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NEW ORLEANS


PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAM BOOK 5.5/9PT


PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAM BOOK 5.5/9PT

WELCOME TO NEW ORLEANS


325 ROYAL STREET • NEW ORLEANS, LA 70130 • (504) 522-4552 www.keilsantiques.com


MOSS ANTIQUES 411 ROYAL STREET

Specializing in 17th -19th century English, French and Continental furniture, decorative accessories and estate jewelry. 504.524.7033

Our beloved jewel of the French Quarter’s historical charm. From antique furniture to fine jewelry, we offer an assortment of treasures. 504.522.398

KEIL’S ANTIQUES 325 ROYAL STREET

BEVOLO GAS & ELECTRIC LIGHTS 304, 316 & 318 ROYAL STREET

ROYAL ANTIQUES 309 ROYAL STREET

Family-owned and -operated antiques store in the heart of the French Quarter since 1899. 504.522.4552

Maker of the original French Quarter lantern and Bevolo Collection. 504.522.9185 • www.bevolo.com.


MARTIN LAWRENCE GALLERIES 433 ROYAL STREET

New Orleans’ premier gallery of fine art—in the heart of the e c e . 504.524. 0 • m l w e ce.com

M.S. RAU ANTIQUES 630 ROYAL STREET

Important fine art, rare antiques and breathtaking jewelry since 1912. 504.523.5660

VINTAGE 329 329 ROYAL STREET

Vintage lithographs, autographed memorabilia, vintage barware and vintage costume jewelry including Chanel® and Bakelite. 504.525.2262

THE BRASS MONKEY 407 ROYAL STREET

Unusual gifts and collectibles, including Limoges boxes, Halcyon days enamels, Jay Strongwater, antique walking sticks, medical instruments, French and English antique reproductions. 504-561-0688


CONTENTS

NOLA ESSENCE BIG EASY BETROTHALS Moss-draped oaks, muledrawn carriages, celebratory second-line parades: Is it any wonder that New Orleans ranks as one of the nation’s top spots for destination weddings? BY SUE STRACHAN

ON THE COVER

The Pontalba Buildings in Jackson Square ©DANIEL GRILL/MEDIA BAKERY INSIDE FRONT COVER

Canal Street ©EDELLA/ISTOCK PHOTO

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28 WHEN CREOLE MET CAJUN A CRESCENT CITY CULINARY COLLISION In the mid 1970s, chef Paul Prudhomme stepped out of

obscurity and into the kitchen at Commander’s Palace, forever changing the way New Orleans—and America—ate. Legendary restaurateur Ella Brennan recalls their initial meeting, a match made in foodie heaven. BY ELLA BRENNAN & TI MARTIN

32 THE NEW NEW ORLEANIANS GETTING A GRIP ON GENTRIFICATION Uber-loving, Airbnb-hosting, social media-saturated millennials are reshaping the Crescent City as “the new Brooklyn,” “the next San Francisco.” But in

the process of becoming big time, is New Orleans losing it’s smalltown charm? BY TERRI COLEMAN

36 SEA CHANGE REALING IT IN With its coastline endangered, so too is the state’s seafood industry. Photographer J.T. Blatty captures “an important piece of Louisiana history.” PHOTOS BY J.T. BLATTY

80 PARTING SHOT ALLEY CAT A peek down Pirate’s Alley.

(FROM LEFT) ©JEN AMATO/NOCVB; ©CHERYL GERBER; ©J.T. BLATTY

24 ISN’T IT ROMANTIC?


FISCHER-GAMBINO magnificent Melanie (Melanie not for sale)

1995-2013

Superb Furnishings

637 Royal Street, New Orleans, LA 504.524.9067 / 888.524.9067 www.lightingneworleans.com


CONTENTS

NOLA ESSENTIALS FOURTEEN GREAT STOPS Must-visit destinations— from the French Quarter to the Garden District.

47 SHOPPING RETAIL ROLODEX Whether you’re in the market for national chains or unique boutiques, New Orleans has a retailer for you. 52 SHOPPING LOOK BOOK

54 DINING FOOD FOR THOUGHT From haute cuisine to down-home fare, a taste of New Orleans’ most appetizing restaurants.

65 GALLERIES+ ANTIQUES ART & COMMERCE A guide to the city’s celebrated antiques shops and cutting-edge art galleries. 70 GALLERY LOOK BOOK

72 NIGHTLIFE CLUBS & PUBS A little night music with your after-dinner drink? Right this way.

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75 ATTRACTIONS SIGHTS, TOURS AND MUSEUMS The best things to see, do and experience.

79 ADVERTISER INDEX

(FROM LEFT) ©SHAWN FINK; ©SEANPAVONEPHOTO/ISTOCK PHOTO; ©SHAWN FINK

14 FIRST LOOK


WELLINGTON & CO. Fine Jewelry

•

Antique & Estate Jewelry

505 ROYAL STREET | FRENCH QUARTER | 504.525.4855

www.wcjewelry.com


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NEW ORLEANS EDITORIAL EDITOR Doug

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Photo: Kaela Rodehorst Williams

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Terri

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Beignets, Coffees, breakfast & lunch menus, with “Local Libations” at the Bourbon Street location!

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MVP NEW ORLEANS, EDITORIAL OFFICE 324 Chartres Street, 2nd floor New Orleans, LA 70130 Phone: 504.522.6468; Fax: 504.522.0018 wheretraveler.com Where GuestBook® publishes editions for the following U.S. cities and regions: Arizona, Atlanta, Baltimore, Boston, Charlotte, Chicago, Colorado, Dallas, Florida Gold Coast (Fort Lauderdale & Palm Beach), Fort Worth, Hawai‘i Island (the Big Island), Houston, Jacksonville/St. Augustine/Amelia Island, Kaua‘i, Los Angeles, Maui, Miami, Nashville, New Orleans, New York, Northern Arizona, O‘ahu, Orange County (CA), Orlando, Philadelphia, Raleigh/Durham/Chapel Hill, Reno/Lake Tahoe, San Antonio, San Diego, San Francisco, Seattle/The Eastside/Tacoma, Southwest Florida (Naples), Tampa Bay, Tucson, Washington D.C. ©2017 by Morris Visitor Publications. All rights reserved. This publication may not be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, in whole or in part, without the express prior written permission of the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility to any party for the content of any advertisement in this publication, including any errors and omissions therein. By placing an order for an advertisement, the advertiser agrees to indemnify the publisher against any claims relating to the advertisement. Printed in the United States.

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FOLLOW IN THEIR FOOTSTEPS It should have been impossible. Crossing the world’s widest ocean to answer an attack made by a powerful adversary. Through hostile terrain and untold suffering, millions of Americans pushed past impossible to win the Pacific war. Follow in their footsteps on the Road to Tokyo, a new immersive experience at The National WWII Museum.

#1 Attraction in New Orleans #4 Museum in the United States #11 Museum in the World

ANDREW HIGGINS DRIVE BETWEEN CAMP AND MAGAZINE STREETS | 504.528.1944 | NATIONALWW2MUSEUM.ORG


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3708 Magazine St. 504-891-4494 artandeyesnola.com

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Riverside Dining

“Home of the Steamed Seafood Bucket” SPANISH PLAZA ON THE RIVER Across from Harrah’s Casino Enjoy one of our seafood buckets after shopping at the Outlet Collection at Riverwalk

•Royal Bucket

•Bourbon St. Combo (Boiled Shrimp & Snow Crab)

504-569-3380 www.thecrazylobster.com

Home of the Poppy’s Voodoo Juice We have All DIRECTV Sports Packages

Certificate of Excellence winner.

10AM UNTIL

7 DAYS A WEEK

Riverside Dining SPANISH PLAZA ON THE RIVER

Across from Harrah’s Casino next to Hilton Hotel 21 47" LG LCD T.V.’s

Gourmet Burgers, Wings, Gourmet Pizzas, Salads & Po-Boys

504-247-9265 • www.poppystimeoutsportsbar.com Live Music Thurs. – Sun.

Your haven’t experienced New Orleans until you have dined at New Orleans Creole Cookery. 510 Toulouse St. | NEWORLEANSCREOLECOOKERY.COM | 504.524.9632


CONTRIBUTORS

Ella Brennan

When Creole Met Cajun, page 28

Restaurateur Ella Brennan, matriarch of the iconic New Orleans culinary clan, has been in the hospitality industry for more than 70 years. Her revolutionary restaurant, Commander’s Palace, introduced the world to nouvelle Creole cuisine and to chefs Paul Prudhomme and Emeril Lagasse. Recipient of the 2009 James Beard Foundation Lifetime Achievement Award, she is the subject of the 2016 documentary film “Miss Ella: Commanding the Table” and the book “Miss Ella of Commander’s Palace.”

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Sue Strachan

Isn’t It Romantic?, page 24

Sue Strachan is the social scene editor and reporter at NOLA.com/ The Times Picayune, where she covers parties, weddings, benefits, Carnival balls and all the elements that go into making them uniquely New Orleans. And, yes, that means she goes out … a lot. Former editor of St. Charles Avenue and New Orleans Homes & Lifestyles magazines, Strachan also served as public relations director of the Ogden Museum of Southern Art.

J.T. Blatty

Terri Coleman

Terri Coleman

The New New Orleanians, page 32

Terri Coleman is a public humanities hustler whose work is as multifaceted as her city and includes writing, stand-up comedy and storytelling. Her recent and forthcoming work appears in an anthology of American writers of color, a conceptual nudie mag and StyleLikeU’s “What’s Underneath” project. You can catch her at area comedy and storytelling shows or hosting Too Trill Trivia, New Orleans’ only trivia night centered on local and black cultural knowledge.

J.T. Blatty

Sea Change, page 36

Photojournalist J.T. Blatty, a graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point, served six years of active duty in the U.S. Army, then followed with a photography internship at National Geographic Traveler. Her images have been published by CNN Photos, Newsweek, the Oxford American and other publications. Now back in her hometown, Blatty is a freelance photographer and a regular contributor to the New Orleans Advocate. Her book, “Fish Town: Down the Road to Louisiana’s Vanishing Fishing Communities” (George F. Thompson Publishing), is due for release in 2018.

FROM LEFT: ©COMMANDER’S PALACE; ©CHRIS GRANGER; ©SHAWN FINK; ©DEYA RAIRAN

Sue Strachan

Ella Brennan


FIRST LOOK

©SHAWN FINK

The city’s top attractions and destinations, in no particular order—from the French Quarter and vibrant music clubs to Central City and mustvisit museums.

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Central City

Sandwiched between Uptown, downtown, the Garden District and Mid-City, Central City has long been a quiet driver of economic, spiritual and musical influence. Though often overlooked by visitors, this slice of the city, which counts close to 20 churches, has a long, diverse history. An area of mostly for-rent houses from its beginning, the working-class neighborhood gave rise to such music greats as Buddy Bolden and Kid Ory, as well as the local Civil Rights movement. Today it’s experiencing a renaissance, especially Oretha Castle Boulevard, which boasts the New Orleans Jazz Market, Southern Food and the Beverage Museum and a growing number of restaurants. WHERE GUEST B OOK

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FIRST LOOK

When most people think of New Orleans, they first envision the French Quarter, and rightly so. When New Orleans was originally laid out in 1721, the Vieux Carré was the city—all 13 blocks of it. The district is now on the National Register of Historic Places, and its trademark Creole townhouses, Spanish-influenced courtyards and iconic ironwork balconies are synonymous with Southern style. Bourbon Street, bustling with bars and nightclubs, is known worldwide for its nonstop party atmosphere, while tony Royal Street is an antiquing epicenter. Chartres Street offers chic boutiques and many of the Quarter’s most historic sites.

Music Clubs

Chicago and St. Louis may quibble over birthrights, but there’s no denying that New Orleans was—and is—a hot bed for jazz. Jazz is at the very heart of the Crescent City beat, but it isn’t the only game in town. Rock, funk, R&B, zydeco, swamp pop, country, classical, gospel, swing, hip-hop, bounce—if there’s a musical genre, you can expect to hear it here. From Bourbon Street to Frenchmen Street to Oak Street, great live music clubs are found throughout the city. Keep an ear to the ground … and your dancing shoes on. 16

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(TOP) ©SHAWN FINK; (BOTTOM) ©THREE MUSES; (OPPOSITE PAGE) ©KERRI MCCAFFETY/HOUMAS HOUSE PLANTATION & GARDENS

French Quarter


Plantation Country

PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAM BOOK 5.5/9PT

During the late 1800s, the banks of the Mississippi between New Orleans and Baton Rouge were lined with hundreds of plantations. Though many have fallen to rack and ruin, a number still remain and are open to visitors. Houmas House and Oak Alley are two of the largest and most famous. Destrehan is the area’s oldest and closest to the city, while Laura: A Creole Plantation conducts what the Lonely Planet guide has called the “best history tour in the U.S.” Recently opened Whitney Plantation, the nation’s first museum devoted to the subject of slavery, has brought renewed interest in the region.

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Garden District/Uptown

New Orleans’ second-most well-known neighborhood is about a mile from the French Quarter, but in spirit, it’s a world apart. Conceived as the city’s “American sector,” the area (technically bound by Louisiana Avenue to Carondelet Street and Josephine and Magazine streets) is famous for its stately homes surrounded by expansive gardens. The Uptown area, filled with Greek Revival, Gothic and Queen Anne mansions, is concentrated around St. Charles Avenue. The St. Charles streetcar runs the full length of the oak-canopied boulevard, an ideal way to view the area’s antebellum masterpieces.

Food Festivals Public Parks

With its easygoing pace, subtropical climate and tranquil outdoor spaces, the Crescent City is made for walks in the park. Founded in 1858, Mid-City’s 1,300acre New Orleans City Park is one of the nation’s oldest, biggest and most-visited, and home to the world’s largest collection of live oak trees. Tranquil Audubon Park in the Uptown area began as a plantation and later served as the site of the 1884 World’s Fair. Louis Armstrong Park on the edge of the French Quarter is named for the legendary jazzman and where jazz is said to have first taken root. 18

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As the saying goes, in New Orleans we don’t eat to live, we live to eat. So, it’s little surprise that among the city’s 130-plus annual festivals, the majority are food-focused. Oysters, crawfish, crab, gumbo—if it’s edible, we’ll celebrate it. March brings the popular pork-a-thon Hogs for the Cause, followed by the New Orleans Wine & Food Experience in May. October’s Po’ Boy Fest salutes the humble sandwich, while Boudin, Bourbon & Beer pays homage to the state’s signature sausage each November. Dig in!

(LEFT) ©RICHARD SEXTON/NOMA; (TOP RIGHT) ©SHAWN FINK; (BOTTOM RIGHT) ©CHERYL GERBER/NOCVB; (OPPOSITE PAGE ) © SEANPAVONEPHOTO/ISTOCK PHOTO

FIRST LOOK


PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAM BOOK 5.5/9PT

Central Business District

Canal Street, laid out in the mid 1800s, originally served as a “neutral ground” between the Creole-populated French Quarter and Uptown’s “American sector.” Cross Canal from the Quarter, and you enter the Central Business District, or CDB, which is defined by Poydras Street, its main artery stretching from the river to the Mercedes-Benz Superdome. As its moniker suggests, the CBD is the hub of Crescent City commerce but also includes the Morial Convention Center, Harrah’s Casino, high-end hotels and massive Mardi Gras World. The Outlet Collection at Riverwalk Marketplace, a sprawling shopping complex, is located along the CBD riverfront. WHERE GUEST B OOK

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FIRST LOOK

Named one of the city’s hippest ’hoods by Travel + Leisure, the French Quarter-adjacent Marigny ( just across Esplanade Avenue) is largely composed of historic Creole cottages and colorful double shotguns. Its central strip, Frenchmen Street, is loaded with cool music venues, funky clubs and great restaurants. Further downriver, the Marigny-adjacent Bywater attracts artists, musicians and other creative types. Though primarily residential, the area is also home to trendy eateries, offbeat watering holes and the burgeoning St. Claude Arts District. Crescent Park, a 1.4-mile riverfront promenade, connects the two neighborhoods to the French Quarter.

Museums

For nearly three centuries, New Orleans has stood at the center of Southern culture, and nowhere is that more evident than in its many museums. There are dozens to explore, each with its own concentration. The Louisiana State Museum system features a number of the city’s oldest and most important buildings; the National WWII Museum ranks as the city’s most popular destination. Classicists are drawn to the New Orleans Museum of Art; modernists will gravitate to the Contemporary Arts Center. Southern art is the focus at the Ogden Museum, while the Historic New Orleans Collection charts the city’s evolution. 20

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Warehouse Arts District

Prior to the 1984 World’s Fair, this area, bounded by Poydras Street and Howard Avenue between St. Charles Avenue and the river, was devoted to crumbling 19th-century warehouses. Today it’s a thriving arts district with dozens of galleries and museums, including the National WWII Museum, the Confederate Museum, the Ogden Museum of Southern Art and the Contemporary Arts Center.

(LEFT AND TOP RIGHT) ©SHAWN FINK; (BOTTOM RIGHT) ©OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART

Marigny/Bywater


Tremé

Long before the HBO series made it a household name, the Faubourg Tremé was known locally as a hot bed of jazz and a gravity center of Crescent City culture. Just north of the French Quarter, the nation’s oldest AfricanAmerican neighborhood, which recently celebrated its 200th anniversary, claims a number of historic sites, including the circa-1841 St. Augustine Church, the oldest black Catholic parish in the U.S. Armstrong Park, home to Congo Square, where people of color would gather during the 1800s to drum, dance and sing, features statues of New Orleans music legends, such as the late great Louis Armstrong, for whom it is named.

Streetcars Mid-City

With access to Bayou St. John, City Park and long sections of both Canal Street and Carrollton Avenue, the Mid-City neighborhood, once referred to as “backatown,” really is in the middle of it all. Built around the New Basin Canal (now Interstate 10), the area rose from swampland to become an industrial center, before morphing into today’s thriving city center. Culture vultures flock to the New Orleans Museum of Art, while outdoor adventurists gravitate to the park and adjacent bayou. The Canal streetcar line links Mid-City to downtown; the Lafitte Greenway, a 2.6-mile bike and pedestrian trail, connects to the French Quarter. 22

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They are one of New Orleans’ biggest attractions, and—at $1.35 a ride—one of its cheapest. The city’s signature streetcars are a must-do. The historic St. Charles line offers an ideal vantage for viewing Uptown’s ornate homes. The Canal line travels the street’s full length with an offshoot to City Park, while the Riverfront line affords easy access to the lower Quarter. The Loyola line makes getting to the Superdome supereasy, and connects with the new Rampart line, which covers the upper Quarter.

(LEFT) ©RAULUMINATE/ISTOCK PHOTO; (TOP RIGHT) ©COLIN D. YOUNG/SHUTTERSTOCK; (BOTTOM RIGHT) ©GRANDRIVER/ISTOCK PHOTO

FIRST LOOK


HOUMAS HOUSE Plantation and Gardens Houmas House Plantation and Gardens makes memories of legendary proportions. Tour the original plantation house built in the 1770s, stroll through 36 acres of breathtaking gardens, discover unique items at the gift shop, and dine at Houmas House’s exquisite restaurants. The Inn at Houmas House now offers 21 luxurious rooms for overnight stays. Plan your visit to the “Crown Jewel of Louisiana’s River Road” today!

Houmas House Plantation and Gardens 40136 Hwy 942 • Darrow, LA 70725 • 225-473-9380 • www.HoumasHouse.com


24 W H E R E G U E ST B O O K PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAM BOOK 5.5/9PT


ISN’T IT ROMANTIC? A toast to New Orleans nuptials

(THIS PAGE) ©BEEBE TRAN/NOCVB; (OPENING PAGE) ©NOTTOWAY PLANTATION

Text by SUE STRACHAN

From the elegant, all-white ballroom at Nottoway Plantation to the city’s historic streetcars, New Orleans makes a picture-perfect wedding destination.

Why would anyone not have their wedding in New Orleans? It’s a question many couples ponder when planning their big day, and one that, in recent years, has helped position the Crescent City—with its timeless architecture, one-of-a-kind cuisine and cherished traditions— among the nation’s top wedding destinations. I have been writing about weddings here for the past 20 years, with a few breaks in between. And while each one is different and unique, there is one constant: The special je ne sais quoi the city can bring to the joyous day. The first location most couples consider is the French Quarter and it’s most iconic attraction, St. Louis Cathedral. Since 1727, the cathedral, with its picturesque

spires and iconic altar, has served as the setting for countless nuptials, and continues to today. According to the Archdiocese of New Orleans, the local landmark plays host to an average of 100 ceremonies annually. It’s not uncommon while walking through Jackson Square (which the cathedral faces) to suddenly find yourself a member of the wedding, tossing birdseed at a twosome you’ve never before laid eyes on. Or getting drawn into a brass band-led second-line procession en route to a reception at one of the many restaurants where dozens of multi-tiered cakes are sliced into each month. But not all New Orleans nuptials need be so formal. Not Catholic? The cathedral can still serve as the backdrop to a ceremony along adjacent Pirate’s Alley, the cobblestone WHERE GUEST B OOK

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26 W H E R E G U E ST B O O K (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT) ©DESTREHAN PLANTATION; ©JEN AMATO/NOCVB; ©NOTTOWAY PLANTATION


©AUDUBON NATURE INSTITUTE

Whether your taste runs classic or unconventional, the city has a venue to fit your fantasy.

passageway that runs aside of the church. Others have been known to celebrate the depths of their love at the nearby Audubon Aquarium of the Americas, or to say their “I dos” along the Mississippi riverfront at Woldenberg Park or Crescent Park. The great outdoors can make a great New Orleans wedding venue, especially from March to April and October to November, when temperatures are mild and days are sunny. The city’s legendary heat and humidity usually starts in May and continues through September, and December and February can be surprisingly cold. But what glorious places you can celebrate in during those four picture-perfect months! The centuries-old oaks in City Park and Audubon Park not only make an ideal backdrop for wedding photos, but for the wedding itself. City Park is home to the Peristyle, a neo-classical open-air pavilion overlooking Bayou Metairie, that can work either for a ceremony or a reception—or both. One memorable event I attended there had the ceremony in the Peristyle, then guests went across the

street to the reception in a tent set up like a scene from “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” At the end of the evening, fireworks lit up the sky, enchanting guests and late-night park-goers alike. For those on a budget or seeking something out of the norm, New Orleans offers all manner of romantic and imaginative alternatives, from jazz clubs to racetracks. One young couple recently wed at a historic courthouse on the Westbank then took the ferry across the river to meet friends and second line to small restaurant in the French Quarter. The city also has no shortage of historic homes and spaces oozing 19th-century atmosphere in which to construct the wedding of your dreams. From the French Quarter and Garden District to the Lower Garden District and Marigny (where singer Solange Knowles and music video director Alan Ferguson famously bicycled to their wedding in a former church that’s been converted into an opera house), the options are near limitless. It’s your day to make your own. Why not make it in New Orleans?

It’s not uncommon while walking through Jackson Square to suddenly find yourself a member of the wedding, tossing birdseed at a couple you’ve never before laid eyes on. WHERE GUEST B OOK

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28 W H E R E G U E ST B O O K PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAM BOOK 5.5/9PT


WHEN CREOLE MET CAJUN Chef Paul Prudhomme’s culinary ascent from farm to fame Text by BY ELLA BRENNAN & TI MARTIN

In 1969 members of the Brennan family purchased Commander’s Palace, a Garden District dining destination that had been in operation since 1893. Soon after they set out to revamp the restaurant and its menu—and, in the process, redefined the concept of Creole cuisine. Here, restaurateur Ella Brennan recalls her introduction to chef Paul Prudhomme, who would make his mark on Commander’s in the mid 1970s and go on to become a household name.

Turquoise temple: In addition to Prudhomme, Commander’s counts Emeril Lagasse, Jamie Shannon and Tory McPhail among its celebrated chefs.

During the first year and a half or so of our running Commander’s full-time, we went through two head chefs. Both were old-school Europeans, but they lacked the foodie gene and had no clue about what we were trying to achieve. While I was searching for that creative force that might transform some of our ideas into reality, I happened to talk to my friend Terry Flettrich, a TV personality at our local WDSU station. She was moving, and we were having a little goodbye lunch. “Well, how’s it going?” she asked. “It’s hell. It’s just not there. We are not there yet.” “Well, what is it?” “I really need a chef. Really need a chef.” “Wait one minute—let me tell you about Paul Prudhomme. He and I have been doing cooking classes together. He’s fantastic, and I think you two should meet.” Terry arranged it, and as soon as I began talking with Paul, I sensed I had found a kindred spirit. It turned out WHERE GUEST B OOK

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It was also risky. At the time, there was just one Cajun restaurant in the city, the Bon Ton, and Cajun culture in general was looked down upon as backwoods and déclassé in many quarters. We had to tread lightly at first, but we knew, as Paul would eventually prove, that once American taste buds were awakened to a distinctive and authentic regional cuisine, their cravings would be unleashed. Paul and I started talking—a lot, every day. We’d start on a bench by the elevator and then migrate to stools right in the kitchen. He’d tell me where he had eaten recently, what his mother cooked, what he thought about French soufflés, how we could “Creole-ize” various dishes, and on and on. I truly felt that we were discovering and creating things, given that there were no Southern Foodways Alliance or James Beard Foundation or CIA seminars to guide us as there are today. The cooks would come around, and we’d all taste and taste and talk and talk. Through these conversations it became clear that Paul was trying to make us into Cajuns, while we were trying to make him into a Creole—and all of us loved every second of it. The end result was something that would shake up the city and, ultimately, America. Excerpted from Miss Ella of Commander’s Palace, ©2016 by Ella Brennan and Ti Martin.

Prudhomme with his famous turducken (left); Ella Brennan in the kitchen at Brennan’s Vieux Carré.

(LEFT) ©K-PAUL’S LOUISIANA KITCHEN; (RIGHT) ©GIBBS SMITH; (OPENING PAGE) ©COMMANDER’S PALACE

that he had been a busboy at Brennan’s long ago, but I hadn’t recognized him. He had run a hamburger stand, traveled the country and cooked in New Orleans at Le Pavillon Hotel and Maison Dupuy. Now he was teaching New Orleanians about Creole cooking as well as the secrets of Cajun cooking that he had learned while growing up on a farm in Opelousas, Louisiana, where he was the youngest of 13 children. At 300-plus pounds, Paul looked the part of a master of hearty country fare. Wildly talented and ambitious, he shared my obsession with food. A few weeks after our initial meeting, he returned and said, “I’ll do lunch for you and try to get the kitchen and the systems organized.” And the next thing we knew, he was working at Commander’s night and day. Paul was one of the nicest guys you’d ever want to meet. You couldn’t have an argument with him. If we had a disagreement over a dish, he’d say, “Well, let’s taste it.” And then we’d break down why a dish worked or didn’t. His palate was the best I’ve ever seen. Hiring a chef whose specialty was heavy Cajun dishes at a time when much of the world was going mad for spare, pretty nouvelle cuisine sounds counterintuitive now, but it was just the thing to ignite a spark at Commander’s.


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PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAM BOOK 5.5/9PT

Over the past decade, the Bywater, once a rarely visited working-class neighborhood, has transformed into a hipster hot spot.


THE NEW NEW ORLEANIANS The city’s ever-changing face of place

PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAM BOOK 5.5/9PT

Text by TERRI COLEMAN

My mother and I are sitting on the porch of a friend-of-afriend’s house in the Lower Ninth Ward. We’re here because a different friend-of-a-friend asked me to throw together an act for the show he’s hosting. “We really want to have some locals,” he’d said. I wonder if he’s disappointed; I can count the locals in attendance on one hand. I overhear pieces of conversations about Brooklyn and Portland. Flat vowels tumbling from Midwestern mouths: the accents of the new New Orleans. My mom is gazing across the street, watching a pair of stylish twentysomethings lock their bikes to a 100-year-old fence. “I don’t think I’ve ever been down in this neighborhood before.” “Ma,” I say, “what are you talking about? Grandma Vera’s house was right over there.” My mom’s mother lived two streets over, on Charbonnet. The little blonde brick house is gone, swept away by a wall of water. My grandma died in another state, a world away from home. The last time I went to see where her home had been, the lot was a mess of foliage and rubble. Unrecognizable. Walking back to the car after the show, I pay attention to the license plates on parked cars. Ohio. California. On a

station wagon with Rhode Island plates is a single bumper sticker: “New Orleans. Proud To Call It Home.” New Orleanians don’t generally stray far. According to the last census before Hurricane Katrina, 77 percent of New Orleanians were natives. We had the highest percentage of native-born residents of any major U.S. city. Our population is concentrated, and that concentration has allowed us to maintain the city’s unique cultural fabric. But, with so many of its weavers and preservers scattered post-K, New Orleans’ cultural fabric is unraveling. No one’s crunched the numbers, but there are hints that New Orleans isn’t as New Orleanian as it used to be. Little demographic bread crumbs that lead from effect to cause. You can see that something’s changing. More than the individual signs—the Whole Foods on Broad, the explosion of restaurants serving organic artisanal everything, the popping up of pop-up after pop-up—it’s in the atmosphere. When we met someone new, we used to ask what school they’d attended or who their relatives were. Now, the question is more likely to be “Where are you from?” And often, the answer is somewhere that is not here. There’s a heavy sadness that sneaks up on me in this new New Orleans. The feeling when you look around, like WHERE GUEST B OOK

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The city’s music scene has amped up exponentially in recent years, with a new generation of buskers taking it to the streets.

BROUSSARD/FLICKR, CREATIVE COMMONS; ©CHERYL GERBER; (OPENING PAGE) ©KRIS DAVIDSON

the city’s first self-serve grocery; it didn’t survive the storm. That piece of history—and of my childhood—is gone forever. Or, to put it in more local terms, it ain’t dere no more. I think those early New Orleanians were right to be afraid. Their fears became reality; the city’s still here, but their cities are gone. Sometimes I look around and find myself in a New Orleans so new I feel foreign in it, and it’s almost too much to bear. But I find comfort in the earliest New Orleanians’ oldest fear: the fear of becoming sauvage. Before we were afraid of Americanization or gentrification, we feared this place. The earliest citizens of New Orleans worried that, cut off from the colonial body, they would become part of the swamps they’d settled. They weren’t wrong. Their children weren’t French; they were New Orleanian. Many of the outsiders who moved here after the storm have settled by now. They’ve fallen in, bought homes, married. Their children will share the city with mine. And it’s sadly sweet to think, 10 or 20 years from now, when the next wave of outsiders comes to make New Orleans new again, those kids, all grown up, will worry about protecting and preserving their city’s culture. Just like New Orleanians always have.

(THIS PAGE) ©DARRELLRHODESMILLER/FLICKR CREATIVE COMMONS; (OPPOSITE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT); ©KRIS DAVIDSON; ©CHERYL GERBER; ©CHERYL GERBER; ©PAUL

my mom did on that porch, and realize you didn’t recognize your own home. This anxiety about culture and communal identity—this fear of losing your home even when you are in it—isn’t new. In fact, it’s got a long history. For the French who founded the city, the threat wasn’t newcomers; they were the newcomers. Instead, their fear was that they might lose their Frenchness. How long could they live in le sauvage—the wild—before they became sauvage too? A generation later New Orleanians worried German settlers would erode their Frenchness. Then, it was Haitian refugees and a new Spanish government. Next, Anglos and Protestants and the new American government threatened to be the end of la Nouvelle Orléans. White New Orleanians’ resistance to Radical Republicans during Reconstruction was not only rooted in racism, but also xenophobia; carpetbaggers were foreigners bringing the threat of change. Here, in 2017, it’s easy to ignore those worries. After all, the city’s still here, isn’t it? Well, yes. But it’s English, not French or Spanish, you’ll hear outside the Cabildo. K&B, our homegrown drugstore chain, was bought out by a national brand. They’re growing up on the same corner in Gentilly that I did, but my children won’t know Zuppardo’s,


BIKE TOURS AND CRAFT COCKTAILS AND THIRDWAVE COFFEEHOUSES— OH, MY! THIS ISN’T YOUR FATHER’S NEW ORLEANS. IN THE WAKE OF HURRICANE KATRINA, A NEW BREED OF NEW ORLEANIAN IS MAKING ITS HOME HERE, PUTTING DOWN ROOTS AND CHANGING THE WAY THE WORLD VIEWS THE 300-YEAR-OLD CITY...AND HOW WE SEE OURSELVES.


SEA CHANGE Capturing a disappearing coast and way of life

PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAM BOOK 5.5/9PT

Text and photos by J.T. BLATTY “Due to a dying industry and rapidly eroding coastline, the places and people who are generations deep in Louisiana’s fishing traditions have been quietly slipping into extinction for decades, many without a form of historic preservation,” writes photojournalist J.T. Blatty about her documentary project, “Fish Town: Down the Road to Louisiana’s Vanishing Fishing Communities.” “These are the same towns that for more than a century have not only made New Orleans an epicenter of fresh seafood dining, but have also traditionally served as getaways for New Orleans families, an escape to nature where time can be spent together sport fishing on the lakes and bayous and gathering around crab and crawfish boils.” WHERE GUEST B OOK

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“SINCE 2009 I’VE BEEN TRAVELING ‘DOWN THE ROAD,’” BLATTY WRITES, “CAPTURING THESE PLACES AND PEOPLE THROUGH PHOTOGRAPHY AND ORAL HISTORY RECORDINGS. ‘DOWN THE ROAD’ IS AWAY FROM THE CITY. IT’S ACROSS THE BRIDGES, HIGHWAYS AND INTERSTATES DIVERGING FROM NEW ORLEANS LIKE VESSELS DIVERGE FROM THE HEART: AN AQUATIC MAZE OF INTERSECTING BAYOUS, LAKES AND CANALS FEEDING INTO THE SEEMINGLY INFINITE WETLANDS OF SOUTHEAST LOUISIANA.”

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SIMULTANEOUSLY CELEBRATORY AND HEART-WRENCHING, BLATTY’S IMAGES (SOON TO BE RELEASED IN BOOK FORM BY GEORGE F. THOMPSON PUBLISHING) FOCUS ON AN ENDANGERED SLICE OF LOCAL LIFE. “THIS IS AN IMPORTANT PIECE OF LOUISIANA HISTORY,” NOTES BLATTY, WHO ALSO SERVES AS A FEMA DISASTER RESERVIST PHOTOGRAPHER. “THE PUBLICATION OF THIS BOOK WILL PRESERVE AND RECOGNIZE THE GENERATIONAL FAMILIES THAT HAVE SERVED OUR COASTLINE FOR CENTURIES.”

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PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAM BOOK 5.5/9PT

“Places and people who are generations deep in Louisiana’s fishing traditions have been quietly slipping into extinction for decades.”

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PROMOTION

FACES OF NEW ORLEANS Excellence is required to exceed expectations and provide visitors with a unique experience during their stay—as well as wow locals, for that matter. Those profiled here are in the know and the movers and shakers who go above and beyond to provide the exemplary experiences and destinations that make New Orleans great.

FACE OF FINE DINING Restaurateur Danny Milan has been creating culinary masterpieces for more than 30 years. Danny decided to open Cava in New Orleans’ Lakeview neighborhood because he loved the family atmosphere. Cava is known for its “farm-to-table” American cuisine with a New Orleans flavor. Danny is constantly creating new dishes based on local, fresh seafood and seasonal ingredients. Attention to detail, along with devotion to customer service is what makes Cava a local—as well as a celebrity—favorite. 504.304.9034

PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAM BOOK 5.5/9PT

CAVA


PROMOTION

FACE OF HEALTH & BEAUTY

BOPP DERMATOLOGY & FACIAL PLASTIC SURGERY Board-certified doctors Barbara and Felix Bopp offer the most advanced cosmetic procedures with a focus on noninvasive rejuvenation, with surgical intervention when necessary. Bopp Dermatology & Facial Plastic Surgery delivers a unique combined approach of addressing skin health and rejuvenation. Their innovative cosmetic program includes hair transplantation, facial and body rejuvenation with Botox, fillers, lasers and other noninvasive procedures, such as fat reduction with CoolSculpting and Kybella. 504.455.9933, boppskin.com


PROMOTION

FACE OF TRANSPORTATION

Celebrating 30 years in business, Mike Nicoll is the premiere provider of excellence in transportation. A native New Orleanian, Mike offers the ultimate experience in chauffeur-driven limousines. Nicoll’s will pamper you with the care that only the tradition of Southern hospitality has to offer. If you are in town for Mardi Gras, Jazzfest or a New Orleans-style wedding, Mike can provide you with first-class transportation at affordable rates. Nicoll’s makes transportation easy! 504.467.7788, nicolls.com

PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAM BOOK 5.5/9PT

NICOLL’S LIMOUSINE SERVICE


PROMOTION

FACES of New Orleans

FACE OF FINE JEWELRY

PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAM BOOK 5.5/9PT

SYMMETRY JEWELERS Symmetry was founded in 1975 with the concept of returning jewelry to its rightful place among the art forms. From the beginning Symmetry was known for the incredible custom work and designs of in-house artist, master engraver and co-owner Tom Mathis. Tom combines the latest in current technology with oldworld craftsmanship to continue this tradition. Brother and co-owner Richard continues Symmetry’s tradition of featuring local, national and international jewelry artists in their beautiful Riverbend gallery. 504.861.9925, symmetryjewelers.com


PROMOTION

FACE OF FORMAL WEAR

TUXEDOS TO GO Mel Grodsky has been a local retail business owner for the past 50 years. Because there are many black-tie events in New Orleans, Mel realized there was a need for a clothing store where customers could purchase (rather than rent) tuxedos, suits and accessories at a great price. Thus, Tuxedos to Geaux was born. Fast, quality service and customer satisfaction are priorities; free delivery to local hotels. Sarah, Mel’s daughter, will lead the business into the next generation. 504.455.5393, tuxedostogeaux.com

FACES of New Orleans


SHOPPING

Louisiana Purchases New Orleans isn't only about spicy food and hot jazz; it's also one of the South's premier shopping meccas.From trendy couture to homemade pralines, leading national chains to charming mom-and-pop shops, Crescent City retailers offer something for everyone and every budget. It's not a matter of what to buy so much as where to begin.

©TOM MCINVAILLE/ART & EYES

H ADORN & CONQUER 82Metalsmith Maria Fomich creates handmade jewelry at this space in the Rink shopping center. New Orleans elements (shotgun houses, streetcars) and bits of nature (leaf and bone imprints) are featured. 2727 Prytania St., 504.702.8036. www.adornandconquer.com. AKA STELLA GRAY “Bohemian luxury” is the concept at this artfully appointed home décor shop. Antique accents and vintage items meld with funky furniture, offbeat art, cool lighting and more. 4422 Magazine St., 504.208.2300. www.akastellagray.com. AIDAN GILL FOR MEN A fab store, filled with antique barbershop memorabilia and top-of-the-

line men's grooming products. The shop specializes in hot-towel shaves and great gifts for that hard-to-surprise guy in your life. 2026 Magazine St., 504.587.9090. 550 Fulton St., 504.566.4903. www.aidangillformen.com. H ART & EYES The eyes have it at this hip eyewear boutique, which specializes in handpicked frames, both new and vintage, to fit just about any face or budget. Wearable art by designer Starr Hagenbring and jewelry is featured. 3708 Magazine St., 504.891.4494. www.artandeyesnola.com. AVERY FINE PERFUMERY This artisanal fragrance “smell gallery” is one of only four in the world and the Italian-based InterTrade Eu-

rope group’s sole stateside location. 527 St. Joseph St., 504.522.7102. www.averyfineperfumeries.com. H BOPP DERMATOLOGY & FACIAL PLASTIC SURGERY Just minutes from the airport, this group of certified specialists offers a full range of cosmetic services, from Botox and laser treatments to plastic surgery procedures and hair transplants. 3421 N. Causeway Blvd., Ste. 102, Metairie, 504.455.9933. www.boppskin.com. BILLY REID Designer Reed’s chic boutiques are found all over the country—and now in his home state as well. Women’s and men’s fashions are featured, along with shoes and accessories.

3927 Magazine St., 504.208.1200. www.billyreid.com. H BUNGALOWS This shop mixes jewelry (including designs by Pandora, Brighton and other popular lines) and women’s accessories (hats, handbags) with cool home accents and great gift items. 719 Royal St., 504.522.9222. COUTELIER Form and function combine at this Riverbend shop, where stunning Japanese knives line cypress display boards. Chef's knives from Kikuichi to Takeda are available, as are knifesharpening services, cookbooks and other kitchen accessories. 8239 Oak St., 504.475.5606. www.nolaknifeworks.com.

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SHOPPING COACH This respected chain offers two Crescent City locations for fans of its luxe leather goods. Quality purses, briefcases and accessories are featured. The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., 1st fl., 504.299.8979. Lakeside Shopping Center, 3301 Veterans Blvd., Metairie, 504.833.0774. www.coach.com. DERBY POTTERY & TILE Former Newcomb College pottery instructor Mark Derby’s elegant hand-pressed Victorian reproduction tile, featuring historically authentic patterns and finishes, can be found in showrooms nationwide. But you’ll see it being made here. 2029 Magazine St., 504.586.9003. www.derbypottery.com. DIRTY COASTCL003672 Just when you thought New Orleans couldn’t possibly fit another T-shirt shop, along comes Dirty Coast. But you won’t find your standard Bourbon Street garb here. Catering to locals and in-the-know visitors, the shop’s slick designs feature funky graphics with cool Crescent Cityinspired slogans. 713 Royal St., 504.324.6730. 5631 Magazine St., 504.324.3745. www.dirtycoast.com.

Sterling Silver Jewelry Crystals • Gemstone Beads • Fossils Watch Battery Replacement Psychic Readings

306 Chartres • 504.581.1348 www.earthodysseynola.com

Open: Mon - Sat 10am - 9pm, Sun 10am - 6pm

H EARTH ODYSSEYCL003249 Though billed as a “nature store,” the main focus at this shop is on jewelry imported from more than 10 different countries. Fossils from Morocco, assorted minerals and Indonesian handcrafts are also featured. 306 Chartres St., 504.581.1348. www.earthodysseynola.com.

ELLEN MACOMBER FINE ART & TEXTILESCL003672 Searching for cool Crescent City collectibles? Set the GPS for this shop, where artist Ellen Macomber’s street map-inspired designs are offered on everything from clothing to housewares. 1720 St. Charles Ave, 504.314.9414. www.ellenmacomber.com. FAULKNER HOUSE BOOKSCL0026148 In 1925, William Faulkner lived at this address, and it was here he penned his novel "Soldiers’ Pay." First editions of his works are sold, as well as contemporary fiction. 624 Pirate’s Alley (behind St. Louis Cathedral), 504.524.2940. www.faulknerhousebooks.net. FLEUR DE PARIS You’re guaranteed to turn heads when sporting one of this store’s handcrafted chapeaux. Choose from over 800 original designs accented with European ribbons and veiling. 523 Royal St., 504.525.1899. www.fleurdeparis.net. H GEM PRINTINGCL003249 For nearly a century, this print company has been making its mark on everything from invitations and cards to napkins and cups. Personalized second-line handkerchiefs, umbrellas and other wedding/party accessories are also offered, with fast turnaround service. 1904 Veterans Blvd., Metairie, 504.834.9580. www.gemprinting.com. GOORIN BROS. HATSCL0062431 New Orleans’ newest hat shop dates to 1895, when master milliner Cassel Goorin first began plying his wares from Pittsburgh street carts. Today

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Goorin’s chic chapeaux and stylish shops are found nationwide. 709 Royal St., 504.523.4287. 2123 Magazine St., 504.522.1890. www.goorin.com.

for a New Orleans street and features handmade acetate frames with gold hardware. 809 Royal St., 504.407.2945. www.kreweduoptic.com.

HEMLINECL0026159 Fashion-forward clothing accessories and such sought-after lines as Diesel and Laundry are found here. 609 Chartres St., 504.592.0242. 3308 Magazine St., 504.269.4005. www.shophemline.com.

H LA PETIT FLEUR06431 Specializing in estate and contemporary jewelry, La Petit Fleur is well known for its own line of pendants based on the fleur de lis, now widely embraced as the symbol of New Orleans’ rebirth. The shop also offers Crescent City-themed charms. 534 Royal St., 504.522.1305. www.lapetitfleur.com.

HOVÉCL002619 Hové is a European-style parfumeur that has been in business for more than 70 years. Among the fragrant perfumes and colognes are New Orleans-inspired scents. 434 Chartres St., 504.525.7827. www.hoveparfumeur.com. KEIFE & CO.CL00271 A charming, beautifully curated wine and spirits shop in the Warehouse District. There’s a hushed library feel to the place, with floor-to-ceiling shelving stocked deep with wines, booze, liqueurs and unique quaffs. Gourmet food items are also offered. 801 Howard Ave., 504.523.7272. www.keifeandco.com. KENDRA SCOTT JEWELRYCL00271 In addition to its signature line of go-anywhere and with-anything designs, this innovative jewelry shop lets you customize pieces to fit your own taste. 5757 Magazine St., 504.613.4227. www.kendrascott.com KREWE DU OPTICCL00271 Eyewear-maker Stirling Barrett has garnered a national following with his locally designed line of sunglasses. Each of his iconic styles is named

LAKESIDE SHOPPING CENTERCL007341 A favorite shopping stop of New Orleanians for more than 30 years, Lakeside houses more than 120 shops, including Coach, J. Crew, Macy’s and Sephora. 3301 Veterans Blvd., Metairie, 504.835.8000. www.lakesideshopping.com.

3807 Magazine Street, New Orleans, LA 70115

H LIL' BIT BOILING CO.CL003249 Grown men can get as excited as little boys when it comes to crawfish boils. Now kids can safely get in on the fun with the Lil’ Bit Crawfish Boil Set, complete with plastic pot, strainer, stirring paddle, mudbugs and accessories. www.lilboil.com. LOUISIANA MUSIC FACTORYCL0026150 There’s no better place in town to stock up on new or used CDs by local artists. Select posters, books, and videos also offered. 421 Frenchmen St., 504.586.1094. www.louisianamusicfactory.com. H MARION CAGE “Jewelry is a form of architecture, and the body is its landscape” is the WHERE GUEST B OOK

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SHOPPING motto of Marion Cage McCollam, whose elegant, minimalist creations reflect her industrial-design training. Cool home accents and hardware are also featured. 3719 Magazine St., 504.891.8848. www.marioncage.com. MEYER THE HATTERCL002618 The oldest hat store in the South stocks one of the largest inventories of quality headwear in the country. 120 St. Charles Ave., 504.525.1048. www.meyerthehatter.com. MIGNON FAGETCL002718 Designer Faget has created extraordinary jewelry, using semiprecious stones and precious metals, for four decades. New Orleans icons and images figure prominently in her work. The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., 1st fl., 504.524.2973. 3801 Magazine St., 504.891.7545. www.mignonfaget.com. H NICOLL'S LIMOUSINE SERVICE CL001In addition to top-notch chauffeured limo service, this company offers limo buses, shuttle buses, luxury sedans and stretch utility vehicles. Airport pickups/drop-offs are also available. 4305 Williams Blvd., Kenner, 504.454.7722. 717 S. Claiborne Ave., 504.522.5656; 800.783.9944. www.nicolls.com. H OSCAR RAJO PHOTOGRAPHY One of the city’s leading wedding photographers, Rajo excels in “capturing the human experience”— and capturing the beauty of New Orleans in the process. 504.837.6611. www.oscarrajo.com.

THE OUTLET COLLECTION AT RIVERWALKCL002731 Located along the Mississippi River at the foot of Canal Street, Riverwalk is home to the nation’s first urban outlet center. Neiman Marcus Last Call Studio and Coach are among the 70-plus retailers featured. 500 Port of New Orleans Pl., 504.522.1555. www.riverwalkmarketplace.com. PAPIER PLUMECL0026174 It’s only fitting that the French Quarter, with its rich literary history, would be home to a store devoted to fine writing instruments. Imported stationery, Florentine journals and other desk accessories are featured. 842 Royal St., 504.988.7265. www.papierplume.com. H PLANET BEACHCL001564 This French Quarter spa provides a variety of services, from massages and facials to spray tanning and teeth whitening. 301 Burgundy St., 504.525.8266. www.planetbeach.com. H PROMENADE FINE FABRICSCL003248 Popped a button on the plane? Promenade stocks the largest selection of quality ribbon and buttons in the South. The shop features a large inventory of elegant and unusual fabrics from the couture houses, including velvets, silks, taffetas and more. 1520 St. Charles Ave., 504.522.1488. H QUEORKL001564 Cork is the big draw at this sleek shop, where the resilient material is fashioned into chic handbags, belts, phone cases, pet collars and more. 838 Chartres St., 504.899.9299. www.queork.com.

H RED BEAN REALTYL001564 Love New Orleans so much you want to make it your second home? Red Bean helps make your realty dream a reality with prime listings and friendly associates. 220 Julia St., Suite A, 504.265.9204. www.redbeanrealty.com. ROUSESCL001564 This regional supermarket chain has built its reputation on sourcing from local suppliers, farmers and fishermen. 701 Royal St., 504.523.1352. 701 Baronne St., 504.227.3838. www.rouses.com. ROUX ROYALECL001564 Catering to foodies, this shop stocks serving ware and kitchen-related accessories, many featuring a Crescent City flavor. Cookbooks by local chefs are also offered. 600 Royal St., 504.565.5252. SANTA’S QUARTERSCL001564 Get your Christmas fix at this holiday-themed shop (the South’s largest) selling nativity sets, specialty lights and locally crafted ornaments year-round. 1025 Decatur St., 504.581.5820. www.santasquartersno.com. SCRIPTURACL002617 A wordsmith’s dream, selling formal and unusual paper products, including New Orleans-themed stationery, pens, journals, note cards, travel diaries and photo albums. 5423 Magazine St., 504.897.1555. www.scriptura.com. THE SHOPS AT CANAL PLACECL002741 Canal Place features some of the world’s finest retailers in an elegant setting. Stores include Saks Fifth Av-

enue, Tiffany & Co., Michael Kors, Coach and Brooks Brothers. 333 Canal St., 504.522.9200. www.theshopsatcanalplace.com. THE SPA AT THE RITZCARLTONCL0026193 This award-winning spa—named the best hotel spa in the nation by Travel + Leisure—features 22 treatment rooms, two couples suites and a separate esthetician wing. 921 Canal St., 504.670.2929. www.ritzcarlton.com. H SYMMETRY JEWELERSCL003248 This full-service jewelry shop, located in the Riverbend neighborhood, features contemporary designs by local, national, and international artists, along with custom-made creations by in-house craftsman Tom Mathis. A large selection of gemstones is offered, in addition to estate pieces. 8138 Hampson St., 504.861.9925. www.symmetryjewelers.com. TOTAL WOMANCL006253 This boutique offers such designers as Diane von Furstenberg, Trina Turk, Vince and Shin Choi, in addition to shoes and accessories by Tracy Reese, Robert Rodriguez and Gucci. 3964 Magazine St., 504.891.3964. www.totalwomanla.com. TRASHY DIVACL00153 Featured in such publications as Elle and Lucky, Candice Gwinn’s NOLAbased clothing company features original and vintage-inspired designs with a modern sensibility. The stylish shop offers women’s clothing, shoes, lingerie, jewelry and accessories, along with numerous locations. 537 Royal St., 504.522.4233. 712 Royal St., 504.522.8861.

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New Orleans 829 Chartres St., 504.581.4555. 2044 Magazine St., 504.522.5686. 2048 Magazine St., 504.299.8777. 2050 Magazine St., 504.265.0973. www.trashydiva.com. H TUXEDOS TO GEAUXCL007893 Why rent a tux when you can own one? This formalwear shop dresses men to the nines—complete with shirt, tie and cummerbund—for under $200. 3400 16th St., Metairie, 504.455.5393. www.tuxedostogeaux.com. VIEUX CARRÉ WINE & SPIRITSCL0026184 The French Quarter’s most popular spot for fine wines, top-shelf liquors, and imported and domestic beer. 422 Chartres St., 504.568.WINE. WALDORF ASTORIA SPACL0026184 This luxe spa offers 10 private treatment rooms and a full menu of body treatments and services, including indulgent therapies that incorporate diamond and 24-carat gold products. 123 Baronne St., 504.335.3190. www.rooseveltneworleans.com. WARBY PARKERCL0026184 Affordable eyewear and mid-century modern stylishness are Warby Parker's trademarks. An in-store photo studio lets customers email images of their new glasses to friends or themselves and then purchase online. 3964 Magazine St., 504.799.2830. www.warbyparker.com. WEHMEIER’SCL0026189 This emporium stocks a wide variety of super-premium items in exotic leathers, including alligator, ostrich, and lizard belts, bags and shoes. Fine leather boots for both men and women, from Lucchese, Old Gringo and

Lane, are also featured. The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., 2nd fl., 504.681.2082. www.wehmeiers.com. H WELLINGTON & COMPANYCL007893 This shop is devoted to antique and estate jewelry, with an emphasis on Victorian, Edwardian and art deco designs. A large selection of diamond engagement rings is also featured, along with new designer lines such as Thistle & Bee. 505 Royal St., 504.525.4855. www.wcjewelry.com. WHOLE FOODSCL0026185 The organic grocery offers a wealth of all-natural goods, along with an excellent selection of prepared food items and three locations. 5600 Magazine St., 504.899.9119. 300 N. Broad St., 504.434. 3364. www.wholefoodsmarket.com.

Best Kids Toy

KIDS

CRAWFISH BOIL SET PASS DOWN

THE TRADITION

WOODHOUSE DAY SPACL0 local branch of this nationwide franchise offers a full range of relaxing body treatments, rejuvenating facials and more. 4030 Canal St., 504.482.6652. www.newsorleans.woodhousespas. com.

TThe

H YVONNE LAFLEURCL007893 Yvonne LaFleur has been one of New Orleans’ foremost designers for more than four decades, crafting custom millinery, business attire, ball gowns, lingerie—even her own signature fragrance. 8131 Hampson St., 504.866.9666. www.yvonnelafleur.com.

It’s a tradition soaked in family, friends and cayenne pepper that we pass down from generation to generation. Now you can share this tradition with your lil’ chef as you boil side by side, creating memories that will last a lifetime.

LILBOIL.COM U S E C O U P O N C O D E “ w h e r e m a g ” F O R $5 O F F WHERE GUEST B OOK

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LOOK BOOK An array of must-have items—both decorative and functional, indulgent and essential, trendy and traditional— for your shopping pleasure.

N AG HI’S LA PE T IT FLE U R

La Petit Fleur Joan Slifka has been designing her sterling silver pieces for La Petit Fleur for more than 30 years. Her designs are striking, but even more impressive when you see the work on the reverse sides! Her work is done in a variety of stone combinations, styles, and sizes. 534 Royal St., (504) 522-1305; www.lapetitfleur.com.

Naghi’s Find one of the largest selections of silver and gold Judaica in the South as well as many more intriguing, one-of-a-kind items at Naghi’s. 633 Royal St., (504) 586-8373; 800 Royal St., (504) 654-1940; 637 Canal St., (504) 585-5700; www.naghis.com. QUEORK

Wellington & Company Wellington & Co is proud to present a beautiful selection of fine diamonds and colored stones. Follow us on Twitter: www.twitter.com/ WellingtonAndCo; Fan us on Facebook: www.facebook. com/WellingtonAndCo. Wellington & Company, 505 Royal Street, (504) 525-4855; www.wcjewelry.com.

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WE L L I NGTON & COMPANY

Queork Queork is based in New Orleans, where we design all of our cork products. We are the only non-import based cork boutique in the USA. Lightweight, Scratch Resistant, Hypoallergenic, Waterproof, Mildew Resistant, Stain Resistant. 838 Chartres Street, 3005 Magazine Street, 504-481-4910. www.queork.com


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

B U N G A LOWS

Bungalows has a pandora stop n’ shop department along with Brighton jewelry and handbags, Alex and Ani, and a wide range of costume jewelry, home accents and women’s apparel and accessories. 719 Royal St., 504.522.9222; www.shopbungalows.com

Adorn & Conquer Adorn & Conquer showcases handmade jewelry and gifts from local and national artists. There’s something unique for everyone, ranging from $10-$400. Jewelry Artists are working in house, stop by and say hello! 2727 Prytania St, Inside The Rink Shopping Center, Suite 6, 504.702.8036, www.adornandconquer.com

WELLI NGTON & COMPANY

Wellington & Company is proud to present a large selection of Time Pieces including vintage Rolex and Cartier watches. Follow us on Twitter: www.twitter.com/ WellingtonAndCo; Fan us on Facebook: www. facebook.com/WellingtonAnd Co. Wellington & Company, 505 Royal Street, (504) 525-4855; www.wcjewelry.com ADORN & CONQU E R LIL’ B IT B O ILIN G CO.

ART & EYES

Art & Eyes Art & Eyes carries over 1500 handmade frames, optical and suns, starting from $75. In addition, some of the finest accessory artisans are featured here. 3708 Magazine Street, (504)891-4494, www.Artandeyesnola.com.

Lil’ Bit Boiling Co. SHARE The EXPERIENCE! It’s a tradition soaked in family, friends and cayenne pepper that we pass down from generation to generation. Now you can share this tradition with your lil’ chef as you boil side by side, creating memories that will last a lifetime. Get your lil’ chef one today at www.lilboil.com! Use coupon code “wheremag” for $5 off New Orleans’ best kids toy.

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DINING

Food for Thought An ever-changing landscape of sauces, seasonings and some of the greatest examples of culinary artistry in the nation, the New Orleans restaurant scene continues to nourish new talent and generate applause. From old-line Creole fare to cutting-edge contemporary cuisine, there's something for everyone and every palate.

H THE AMERICAN SECTOR006721 American. A nostalgic homage to wartime classics with gourmet twists, the menu at this National World War II Museum eatery features such kicked-up throwbacks as “Victory Garden” salads, open-face pot roast sandwiches and s'mores pie. L, D (daily).

945 Magazine St., 504.528.1940. www.american-sector.com. H ANTOINE’SCL002714 Creole. Established in 1840, Antoine’s is New Orleans’ oldest restaurant and a living treasure. The great-great-great-grandchildren of founder Antoine Alciatore run the place as he wanted, which means rich French-Creole food, courtly waiters, and an atmosphere of hospitality and tradition. L, D (M-Sa); Su jazz brunch. Antoine’s Annex (513 Royal St.) serves pastries and light fare daily. 713 St. Louis St., 504.581.4422. www.antoines.com.

H ARNAUD'SCL002714 Creole. Arnaud’s continues a tradition begun in 1918. The restaurant was assembled piecemeal over the decades, which is part of its charm. Shrimp Arnaud, oysters Bienville and café brulot are three of the many famous dishes. D (daily); Su jazz brunch. 813 Bienville St., 504.523.5433. www.arnauds.com. AVOCL007293 Italian. Chef Nick Lama does his fourth-generation Sicilian ancestry proud with such standouts as charred octopus with eggplant and cranberries, cioppino, gnocchi with wild mushrooms and lasagna with short rib ragout. D (M-Sa). 5908 Magazine St., 504.509.6550. www.restaurantavo.com.

BALISECL007293 French. Chef Justin Devillier of La Petite Grocery fame now has a second space in a beautifully restored 1830s building with cool art, smart cocktails and a small menu with depth. Must-haves include the fried smoked oysters and chicken and ricotta dumplings. L (Tu-F), D (nightly); brunch (Sa-Su). 640 Carondelet St., 504.459.4449. www.balisenola.com. BAYONACL00271 American. Bayona continues its reign as one of the city’s best restaurants. Chef Susan Spicer’s menu continually surprises with fresh specials, but still includes her signature musthave: grilled shrimp with black-bean cakes and coriander sauce. L (W-Sa), D (M-Sa).

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ANGELINECL00271 Southern. Chef Alex Harrell’s Alabama upbringing informs the menu at his casually elegant eatery. Consider the black-eyed pea and collard green soup, crispy smoked pork cheeks with cornbread puree and the Gulf shrimp and country ham with butterbeans and sweet potatoes. D (W-Su); brunch (F-Su). 1032 Chartres St., 504.308.3106. www.angelinenola.com.


430 Dauphine St., 504.525.4455. www.bayona.com. BORGNECL007293 Seafood. At this seafood-centric John Besh restaurant (helmed by mega-talented chef Brian Landry), fantastic apps (such as duck-andjalapeno poppers) partner swimmingly with easy-going sandwiches, fish cooked “in a bag” and more. L, D (daily). 601 Loyola Ave. (in the Hyatt Regency Hotel), 504.613.3860. www.borgnerestaurant.com. BOUCHERIECL005786 Southern. Looking for a great offthe-beaten-path place? Chef/owner Nathaniel Zimet’s culinary creations are as delicious as their prices. Collard greens with grit fries, duck confit po’ boys, Krispy Kreme bread pudding—trust us on this one. L, D (TuSa). 1506 S. Carrollton St., 504.862.5514. www.boucherie-nola.com.

CL002718

BOURBON HOUSE Seafood. A standout addition to Dickie Brennan’s restaurant empire. Stylish seafood dishes are complemented with outstanding filets and sides—don’t miss the redfish on the half shell with jumbo lump crab or the bourbon-glazed shrimp, a unique twist on the classic barbecued version. L, D (daily). 144 Bourbon St., 504.522.0111. www.bourbonhouse.com.

H BRENNAN'S02714 Creole. Breakfast at Brennan’s is back on the New Orleans menu. Now under the helm of new owner Ralph Brennan and executive chef Slade Rushing, the legendary eatery

continues more than six decades of tradition with long-popular classics (turtle soup, eggs Hussarde, bananas Foster) coupled with fresh, contemporary takes on Creole cuisine. B, L, D (daily). 417 Royal St., 504.525.9711. www.brennansneworleans.com. BRIGTSEN’SCL00174 Creole. Secluded in the Riverbend neighborhood, Brigtsen’s has a lower profile than many other first-rank local restaurants. A protegé of Paul Prudhomme, Frank Brigtsen serves up food that is rooted in Louisiana tradition, but moves into a sphere of its own with his genius for combining tastes and ingredients. D (Tu-Sa). 723 Dante St., 504.861.7610. www.brigtsens.com. BROUSSARD’SCL00174 Creole. Recently renovated, Broussard’s, established in 1920, remains one of the city’s premier fine dining spots, with one of the most elegant courtyards in the Quarter. Chef Neal Swindler serves up classic FrenchCreole cuisine to match the Old World ambiance. Corn-and-crab bisque, slow-roasted pheasant, ovenbaked Dover sole served table-side. Tradition never tasted so good. L (F), D (nightly); Su jazz brunch. 819 Conti St., 504.581.3866. www.broussards.com. H CAFÉ BEIGNET Coffee. Light fare, café drinks, and delicious beignets are the draw at these comfy French Quarter coffeehouses. Traditional jazz performances at the Bourbon Street location daily, beginning at 8 am. B, L, D (daily). 311 Bourbon St., 504.525.2611. 334-B Royal St., 504.524.5530.

600 Decatur St. www.cafebeignet.com. CAFÉ DU MONDECL002718 Coffee. No visit to the Crescent City is complete without a stop at Café Du Monde, in operation since 1862. On the menu: café au lait (made with ground chicory root) and beignets, the unofficial doughnuts of New Orleans. 24h (daily). 800 Decatur St., 504.525.4544. www.cafedumonde.com. CANE & TABLECL001634 Cuban. This rum-centric restaurant provides a taste of the tropics and the city’s Caribbean connection. Classic cocktails are given clever contemporary twists, while island flavors inform the “seasonal smart” menu in dishes such as jerk chicken and plantain dumplings. L (F), D (nightly); brunch (Sa-Su). 1113 Decatur St., 504.581.1112. www.caneandtablenola.com. CARIBBEAN ROOMCL001634 Eclectic. This Garden District gem, shuttered since the 1990s, was recently reopened by John Besh with chef Chris Lusk at the helm. Like the décor, the menu melds old and new, with long-popular favorites like Mile High Pie joining modern additions, such as wagyu beef and beet tartare. Jackets required; jeans discouraged. L (F), D (daily); Su brunch. 2031 St. Charles Ave., 504.323.1500. www.thecaribbeanroom.com. H CAVA American. Named for the Spanish sparkling wine, this light, airy dining space boasts a menu of American cuisine (herb-roasted lamb chops) and a few twists (braised rabbit re-

moulade) to go with a deep wine list (yes, there is Cava) and well-stocked bar. D (M-Sa). 789 Harrison Ave., 504.304.9034. CAVANCL0028137 Seafood. This Victorian home’s “beautiful deterioration” is an ideal setting for chef Ben Thibodeaux’s casual coastal cuisine. Start with the scallop crudo or crab-and-avocado toast, before moving on to the seared Gulf fish. Or just grab a cocktail at the bar, while munching on Old Bayseasoned fries. B (F-Su), D (nightly). 3607 Magazine St., 504.509.7655. www.cavannola.com. CENTRAL GROCERYCL002719 Deli. This Italian deli-grocery is a shrine to old New Orleans, and is the place to acquaint yourself with the classic muffuletta sandwich: layers of provolone cheese, olive salad, mortadella, salami and ham. L (Tu-Sa). 923 Decatur St., 504.523.1620. H CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS CL0027194Steaks. Forget the standard sauces and heavy sides; the focus at this upscale-casual steakhouse is on its top-quality, USDA prime-only meats. An uncomplicated menu, easygoing atmosphere and live entertainment make the Chophouse a cut above. D (nightly). 322 Magazine St., 504.522.7902. www.chophousenola.com. COCHONCL001635 Louisiana. Many restaurants profess to be “better than your mama’s,” but chef Donald Link’s lives up to the claim with haute twists on simple standards such as oyster-and-bacon sandwiches. The adjacent Cochon Butcher offers sandwiches and house-cured meats. WHERE GUEST B OOK

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DINING L, D (M-Sa). 930 Tchoupitoulas St., 504.588.2123. www.cochonrestaurant.com. COMMANDER’S PALACECL0028137 Creole. This beloved turquoise palace is a shrine for food worshippers. Chef Tory McPhail carries on the Brennan family tradition of adventurous food based on Creole principles, served in a courtly atmosphere. L (M-F), D (nightly); jazz brunch (Sa-Su). 1403 Washington Ave., 504.899.8221. www.commanderspalace.com.

2009-2012 James Beard Award finalist “Top Ten Restaurants in New Orleans 5 of the last 7 years”. “Sexiest dining room in New Orleans” Travel and Leisure Food & Wine’s Best New Chefs 2002 New Orleans Magazine Chef of the Year 2001

3637 Magazine Street, New Orleans, LA A five minute cab ride from the French Quarter

504.895.1636 liletterestaurant.com

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COMPANY BURGERCL0028137 American. Adam Biderman’s award-winning burger joint sticks to the basics, which makes it all the better. Hand-ground beef, turkey or lamb patties topped with American 1:40:29 PM cheese; house-made mayo and pickles; fresh-baked buns. Add a side of hand-cut, twice-cooked fries...and dig in. $ L, D (daily). 611 O’Keefe St., 504.309.9422. www.thecompanyburger.com. COMPÈRE LAPINCL0028137 Caribbean. A native of St. Lucia, chef Nina Compton’s island upbringing is evident in dishes such as conch croquettes, roasted jerk corn and curried goat with plantain gnocchi. For dessert? A horchata panna cotta with compressed melon, of course. L, D (daily); brunch (Sa-Su). 1535 Tchoupitoulas St., 504.599.2119. www.comperelapin.com.

COQUETTECL005781 French. What do you get when you mix traditional Louisiana cooking with spicy Italian and refined French? Coquette, where the menu changes daily but is always stellar. L (W-Sa), D (M-Sa); Su brunch. 2800 Magazine St., 504.265.0421. www.coquette-nola.com. H COURT OF TWO SISTERSCL0027194 Creole. No French Quarter visit would be complete without a meal at this romantic restaurant, which features a daily jazz brunch and a nightly a la carte menu. Creole and Cajun cuisine, combined with southern hospitality and a magical patio setting make for a memorable dining experience. L, D (daily). 613 Royal St., 504.522.7261. www.courtoftwosisters.com. H CRAZY LOBSTERCL0027194 Seafood. Huge buckets of steamed seafood is the draw at this riverfront restaurant, where the lobster never runs out, the rest of the crowd can dig into some spicy Cajun fare and you can all while away an afternoon sipping cocktails and watching the ships sail by. L, D (daily). Spanish Plaza (Poydras St. at the river, across from Harrah’s Casino), 504.569.3380. www.thecrazylobster.com.

CL0027196

DICKIE BRENNAN’SCL005781 STEAKHOUSE Steaks. An upscale steakhouse serving superior USDA prime beef with luscious sauces (try the barbecue ribeye topped with Abita-beer shrimp or the filet with flash-fried oysters). L (F), D (nightly). 716 Iberville St., 504.522.2467. www.dickiebrennanssteakhouse. com.

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DOMENICACL0059671 Italian. Inspired by traditional Sunday Italian family feasts, this hot spot is counted among celebrated local chef John Besh’s growing family of restaurants. Dive into handmade pastas, authentic pizzas and Old World classics such as Sicilian meatballs or grilled pompano with fennel. L, D (daily); brunch (Sa-Su). 123 Baronne St. (in the Roosevelt Hotel), 504.648.6020. www.domenicarestaurant.com. DOOKY CHASECL002813 Creole. One of the oldest AfricanAmerican restaurants in the nation. Chef Leah Chase has built a loyal following with classic dishes, such as her seemingly simple red beans and rice, steaming gumbo and crispy-yettender fried chicken. L (Tu-F), D (F). 2301 Orleans Ave., 504.821.0600. DORIS METROPOLITANCL006507 Steaks. A stunning steakhouse and butcher shop featuring superior quality dry-aged meats. A full remodel of the historic space is alone worth a visit, though the hunger-inducing menu also impresses with an eclectic collection of specialty cuts and an extensive wine list. D (nightly). 620 Chartres St., 504.267.3500. www.dorismetropolitan.com. EMERIL’SCL001638 Louisiana. Emeril Lagasse’s flagship sets the course for the Lagasse empire. Opened in 1990, this is where the celebrated chef created many of his classic dishes, including barbecued shrimp, andouille-crusted drum, banana cream pie and more. L (M-F), D (nightly). 800 Tchoupitoulas St., 504.528.9393. www.emerils.com.

EMERIL’S DELMONICOCL002813 Creole. This elegant circa-1895 restaurant now serves chef Emeril Lagasse’s modern takes on Creole classics. Start with the house-made charcuterie, before moving on to shrimp Bordelaise or reinvented drum meunière. L (F), D (nightly). 1300 St. Charles Ave., 504.525.4937. www.emerils.com. H FELIX’S RESTAURANT & OYSTER BARCL0027169 Seafood. Endearingly down-home, even after its recent renovation, Felix’s has an extensive menu that offers no-frills seafood, including oysters both on the half shell and char-grilled, grilled Gulf fish, gumbo, seafood po’ boys, fresh lobster, a variety of breakfast items and more. B, L, D (daily). 739 Iberville St., 504.522.4440. www.felixs.com. GALATOIRE’S Creole. Since 1905, Galatoire’s has been a gravity center of New Orleans, where political careers are made, engagements pledged, rumors spread and business deals won and lost. Happily, the food is as good as the party atmosphere. L, D (Tu-Su). 209 Bourbon St., 504.525.2021. www.galatoires.com. GRILL ROOMCL001647 Contemporary. The Mobile fourstar fine dining room at the Windsor Court Hotel is a favorite of both locals and visitors. Refined yet relaxed, the Grill Room features innovative American cuisine that’s strong on Southern influences and local ingredients. B, L, D (daily); brunch (Su). 300 Gravier St., 504.522.1994. www.windsorcourthotel.com. WHERE GUEST B OOK

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Unique Dining Experience For All Occasions

Japanese Seafood & Steak house

1403 St. Charles Ave. (504).410.9997 www.miyakonola.com

DINNER

Mon - Thu 5 - 10p • Fri 5 - 10:30p Sat 3:30 - 10:30p Sun noon - 10p

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DINING

Sun - Fri Lunch Specials Party Room Available

H GUMBO SHOPCL0028105 Creole. Housed in a circa-1794 building, the Gumbo Shop features traditional and contemporary Creole cuisine, including several types of gumbos, étouffée, jambalaya and other Louisiana favorites. A variety of fresh fish, from amberjack to tuna, is offered, as are more than 30 wines by the glass. L, D (daily). 630 St. Peter St., 504.525.1486. www.gumboshop.com.

GW FINSCL0028103 Seafood. At this hot restaurant, chef Tenney Flynn has taken the local obsession with seafood to global heights: fresh fish is flown in daily LUNCH from around the world. Irish salmon Sun - Fri, 11a - 2:30p and New Zealand lobster rub shoulReservations Accepted ders with Gulf shrimp and Louisiana Order Online: MiyakoNola.com duck on the menu, all exquisitely prepared. D (nightly). 808 Bienville St., 504.581.3467. 3/4/15 4:59:57 PM www.gwfins.com. HERBSAINTCL001640 French. James Beard Award-winning chef Donald Link’s entrées range from confit of Muscovy duck leg with dirty rice and citrus gastrique to chili-glazed pork belly with Beluga lentils. L (M-F), D (M-Sa). 701 St. Charles Ave., 504.524.4114. www.herbsaint.com.

AN EXPERIENCE THAT DEFINES NEW ORLEANS JAZZ BRUNCH DAILY 9AM-3PM

OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK Reservations Encouraged

JOHNNY SÁNCHEZCL001640 Mexican. Squash blossom tacos, pig ear chilaquiles, octopus tostadas— this isn’t your standard taqueria fare. Celebrity chefs (and old friends) John Besh and Aarón Sánchez teamed to create this hip eatery, which puts contemporary spins on authentic Mexican cuisine. L (Su-F), D (nightly). 930 Poydras St., 504.304.6615. www.johnnysanchezrestaurant. com.

DINNER NIGHTLY 5:30-10PM

613 Royal Street in the French Quarter 504.522.7261 • A Fein Family Restaurant menu available online: www.CourtofTwoSisters.com

JOSEPHINE ESTELLECL001640 Italian. At this casual Ace Hotel eatery, snapper crudo with browned butter dances elegantly between raw and cooked, the pastas are toothy, and each dish has some beautifully surprising element that lingers long after the meal. B (M-F); L, D (daily); brunch (Sa-Su). 600 Carondelet St., 504.930.3070. www.josephineestelle.com. K-PAUL’S LOUISIANA KITCHENCL0028109 Louisiana. Chef-personality Paul Prudhomme was one of the first to introduce Cajun cuisine to a global audience. His restaurant is an ideal spot to sample some K-Paul classics, including okra gumbo, jambalaya and blackened beef tenders. Deli L (Th-Sa), D (M-Sa). 416 Chartres St., 504.524.7394. www.kpauls.com. KENTON'SCL0028109 American. Chef Kyle Knall’s menu is full of smoke and spirit (he has a thing for bourbon). Try the crispy grits with country ham and bourbon aioli or slow-smoked sea trout with charred red onion, pickled mustard seed and apples. L (M-F), D (nightly); brunch (Sa-Su). 5757 Magazine St., 504.891.1177. www.kentonsrestaurant.com. H KRYSTALCL00281 American. Since 1932 Krystal has been satisfying big appetites with its small, square burgers, making it the oldest quick-service chain in the Southeast. Open 24h (daily). 116 Bourbon St., 504.523.4030. www.krystal.com.

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LA PETITE GROCERYCL001753 French. What once was a corner grocery has been transformed into an intimate French bistro with gas lighting and pressed-tin ceilings, where local specialties share menu space with French favorites. L, D (Tu-Sa). 4238 Magazine St., 504.891.3377. www.lapetitegrocery.com. LATITUDE 29CL001753 Eclectic. World-renowned tiki guru Jeff “Beachbum” Berry’s seriously cool, new-school tiki bar and restaurant recalls the spirit of Trader Vic’s. Island flourishes, brilliant bartenders and chefs with a local following make this one a winner. (L, D) Tu-Su. 321 N. Peters St., 504.609.3811. www.latitude29nola.com. H LILETTE0281 French. Chef John Harris’ bistro looks and feels French, but makes a mean Italian eggplant Parmigiano as well. Traditional appetizers are accented with imaginative sauces, such as the escargots with Calvados cream. L (Tu-Sa), D (M-Sa). 3637 Magazine St., 504.895.1636. www.liletterestaurant.com.

to scoop whole roasted pumpkin, apple and house coppa, or go spicy with vindaloo chicken with crispy sticky rice cubes and pickled mirliton. $$$ L, D (daily). 611 O’Keefe St., 504.518.6345. www.maypoprestaurant.com. MERILCL002861 International. Emeril Lagasse’s new casual dining venue is reflective of the celebrity chef’s world travels, with a globetrotting menu featuring everything from Japanese-style barbecue to pork rib tamales. L, D (daily). 424 Girod St., 504.526.3745. www.emerilsrestaurants.com/meril H MIYAKO SUSHI BAR & HIBACHICL002714 Japanese. Hibachis are the draw here, but sushi lovers will be just as happy. Dexterous hibachi chefs wow guests, preparing lobster, prime rib, scallops and more. Sushi, sashimi and tempura are also on the menu. L (Su-F), D (nightly). 1403 St. Charles Ave., 504.410.9997. www.miyakonola.com.

MARIZACL002861 Italian. Chef/owner Ian Schnoebelen’s cozy-chic Italian-inspired space in the trendy Rice Mill Lofts. Try the lamb meatballs, black linguini with shrimp and crab and killer chocolate torte. D (Tu-Sa). 2900 Chartres St., 504.598.5700. www.marizaneworleans.com.

MOPHOCL001753 Vietnamese. Chef Mike Gulotta rocks modern Vietnamese-inspired dishes at his naughty-named restaurant near the Canal streetcar line. The sweet-and-spicy chicken wings and pepper jelly-glazed clams are must-haves. L, D (daily). 514 City Park Ave., 504.482.6845. www.mophonola.com.

MAYPOPCL002861 Vietnamese. Chef Michael Gulotta (MoPho) expands on his Asianfusion food theme in a bright, open space with an industrial-terrarium vibe. Tear pieces of warm roti bread

MR. B’S BISTROCL002861 Louisiana. Bustling Mr. B’s is another outstanding Brennan family restaurant, famed for its deceptively casual power-lunch scene. Must-tries include the barbecued shrimp, bread WHERE GUEST B OOK

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DINING pudding in Irish whiskey sauce, and the white chocolate brownie. L (MSa), D (nightly); Su jazz brunch. 201 Royal St., 504.523.2078. www.mrbsbistro.com. N7CL002861 French. This quiet, tucked-away bistro is named for France’s Route Nationale 7. The menu is divided into plated dishes (steamed mussels, hangar steak with crushed potatoes) and specialty tinned seafood. A lovely wine list, great music and fine service equate to total charm. D (M-Sa). 1117 Montegut St., no phone. NAPOLEON HOUSECL002891 Louisiana. Napoleon never slept here, but this historic café and bar, with its peeling walls and worn charm, has its share of French ambiance. The café serves soups, seafood gumbo, salads, sandwiches and warm muffulettas; the bar serves its famous Pimm’s Cups. L (M-Sa), D (Tu-Sa). 500 Chartres St., 504.524.9752. www.napoleonhouse.com.

SINCE 1913

H NEW ORLEANS CREOLE COOKERYCL0027194 Creole. Creole standards (gumbo, shrimp Creole) are coupled with fresh fish, seafood, char-grilled oysters and a raw bar. L, D (daily). 510 Toulouse St., 504.524.9632. www.neworleanscreolecookery. com.

Home of the Original

BBQ SHRIMP & FAMOUS OYSTER BAR Serving the finest in Fresh Seafood, Italian Specialties, and Delicious Steak A Pleasureable Dining Experience is Waiting for You. Private Rooms Available Open Lunch & Dinner • Monday - Friday • Dinner only Saturday Ample Off-Street Parking

1838 Napoleon Ave. • 504.895-4877 (3 Blocks from St. Charles)

www.pascalsmanale.com

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK!

NOLACL002810 American. Emeril Lagasse’s French Quarter bistro is a perennial hot spot. The menu is filled with Emeril creations such as crab cakes with Creole tartar sauce, pork cheek boudin balls and a grilled double-cut pork chop with pecan-glazed sweet potatoes.

L (Th-Su), D (nightly). 534 St. Louis St., 504.522.6652. www.emerils.com. PALACE CAFÉCL00379 Creole. Part of the Brennan restaurant empire, the Palace offers a sweeping view of Canal Street. Standouts include the savory crabmeat cheesecake, andouille-crusted Gulf fish, and white chocolate bread pudding. L (M-Sa), D (nightly); Su jazz brunch. 605 Canal St., 504.523.1661. www.palacecafe.com. PALADAR 511CL00379 Contemporary. California cooking New Orleans-style means lots of frilly salads and fish left au naturel. Pizzas, smartly topped with farm eggs, summer squash and the like, take center stage on the menu. D (W-M); brunch (Sa-Su). 511 Marigny St., 504.509.6782. www.paladar511.com. H PASCAL’S MANALECL00175 Louisiana. A New Orleans landmark since 1913, Pascal’s is famous for inventing barbecued shrimp (a must-get) and eternally popular for its traditional Italian food. Pascal’s has an army of regulars who devour the gumbo, steaks and those succulent barbecued shrimp. L (M-F), D (M-Sa). 1838 Napoleon Ave., 504.895.4877. PÊCHECL00379 Seafood. Donald Link and Stephen Stryjewski (the award-winning team behind pork-centric Cochon) have another winner on their hands. The focus here is on chef Ryan Prewitt's simple seafood grilled over hardwood coals...and it couldn’t be better. From the raw bar to the smoky

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mussels to the whole grilled fish, you can’t go wrong. L, D (M-Sa). 800 Magazine St., 504.522.1744. www.pecherestaurant.com. PETIT LIONCL00379 Eclectic. Chef Phillip Lopez (Root/ Square Root) partnered with the Troubadour Hotel on this sleek, modern space with upscale bistro food. Dive into a big bucket of mussels in coconut-curry broth or the smoky double-patty burger. Cocktails are excellent; desserts are divine. B, L, D (daily). 1111 Gravier St., 504.518.5500. www.petitlionnola.com. H POPPY'S TIME OUT SPORTS BAR & GRILL American. Sports fans will score here. Along with gourmet burgers, personalized pizzas and a variety of wings, this riverside restaurant and bar features more than 20 beers on tap, live music and big-screen TVs. B, L, D (daily). Spanish Plaza (Poydras St. at the river, across from Harrah’s Casino), 504.247.9265. www.thecrazylobster.com. RALPH’S ON THE PARK Louisiana. Veteran restaurateur Ralph Brennan serves up globally inspired local cuisine in this beautifully restored historic building overlooking scenic City Park. One of the most romantic locations in town. L (W-F), D (nightly); Su brunch. 900 City Park Ave., 504.488.1000. www.ralphsonthepark.com. H RED FISH GRILLCL00281 Seafood. Grilled fish too plain? Not here. The hickory-grilled redfish topped with crab or crawfish is a modern classic, and the other spe-

cialties (barbecued oysters, doublechocolate bread pudding) are all exceptional. L, D (daily). 115 Bourbon St., 504.598.1200. www.redfishgrill.com. H REMOULADE CL002819 Louisiana. Arnaud’s operates this très casual bistro spin-off of its adjacent restaurant, serving favorites such as po’ boys, spicy boiled seafood and jambalaya. The young waiters may wear T-shirts, but much of the food is surprisingly sophisticated; try the turtle soup and shrimp remoulade. L, D (daily). 309 Bourbon St., 504.523.0377. www.remoulade.com. RESTAURANT AUGUSTCL001648 French. In New Orleans, chefs are as famous as rock stars, and John Besh is the city’s culinary Sting. He knows the classics, he’s bold in his experimentation and he’s got a vision. The dining rooms are elegant, and the food is spectacular, as Besh combines European style with Gulf Coast ingredients for dishes such as gnocchi with crab and truffle. L (MF), D (nightly). 301 Tchoupitoulas St., 504.299.9777. www.restaurantaugust.com.

Breakfast at

4 1 7 R O YA L S T R E E T, F R E N C H Q UA R T E R • d i N N E R • p R i vAT E Ev E N TS

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Reservations 504.525.9711 www.brennansneworleans.com PROPRIETORS terry white • ralph brennan, EXECUTIVE CHEF slade rushing

RESTAURANT R’EVOLUTIONCL0073681 Louisiana. Award-winning chefs Rick Tramonto and John Folse are the tour de force behind this elegant-yetrelaxed fine dining venue. The rooms are gorgeously appointed and finely detailed, while the menu is made up of modern reinterpretations of classic Cajun and Creole cuisine. L (M-F), D (nightly); Su brunch. 777 Bienville St. (inside the Royal Sonesta Hotel), 504.486.0300. www.revolutionnola.com. WHERE GUEST B OOK

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DINING ROOT/SQUARE ROOT0/01648 Contemporary. Two hip restaurants in one. Upstairs the focus is on chef Phillip Lopez's contemporary twists on culinary standards and creative charcuterie. Downstairs centers around 16 seats flanking an open kitchen and Lopez's multicourse tasting menu (online reservations only). D (Tu-Sa). 200 Julia St., 504.252.9480. www.rootnola.com; www.squarerootnola.com. SALON BY SUCRÉCL00173 Eceltic. Pastry chef extraordinaire Tariq Hanna’s homage to haute cuisine is a reflection of his passion for presentation of dishes both savory and sweet. Upstairs is the place for afternoon tea, a glass of wine and daily protein selections that can be ordered as an app or main course. Downstairs it's all about Hanna’s amazing desserts. Brunch, D (Th-M). 622 Conti St., 504.267.7098. www.shopsucre.com. SEAWORTHYCL00173 Seafood. This chic offshoot of New York’s Grand Banks oyster bar casts a wide net, serving up fresh bivalves from the Gulf, along with East and West coast varieties and other sustainably sourced seafood. Caviar, creative cocktails and a wide wine selection round out the menu. D (daily). 630 Carondelet St., 504.930.3071. www.seaworthynola.com.

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SHAYACL00173 Mediterranean. Uptown gets a taste of Israel at this modern Mediterranean eatery from chef Alon Shaya of restaurant Domenica fame. Shaya's wood-burning oven turns out a full menu of falafel, kebabs and labneh, along with interesting entrees such as

1-800-414-7941 WadePecans.com

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slow-cooked lamb with pomegranate tabouleh. L, D (daily). 4213 Magazine St., 504.891.4213. www.shayarestaurant.com. SOBOUCL00173 Contemporary. The focus at this “south of Bourbon” hot spot, an offshoot of the famed Commander’s Palace, is on creative cocktails and chef Juan Carlos Gonzalez’s amazing selection of small plates (order the shrimp-and-tasso pinchos with grilled pineapple). B, L, D (daily). 310 Chartres St. (in the “W” French Quarter Hotel), 504.552.4095. www.sobounola.com. ST. ROCH MARKETCL004705 Eclectic. Dating to 1875, this longshuttered marketplace recently received a massive makeover while retaining its historic character and 24 steel columns. The bright space features 13 vendors offering everything from crawfish-gouda mac and cheese to fresh-shucked oysters, along with a bar and both indoor and outdoor dining. L, D (daily). 2381 St. Claude Ave., 504.609.3813. www.strochmarket.com. H SUPERIOR GRILLL001756 Mexican. Located on the St. Charles streetcar line, this place is party central during Mardi Gras season. Come for the loaded nachos, crawfish enchiladas and sizzling fajitas; stay for the top-shelf margaritas. L, D (daily); brunch (Sa-Su). 3636 St. Charles Ave., 504.899.4200. www.superiorgrill.com. H SUPERIOR SEAFOODL001756 Seafood. Seafood is the main catch at this sizable restaurant. Dive into a bowl of steamed mussels or grab

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a spot at the oyster bar for freshshucked bivalves and “Angels on Horseback” (oysters wrapped in bacon and fried). L, D (daily). 4338 St. Charles Ave., 504.293.3474. www.superiorseafoodnola.com.

eyed pea salad with cornbread croutons offer a taste of the region’s delicious diversity. L, D (M, W-Sa); Su brunch. 1504 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 504.304.2147. www.toupssouth.com.

SYLVAINCL007513 Contemporary. Chandeliers dangle overhead at this hip gastro pub just off Jackson Square, as diners sip on hand-crafted cocktails and nibble refined comfort classics, such as panroasted scallops and pasta Bolognese. D (nightly); brunch (F-Su). 625 Chartres St., 504.265.8123. www.sylvainnola.com.

TURKEY AND THE WOLFCL0028134 Eclectic. Sandwiches are the menu mainstay at this casual café: fried baloney with American cheese and hot mustard, chicken fried steak, crab meat and crab boil potatoes served open-face. Don’t miss the wedge salad with blue cheese and “everything bagel” crunchies. L, D (W-Su). 739 Jackson Ave., 504.218.7428. www.turkeyandthewolf.com.

TABLEAUCL0TH0E281 Creole. Housed in historic Le Petit Theatre, Dickie Brennan’s Jackson Square bistro offers two bars, balcony and courtyard dining and applause-worthy French-Creole fare by chef Gus Martin. B (M-F), L, D (daily); brunch (Sa-Su). 616 St. Peter St., 504.934.3463. www.tableaufrenchquarter.com. TOUPS’ MEATERYCL0028134 Louisiana. Chef Isaac Toups is known for his masterful charcuterie. Start with the “Meatery Board,” a selection of house-cured meats and condiments, before moving on to the lamb neck with fennel and blackeyed pea salad. L, D (Tu-Sa). 845 N. Decatur St., 504.252.4999. www.toupsmeatery.com. TOUPS SOUTHCL0028134 Southern. Chef Isaac Toups serves up museum-quality Southern cuisine at the Southern Food & Beverage Museum’s in-house eatery. Homey fare, such as biscuits with crab fat butter, goat tamales and fried black-

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TUJAGUE’SCL00 Creole. Open since 1856, Tujague’s (“two-jacks”) ranks as one of the city’s oldest eateries. The restaurant serves a traditional Creole prix fixe menu (shrimp remoulade and beef brisket to start, followed by a choice of entrée and pecan pie), along with contemporary a la carte offerings. L, D (daily); Sa-Su brunch. 823 Decatur St., 504.525.8676. www.tujaguesrestaurant.com. WILLA JEAN BAKERYCL0028134 American. Pastry chefs Lisa White and Kelly Fields, known for their beautiful baked goods, show off their savory sides as well in dishes such as corn-and-crab fritters and lamb pot pie. Need a biscuit? This is the place. B, L, D (daily). 611 O'Keefe St., 504.509.7334. www.willajean.com.

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

OPE 24 HRNS !

KRYSTAL In 1932, the nation’s first Krystal restaurant opened its doors in Chattanooga, Tennessee amid harsh financial times of the Great Depression. Its founders believed that despite the severe economic upheaval of the times, people would patronize a restaurant that was kept spotlessly clean, provided courteous service and offered a good meal at the lowest possible price. The restaurant became an overnight success with customers flocking to the small building to savor hot-off-the-grill Krystals and sip freshly brewed coffee from thick china mugs. A passion for Krystal has been passed down from generation to generation, Krystal has become an experience that nearly every man, woman and child in the South has shared. 116 Bourbon Street @ Canal Street

504.523.4030

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I do THE NEW ORLEANS WEDDING GUIDE

The I DoP Book 3 ROMOTION


THE I DO WEDDING GUIDE

Your Wedding Day Wedding venues are in high demand all year round. Sometimes, the more creative you get, the more obstacles you'll need to handle. From the start, match the venue to what style of wedding you would like to have. One of the biggest setbacks can be “no music after 10 pm”—so check the rules and work backwards. Happily ever after begins at the venue.

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metropolitan New Orleans area run the gamut, from the most traditional hotel weddings to weddings at historic homes, City Park, Audubon Park, the racetrack, spaces overlooking the Mississippi River, beautiful churches, restaurants with lush courtyards, plantations, jazz clubs and so much more. 4

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©ANNA KIM PHOTOGRAPHY; (OPENING PAGE) ©OSCAR RAJO PHOTOGRAPHY

Venue choices in the


Yvonne LaFleur A half-century of dressing beautiful brides. When you enter the bridal salon at Yvonne LaFleur Emporium, you are greeted with clouds of heavenly dresses. They are fashionable but timeless. Whatever your wedding vibe—late ’30s, “High Society,” Grace Kelly, “Downton Abbey”—your bridal consultant will assist you in selecting the best silhouette for your figure, appropriate for your magical event. Bridal accessories and trousseau selections are presented; complimentary in-house alterations offered. 504.866.9666, yvonnelafleur.com

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Tradition The second-line parade and handkerchief originated with New Orleans' famous jazz funerals, and, either due to the heat or just the ŠOSCAR RAJO PHOTOGRAPHY

spirit of the occasion, the umbrella followed. This tradition has carried over into Southern weddings, signifying the beginning of a new life for the bride and groom. Permits are necessary to second line in the streets; check with New Orleans City Hall.

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FREE LIFETIME ALTERATIONS • YEAR ROUND SERVICE • FREE DELIVERY TO YOUR HOTEL ROOM

Bopp

Flawless

Dermatology & Facial Plastic Surgery

HOME OF THE $169 TUXEDO SET! Why Rent? OWN IT!

At Tuxedos To Geaux, we don’t believe in rentals. Why hassle with returning your tuxedo the morning after?

(504) 455-5393 • 3400 16TH STREET, METAIRIE, LA 70002 • NEXT TO IMPASTATO’S RESTAURANT

Gem Printing Co. — since 1918 —

Celebrating 99 years in business!

• Wedding & Party Invitations • Second Line Handkerchiefs • Cups • Napkins • Koozies and so much more. • One Day Service! 1904 Veterans Blvd., Metairie 504-831-1762 – www.gemprinting.com Genuine Engraving, Letterpress and Thermography Now in Our Fourth Generation

PRE-WEDDING S E RV IC E S

Botox Fillers HydraFacial MD Facial Plastic Surgery

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Microdermabrasion Chemical Peel Laser Treatments Hair Transplants

Look as young as you feel

Dermatology & Facial Plastic Surgery

3421 N. Causeway Blvd. Ste. 102 Metairie, LA 70002 (504) 455-9933

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Offering a charging station is a considerate gesture to show your guests you care about their personal needs. Plus you want to see tons of Instragram photos of your wonderful reception! Be sure to include a sign with your hashtag.

Wedding Day Wonderful Curating a specialty cocktail can provide color, flavor and excitement to your reception. Serving one or two custom beverages will

Š ARTEMZ/SHUTTERSTOCK

give the party a personal feel and won't break your budget. Try nicknames, favorite places or something else that tells your story to name your drinks.

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Celebrate Black and white photos are timeless. Give each other gifts on your wedding night. Preserve your gown professionally. Be as creative as you'd like. Pick a song for your first dance that you both love. Buy the gown that fits now. Involve the groom; it's his wedding too. Hire a pro to do your wedding website. Smile when you walk down the aisle. Store your mementos carefully. Wear waterproof mascara. Be in the moment; you'll want to remember this day. Make it personal, make it your own. Remember to say "I do!"

PROMOTION


Superior Grill is “the place to be” for bachelor or bachelorette parties, and large groups. In addition to our festive indoor dining room, we offer a memorable outdoor dining experience on our landscaped patio featuring beautiful flowers and one of the best views of St. Charles Avenue.

4338 St. Charles Avenue, New Orleans, LA 70115 P: 504-293-3474 F: 504-293-0596 | www.superiorseafoodnola.com

© SOUBRETTE/ISTOCK PHOTO

3636 St. Charles Ave., New Orleans, LA 70115 P: 504.899.4200 F: 504.891.1329 | www.superiorgrill.com

Whether you desire an intimate party for your rehearsal dinners or bridal showers, one of the unique spaces our restaurant has to offer–Private Dining Room, Porch, or Climate-Controlled Patio–Superior Seafood & Oyster Bar will handle everything from the fresh seafood to the friendly waitstaff. Guided by your vision, we’re here to turn your party into a hassle-free, personalized affair.

The charming Best Western Plus St. Charles Inn is located on historic St. Charles Avenue and is the quintessential place to gather family and friends for your special day. Hotel guests are welcome to a complimentary hot breakfast each morning. Other hotel amenities include a state-of-the-art exercise facility, business center, and free parking.

3636 St. Charles Avenue, New Orleans, LA 70115

| Phone: 504-899-8888 | Fax: 504-899-8892 | www.stcharlesinn.com PRO MOTION The I

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HOUMAS HOUSE Plantation and Gardens

Houmas House Plantation and Gardens is a stunning and romantic setting for memorable weddings, from the grandest of ceremonies and receptions to the most intimate. Our wedding planner and event staff have the experience and creativity to bring any bride’s vision to life. Guests (FACIING PAGE) ©OSCAR RAJO PHOTOGRAPHY

can stay overnight in a luxurious cottage at The Inn at Houmas House, where they will have full access to 36 acres of breathtaking gardens. Call us today to plan the wedding of your dreams. Houmas House Plantation and Gardens 40136 Hwy 942 • Darrow, LA 70725 225-473-9380 • www.HoumasHouse.com

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Splurge! Open bar Videographer Professional lighting Photobooth and props A band instead of a DJ Dance floor for an outdoor venue Your dream dress Pre-wedding spa time Post-wedding spa time The honeymoon The perfect flowers Professional hair and makeup The hors d’oeuvres The food A pro photographer Goody bags for guests Fancy china and silverware Quality invitations Your bouquet

PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAAM BOOK 5.5/9PT

A wedding planner

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I Do...

Chattman Photography

Private dining available Beautiful Outside balcony American inspired food with Old New Orleans flavors 789 Harrison Ave, New Orleans, LA 70124 • 504.304.9034 Monday-Sunday 5PM-10PM • CavaNewOrleans@gmail.com

3807 Magazine Street, New Orleans, LA 70115

CHARMING Historic Weddings

220 Julia, Ste. A, New Orleans | 504.265.9204 | info@redbeanrealty.com

#

CELEBRATING

1

in Total Transactions since 2011 in the Warehouse District/CBD!

© CRAFTVISION/ISTOCK PHOTO

Sales, Long & Short-Term Leasing Property Management

1-877-453-2095 destrehanplantation.org Independently Owned & Operated

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The I Do Book PROMOTION PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAAM BOOK 5.5/9PT


AT NOMA, YOUR WEDDING IS A WORK OF ART CONTACT: events@noma.org

www.noma.org | 504.658.4139

Riverfront Rehearsal Dinners, Crawfish Boil Rehearsal Dinners, Casual Family Fun All events feature: Riverside Dining, Live Music, Private Bar Set Up. The Crazy Lobster where family, friends & food equal FUN on the River. (FACING PAGE) ©OSCAR RAJO PHOTOGRPAHY

You relax & let us do all the work. Spanish Plaza on the River Across from Harrah’s Casino 504.569.3380 www.thecrazylobster.com Visit our website to request a quote! 41-0217 Where Magazine Bride Ad.indd 1

2/24/17 5:02 PM

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GALLERIES+ ANTIQUES

The Art of the City

©GALLERY TWO

Royal Street has long reigned as one of the nation's leading antiquing avenues and, in recent years, has established itself as a hot spot for emerging artists. But don't limit your gallery hopping to the French Quarter; explore the numerous art and antiques offerings along Julia and Magazine streets as well. Quarter shops, restaurants, and homes are made at Bevolo. Choose from a selection of available styles, or have fixtures custom-built on site. 521 Conti St., 504.522.9485. 318 Royal St., 504.522.4311. www.bevolo.com.

A GALLERY FOR FINE PHOTOGRAPHYCL006481 The city’s most extensive collection of fine photographs for sale. Artists represented here include Ansel Adams, Henri Cartier-Bresson and Herman Leonard, among others. 241 Chartres St., 504.568.1313. www.agallery.com.

ANGELA KING GALLERYCL001257 One of the French Quarter’s leading contemporary art galleries. Sculptors and painters represented include Peter Max, Raymond Douillet, Andy Baird, Woodrow Nash, Steve Taylor, and Patterson & Barnes. 241 Royal St., 504.524.8211. www.angelakinggallery.com.

H ANTIQUES DE PROVENCE A bit of southern France on Royal Street, featuring 17th- and 18thcentury antiques, including armoires, chandeliers, limestone fountains and a huge selection of olive jars. 623 Royal St., 504.529.4342. 611 & 619 Royal St. www.antiquesdeprovencellc.com.

ALEX BEARD STUDIOCL001257 This gallery features the works of resident artist Alex Beard, whose intricate drawings and paintings have been acquired by such collectors as Mick Jagger and England’s late Princess Margaret. Originals are offered, along with limited-edition silk screens and giclée prints. 3926 Magazine St., 504.309.0394. www.alexbeardstudio.com.

H ANTIEAU GALLERY Folk artist Chris Roberts-Antieau’s offbeat textile appliqué works are found in the American Visionary Art Museum and at her New Orleans galleries. Each of her one-of-a-kind stitched and quilted “fabric pictures” feature hand-painted frames. 927 Royal St., 504.304.0849. 4532 Magazine St., 504.510.4148. www.antieaugallery.com.

ARTHUR ROGER GALLERYCL001257 One of New Orleans’ leading modern art galleries, featuring an extensive collection of paintings, sculpture, photographs and works on paper. 432-434 Julia St., 504.522.1999. www.arthurrogergallery.com.

BOYD SATELLITE GALLERYCL001257 Local multimedia artist Blake Boyd finally has a room of his own—and a place for his friends to hang as well. Regional and international artists are featured, along with Boyd’s own offbeat works.. 440 Julia St., 504.581.2440. www.boydsatellitegallery.com

H BEVOLO GAS & ELECTRIC LIGHTS00135 The vast majority of copper and brass gas lanterns adorning French

H BRASS MONKEY Don't be fooled by its size: This tiny storefront offers one of the largest selections of Limoges boxes in the

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GALLERIES + ANTIQUES French Quarter, along with antique walking sticks and other collectibles. 407 Royal St., 504.581.0688. CALLAN CONTEMPORARYCL0032603 This chic Julia Street gallery offers modern-minded works by American and international artists with an empahsis on abstract and figurative paintings and sculpture. 518 Julia St., 504.525.0518, www.callancontemporary.com. CALLAN FINE ARTL0032603 Specializing in fine European paintings from 1830 to 1950, this prestigious gallery features museumquality examples from the academic, Barbizon, impressionistic and postimpressionist movements as well as select contemporary works. 240 Chartres St., 504.524.0025. www.callanfineart.com. CLAIRE ELIZABETH GALLERYCL0032603 Emerging local and regional contemporary artists are spotlighted here. Works range from painting and photography to sculpture and papercuts. 131 Decatur St., 504.309.4063, www.claireelizabethgallery.com. COLE PRATT GALLERYCL0032603 One of Magazine Street’s leading contemporary galleries, exhibiting works by emerging local and national artists, from post-impressionists to abstract expressionists. 3800 Magazine St., 504.891.6789, www.coleprattgallery.com. H CRAIG TRACY GALLERYL00130CL0013 The bulk of artist Craig Tracy’s body of work is devoted to the human form, which the award-winning bodypainter enhances with intricate imagery then captures on film. Limited-edition photographs and giclée prints are offered.

827 Royal St., 504.592.9886. www.craigtracy.com. DUTCH ALLEY ARTISTS' CO-OPCL032603 This artist-run venue is home to a variety of local crafters specializing in a wide range of media. A great spot for great gift items at great prices. 912 N. Peters St., 504.412.9220, www.dutchalleyartitstsco-op.com. H ELLIOTT GALLERYCL0032604 Fine contemporary and modern art from world-renowned artists is the standard here. Artists represented include Theo Tobiasse, James Coignard, Max Papart, Nissan Engel, Garrick Yrondi, David Schneuer, Petra Seipel, Picasso, Miró and Chagall. 540 Royal St., 504.523.3554. www.elliottgallery.com. H FISCHER-GAMBINO283 An eclectic shop specializing in fine lighting fixtures, as well as works by artists including Doug Anderson and Laney Oxman, whose works have have been displayed at the White House. 637 Royal St., 504.524.9067. 602 Metairie Rd., Metairie, 504.833.7757. www.fischergambinoneworleans. com; www.lightingneworleans.com. FRANK RELLE PHOTOGRAPHY Award-winning photographer Relle’s moody “nightscapes” are counted among the permanent collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of History and the private holdings of Brad Pitt, Wynton Marsalis and others. 910 Royal St., 504.388.7601. www.frankrelle.com.

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FRENCH ANTIQUE SHOP Founded in Paris, this shop relocated to New Orleans in 1939. Today it carries French antique furniture from the 18th and 19th centuries and Oriental accents, including vases with bronze mountings. 225 Royal St., 504.524.9861. www.gofrenchantiques.com.

HALL-BARNETT GALLERYCL001308 During the 1980s Howard Barnett shook things up with one of the first contemporary galleries in the Quarter. Today daughter Holly continues his legacy with an eclectic mix of emerging and established artists. 237 Chartres St., 504.522.5657. www.hallbarnett.com.

GALLERY ORANGE Contemporary collectors will score at this hip gallery. A vibrant mix of local and international artists, both emerging and established, is featured. 819 Royal St., 504.875.4006. www.gallery-orange.com.

HAROUNI GALLERYCL001308 David Harouni has an eye for heads, as evidenced by the paintings that populate his gallery. Harouni’s expressionistic oilworks and sculptures have been exhibited worldwide, but you’ll find them—along with the artist—at his French Quarter studio. 933 Royal St., 504.299.4393. www.harouni.com.

GALLERY RINARDC This contemporary gallery features colorful originals and limited-edition serigraphs by artist-owner Matt Rinard, as well as Robert Guthrie’s watercolors and whimsical pet portraiture by Georg Williams. 738 Royal St., 504.522.6536. www.galleryrinard.com. H GALLERY TWOCL001308 Part animal/part human, Betsy Youngquist’s stunning beaded sculptures will draw you into this shared gallery space, which also features Ann Marie Cianciolo’s whimsical sculptural jewelry. 831 Royal St., 504.8312 . www.gallerytwonola.com GARDEN DISTRICT GALLERYC This gallery, located near Commander’s Palace restaurant, features rotating exhibits by local, regional and national artists. 1332 Washington Ave., 504.891.3032. www.gardendistrictgallery.com.

IDA MANHEIM GALLERYCL001308 This impressive showroom features 17th-, 18th- and 19th-century French, English, Dutch and Continental furniture. You’ll also discover a selection of fine paintings and porcelain, in addition to statuary. 409 Royal St., 504.620.4114. www.idamanheimantiques.com. H JAZZFEST GALLERY00136 Illustrator David Stone Martin created hundreds of jazz album covers during the 1940s and ’50s. This exclusive dealer of his images offers museum-stock prints produced from vintage-edition plates. www.jazzfestgallery.com. JAMES H. COHEN & SONSCL001308 This fifth-generation, family-run business, founded in 1898, specializes in pre-19th-century weaponry, coins dating from 450 B.C. and Civil War-related items. 437 Royal St., 504.524.0802. www.cohenantiques.com WHERE GUEST B OOK

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GALLERIES + ANTIQUES

ANTIQUES DE PROVENCE, llc FRENCH INTÉRIEURS & JARDINS

JONATHAN FERRARA GALLERYCL001308 This gallery is home to the cuttingedge work of proprietor Jonathan Ferrara and other local and national artists. Sculpture, glass, metal and installation art are featured. 400A Julia St., 504.522.5471. www.jonathanferraragallery.com. H KEIL'S ANTIQUESCL001308 Founded in 1899, Keil’s established its reputation with rare 18th- and 19th-century French and English furniture. The shop also specializes in chandeliers, mantels, mirrors and fine jewelry. 325 Royal St., 504.522.4552. www.keilsantiques.com. KURT E. SCHON LTD.0138 This fine art gallery deals in international oil paintings from the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries for collectors, museums and investors. 510 St. Louis St., 504.524.5462. www.kurtschonltd.com.

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LEMIEUX GALLERIESCL007250 Contemporary paintings, sculpture, pottery, jewelry and glassware are among the media exhibited here. 332 Julia St., 504.522.5988. www.lemieuxgalleries.com. H LUCKY ROSE GALLERY00136 Devoted to the stunning porcelain sculpture of artist-owner Cathy Rose, who often incorporates pieces of New Orleans into her works. 840 Royal St., 504.309.8000. www.cathyrose.com. LUCULLUSCL007250 An antique shop specializing in objects for almost every culinary passion. Fine dining tables, porcelain, silver, 19th-century glassware, rustic

farmhouse implements and bistro equipment are among the offerings. 610 Chartres St., 504.528.9620. www.lucullusantiques.com. M CONTEMPORARY GALLERY07250 At this contemporary space works run the gamut, from paintings and sculpture to textiles and glass. 906 Royal St., 504.523.2022. www.handselgallery.com. H M.S. RAU INC.CL001308 This third-generation family business is one of the country’s oldest dealing in 19th-century antiques. M.S. Rau is known for its American, French and English furniture, fine silver, glass, porcelain, clocks, watches and quality jewelry. 630 Royal St., 504.523.5660. www.rauantiques.com. MANN GALLERYL001308 Specializing in French impressionist and post-impressionist paintings, this gallery features such 19th-, 20th- and 21st-century artists as Luc Didier, Edmond Petitjean, Jac Martin-Ferrieres and Pierre Gaston Rigaud. 305 Royal St., 504.523.2342. www.vincentmanngallery.com. H MAISON ROYALECL001306 Original impressionistic and post-impressionistic oilworks are the focus here. Featured artists include Camille Pissarro, Maurice Utrillo and Raoul Dufy, among others. 501 Royal St., 504.525.5045. www.maisonroyale.com. H MARTIN LAWRENCE GALLERYCL001304 This branch of the nationwide Martin Lawrence galleries features contemporary paintings, sculpture and limited-edition graphics by such renowned artists as Picasso, Chagall,

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Dali, Miró, Warhol, Haring and Erté, among others. 433 Royal St., 504.299.9055. www.martinlawrence.com. MARTINE CHAISSONCL0000012645 Contemporary is the key word here, from the sleek space itself to the cutting-edge creations on its walls. Rotating exhibits are featured. 727 Camp St., 504.302.7942. www.martinechaissongallery.com. MICHALOPOULOSCL00 off-kilter architectural renderings of James Michalopoulos are instantly recognizable. You’ll find them here, along with his figurative paintings, still lifes and landscapes. 617 Bienville St., 504.558.0505. www.michalopoulos.com.

0136The

range of antique and new silver and silverplate. A large selection of estate jewelry is also offered. 600 Chartres St., 504.522.8333. www.neworleanssilversmiths.com. PHOTO WORKSCL001308 This gallery showcases the work of photographer Louis Sahuc, known for his dramatic shots of the city, which have been called “the quintessential images of New Orleans.” Sahuc specializes in black-and-white, but also creates vivid color prints. 521 St. Ann St., 504.593.9090. www.photoworksneworleans.com.

why Elle magazine calls Longshore “New Orleans’ most badass artist.” 4537 Magazine St., 504.333.6951. www.ashleylongshore.com. SONIAT HOUSE ANTIQUESCL001308 Architectural Digest, Town and Country and Art & Antiques have all featured this gallery. French painted furniture (18th- and 19th-century), as well as Italian pieces, can be found in this collection. 1130 Chartres St., 504.212.0200. www.soniatantiques.com

RED TRUCK GALLERYCL001308 “Beautiful, unexpected art” by contemporary up-and-comers will make you want to park here for a while. 938 Royal St., 504.231.6760. www.redtruckgallery.com.

SOREN CHRISTENSEN GALLERYCL0 1Paintings, sculpture and photography by nationally recognized as well as emerging contemporary artists is the focus here. 400 Julia St., 504.569.9501. www.sorengallery.com.

H NAGHI’SCL002613 From rare objects gathered from around the world to original jewelry crafted on site, Naghi’s showroom is full of fascinating items. Specializing in Judaica, the shop has an extensive collection of antique silver and family heirlooms. 633 Royal St., 504.586.8373. 800 Royal St., 504.654.1940. 637 Canal St., 504.585.5700.

RODRIGUE STUDIOSCL001CL0000012645 This French Quarter landmark is the gallery of the late George Rodrigue. Paintings and silkscreens representing Rodrigue’s Cajun roots period and popular “Blue Dog” series are available. 730 Royal St., 504.581.4244. www.georgerodrigue.com.

STELLA JONES GALLERYL001308 New Orleans’ preeminent exhibition space for African-American artists, featuring works by Elizabeth Catlett, Richmond Barthé, Georgette Baker, Charly Palmer and Samella Lewis, among others. 201 St. Charles Ave., 504.568.9050. www.stellajonesgallery.com.

H ROYAL ANTIQUESCL001CL0000012645 English, French and Continental furniture from the 17th through 19th centuries is the specialty of this fourth-generation dealer. Antique and estate jewelry is also featured. 309 Royal St., 504.524.7033. www.royalantiques.com.

NEW ORLEANS SILVERSMITHCL001308 Since 1938, this Chartres Street boutique has specialized in antique and modern gold, platinum and sterling silver jewelry, in addition to a wide

SARAH ASHLEY LONGSHORECL001308 Step into this Uptown gallery/studio, with its pop art paintings, giant lipstick sculptures and statement-making furniture, and you’ll understand

TERRANCE OSBORNE GALLERYL001308 Artist Terrance Osborne has garnered a growing national following with his vibrant architectural works and reflections on Crescent City life, which have been commissioned by Nike, the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival and others. 3029 Magazine St., 504.232.7530. www.galleryosborne.com.

H MOSS ANTIQUESCL001306 Fine art objects fill this gallery, which offers jewelry, porcelain, humidors and cigar accessories. Merchandise here comes primarily from England and France. 411 Royal St., 504.522.3981. www.mossantiques.com.

TANNER GALLERIESL001308 Home to local artist Tanner’s colorful-yet-haunting “treescapes.” Originals are offered. 830 Royal St., 504.524.8266. www.hauntingart.com TRESOR GALLERYCL001327 Offbeat illustration, macabre assemblage dolls, quirky circus banners: If it’s edgy and eclectic, you’ll spot it here. Works by both local and national artists are featured in a wide range of media. 811 Royal St., 504.309.3991. www.tresorgallery.com. H VINTAGE 329CL001306 A mecca for history, sports and Hollywood buffs, this hip shop is filled with maps, signed collectibles and one-of-a-kind jewelry. Marilyn Monroe glamour pics, first-edition novels and assorted music memorabilia are among the many offerings. 329 Royal St., 504.525.2262. www.vintage329.com. WHISNANT GALLERIESCL001327 In this showroom fine art and furnishings from the 16th through 20th centuries vie for attention amid 19thcentury sculpture, Georgian jewelry and African and Asian antiquities. 229 Royal St., 504.524.9766. www.whisnantgalleries.com. WINDSOR FINE ARTCL001329 This gallery features fine works in a variety of media by the great masters, from Durer to Rembrandt, as well as modern masters such as Picasso, Chagall, Matisse, Miro and Dali, along with original works by Toulouse-Lautrec. 221 Royal St., 504.586.0202. www.windsorfineart.com.

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION VINTAGE 329

LOOK BOOK From Academic to edgy, oil paintings to watercolors, one-of-a-kind originals to limited-edition prints—a showcase of accessible art.

JAZZFEST GALLERY

Vintage 329 Janine Wesselman, ‘Le Temps Qui Passe’ 24” x 30” Oil on canvas. View more of our gallery collection at 329 Royal St. 329 Royal St, 504-525-2262; info@vintage329.com

Lucky Rose Gallery Devoted to the stunning porcelain sculpture of artist-owner Cathy Rose, who often incorporates pieces of New Orleans into her works. 840 Royal St., 504.309.8000. cathyrose.com

JazzFest Gallery Showcasing vibrant museum-quality fine art prints of legendary jazz albums, JazzFest Gallery exclusively features the acclaimed artwork of superstar jazz illustrator David Stone Martin (1913-1992). Martin’s extraordinary portfolio includes iconic designs for such jazz luminaries as Billie Holiday, Charlie Parker, Stan Getz, Count Basie, Illinois Jacquet, Lionel Hampton, Buddy Rich, Oscar Peterson, Dizzy Gillespie, and Lester Young. “His strikingly modernist work is a dazzling visual refraction of the energy and spontaneity of postwar jazz itself.” –JAZZIZ Magazine. While in New Orleans, make an appointment to visit our Arts District studio for exclusive, locals-only pricing and free express global shipping. 504.218.0304, www.JazzFestGallery.com

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Discover the area’s rich history through original art and artifacts on view at The Historic New Orleans Collection’s Louisiana History Galleries. The recently renovated selfguided tour features 13 rooms exploring the early colonial period through the modern day. Free admission. Open Tues.-Sun. 533 Royal Street, (504) 523-4662, www.hnoc.org

Gallery Two exclusively features the work of it’s artist-owners, Ann Marie Cianciolo and Betsy Youngquist. We invite you to enter their surreal worlds of contemporary sculpture. Two Women. Two Artists. Two Expressions. Gallery Two. 831 Royal St, 504-513-8312, gallerytwonola.com

THE HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION

Fischer-Gambino At Fischer-Gambino you will find a unique selection of high-quality lighting and furniture items, like the monkeys above, each holding a penshell umbrella. 637 Royal St. (504) 524-9067; 1-888-524-9067 www.lightingneworleans.com

GALLERY TWO

Antieau Gallery showcases the work of nationally recognized, New Orleans fabricappliqué artist Chris Roberts-Antieau. As a selftaught Visionary artist, Antieau’s work tells stories of nature, perception, and above all, the human experience. See her impeccably stitched works at her gallery in the French Quarter at 927 Royal Street (open daily, 10am to 8pm) or Uptown at 4532 Magazine Street (open Mon-Sat, 10am to 6pm). (504) 304-0849 • antieaugallery.com

FISCHER-GAMBINO

Vintage 329 This Rare Fred Press Martini Set, from our Vintage Barware Collection, features 22kt gold. 329 Royal St., 504-525-2262 info@vintage329.com

ANTIEAU GALLERY

VINTAGE 329

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NIGHTLIFE

Party Central You would think the city in which the first cocktail is alleged to have been poured would have its fair share of nightlife ... and you'd be right. From Bourbon Street to Frenchmen Street, classy clubs to dingy dives, Sazeracs to Hurricanes, jazz to rock, sunup to sundown—you'll find it all (and then some) in New Orleans. CHICKIE WAH WAHCL001456 This hot venue keeps the Mid-City music scene at a steady boil with sets by leading jazz and funk acts. 2828 Canal St., 504.304.4714. www.chickiewahwah.com.

AVENUE PUB The NOLA go-to for craft beers, offering the city’s largest available selection of locally produced brews. 1732 St. Charles Ave., 504.586.9243. www.theavenuepub.com.

COLUMNS BARCL001456 This stately Victorian on St. Charles Avenue is a choice hangout for Uptowners. Watch the streetcar roll past while sipping a cocktail on the front porch, or relax in the 19th-century splendor of the indoor bar. Live music nightly. 3811 St. Charles Ave., 504.899.9308. www.thecolumns.com.

BLUE NILECL001456 This lively Frenchmen Street venue is simultaneously funky and stylish, with oodles of ambiance. Local and national acts are featured. 532 Frenchmen St., 504.948.2583. www.bluenilelive.com.

CURECL001456 This cutting-edge cocktail lounge, housed in a former fire station, has one foot in the 19th century and one in the 21st. The cocktail menu is also

half old fashioned and half modern, making Cure one of the hippest places in town to imbibe and socialize. 4905 Freret St., 504.302.2357. www.curenola.com. D.B.A.CL001456 This club features 20 premium draught beers, fine tequilas and single-malts and live music nightly. 618 Frenchmen St., 504.942.3731. www.dbabars.com/dbano. THE DAVENPORT LOUNGECL001456 An elegant escape inside the RitzCarlton Hotel offering classic New Orleans cocktails, along with entertainment by celebrity trumpeter/ crooner Jeremy Davenport. 921 Canal St., 504.524.1331. www.ritzcarlton.com.

FRITZEL’SCL001456 A German jazz club? Only in New Orleans. Traditional jazz by local musicians as well as visiting European bands is featured nightly. 733 Bourbon St., 504.586.4800. www.fritzelsjazz.net. H HERMES BAR This sophisticated hideaway, tucked inside Antoine’s restaurant, offers quiet respite from the din on nearby Bourbon Street, great ambiance and access to the historic eatery’s menu. Live entertainment on weekends. 713 St. Louis St., 504.581.4422. HOUSE OF BLUESCL001456 The local branch of this national chain consistently tops local best-of lists by mixing big-name tours with New Orleans favorites.

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ARNAUD’S FRENCH 75CL001456 Fine libations and classic cocktails in a clubby atmosphere, adjacent to Arnaud’s restaurant. Cigar-friendly. 813 Bienville St., 504.523.5433. www.arnauds.com.


225 Decatur St., 504.529.2583. www.hob.com. HOWLIN’ WOLFCL001456 This locally owned club features low cover charges and low attitude. Acts include both local favorites and big names; the music ranges from punk to straight-ahead rock. 907 S. Peters St., 504.522.9653. www.howlin-wolf.com. THE JAZZ PLAYHOUSECL001456 This stylish spot inside the Royal Sonesta New Orleans recreates the tony jazz clubs of Bourbon Street’s 1950s heyday. The club features performances by a rotating roster of top-tier local talent, nightly. 300 Bourbon St., 504.533.2299. www.sonesta.com/jazzplayhouse. LAFITTE’S BLACKSMITH SHOPCL00143 This historic cottage dates to the late 1700s. The legends surrounding Lafitte’s are vast; it’s easy to sit in the dark, watching the carriages pass, and imagine yourself back in a den of pirates and privateers. 941 Bourbon St., 504.593.9761. LITTLE GEM SALOON CLThis long-neglected jazz landmark has received a new lease on life, and is once again a player on the city’s live-music scene. The supper club offers two stages and performances most nights of the week. 445 S. Rampart St., 504.267.4863. www.littlegemsaloon.com. MAPLE LEAF tin roof, a sweaty dance floor, a quintessential N’awlins experience: fueled by funk, the crowd goes till dawn. 8316 Oak St., 504.866.9359. www.mapleleafbar.com. C456A

NAPOLEON HOUSE C456Offered to the emperor if he could escape exile (so the tale goes), this is a legendary French Quarter watering hole. An hour spent enjoying a muffuletta and a Pimm’s Cup in the courtyard is a quintessential N’awlins experience. 500 Chartres St., 504.524.9752. www.napoleonhouse.com. NOLA BREWINGCL001456 Weekly brewery tours, a massive tap room and in-house barbecue make this a must-stop for beer fans. Check out the many seasonal beers. 3001 Tchoupitoulas St., 504.896.9996. www.nolabrewing.com. OLD ABSINTHE HOUSE A favored tavern of such bon vivants as Oscar Wilde, Mark Twain and Walt Whitman, this historic bar continues to draw absinthe enthusiasts and those thirsty for a taste of authentic New Orleans as it has since 1806. 240 Bourbon St., 504.523.3181. www.oldabsinthehouse.com. ONE EYED JACKS C456Rockabilly, retro, rock, neo-burlesque: this French Quarter swankdive serves it all up in a vintage bordello atmosphere. 615 Toulouse St., 504.569.8361. www.oneeyedjacks.net. PALM COURT JAZZ CAFÉ This excellent venue for traditional live jazz is a favorite of locals in the know and well-informed visitors. 1204 Decatur St., 504.525.0200. www.palmcourtjazzcafe.com. H PAT O’BRIEN’SCL0014 Birthplace of the Hurricane cocktail, WHERE GUEST B OOK

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NIGHTLIFE this complex features four bars, a full menu and the famous courtyard and fountain. A Crescent City must-do. 718 St. Peter St., 504.525.4823. www.patobriens.com.

ALL MATERIAL © HAUNTED HISTORY TOURS, INC. TM

PATRICK’S BAR VIN Krewe of Cork founder and allaround grape guy Patrick Van Hoorebeek’s namesake wine bar offers dozens of vintages by the glass and even more by the the bottle. Cocktails, cheeses and charcuterie are also served. 730 Bienville St., 504.581.7300. www.patricksbarvin.com.

Theatrical • Historical • Entertaining

New Orleans’ Only 5 Star Adventure Fun Filled Daily & Nightly Tours Recommended by Travel Channel, Major Hotels, Tour Planners and Travel Magazines

(504) 861-2727 www.HauntedHistoryTours.com

PRESERVATION HALLCL001467 Home to traditional jazz since 1961, this no-frills nightspot still packs ’em in despite not serving liquor. Drunks and yakkers: go elsewhere. 726 St. Peter St., 504.522.2841. www.preservationhall.com. REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANSCL0068915 One of downtown’s hottest spots. Bands, touring and local, share the stage with a late-night dance club. 828 S. Peters St., 504.528.8282. www.republicnola.com. ROCK ’N’ BOWLCL0068915 A legendary local favorite now in a new, larger location, Rock ’n’ Bowl still features the winning combination of bowling lanes and live music from the region’s top zydeco, R&B and rock acts. 3000 S. Carrollton Ave., 504.861.1700. www.rockandbowl.com. SAZERAC BARCL001456 Thirties elegance and classic cocktails in the beautifully restored Roosevelt Hotel. The perfect place to sample a Sazerac—the official

cocktail of New Orleans. 123 Baronne St., 504.648.1200. www.therooseveltneworleans.com. L005794SNUG

HARBORCL001470 An elegant, intimate mainstay of Frenchmen Street’s music row, Snug Harbor was rated the city’s best jazz club by Esquire. Ellis Marsalis and Charmaine Neville are regulars. 626 Frenchmen St., 504.949.0696. www.snugjazz.com. THE SPOTTED CATCL001470 This tiny club has a casual, laid-back vibe and a large, loyal following among locals and visitors alike. Live music starts at 4 pm on weekdays (3 pm on weekends) and continues way into the wee hours. 623 Frenchmen St., no phone. www.spottedcatmusicclub.com. STAGE DOOR CANTEENCL001456 Swing back to a bygone era at this fun WWII Museum venue, which features live musical productions reminiscent of 1940s USO shows. 945 Magazine St., 504.528.1943. www.stagedoorcanteen.org. THREE MUSESCL0068915 This Frenchmen Street venue offers a veritable nightlife trifecta: cool handcrafted cocktails, gourmet small plates and live local music. 536 Frenchmen St., 504.298.8746. www.thethreemuses.com TIPITINA’S6 TCLhe legendary Tip’s offers an eclectic, always-entertaining lineup. Sunday afternoons feature a traditional fais do-do with live Cajun music. 501 Napoleon Ave., 504.895.8477. www.tipitinas.com.

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ATTRACTIONS

On the Town There is more to New Orleans than Bourbon Street, and visitors don't have to look far to find it. Culture seekers will be drawn to the city's many museums, while outdoor types will gravitate toward area parks and river excursions. From Audubon Zoo to the steamboat Natchez, there's something to do 24/7.

©THE HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION

H AUDUBON AQUARIUM From its perch on the banks of the Mississippi, New Orleans’ aquarium is home to marine life and birds from all across the globe. Highlights include the Caribbean reef tunnel, rare white alligators, sea otters, penguins and the “Parakeet Pointe” exhibit. 1 Canal St., 504.581.4629. www.auduboninstitute.org. H AUDUBON BUTTERFLY GARDEN AND INSECTARIUMCL0027301 The nation’s largest museum devoted to insects. features more than 70 interactive exhibits, along with thousands of live and mounted species. 423 Canal St., 504.581.4629. www.auduboninstitute.org.

AUDUBON PARKCL001359 Walk, jog, golf or picnic among the oaks in this beautiful glade. On the St. Charles streetcar line (stop 36). St. Charles Ave. at Walnut St., 504.212.5237. www.auduboninstitute.org. H AUDUBON ZOOCL001360 New Orleans’ world-renowned zoo is an award-winning showcase of creatures great and small, and a destination for endless learning, exploration and family fun. Highlights include the “Louisiana Swamp” and “World of Primates” exhibits, white tigers, sea lions and southern white rhinos, along with the “Cool Zoo” splash park. 6500 Magazine St., 504.581.4629 or 800.774.7394. www.auduboninstitute.org.

H DESTREHAN PLANTATIONCL001360 A 45-minute drive from New Orleans, Destrehan was built in 1787 by a sugar planter and is the oldest plantation home in the lower Mississippi Valley. Tours are offered daily, 9 am-4 pm. Advance group rates available. Closed all major holidays. 13034 River Rd., Destrehan, 877.453.2095. www.destrehanplantation.org. H ENTERGY GIANT SCREEN THEATRECL00136 Eye-popping features are shown on five-and-a-half-story screen. Located next to the Audubon Aquarium. 1 Canal St., 504.581.4629. www.auduboninstitute.org. H GRAY LINE TOURSCL001379 Gray Line has been showcasing New

Orleans to visitors since 1924, whether by motor coach, on foot or aboard an authentic riverboat. Tour options feature nearby swamps and bayous, plantations, city highlights, riverboat cruises, French Quarter and Garden District walking tours, a cocktail and historic bar tour and evening outings. 400 Toulouse St., 504.569.1401. www.graylineneworleans.com. H HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTIONCL00140 Combining a museum, research center and publishing house, the Historic New Orleans Collection is dedicated to studying, preserving and sharing the Gulf South region’s history and culture. The museum offers changing exhibitions and its Louisiana History Galleries, with 10 permanent displays tracing the area’s

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ATTRACTIONS

DAYE N KAG BOPAC DU AU AN DAY TO KE MA NCE ERIE EXP N UBO AUD WITH THE

best value! three ATTRACTIONS. ONE PRICE. COUNTLESS POSSIBILITIES. THE AUDUBON EXPERIENCE PACKAGE INCLUDES ENTRY TO OUR NEW ORLEANS ATTRACTIONS:

AUDUBON ZOO 6500 MAGAZINE STREET, UPTOWN

Cool Zoo, A Wild and Wet Splash Park* Open Spring and Summer

AUDUBON AQUARIUM OF THE AMERICAS CANAL STREET AT THE RIVER

Snorkel or dive in the Great Maya Reef. A new underwater adventure!*

AUDUBON BUTTERFLY GARDEN & INSECTARIUM 423 CANAL STREET

"A top museum for you and your kids" - CNN.com Be sure to visit the Golf Club at Audubon Park for world-class golf and dining. Uptown in Audubon Park. FOLLOW US ON:

VISIT AUDUBONNATUREINSTITUTE.ORG.

*Separate admission fee required

multilayered past. 533 Royal St., 504.523.4662. www.hnoc.org. H HOUMAS HOUSE PLANTATION AND GARDENSCL003807 This stunning plantation home is famous for its imposing Greek Revival architecture and lush grounds. The in-house restaurant, Latil’s Landing, features fine dining fit for a sugar baron. Tours are offered daily. Old South Tours provides transportation via luxury buses that depart daily from the French Quarter; call 877.303.1776 for details. 40136 Hwy. 942, Darrow, 225.473.9380. www.houmashouse.com. H NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUMCL001408 Designated by Congress as America’s official World War II museum, this rapidly expanding facility explores the nation’s experience during wartime. From the Normandy invasion to the Pacific campaign to life on the home front, this award-winning museum pays homage to those who fought and lived through the titanic global struggle. The U.S. Freedom Pavilion: The Boeing Center spotlights wartime aircraft, while the Victory Theater showcases the 4-D film “Beyond All Boundaries” and the new Campaigns of Courage pavilion houses the “Road to Berlin” and “Road to Tokyo” exhibits. 945 Magazine St., 504.527.6012. www.nationalww2museum.org. H NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ARTCL00142 One of the South’s finest museums, featuring an extensive collection from the 15th through 20th centuries, with a special focus on European and

American paintings, along with rotating touring exhibits. The free Besthoff Sculpture Garden offers more than 60 sculptures by major 20th-century artists spread over five acres. 1 Collins C. Diboll Circle (City Park) 504.658.4100. www.noma.org. H NEW ORLEANS STEAMBOAT COMPANYCL003807 The grandeur of the Mississippi River and the mystique of New Orleans history and heritage combine for memorable experiences aboard the steamboat Natchez. Choose from harbor cruises or a dinner jazz cruise. Cruises depart from behind Jax Brewery. 2 Canal St., 504.569.1401. www.steamboatnatchez.com. H NOTTOWAY PLANTATION CL003807 The famed “White Castle of Louisiana,” resting on 37 acres of land, is one of the largest antebellum homes in the South. Nottoway has beautiful antique rooms with overnight accommodations available; reservations recommended. Guided tours are offered daily, 9 am-4 pm. 30970 Louisiana Hwy. 405, White Castle, 225.545.2730. www.nottoway.com. H PORT OF NEW ORLEANS CL003807 More than one million passengers pass through the Crescent City’s cruise terminal each year, making it one of the most popular destinations in the nation to embark/disembark. 1350 Port of New Orleans Pl., 504.522.2551. www.portno.com.

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NEW ORLEANS SIGHTSEEING TOURS …local Experts Since 1924!

Cocktail

Cemetery

Garden District

Swamp

Plantation

Additional Gray Line Tours: City • Cemetery & Voodoo • Katrina • Double Plantation Katrina/City • Garden District • French Quarter • Ghosts & Spirits • Groups

Reservations: 504.569.1401 | GrayLineNewOrleans.com


ADVERTISER INDEX SHOPPING

DINING

GALLERIES & ANTIQUES

ATTRACTIONS

Adorn & Conquer .......................................53

The American Sector ..................................9

Antieau Gallery........................................... 71

Audubon Aquarium of

Art & Eyes .......................................... 10 & 53

Antoine’s Restaurant.................................5 7

Antiques de Provence ............................. 6 8

Bopp Dermatology

Arnaud’s ...................................................... 56

Bevolo Gas & Electric Lights ....................2

the Americas ...........................................7 6 Audubon Butterfly Garden

& Facial Plastic Surgery ............... 43 & i7

Brennan’s ..................................................... 6 1

Brass Monkey ................................................3

and Insectarium ......................................7 6

Bungalows ...................................................52

Café Beignet .................................................8

Craig Tracy Gallery ................................... 2 1

Audubon Zoo ..............................................7 6

Earth Oddessy ........................................... 4 8

Cava ................................................... 42 & i15

Elliott Gallery ..............................................6 7

Destrehan Plantation ............................... i15

Gem Printing ................................................i 7

Chophouse New Orleans ............................1

Fischer-Gambino................................ 5 & 70

Entergy Giant Screen Theatre ................7 6

La Petit Fleur ...................................... 5 & 52

Court of Two Sisters .................................5 8

Gallery Two ................................................. 71

Gray Line Tours ..........................................77

Lil’ Bit Boiling Co. .............................51 & 53

Crazy Lobster .................................... 11 & i17

JazzFest Gallery ........................................ 70

Haunted History Tours ..............................74

Marion Cage ..................................... 49 & i15

Felix’s Restaurant & Oyster Bar ............ 64

Keil’s Antiques ......................................i2 & 2

Historic New Orleans Collection ............ 7 1

Nicoll’s Limousine Service ............ 44 & i13

The Gumbo Shop ...................................... 6 3

Lucky Rose Gallery................................... 7 0

Houmas House Plantation .............23 & i13

Oscar Rajo Photography...........................i9

Krystal................................................ 62 & 64

M. S. Rau Inc .................................................3

National WWII Museum .............................9

Planet Beach .................................................8

Lilette........................................................... 56

Martin Lawrence Gallery ....................3 & 13

New Orleans Museum of Art. ................. i17

Promenade Fine Fabrics ......................... 48

Miyako Sushi Bar & Hibachi.....................5 8

Moss Antiques .............................................. 2

New Orleans Steamboat Co.. ................. C3

Queork ..........................................................52

New Orleans Creole Cookery .................. 11

Naghi’s .......................................................... 52

Nottoway Plantation. ............................... i18

Red Bean Realty ....................................... i15

Pascal’s Manale ......................................... 6 0

Royal Antiques .............................................2

Port of New Orleans. ................................7 8

Symmetry Jewelers ................. C4, 45 & i13

Poppy’s Time Out

Vintage 329 ......................3, 31, 48, 70 & 71

Steamboat Natchez.................................. C3

Tuxedos To Geaux ............................46 & i7

Sports Bar & Grill ........................................ 1 1

Wellington & Company ..............7, 52 & 53

Red Fish Grill .............................................. 6 1

NIGHTLIFE

Yvonne LaFleur .................................49 & i5

Remoulade ................................................. 6 0

Hermes Bar ..................................................5 7

Superior Grill ............................................... i11

Pat O’Brien’s ...............................................7 3

©SEA GEM STUDIOS

Superior Seafood ....................................... i11

WHERE GUEST B OOK

79


Alley Cat PIRATE’S ALLEY, THE COBBLESTONE PASSAGE THAT RUNS ALONGSIDE ST. LOUIS CATHEDRAL, IS ALLEGED TO HAVE BEEN WHERE GENERAL ANDREW JACKSON AND PRIVATEER JEAN LAFITTE CONVENED IN 1814 TO PLOT OUT THE BATTLE OF NEW ORLEANS. 80

W H E R E G U E ST B O O K

PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAM PHOTO ©OUTMARCH69/ISTOCK BOOK 5.5/9PT

PARTING SHOT


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New Orleans Where GuestBook 2017  

Everything you need to do and what to do in New Orleans DINING From haute cuisine to down-home fare, a taste of New Orleans’ most appetizin...

New Orleans Where GuestBook 2017  

Everything you need to do and what to do in New Orleans DINING From haute cuisine to down-home fare, a taste of New Orleans’ most appetizin...

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