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ISLAND

HAWAI‘I


F lawless.

h i l d g u n d

Hildgund Makes Histor y. The Hildgund heritage is as distinguished as the works of art they are so well known for. The company began in 1873 as Dawkins

W h e n i t c o m e s t o f i n d i n g t h e p e r f e c t j e w e l r y, one need look no further than Hildgund.

Benny Jewelry in Downtown Honolulu. They had the distinct honor of being one of the first jewelers in the state to create

When world travelers seek the perfect vacation destination, they come to Hawaii. When the privileged

crests for Hawaiian Royalty.

few come in search of the world’s finest jewelry, they need look no further than Hildgund.

Step inside some of Hawaii’s most prestigious resorts, and you’ll find Hildgund. Prepare to be dazzled by the myriad of precious gems, exotic yellow diamonds, fine jade, rubies, pearls and emeralds that come from all corners of the world. If you’re looking to commemorate one of life’s unforgettable moments and only the most spectacular piece of jewelry will do, then Hildgund is the place to shop.

Hildgund’s service evokes the warm aloha spirit and friendly hospitality of a kama‘aina company. Each store is adorned with beautifully-crafted koa wood counters along with a welcoming portrait of Hildgund Bucky, the company’s founder. The purchase of any piece of Hildgund merchandise is likely to be one of grand proportions. However, the comfort and care that staff members provide to customers makes the experience more like buying from a friend. Staff members have been with the company for many years and over that time, have established long-lasting and trusting friendships with their customers.

In the 1940s, Hildgund Bucky, a master goldsmith from Germany, came to Hawaii to work at Ming’s as a designer. She

along with Tahitian, South Sea and Freshwater Pearls. In addition, they offer an extensive collection of limited edition jewelry and collectible accessories for men, including beautifully hand-crafted knives by brilliant designers. -Bruce Bucky, president

“I want to give our customers a one-of-a-kind perfect piece that they can’t find anywhere else, while providing the best possible service and value,” says company president Bruce Bucky.

Benny, where she perfected

a style of jewelry renowned for her superior quality and craftsmanship. She eventually purchased the company, renaming

it

Hildgund

at One of many custom-designed pieces by Hildgund.

Dawkins Benny.

When it comes to creating jewelry, the Hildgund philosophy has always been to create pieces that Hildgund Bucky, being a woman of exceptional fashion and style, would be proud to wear herself. Hildgund is forever searching the world for precious stones that are transformed into wondrous works of art by designers from Hawaii and around the world. Hildgund features the largest collection of internally flawless yelI want to give our customers a one-of-a-kind perfect piece that low diamonds in the state. You’ll also find exotic colored gems that are certified, natural and unheated from around the globe, they can’t find anywhere else.”

then moved on to Dawkins

Hildgund making jewelry in an early photo.

In

the

1980s,

Hildgund opened stores in some of Hawaii’s most elite resorts. The locations allowed her to share her creations with visitors on holiday a brooch from Hildgund’s sketchbook.

as well as locals. Hildgund Bucky retired in 1995,

but the tradition continued with her husband Carl Bucky and son, Bruce. Bruce carries on the tradition of offering exclusive, one-of-a-kind pieces in a friendly setting.

Over the years, Hildgund has received many offers to expand throughout the world, but they have always declined. “We want shopping at Hildgund to remain a special treat when visiting Hawaii,” says Bruce.

Today Hildgund has six locations at the most exclusive

When it comes to the perfect pairing of jewelry to individual taste, and total discretion with one-on-one customer care, you’d have to say that the Hildgund experience is simply flawless.

resorts throughout Hawaii.

Hildgund Bucky. 1924 - 2012

Oahu Halekulani

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3900 Wailea Alanui

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HAWAI‘I ISLAND GUESTBOOK is part of a series of four books that Where® Hawai‘i will release on all the major Hawaiian Islands in 2017-2018, including Maui, O‘ahu and Kaua‘i. Each island will be represented with its own unique, iconic aerial image as the cover art. These books are designed to ®

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entertain and educate visitors about each respective

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and artistic manner. We hope you enjoy the book as

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where GUESTBOOK

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island, and to tell the stories of Hawai‘i in an engaging

O‘AHU 2018

MAUI

much as we took pleasure in writing about Hawai‘i’s ISLAND

KAUA‘I 2018

HAWAI‘I ISLAND 2018

HAWAI‘I

KAUA‘I

treasures, places and people.


HAWAI‘I ISLAND CONTENTS

ISLAND ESSENCE 36 PEAK INTEREST SACRED SUMMITS Enjoy an aerial perspective of the island through the lens of a talented photographer.

INDIGENOUS KOA WOOD Efforts to revive the nearly extinct indigenous tree have wide community support.

BY CAMERON BROOKS

BY KRISTEN NEMOTO JAY

44 THE ALOHA SHIRT CLASSIC WEAR An excerpt from “The Aloha Shirt: Spirit of the Islands,” which traces the history of these shirts from 1935 to 1955. BY DALE HOPE

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56 ROOTED LEGACY

ON THE COVER Plumes of smoke rise as Kīlauea continues to erupt, pouring hot lava into the sea to create a truly awesome and memorable scene. ©CAMERON BROOKS INSIDE FRONT COVER (From left) ©akphotoc/Shutterstock ©Gang Liu/Shutterstock


HAWAI‘I ISLAND CONTENTS

ISLAND ESSENTIALS 16 NAVIGATE HAWAI‘I ISLAND MAP Getting around the island.

18 DATEBOOK NOT-TO-MISS EVENTS A calendar of events that includes the Merrie Monarch Festival and the Kona Coffee Cultural Festival.

24 FIRSTLOOK SIGNATURE ATTRACTIONS Hawai‘i Island boasts some spectacular scenes that include flowing lava, ancient petroghlyphs and a magical valley.

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68 ISLAND VIEWS NEIGHBORHOOD WATCH No two parts of Hawai‘i Island are alike. KAILUA-KONA: It’s often dry and sunny on this side of the island. HONOKA‘A: This is the largest town along the Hāmākua Coast. HILO Be sure to visit the popular Farmers Market. KĪLAUEA: The volcano here has been erupting since 1983. POLOLŪ VALLEY: Discover one of the island’s most scenic overlooks.

78 PARTING SHOT TRADITIONAL CANOE Known as wa‘a in Hawaiian, canoes continue to be a vital tradition in local culture.

SPECIAL SECTION DINING IN PARADISE With easy access to a variety of locally sourced ingredients, Hawai‘i Island chefs adhere to the farm-to-fork philosophy.


L E G E N DA RY SHOPPING & DINING

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HAWAI‘I ISLAND ADVERTISING & CIRCULATION GROUP PUBLISHER William A. Moore III

HAWAI’I SALES DIRECTOR Leianne Pedro

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Bob Kowal, Donna Kowalczyk, Nicholas Riopelle

Alice Gustave Jordan Sutton CIRCULATION AND MARKETING DIRECTOR Sidney Louie SALES COORDINATOR

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Where GuestBook® is produced by Morris Visitor Publications (MVP), a division of Morris Communications, Co., LLC. 725 Broad St., Augusta, GA 30901, morrismedianetwork.com. Where® magazine and the where® logo are registered trademarks of Morris Visitor Publications. MVP publishes Where magazine, Where® QuickGuide, IN New York, and IN London magazines, and a host of other maps, guides, and directories for business and leisure travelers, and is the publisher for the Hospitality Industry Association. Hawai’i Where Guestbook is pleased to be a member of the list of associations below. MVP IS A PROUD SPONSOR OF LES CLEFS D’OR USA


HAWAI‘I ISLAND EDITORIAL SENIOR EDITOR Simplicio Paragas EDITOR Kristen Nemoto Jay ART DIRECTORS Chris Cardelli, Veronica Montesdeoca, Jennifer Keller Vaz CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Bonnie Friedman, Dale Hope, Mari Taketa CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

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MVP O‘AHU, EDITORIAL OFFICE 1833 Kalākaua Ave., Suite 810 Honolulu, HI 96815 Phone: 808.955.2378; Fax: 808.955.2379 wheretraveler.com Where GuestBook® publishes editions for the following U.S. cities and regions: Arizona, Atlanta, Baltimore, Boston, Charlotte, Chicago, Colorado, Dallas, Florida Gold Coast (Fort Lauderdale & Palm Beach), Fort Worth, Island of Hawai‘i, Houston, Jacksonville/St. Augustine/Amelia Island, Kansas City, Kaua‘i, Los Angeles, Maui, Miami, Nashville, New Orleans, New York, Northern Arizona, O‘ahu, Orange County (CA), Orlando, Philadelphia, Reno/Lake Tahoe, San Antonio, San Diego, San Francisco, Seattle/The Eastside/Tacoma, Southwest Florida (Naples), Tampa Bay, Tucson, Washington D.C. ©2017 by Morris Visitor Publications. All rights reserved. This publication may not be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, in whole or in part, without the express prior written permission of the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility to any party for the content of any advertisement in this publication, including any errors and omissions therein. By placing an order for an advertisement, the advertiser agrees to indemnify the publisher against any claims relating to the advertisement. Printed in the United States of America.

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NAVIGATE

Island Overview GETTING AROUND HAWAI’I ISLAND

Ni‘ihau The “forbidden” island is known for exquisite shell jewelry. Kaua‘i Magnificent sea cliffs, canyons and foliage distinguish the Garden Isle. O‘ahu It’s known for Waikīkī beaches, shopping, Pearl Harbor and the North Shore. Moloka‘i You’ll find old Hawai‘i charm, mule rides and famous Moloka‘i bread.

Maui Come to the Valley Isle for whale-watching, art, Mt. Haleakalā and the winding Hāna Highway. Kaho‘olawe Once a Navy firing range, this island is now dedicated to the preservation of Hawaiian culture. Hawai‘i Hawai’i Island has an active volcano and wonderfully diverse scenery.

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©EUREKA CARTOGRAPHY, BERKELEY, CA; (WATERCOLOR BACKGROUND AND EDGE PATTERN) ©MIKE REAGAN

Lāna‘i Lovely Hulopoe Bay has posh resorts, and Koele has pine-studded uplands.


DATEBOOK LIGHTS, CAMERA, ACTION

MERRIEST OF THEM ALL

Now in its eighth year, the action-packed

It’s that time of year again when hālau hula

2018 Waimea Ocean Film Festival (Ocean

(schools of hula) trek to the usually quiet

Film) features an impressive lineup of

town of Hilo on the island of Hawai‘i, and

movies, special guests, intimate coffee talks,

kama‘āina and visitors clamber for tickets to

Q&As, exhibits, receptions and morning

see each hālau’s technically-trained students

activities. Enjoy feature films and programs

perform ‘auana (modern style) and kahiko

showing at the Mauna Kea Resort, The

(ancient) hula, choreographed by its highly

Fairmont Orchid and the Four Seasons

respected kumu (teacher). It’s the annual

Resort Hualālai at Historic Ka‘ūpūlehu’s.

Merrie Monarch Festival, and this year marks

Ocean Film brings more than 60 films to the

its 55th anniversary.

big screen—most of which are world, U.S. or

April 1-7, merriemonarch.com

Hawai‘i premieres—with many filmmakers in attendance to answer questions following

ROYAL HONOR

the showing of each film.

Every year, thousands of people gather on

January 1-9, waimeaoceanfilm.org

the northern tip of Hawai‘i Island to honor Kamehameha I, the chief who united the

FLOWER POWER

Hawaiian Islands in 1795. A visit to this

The annual Waimea Cherry Blossom

historic area on King Kamehameha Day is

Heritage Festival showcases the more-than-

sure to be a highlight of a trip to the Islands.

60-year-old cherry trees planted at Church

Enjoy the natural beauty, while watching a

Row Park and the Japanese tradition of

traditional pa’u parade with horses and rid-

viewing them known as hanami. The festival

ers adorned in flowers and myriad colors.

includes a variety of activities. Enjoy an all

June 11, kamehamehadaycelebration.org

performing arts, in addition to hands-on

BIRDS OF A FEATHER

demonstrations of bonsai, origami, tradition-

The Third Annual Hawai‘i Island Festival of

al tea ceremony and mochi pounding. Free

Birds will feature workshops and field trips

shuttle transportation among most venues.

along the 90-mile Hawai’i Island Coast-to-

February 3, waimeacherryblossom@gmail.

Coast Birding Trail (HICCBT) and a gala din-

com, 808.961.8706

ner. The HICCBT is a first for the state and will traverse the island’s many habitats—from

CHERRIES JUBILEE

FESTIVAL CELEBRATES KONA COFFEE

The oldest and one of the most successful food events in Hawai‘i, the Kona Coffee Cultural Festival includes 10 days of festivities that promote Hawai‘i’s unique culture and diversity, and supports the Festival’s mission to preserve, perpetuate and promote Kona’s unique coffee heritage. Throughout the 10-day Festival, attendees celebrate the harvest as Kona coffee farms offer a firsthand look at growing this world-famous crop. The coffee art scene fills with inspiration, and music and dance enrich cultural exchanges. Kona coffee and food events offer tastings, and hands-on cultural events help tell the story of Kona’s rich coffee history. Early November, konacoffeefest.com 18

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HOPS & GRINDS

desert to rain forest—with opportunities to

The microbrewery revolution in Hawai‘i is

see an incredible diversity of birds along the

alive and hopping, judging by the popularity

way. September 14-17, birdfesthawaii.org

of the annual Kona Brewer’s Festival at the Courtyard King Kamehameha’s Kona Beach Hotel. Now in its 23rd year, the event taps into the talents of local and national brewmasters, and more than 30 chefs. The festival also includes live entertainment and the annual “Trash Fashion Show,” which shows off whimsical attire made entirely from recycled material. It has grown to include a Brewer’s Pā’ina and Art Auction, a Home Brewers Competition, and a 5/10k run/walk. March 10, konabrewersfestival.com

(FROM LEFT) ©HAWAII TOURISM AUTHORITY/TOR JOHNSON; ©DAN CLARK/USFWS

day lineup of Japanese and multi-cultural


www.sassafrashawaii.com KONA

WAIMEA

808.328.8284

808.885.1081

ALI’I GARDENS 75-6129 ALII DR KAILUA-KONA, HAWAII 96740

PARKER SQUARE • SUITE 106 65-1279 KAWAIHAE ROAD KAMUELA, HAWAII 96743


Paintings. Collages. Prints. Private Studio located at 67-1233 Mamalahoa Highway Kamuela, HI 96743 By Appointment Only (808) 987-0357 www.maryspears.com


Expect the Unexpected! The Waimea General Store has been a local favorite since 1970 and family owned since 1976. But if you’re expecting aisles of soda, sunscreen, and flip flops, be prepared for a surprise! This old style, wood floored, vintage store is stocked with Crabtree & Evelyn, locally made soaps and lotions, an array of kitchen tools, Le Creuset, Hawaiian books including children’s and cookbooks. Browse an array of fun cards, gifts, elegant paper goods, candles, cotton kimonos, local jams, and chocolates, and have it gift wrapped free. This fun, relaxed store is sure to become your favorite place to visit whether you’re visiting from near or far! LOOK FOR THE ‘NENE' SIGN AT PARKER SQUARE ~ OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK! www.waimeageneralstore.com

|

(808) 885-4479

|

65-1279 Kawaihae Rd, Kamuela HI, 96743


FIRST LOOK Only on Hawai‘i Island can you snowboard and snorkel in the same day, and then maybe catch some waves and rays in between. Adventure and scenery await.

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“Mauna Kea is our people … It’s a guiding protector and sacred place for the people of Hawai’i.” KALANI NAKOA—Director of the Nakoa Foundation

Mauna Kea

Mauna Kea was a landmark for Polynesian voyagers, and was most likely the first sight ancient travelers espied when approaching the Hawaiian Islands. This massive mountain thrusts its summit 13,796 feet into the atmosphere, making it one of the planet’s best venues for stargazing. Many nations have built observation stations on this pinnacle, with 13 telescopes from 11 countries in operation. ifa.hawaii.edu/info/vis/

WHERE GUEST B OOK

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FIRST LOOK

A marine preserve that teems with tropical fish, moray eels and octopus, Kealakekua Bay is one of the best snorkeling sites on the island. But it’s not just eye candy; it occupies a singular position in Hawai‘i history as the place where British Capt. James Cook, thought to be the first European to visit Hawai‘i, was both greeted as a god and put to death in 1779, one year after he first anchored in west Kaua‘i. The event is marked by a plaque and white obelisk at the site of his death, across the bay at Nāpō‘opo‘o Wharf and accessible only by a boat or snorkeling tour.

Hilo’s Farmers Market

Some 200 farmers from across the island make the trek to one of the most famous Farmers Market in Hawai‘i. The Hilo Farmers Market is the end result of the island’s diversity of terrain, climate and rich soil, mixed with the blend of cultures, culminating in a selection of produce, fruit, flowers and baked goods that are a treat for your senses. A trip to the Farmers Market, though, isn’t just a great place to cast your gaze over the range of local produce or a chance to stand in wonder at the exotic fruits and vegetables. It’s not just delightful smells, but one of the few opportunities to really experience Hawai‘i. Most vendors are very friendly and proud of their products. 26

W H E R E G U E ST B O O K

(PREVIOUS PAGE) ©SAKKAWOKKIE/ISTOCK; (FROM TOP) ISLAND OF HAWAII VISITORS BUREAU/TYLER SCHMITT; ©OLIVIER KONING

Kealakekua Bay


FIRST LOOK

Also known as the “Place of Refuge,” this storied piece of lava-walled shoreline served as a sanctuary of forgiveness and protection in pre-contact Hawai‘i. This 180-acre national historic park is one of Hawai‘i’s most sacred historic places. Take a self-guided walking tour and explore the grounds, including the Great Wall, standing 10-feet high and 17-feet thick.

Puakō Petroglyph Park Waipio Valley

From the lookout in Honoka‘a, one can gaze deep into this verdant valley and into Hawai‘i’s past. Framed by a black-sand beach and 2,000-foot cliffs, this “Valley of the Kings” has a palpable, mystical power, and is still revered by Hawaiians. Once home to ali‘i (royalty), Waipi‘o thrives with taro farms, sacred sites and temples. A final resting place for generations of chiefs, Waipi‘o still exudes the power and history of the kanaka moli (original Hawaiians). 28

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Ancient Hawaiians called their stone art k‘i‘i pohaku, or images in stone. We now know them as petroglyphs. While these lava rock carvings are found throughout the state, the largest concentrations are located north of the Mauna Lani Resort on the Kohala Coast. You can make out human forms, families, dancers, canoes, turtles and even dogs. The park can be accessed from Holoholokai Beach.

(CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT) ©LEEKRIS/ISTOCK; ©CAMPPHOTO/ISTOCK; ©EDWARD BRUNS/SHUTTERSTOCK

Pu‘uhonua o Hōnaunau National Historical Park


FIRST LOOK

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park

Waimea/Kamuela

Up north in the district of Waimea, green, undulating hills roll into the horizon. This is Hawai‘i’s cowboy country and home of Parker Ranch, one of the largest (and oldest) ranches in the United States. Decades before cowboys existed in the American West, they roamed the pastures of what is now the 130,000-acre ranch. Learn the story of Hawai‘i’s paniolo (cowboy) at the Parker Ranch Museum and visitors center, or book a horseback riding tour. While Waimea is the town’s older name, Kamuela came into use in the early 20th century, when the postal service needed to distinguish this Hawai‘i Island town from others so named throughout Hawai‘i. 30

W H E R E G U E ST B O O K

(FROM TOP) ©BOOGICH/ISTOCK; ©ISLAND OF HAWAII VISITORS BUREAU/NANCY ERGER

Founded in 1916, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park spreads across 333,000 acres from the summit of Mauna Loa to the ocean. Home of the fiery goddess Pele, Kīlauea Volcano— sometimes whimsically referred to as “the world’s only drive-in volcano”—was recognized in 1987 as a World Heritage site. The main lava pit, or caldera, is easily accessible by car on the Chain of Craters Road. Check in with the Visitor Center to learn about the latest flow reports. 808.985.6000 or www.nps.gov/havo


36 W H E R E G U E ST B O O K PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAM BOOK 5.5/9PT


PEAK INTEREST The Hawaiian Islands’ summits are sacred realms that have been homes for gods and goddesses TEXT BY SIMPLICIO PARAGAS

PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAM BOOK 5.5/9PT

PHOTOGRAPHY BY CAMERON BROOKS

Hawai‘i’s summits are the realms of the gods, Nā wao akua. Far above the zones of human habitation, these summits once roared with fiery eruptions and now ring with silence. The air is thin, the ground free of footsteps. At the sky-reaching summits of Hawai‘i, Earth’s grandeur has never been brighter. Many of the early Polynesian gods and demi-gods derived from or dwelt in the heavens, and many of the legendary exploits took place among the heavenly orbs. Not surprisingly, ancient Hawaiians always had a relationship with the skies, using them to navigate from island to island, and believing in their powerful and sacred nature. In the following pages, photographer Cameron Brooks captures aerial views of some of these hallowed summits, offering panoramic snapshots of a dormant volcano (Maui), towering sea cliffs (Moloka‘i), cloud-covered peaks (O‘ahu), cascading waterfalls (Kaua‘i) and plumes of smoke (Hawai‘i Island).

MAUI At Haleakalā, where the pan-Pacific demigod Maui snared the sun, we break above the realm of clouds into a sun-baked, subalpine world 10,023 feet above sea level.

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HAWAI‘I ISLAND In Hawaiian mythology, no other figure compares to Madame Pele. In addition to being recognized as the goddess of volcanoes, she is also known for her power, passion and jealousy. Sacred among Hawaiians, Waipi‘o Valley is the site of many heiau (temples) and waterfalls.

WHERE GUEST B OOK

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KAUA‘I The elusive summit of Mount Wai‘ale‘ale is considered the wettest spot on Earth, creating a cascading series of waterfalls. In one of the most dramatic topographies in the island chain, the cliffs along the Nāpali Coast are the source of many Hawaiian legends and myths.

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WHERE GUEST B OOK

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O‘AHU ‘Ōlapa ke ahi o ka lewa is an old Hawaiian proverb, which translates to “The fire of the sky flashes.” At 4,025 feet high, Ka‘ala is home to the benevolent patron goddess of travelers, Kaiona, who had frequent and helpful encounters with those voyaging through her realm.

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THE ALOHA SHIRT Spirit of the Islands BY DALE HOPE

PROLOGUE Aloha puts into one word the warm sense of greeting, love, and playfulness for which Hawai‘i is so well known. If you are lucky enough to have been to Hawai‘i, you know that the beauty of the aloha spirit comes to you through every one of your senses. Feel it in the warmth of the sun, in the trade winds caressing your skin, in the sand between your toes, in the fragrance of a plumeria lei—how fitting it is that these sensations have come together to inspire the canvas that is the aloha shirt. This whisper of fabric expresses a uniquely Hawaiian experience. And whenever you see a classic aloha shirt, no matter where you are, it brings you back to a lifestyle that says relax, be at ease, have some fun. The history of such a marvelous cultural icon, so evocative of the spirit of its home, is woven with the mystery

and allure of Hawai‘i and the stories of those who have lived there. Different tales have circulated for decades about the origins of the aloha shirt. Did it spring forth late one night from the hand-operated sewing machine of a Japanese tailor? Was it inspired by the tails-out shirts of the Philippines; elegant kimono cloth from Japan; or colorful, bold flower prints from Tahiti? What we do know is that aloha shirts were created by a wonderfully inventive and artistic group of people during the time when Hawai‘i was emerging as an island paradise for tourists—when the building of the Royal Hawaiian Hotel and the christening of a trio of magnificent cruise ships by Matson Navigation opened this majestic string of islands to the world. Those were the days when boatloads of visitors were charmed by hula dancers swaying to the rhythm of a lone WHERE GUEST B OOK

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In the late 1920s, most visitors to Waikiki beachside hotels wore only one socially acceptable daytime color—white. The fashion was white duck or linen suits for men, dresses for women. Tourists at the big hotels could have a suit cleaned for a mere fifteen cents. In the early 1930s, imported Chinese pongee replaced the conventional daytime whites. The pongee, a handwoven, crude-textured lightweight tan silk, was fashioned into suits and dresses by tailors in Honolulu. These plaincolored pongee garments were practical and popular and were taken back to the mainland United States. The Japanese and Chinese home sewers, tailors, dressmakers, and dry-goods merchants had established a tradition of using their Asian fabrics in island clothing by importing fine fabrics such as Japanese printed silk and cotton yukata, a summer kimono material, from relatives back home. As of 1922, Hawai‘i’s clothing factories mostly produced plantation uniforms. Then, as Hawai‘i began to change from an agricultural to a service-oriented economy, the emphasis of the island clothing industry shifted from the production of work clothes to sports- and casualwear. There are many stories about the “who” and the “how” of the creation of the first aloha shirt. In a 1966 magazine article, journalist and textile designer Hope Dennis observed, “About thirty-five years ago an astute Hawaiian garment manufacturer (who shall remain nameless to avoid renewing a thirty-five-year old argument) designed the first aloha shirt,” launching what was to become the Golden Age of aloha shirts—the 1930s through the 1950s. In a letter to the editor in the Honolulu Star-Bulletin of September 26, 1984, Margaret S. Young’s recollection of the first aloha shirt placed it in 1926: “A classmate of

COURTESY D0LORES MIYAMOTO; COURTESY DALE HOPE. (OPPOSITE PAGE) COURTESY DALE HOPE

TAILOR SHOPS TO FACTORY PIONEERS

(PREVIOUS SPREAD, FROM LEFT) COURTESY DALE HOPE; ©JEFF DIVINE. (THIS PAGE, FROM LEFT) COURTESY DANNY ESKENAZI;

(Previous spread, from left) Handpainted fabric from Alfred Shaheen’s studio, 1950s; Hawaiian Kahili print by artist John ‘Keoni’ Meigs. (This page, from left) Textile artists Elsie Das, left, and Nobuji Yoshida; Musa-Shiya's retail store in Honolulu; the first aloha shirt advertisement. (Opposite) Original pattern by Hale Hawaii depicting island life.

‘ukulele and enchanted by Waikiki beachboys riding the waves on their great wooden surfboards. For those who came from the far corners of the world, nothing painted a more vivid picture of Hawai‘i than these bold shirts with their colorful island images. “In a sense, aloha shirts put Hawai‘i on the map,” remembered renowned fabric designer John “Keoni” Meigs, discussing his early fashion days. “The first thing people did when they arrived was make a beeline for a department store to buy one.” Keoni was just one of the many flamboyant designers in the Golden Age of aloha shirts, from the 1930s through the 1950s. For inspiration, they shared the sunsets, beaches, flowers, and rain forests of Hawai‘i. They and their visionary peers—manufacturers, artists, and retailers—made up the community that created this memorable art form. Welcome to this rich collection of stories about a unique time and place—folk histories of the many people who brought aloha shirts to life, celebrations of the romance and beauty of Hawai‘i, and the wonderful stories told by the shirts themselves.


Additional photography: (page 42, top left) ©joe carini/getty images; (page 42, bottom left) ©joe carini/pacificstock; (Page 42, middle left) ©Philip rosenberg/pacificstock; (page 44, bottom right) ©ron dahlquist/getty images; (page 48, left) ©allan seiden/getty images

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COURTESY DALE HOPE

For the 50th anniversary of the Hawaiian Pineapple Company, Vera Stone Cook and Herb Briner, owner of Kamehameha, renewed the original design and fabric used to make this shirt.


COURTESY CAMILLE SHAHEEN TUNBERG (2)

mine, the late Gordon S. Young (no relation), developed in the early 1920s another pre-aloha shirt which became popular with some of his friends at the University of Hawai‘i. He had his mother’s dressmaker tailor shirts out of the cotton yukata cloth which Japanese women used for their work kimonos. The narrow width material usually had blue or black bamboo or geometrical designs on white. Gordon had a broad figure and it took several widths to make a shirt, which he wore tucked in. He took a supply when he entered the University of Washington in 1926 and created a topic for campus conversation.” In a Honolulu newspaper article, local residents Bob Lowry and his wife, Sally, recalled how in the late ’20s their classmate James P. Kneubuhl from Samoa showed up at Madame Lester’s School of Ballroom Dancing in Honolulu wearing a printed shirt with a striking tapacloth design. The shirt’s material, from the store run by Kneubuhl’s parents in Pago Pago, inspired Madame Lester to have a bolt of similar cloth sent to Honolulu. Hawaiian merchant Koichiro Miyamoto, “Musa-Shiya the Shirtmaker,” made shirts from the fabric for the other dance students. Eventually, shirts and undershorts made from the same tapa-influenced material became popular with high school students. Dolores Miyamoto, wife and working partner of Koichiro Miyamoto, also recalled that in the early ’30s famed Hollywood actor John Barrymore came into the store and ordered a colorful shirt made of kimono fabric. Ruth Hirata, then a young Honoka‘a tailor on the Big Island of Hawai‘i, remembers making colorful flowered shirts for Tony and Charles Labrador, who were with Alfred’s Dance Band in Honoka‘a, during the early ’30s. Lila Watumull Sahney, a buyer for the legendary Honolulu retailer Watumull’s East India Store, remembered, “The aloha shirt came into popularity, or began to be noticed more as a fashion item when the haole [caucasian] boys here wore them. They would get Ellery Chun, or Linn’s or Yat Loy, two local tailoring and retail outlets, or Musa-Shiya to make a shirt for them,” Sahney recalled. “And then they’d wear that to a lū‘au.” In matching the young islanders’ love for colorful clothing with the tourists’ desire to bring home keepsakes of

the carefree islands, Hawai‘i’s clothing styles were forever changing. The shirts were first made commercially by Honolulu merchants in tailor shops downtown. Ellery Chun’s family dry-goods store, King-Smith, was conveniently located next door to a tailor shop where visitors went to order custom shirts. In 1932 or 1933 (two different dates are provided in newspaper articles), Mr. Chun decided to manufacture some warm-weather shirts to keep in stock so customers would not have to wait for them. In 1932, Surfriders Sportswear Manufacturing, owned by Ti How Ho, reportedly made and sold its first “Hawaiian” shirts. In the summer of 1934, when President Franklin D. Roosevelt and his family visited Hawai‘i, sportswear had not yet firmly found its place in Honolulu. The newspaper photographs of a large lū‘au attended by FDR and friends show that “there were no gay Hawaiian garments on the participants as are now worn,” observed Emma Fundaburk, whose 1965 history of the Hawaiian garment industry has become a classic. “The guests at the lū‘au were all wearing leis, but were dressed in regular street or afternoon wear as would have been worn on the mainland at that time.” As the tourist trade and visits by the US Navy increased, the demand for Hawaiian souvenirs grew. The word “aloha” was used in connection with many

(From top) Former Miss Hawai‘i Bev Noa in an ad for Alfred Shaheen, whose factory housed an artist studio, a screen-print operation, a sewing operation, finishing and shipping departments, and a sales showroom; Shaheen textile artist Tony Walker.

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Adapted from “The Aloha Shirt: Spirit of the Islands” by Dale Hope (Patagonia, 2016). Used by permission.

(THIS PAGE, FROM TOP) ©SIG ZANE COLLECTION; COURTESY CAMILLE SHAHEEN TUNBERG. (OPPOSITE) COURTESY DALE HOPE

(This page, from top) Artist and designer Sig Zane inspects a hand cut Rubylith used to make his silk screen; fabrics move through a rope washer. (Opposite) Hand-painted textile artwork from the Alfred Shaheen studio, inspired by ancient Hawaiian themes.

products advertised in shop windows and newspaper advertisements. Emma Fundaburk noted that “in 1935 and 1936 when the word ‘aloha’ was attached to many types of merchandise, it was not unique that it also was attached to shirts and sportswear.” On June 28, 1935, Musa-Shiya Shoten, Ltd., took out an advertisement in the Honolulu Advertiser: “Honolulu’s Noted Shirt Maker and Kimono Shop. ‘Aloha’ shirts—well tailored, beautiful designs and radiant colors. Ready-made or made to order...95¢ up.” Aimed directly at the tourist market, this was probably the first appearance of the phrase “aloha shirt” in print. “In 1936, Chun decided to give his distinctive style a more exotic name—‘Aloha Shirt’—and he registered this as a trademark. He advertised it locally with persistence, the shirts caught on and so did the name, and that was the beginning of a popular trend that gave impetus to Hawai‘i’s fashion industry,” noted the Atlanta Journal. During the mid-1930s, many advertisements by custom tailors of shirts, dresses, and uniforms started to appear in the local Hawaiian newspapers, largely driven by the increasing tourist trade. By 1936, there were 275 tailors in Honolulu. Until the bombing of Pearl Harbor in 1941, the local garment industry continued to experience considerable growth. Large factories began to open with greater production capabilities. Two of the most important companies that changed the method of production from tailor made

to factory made were Kahala (originally Branfleet) and Kamehameha. George Brangier and Nat Norfleet Sr. of Branfleet humbly launched their shirt business in 1936, sewing coconut buttons on Japanese silk kimono cloth shirts. Kamehameha’s Herb Briner also pioneered raw silk aloha shirts out of a factory on Beretania Street in 1936. The Royal Hawaiian Manufacturing Company was founded in 1937 by Max Lewis with eight sewing machines and twelve employees, and grew in just three years to seventy-five sewing machines and more than eighty employees. Royal Hawaiian shipped its products to the mainland, Bermuda, London, Paris, Switzerland, and Australia. “To these far places go shirts and slacks, housecoats, pajamas and play suits in exotic prints over which tumble in delightful confusion tropical fish and palm trees, Diamond Head and Aloha Tower, surfboards and leis, ‘ukuleles and Waikiki beach scenes. All of these exciting Hawaiian patterns come in washable crepe,” wrote “Pins and Needles” columnist Lorna Arlen in the Honolulu Advertiser in 1939. Kunichi Tanaka founded Pacific Sportswear in 1936. Pacific made clothing for men, women, and children. In later years, Kunichi’s son, Raymond, and his older brother, Jerry, both joined the family firm as apprentice fabric cutters. As a young man, Ray was a noted musician. “Yeah, I played a lot of military clubs, the hotels, and clubs. I was making more money working weekends in my music business than I was in the garment business,” he remembered. In 1937, sales of aloha shirts and other cotton apparel to the mainland reached $128,000. As the decade drew to a close, more than $600,000 worth of Hawaiian-made sportswear was being shipped to mainland stores annually, and the industry employed 450 people. “The aloha shirt—symbol of the comfortable, gay and picturesque sportswear that is made and designed in Hawai‘i—has become big business,” wrote a newspaper columnist. “From a hit or miss business a few years ago, clothes manufacturing in Hawai‘i has grown to be an industry of great significance in the territory.”


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ROOTED LEGACY Hawai‘i’s indigenous koa wood trees are reincarnated with community support BY KRISTEN NEMOTO JAY

Years before there were hotels along the shoreline. And long before anyone or anything occupied the vast landscape of Hawai‘i Island, there was land devoid of any plant life. Years would pass with no change other than the slight wear and tear of the island’s sharp and rocky shoreline from the ocean’s merciless waves. Millions of seasons would continue without a single shred of greenery until nature’s path of wind, waves and birds strewed seeds and spores onto the ground. One of these seeds, thought to have been blown in by a bird caught in a storm, slowly grew and became the island’s most influential and symbolic piece of Native Hawaiian culture: the koa tree. As early Native Hawaiians voyaged and settled to the Hawaiian Islands, they soon discovered the versatile use of koa trees, deeming them as an important asset to their culture and customs.

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There’s an impact on many levels of our lives that will result in us taking care of the environment. It’s about a shift in values.

(THIS PAGE CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT) ©ORXY/SHUTTERSTOCK; ©C-PHOTO/ISTOCK; ©HAWAII TOURISM AUTHORITY/TOR JOHNSON

commoners were never established, thereby leading the permanent loss of control of their ancestral lands. Newly divided parcels, roads and trails demolished any forestation that came within its path. Include the fact that Hawai‘i’s fragile ecosystem had become ravaged by goats, sheep, deer, cattle and other large animals imported from outside settlers, koa trees were diminishing to the point of near extinction. Today, koa has become the largest of native Hawaiian trees and is one of a handful of flora that’s capable of restoring nitrogen, which provides natural fertility to surrounding plants. Although only 10 percent of original koa forests remain in Hawai‘i, efforts to revive the nearly extinct indigenous tree has taken root, requiring a complete paradigm shift in environmental values. Established in 2008, the Hawaiian Legacy Reforestation Initiative (HLRI) is a nonprofit organization whose mission is “to preserve economically viable and sustainable Hawaiian forests, protect endangered

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The sturdy wood was carved to build a canoe or shaped to make surfboards, paddles, spears and bowls. Koa was in abundance, and these early settlers used only what was needed to survive. It wasn’t until the arrival of the first wave of missionaries did the beauty and value of koa begin to shift. The kapu (forbidden) systems, which protected upland forests from deforestation and stressed the importance of a sustainable island ecology, were ignored and overcome by the increased demand for koa wood. When the koa industry was established in the 1830s, homes and churches showed off lavish use of koa in their floorings, wall panels, furniture and house frames. In 1848, a seminal act called the “Māhele” allowed private ownership of land for the first time, giving maka‘ainana (commoners) an opportunity to claim the land—once controlled by the king and other ali‘i—which they worked as their own. However, due in part to different cultural perceptions of property and inability to raise capital necessary for required surveys, claims among the


species, sequester carbon and recharge watersheds.” Through HLRI’s Hawaiian Legacy Tours, visitors can purchase a “legacy tree” and plant their own koa, or various other endemic trees, within the Legacy forests of Kūka‘iau and Kahuā Ranch. To date, more than 400,000 trees—out of an optimal goal of 1.3 million—have been planted. HLRI executive director Jeff Dunster says he’s proud to see how far sustainability efforts have come to revive what was once an important aspect to the island’s ecology and Native Hawaiian culture. The beauty of reintroducing Hawai‘i’s once-lost ecosystem to itself is to see what was previously in abundance prior to human contact. Endemic hawks and birds are coming back to nest and hunt—a rare phenomenon that’s now a frequent occurrence. Lush landscapes of greenery and shrubs are beginning to grow aplenty around the ring and roots of every legacy tree. And if the fact that an ecosystem coming back together isn’t of interest, the sheer value of a tree’s economic impact 60

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is impressive. Dunster says one tree generates approximately $161,000 of benefit to our society over its lifetime, saving monies that otherwise would have been needed to help prevent air pollution and promote water recycling. With more than 400,000 trees already planted, the dollar value is approximately $64 billion. As HLRI and Hawaiian Legacy Hardwoods have helped—and continue to help—move the conversation forward in the importance of taking care of Hawai‘i’s land and natural resources, Dunster is optimistic and grateful for the future as he has seen many visitors show a genuine interest in protecting the island’s natural resources. “There’s an impact on many levels of our lives that will result in us taking care of the environment,” he says. “It’s about a shift in values. And slowly people will start to think differently about how the world works and you’ll think outside of yourself ... I think that’s probably the biggest key, to understand that we have to see and are a part of the bigger picture.”

©SIMPLICIO PARAGAS

Koa wood’s colors tend to be highly variable but they can be medium golden or reddish brown with wavy and/or curly grain, as seen in this bowl.


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ISLAND VIEWS With its sprawling diversity of land- and seascapes, Hawai‘i Island is larger than all the other Hawaiian Islands combined, measuring 4,028 square miles.

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Hilo

Mostly known for its rainy climate and small town vibe, Hilo is located near the eastern tip of Hawai‘i Island, along the base of two volcanoes. Visitors who fly into Hilo International Airport—and take their first car ride out—are taken aback by the relaxed lifestyle and relatively non-existent traffic. Hilo is also home to the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo, the ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai‘i and the coveted Merrie Monarch Festival, known as the “Olympics” of hula. WHERE GUEST B OOK

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Pololū Valley

Once you’ve reached the end of Highway 270 in North Kohala, you’ll be swept away by Pololū Valley’s panoramic view of black sand beaches and rugged sea cliffs, making this overlook one of the most scenic on the island. Horses graze on the hillside as you look out at the small island outcroppings sitting in the waters offshore. Visitors often opt to take the steep but short hike down, which takes 30 to 45 minutes one way. However, swimming is discouraged because of strong currents.

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Kailua-Kona

Simply referred to as “Kona” among residents, this is the commercial hub of the island’s west side. Ali‘i Drive—the main street along the waterfront— snakes past souvenir shops, tour desks, condos and hotels. Historical sites within walking distance of Ali‘i Drive include Moku‘aikaua Church, built entirely of lava and coral; Hulihe‘e Palace, once a summer retreat for Hawaiian royalty; and Ahu‘ena Heiau, a temple built by King Kamehameha I. In the center of town, a stone seawall lines the bay and is a magnet for sunset watchers.

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ISLAND VIEWS


Kīlauea

Legends say that Kīlauea is the place where the fiery goddess Pele lives. Since 1983, she has been creating new land while alternately devouring homes and roads. Thousands have seen its fiery glowing displays and walked through its otherworldly sulfuric clouds. The main lava pit, or caldera, is easily accessible by car on the Chain of Craters Road. The dynamic flow of lava constantly changes, so call or stop by the Kīlauea Visitor Center first to get the latest flow reports and lava viewing tips. 808.985.6000, nps.gov/havos

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Honoka‘a

For more than a century, sugar was king along the fertile Hāmākua Coast. Today, despite the industry’s demise in the late 1990s, Honoka‘a, the biggest small town along this coast, remains a living testament to the plantation era. Economic changes have not diminished Honoka‘a’s historical integrity. On Mamāne Street, the Honoka‘a People’s Theater has been showing movies since the late ’30s. Learn more about the area’s plantation days at Laupahoehoe Train Museum.

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ISLAND VIEWS


E X P LO R E OUR KO N A

Pe e r a t l a n t i s a d ve n t u re s .c o m | ( 8 0 8 ) 3 2 6 -1 0 0 1 | # a t l a n t i s h awa i i

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Cultural Practice FOR HAWAI‘I RESIDENTS, OUTRIGGER CANOEING IS NOT ONLY THE OFFICIAL STATE TEAM SPORT BUT IT ALSO SERVES AS A RICH HISTORICAL REMINDER

RESPECT THE OPEN SEAS. FEW OTHER CULTURES HOLD SUCH AN INTERTWINED EXISTENCE WITH THE OCEAN. 78

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Football-shaped cacao pods are the colors of New England autumn leaves.

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CACAO CULTIVATION Hawai‘i farmers reap sweet rewards BY BONNIE FRIEDMAN

CREDIT

PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHRIS MCDONOUGH

DINI N G I N PA RA DI SE

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The cacao pod measures approximately 5 inches long with yellow, red, orange, green or purplish pigmentation. When it’s fully processed, we know it to be as chocolate.

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Like its earliest devotees, we drink it to warm our bodies and souls. Processed into a fine, brick red powder, it makes our favorite brownies even more scrumptious. We create a thick, hot, fudgy syrup, pour it over vanilla ice cream and make an incomparably luscious mess. We savor a dark, bittersweet, basil-infused truffle to put a smile on our faces and a song in our heart, not to mention what it does to our brains. Is there a more storied—or studied—food? Claims range from heart health to recreating the feeling of falling in love. For many of us, it is a food group unto itself. Say it with me. Chocolate. Its history dates back millennia but its original form bore almost no resemblance to the stuff we crave. For thousands of years the Mayans drank the bitter liquid during religious ceremonies and ate the beans after grinding them up with other seeds and grains. By the 16th century,

chocolate was being used as currency. And members of the Spanish court discovered that heating the beverage, adding sugar, vanilla and cinnamon made it taste mighty fine. They tried to keep their secret from the rest of Europe, but by the 1800s anyone who could afford cacao was drinking it. But it took another two hundred years to figure out a way to process the magical—even medicinal—elixir in a way that made it accessible to all, not just in beverage form. British physician Joseph Fry is credited with inventing the chocolate candy bar. Since then it’s been mass produced all over the world, attesting to its universal appeal. In the last decade or so, chocolate has taken on a cachet previously reserved for wine and, more recently, coffee. In supermarkets, you’ll find displays of bars with labels boasting their high percentages of cacao and whether the beans are “single origin,” estate-


A cacao farm worker splits open the pod to reveal the mucilaginous pulp that protects, nourishes and encases the cocoa beans. Once halved, workers will scrape the beans from the sides of the pods.

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grown. Flavors are described in terms familiar to oenophiles: “fruity,” “nutty,” “notes of coffee, tobacco, grass.” Savory elements are added, most notably sea salt of every conceivable variety, and herbs, lots and lots of herbs. Milton Hershey surely wouldn’t recognize the stuff he popularized in the United States more than a hundred years ago. Whatever your taste (and the vast majority of Americans still prefer the sweeter, more commercial milk chocolate to its bittersweet, more upscale cousin), it is a long difficult road from cacao tree to chocolate truffle, from bean (or, more precisely, pod) to bar. Hawai‘i is well situated—although not perfectly so—for growing cacao. But the almost limitless variables (rainfall, wind, pests, and fungus among them) have prevented cultivation from taking hold in the Islands in a big way. That is subject to change. Cacao was first planted

here in the 1850s. Today, according to Dr. H.C. “Skip” Bittenbender, there are about 65,000 cacao trees (about 60 acres) producing approximately 60,000 pounds of dry beans per year statewide, which is not very much at all. “But there’s a lot of potential for expansion,” adds the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa extension specialist for coffee, kava and cacao. Dole’s Waialua Estate on the North Shore is, by far, the largest cacao orchard in the Islands, with more than 20 acres. First planted in 1996, “it was an experiment,” says Derek Lanter, sales manager for coffee and chocolate operations. “Hawai‘i is not cacao’s natural area, but the trees will certainly adapt outside of their normal range.” In addition to growing the trees, the harvested beans are fermented and dried on site. Then they travel to the Mainland, where they’re processed by Guittard into 70 percent


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Cacao beans are fermented for three to seven days, during which time flavor is shaped. After fermentation, the beans are dried and inspected by sight and scent.

dark (bittersweet) chocolate, 55 percent semi-sweet and 38 percent milk. “The majority of our production is for the local market, both retail and at top end restaurants, which are using it for desserts,” says, Lanter. It is a complex, expensive, multistep process to get from pod—in which the cacao beans grow—to bar. Pods are harvested from the trees and then beans removed from the pods by hand. The beans are fermented, dried, then roasted. After being tested and cleaned, they are ground and finally conched, the process by which all the individual components of the processed beans are combined into chocolate. Only then can it be made into bars or desserts or other confections. 12

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Bob and Pam Cooper go this full distance on their 6-acre farm, with just one acre of cacao, in the Keahou district. “We didn’t even know cacao grew on trees,” says Bob of their initial inexperience with the crop. But when they bought the property in 1997, the cacao that the former owner had planted years before was thriving. “They were at full fruition,” Bob notes. “We had pods and beans. We didn’t want to process on the Mainland.” So they asked a chocolatemaking veteran from Great Britain to help them set up their own little production facility. Original Hawaiian Chocolate made its first batch of chocolate in 2000. “We’re making


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Aside from satisfying one’s sweet tooth, chocolate possesses more than 400 chemical compounds, including anandamide, which is known as the bliss chemical.

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about 10,000 pounds right now; we can make between 50,000 and 80,000 pounds a year with the trees and facility we have.” The Coopers’ finished product is distributed through 60 retail locations throughout Hawai‘i and direct to consumers online. Chefs use it, too. Jackie Lau, formerly of Roy’s Restaurants statewide, loves it. “We try to use it as much as possible for specialty desserts,” she says. “At the Tavern in Princeville (now closed), I feature it in my Tavern Pie—Chocolate Pudding ‘Pie’ with Hawaiian salted caramel and cream. I also do a Hawaiian hot chocolate. Most of our restaurants use the cocoa

nibs. I like that fact that the cocoa is from Hawai‘i and stays in Hawai‘i!” Veteran restaurateur Philippe Padovani is arguably Hawai‘i’s best chocolatier, certainly our most knowledgable. He sells Waialua Estate chocolate in his shop and uses it in the tropical-flavored confections he makes for special events. “It will take a commitment from the growers and a European-style processing plant” to make cacao a big, successful crop here. He thinks it can—and will— happen. Waialua Estate’s Lanter, too, sees positive signs. “Awareness continues to grow,” he says. “And the future is looking sweet.”


NAME

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SWEET SENSATIONS Hawai‘i’s climate is ripe for growing exotic fruits

(OPPOSITE PAGE) ©DAPHOTO/123RF STOCK PHOTO; (THIS PAGE) ©PHROMPAS/SHUTTERSTOCK

BY SIMPLICIO PARAGAS

While best known for our pineapples and apple bananas, Hawai‘i does grow other exotic fruits, including the pitaya or dragon fruit (left) and the purple mangosteen (above).

Beyond the iconic pineapple, Hawai‘i farmers cultivate a colorful array of exotic fruits. Mangoes, papayas, guava, breadfruit, coconut, avocado, banana and berries can now all be readily found at local Farmers Markets and supermarkets. Even the Southeast Asian durian is available for tasting — if you can get past its foul stench. In early Polynesian voyaging days, only a few berries existed on the Islands and it wasn’t until postWestern contact did fruits, such as guava, papaya and mangoes, begin to flourish. Waves of immigrants from Japan, China and the Philippines later brought their own favorite trees and planted them at plantations and eventually in surrounding suburbs. For the past several years, Mark Suiso has been “waving a flag,” trying to get the attention of island residents in an effort to encourage them to grow more fruit trees in their yards. His proselytizing is starting to pay off. Signs of an increasing number of trees are beginning to sprout across neighborhoods and Suiso is seeing more pruning. “It’s encouraging,” says Suiso, owner of Makaha Mangoes and

president of Hawai‘i Tropical Fruit Growers, a nonprofit dedicated to tropical fruit research, education, marketing and promotion. “And I’m getting a lot of people come up to me and ask how they could get their trees to produce more fruit.” In a study published by the University of Hawai‘i’s College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources, author Mike Nagao points out that farmers have been increasingly cultivating specialty fruits, including rambutan, longan, lilikoi, lychee, abiu, atemoya, breadfruit, caimito, dragonfruit and durian. Growers also currently plant jaboticaba, jackfruit, langsat, loquat, mangosteen, persimmon, poha, rollinia, sapodilla, soursop, starfruit and white sapote. But what are some of these fruits and what do they taste like? Here’s an alphabetic sampling of some of the more popular fruits that can be found at various markets, as well as on restaurant menus. ABIU (Pouteria caimito) The yellow,

baseball-sized fruit hails from the Amazon and possesses a gummy latex exterior that needs to be peeled. Its

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17


transparent flesh has been described as tasting like vanilla pudding with a hint of caramel or a gel blend of melon and persimmon.

the pitaya is a type of cactus and comes in three primary colors: white, red and magenta. To determine ripeness, look for bright, even-colored skin with few blotches.

BREADFRUIT (Artocarpus altilis)

Star apples,below, and durian offer distinct flavor profiles.

A flowering tree in the mulberry family, breadfruit grows throughout most Pacific Ocean islands and can substitute for a meal’s starch component. When cooked, ‘ulu, breadfruit in Hawaiian, has a potato-like flavor. The versatile fruit can be grilled, boiled, roasted, baked or fried.

DURIAN (Durio zibethinus) While it may be recognized as the king of fruits in Southeast Asia, Westerners usually can’t get past its pungent aroma or “stinky feet” smell. Famed naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace described its flesh as “a rich custard highly flavored with almonds.”

CAIMITO (Chrysophyllum cainito)

JACKFRUIT (Artocarpus heterophyllus) Weighing on average 20 to

Commonly known as star apple, this fruit is a native of the Greater Antilles and West Indies. When cut horizontally, the core resembles a starlike appearance and hence its name. Its flavor profile is a cross between custard and an apple.

40 pounds, the jackfruit comes from the East Indies. Some say it tastes like Juicy Fruit gum while others consider it a cross between a banana and papaya. Its buttery flesh is dense with fiber and often described as starchy.

LANGSAT (Lansium domesticum)

These tiny, yellow, orb-shaped fruits

(FROM TOP) ©STIEGLITZ/ISTOCK; ©WORRADIREK/SHUTTERSTOCK

DRAGON FRUIT (Hylocereus)

Tasting like a pear-and-kiwi hybrid,

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LILIKOI (Passiflora edulis) The passion fruit plant produces a spectacular 1”-3” flower with yellow or purple fruit. Seeds of the purple variety were first planted on Maui in 1880 by Eugene Delemar who brought them from Australia and planted them at his ranch in an area still known as “Lilikoi Gulch.” Varying flavor profiles include mango with a touch of lemon and a mix between a papaya and pineapple. MANGOSTEEN (Garcinia mangostana) Believed to have originated in the

Sunda Islands and the Moluccas of Indonesia, the fragrant, edible flesh of the purple mangosteen is sweet, tangy, citrusy and peachy. Its hard shell must be split with a knife and cracked open. 20

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RAMBUTAN (Nephelium lappaceum) Similar to lychee and lon-

gans, rambutans are covered with soft spines. Indigenous to the Malay Archipelago, the name of this fruit is derived from the Malay word meaning “hairy,” and you can see why. But once the hairy exterior is peeled away, the tender, fleshy, fruit offers a balance of sweet and sour, much like a grape. WHITE SAPOTE (Casimiroa edulis)

Native to Mexico, the white sapote has a flavor that ranges from bananalike and peach to pear and vanilla flan. It’s sometimes called “custard apple” because of the smooth texture of its flesh, similar to that of a Granny Smith apple. So whether it’s a piece of abiu or white sapote, rambutan or durian, you’ll want to sample the fruits of Hawai‘i. As Homer once wrote, you may never want to go home after tasting our honey-sweet fruits.

Llilikoi, langsat and dragon fruit, clockwise from left, are among the exotic fruits grown on Hawai‘i farms.

(THIS PAGE) ©ELINA MANNINEN/SHUTTERSTOCK; © LUKAS GOJDA/SHUTTERSTOCK; (OPPOSITE PAGE) ©ELINA MANNINEN/SHUTTERSTOCK

grow in clusters and can be quite sour when unripe, but are perfectly sweet when ripe with hints of grape and orange.


DINI N G I N PA RA DI SE 21

PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAM BOOK 5.5/9PT


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RCSH Where_Dining In Paaradise AD (11-17) - Half Page (6.25” x 4.125”) - 4 color process

Dining In Paaradise AD (11-17)


LOCAL FAVORITES Must-tries while vacationing in Hawai‘i

Poke, manapua, shave ice, malasadas: Hawaii’s iconic snacks are oneof-a-kind. Like the waves of people who introduced, adapted and embraced them, they’re unique to the Islands, a happy blend of sweet, savory, puckery and hot. Here’s a quick intro to Hawai‘i’s favorite snacks. SHAVE ICE Right after the beach on hot summer days, there’s nothing 26

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like a delicious cone of soft, sweet ice to remind you that Hawai‘i no ka oi (Hawaii is the best). Just ask former President Obama, who takes Sasha and Malia on at least one shave ice outing every time he visits his island home. The snack arrived generations ago with immigrants from Japan, where it’s a simple summer treat, but the Hawai‘i version now arguably outdoes the original. The ice is shaved ultra-fine by sharp blades, mounded

©HAWAII TOURISM AUTHORITY/TOR JOHNSON (2)

BY MARI TAKETA


S

©HAWAII TOURISM AUTHORITY/TOR JOHNSON (2)

Shave ice arrived generations ago with immigrants from Japan, where it’s a simple summer treat, but the Hawai‘i version now arguably outdoes the original.


MALASADAS Introduced by the

islands’ first Portuguese immigrants, malasadas are balls of doughy goodness that have been deep-fried and rolled in sugar. At Leonard’s Bakery on the edge of Waikīkī, they’re madeto-order and come out piping hot, fluffy and utterly delicious. A generation ago the bakery’s founding Rego family introduced the sugary sweet

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for Shrove Tuesday, a Portuguese tradition preceding Lent, and malasadas took off. Well-known competitors in Honolulu now include Champion Malasadas and Agnes Portuguese Bake Shop, each with slight variations in their recipes, but for many malasada-loving local residents, Leonard’s still reigns supreme. Leonard’s Bakery, 933 Kapahulu Ave., 808.737.5591 CRACK SEED Children in Hawai‘i know the puckery knobs of salted preserved plum called li hing mui are good for sore throats, but there’s much more to it than that. Li hing mui is just one of an infinite assortment of crack seed, a favorite after-school snack named for the process of cracking the seed inside some of the fruit before it’s preserved. There’s rock salt plum, pickled plum, lemon peel and pickled apricot. Newer varieties include shredded mango and candied ginger. Old neighborhoods still have

Hawai‘i’s answer to the beignet, malasadas are Portuguese donuts that are deep-fried then covered in sugar for a satisfying sweet treat.

©YASUHIROAMANO/ISTOCK

by hand atop paper cones and doused with fruity syrups. The most popular flavor? Old-fashioned strawberry. Most popular combo? Rainbow, a colorful cone with strawberry, vanilla and banana syrups. Don’t forget addons like sweet condensed milk, ice cream or sweet red azuki beans. And whatever you do, do not call these snow cones. Waiola Shave Ice, 2135 Waiola St., 808.949.2269 and 3113 Mokihana St., 735-8886; Matsumoto Shave Ice, 66-087 Kamehameha Hwy., 808.637.4827


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Hawai‘i residents are crazy about

POKE Poke in Hawaiian (pronounced

POH-keh) means ‘to slice or cut,’ which is exactly what’s done to premium raw fish to turn it into one of Hawai‘i’s favorite snacks. In olden days the cubed fish was simply mixed with sea salt and crushed kukui nuts; today, reflecting the Islands’ mixed cultures, the incarnations are infinite. Supermarkets typically sell a dozen or more varieties, with different stores known for different specialties. Even local Foodland and Whole Foods stores feature poke counters. Popular choices include ahi mixed with soy sauce (shoyu ahi poke), spicy ahi and salmon poke. There’s even smoked meat poke, raw crab poke and vegan

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tofu poke. The best part: Every poke counter offers free samples, so don’t be afraid to taste different selections until you find your favorite. Tamura’s Fine Wines & Liquors, 1216 10th Ave., 808.735.7100 Poke Stop, 94-050 Farrington Hwy.,808.676.8100; Tanioka’s Seafoods & Catering, 94-903 Farrington Hwy., 808.671.3779; Ono Seafoods, 747 Kapahulu Ave., 808.732.4806 SPAM MUSUBI SPAM musubi is so

popular in the Islands, it’s sold at virtually every 7-Eleven. What’s more, the 24-hour chain is known for its many varieties, including the Deluxe SPAM Musubi, composed of a strip of the processed preserved meat set atop a large ball of white rice then stacked with a slab of scrambled egg. What gives? Simply put, Hawai‘i residents are crazy about SPAM, consuming more per capita than any other state in the U.S., and SPAM musubi is the most popular and portable way to consume it. The snack is a staple at family picnics and sports practices—

Poke can be prepared with a variety of ingredients but the classic favorite consists of ahi mixed with sea salt and crushed kukui nuts.

©ALEXANDRALAW1977/SHUTTERSTOCK

entire shops dedicated to crack seed, the choices displayed enticingly in rows of large glass jars. Flavors range from uber-salty to sweet-tart to saltyspicy. If in doubt, ask about the bestsellers and start from there. Crack Seed Store, 1156 Koko Head Ave., 808.737.1022; Lin’s Hawaiian Snacks, 401 Kamakee St., 808.597.8899

SPAM, consuming more per capita than any other state in the U.S., and SPAM musubi is the most popular and portable way to consume it.


MANAPUA Savory buns of meaty

goodness, manapua is the local name for the traditional Chinese snack known as char siu bao. It comes from the Hawaiian words mea ono, or cake or pastry, and pua‘a, or pork. Fist-size balls of dough are stuffed with shredded roast pork, baked or steamed to soft, fluffy fulfillment and sold at Chinese delis, bakeries and dim sum restaurants. In Hawai‘i today, local appetites have spurred innovations including vegetarian versions and manapua stuffed with Hawaiian kalua pork, Portuguese sausage and curried chicken. Manapua are so popular, O‘ahu locals visiting relatives on the neighbor islands buy them by the dozen, and most longtime residents can name a favorite manapua shop. And yes, they’re even sold at 7-Eleven. Libby Manapua Shop, 410 Kalihi St., 808.841.2253; Royal Kitchen, 100 N. Beretania St., 808.524.4461; 32

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Char Hung Sut, 64 N. Pauahi St., 808.538.3335 SAIMIN A savory bowl born on the sugar plantations of long ago, saimin is quintessentially local. Japanese workers tended large pots of broth made with the humble ingredients at hand: dried shrimp, pork or beef bones, soy sauce. They added Chinese noodles and topped them with fish cake and strips of luncheon meat or Chinese roast pork, and the dish became an amalgam of Hawai‘i. Locals love saimin for the homey flavors and memories of childhood meals with the family and of post-game snacks with high school friends. Today there are restaurants throughout the islands that specialize in saimin. But the true measure of its popularity? Saimin is on the menu of every McDonald’s in Hawai‘i. Palace Saimin, 1256 N. King St., 808.841.9983; Zippy’s, various locations across O‘ahu and Maui; Shiro’s Saimin Haven, 98-020 Kamehameha Hwy., 808.488.8824 and 94-256 Waipahu Depot St., 808.676.2088

Known as char siu bao in Chinese, manapua can be either baked or steamed. The savory snack is a common staple during dim sum.

©PAUL_BRIGHTON/SHUTTERSTOCK

and as its rank as one of 7-Eleven’s top local sellers attests, it’s a favorite snack of drivers on the go.


Keauhou Shopping Center 78-6831 Alii Drive. STE.402 Kailua-Kona, HI

808.322.8424

www.royalthaicafe.com Monday to Friday, 11am-9pm Saturday & Sunday, 12pm-9pm FRESH, AUTHENTIC THAI Come to Royal Thai Cafe to taste for yourself!


RESTAURANT GUIDE Hawaii Calls Restaurant & Lounge (Waikoloa Beach Marriott Resort & Spa) 69-275 Waikoloa Beach Dr. (808) 886-8111 www.marriott.com B, L, D, C, B/W Ruth’s Chris Steak House (The Shops at Mauna Lani) 68-1330 Mauna Lani Dr. (808) 887-0800 www.ruthschrishawaii.com D, C, B/W

FRENCH

The Blue Room Brasserie & Bar (The Shops at Mauna Lani) 68-1330 Mauna Lani Dr. (808) 887-0999 www.theblueroomhi.com L, D, C, B/W

HAWAI‘I REGIONAL

Ahualoa Farms 45-3279 Mamane St. (808) 775-1821 www.maunakeagold.com Retail Aka’ula Lānai (Waikoloa Beach Marriott Resort & Spa) 69-275 Waikoloa Beach Dr. (808) 886-6789 www.marriott.com B, L, D, C, B/W Big Island Bees 82-1140 Meli Rd., Ste. 102 (808) 328-1315 www.bigislandbees.com Tours Big Island Candies 585 Hinano St. (808) 935-8890 www.bigislandcandies.com Self-guided tour, Retail Brown’s Beach House (Fairmont Orchid) 1 North Kaniku Dr. (808) 887-7368 D, C, B/W CanoeHouse (Mauna Lani Resort) 68-1400 Mauna Lani Dr. (808) 881-7911 D (M-Sa), C, B/W Daylight Mind Coffee Company 75-5770 Ali‘i Dr. (808) 339-7824 www.daylightmind.com B, L, D

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Don the Beachcomber (Royal Kona Resort) 75-5852 Ali‘i Dr. (808) 930-3286 www.royalkona.com B, D, C, B/W Hawai‘i Loa Lū’au (Fairmont Orchid) 68-1400 Mauna Lani Dr. (808) 887-7368 D, C, B/W Kawaihae Seafood Bar & Grill 61-3642 Kawaihae Rd. (808) 880-9393 www.seafoodbarandgrill.com B (Su), L, D, C, B/W Kona Coffee & Tea 74-5035 Queen Ka‘ahumanu Hwy. (808) 329-6577 74-5588 Palani Rd. (808) 365-5340 www.konacoffeeandtea.com B, L, B/W

Volcano Winery 35 Piimauna Dr. (808) 967-7772 www.volcanowinery.com Tastings, Retail

ITALIAN

Al Vicolo Italian Restaurant 61-3642 Kawaihae Rd. (808) 882-1200 L, D, C, B/W

Mountain Thunder 73-1942 Ha‘o St. (808) 443-75935 www.mountainthunder.com Daily Tours

Mi’s Waterfront Bistro 75-5770 Ali‘i Dr. (808) 329-3880 www.miswaterfrontbistro.com L, D, B/W

Original Hawaiian Chocolate Factory, The 78-6772 Makenawai St. (808) 322-2626 www.ohcf.us Tours

Romano’s Macaroni Grill 201 Waikoloa Beach Dr. (808) 443-5515 www.macaronigrill.com B, L, D, C, B/W

Plantation Grill 61-3642 Kawaihae Rd. (808) 882-1200 www.plantationgrillhawaii.com D (W-M), C, B/W Sunset Lū’au (Waikoloa Beach Marriott Resort & Spa) 69-275 Waikoloa Beach Dr. (808) 886-8111 www.marriott.com D, Mondays, Wednesdays Tommy Bahama Restaurant & Bar (The Shops at Mauna Lani) 68-1330 Mauna Lani Dr. (808) 881-8686 www.tommybahama.com L, D, C, B/W Under the Bodhi Tree (The Shops at Mauna Lani) 68-1330 Mauna Lani Dr., #116 (808) 895-2053 www.underthebodhi.net B, L, D

JAPANESE

Monstera (The Shops at Mauna Lani) 68-1330 Mauna Lani Dr., #111 (808) 887-2711 www.monsterasushi.com D, C, B/W Sansei Seafood Restaurant & Sushi Bar (Queen’s Marketplace) 201 Waikoloa Beach Dr. (808) 886-6286 www.sanseihawaii.com D, C, B/W

PACIFIC RIM

A-Bay’s Island Grill (Kings’ Shops) 250 Waikoloa Beach Dr., #J106 (808) 209-8494 www.a-bays.com B (Su), L, D, C, B/W Bamboo Restaurant & Gallery 55-3415 Akoni Pula Hwy. (808) 889-5555

www.bamboorestaurant.info Br (Su), L, D, C, B/W Fish Hopper, The Seafood & Steaks 75-5683 Alii Dr. (808) 326-2002 www.fishhopper.com B, L, D, C, B/W Manta & Pavilion Wine Bar (Mauna Kea Beach Hotel) 62-100 Mauna Kea Beach Dr. (808) 882-5707 B, Br (Su), D, B/W Nani Mau Gardens & Restaurants 421 Makalika St. (808) 959-3500 www.nanimaugardens.com L, D Roy’s Waikoloa Bar & Grill 250 Waikoloa Beach Dr., E-1 (808) 886-4321 www.royshawaii.com D, C, B/W

THAI

Charley’s Thai Cuisine (Queen’s Marketplace) 201 Waikoloa Beach Dr. (808) 886-0591 www.charleysthaihawaii.com L, D, B/W Royal Thai Cafe (Keauhou Shopping Center) 78-6831 Ali‘i Dr. (808) 322-8424 www.royalthaicafe.com L, D, B/W

KEY TO DINING ABBREVIATIONS: Service: (B) Breakfast; (Br) Brunch; (L) Lunch; (D) Dinner; (C) Cocktails; (E) Entertainment; (B/W) Beer & Wine.

©STEVE CZERNIAK

AMERICAN


Queens’ MarketPlace

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—— GROCERY —— Island Gourmet Markets

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Where Guestbook Hawaii 2018  
Where Guestbook Hawaii 2018