Su-W 10 am-7 pm, Th-Sa 10 am-9 pm. 1 Washington St., 508.400.1712. EDWARD M. KENNEDY INSTITUTE FOR THE UNITED STATES SENATE

The Edward M. Kennedy Institute offers a dynamic, interactive experience in democracy. Visit a full-scale representation of the United States Senate Chamber and see a replica of Senator Kennedy’s Washington office.

Awe-INSPIRING GLOBAL Perspective Boston LANDMARK SEE THE MAPPARIUM® at THE MARY BAKER EDDY LIBRARY

Experience a three-dimensional perspective of the earth! Newly installed LED lights now produce even deeper colors and tones in this world-famous stained-glass globe. M B E L I B R A RY.O R G | 617- 4 5 0 -7 0 0 0 | 2 0 0 M A S S AC H U S E T T S AV E . , B O S T O N

47


Sights

SE ARCH THE CIT Y / For more listings, see wheretraveler.com/boston

Open Tu-Su 10 am-5 pm. Admission: $8-16. Columbia Point, 210 Morrissey Blvd., 617.740.7000. HARVARD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY

Offers a look at fascinating objects, including meteorites, 1,500 mammal and bird specimens, and the a dazzling collection of 3,000 glass flowers and plants. Open daily 9 am-5 pm. Admission: $8-12. 26 Oxford St., Cambridge, 617.495.3045. JOHN F. KENNEDY PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY AND MUSEUM

Dedicated to JFK and the legacy of Camelot, spotlighting such subjects as JFK as a child, the 1960 campaign, Vietnam, the Peace Corps, and civil rights. Open daily 9 am-5 pm. Admission: $10-14, free ages 12 and under. Columbia Point, 617.514.1600.

48 W H E R E I D E C E M B E R 2017

THE MARY BAKER EDDY LIBRARY

Explore achievements of Mary Baker Eddy, 19th-century writer, teacher and businesswoman who founded the Christian Science religion, The Church of Christ, Scientist, and the newspaper The Christian Science Monitor. Admission: $4-6. Open Tu-Su 10 am-4 pm. 200 Massachusetts Ave., 617.450.7000. MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY

New England’s largest African-American history museum. This month: “Picturing Frederick Douglass: The Most Photographed American of the 19th Century,” through December. Open M-Sa 10 am-4 pm. Admission by donation. 46 Joy St., 617.725.0022.

MUSEUM OF SCIENCE

A compelling technology and science-based destination. Permanent exhibits study the weather, mathematics, space, the human body and other “minds-on” topics. Admission: $20-25. Open Sa-Th 9 am-5 pm, F 9 am-9 pm. 1 Science Park, 617.723.2500. MUSEUM OF THE ANCIENT AND HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY OF MASSACHUSETTS

Chartered in 1638 as the New World’s first organized military. Headquarters have been in Faneuil Hall since 1746. Today, the space is a museum featuring artifacts from every war America has been a part of. Open M-F 9 am-3:30 pm. Faneuil Hall, 617.227.1638.

PAUL S. RUSSELL, MD MUSEUM OF MEDICAL HISTORY AND INNOVATION

This medical museum tells the rich story of Massachusetts General Hospital’s two centuries of history. Learn about the hospital’s important contributions to the medical field and see how these discoveries and advancements have shaped the present. Open M-F 9 am-5 pm, Sa 11 am-5 pm. Free admission. Massachusetts General Hospital, 2 North Grove St., 617.724.8009. PEABODY ESSEX MUSEUM

Collections include American art and architecture, maritime art and history, Native American art, Asian export, African, Oceanic and contemporary art, photography and the fascinating Yin Yu Tang house. Exhibits include: “All the Flowers Are for Me,” through April 1, 2018; upcom-


Sights ing: “PlayTime” Feb. 10-May 6, 2018. Great hands-on activities, tours, concerts, classes and family programs. Open Tu-Su 10 am-5 pm. Admission: Adults $20, seniors $18, students (with ID) $12; Free for youth (under 16) and Salem residents (with ID). 161 Essex St., Salem, 866.745.1876. SALEM WITCH MUSEUM

This popular museum brings the Witch Trials of 1692 to life, recreating the drama of accusers and accused, court proceedings and the execution of 20 victims. On exhibit: “Witches: Evolving Perceptions.” Multilingual translations available. Admission $9-12, free under age 6. Open daily 10 am-5 pm. 19 1/2 Washington Square North, Salem, 978.744.1692. THE PEABODY MUSEUM OF ARCHAEOLOGY AND ETHNOLOGY

Offers collections of human cultural history from Africa to Europe and South America. Exhibits include: “Arts of War: Artistry in Weapons Across Cultures,” through 2017. Admission: $8-12. Open daily 9 am-5 pm. 11 Divinity Ave., Cambridge, 617.496.1027. THE USS CONSTITUTION MUSEUM

Located beside where Old Ironsides is berthed, the museum teaches about the historic warship named by George Washington. Suggested $3-10 donation. Open daily 9 am-6 pm. Charlestown Navy Yard, 617.426.1812.

PARKS & NATURE

ARNOLD ARBORETUM

Founded in 1872 and administered by Harvard University, the historic arboretum designed by Frederick Law Olmsted is a great escape from the city, and consists of 281 acres filled with trees, flowers and plants from around the globe. Open daily sunrise to sunset. Visitor Center open Th-Tu 10 am-5

pm. 125 Arborway, Jamaica Plain, 617.524.1718. MOUNT AUBURN CEMETERY

America’s first landscaped cemetery. Many 19th-century forward thinkers buried: Mary Baker Eddy, Isabella Stewart Gardner, Oliver Wendall Holmes. Programs and tours. Grounds open 8 am-6 pm; visitor information, M-Sa 8:30 am-4:30 pm. 580 Mt. Auburn St., Cambridge, 617.547.7105.

RECREATION

BLUE HILLS SKI AREA

Located only half-an-hour away from Boston, Blue Hills Ski Area in Canton is quite the ideal place to hit the slopes whether on skis or a snowboard. If you’re really itching to get out into the fresh snow, but have nowhere to go in your immediate vicinity, then this is the perfect day escape for you. With several trails for all different levels ranging from beginner to expert, there’s plenty of opportunity to carve some snow. You can even purchase season passes as well. 4001 Washington St., 781.828.5070. BROOKLYN BOULDERS

This specialized fitness center is the place to get your climb on. Bouldering and auto belay, top roping and lead climbing and a variety of wall heights. Day pass: $29. Gear rentals: $2-$11. Open M-F 7 am-11:00 pm, Sa-Su 9 am-11:00 pm. 12A Tyler St., Somerville, 617.623.6700.

SPORTING EVENTS

NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS

Quarterback Tom Brady and team rule the Razor. Home games: Buffalo Bills, Dec. 24 at 1 pm; New York Jets, Dec. 31 at 1 pm. Ticket prices vary. Gillette Stadium, 1 Patriot Place, Foxboro. Tickets: 800.745.3000.

49


Explore North End Pizza Tour Dough, pugilism and history feature on this marvelous North End walkabout, which begins at the statue of boxer Tony DeMarco and follows a trail of tomato and melted cheese past some of the city’s most fascinating buildings, from the Paul Revere House (circa 1680) to the Clough House: an old print shop built in the early 18th century. With delicious slices at every turn, from a daily rotation of world-class pizza houses, both hunger and curiosity will be fully satisfied. bostonpizzatours.com, 617.401.0661

The three-deck Odyssey luxury yacht features sails around Boston Harbor and chef-curated plated meals. After dinner, dance to music by live bands. Cruise options: lunch, dinner and brunch. New Year’s Eve Dinner Cruise includes a champagne toast at midnight. Visit website for full schedule. Tickets start at $51.90. 60 Rowes Wharf, 866.307.2469.

NEIGHBORHOODS

BACK BAY

Back Bay is one posh place to spend some leisure time. Stores on Newbury Street and designer boutiques in Copley Place provide lavish shopping options and outdoor green spaces like the Public Garden and Copley Square offer serene spots to sit. DOWNTOWN

This is the historic heart of Boston. The Freedom Trail begins here at Boston Common and continues past sights like the Granary Burying Ground and Old State House. For shopping and dining, head down Winter Street to Downtown Crossing. SOUTH END

This enclave jumps right from the pages of a Henry James novel and is on the National

50 W H E R E I D E C E M B E R 2017

Register of Historic Places as the country’s largest Victorian row house district. Food fans go wild for the sheer volume of great restaurants, while culture vultures devour the vibrant art scene. THEATER DISTRICT

Historic stages clustered on Tremont and Washington streets, such as the Colonial, Wang, Shubert, Majestic and the Opera House, host Broadway tours as well as smaller traveling productions and homegrown theatrical endeavors.

TOURS

BOSTON DUCK TOURS

Eighty-minute tour narrated by “conDUCKtors” versed in local lore. Combines land tour with a splash in the Charles River. Departs the Prudential Center, Museum of Science and New England Aquarium daily. Tickets: $10.5039.50. Prudential Center, 53 Huntington Ave.; Museum of Science, 1 Science Park; New England Aquarium, 1 Central Wharf; 617.267.3825. BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY ART & ARCHITECTURE TOURS

America’s first free municipal library has free guided tours taking visitors beyond the bookshelves to examine works by John Singer Sargent, Daniel Chester French, Pierre

Puvis de Chavannes and Edwin Austin Abbey. Departs Dartmouth Street lobby M 2:30 pm, Tu and Th 6 pm, W and F-Sa 11 am, Su 2 pm. 700 Boylston St., 617.536.5400. OFF THE BEATEN PATH FOOD TOURS

History, folklore and fabulous local food—from root beer floats to artisanal gyros, pies and pizza—converge in the neighborhoods of Cambridge and Somerville. Davis Square and Union Square are the focus, with more tours of nearby hotspots on the way. Morning and afternoon tours on Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Check website for details. Somerville & Cambridge. OLD TOWN TROLLEY

Narrated historical journey takes in points of interest like the Freedom Trail and Fenway Park. Ride in a continuous loop or disembark and reboard as you choose at 19 convenient stops. Departs daily 9 am-5 pm. Tickets online. 855.396.7433.

TRANSPORTATION: NORTHEAST REGIONAL

AMTRAK

Amtrack offers the convenience of high-speed rail services, with routes like the Acela Express that travels

from Boston to Washington, D.C., and The Downeaster, which journeys from Boston to Portland, Maine. North Station, 135 Causeway St. 800.872.7245; Back Bay Station, 145 Dartmouth St.; South Station, 2 South Station. STEAMSHIP AUTHORITY

Year-round ferry and fast-ferry service from Cape Cod to Martha’s Vineyard and Nantucket, for both passengers and vehicles. Tickets: $4.50-107 (additional charges for cars, bikes, etc.). 508.477.8600; Hyannis Terminal, 65 South St., Hyannis, 508.771.4000; Woods Hole Terminal, 1 Cowdry Road, Woods Hole, 508.548.3788.

TRANSPORTATION: PUBLIC & CITY

BOSTON COMMUTER BOAT SERVICE

This MBTA commuter boat service crosses between Charlestown Navy Yard and Long Wharf in the Financial District. It’s a quick (10 minutes) way to get to Charlestown to explore attractions like the USS Constitution Museum. Fare: $3.50. Departs M-F 6:30 am-8 pm, Sa-Su 10 am-6 pm. 1 Long Wharf 617.227.4321.

©JAMES CAMP

CRUISES

ODYSSEY CRUISES


Explore BOSTON HARBOR CRUISES WATER TAXI

The Water Taxi operates year-round, offering travelers an alternative to traditional ground transportation. Look for 28 water taxi stops along the waterfront. Call for a pick-up 6:30 am-10 pm (until 8 pm on Su). Tickets available onboard: $12. 1 Long Wharf 617.227.4320. LOGAN EXPRESS

S

RIDES

SAVE 45%

BOSTON’S 4 TOP ATTRACTIONS � BUY HERE �

New England Aquarium Museum of Science Skywalk Observatory at the Prudential Center Boston Harbor Cruises Harvard Museum of Natural History 98% RECOMMEND CityPASS VALID 9 DAYS

citypass.com Savings based on adult pricing. Program, pricing and discounts subject to change; visit citypass.com for current details.

NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS FOOTBALL TRAINS TO GILLETTE STADIUM

Hitch a ride to the Razor on the MBTA Commuter Rail’s Football Trains and catch a New England Patriots home game. Trains depart Boston approximately two hours before kick-off and depart Foxboro 30 minutes after the conclusion of the game. Please note that these tickets are different from commuter passes and CharlieCards: $20 round-trip.

Full-service buses take travelers to Logan International Airport, making stops at SUPERSHUTTLE each terminal, from the Back Around-the-clock, affordaBay at Hynes Convention ble, shared-ride airport Center and Copley T Station. transportation since 1983. Allow 20 minutes travel SuperShuttle serves Logan time. Daily 5 am-9 pm. International Airport and $5; free with valid MBTA more than 40 other airports pass. Logan International nationwide, offering doorAirport, 800.235.6426; Hynes � BUY HERE to-door � service, group rates, Convention Center, 900 charters, and frequent flier Boylston St.; Copley Square T points and miles with seStation, 650 Boylston St. lect airlines. Find curb-side MBTA BUS attendants at Terminals A, The Massachusetts Bay B, C and E daily 7 am-11 pm. Transportation Authority Customers can also book onoffers bus services to compleline or by mobile app. Logan ment its subway system. Bus International Airport. For routes run throughout Boston after-hour service (11 pm-7 am), proper, Greater Boston and please call 617.567.8900. suburbs. Operates from USEFUL INFORMATION 5:15-12:30 am. Fares: $1.70-2. GREATER BOSTON 617.222.3200. MBTA SUBWAY

CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU

Boston’s subway system (a.k.a. the “T”) is the nation’s oldest. It is comprised of five lines (Red, Orange, Blue, Green and Silver) and connects areas like Newton, Malden and Logan Airport with Downtown Boston. Fare per ride: $2.252.75. The subway operates from 5 am 1 am. 617.222.3200.

The GBCVB has two locations stocked with visitor guides, maps, and brochures from local businesses and more. Open daily 9 am-5 pm. Boston Common Visitor Information Center, 139 Tremont St.; Prudential Center Visitor Information Desk, 800 Boylston St.

NEW BALANCE HUBWAY

THE SHATTUCK EMERALD

Hubway features 180 bicycle NECKLACE VISITOR CENTER Old Stony Brook Gatehouse rental stations across Boston in the Back Bay Fens for where visitors can grab a bike information about Boston’s and pedal off for a tour of Emerald Necklace parks creatthe city. Select Cambridge ed by Frederick Law Olmsted. locations open year-round. Open M-F 9 am-5 pm, Sa-Su Price: $6 for 24 hours; $20 citypass.com 11 am-4 pm. 125 The Fenway, monthly pass; $85 yearly pass. 617.522.2700. 855.948.2929.

51


Scene Event Cinema: “Casablanca” The 75th anniversary of perennial favorite and silver-screen masterpiece “Casablanca” prompts this “play it again” two-day event, featuring a special introduction by Turner Classic Movies that’s sure to add a fascinating layer of behindthe-scenes backstory. Humphrey Bogart is quite simply magnificent as Rick, squeezed between love and conscience in wartime Africa. When Ingrid Bergman shows up the real movie magic kicks in. Screening at a selection of theaters in the Boston area. showcasecinemas.com

THE KINSALE IRISH PUB & RESTAURANT

Contemporary art and views of Boston, this spot curates its wine list and creates cocktails based on famous masterworks. Patio includes fire pits and snack menu. Open Su-M 6:30 am-3 pm, Tu-Sa 6:30 am-11 pm. 40 Edwin Land Blvd., Cambridge, 617.806.4122.

Celtic craftsmanship and an interior imported directly from the old country create an atmosphere perfect for kindred spirits and hearty pints. The dining room is packed daily with local businesspeople lunching or grabbing a drink after work, while evenings and weekends afford a fun, friendly crowd ready for live music, trivia or conversation. Validated parking M-F after 5 pm, Sa-Su anytime, max three hours and minimum check $20. 2 Center Plaza, 617.742.5577.

MIRACLE OF SCIENCE BAR & GRILL

Near MIT, this “geek-chic” watering hole caters to its brainy clientele with beaker-inspired bar ware and a huge periodic table of menu items that decorates the tiny space. A full bar offers great mixed libations, while the food is focused on things like kebabs, burgers and salads. Open daily 11-1 am. 321 Massachusetts Ave., 617.868.2866.

BARS: IRISH

THE BURREN

Named for a stretch in County Clare filled with stone structures, this no-frills Irish pub slings cheap beer, good cheer and is a Davis Square staple. There’s live traditional Irish music seven days a week. Open M-Th 11:30-1 am, F 11:30 am-2 am, Sa 10 am-2 am, Su 10 am-1 am. 247 Elm St., Somerville, 617.776.6896.

52 W H E R E I D E C E M B E R 2017

THE WHISKEY PRIEST

Carries more than 100 whiskeys and menu ranges from traditional Irish fare to American comfort food. Roof deck and 32 beers on draft. Live music on weekends. Open M-F 11:30-2 am, Sa-Su 10-2 am. 150 Northern Ave., 617.426.8111.

BARS: SPORTS

GAME ON! SPORTS CAFE

The self-titled “official” bar of any game that’s on, this two-story venue sidles up to Fenway Park. Above the bar and around the room, more than 30 HDTVs screen professional and college games. Menu includes wings, pizzas and other pub grub. Open Su-W 11:30 am-1 am, Th-Sa

11:30 am-2 am. 82 Lansdowne St., 617.351.7001. JOSHUA TREE BAR & GRILL

Sports, burgers and beer are big here. Custom draft system offers 32 beers on tap; sporting matches shown on a 106-inch HD projector screen. Open M-Th 4 pm-1 am, F 11:30-2 am, Sa 11-2 am, Su 11-midnight. 256 Elm St., Somerville, 617.623.9910.

BILLIARDS/BOWLING

KINGS LANES, LOUNGE AND BILLIARDS

Swanky gaming hall and lounge, with locations in Back Bay and Seaport. Rack ‘em and shoot ‘em on vintage Brunswick Gold Crown billiard tables or test your skills at bowling, shuffleboard or skee ball. Players who want to feast can nosh on American food with a Southwestern bite. Bowling rates: $7-9 per person per game; shoe rental $4. Billiards and shuffleboard: $15-18 per hour. Open M-W 3 pm-1 am, Th-F noon-1 am, Sa noon-2 am, Su noon-11 pm; 21+ after 6 pm. 50 Dalton St., 617.266.2695; 60 Seaport Blvd., 617.401.0025.

BREWERIES & DISTILLERIES

AERONAUT BREWERY

Started by beer-enthusiast friends (of MIT and Yale), the brewery has a distinct home-

grown, laid-back feel. Open Tu-Th 5 pm-midnight, F 5 pm-12:30 am, Sa noon-12:30 am, Su noon-8 pm. 14 Tyler St., Somerville, 617.987.4236. BOSTON HARBOR DISTILLERY

This local distillery opened its doors in late spring of 2015 serving up its signature liquor—Lawley’s New England Spirit—from within this former factory. For 10 bucks, visitors can take a tour of the 11,000-square-foot space, learn about the building and the distillery’s history, and try a couple samples in the lounge. Open Sa 1-7 pm. 12R Ericsson St., Dorchester, 617.533.7001. SAMUEL ADAMS BREWERY

Craft brewery known for the Sam Adams family of beers. Free hour-long brewery tour and sampling session. Tours M-Th and Sa 10 am-3 pm, F 10 am-5:30 pm. Suggested donation: $2. Shop hours M-Th 10 am-6 pm, F 10 am-6:30 pm, Sa 10 am-4 pm. 30 Germania St., Jamaica Plain, 617.368.5080.

COMEDY

THE COMEDY STUDIO

Above the iconic Hong Kong, The Comedy Studio has been spotlighting comedians who push boundaries for 15 years. National headliners try out new material as do newcom-

©BREVE STORIA DEL CINEMA/CREATIVE COMMONS

BARS

ARTBAR


SE ARCH THE CIT Y / For more listings, see wheretraveler.com/boston

ers hoping to break into the industry. Running themes include: “Mystery Lounge,” “The Big Saturday Night Show,” and “The Sunday Funnies.” Tickets: $10-12. Shows: Tu-Su at 8 pm. 1236 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, 617.661.6507. LAUGH BOSTON

This standup comedy venture features different performers every week. Shows include: Sarah Tiana Dec. 1-2; Michelle Wolf Dec. 8-9; Chris Distefano, Dec. 15-16. Show times: W-Th at 8 pm, F-Sa at 7:30 pm and 10 pm. Ticket prices vary per show: $15-25. 425 Summer St., 617.725.2844.

FILMS

COOLIDGE CORNER THEATRE

theaters in the country—that shows predominantly art and independent films. Full schedule online. 290 Harvard St., Brookline, 617.734.2500. THE BRATTLE THEATER

Classic, cutting-edge, foreign and art-house films are shown at this repertory theater, where a screening of the German film, “Der Hauptmann von Köpenick,” kicked things off in 1953. Schedule online. 40 Brattle St., Cambridge, 617.876.6837.

LIVE MUSIC CLUBS

HOUSE OF BLUES

This landmark concert hall on Lansdowne Street can accommodate up to 2,400 fans. This month includes: The Roots, Dec. 26 at 7 pm; The Mighty Mighty Bosstones, Dec. 28-30 at 7 pm. Full schedule online. 15 Lansdowne St., 888.693.2583.

This building was originally a church, but was converted into a theater in 1933 and is now an Art Deco movie house—one of the top 10 WhereAd art house film3/1/17 exhibition 11:54 AM

Page 1

THE PARADISE ROCK CLUB & LOUNGE

More than just a rock club, The Paradise is a Boston institution with a list of past performers that includes the music industry’s finest. This month includes: Jake Bugg, Dec. 5 at 7 pm; Dispatch, Dec. 16 at 7 pm; Dopapod, Dec. 31 at 8 pm. Full schedule online. Doors one hour prior to show. Ticket prices vary. 967/969 Commonwealth Ave., Allston, 617.562.8820. Concert line: 617.562.8800.

PERFORMANCE VENUES

THE ROCKWELL

Everything from theater to comedy to concerts is offered at this Somerville favorite. This month includes: Ian Ethan Case, Dec. 3; New Year’s Eve Spectacular with Jim McCue, Dec. 31. Full schedule available on website. 255 Elm St., Somerville, 617.684.5335. SHUBERT THEATER AT BOCH CENTER

Opened in 1910 as a stage for Shakespearean productions, the Shubert has hosted that and a lot more, seeing performances by John Barrymore, Richard Burton and Julie Andrews. Today, many community arts groups offer productions here. Tickets from $39.50. 267 Tremont St. 866.348.9738. WANG THEATRE AT BOCH CENTER

The Wang Theater, formerly The Metropolitan Theater, features crystal chandeliers, gilded Renaissance-style frescoes and imported marble. Full schedule online. 270 Tremont St., 866.348.9738.

THEATER

AMERICAN REPERTORY THEATER

Professional nonprofit that’s won a Pulitzer Prize and a number of Tony Awards. This month at Oberon: “Sweeney Todd,” Dec. 7; “Marga Gomez - Latin Standards,” Dec. 14. Show times vary. Tickets:

Scene

$25-85. Loeb Drama Center, 64 Brattle St., Cambridge, 617.547.8300. BROADWAY IN BOSTON

Broadway in Boston presents the official touring productions of hit Broadway plays and musicals. Principal show times: Tu-Th 7:30 pm, F 8 pm, Sa 2 pm and 8 pm, Su 1 pm and 6:30 pm. Boston Opera House, 539 Washington St. 866.523.7469. THE LYRIC STAGE COMPANY OF BOSTON

Artistic director Spiro Veloudos leads Boston’s oldest professional theater company, a mid-size organization that produces contemporary productions written by accomplished and emerging playwrights from Shaw to Mamet. This month “Hold These Truths.” Tickets start at $36. 140 Clarendon St., 617.585.5678. SHEAR MADNESS

Fresh, funny and set in a hair salon, this “whodunit” lets the audience match wits with the suspects to catch the killer in this hilarious murder mystery. Show times: Tu-F at 8 pm, Sa at 5 pm and 8 pm, Su at 3 pm and 7 pm; call for added shows. Tickets: $61. Stage II at The Charles Playhouse, 74 Warrenton St., 617.426.5225.

TICKETS

ARTSBOSTON CALENDAR

What to do, where to go, what to see: The ArtsBoston Calendar is a go-to resource for current and upcoming performances, exhibits, festivals and free events. The site is updated daily, curated weekly and features hundreds of deals from BosTix. TICKETMASTER

Provides tickets for concerts, sporting events, arts, theater and family activities at local venues and arenas. 800.745.3000.

53


Food Yvonne’s Holiday Lunch Once known as Locke-Ober, Yvonne’s was a men-only watering hole until 1971, patronized by the likes of JFK and Frank Sinatra, but in 2015 the place was reborn as a thoroughly modern supper club (named after the portrait of ‘Mademoiselle Yvonne’ that hung there for more than a century). Following tradition, the joint opens early on Fridays during December for reservation-only holiday lunches featuring classics such as Lobster Thermidore and Sticky Toffee Pudding. 2 Winter Pl., 617.267.0047

French Acclaimed chef Daniel Boulud operates this Frenchinspired bistro and wine bar at the Mandarin Oriental hotel. Chef de Cuisine Michael Denk runs the kitchen, offering traditional Parisian bistro fare. B, L and D (daily), brunch (Sa-Su). Mandarin Oriental, 776 Boylston St., 617.535.8800. DAVIO’S NORTHERN ITALIAN STEAKHOUSE

Italian Grand and sophis-

ticated, this restaurant is amenable to dates, business dinners, or even a simple glass of wine at the bar. Lengthy menu features regional dishes from northern Italy, as well as grilled meat a la carte. Gluten-free menu available. L (M-F), D (daily). 75 Arlington St., 617.357.4810. $$$$; 236 Patriot Place, Foxboro 508.339.4810. EARLS KITCHEN & BAR

American Although the first Earls cropped up in Canada in 1982, everything about the Somerville and Prudential Center outposts is local, from design elements to staff. Concept is upscale casual; vibe is lively; food is modern, scratch-made and sourced around here. Favorites, depending on the venue, include the Cajun blackened chicken breast and the messily more-ish Avocado Super

54 W H E R E I D E C E M B E R 2017

Toast (with a cheeky kick of Sriracha). At the bar, we especially love Earls’ honey-lemony Bees Knees, served short. L and D (daily). Assembly Row, Somerville; 800 Boylston St., 857.957.0949. LUKE’S LOBSTER

Seafood This Maine-style lobster dining destination serves up sustainable seafood and has a commitment to preserving its local fisheries. It’s food with a conscience and loads of flavor. L and D (daily). 75 Exeter St, 857.350.4626. RED LANTERN

Pan-Asian This foxy Asianstyle restaurant and lounge off the Back Bay’s beaten track has some pretty amazing food. Try Chef Kevin Long’s duck buns (think slowcooked hoisin barbecue duck with pickles stuffed into taco-shaped, fluffy, steamed bread), as well as the Singapore street noodles, the spicy tuna tempura roll and, frankly, the martinis. Excellent gluten-free offerings available. D (daily). 39 Stanhope St., 617.262.3900. $$$ SONSIE

International One of the best features of this longstanding Newbury Street restaurant are its French doors that open right onto the sidewalk. Inside, the vibe can be club-

by, sophisticated and chic without being pretentious. Chef Bill Poirier’s menu is international in flavor, seasonal in ingredients and follows the trends of upscale dining. In the morning, Sonsie serves espresso drinks and pastries. B (daily), L (M-F), D (daily), brunch (Sa, Su). 327 Newbury St., 617.351.2500. $$$ STEPHANIE’S ON NEWBURY

American This popular, prep-

py bistro has been a landmark on Newbury Street for 20-plus years. A recent renovation has it looking as fresh as the menu, which serves up awesome comfort food as well as a number of signature dishes. In season, Stephanie’s expansive patio is consistently packed. Great after work bar scene for professionals. B (M-F), L and D (daily), brunch (Sa, Su). 190 Newbury St., 617.236.0990. $$$ TAPEO RESTAURANT & TAPAS BAR

Small Plates-Tapas Colorful tiles and a Spanish vibe set the tone for a sensuous and authentic dining experience. Menu features tapas frias y calientes, and we suggest visiting with an empty stomach because selecting only a few of these delicious small plates will be a challenge! Innovative main dishes and hot stone grilling are great for heartier

appetites or to share with a few people. L (Sa-Su), D (daily). 266 Newbury St., 617.267.4799. $-$$$ TOP OF THE HUB

American Expect modern, eclectic takes on regional New England cuisine with a focus on seafood. Top of the Hub also stands 52 stories above the city, so diners get a stunning view. Two wine cellars are the winners of Wine Spectator’s Award of Excellence. Dancing and live music in the lounge. L (M-Sa), D (daily), brunch (Su). Prudential Center, 800 Boylston St., 617.536.1775. $$$

CAMBRIDGE/CENTRAL SQUARE

INDIA PAVILION

Indian This neighborhood mainstay introduced Indian food to the Cambridge community in 1979, when it took up residence in a former pizzeria. Today, the restaurant has expanded and features two authentic tandoor ovens and plenty of seating. Food ranges from lobster mushroom masala to goat vindaloo; excellent selection of breads, kabobs and vegetarian cuisine. L and D (daily), brunch (Su). 17 Central Square, Cambridge, 617.547.7463. $

©LISA RICHOV

BACK BAY

BAR BOULUD


Food 1525 WASHINGTON ST Boston, MA 02118

617.247.7747

5 off

$

your appetizer, any day/ any time, no restriction with this ad!

Located in the heart of Boston’s South End Neighborhood Stella offers affordable and innovative Italian cuisine in a chic environment.

LIFE ALIVE URBAN OASIS & ORGANIC CAFE

American The decor at

organic cafe is a magnet for vegetarians, vegans, macrobiotic and raw eaters and/or those who follow a gluten-free and paleo diets. The plant-based menu is filled with healthy “warm meals” and “cool meals” with fun names. B (M-Sa), L and D (daily). 765 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, 617.354.5433. $

Pammy’s is simple, rustic, classical and decadent all at the same time: just like the menu, where Sicilian anchovies elope with ricotta-stuffed artichokes and handsomely crisped red snapper dances a lascivious tango with Pammy’s signature chili sauce. Stellar. D (M-Sa). 928 Massachusetts Ave., 617.945.1761.

Vegetarian-Vegan-Raw All-

LITTLE DONKEY

Small Plates-Tapas James Beard Award-winning chefs Ken Oringer and Jamie Bissonnette focus on their global travels through diverse and unique (truly!) small plates, a raw bar, rotating charcuterie and eclectic cocktails. B and L (M-F), dinner (daily), Br (SaSu). 505 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, 617.945.1008.

CAMBRIDGE/ HARVARD SQUARE

BEAT BRASSERIE

American American and internationally inspired food mingle with the offbeat live music in an atmosphere rife with whimsy and joie de vivre. Great cocktails and sustainable, small-batch wines. D (daily), brunch (Sa-Su). 13 Brattle St., Cambridge, 617.499.0001. CLOVER FOOD LAB

Vegetarian-Vegan-Raw The philosophy behind this foodtruck-turned-brick-and-mortar creation is simplicity and speed. With an average serve time around 3.5 minutes, there’s no need to wait long for a fresh, delicious meal. The food is locally sourced and the menu is constantly changing to keep pace with the seasons. And don’t forget to order a one-of-a-kind drink like cinnamon lemonade or maple soda. B, L and D (daily). Locations include: 1075 Cambridge St., Cambridge; 5 Cambridge Center, Cambridge; 6 Harvard St., Brookline.

PAMMY’S

CAMBRIDGE/ KENDALL SQUARE

CAFÉ ARTSCIENCE

American/French No surprise this place is within the bounds of MIT. Café ArtScience explores innovations within the culinary world and shows off products being developed onsite. Inhale a cocktail or a flavor cloud; then munch on the refined, innovative cuisine. L (M-F), D (M-Sa). 650 E. Kendall St., Cambridge, 857.999.2193.

CHINATOWN

DOUBLE CHIN

Asian Fusion Gloria and Emily Chin opened their new Chinatown-Theater District Hong Kong style cafe hoping to corner the college and post-college aged crowd with delightful and calorie-heavy Asian-American treats of both the sweet and savory variety. Try modern Asian fusion salads, sandwiches and comfort food, including Craisin crab rangoon, Asian-inspired “poutine” and Spam-and-taro fries. Dessert is decadent, from Matcha Tres Leches Grass Jelly to the signature cube toast. Open 7 am-midnight. 86 Harrison Ave., 617.482.0682. NEW SHANGHAI

Chinese Highly-skilled Shanghainese chefs man the kitchen that offers Shanghaistyle cuisine, as well as Szechuan and Americanized entrees. Don’t miss the specialty Shanghai-style cold dishes. L and D (daily). 21 Hudson St., 617.338.6688. $$

55


Food

SE ARCH THE CIT Y / For more listings, see wheretraveler.com/boston

DOWNTOWN

FAJITAS & ‘RITAS

Southwestern Easygoing restaurant featuring fresh, healthy southwestern barbecue and Texan fare at bargain prices. An all-around fun place to drink some of Boston’s best—and sturdiest—margaritas. L and D (daily). 25 West St., 617.426.1222. YVONNE’S

Global Supper club experience with a contemporary approach. Dining among the sophisticated but noisy crowd is meant to be social and shared. D (daily). 2 Winter Place, 617.267.0047.

FINANCIAL DISTRICT/ WATERFRONT

LEGAL SEA FOODS

Seafood Discover award-winning chowder, pristine oysters, succulent Maine lobster, and more than 40 varieties of delicious fish and shellfish. Excellent wine list. Hours vary by location. 100 Huntington Ave., 617.266.7775; 255 State St., 617.742.5300; 26 Park Plaza, Theater District, 617.426.4444; 20 University Road, Cambridge, 617.491.9400. UNION OYSTER HOUSE

Seafood Opened in 1826, Union Oyster House is a National Historic Landmark and the nation’s oldest continuously operating restaurant. Fresh seafood is the main attraction and always has been, and the menu is heavy-handed on shellfish and oysters, fried and broiled fish, baked, boiled and broiled lobster and local Yankee favorites. L and D (daily). 41 Union St., 617.227.2750. $$

KENMORE SQUARE/ FENWAY

SALONIKI

Greek Jody Adams’ casual Greek to-go: patrons can build their own pita wrap choosing from a variety of proteins and sauces, or they can select from classic recipes. Salads, soups and a couple sweets make up the rest

56 W H E R E I D E C E M B E R 2017

of the menu. L and D (daily). 4 Kilmarnock St., 617.266.0001; 181 Massachusettes Ave., Cambridge, 617.714.5151.

unparalleled in this city. D (TuSa). 9 East St., 617.654.9900. $$$$

SOL AZTECA

Café One of Boston’s oldest

Mexican Cactus enchiladas covered in green sauce and chicken Veracruzano are just two of the many traditional Mexican dishes at this quaint restaurant. Sip on Central and South American varietals. D (daily). 914 Beacon St., 617.262.0909. TAPESTRY

American Two-part dining venture featuring globally inspired fare in the laid-back, beachy setting of the openkitchen-style Expo Kitchen as well as inspired, upscale cuisine in the Club Room. D (Tu-Su), brunch (Sa-Su). 69 Kilmarnock St., 617.421.4470. WAHLBURGERS

American Around the corner from Fenway Park, quintessential Bostonians Mark, Donnie and Paul Wahlberg open the third outpost in their family’s small chain of burger joints. On the menu: burgers and artisan-style sandwiches, onion rings, boozy frappes and more. L and D (daily). 132 Brookline Ave., 617.927.6810.

LEATHER DISTRICT

LA COLOMBE

Coffee Premium coffee roaster from Philadelphia. Unique offerings include bottled cold brew to-go and lattes on tap. Open M-F 7 am-7 pm, Sa-Su 8 am-6 pm. 745 Atlantic Ave., 857.317.5340. O YA

Japanese Located in a century-old fire station, Tim Cushman’s upscale O Ya is Boston’s coolest place for modern Japanese cuisine. The izakaya-style menu offers elegant dishes with interesting and innovative ingredient combinations and flavors; diners can also indulge in the omakase chef’s tasting menu. Sake list is extensive and

NORTH END

CAFFE DELLO SPORT

caffés where sports play almost as important a role as the delicious Italian roasts. Select from espresso, caffè latte or latte macchiato or lunch on the inzaghi, zanetti or di vaio paninis. Imported grappa, Limoncello, Sambuca and other specialty liqueurs. Caffé Dello Sport also screens soccer matches direct from Italy, on two large screens. B, L and D (daily). Cash only. 308 Hanover St., 617.523.5063. $ IL MOLO

Seafood Seafood focused eatery with Chef Pino Maffeo serving up housemade pastas, fresh oysters and fish-focused entrees like hay-roasted salmon with seasonal vegetables. L (Th-Sa), D (M-Sa), brunch (Su). 326 Commercial St., 857.277.1895. MOTHER JUICE

Vegetarian-Vegan-Raw Delicious veggie, vegan, gluten-free and juice options abound at well-situated brick-and-mortar locations— including Boston Public Market—for this former foodtruck startup. Mother Juice is a Boston pioneer in the meatless market, under a “Peace, love and veggies” banner. Hours vary by location. 100 Hanover St; 291 Newbury St., 857.263.7401; 625 West Kendall, Cambridge, 617.945.7357. PARLA

Italian Not your typical “Little Italy” joint. Find a modern speakeasy vibe served up with contemporary takes on Italian cooking such as herbed-lamb pappardelle and pork belly chips. D (daily), brunch (Sa-Su). 230 Hanover St., 617.367.2824. WARD 8

American Its location in the far reaches of the North End doesn’t hamper this place

from being jammed every night of the week with young professionals. The bar program revisits different eras with its cocktail creations, sometimes staying true to classic recipes and sometimes putting on a new spin. Bristol Lounge vet Kenny Schweizer mans the kitchen, serving up a menu of sinful dishes the run the gamut from fresh lobster chowder to the signature Ward 8 mac and cheese. D (daily). 617.823.4478.

SEAPORT DISTRICT/ FORT POINT CHANNEL

COMMITTEE

Mediterranean Eastern Mediterranean-style small plates that run the gamut from grape leaf dolmades to marinated lamb with tzatziki. Don’t miss the Greek yogurt pancakes at brunch. L (M-F), D (daily), brunch (Sa-Su). 50 Northern Ave., 617.737.5051. EMPIRE

Pan-Asian Empire is one of the largest restaurants to open in Boston in recent years, which makes it not too hard to find a seat and order up Chef Kevin Long’s pan-Asian treats, from freshly rolled sushi and delicate dumplings to spicy stir-fry. The lively open kitchen contains a noodle station, eightseat wok bar and eight-seat sushi bar. D (M-Sa). 1 Marina Park Drive, 617.295.0001. $$$ MASTRO’S OCEAN CLUB

Seafood Boston’s addition to the nationwide collection of classic, elegant Ocean Club and Steakhouse locations makes a very comfortable home in the Seaport District. First-class wine list, lively atmosphere. D (daily), brunch (Sa-Su). 25 Fan Pier Blvd., 617.530.1925. OAK + ROWAN

American Farm-to-table ethos means artisanal dishes comprised of locally sourced ingredients. Think lobster and veal sweetbreads, beef sirloin with tallow bread pudding


Food and tarragon fettuccine with pistachio. L and D (daily). 321 A St., 857.284.7742.

SOMERVILLE

FOUNDRY ON ELM

Gastropub Consistently packed with locals. Great beer list—32 on tap. Vittles run the gamut from roasted Asian pear pizza to pan-roasted scallops to the gravy and cheddar-smothered poutine. L (M-Sa), D (daily), brunch (Su). 255 Elm St., Somerville, 617.628.9999. SOUTHERN KIN COOKHOUSE

Southern Expect southern hospitality, whiskey-centric drink options and a full belly. Comfort food is on the menu, and there’s six types of pie for dessert. L and D (daily). 500 Assembly Row, Somerville, MA, 617.764.5966.

SOUTH BOSTON

CAPO

Italian House-made pastas and classic Italian dishes aren’t just for the North End. Chef Tony Susi creates authentic flavors in a rustic, neighborhood setting, including wood-fired pizzas and plenty of vino on the carefully curated menu. L (Sa-Su), D (daily). 443 West Broadway, 617.993.8080. COPPERSMITH

Global Restaurant and cafe offering a vintage-industrial aesthetic. Chef Jason Heard provides a globally inspired menu reflective of his extensive travels and Southern upbringing. L (M-F), D (daily), brunch (Sa-Su). 40 W. 3rd St., 617.658.3452.

SOUTH END

sic-loving crowd is part café, bar, artist hangout and music club and plays to old bohemia. The menu features tasty and eclectic, globally inspired food. Nightly live music runs the gamut from jazz to cabaret to electronica. D (daily), live-music brunch (Sa, Su). 541 Tremont St., 617.423.0069. BLACKBIRD DOUGHNUTS

Bakeries From popular South End restaurant The Gallows comes this bakery that focuses solely on the doughnut. Fresh-made daily onsite, styles range from chocolate old-fashioned to wild berry Bismark. Open M-F 7 am-6 pm, Sa-Su 8 am-6 pm. 492 Tremont St., 617.482.9000; 20 Kilmarnock St. DARRYL’S CORNER BAR & KITCHEN

THE BEEHIVE

Southern This club and restau-

point aimed at a funky, mu-

rant sends out great Southern food and good vibrations

Global This casual rendezvous

in the South End with an upscale, modern interior and live jazz and R&B acts. Open Tu-Th 5 pm-midnight, F-Sa 4 pm-2 am, Su 10 am-10 pm. 604 Columbus Ave., 617.536.1100. SRV

Italian Venice meets the contemporary culinary traditions of Boston’s South End. Chefs Michael Lombardi and Kevin O’Donnell tag team the kitchen, preparing a menu of snacks, pasta and protein-heavy entrees. Atmosphere is ornate yet casual and lively, especially after sampling a classic Italian cocktail at the bar. D (daily). 569 Columbus Ave., 617.536.9500. STELLA

Italian Evan Deluty’s Stella is a sexy room with a sleek bar and cuisine that is rooted in roasting, braising and homemade pasta. Great $6 appetizer menu M-F 4-6 pm. D (daily), brunch (Su). 1525 Washington St., 617.247.7747.

THEATER DISTRICT/ BAY VILLAGE

THE BRISTOL

American The Four Seasons’ sophisticated dining room, a bar that locals love for its people-watching power and an upscale spin on New England comfort food. Great view of the Public Garden, situated right across Boylston Street. B, L and D (daily), brunch (Su). Four Seasons Hotel, 200 Boylston St., 617.351.2037. $$$$ MAGGIANO’S LITTLE ITALY

Italian This is the kitchen you might imagine your Italian grandmother running. Dig into massive platters of food served family-style that range from specialties like beef tenderloin medallions and chicken saltimbocca to all types of pasta. Reasonably priced and very popular, so expect to wait for a table. L and D (daily). 4 Columbus Ave., 617.542.3456.

57


Shop Tiffany When is a tin can not a tin can? Or a drinking straw not a drinking straw? When these everyday objects have been handcrafted in sterling silver by Tiffany artisans, of course. The tension between the ordinary and the precious has been a hallmark of the Tiffany aesthetic since legendary window designer Gene Moore added neon to a humble paint can for a 1978 window display. Thanks to this new collection, that streak of genius will follow you home. 100 Huntington Ave. & 5 Newbury St., tiffany.com

At this family owned hat company, customers can expect a personal shopping experience as they check out all types of hip head wear. Open M-Sa 10 am-8 pm, Su 11 am-7 pm. 130 Newbury St., 617.247.4287; 43 Brattle St., Cambridge, 617.868.4287. MARIMEKKO

Finnish textile and design company recognized around the world for its saturated colors and gregarious patterns. Home decor, apparel and accessories. Open M-Sa 10 am-6 pm, Su noon-5 pm. 140 Newbury St., 617.247.2500; 350 Huron Ave., Cambridge, 617.354.2800.

APPAREL: GENERAL

COS

This global brand boasts a modern, functional style that exudes sophistication. The timeless pieces in each collection are sure to become closet staples. Open M-Sa 10 am-7 pm, Su 11 am-6 pm. 138 Newbury St., 617.603.0118. JOHNNY CUPCAKES

Johnny Cupcakes is not your average bakery. In fact, it’s not a bakery at all. Boston native Johnny Earle serves up his highly sought-after, limited-edition cupcake-themed graphic tees in pastry cases

58 W H E R E I D E C E M B E R 2017

and commercial refrigerators. Open M-Sa 11 am-8 pm, Su 11 am-7 pm. 279 Newbury St., 617.375.0100. WOOLRICH JOHN RICH & BROS.

American heritage outdoor brand on Newbury Street has ready-to-wear lifestyle apparel and accessories, and signature items like Woolrich wool blankets. Open M-Sa 10 am-8 pm, Su 11 am-7 pm. 299 Newbury St., 857.263.7554.

APPAREL: MEN

wardrobe needs, from dresses and jumpsuits to handbags and sunglasses. Open M-Sa 10 am-7 pm, Su 11 am-7 pm. 166 Newbury St., 617.297.9059. JOHNNY WAS

Effortlessly chic styles of California’s fashion scene. Rich textures, colors and prints define this brand’s free-spirited womenswear and accessories. Open M-Sa 10 am-9 pm, Su 11 am-7 pm. 800 Boylston St., 857.233.5989.

BEAUTY

BALL AND BUCK

FRESH

This local retailer only sells American-made products for style-conscious men. Includes a complete Ball and Buck product line, and other exclusive brands. Open daily 11 am-8 pm. 144 Newbury St., 617.262.1776.

Born-and-raised Boston beauty company Fresh offers top-quality skin care and cosmetics made from natural ingredients like soy, sugar and black tea. Open M-Sa 10 am-7 pm, Su noon-6 pm. 121 Newbury St., 617.421.1212.

INDOCHINO

THE ART OF SHAVING

Men looking for a smart suit that fits perfectly can choose from endless options, including fabrics, buttons, lapels and more, at this custom showroom. Open M-F 10 am-8 pm, Sa-Su 10 am-6 pm. 85 Newbury St., 857.277.0585.

Men face off for fine shaving essentials of all kinds. Tools include straightedge razors, various oils and brushes. Find specialized skin care products, shaving cream, soap, after-shave. Open M-Sa 10 am-8 pm, Su noon-7 pm. 139 Newbury St. 857.239.7261.

APPAREL: WOMEN

ALICE + OLIVIA

The expert eye of Stacey Bendet brings cutting-edge fashions to womenswear and accessories. Find all your

BOOKS & MEDIA

TRIDENT BOOKSELLERS & CAFE

Hide away in this cozy half-bookstore, half-café with

an extensive selection of magazines, unusual titles and bargain books. Café serves “perpetual breakfast,” lunch and dinner. Open daily 8 am-midnight. 338 Newbury St., 617.267.8688.

DEPARTMENT STORES

BARNEYS NEW YORK

The Manhattan institution’s New England outpost spotlights the best of haute couture like Lanvin, Givenchy and Diane von Furstenberg as well as edgy looks from new designers. Open M-Sa 10 am-8 pm, Su noon-6 pm. Copley Place, 100 Huntington Ave., 617.385.3300. PRIMARK

This Irish shop features trendy looks as one of Europe’s largest clothing retailers—from cropped tops to men’s slipon sneakers to housewares. Open M-Th 8 am-9 pm, F-Sa 8 am-9:30 pm, Su 10 am-9 pm. 10 Summer St., 617.350.5232.

ELECTRONICS

BANG & OLUFSEN

Founded in Denmark in 1925, Bang & Olufsen is known for its design excellence, its advanced technology and its high-quality audio, video and other media experiences. Open M-Sa 10 am-6 pm, Su noon-5 pm. 141B Newbury St., 617.262.4949.

COURTESY TIFFANY

ACCESSORIES

GOORIN BROS.


SE ARCH THE CIT Y / For more listings, see wheretraveler.com/boston

HOME

CASA DESIGN

For those with an eye for upscale, contemporary design, the showroom here offers a plethora of aesthetically pleasing options for both home and office. Open M-F 10 am-6 pm. 460 Harrison Ave., 617.654.2974. KATE AND THEO HOME

On Beacon Hill’s Charles Street, this off-shoot of interior design firm Theodore & Company features lovely lifestyle and home decor pieces. Open M-F 10 am-6 pm, Sa 11 am-5 pm. 96 Charles St., 617.227.1915.

JEWELRY

LAURA PRESHONG

Local artist Laura Preshong handcrafts many of the classic, yet modern pieces of jewelry highlighted in this showroom, plus gemstones and metals used are ecofriendly

and conflict-free. Open Tu-Sa 11 am-7 pm, Su noon-5 pm. 558 Tremont St., 617.236.7660.

LEATHER

Shop

OUTLETS

LONGCHAMP

ASSEMBLY ROW

Sophie Hughes’ jewelry boutique features handmade pieces by local and emerging designers who use recycled precious metals and responsibly sourced gems whenever possible. Open daily 10 am-6 pm. 80 Dartmouth St., 617.247.7426.

Elegant leather portables of all sorts and in both traditional and bold colors are in-store here. Classic looks take on contemporary needs—find attaché cases, laptop bags, purses, shoulder bags, wallets and much more. Repairs on Longchamp brand only. Open M-Sa 10 am-7 pm, Su noon-6 pm. 139 Newbury St., 617.425.0740.

Somerville shopping destination with 50 upscale outlets, including Saks Fifth Avenue OFF 5TH and Brooks Brothers Factory Store. Exclusive dining options, a movie theater with IMAX screen and more. 340 Canal St., Somerville, 617.440.5565.

SMALL PLEASURES

LOUIS VUITTON

Charming shop that specializes in antique, estate and custom jewelry, from engagement rings to cameo brooches and elegant necklaces. Watch repairman on premises. Open M-F 11 am-6 pm. Sa 10:30 am-5 pm. 142 Newbury St., 617.267.7371.

The ultimate stop for any stylish traveler who values fine craftsmanship and a classic look. Find the icon’s signature leather bags, luggage and other essentials. Open M-Sa 10 am-8 pm, Su noon-6 pm. Copley Place, 100 Huntington Ave., 617.437.6519.

ORE JEWELRY

WRENTHAM VILLAGE PREMIUM OUTLETS

Find discounts of 25 to 65 percent off at this outdoor village-style outlet center 35 miles from Boston, with stores like Michael Kors and Saks Fifth Avenue Off 5th. Open M-Sa 10 am-9 pm, Su 10 am-6 pm. 1 Premium Outlets Blvd., Wrentham (exit 15 off I-495), 508.384.0600.

SHOES

BODEGA

You might walk right past this shop that caters to an ultra

Won Best of Boston 2016 and 2017

59


Shop

Experience

the touch of Hawaii

exclusive audience interested in one-of-a-kind clothing and accessories—a convenience store and a secret entrance are part of the gimmick. Open M-Sa 11 am-6 pm, Su noon-5 pm. 6 Clearway St.

apparel with special focus on the Celtics and Bruins. Open M-Sa 10 am-5 pm, Su 11 am-5 pm; also open during games. TD Garden, 100 Legends Way, 617.624.1500.

CONVERSE

BOSTON OLIVE OIL COMPANY

Design your own pair of Chuck Taylor All-Stars here. Huge selection of Converse gear, including lines like Jack Purcell, One Star and Star Chevron. Open daily 10 am-7 pm. 348 Newbury St., 617.424.5400.

This family owned store seasonally imports and bottles on site more than 60 varieties of the highest quality, unfiltered, extra virgin olive oil and finest-aged balsamic vinegar. Open Su-F 11 am-6 pm, Sa 11 am-7 pm. 253 Newbury St., 857.277.0007.

SHOPPING CENTERS

CAMBRIDGESIDE

Waterfront shopping center boasts more than 120 brand-name stores and restaurants. Open M-Sa 10 am-9 pm, Su noon-7 pm. 100 CambridgeSide Place, Cambridge, 617.621.8666. COPLEY PLACE

Posh offerings at this luxury designer mall include Neiman Marcus, Barneys New York, Chanel and Tom Ford. Open M-Sa 10 am-8 pm, Su noon6 pm. 100 Huntington Ave., 617.262.6600. FANEUIL HALL MARKETPLACE

This marketplace has been a vendor market since Colonial days. Today, find numerous stores, pushcart vendors and historic and modern restaurants. Open M-Sa 10 am-9 pm, Su noon-6 pm. Financial District, 617.523.1300. PRUDENTIAL CENTER

Upscale shopping mall featuring select brands including Aritzia, Johnny Was and Shinola. Hungry shoppers stop by Eataly Boston, Bar Boulud or others. Open M-Sa 10 am-9 pm, Su 11 am-8 pm. 800 Boylston St., 617.236.3100.

SOUVENIRS

PROSHOP POWERED BY REEBOK

Destination for official NBA (Adidas-branded) and NHL (Reebok-branded) team

60 W H E R E I D E C E M B E R 2017

SPECIALTY FOODS

20 YEARS IN PRACTICE!!

Customized Massage for Each Client. Specializing in Hawaiian Lomi-Lomi Massage and Pre/Post Natal Massage.

Aloha Boston Massage 45 Newbury Street, Suite #333 Boston, MA 978.771.5590 | AlohaBostonMassage.com

Restaurant & Tapas Bar

SPORTS & YOGA APPAREL

CRANE & LION

No need to sacrifice a chic aesthetic while in your workout gear thanks to the simple elegance of Crane & Lion styles. Open M-Th 10 am-7 pm, F-Sa 10 am-8 pm, Su 11 am-6 pm. 460 Harrison Ave., Suite C2, 617.982.7145; 40 Charles St., 857.239.8170. IBEX

266 Newbury Street Back Bay, Boston 617.267.4799 info@tapeo.com tapeo.com

A Taste of Spain - in the Back Bay

SMALL PLEASURES

Vermont-based retailer Ibex has its flagship in Boston. Items are made exclusively of New Zealand merino wool, water repellent and temperature regulating. Open M-Sa 10 am-7 pm, Su 11 am-6 pm. 303 Newbury St., 857.277.1932. LUCY’S LEAGUE

This Faneuil Hall boutique caters to the sporty gal with team apparel that fits and flatters the figure. Open M-Sa 10 am-9 pm, Su noon-6 pm. North Market, Faneuil Hall Marketplace, 617.248.3986.

Boston’s purveyor of antique and fine vintage jewelry, featuring Edwardian, Art Deco and period engagement rings. Watch and jewelry repair, as well as custom work. Timeless quality and expert service. Open M-F 11 am-6 pm, Sat. 10:30 am-5:00 pm. 142 Newbury St. | www.small-pleasures.com | 617.267.7371

Authentic Lomi Lomi • Kahuna Bodywork • Swedish Massage • Customized Treatments • Couples Workshops

THE NORTH FACE

Technical, innovative gear and apparel fit for all types of weather. Find jackets, accessories, footwear, packs and equipment. Open M-F 10 am-7 pm, Sa 10 am-8 pm, Su 11 am-6 pm. 326 Newbury St., 617.536.8060.

Available Monday- Sunday by appointment. 581 Boylston St. 617-207-6010 | www.healinghandsbodywork.com


Be Well Marc Harris Salon It’s hard to rave about world-class hair salons without punning on the phrase “cutting edge” but Marc Harris Salon truly deserves that description, not least for resident scissor sister Grace Burke McGinley. Technically outstanding, Grace is also a color specialist whose expertise with red hair is beyond compare in Boston: she was voted the city’s “best red hair colorist” for three years in succession, 20142016. So maybe it’s time to go red, or go home. 115 Newbury St., 617.262.2222

BARBER SHOPS

ROOSTERS MEN’S GROOMING CENTER

Half a dozen barbers treat men to grooming, skin care and relaxation at this new South End rendezvous. A dozen or so services run the gamut from precision cut, shampoo, massage and hot towel treatment to a simple neck trim. Open M-W 10 am7:30 pm, Th 10 am-8:30 pm, F 10 am-6:30 pm, Sa 8 am-5 pm, Su noon-5 pm. 518 Tremont St., 857.305.3106.

BEAUTY & PERSONAL CARE

BOSTON CENTER FOR FACIAL REJUVENATION

©MIKE HODGKINSON

Based on Newbury Street in the Back Bay—and with a second location in Brookline— this excellent practice specializes in state-of-the-art plastic surgery as well as innovative non-surgical treatments. Procedures available include Botox, Tummy Tuck, CoolSculpting and Juvederm. Boston office hours M-Th 9 am-5 pm. 69 Newbury St., 617.450.0070; 1 Brookline Pl., 617.735.8735. LASH L’AMOUR

Show a little love for your lashes at this boutique beauty care hot spot. Services include everything eyelashand eyebrow-related, from extensions to tinting, waxing

and hydrafacials. Open M-W 10 am-7 pm, Th-F 9 am-8 pm, Sa 10 am-6 pm, Su 11 am-6 pm. 129 Newbury St., 617.247.1871.

FITNESS

BURN FITNESS STUDIOS

This boutique gym is shaking up workout routines with innovative sweat sessions that keep your body guessing with a multitude of physical challenges. Combining strength training, cardio and flexibility, the classes here are sure to “burn” in the best way. Class schedule and registration available online. 867 Boylston St., 617.651.3625; 547 Columbus Ave. RECYCLE STUDIO

Cate Brinch’s cycle studios were some of the first to open in Boston, back in 2011. Today, the boutiques are candle-lit, state-of-the-art and designer implemented, in order to put a focus on relaxation and well being. Schedule online. 9 Newbury St., 617.366.9670; 18 Union Park St. SWET STUDIO

Swet Studio hosts a variety of classes intended to raise your fitness level and provide relaxation. Whether you choose an aerial yoga, barre or meditation class, you are sure to have a challenging yet rejuvenating experience. Schedule

and registration online. 480 Tremont St., 617.670.0631.

SALONS

ESCAPE SALON

Aveda Lifestyle Salon offering services including cuts, color, keratin treatments, botanical therapies and airbrush tanning. Private hair services room for those requiring privacy for religious reasons. Open M-F 10 am-10 pm, Sa 9 am-10 pm, Su 10 am-8 pm. 800 Boylston St., 617.423.1350. SALON MARIO RUSSO

Long established in this city, this upscale salon offers haircuts and coloring, scalp treatments, straightening and bridal services. Open Su-Tu 10 am-6 pm W-F 10 am-8 pm, Sa 9 am-6 pm. 9 Newbury St., 617.424.6676; 22 Liberty Drive, 857.350.3139.

SPAS

BELLA SANTE

Candlelit rooms, finely made robes and immaculate surroundings are all part of the experience at this local favorite. Open M-Th 9 am-9 pm, F 8 am-9 pm, Sa 8 am-6 pm, Su 9 am-6 pm. 38 Newbury St., 617.424.9930. THE SPA AT MANDARIN ORIENTAL

This spa lives up to its fivestar status, boasting tranquil lounges, vitality pools and

more. Emphasis on Asian philosophy and Traditional Chinese Medicine. 776 Boylston St., 617.535.8820.

WELLNESS

ALOHA MASSAGE

Since 1997, Bostonians have been relaxing here with customized and specialty massages, from deep tissue and Swedish to traditional Hawaiian Lomi Lomi. Available W-F 12:30-6:30 pm, Sa 8 am-1 pm. 45 Newbury St., Suite 333, 978.771.5590. EXHALE SPA

Services nourish both the mind and body and range from body treatments to acupuncture, yoga and Core Fusion classes. Therapeutic massage includes deep flow, Thai stretching and shiatsu. Open M-F 6 am-9 pm, Sa-Su 7:30 am-8 pm. 28 Arlington St., 617.532.7000; 2 Battery Wharf, 617.603.3100. HEALING HANDS

Everybody loves a great massage, and one of the best in town is available in Back Bay. Featuring Swedish as well as Lomi Lomi techniques that provide superlative tension relief and a great foundation for wellness. Visits are available. Hours by appointment. 581 Boylston St., 617.207.6010.

61


Map 1

DOWNTOWN BOSTON Donnelly Field

Western Ave 3 Bridge

Stadium

Place of Interest

Concert Hall

View Point

State Highway

Ferry

Theater

Church

Information

Water Taxi

Museum/ Gallery

Library

University/ College

Parking

Un ion sor Wi nd rt rn

Train Station

t Po

Pleasant

KENDALL SQ Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Great Dome MIT List Compton Gallery Visual Art Center

irm

Fa

e sid

River

r

s

te

s Cro

Hospital

MIT Museum Sm a

Rd

Fai

bo

v tA

on Commuter Rail rm

Bridge

To: Harvard Square

Central Square

Os

Subway T Stop

Interstate

River St. y Highway Alm U.S.

x

se

Es

KEY

Pin e

Soldiers Field

m ttle do Sea Win

CENTRAL SQ

t

on

Kresge Auditorium

d

or hf As

Boston University Bridge

Dum

mer

BU West

30

e

cis

nw

er on

er

Ru

rk Pa

y Da

Moz

n

To: Sam Adams Brewery

lvd

Centre d hlan Hig

Newton St Worcester St Mass Ave Boston Medical Center

d

Jackson Square

r

les

Blv

da

gg

XB

ss

Colu

Ce

lcolm

d

Centre

l

r da Ce

a Wym

n

ida

bes

For

art

T

Ma

Ca

Wald en

Riv e

les Rugg remont

ea

e Hil

WHE RE I D E C E M B E R 2017

ve us A

mb

Edg

Bolster

ury Roxb ing Cross

ox Len Kendall

on

t

Minden

ner

Trem

m

Heath

Byn

r She

62

ont

Tr e

Fisher

v sA

bu

lum

Co

mon

n

ins

Ga

eln M

eto

St

s

Ham

Huntington Av

stl

Iro Par quois ker Hill

s

su

on

h Alp

o

Trem

t

hS

ug

ro bo

Le

ide

Heath Street

rda

le P

ky

Jamaicaway

Hills

Bo fo

Jordan Hall

eu

wo

le

Back of the Hill

Boston Univ. Theater

us

Forsyth St

Av

Museum of Fine Arts M

ng

m od Brigham & wood Rd Long al Area Women’s Hospital edic am M h g ri Fenwood B Ru le gg Circ

d oo

ton Hunting

Copley Place

Symphony Hall

Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum

Lo

Fe

Riverway

Brookline Village

Ca

Mission Park

Park

Children’s Hospital

ck

tu

at

Bi

ll

Sh

ey

nn

wa

Hynes Convention Center

k Par

Medical Center

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute an Fr

pin

y wa

im

gr

Br

Rd

Tower

Queensberry

kl Beth Israel Deaconess

oo

Pil

As

Av ine

Haviland

rk

d

Fen

Kent

y rwa

Francis

Boston Public

Prudential Center (Shops)Library and Prudential Prudential Tower

Jersey

Longwood Riv

Yawkey

Kilmarnock

C

woo

Fenway Park

n

rto

lle

Fu

l

Long

ate

er

Min

Carlton

Fenway

e hap

Beech

rlesg

del

St Mary’s

Monmouth

20

Cha

lton Car

fort

St. Mary’s St

Beacon

Hawes

Borland

Kent

Chatham

Sewall

Blanford Str

unt

on

Arun

Powell

Hawes St

Mo

Eust Ivy

Park

BROOKLINE St. Paul St

State

BU East

man

Kent St

Bay

BU Central

ox

Ess

tta Co

Am

Free

Len

ex

ge

ory

Far

m

ont

Pa

Egm

orn

ord

erb

ttsf

Sh

bo

St P

Ab

aul

Babcock Packard’s Pleasant St Corner St. Paul

Marcella

n lver

orn

Ma

Alc

ury

Agganis Arena

Audrey

Amesb

0

Dudley Square

gton

hin Was

St Jam

es

Lenox St Melnea Cass BlvdMelne

Mass

Bradston

a Cass Blvd

k At So


Maps ol

Wa lfo

ho

Win te

Sc

r

rd

Bu

t et rtl Ba

nk

Hi

e

v rd A

3

99

int d Blv

y Terr

USS Constitution In drydocok until 2018

n Lege

ae

k

Sports Museum

To: Logan Airport

I-93

Massachusetts Eye & Ear Infirmary

ic er

t oa rB ute mm n Co ow TA est MB harl C to

ay ds W

TD Garden

av M

um

USS Cassin Young

ew

r

en

Wy

Ring

Museum of Science & Imax Mugar Omni Kendall

Av

9th

Po

Av 1st USS Constitution Museum

Education

CambridgeSide

Ath

8th

Av

N

wn

3rd

27

sto

rle

a Ch

Av

St

dik

4th

ll

th

orn

er

Bunker Hill Monument

13

Th

Av

h

5t

N

7t

h

Gore Go Park re

el tunn 26

Harrison Gray Otis House Hatch Memorial Shell

24B

r1 Pie

24A

I -9

Museum of African American History

3t

Ro

l ne un

Massachusetts State House

Ke se

* *Closed until March 2016

Faneuil Hall & Quincy Market

el

r ull ute & H mm cy Co uin TA o Q MB ats t Bo

Charles Playhouse

ont

Logan Airp ort Bo Sale sto mF n erry Ha rbo r Is lan dF err y Water Shuttle to Logan Airport

Paramount Theater

Colonial Majestic Wilbur Shubert

nn 3 tu el I-9

Tufts

Wang Center

nn tu I-93

20B

Moakley Courthouse

Boston Tea Party Ships and Museum

a Se

Trem

MBTA Boat to

New England Aquarium & Imax

Opera House

John Hancock Tower

nnedy Greenway

Gibson House

Courthouse

rt

po

Institute of Contemporary Art

Bo

Boston Children’s Museum

rd

va

ule

oston Center or the Arts

Sti

h

Blue Hills Bank

ul

306 Northern Ave

Northern Ave & Harbor St

Ha

e

d Ti

n d

3r

St

ay W

Harpoon Brewery

r rbo

od

l

ne

an

Ch

To: Logan Airport

afo Se

Ha

to St

Dorchester

t

l Bo

D

D St E St

tS 1s

St

t

CS

ort

M

d

Andrew

Old Colony Av

18

ns he ay At dw oa Br

Bypass

20

ss

p ass

2n

t

BS

18

S Boston

re

Seaport World Pavilion Trade Center Silver Line Way

Boston Convention and Exhibition Center

St

26

ng

d

4t

Co

ar

st We

e Sid

Dr

lev

Union Park St

ass

yp

nB

sto

o SB

Seaport World Trade Center u Bo

St

t BS

rt

A

Rd po

24B

E. Berkeley St

e

ic

rv

Se

a Se

24A

Ave Connector n so gs ka in kin m pe ore m To Mo outhhamptonCu

gs

llin

Herald St

ont

t ES

Northern Ave & Tide St k A v 88 Black Black Falcon Ave & B lack Design Center Place Falc Falcon Ave on Boston Design Black Falcon Terminal Center Cruiseport Boston Dry

doc

63


WHERE IN BOSTON

We’re addicted to grown-up desserts

For more great grown-up desserts in the city visit wheretraveler.com

The Capital Grille When it comes to boozy desserts I am definitely old school. A flourless chocolate cake at the The Capital Grille with vanilla bean ice cream and a Macallan 25. That is a perfect holiday dessert. –Mark Keaney, Brand Consultant, @markkeaney2pt0

Grass Fed Try their Salted Carmel flavor. It “brings all the 64

WHE RE I D E C E M B E R 2017

boys to the yard” by mixing vanilla ice cream with caramel vodka, a shot of tequila, sea salt, and cream. –Kristin Quinn, Writer, @Misadventures inMommyhood

Boston Burger Co. As an Ice Cream addict, the freak frappes at Boston Burger Co. are my shake of choice. Not only are they thick and really delicious, they’re

piled high with toppings in and around the shake itself. Boozy shakes change regularly and are all delicious. –Matt Simko, TV Host, @SimkoSays

Met Bar & Grill One of my favorite ways to end a meal is with the colossal Brownie Sundae Crazy Shake (kicked up with vodka) at Met Bar & Grill in Dedham. What’s more,

the enormous chocolate lover’s dream even comes with a cookie. –Kellie Speed, Writer/Editor, @hauteliving

Grass Fed I’m with Kristin: Grass Fed in Jamaica Plain has the most amazing boozy milkshakes. You can’t go wrong with the salted caramel. –Gillian Britt, Executive Editor, @eatdrinklucky

COURTESY PEXELS.COM

 Local Boston influencers weigh in on where to feed their obsessions. This month—boozy desserts and adult shakes.


ENJOY AMSTEL XLIGHT™ RESPONSIBLY. ©2017 AMSTEL XLIGHT™ BEER IMPORTED BY AMSTEL USA, WHITE PLAINS, NY.

Where Magazine Boston Dec 2017  
Where Magazine Boston Dec 2017