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WELCO M E TO M AUI

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Letter FrOM tHe PUBLiSHer

ALOHA, MAUI IS THE ISLAND that has been classified time and time again as the

“Best Island in the World.” There are well-preserved historic villages, humpback whales breaching in full view just off the coast and activities of all sorts accessible to visitors. The Valley Isle is consistently celebrated for its natural beauty, ideal climate, outdoor activities, dining, shopping and relaxed lifestyle. Here, between two covers, are many of the reasons for this distinction. In our commitment to place, culture and community, we bring you tales of Maui’s treasures on and off the beaten path. In this year’s GuestBook, our photo essay, “Life Aquatic,” shows our connection to the power of the ocean. Through the lens of photographer Mike Coots, we share this special archipelago we call home. The Pacific Ocean is also home to humpback whales, and every winter these giant mammals migrate to Hawai‘i to give birth. The history between koholā (whales) and Kanaka Maoli (Native Hawaiians) has existed for centuries. Also centuries-old are some of the instruments that continue to be heard and seen during mele (music) and hula. Meanwhile, longtime Maui resident Shep Gordon has danced to the beat of his own drum while managing rock stars and gourmet geniuses. In 1968, the New York native set out to California to begin a career that only Hollywood writers could script. What would unfold for the then-21-year-old would be a run of famous publicity stunts, including one that halted traffic in Picadilly Circus in London.

tHe StOry OF HAwAi‘i HAS A StrOng cOnnectiOn tO OUr SUrrOUnding wAterS. OUr HiStOry And cULtUre Are intiMAteLy Linked tO tHe PAciFic OceAn.

In Dining in Paradise, distillers, brewers and a vintner take advantage of Maui’s natural ingredients and environment to produce rum, vodka, craft beer and wine, which have earned awards and praise from industry leaders and connoisseurs. We also share dishes that some may find bizarre but we consider pūpu or snacks. For an edible gift or souvenir, we recommend several favorites.

and we hope you enjoy the journey with us. – Kathleen M. Pahinui, Group Publisher, Where Hawai‘i

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credit

Mahalo for joining us on this island adventure. The Maui GuestBook is a small taste of a vast paradise,

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Experience the Adventure of a Lifetime SUNSHINE HELICOPTERS

WATCH TOUR HIGHLIGHTS VIDEO!

MAUI

KAUAI

BIG ISLAND

LAS VEGAS

RESERVATIONS

(808) 877-3167 sunshinehelicopters.com

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cOnTEnTS

ISLAnD ESSEncE 32 photo essay life aquatic

Talented photographer turns his lens towards the ocean. by miKe coots

42 the adventures of marK twain author’s posts from maui 150 years later

Twain’s colorful writings capture the breathtaking beauty of the island. by simplicio paragas

on the cover

48 whale tales the humpbacK’s spiritual connection to maui

Native Hawaiians’ reverence for these massive mammals detailed in oral accounts.

58 shep gordon legendary manager

From managing rock stars to celebrity chefs, this longtime Maui resident has helped build successful careers. by simplicio paragas

by Kristen nemoto

54 the song of mana musical implements

Traditional Hawaiian instruments are more percussive than they are melodic.

82 hawaiian song poetry in motion

Hawaiian poet laureate, Kealoha, shares his appreciation for Hawaiian culture in “Native Intelligence.”

by Kristen nemoto

The ‘Īao Needle rises 1,200 feet from the valley floor. ©MIcHAEL ScHWAB/ GETTy IMAGES

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cOnTEnTS

ISLAnD ESSEncE

10 maui map island overview

A quick tour of Maui shows the different regions and various points of interest that are not to be missed.

16 first look must-see sites while visiting the valley isle

Beyond its award-winning beaches, Maui is home to the Maui Ocean Center, the Bailey House Museum and the Keālia Pond National Wildlife Refuge.

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56 island views maui’s landscape changes from lush green valleys to moon-like craters

From east to west, north to south, the island offers a different scenery at every turn.

special section dining in paradise

Discover a host of bizarre foods that you’ll want to try. Then quench your thirst with Maui-produced spirits. Also, bring home a gourmet gift for family and friends.

68 off island neighbor isles

Accessible by a ferry ride, nearby Lāna‘i and Moloka‘i offer peaceful retreats.

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MAUI ADVERTISING & CIRCULATION

Kathleen M. Pahinui, 808.983.5441 regIonAl VICe presIdent of sAles Courtney Fuhrmann ACCoUnt MAnAgers Bob Kowal, Donna Kowalczyk, Chris Snipes Independent sAles ContrACtors Debbie De Mello, Wanda Garcia-Fetherston bUsIness AdMInIstrAtor Miao Woo CIrCUlAtIon And MArKetIng dIreCtor Sidney Louie prodUCtIon MAnAger Brittany L. Kevan

EDITORIAL & ART edItor In ChIef Simplicio

Paragas Nemoto Art dIreCtor Veronica Montesdeoca

groUp pUblIsher

edItor Kristen

ContrIbUtIng photogrApher Mike

Morris Visitor Publications MVP I CREATIVE

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Coots

Where GuestBook® publishes editions for the following U.S. cities and regions: Arizona, Atlanta, Baltimore, Boston, Charlotte, Chicago, Colorado, Dallas, Florida Gold Coast (Fort Lauderdale & Palm Beach), Fort Worth, Hawai‘i Island (the Big Island), Houston, Jacksonville/St. Augustine/Amelia Island, Kansas City, Kaua‘i, Los Angeles, Maui, Miami, Nashville, New Orleans, New York, Northern Arizona, O‘ahu, Orange County (CA), Orlando, Philadelphia, Raleigh/Durham/Chapel Hill, Reno/Lake Tahoe, San Antonio, San Diego, San Francisco, Seattle/ The Eastside/Tacoma, Southwest Florida (Naples), Tampa Bay, Tucson, Virginia, Washington D.C. ©2016 by Morris Visitor Publications. All rights reserved. This publication may not be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, in whole or in part, without the express prior written permission of the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility to any party for the content of any advertisement in this publication, including any errors and omissions therein. By placing an order for an advertisement, the advertiser agrees to indemnify the publisher against any claims relating to the advertisement. Printed in the United States of America.

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Where GuestBook® is produced by Morris Visitor Publications (MVP), a division of Morris Communications, Co., LLC. 725 Broad St., Augusta, GA 30901, morrismedianetwork.com. Where® magazine and the where logo are registered trademarks of Morris Visitor Publications. MVP publishes Where magazine, Where® QuickGuide, IN New York, and IN London magazines, and a host of other maps, guides, and directories for business and leisure travelers, and is the publisher for the Hospitality Industry Association. ®

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navigatE

MAUI, THE SECOND LARGEST of the Hawaiian Islands, was named for the demigod Maui, the superman of

Polynesian myth. He is known as Maui tiki-tiki — Maui the Wonder Worker. The wonders of Maui are many, from the historic town of Lahaina, once the major whaling center of the Pacific, to the royal resort of Kā‘anapali and the fabulous shopping and dining in West and South Maui. From the summit of Haleakalā to the beaches of Nāpili and Kapalua, from the charming towns of Upcountry to the beautiful curves of the road to Hāna, the Valley Isle offers the visitor much to explore, experience and discover. 10

Map: ©EurEka cartography, bErkElEy, ca; (watErcolor background and EdgE pattErn) ©MikE rEagan

The Island of Maui

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Ni‘ihau The “forbidden” island is known for exquisite shell jewelry. Kaua‘i Magnificent sea cliffs and canyons distinguish the Garden Isle. O‘ahu Known for Waikīkī beach, the state capital, shopping, Pearl Harbor and more. Moloka‘i You’ll find Old Hawai‘i charm, mule rides and famous Moloka‘i sweet bread. Lāna‘i Lovely Mānele Bay has posh resorts and pine-studded uplands. Maui Come to the Valley Isle for whale-watching, art, Mt. Haleakalā and the 54-bridge Hāna Highway. Kaho‘olawe Once a Navy firing range, the island is now dedicated to the preservation of Hawaiian culture. Hawai‘i The Big Island has an active volcano and wonderfully diverse scenery.

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Map: ©EurEka cartography, bErkElEy, ca; (watErcolor background and EdgE pattErn) ©MikE rEagan

Hawaiian Islands

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first look

Photo credit gotham book 5.5/9Pt

Maui is an island of contrasts. It’s home to rustic towns and chic resorts, history and humpbacks, lush verdant jungle and alpine peaks.

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“I still remember, with a sense of indolent luxury, a picnicing excursion up a romantic gorge there, called the ‘Īao Valley.” — MARK TWAIN

‘Īao Valley

The valley and its signature peak, Īao Needle, are the remains of Pu‘u Kukui, the crater of a dormant volcano in the West Maui Mountains. ‘Īao Stream (fed by up to 400 inches of rain per year) cuts through the valley, and there are excellent hiking trails throughout the park. It is said that the bones of many chieftains are buried in the vicinity of the needle. Olopio, a cave containing the remains of royal elders, is rumored to be hidden somewhere in the valley. The end of ‘Īao Valley Road (Hwy. 32)

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first look

Known as the “House of the Sun,” Haleakalā majestically rises 10,023 feet above sea level and offers a winding odyssey of 36 miles of hiking trails, which open to fascinating landscapes. As the world’s largest dormant volcano, Haleakalā’s crater measures 3,000 feet deep, 2.5 miles wide and has a circumference of 21 miles. The park is also home to endangered flora and fauna, such as the nēnē, a goose endemic to the Hawaiian Islands, and the silversword, a cactus lookalike with dense coats of silvery hair. Call 808.572.440 for park information.

Helicopter Tours

Maui’s helicopter tours combine eye-popping visuals with amusement park–style thrills. Maui has a half dozen helitour companies, which offer an array of tour packages at a variety of price ranges. See streaming waterfalls in West Maui, Haleakalā’s moon-like crater, the Hāna Rainforest and the remote northern coast of the neighboring island of Moloka‘i from a bird’s-eye view. 18

(previous spread) ©isaac arjonilla; (This page, from Top) ©gabbro/alamy; courTesy maverick helicopTers

Haleakalā National Park

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Greenleaf Diamonds Tanzanite

At The Shops at Wailea 808.874.1118

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first look

“Hāmoa Beach is so perfectly formed that I wonder at its comparative obscurity. The only beach I’ve ever seen that looks like ‘South Pacific’ was in the North Pacific.” JAMES MICHENER

From the stunning black sands of Wai‘ānapanapa State Park in East Maui to the dramatic red granules at Kaihalulu in Hāna, Maui’s 30 miles of beaches consistently rank as some of “America’s Best.” No one beach is alike on Maui, with Kapalua’s DT Fleming Beach, Kā‘anapali Beach, Wailea Beach and Kapalua Bay Beach among the most popular. Other beaches not to miss are Hāmoa Beach (pictured) and Mākena Beach.

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©Al ArguetA/AlAmy

The Beaches

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Isolated from the rest of the island, Hāna is an undeveloped tropical enclave on the east end of Maui. The famous Hāna Highway, the only road that connects the town with the rest of the island, takes roughly three hours to traverse and winds its way over single-lane bridges and past numerous waterfalls and scenic sights, including the resting place of aviator Charles Lindbergh in Kīpahulu.

Maui Ocean Center Seven Sacred Pools

A series of cascading waterfalls and tranquil pools flow through the ‘Ohe‘o Gulch, which is the official name for this attraction. The terraced cold springs in East Maui rival any natural day spa. Trickling water spills over tiers of lava beds, creating up to 24 distinct pools that flow from the mountains all the way to the ocean. Arrive early since the pools can get crowded, especially during the weekends. Near mile marker 42 on the Hāna Hwy. 22

The largest aquarium in Hawai‘i, this marine park boasts more than 60 exhibits dedicated to the conservation of the Islands’ indigenous sea life. Walk through an acrylic tunnel that passes through a 750,000-gallon saltwater tank and watch as reef sharks, stingrays and tropical fish swim overhead. 192 Mā‘alaea Road, 808.270.7000, mauioceancenter.com.

(clockwise from left) ©ron niebrugge/alamy; ©ingmar wesemann/istock; courtesy maui ocean center

Hāna

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Historic Lāhainā

Keālia Pond National Wildlife Refuge

One of the few natural wetlands remaining in the Islands, the 713-acre Keālia, along the south-central coast of Maui, is easily accessible and perfect for viewing diverse flocks of feathered visitors from as far away as Alaska, Canada, and occasionally even Asia. You can go directly to the boardwalk from North Kīhei Road or sign in at the office on Mokulele Highway and explore the ponds on your own. Upon request, if there’s time, staff members may offer an introductory tour. Mokulele Highway at mile 6, 808.875.1582, www.fws.gov/kealiapond/

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©tor johnson/hawaii tourism authority (hta) (2)

The first whaling ships arrived in Hawai‘i in the early 1820s, administering the proverbial shot in the arm to small port towns throughout the Islands. Lāhainā was one such town, and the evidence of its history can be seen easily in the road structure, characteristic of smaller historical port cities and its wellpreserved architecture. Lāhainā was also the first capital of the Kingdom of Hawai‘i. West side of the island

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For the Ver y Best, Look for the Pineapple Shape ÂŽ MAUI Front Street | Whalers Village | The Shops at Wailea OAHU Ala Moana Center | Ward Warehouse | Waikiki Beach WalkÂŽ Hilton Hawaiian Village | Royal Hawaiian Avenue | Waikiki Beach Marriott Hyatt Regency Waikiki | Royal Hawaiian Center | Outrigger Waikiki Beach Resort

NEVADA Grand Canal Shoppes at The Venetian | The Palazzo Grand Bazaar Shops

KOREA Myeong-dong shopping district, Seoul

honolulucookie.com |

| @honolulucookie | 1-866-333-5800

Baked Fresh Daily in Honolulu Using the Finest Ingredients The pineapple shape of the cookie is a federally registered trademark of the Honolulu Cookie Company. April 2016. Where Guestbook Maui.

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fiRST lOOK

“Hā‘ale i ka wai a ka manu. The rippling water where birds gather. The rippling water denotes a quiet, peaceful nature which attracts others.”

Molokini

This is an underwater fantasy: 80-degree turquoise waters, 100-foot visibility on clear days and exotic marine life around a tiny, crescent-shaped islet located three miles off the southwest coast of Maui. It’s no wonder that Molokini has gained a reputation as one of the best snorkeling and diving spots on the globe. It’s also a Hawai‘i State Seabird Sanctuary, which lures both amateur and professional bird watchers.

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©Design Pics inc/alamy

HAWAIIAN PROVERB in ‘Ōlelo No‘eau by Mary Kawena Pukui

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Bailey House Museum

Whalers Village Museum

Step back in time through the eyes of an ordinary sailor or “whaleman.” Celebrating Maui’s storied seafaring heritage, Whalers Village Museum houses one of the world’s largest scale models of a 19th-century whaling ship, the skeletal remains of a 40-foot sperm whale and displays showcasing the harsh reality of life on the open sea. 2345 Ka‘anapali Pkwy., Lāhainā, 808.661.5992, www.whalersmuseum.com. 28

(from top) courtesy bailey house museum; ©tor johnson/hta

Built in 1833, the stone-and-adobe structure opened as the Wailuku Female Seminary in 1837 and remained so until 1847 when missionary teacher and “renaissance” man, Edward Bailey, and his family took up residence. In 1957, the building was established as the home of the Maui Historical Society and a small museum was opened. Renovated in 1974, it still houses the Historical Society and its substantial archives, as well as what is now known as the Bailey House Museum. Reminders of the 19th century can be found throughout the building, from the fine furniture constructed of European and koa woods to the largest public collection of ancient Hawaiian artifacts. 2375-A Main St., 808.244-3326, www.mauimuseum.org.

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LIFE AQUATIC The story of Hawai‘i is the story of water. Our history and culture are intimately linked to the sea. We ride its waves and delve into its depths, we fish its waters and cultivate its plants. It is life itself. Hawai‘i photographer Michael Coots explores this captivating world.

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PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAM BOOK 5.5/9PT

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PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAM BOOK 5.5/9PT

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PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAM BOOK 5.5/9PT

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Photographer Mike Coots’ love affair with the ocean has remained constant—even after losing a leg at the age of 18 to a shark. Undeterred and fitted with a specially designed prosthetic leg, the avid surfer returned to the waves to enjoy—and photograph—his favorite sport and environment. His respect for the ocean and its inhabitants extends even to sharks. As an activist, Coots campaigns to end shark finning and culling and to make people aware of the dangers of polluting the ocean. One of his most rewarding causes is helping children who have lost limbs, inspiring them to pursue their dreams—as he has done.

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THE ADVENTURES OF MARK TWAIN “I went to Maui to stay a week and remained five. I never spent so pleasant a month before, or bade any place goodbye so regretfully. I have not once thought of business, or care or human toil or trouble or sorrow or weariness, and the memory of it will remain with me always.” –Mark Twain BY SIMPLICIO PARAGAS

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Back in 1866, California-based journalist Samuel Langhorne Clemens spent four months and a day exploring the Sandwich Islands, as he perpetuated in calling this archipelago, several of them on Maui. He arrived on the island from Honolulu by way of a small, inter-island steamer. “The Boomerang was about as long as two street cars, and about as wide as one,” Clemens wrote in one of his 25 dispatches for the Sacramento Union. This was the denouement of Clemens’ journalism career and the beginning of his metamorphosis into legendary author Mark Twain. It was 150 years ago that Twain’s sojourn in the islands was documented and dispatched for public consumption. Today, his WHERE GUEST B OOK

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“For me its balmy airs are always blowing, its summer seas flashing in the sun; the pulsing of its surf is in my ear;

(previous spread) ©M.M. sweet/getty; ©pictorial press ltd/alaMy; (opposite page) ©westend61 gMbH/alaMy; (tHis page) ©isaac arjonilla

I can see its garlanded crags, its leaping cascades, its plumy palms drowsing by the shore, its remote summits floating like islands above the cloud-rack.”

(Previous spread) Mark Twain spent time at Kamaole Beach in Kīhei. (Opposite page) Makahiku Falls is a 200foot waterfall. (This page) Watch the sun rise at Haleakalā National Park.

‘tales’ of Hawai‘i remain fresh, amusing and some of the best travel writing about the Hawaiian Islands. His personal accounts of and encounters with island residents reveal a man who was open to discovery and wanting, as he wrote to his mother, “to ransack the islands, the great cataracts & the volcanoes completely…” While on Maui, he set out on horseback to explore the ‘āina (land), seeing everything, meeting everyone and trying anything, including surfing in the nude as he had witnessed locals do. In a letter addressed to Messrs. Kimball, Twain wrote: “Gentlemen — Don’t you think for a moment of going up on Haleakalā without giving me an opportunity of accompanying you! I have waited for & skirmished after some company for some time without avail, and now I hear that you will shortly be at Haiku. So I shall wait for you. Cannot you let me know just as soon as you arrive, & give me a day or two (or more, even, if possible,) to get there in with my horse? Because I am told the distance

hence to Haiku is 15 miles — to prosecute which will be a matter of time, to my animal, & possibly a matter of eternity. His strong suit is grace & personal comeliness, rather than velocity.” Twain never did post about his travails to see Haleakalā for the Sacramento Union but he did six years later when he penned Roughing It. He praised the dormant volcano, calling it the “sublimest spectacle” he had ever witnessed, the memory of which, he described, “will remain with me always.” “It seemed to me that if Captain Cook needed a monument, here was one ready made — therefore, why not put up his sign here, and sell out the venerable coconut stump?” Twain noted. “But the chief pride of Maui is her dead volcano of Haleakalā — which means, translated, ‘the house of the sun.’ We climbed a thousand feet up the side of this isolated colossus one afternoon; then camped, and next day climbed the remaining nine thousand feet, and anchored on the summit, where we built a fire and froze WHERE GUEST B OOK

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“...I can feel the spirit of its wildland solitudes, I can hear the splash of its brooks; in my nostrils still lives the

and roasted by turns, all night. With the first pallor of dawn we got up and saw things that were new to us. Mounted on a commanding pinnacle, we watched Nature work her silent wonders. The sea was spread abroad on every hand, its tumbled surface seeming only wrinkled and dimpled in the distance. A broad valley below appeared like an ample checker-board, its velvety green sugar plantations alternating with dun squares of barrenness and groves of trees diminished to mossy tufts.” Tracing Twain’s steps on Maui is akin to reading a travelogue, detailing the author’s personal Huckleberry Finn adventures. His poetic language and vivid descriptions still inspire the modern-day traveler. “I still remember, with a sense of indolent luxury, a picnicing excursion up a romantic gorge there, called the ‘Īao Valley,” he wrote. “The trail lay along the edge of a brawling stream in 46

the bottom of the gorge — a shady route, for it was well roofed with the verdant domes of forest trees. Through openings in the foliage we glimpsed picturesque scenery that revealed ceaseless changes and new charms with every step of our progress.” While much has changed on Maui since Twain’s visit, much has remained the same. It’s easy to follow in the famous author’s footsteps. And you don’t need a horse. These days, not even passage on an inter-island steamer is necessary. All that is required is an adventurous spirit. “Those islands which to me were Paradise,” Twain said, “a Paradise which I had been longing all those years to see again.” That dream — along with many others, of Twain’s — began here, in 1866, on a slow horse, going up a mountain ... and is shared, still, by millions of tourists seeking their own Tom Sawyer-like adventures.

(This page) Twain often rode on horseback traversing such trails as Waihe‘e Ridge, left. Birds of paradise grow wild. (Opposite page) A bamboo forest is located near the Pools of Ohe‘o.

(THIS PAGE, LEFT) ©ISAAc ArjonILLA; ©Buddy MAyS/ALAMy; (oPPoSITE PAGE) ©ISAAc ArjonILLA

breath of flowers that perished twenty years ago.”

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Humpback whales and their newborn calves are commonly sighted in shallower waters of Hawai‘i through the winter months.

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Whale Tales The turbulent history and hopeful future of Maui’s winter visitors by kristen nemoto

THE STORY OF NATIVE HAWAIIANS’ connection with humpback whales dates back thousands of years, a time when gods ruled the Earth and every species — from plants to the animals — was believed to have its own mana, otherwise known as a life form’s spirit or power. Legends of the koholā (whale) were taught through mo‘olelo, an oral account of a person, place, thing or event that’s communicated from generation to generation. One of the few but poignant tales of the koholā was that of a kahuna (priest) named Makua and his son. Makua prayed to Kāne, the god of procreation, and Kanaloa, god of the ocean, to help make his son a greater kahuna than he could ever be. They granted Makua’s wish and said they will send a messenger to his son. Years passed with no messenger in sight until one day, a koholā had suddenly washed ashore. The children of the village climbed and played on the deceased whale, while Makua and his son watched nearby. Makua had an eerie feeling that this may be the messenger the gods had sent and was hesitant to allow his son to play with the other children; but he did. Suddenly, and much to everyone’s surprise, once Makua’s son climbed on top of the koholā, life began to flare once again in its eyes. Without warning, the other children were knocked off the koholā and Makua’s son was carried away and into the depths of the ocean. That night Makua mourned the loss of his son until the gods came to him in a dream. They assured him that his son was well, living in the land where they are from and learning to become a great kahuna. Although stricken by grief, Makua was relieved and hoped to one day see his son again as the kahuna that he had hoped he would be. The legend of Makua’s prayer, along with some written history, place names and precious artifacts of the koholā, provide evidence that ancient Native Hawaiians were aware of its presence within the vast Pacific Ocean. However, the minimal amount of historical recordings — compared to other plants and animals of Hawai‘i — has led people to wonder why there was such a scarce amount of ancient Native Hawaiian information on what was, and still is, the world’s largest mammal. WHERE GUEST B OOK

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suite 23, salem, ma 01970, 978-594-5350, www.stobart.com

(this page) lahaina, maui: the whaling brig “isabella” arriving in 1865, John stobart, image ©1989 courtesy Kensington galleries, 10 colonial road,

(previous spread) ©Karim iliya; (opposite page, clocKwise from top left) ©design pics inc/alamy; ©Karim iliya; courtesy creative commons;

(Opposite page, clockwise, from right) A humpback whale breaches; a close-up look at a whale tooth necklace known as a lei niho palaoa; Chiefess Liliha wears a lei niho palaoa. (This page) The whaling brig Isabella arriving in Lāhainā, Maui, in 1865.

“It was believed that all Hawaiian deities could take the form of some animate object,” says Joylynn Paman, the executive director of ‘Ao‘ao O Na Loko I‘a O Maui (Association of the Fishponds of Maui). “But because the koholā was a seasonal animal, there is some speculation whether it was or wasn’t a deity because it would disappear for half of the year.” While attending the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo, Paman participated in an internship program at the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary and wrote her thesis on “The Cultural and Historical Importance of Whales in Hawai‘i.” Through Paman’s research, she hypothesized that Native Hawaiians may have viewed the koholā as a sacred creature, which may have caused its information to be kept secret and possibly reserved for those of high rank. “The rarity of the koholā made its sightings a blessing,” Paman continues. “There’s no record of Hawaiians hunting whales. I say it was more of an opportunistic situation where they just waited patiently for them to wash ashore. The lifestyle that the Hawaiians originally lived by had all of their resources available to them. That’s why it was so successful from mauka (mountain) to makai (ocean). “When you think about it … What are you going to do with a 40-ton whale? How would they have lugged it with just a couple of canoes?”

When a beached whale would appear on shore, Paman says Native Hawaiians would declare it a property of the district’s ali‘i (chief ) and then remove its teeth to create a lei niho palaoa (whale tooth pendant). Worn solely by the ali‘i, it was believed that the mana from the lei would be passed on to the ali‘i and help exhibit all the characteristics of a god. The pendant is curved and shaped like a tongue, symbolizing someone who speaks on behalf of the community. The size of the lei niho palaoa was dependent upon one’s rank or status. Some would try to steal it from an ali‘i, and — if successful — would then inherit that person’s mana and ability to reign. “Even after an ali‘i would pass on, the lei niho palaoa would be buried along with them,” Paman says. “That’s why, to this day, many people do not know where an ali‘i is buried as they don’t want people to steal their mana.” The rarity of seeing a koholā, let alone obtaining its teeth to make a lei niho palaoa, was considered a sacred and honored gift to Native Hawaiians for thousands of years. Unfortunately, in the early 19th century when thousands of whaling ships took to the high seas, the significance of a koholā began to rapidly decline because their numbers decreased. Once word spread that the warm waters of the Hawaiian Islands was a popular migration destination for humpback whales, fleets of whaling ships would abruptly drop anchor at the island’s harbors, impatiently seeking their turn at the prized possession. Lāhainā, Maui and WHERE GUEST B OOK

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Today, sightings of the koholā continues from afar. The abundance of pod migration during the winter season (November through February) is a sight to see along the coast of Lāhainā. It’s a rare glimpse of what Native Hawaiian ancestors used to enjoy prior to Western contact. Although the greedy and wasteful mindset of the whaling industry no longer exists within the Hawaiian Islands, Paman believes visitors and locals alike can continue to strive to make Hawai‘i’s koholā — and countless other plants and species — a priority to protect and thrive for future generations to come. “It’s all about compromise,” Panam says, as she recalls a beached whale incident in the early 2000s when scientists wanted to keep the bones to study while cultural leaders wanted to return its remains to the ocean. “That’s the big challenge now, in general, when it comes to people believing their point of view is greater than the other. There is this constant tug of war. But I think, in the end, when we all work together, an agreement can be made when integrity has its best interest at heart. It’s that idea of what kind of legacy are we leading for the future. When our future people look back at us as their ancestors, will they be proud? I hope they will be.”

(This page) The distinctive bumps seen on the heads of humpback whales are oversized hair follicles. (Opposite page) A humpback whale slaps its tale, which can be heard for miles.

(this page) ©barcroft media/getty; (opposite page) ©Karim iliya

Honolulu soon became boomtown favorites among whalers. Lāhainā was especially popular since it was located in an area where foul weather was rare and the water’s channels were mostly always calm. According to the Maui Historical Society, from 1843 to 1860 — also known as the “Golden Age” — Lāhainā was the “principle anchorage of America’s Pacific whaling fleet and the town became the recruiting grounds for supplies and Hawaiian seamen.” But once petroleum and kerosene were discovered as alternatives to whale oil, and the fact that the whale population was simply overhunted to the point of near extinction, whaling in Hawai‘i began to decline. By the turn of the 20th century, the global population of humpback whales was nearly depleted by the commercial whaling industry. In 1973, the United States government passed the Endangered Species Act, which included and listed the protection of the humpback whale. In 1992, Congress enacted the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary in Kīhei, Maui. Administered by a partnership between NOAA’s Office of National Marine Sanctuaries and the state of Hawai‘i through the Department of Land and Natural Resources, the sanctuary is a vital component for the protection of the humpback whale population. W H E R E G UESTBO O K

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THE SONG OF MANA Remembering the sources of old Hawai‘i BY KRISTIN NEMOTO PHOTOGRAPHY BY LINNY MORRIS

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(Previous spread from left) The details of an ‘ulĪ‘ulĪ (feathered gourd rattle); and ‘ili‘ili (stone pebbles) and pŪpŪ shells. (This spread clockwise from top left) A hula dancer holds two kāla‘au (beating sticks); an assortment of kāla‘au; the detailed carvings of a pahu drum; ‘Ūlili (chord) rattles; two variations of an ipu (gourd drum); and a hula dancer holding ‘ili‘ili between her fingers to create a distinct percussion sound.

(OPPOSITE PAGE TOP RIGHT) ©ALLAN SEIDEN/GETTY IMAGES

ing sticks) in each hand, they knelt and stomped to the beat of “Aia I Ni‘ihau Ku‘u Pāwehe”— a dedicatory dance to the island of Ni‘ihau. With a vertical and longer kāla‘au in their left hands and a horizontal and shorter kāla‘au in their right, the men of Ka Leo banged the sticks to create percussions of stomp, stomp, stomp … tap, tap; stomp, stomp, stomp … tap, tap. Using ancient implements, the young dancers performed to the beat of the sacred mele, just the way their ancestors had done so before them. “What we don’t realize enough today is that Hawaiians were so meticulous,” Trinidad continues. “(There’s the) ‘ulī‘ulī (gourd rattle, with usually dyed red and yellow duck feathers along the brim) that has a lot of parts to it … Who would think to make something like that? It’s just so interesting.” Another rattle instrument includes the pū‘ili — a fringed or split bamboo that’s often played by dancers seated crosslegged. The predecessor to the ‘ūkulele, the ‘ūkēkē, was the only stringed instrument in Hawai‘i, made of fine two-ply dried fibers and sandalwood. In the percussion family are the ipu pa‘i, a large double-gourd; the pūniu known as the coconut knee drum; and the hula pahu, a bass drum that’s traditionally made from the base of a coconut trunk and sealed with a piece of stretched and fitted shark belly skin. Today, ancient Hawaiian implements can still be seen in local museums or at hālau performances throughout the Islands, on the mainland and abroad. In the hands of talented artists such as the late Gabby “Pops” Pahinui or Jake Shimabukuro, modern implements such as the slack key guitar and the ‘ūkulele have revolutionized and redefined Hawaiian music. In the spring of 2015, Hawai‘i Governor David Ige declared the ‘ūkulele and the pahu as official state musical instruments. When it comes to using any implements during his hālau performances, Trinidad appreciates them all equally, as each represents a special piece of his ancestors’ lineage. It’s a ritual he hopes to pass down to each of his students and anyone interested in Hawai‘i’s unique connection to its storied past. “You have to keep the culture alive,” he says. “How a particular object conveys its mana or spiritual essence is what’s happening to the implements. It’s a beautiful and amazing reflection upon Hawaiian people and Hawaiian culture.”

(THIS PAGE FROM TOP) ©JOE CARINI/GETTY IMAGES; ©JOE CARINI/PACIFIC STOCK;

Before the popularization of the “jumping flea” known as the ‘ūkulele or Bing Crosby’s holiday classic “Mele Kalikimaka,” there was a single beat—a distinct rhythmic sound that transcended from one Hawaiian lineage to another. Unlike a written score by Mozart or a tale within a history book, ancient Native Hawaiians expressed themselves in the form of storytelling, otherwise known as the tradition of mo‘olelo, an oral account of a person, place, thing or event that’s communicated from generation to generation. Unabashedly personal and emotionally charged, mo‘olelo is steeped within thousands of years worth of mele (song), oli (chant) and hula (dance). Native Hawaiians thrived in the art of mele, conveying songs and stories from former leaders who stressed the importance of the past as a guide for defining what was pono (proper, true). Without these teachings, many Native Hawaiians would not have the proper knowledge of their own traditions, which today remains pivotal to the survival and perpetuation of Hawaiian beliefs and culture. To enhance the expression of Native Hawaiian poetry, single or combined implements and hula would accompany the lyrics of a song. Except for the ‘ili‘ili (stone pebbles) used as percussion and the pū (conch-shell trumpet), most ancient implements were made, at least in part, from plant materials and required days, months and even years of laborious work. One of Merrie Monarch Festival’s (known as the Olympics of hula) most revered teachers, Kumu Hula (hula teacher) Kaleo Trinidad appreciates Native Hawaiian ancestors’ ability to be completely “utilitarian” and precise in their craft. It’s an art form that he strives to re-create in his hula practice. “Native Hawaiian implements are shaped exactly the way they’re needed,” Trinidad says. “If you notice, there are not many ornamentations on it. Why? Because to keep that instrument strong, you don’t carve into it.” The implements need to be thoughtful and sound, according to Trinidad. During the 2014 Merrie Monarch, his hālau (hula school) Ka Leo O Laka I Ka Hikina O Ka Lā (the voice of Laka at the rising of the sun) demonstrated such virility and strength while using Hawaiian implements in the hula kahiko (ancient form of hula) division that they took home the coveted overall winner title. As rows of his mountainous men stood with kāla‘au (beatW H E R E G U ESTBO O K

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Q&a

Shep Gordon Maui-based talent manager helped establish Hawai‘i Regional Cuisine. By Simplicio paragaS | photography By jeSSe dittmar

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grabbed a dictionary and found the first word that contained the letter: Alive, the name of Gordon’s enterprise to this day. Gordon would later be introduced to a budding rock star by the name of Alice Cooper, who vividly recounts in the film meeting Gordon for the first time in a smoke-filled — and not tobacco, either, according to Cooper — hotel room with Joplin, Hendrix and Jim Morrison sitting nearby. The meeting would forever change the life of the 21-year-old New Yorker, whose business acumen and publicity stunts have earned his clients ink and airtime around the world. What was your role in the formation of the hawai‘i regional cuisine movement?

During the early ’90s, I used to get together with chefs like Sam Choy, Mark Ellman and Peter Merriman, and they used to come to my house to cook. It was uncomfortable because they

knew that I was managing other chefs but they never asked me to represent them. At the time I was working with Roger Verge, founder of Nouvelle Cuisine, and Dean Fearing, considered the father of Southwestern Cuisine. I suggested starting a movement in Hawai‘i and everybody was totally into it. So we did.

emeril lagasse lauds you as the inventor of the “celebrity chef” status; is this an accurate statement?

I like to think that I’m the “exposer” of the celebrity chef. Long before the term even existed, I knew that chefs would be the stars of tomorrow. But they weren’t being recognized—nor paid—like other artists.

do you see the movement as having progressed?

do you consider yourself a

I see the movement as living and thriving. This next generation of local chefs are raised on Hawai‘i Regional Cuisine. And while the movement has progressed, chefs like Alan (Wong) and Roy (Yamaguchi) still have to keep old dishes around. It’s like going to a Rolling Stones concert and not hearing “Brown Sugar;” the Stones still have to play crowd favorites. The same holds true for chefs. You expect that macnut-crusted mahimahi to be on Roy’s menu but he’ll also add new menu items.

fighter for the underdog?

Yeah, I still like to think that I’m the guy on a white horse who’s coming to the rescue of a damsel in distress (laughs). What’s really important for me is to do compassionate business. how different is it managing rock stars and celebrity chefs?

It’s not really all that different. As an artist manager, I want to create demand for my clients, whether it’s selling tickets for a concert or tables for a restaurant. That’s is my job.

Photo credit gotham book 5.5/9Pt

As a talent manager, Shep Gordon abides by his own holy trinity: 1) get the money; 2) always remember to get the money; and 3) never forget to always remember to get the money. In 1968, the New York native set out to California to begin a career that only Hollywood writers could script. Within 24 hours of arriving in Los Angeles, he was beat up twice, the second time by a woman who he thought was being raped poolside; she wasn’t. Apologizing the next day, that woman turned out to be Janis Joplin who was dating Jimi Hendrix at the time. In a scene in Mike Myers’ documentary, “Supermensch: The Legend of Shep Gordon,” it was Hendrix who suggested that Gordon become a manager, only because he was Jewish. Hendrix also told Gordon that his business name had to include a “V.” It was the ’60s after all. So they

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iSland viEWS Spend some time exploring Maui’s diverse regions, from Upcountry to the curving shoreline and lush rainforest and posh resorts.

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Wailea

This popular South Maui destination is a land of luxurious resorts, manicured golf courses, upscale retail, fine dining and, one can confidently say, the island’s best beaches. Mokapu, Ulua, Wailea and Polo beaches offer prime snorkeling, swimming and unrivalled views of the neighboring islands of Lāna‘i, Kaho‘olawe and Molokini Islet. The coastal walk between Mokapu and Polo beaches stretches for 1.5 miles.

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Kapalua

Surrounded by the protected West Maui rainforest, Kapalua Resort is nestled between two prominent sanctuaries: Pu‘u Kukui Watershed Preserve, at the summit of the West Maui Mountains, and HonoluaMokulē‘ia Marine Life Conservation District, the shoreline jewel of the 22,000acre resort. Formerly a pineapple plantation, Kapalua is well known for its unwavering support of the Hawaiian arts.

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Upcountry

There’s a certain kind of red rain that’s visible only at a certain time in the late afternoon from a certain part of the road leading to Haleakalā in Upcountry Maui. This is part of the magic of this bucolic scene, where every turn reveals a visual feast. Even with the heroic feats of the demigod Maui, who lassoed the sun to create longer days, there aren’t enough hours to take in the splendors of Upcountry Maui.

(FROM LEFT) ©BREndOn LOy/ALAMy; ©BiLL BROOks/ALAMy

island views

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Kā‘anapali

In the 1960s, as developers built West Maui resorts to rival Waikīkī’s, Kā‘anapali experienced a surge of popularity. Along the length of the resort, Kā‘anapali Beach is lined with swank hotels that have made West Maui a top destination among visitors. At the north end, Kahekili Beach is great for snorkeling. One of Kā‘anapali’s signature attractions, Pu‘u Keka‘a (Black Rock) is a unique outcropping of lava surrounded by a thriving coral reef.

Mākena

Mākena boasts some of the most diverse and rugged terrain on the island. The area’s Little Beach and Big Beach—known jointly as Mākena Beach—are popular with swimmers and sun worshippers. The beaches are divided by Pu‘u Ola‘i, a cindercone with a challenging hiking trail that leads to its summit. Mākena Landing is a popular snorkeling and kayaking spot. Scuba divers are encouraged to visit Five Graves/Five Caves, where they can explore the elusive “bubble cave.”

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Wailuku

Historic, charming and diverse, Wailuku, Maui’s municipal center, is tucked into the foothills of the West Maui Mountains near the scenic streams and cliffs of ‘Īao Valley State Park. Downtown Wailuku is sprinkled with historic attractions, including the Bailey House Museum, ‘Īao Theater and Ka‘ahumanu Church, one of the oldest on the island. On the first Friday of each month, the town celebrates its emerging arts scene with a block party.

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(previous spread) ©douglas peebles photography/alamy; (this page) ©timothy epp/alamy

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Kīhei

This South Maui development is the result of sunshine and accessible beaches. Once a dusty scrubland, Kīhei is today lined with condominiums, small hotels, restaurants and shops—and six miles of beaches. From its three popular beach parks, Kama‘ole I, II and III, you can see Molokini, Lāna‘i and the West Maui Mountains. Other Kīhei attractions include the Pacific Whale Foundation’s Marine Resource Center and whale-watching in the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary.

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Pā‘ia

Once a plantation town centered on Hawaiian Commercial & Sugar Company, Pā‘ia today is the global emblem of windsurfing and the last stop for stocking up on supplies for the long road to Hāna. In the winter months, the waters of Ho‘okipa are dotted with sailboarders as they slice through air and water in complex maneuvers. Pā‘ia abounds with surf and windsurfing shops, boho-chic boutiques, juice bars, gelato shops and vegan restaurants.

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Kahului

Kahului is Maui’s busiest port and most populous metro area. This workaday town of some 20,000 people is usually the first city visitors to Maui see after touching down at nearby Kahului Airport. The district contains worthwhile attractions, including the Maui Arts & Cultural Center, one of the island’s premier venues for concerts and art exhibitions; Kanaha Pond State Wildlife Sanctuary; and Maui Nui Botanical Gardens.

(FROM leFt) ©epicStOckMedia/ShutteRStOck; ©tRavel pix/alaMy

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ADVENTURES 6/1/16 11:27:27 6/3/16 10:37:06 AM


OFF iSland Two of Maui’s most exciting day trip adventures lie just a half-hour boat ride away.

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The clear water and abundant sea life within Pu‘u Pehe Cove make it a spectacular snorkel spot.

WHERE GUEST B OOK

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where traveler.com

®

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Lāna‘i

The third smallest in the Hawaiian chain, the island of Lāna‘i is bordered by towering 1,000-foot sea cliffs and populated by spotted deer, big horn sheep, Rio Grande turkeys and a spectacular variety of rare flora and fauna. It is the place to visit if you want to veer off the beaten track. Home to only approximately 3,000 residents and not a single stoplight to be found, Lāna‘i moves at a markedly slower pace, and interlopers are all too willing to adapt to that casual tempo.

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Off iSland

W H E R E G U ESTBO O K

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Moloka‘i

To experience what Hawai‘i might have been like in a bygone era, set your sights on Moloka‘i. It’s a reward for serenity-seeking travelers, a place to unwind away from the rigors of urban life. On Moloka‘i, where the coconut trees tower over the buildings, you could actually be alone on a golden sand beach or in a forest of ironwood trees. Adventurous travelers will want to visit Kalaupapa Peninsula, isolated from the rest of the island by the world’s highest sea cliffs, which rise 2,000 feet above the Pacific.

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TAKE MAUI HOME with Fresh Roasted Hawaiian Coffee

Come and see us at our Café and Retail Store to grab a cup and a bite to eat and bring home a piece of the islands with our fresh roasted Hawaiian coffees. We also carry a fantastic variety of local products from Maui sugar to Maui Strawberry Jam. We look forward to seeing you!

shopping barefoot

Serving Our Customers for Over 37 Years Your Supplier of the Best Hawaiian Coffees Kona Coffee, Flavored Coffee and Other Great Local Maui Products

This is no ordinary shopping center.

We Ship Worldwide

With 90 stores and restaurants, you can shop for beach gear and vacation keepsakes, and enjoy a leisurely meal – all just a few steps from the sand.

Maui Coffee Roasters

/ WhalersVillage

@WhalersVillage

Free WiFi

2435 Kaanapali Parkway, Maui | 808-661-4567 Open daily from 9:30am–10pm whalersvillage.com

1 Mile From Airport at: 444 Hana Highway • Kahului

(Corner of Dairy Road and Hana Highway) Mon - Sat: 7am-6pm (Kitchen 7am-5pm) • Sun: 8am-4pm (Kitchen 8am-2:30pm)

MauiCoffeeRoasters.com • (808) 877-CUPS or 1-800-645-CUPS

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5/9/16 9:32 AM Job Name: WHLR-31118 Size/colour: 1/2 page verical: Trim: 4" x 8-1/2"; 4C Pub: Where Guestbook Maui Pub Date: July 2016 - June 2017

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PLAY MORE “adventureland” Maui Guestbook 1/2 pg Full color no bleed 4”w x 8.5”h Due: 05.17.16

W E LCOM E TO

Side-By-Side Ziplines Treetop Ziplines Wedding & Group Adventures Hiking Tours Zipline/Hike Combo The QUICKjump

“PLAY MORE” Maui GB 1/2 page no bleed 4C 4 x 8.5 Due: 05.23.16

THERE’S PLENTY TO PLAY AT HAWAII’S ONLY 54-HOLE GOLF RESORT With three championship courses, scores of awards and ocean views from every hole – there’s more to enjoy at the Wailea Golf Club than any other golf destination in the islands. Plus: great seasonal offers and multi-round specials mean you can play even more. You’re just a tee time away. follow us!

www.waileagolf.com TOLL-FREE 1.888.328.MAUI | 808.875.7450 WAILEA GOLD | WAILEA EMERALD | WAILEA BLUE

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where you are. ®

(and where you’re going.) All the latest buzz about the city

Come Sail Away

from the experts at Where Magazine. Shopping, dining, attractions, it’s all here 24/7.

Snorkel & Sunset Sails – Winter Whale Watches Catered by the Westin Maui Resort & Spa

www.geminicharters.com – 808•669•0508

Kaanapali Beach, Maui

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We are the 21st century Hawaiian. Stand strong on the shoulders of our past and look to the future with revolutionary eyes. We are Hawaiians... Excerpt from “Native Intelligence” by Kealoha

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©isaac arjonilla

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Call to learn more about the Healing Waters of Maui™ Inspired by artist Ingre’s painting, ‘The Grand Odalisque’

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3850 Wailea Alanui, Wailea, HI 96753 800.888.6100 WWW.GRANDWAILEA.COM

6/1/16 12:05:26 10:28:44 PM AM


w h eretravele r.co m/mau i

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YOUR STYLE. STACKED TO PERFECTION.

T H E PA N D O R A S T O R E AT

WHALER’S VILLAGE 808.661.8960

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Maui Where GuestBook 2016 2017