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The Shops at wailea

THe shopping Dining Arts & culture magazine

Summer/Fall 2019


center information WELCOME to Maui’s premier shopping and dining destination. With more than 70 distinct boutiques, shops, restaurants and galleries, The Shops at Wailea offers an unparalleled leisure experience in the heart of the Wailea Resort. For a map of the center and a store directory, please see page 44. For a list of center events, please see page 8.

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PIILAN Y. I HW

Wailea Ekahi

Andaz Resort

Wailea Elua

Wailea Blue Golf Course

Wailea Marriott Resort Wailea Beach Villas Grand Wailea

Residence Inn Wa i l Maui Wailea ea Ik e Dr ive Wailea Ekolu

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Wailea Point

Grand Champions Villas

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Four Seasons Resort

Wa i l ea Al a

PARKING

One hour free parking. Three additional hours free parking with validation. Or $3 per half hour, $40 per day maximum or lost ticket.

W ai nui Dr . l e a Al a

From Pi‘ilani Highway Take Wailea Ike Drive toward the ocean until you reach the traffic light at Wailea Alanui Drive. Turn either right or left onto Wailea Alanui Drive. Entrances to the center are located immediately following in either direction.

Road

From within Wailea resort area Take Wailea Alanui Drive to the intersection of Wailea Ike Drive and look for our monument signs.

To Kahului Via Piilani Hwy 31

S. Kihei

DRIVING DIRECTIONS

Ro

.

HOURS

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Dr.

To Makena Surf

Makena Al an u i

Monday-Sunday, 9:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. Select merchants and restaurants open earlier and remain open later. For more information, please call the management office at 808.891.6770.

Hotel Wailea

Fairmont Kea Lani

Gold and Emerald Courses


Shops at Wailea, East Wing Upper Level


The Shops

ADVERTISING J. ELLIOTT & CO., INC.

at wailea magazine

the shops at wailea

3750 Wailea Alanui Drive, Wailea-Makena, HI 96753 (808) 891-6770 www.theshopsatwailea.com Vice President, General Manager Diana Whitt The Festival Companies Vice President, Director of Marketing Sam Shenkus The Festival Companies Marketing Director Candace Shaw The Festival Companies

Executive Director Pat O’Donnell Regional Vice President of Sales Courtney Fuhrmann Group Publisher William A. Moore III b.moore@jgeco.com Account Executive Debbie De Mello Manager of Hospitality Relations, Distribution & Events Sherry Mae Ravago Customer Service Representative Kimberly Jacks

EXECUTIVE

President Donna W. Kessler Vice President of Operations Angela E. Allen Head of Digital Jamie Turner

EDITORIAL

MORRIS COMMUNICATIONS

MORRIS VISITOR PUBLICATIONS

Chairman William S. Morris III President & CEO William S. Morris IV

Senior Editor Simplicio Paragas Chief Creative Officer Haines Wilkerson Publication Services Director Karen Fralick

Operations/Facilities Manager Kenneth Kinores The Festival Companies

Director of Photography Vincent Hobbs Art Director Ron Vaz Assistant Photo Editor Kiara Bouyea Retouching Erik Lewis Publication Services Manager Rosemary Stephens Director of Manufacturing Donald Horton

Official publisher for The Shops at Wailea

POGGENPOHL KITCHENS AND EUROPEAN ACCESSORIES

Luxury European Kitchen Specialists The Shops at Wailea 808.264.7507 Adjacent to Lineage Restaurant

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Our Wave collection comes in several styles and sizes and is available in 14K Yellow, White or Rose Gold.

An incomparable collection of Hawaiian and Island lifestyle jewelry WAILEA The Shops at Wailea, Upper Level • Grand Wailea Resort KAANAPALI: Whalers Village • Hyatt Regency Maui LAHAINA: 858 Front Street, across from Bubba Gump • 744 Front Street, across from the seawall • Lahaina Cannery KAHULUI: Queen Ka‘ahumanu Center

NaHoku.com • 1-800-260-3912 Best of HONOLULU MAGAZINE 2018

HAWAII’S BEST

People’s Choice Awards The Star-Advertiser 2019

HAWAII MAGAZINE Readers’ Choice Award 2019


The shops at Wailea

Events 8 / Concerts at the shops / market / ‘ukulele lesson

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FASHION

ACCESSORIES

DINING

GIVING

HAWAIIAN

A mix of fabulous summer and fall looks that are both refined and relaxed.

Find an array of stylish standouts to elevate your wardrobe and home.

From seafood pasta and Prime steaks to creative mai tais and martinis, savor it all at The Shops.

BACK

CULTURE

Learn about the different Maui nonprofits that are individually supported each month.

While not endemic to Hawai‘i, the versatile coconut palm was embraced by Kanaka Maoli (Native Hawaiians).

Directory 44 / map 46 on the cover RENEW ARTISTS, HAWAI‘I model Kalia Dowsett poses in a tropical ensemble with the top, pants,

earrings and bracelet from Mahina, and accessories from Billabong (bag), ring (Na Hoku) and hat (Aloha Hat Company). Location: Andaz Maui at Wailea Resort.

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(COVER ) ©HAROLD JULIAN (THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT) ©HAROLD JULIAN; ©ISAAC ARJONILLA (2) ON KALIA : BIKINI TOP, BILLABONG; SHORTS AND SHIRT, MAHINA; HAT, ALOHA HAT COMPANY; JEWLERY: KELIKI

contents


Events Art, music, dance, crafts

DYNAMIC DUO Kellen and LÄ«hau hau Paik will perform on October 16.

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COncerts at the shops

island wood carving Every Wednesday, 10:30 am – 1 pm; and every Friday, 12:30 – 3:30 pm Bone and wood carving is an important tradition in Tongan culture. At Tasini Tiki Gallery, learn about the culture and history behind this practice, and see examples of carving artistry from owner Taani Tasini Lavaka, who was raised in Tonga.

henry kapono

August 21, 5:30 – 7 pm. Free. Kapono has been blending rock ‘n’ roll vibes into traditional Hawaiian sounds since the 1970s. He has since earned 14 Nä Hökü Hanohano Awards, as well as a coveted Grammy nomination. kamaka kukona and halau

September 18, 5:30 – 7 pm. Free. This Grammy-nominated artist blends his elegant vocals with traditional sounds. He’s also an award-winning kumu hula and he’ll showcase his mastery of both art forms by sharing the stage with his hālau. kupaoa and halau

(OPPOSITE PAGE) COURTESY KUPAOA. (THIS PAGE) ©ISAAC ARJONILLA (2)

October 16, 5:30 – 7 pm. Free. Kellen and Līhau Paik, known as the duo Kūpaoa, have performed together for 15 years. They have released seven albums and received six Nā Hōkū Hanohano awards. del beazley

November 20, 5:30 – 7 pm. Free. Six-time Nā Hōkū Hanohano award winner, Beazley performs a range of songs with his rich voice that include Hawaiian and devotional. His diverse repertoire has earned him much praise.

polynesian Dance shows Every Tuesday and Thursday, 5:30 – 6:30 pm Every Pacific Island nation has its own unique style of dance, many of which are showcased during The Shops’ weekly Polynesian dance shows. Let the performers transport you to another world with different dance styles, like the Hawaiian hula and Ori Tahiti.

napua greig

December 18, 5:30 – 7 pm. Free. This distinguished recording artist has won many Nā Hōkū Hanohano Music awards for her albums “Pihana” and “Möhalu,” including Best Female Vocalist and Hawaiian Album of the Year. She is also an award-winning kumu hula, which is reflected in her albums. T he Sho p s at Wa il ea

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events

MARKET

jazz at the shops Every first Wednesday of the month, 5:30 – 7 pm Become further immersed in Maui’s relaxing environment with Jazz at The Shops. Let award-winning musicians enchant you with their soulful island jazz performances under the stars. The series features talented musicians every month. Scheduled performers include Angela and Phil Benoit (Sept. 4), Kelly Covington (Oct. 2) and Keoki Ruiz (Nov. 6).

Second and fourth Wednesday of the month, 4 – 6 pm What could be more enticing than fresh pineapples, specialty foods and artisanal goods? Market at The Shops is a fun grocery shopping venue that offers farm-fresh and sustainably grown produce from local growers, producers and artisans. You’ll get the freshest ingredients and the chance to learn about the food and products directly from the vendors.

’UKULELE LESSONS Every Monday, 5:30 – 6:30 pm; and every Friday, 3 – 4 pm One of the most important instruments in Hawaiian culture, the ‘ukulele is synonymous with Hawaiian music. And with its diminutive shape and the sweet, relaxing sounds it produces, it is perhaps one of the least intimidating instruments to learn. Whether you’re a beginner or an ‘ukulele virtuoso, this event is for you. STRUMMING Learn to play basic ‘ukulele during lessons held on Mondays and Fridays.

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(CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT) COURTESY KELLY COVINGTON; ©ISAAC ARJONILLA (2)

at the shops


Wailea chic Casual elegance in paradise


CASUAL COMFORT (Opposite page) Swimsuit, Volcom; Jumpsuit, Billabong; Earrings, Keliki. (This page)

photographed by Harold Julian Models: Kalia Dowsett Chris Harris, Renew Artists Hair/Makeup: Ry-n Shimabuku

Shirt, Blazer and Pants, Banana Republic; Shoes, Tommy Bahama; Bag, Louis Vuitton; Bracelet, Tiffany & Co.


CABANA COOL Top, Volcom; Pants, Banana Republic; Jewelry, Na Hoku and Mahina; Bag, Mahina.


DRESS IN STYLE Dress, Gucci; Jewelry,Tiffany & Co.


SUMMER BREEZE Dress, Prada; Jewelry, Na Hoku; Sunglasses, Sunglass Hut.


LOREM IPSUM DAY DREAMING Dress, Prada; Shirts and Shorts,Volcom; earrings and bracelet, Shoes, Tommy Bahama; Na Hoku; ring, Mahina; Bracelet, Na Hoku. shoes, Banana Republic.


(This page) RESORT WEAR Swimsuit, Billabong; Wrap, Mahina. (opposite page) ROMANTIC RED Blouse and Skirt, Gucci; Shoes, Banana Republic; Jewelry, Tiffany & Co.


THE AMAZING ANDAZ MAUI IS WAILEA’S MOST INTIMATE BEACHFRONT RESORT, FEATURING 300 GUESTROOMS AND SUITES, INCLUDING 10 LUXURIOUS OCEANFRONT RESIDENTIAL VILLAS. ANDAZMAUI.COM


casual chic With the right accessories, your day in Wailea will be easy, breezy and stylish.

sunglass hut

Sunglasses are meant to protect your eyes from the sun’s harsh rays but who says you can’t look good doing it?

aloha hat company

Don a fun and functional hat while walking the beach.

enchantress gallery by bootzie

Add a little charm to your wrist and pick out a bracelet.

enchantress gallery by bootzie

Earrings that dazzle.

enchantress gallery by bootzie

Keep things wild in this eye-catching jumper. Banana Republic

cos bar

A pair of Madison 12-Hour Pumps belong in every woman’s closet.

A bottle of raffermissant serum.

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Keliki

Bold and beautiful maxi dress.

tommy bahama

ŠHAROLD JULIAN

These adorable tassel earrings perfectly complement a seaside look.

Dress and Jacket, Banana Republic; blue ginger

Live the aloha lifestyle in this cute blue dress.

Bag, Louis Vuitton; Earrings and Ring, Mahina; Ring (left hand) , Na Hoku T he Sho p s at Wa il ea

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island inspiration Bring the aloha spirit with trendy island wear that is bound to impress, both day and night.

NA HOKU billabong

Make a bold fashion statement with this black aloha shirt.

These cuff links are classic, elegant and undeniably Hawaiian.

sunglass hut maui clothing company

A pair of these classic Ray-Bans will complement any outfit.

Camo Hat. cariloha

The Hawaiian green sea turtle is symbolic of a guardian spirit, or Amakua.

tommy bahama

A versatile and stylish pocket knife.

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child’s play Toys, clothes and refreshing treats—everything your child needs for his/her Maui adventure.

maui waterwear

Floral patterns add style to any swimsuit.

SoHa Living

Take home a shark.

lappert’s hawai‘i

The sweet aroma of a fresh waffle cone brings out the kid in all of us. 24

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blue ginger

Cool and comfortable, this aloha shirt suits all occasions.

billabong

The whimsical print is bound to make a splash.

Elephant Walk

Hula girl toy.


island living Transform your house with an artistic piece of Maui.

soha living

Let nature take its course as you doze off on this comfy pillow.

ki‘i gallery

Glass sculptures inspired by Maui’s boundless beauty. tasini tiki gallery

This tiki will keep watch over your home.

enchantress gallery by bootzie

One-of-a-kind pillow.

soha living

A perfect addition for those who decorate their homes to look coastal chic.

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CLASSIC CUISINE iconic dishes maintain their popularity By Simplicio Paragas photography by isaac arjonilla

EVERY RESTAURANT HAS

its core menu, featuring a host of dishes that have stood the test of time. While some establishments thrive on constantly changing their offerings—from seasonal to ethnicity—others are content to stay the course, relying more on consistency and responding only to their clients’ demands as opposed to caving to current trends. A favorite among locals and visitors alike since 1976, Longhi’s is well known for its iterations on Mediterranean coastal cuisine and supper-club elegance. The best-seller both day and night is the catch of the day, which, on the day of visit, happened to be the prized opakapaka. “Our seafood is always fresh,” explains general manager Michael Rose. “Our lobsters, clams, scallops are all air-flown and guaranteed to be fresh.” Sublime and creamy, the Veroniquestyle opakapaka (Hawaiian pink snapper) is Longhi’s interpretation of the classic Sole Véronique, developed by the late, great French chef Georges Auguste Escoffier. The white cream sauce holds up well to the firm texture of the opakapaka. Halved green grapes sit atop and surround the flaky fillet. It’s an easy dish to digest and the perfect light summer entrée. “It’s really easy to eat light here regardless what you order,” Rose says. “Our menus are built on family-style dining. We don’t have splitting or side-plate charges. We really encourage people to share.” 28

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WINE AND DINE (Opposite page) Longhi’s Véronique-style opakapaka is garnished with halved green grapes. (This page) Another signature Longhi’s dish, the bountiful seafood pasta is comprised of shrimp, mussels, clams and calamari, all served over a bed of linguine in a bold red sauce.

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Colicchio once told Gourmet writer Colman Andrews, “Having a steak house is ultimately about putting the best meat possible on the table, period.” The late Ruth Fertel understood this well. And she did indeed serve the best meat possible when she opened the first tongue-twisting Ruth’s Chris Steak House in 1976 in New Orleans. A year later, the affectionately known “Empress of Steak” agreed to issue her first franchise with many more to follow, including this Wailea location that opened in 2000. Synonymous with USDA Prime steaks, Ruth’s Chris’ advantage over other steak houses can be attributed to its custom-designed oven, which quickly chars the beef while sealing in the juices. “It has to be medium rare,” says longtime server Olivier Lange, while preparing for dinner service. “I think our service and the quality of our steaks set us apart from other restaurants. What we provide is more than just a great meal but a great experience overall. Many of us have been with Ruth’s Chris for a long time and we all still like being here.” Perhaps one of the most enduring entrées on any restaurant menu is the kingly steak. And amid the proliferation of steak houses on Maui—or nationwide for that matter—Ruth’s Chris remains a stalwart in this culinary genre. And for good reason. Its “Cowboy” bone-in ribeye still ranks high among visitors and island residents, including me, who prefer the deep marbling and fat content over the leaner filet or New York striploin. Honestly, though, what makes Ruth’s Chris better than other restaurants of the same ilk? Is it name recognition? Perhaps. Is it service? Possibly. Is it the 1,800-F temperature of the broiler that locks in the corn-fed flavor of the USDA Prime cut? Definitely. As celebrity chef Tom 30

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At Cheeseburger Grille & Tap Room Christopher McKinney can often be seen singing and bobbing his head to the music as he darts to and from the kitchen and dining room. “This is a happy place,” says McKinney, the restaurant’s service manager. “We’ve got burgers, drinks and a handpicked classic rock n’ roll playlist to get everybody’s feet tapping.” McKinney says they’ve recently added more burgers to the menu, which “speak more to the brand.” “We now have burgers that are topped with mac and Jalapeño cheese, chili and a weekly special Brewmaster that’s outstanding.” For a heartier burger, try the French Dip Cheeseburger, a thick burger topped with 4 ounces of prime rib then smothered with creamy horseradish and sautéed onions. You’ll definitely need extra napkins to handle this two-hands-required sandwich. Those looking for an entrée other than a burger may want to try either the beer-battered cod and

chips, ahi tacos or the Kapalua Kobb salad composed of mixed greens, grilled chicken strips, bacon, avocado, crumbled bleu cheese, tomatoes and slices of hard-boiled egg. “In addition to our burgers,” McKinney says, “these are some of our best-sellers.”

shortlist Cheeseburger grille & tap room

808.874.8990 cheeseburgernation.com /locations/cheeseburger -grille-and-tap-room -wailea

Ruth’s Chris Steak House 808.874.8880 ruthschris.com /restaurant-locations /wailea-maui

longhi’s

808.891.8883 longhis.com

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HAPPY TIMES ARE HERE sip and savor in style at the shops

By Simplicio Paragas

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The s ho ps at Wa ilea photography

By isaac arjonilla


“OH YEAH!” THIS ONE-TIME KOOL-AID

advertising catchphrase has become somewhat of a chorus at Lineage, where staff members upon hearing the two words happily reply, “chikachika,” a reference to another ’80s commercial. “It’s an adult Hawaiian Punch,” explains Lineage senior mixologist Natalie Hansen. “It’s got Negroni, Campari, Fid Street Hawaiian Gin, Cocchi Rosa, Plantation Pineapple, lilikoi syrup, saline and orange peel. It truly tastes like Hawaiian Punch.” Jingles aside, this version of a Hawaiian Punch packs a real wallop. Since joining Lineage a month ago, Hansen has added her own specialty cocktails, including the UTU Bamboo, an intoxicating blend of Lustau Sherry, Kō Hana Hawaiian Agricole Rum, Dolin Blanc Vermouth, Banane du Brésil, lime stock and Angostura Aromatic Bitters.

Hansen likes to compare mixology with the culinary arts with one defining difference: “They cook hot and we cook cold,” says Hansen, who has a degree in fine arts, which she finds helps her develop a color wheel for her cocktails. “We both focus on the manipulation of flavors.” Happy Hour here starts at 9:30 p.m., when the late-night crowd shuffles in for cocktails and appetizers. The truncated menu includes garden poke ($5), kimchi dip with Maebo One-Ton Chips ($5), pipi kaula (Hawaiian-style beef jerky, $3), oyster shooters ($3), “Housemade Spam” musubi ($4) and chicharon (crispy pig skin, $7). “We also offer ‘Omakase’ cocktails,” Hansen says, “which means you leave it to us to determine the type of cocktail for you. I guarantee it will be a surprise.”

SIP & SAVOR (Opposite page) The Pint & Cork’s signature cocktails include the Pisco in Paradise and Barrel Select Margarita. (Top, from left) Lineage’s senior mixologist Natalie Hansen describes the bar area as her “liquid kitchen;” two of her new cocktails include the Hawaiian Punch-inspired Oh Yeah! and the UTU Bamboo. T he Sho p s at Wa il ea

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SIP & SAVOR

“We create cravings. we have what we call ‘speak easier’ cocktails.” For a classic mai tai, the Trader Beach is the closest to the Trader Vic’s original tiki cocktail, according to Pacer. Ingredients include Zaya Aged Rum, dark rum, orgeat, Peychauds bitters and an Absinthe mist. “It’s not as sweet as other mai tais,” Pacer asserts. “And there’s abosolutely no hint of pineapple in this version.” Happy Hour menu highlights include deviled eggs Rockefeller, Parmesan-and-garlic hand-cut fries and spicy lemongrass chicken wings.

Surprises abound at Pint + Cork where the creative, cocktail-forward menu is developed by a passionate group of mixologists whose liquid kitchen is stocked with homemade syrups and micro-floral petals. “We create cravings,” says The Pint + Cork’s managing partner Scott Pacer. “We have what we call ‘Speak Easier’ cocktails, which don’t require a great deal of time to prepare. And this is certainly important during our Happy Hour (2-5 p.m.)” A favorite among regulars, the Pisco in Paradise blends Pisco Portón Brandy with a custom-made hibiscus syrup, Angostura mist and an egg white that forms a dreamy cloud of foam that floats at the top. It’s not only pretty to look at, but it’s also pleasant to sip on. Another impressive cocktail is the Barrel Select Margarita, which is prepared with Patrón Barrel Select Reposado Tequila, agave and Grand Marnier, then poured into a Himalayan-Pink-Saltrimmed glass. “We went to Patrón and selected our own one-of-a-kind barrel of tequila—which is truly unlike any other in the world,” Pacer explains. “We’re now on our fourth barrel, which is equivalent to about 30 cases with 12 bottles in each case.” 34

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CREATIVE COCKTAILS (Top) Pint & Corkʻs Pisco in Paradise blends Pisco Portón Brandy with a custommade hibiscus syrup, then garnished with micro-floral petals. (Above) Tommy Bahamaʻs Pineapple Paradisio offers a blend of Bacardi Pineapple, St-Germain Elderflower, crème de banana and scratch sour.


At Tommy Bahama’s Restaurant & Bar, Kylene Nichols says the bar is the central hub at any time of the day, but especially during Happy Hour, daily from 2-5 p.m. “This is where everyone gathers for a cocktail,” says Nichols as she prepares a classic mojito. “This is the Tommy Bahama lifestyle image that everyone has come to expect.” Frequent Maui visitors have also made it a point to stop in for a Pineapple Paradisio. “It lowers the blood pressure,” quips assistant general manager Adam Wohler. “They want to relax with a cocktail.” The Pineapple Paradisio martini is a refreshing blend—especially after long or short interisland flights—of Bacardi Pineapple, St-Germain Elderflower, crème de banana, scratch sour and pineapple. Equally soothing is the signature Mango Habanero Margarita, a tropical concoction of Milagro Silver, mango purée, Orange Curaçao, scratch sour and sliced habanero. And when in

doubt, the classic mojito with homemade sugar cane syrup and Cruzan Citrus always satisfies. To nosh on, small plates showcase ahi poke, cheeseburger sliders, macadamia-nut-crusted goat cheese and the famous Coconut Shrimp. “Tommy Bahama ties food, family, friends and drinks all together for a casual, island-style experience,” Wohler says. “It’s one long weekend here every day.”

shortlist lineage

Tommy Bahama

808.879.8800

808.875.9983

lineagemaui.com

tommybahama.com /restaurants/wailea

The Pint & Cork

808.727.2038 thepintandcork.com

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GIVING BACK The Shops at Wailea helps support nonprofit endeavors By jasmine HU

WITH A PASSION for local programs that are truly making a difference, The Shops at Wailea is giving back in a big way by partnering with 12 Mauibased nonprofits—one each month—using its special events as an avenue of philanthropy.

with IDD to bond with and befriend those who don’t have IDD, erasing the invisible line that often separates them. They also hold trainings and workshops to equip people with IDD with the skills they need to successfully self-advocate and become leaders and public speakers.

BUDDY SYSTEM SAFE ZONE

October’s partner, Women Helping Women, offers a safe space for women stuck in abusive relationships. Their motto is “until every home is safe” and they work toward their mission through advocacy, education and prevention, and offer safety, support and empowerment. Whether it’s providing free presentations and trainings on domestic violence, offering a 24-hour emergency domestic shelter for women and children fleeing from immediate danger, transitioning women from homelessness and temporary housing to permanent housing, offering various services to affected children and teenagers or helping obtain temporary restraining orders, Women Helping Women is here to help bring an end to domestic violence on the island. CULTURAL TRADITION

A HELPING HAND Best Buddies has made a positive impact on Maui’s local schools and the community in general.

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November’s nonprofit perpetuates the Hawaiian tradition, culture and heritage through its arts, beliefs, dance, language and agriculture. Keali‘i Reichel’s Hālau Ke‘alaokamaile’s vision is to create a physical home for the community to learn, honor and embody the legacy of Hawaiian knowledge. “Through physical connection to ‘aina,” Reichel says, “our environmental and cultural kinship is rekindled and re-established.”

(THIS PAGE) COURTESY BEST BUDDIES. (OPPOSITE PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT) COURTESY HALAU KEALAOKAMAILE; COURTESY FRIENDS OF THE CHILDREN’S JUSTICE CENTER; ©SYDA PRODUCTIONS/SHUTTERSTOCK

September’s partner, Best Buddies Hawai‘i, emphasizes the importance of community and relationships. It is a branch of Best Buddies International, the world’s largest organization helping people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) connect and form meaningful relationships with the world around them. Hawai‘i’s branch focuses on two pillars: oneto-one friendships and leadership development. Conducting school and community friendship programs like Best Buddies Middle Schools, Citizens and e-Buddies, they provide opportunities for people


ACTS OF SERVICE (Clockwise from left) Hālau Ke‘alaokamaile members prepare palai (native fern fronds), which was one of the most important plants placed on the hula altar to Laka, goddess of hula; Maui Frends of the Children’s Justice Center protect the welfare of keiki (kids); Women Helping Women join hands in a symbolic support for each other.

FUTURE GENERATION

December’s partner, Friends of the Children’s Justice Center (FCJC), places an emphasis on the social welfare of children who have been traumatized by abuse and neglect. FCJC works to be proactive, rather than reactive, when it comes to child abuse and neglect. Its three-part mission is: (1) to provide assistance to abused and neglected children in Maui; (2) to promote prevention of child abuse and neglect; and (3) to support the Children’s Justice Center of Maui. In the past year, they’ve provided funds for such direct services as education, tutoring, counseling and after-school programs to over 900 children, distributed over 2,500 children’s Christmas gifts and reached 8,000 children and parents through community events. They also help fund the Children’s Justice Center of Maui, where suspected victims of child sexual abuse and extreme physical abuse are brought in for interviews and potential forensic examinations.

LEARN MORE, GIVE MORE best buddies

Keali‘i Reichel’s

95 Mahalani St.,

hĀlau

No. 28-1A

Ke‘alaokamaile

Wailuku, HI 96793

P.O. Box 881040.

808-242.6962

Pukalani, HI 96788-1040

bestbuddies.org

kealaokamaile.com

women

Friends of

helping women

the children’s

1935 Main St., Ste. 202

justice center

Wailuku, HI 96793

1773 Wili Pa Loop #A

808.242.6600

Wailuku, HI 96793

womenhelpingwomen

808.986.8634

maui.com

mauicjc.org

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TREE OF LIFE cracking open a coconut is a portal to understanding Polynesia. By anu Yagi Photography by isaac arjonilla

TOWERING PALM TREES BEND

and sway amid the gentle trade winds, their fronds waving as if welcoming visitors. Some call it the “tree of heaven.” Others refer to it as the “tree of life.” And in ancient Polynesian times, the coconut —considered a “canoe plant” in Hawai‘i—was a revered plant that yielded many uses. 38

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Believed to have originated in the Indo-MalaysiaMelanesia triangle, the coconut palm is one of the most versatile plants of the tropics. Shells from the coconut were made into cups, bowls, utensils and containers, among other ornamental items. Fronds were woven into hats, mats, brooms and toys; and wood was used for everything from house-building to drum-making.


BEAR THE PALM Hawaiian cultural expert Makahiwa Thompson shares the versatile qualities of coconut.

COCONUT HUSKING

“Have you ever tried to pick up a coconut off the ground, but couldn’t?” asks Makahiwa Thompson, a big man with a gentle voice, as he gestures straining to lift a tiny object. The crowd around him giggles. “It’s kind of funny watching someone try.” Makahiwa is a Hawaiian cultural expert who conducts two weekly coconut demonstrations. He explains how a coconut will shoot strong roots into the ground as it germinates—which, for the unwitting, makes it amusingly impossible to lift. Seated under a shade tent near The Shops’ coconut palm-filled courtyard, workshop attendees lean in close 40

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to listen to Makahiwa’s fluid narrative. One guest asks Makahiwa about the trees’ root systems, to which he receives a response befitting a university botany class. Known as niu in ÿölelo Hawaiÿi (Hawaiian language), the plant has myriad uses that provide insight into the Polynesian way of life. Used for food, medicine, household materials, personal care products, plus artwork—niu aids in effectively every aspect of traditional living. A professional educator, Makahiwa is happy to answer visitors’ diverse questions. He’ll discuss everything from indigenous sciences to oceanic voyaging to origins of the humble coconut.


tree of life COCONUT ORIGINS

According to one legend, Apua and Aukele, two brothers who lived on Kaua‘i, sailed from Kahiki (Tahiti) with the palm tree seeds, along with taro and bananas. They landed at Puna on the Hawai‘i Island and planted the first trees there. Alternatively, another folklore credits the god Kane as introducing the coconut to Hilo and planted it there to provide food for “earth children.” Another well-known legend recounts the story of a young Hawaiian boy, the son of Hina and Ku, the goddess of female spirits and the god of male spirits, respectively. After returning to his homeland of Tahiti, Ku is longed for by his son who solicits the help of his mom. In response, Hina chants to their ancestor, the coconut tree, singing “niu-ola-hiki,” (“o life-giving-coconut of Tahiti”). She continues with “niu-loa-hiki” (“o far-traveling coconut”) when a coconut sprouts in front of her. She wakes her son and instructs him to climb the tree and hold on while she continues chanting. The coconut sways and bends, it stretches and grows, it stretches over the ocean until its leaves rest on Tahiti, and son and dad are reunited. Regardless of origin, in the hands of Makahiwa, the coconut is a teaching tool. His workshop materials include a bevy of visual examples, plus hands-on crafting or tasting opportunities. (Tuesday workshops focus on husking; Thursdays showcase frond weaving.) “It’s amazing,” Makahiwa says after the class, “I’ve had many tourists tell me they’ve been visiting Maui for 20-plus years—and this is the first time they’ve been exposed to this kind of information.” Makahiwa shows visitors a coconut that he’s freshly husked on a clever wooden spike. He points out the “face” in the shell—three dots that resemble eyes and a mouth (that are actually micropyle germination points). He highlights one of the core lines going between the two eyes, and with deft nimbleness and a sharp whap, cracks the shell so that it gushes fresh coconut water into a wooden bowl. The crowd “oohs” and “aahs,” then “mmms” as Makahiwa passes around tasting cups. He then cracks the coconut open to reveal the thick, delicious meat within. It glistens in the sun like an inverted pearl; an intriguing portal into understanding Polynesia. 42

The s ho ps at Wa ilea

In truth, coconut is one of the most versatile plants on the planet. From root to fruit, every part of this palm is crucially useful, and therefore deeply respected by Polynesian cultures.

steps to nutty goodness Getting to the meat of the coconut 4 Find the nut within

1 Straight from the tree

5 “Face” time

2 Spike it

6 The big reveal

3 Husk it

7 Enjoy


directory See Maps Next Spread

LUXURY FASHION & LIFESTYLE

Mahina

A35

Malibu Shirts

B21

Maui Clothing Company

B1

Maui Sunglass/Maui Jim

A16

Maui Waterwear

B2

Moonbow Tropics

A26

Poggenpohl Kitchens Hawai‘i

EW21

Quiksilver

B50

Rip Curl

B4

Sunglass Hut

B36

TINA Stephens

EW14

T-Shirt Factory

B32

Tommy Bahama Store

A33

Tori Richard

B3

Truffoire

B6

Volcom

B7

Bottega Veneta

EW3

Cos Bar

EW19

Gucci

EW9

Louis Vuitton

EW1

Prada

EW24

Greenleaf Diamonds

B26a

Tiffany & Co.

EW2

Ki‘i Gallery

A17

Tourneau

EW6

Lambros Fine Jewelers

EW17

Na Hoku

A21

Swarovski Crystal

A15

Tiffany & Co.

EW2

Tourneau

EW6

FASHION & LIFESTYLE

JEWELRY

Aloha Hat Company

A38

Banana Republic

A47

Billabong

B41

Blue Ginger

B38

Cariloha

B20

ABC Stores

A53

Crazy Shirts

A49

Elephant Walk

A36

GOTTLING

EW23

Martin & MacArthur

B17

Honolua Surf Co.

B47

Mele Ukulele

A30

Imrie

EW10

SoHa Living

B45

J.McLaughlin

EW16

Swarovski Crystal

A15

Keliki

B5

Whalers General Store

B12

lululemon

EW18

44

T he s ho ps at Wa ilea

SPECIALTIES & GIFTS


DINING

shoes

Cheeseburger Grille & Tap Room

B25

ABC Stores

A53

LINEAGE

OP2

Banana Republic

A47

Longhi’s

B22

Billabong

B41

The Pint & Cork

EW4

Bottega Veneta

EW3

Ruth’s Chris Steak House

A34

Elephant Walk

A36

Tommy Bahama Restaurant & Bar

A33

Gucci

EW9

Honolua Surf Co.

B47

Island Gourmet Markets

OP1

J.McLaughlin

EW16

Keliki

B5

Maui Clothing Company

B1

Maui Waterwear

B2

Rip Curl

B4

Tommy Bahama Store

A33

MARKET & SPECIALTY FOODS ABC Stores

A53

Honolulu Coffee Company

EW25

Honolulu Cookie Company

B27

Island Gourmet Markets

OP1

Lappert’s Hawai‘i

B33

Surfing Monkey Shave Ice

T07

Whalers General Store

B12

GALLERIES

B43

Whalers General Store

B12

children

Enchantress Gallery by Bootzie

A19

Ki‘i Gallery

A17

Lahaina Galleries

A23

National Geographic | Fine Art Galleries

EW11

Tasini Tiki Gallery

A43

REAL ESTATE SERVICES Coldwell Banker Island Properties

The Walking Company

A37/B35

ABC Stores

A53

Billabong

B41

Blue Ginger

B38

Crazy Shirts

A49

Elephant Walk

A36

Honolua Surf Co.

B47

Island Gourmet Markets

OP1

J.McLaughlin

EW16

Fidelity Title

EW22

Maui Clothing Company

B1

Premier Global Partners of

A27

Maui Waterwear

B2

Quiksilver

B50

Rip Curl

B4

Keller Williams Realty Maui Wailea Realty

B16

SoHa Living

B45

T-Shirt Factory

B32

Whalers General Store

B12

T he Sho p s at Wa il ea

45


UPPER LEVEL

bottega veneta

Prada

The pint & cork

tiffany & co.

Louis VuitTon

lululemon

gucci

abc stores

banana republic

Tommy bahama

ruth’s chris

LEGEND EW East Wing Upper Level A Upper Level B Lower Level OP Out Parcel

RESTROOMS

ELEVATOR

ESCALATOR

STAIRS

b51

MANAGEMENT OFFICE

P ATM

HOTEL SHUTTLES

USPS MAILBOX

PARKING PAY STATION

SECURITY OFFICE

PARKING OFFICE

Open Daily . 3750 Wailea Alanui Drive . 808.891.6770 . theshopsatwailea.com . Managed by The Festival Companies

46

The sho ps at Wa ilea


lower LEVEL

quiksilver

T07

whalers general store

B29

longhi’s

cheeseburger

The

Shops at Wailea

T he Sho p s at Wa il ea

47


A HUI HOU AKU (Until we meet again)

You can find the perfect outfit for any adventure at The Shops at Wailea.

48

T he sho ps at Wa ilea

© HAROLD JULIAN

fashion meets paradise


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Shops At Wailea Maui Aug 2019  

Shops At Wailea Maui Aug 2019