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SPRING •

SUMMER 2018 / ISSUE 14

wailea MAGAZINE


85 O % VE S R O LD

find yourself at home on wailea’s coast

Discover Makali’i, a luxurious collection of open-concept townhomes steps from the beach. With Mid-Century Modern design, light-filled interiors and extraordinary amenities, its prestige is matched only by its views. With a vantage point above the treetops, the very best of Wailea is yours. Visit the Sales Gallery today for complimentary island refreshments and an exclusive tour of Makali’i. Townhomes available from $1.3M.

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WELCOME TO

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CO N TEN TS S P R I N G •S U M M E R 2 0 1 8 / I S S U E 1 4

32 F E AT U R E S

26 Maui on His Mind

42 Holy Moly!

54 Fire and Water

THE ARTIST REMEMBERS HIS ROOTS

THE RAW POWER OF PELE'S PYROTECHNICS

BY GRADY TIMMONS

THE VALLEY ISLAND IS A HOTBED OF PEPPER POWER

PHOTOGRAPHY BY DANA EDMUNDS

BY ILIMA LOOMIS

BRUCE OMORI

32 Eddie Would,

So Others Could

REMEMBERING A HAWAIIAN HERO BY KATHY MUNENO

PHOTOGRAPHY BY RACHEL OLSSON

48 The Secret Life of Resort Wear

WHY UNIFORMS ARE ANY THING BUT UNIFORM BY ILIMA LOOMIS PHOTOGRAPHY BY RACHEL OLSSON

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY TOM KUALI‘I AND

64 Maui’s Show of Stars IT’S NOT JUST GLITZ AND GLAMOUR BY RICK CHATENEVER


CO N TEN TS

18

72 D E PA R T M E N T S

6 Welcome Letter

From Bud Pikrone

THE GUIDE

18 Faces of Wailea

72 Explore

ALOHA IN ACTION

THE GENTLE, CALMING LIFE OF THE SOUTH SHORE

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

8 Contributors

RACHEL OLSSON

10 Lei of the Land

96 Aloha Moment

74 Dine

GET TING AROUND WAILEA

WHERE TO GO FOR FARE TO REMEMBER

16 Wailea Hall of Fame

76 Shop

THE BUZZ ABOUT TOWN

THE ART OF SHOPPING

BY CARLA TRACY

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76 ON THE COVER

Bruce Omori, owner of Extreme Exposure Fine Art Gallery in Hilo, captures the beauty of lava in this image, “Lava Bleed.”


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ALOHA

MAGAZINE

As we head into the summer months, we acknowledge that many of our pleasures are seasonless and timeless. We enjoy the year’s rhythms, the ebb and flow of familiar patterns and events, and we anticipate the surprises and pleasures of the months to come. Now we look forward to the calm waters and longer days ahead, and to the new recreational choices they bring. Wailea’s weather, activities, accommodations and amenities are enjoyable year-round and remembered for years to come. And while we bid aloha to the koholā, the cherished humpback whales that migrate here annually, we look forward to their return next fall. Throughout the year, one of our constant, reliable features is the serene Coastal Path. Both a walkway and a gathering place, it’s our link to so many things: invigorating morning walks, oceanfront exercise and the daily spectacle of sunset. As you enjoy your walk, you are never more than minutes away from a romantic dinner where our world-renowned chefs celebrate their talents and the prodigious local harvests. The Maui Film Festival is featured every spring, and the biannual Restaurant Week is among the special gatherings throughout the year. This is a destination in which nature, the environment and modern amenities seamlessly coalesce. The sunrise over Haleakalā is always spectacular, especially over the first sip of Maui coffee on a welcoming lānai. We’re also proud of the aloha spirit our guests and residents experience daily, and of the Hawaiian culture and traditions we celebrate: the ‘ukulele, hula, surfing, ocean sports, crafts and the visual arts. We also honor our cultural wayfinders and the ocean channels that brought the early navigators to this shore. We hope your time in Wailea is gratifying, and that your new memories form a lei of aloha that will always be with you. In Island lore, when a lei is thrown into the ocean and returns to shore, it means that you, too, will return. Mahalo nui loa for sharing your time with us here in Wailea.

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WAILEA RESORT ASSOCIATION GENERAL MANAGER

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WAILEA DESTINATION LIAISON

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MORRIS VISITOR PUBLICATIONS MVP | Executive

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where | HAWAII OFFICES 677 Ala Moana Blvd., Suite 700, Honolulu, HI 96813 ph 808.955.2378 fax 808.955.2379

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William S. Morris III William S. Morris IV

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Kipa hou mai! (Come visit again!)

Frank “Bud” Pikrone General Manager, Wailea Resort Association For more information about Wailea Resort, please visit www.wailearesortassociation.com. 6

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Copyright 2018 by Morris Visitor Publications. All rights reserved. This publication may not be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, in whole or in part, without the express prior written permission of the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility to any party for the content of any advertisement in this publication, including any errors and omissions therein. By placing an order for an advertisement, the advertiser agrees to indemnify the publisher against any claims relating to the advertisement. Printed in U.S.A. Wailea magazine is produced in cooperation with the Wailea Resort Association.


CONTRIBUTORS

Dana Edmunds

Tom Kuali‘i

Maui on His Mind, p. 26 As a Hawai‘i-based commercial photographer, Dana shoots for various editorial, advertising and actionsports clients here in Hawai‘i and throughout the world. He describes himself as “happily married, with two kids, a dog and a chicken.” He is a regular contributor to this magazine.

Ilima Loomis

Fire and Water, p. 54 Hilo native Tom Kuali‘i discovered photography while deployed to Iraq, where he found beauty in chaos: nature, animals, sand and the smiles he coaxed from faces full of fear and sorrow. A Native Hawaiian, he says he finds strong mana in the volcano landscape, especially at night.

Holy Moly!, p. 42; The Secret Life of Resort Wear, p.48 Ilima Loomis has written about sunspots, dark matter, popsicle chefs, pet psychics and more for publications such as Popular Science, National Geographic Traveler, Nature and Islands. She also authored an award-winning book on Hawaiian cowboys. She wrote about edible flowers and local designer Kealopiko for the April 2017 issue of this magazine.

Rick Chatenever

Kathy Muneno Eddie Would, So Others Could, p. 32 Kathy Muneno is the weekend news anchor for KHON2. She has worked as a reporter and anchor in Hawai‘i for more than 20 years. Kathy is an award-winning writer and producer whose work has included “Hōkūle‘a: Her Farthest Journey.” She is also the recipient of a regional Emmy Award for the weekly series “SEARCH Hawai‘i: Where Food Meets Culture.”

“Eddie Aikau’s dream— to ‘pull Tahiti out of the sea’—was fulfilled two years later and has been many times since, culminating in Mälama Honua, a four-year worldwide voyage. Crew members say Eddie was always in their hearts and minds.”–From “Eddie Would, So Others Could,” p. 32 8

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Grady Timmons Maui on His Mind, p. 26 Grady Timmons, communications director for The Nature Conservancy of Hawai‘i, has written about Hawai‘i sports and other subjects for numerous local, national and international publications. He is the author of the awardwinning book “Waikiki Beachboy,” as well as “A Century of Golf: O‘ahu Country Club,” published in 2007.

Bruce Omori Fire and Water, p. 54 Bruce Omori, an asthmatic, is allergic to the sulphur emitted by volcanoes. After several “close calls,” he uses a respirator and medication when shooting eruptions. He and his wife own Extreme Exposure Fine Art Gallery in Hilo.

Maui’s Show of Stars, p. 64 Award-winning journalist, Emmynominated scriptwriter and retired newspaper editor Rick Chatenever has interviewed luminaries and moderated filmmaker panels for the Maui Film Festival since its inception. He writes a weekly newspaper column about Maui and teaches English at UH-Maui College.


NAVIGATE

Lei of the Land GETTING AROUND WAILEA

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WAILEA is nestled on the leeward side of South Maui. Only 30 minutes from the Kahului Airport, just south of the town of Kīhei, Wailea is easily accessible by automobile. The main entrances to Wailea’s luxurious beachfront resorts are located along Wailea Alanui. All of Wailea’s resorts, along with golf, tennis, dining and shopping, are within a few minutes’ drive of your resort or condominium. The 1.5-mile Coastal Walk affords easy access to the beachfront resorts. Throughout the year, the Wailea Coastal Path provides the ideal location for watching sunsets. The sun melts into the tranquil waters, where paddlers, swimmers and sailboats are a festive sight and dolphins may leap into view.

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Island sizes and locations not to scale

WAILEA RESORT MAP KEY 1 Fairmont Kea Lani 2 Four Seasons Resort Maui at Wailea 3 Grand Wailea 4 Ho`olei at Grand Wailea 5 Wailea Beach Resort 6 Hotel Wailea 7 Wailea Beach Villas 8 Wailea Elua Village 9 Palms at Wailea 10 Wailea Ekolu Village 11 Wailea Grand Champions Villas

12 13 14 15 16 17 18

Wailea Ekahi Village The Shops at Wailea Wailea Town Center Wailea Gateway Center Wailea Tennis Club Wailea Blue Clubhouse Wailea Gold & Emerald Clubhouse 19 Andaz Maui Wailea Resort 20 Wailea Residence Inn 21 Keala O Wailea

Resort Hotels Condominiums Shopping Tennis Golf Courses Beaches Snorkeling Coastal Path Beach Parking

(WATERCOLOR) ©MIKE REAGAN

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(MAP) ©EUREKA CARTOGRAPHY, BERKELEY, CA;

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MAUI Four Seasons Resort Maui at Wailea

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Mauna Kea Beach Hotel

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Four Seasons Resort Maui at Wailea Four Seasons Resort Maui at Wailea Mauna Lani Bay Hotel Kahala Hotel, Halekulani OAHU The The Kahala Hotel, Halekulani Halekulani Hotel

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Wailea Hall of Fame THE CELEBRITY TRAIN KEEPS ROLLING into Wailea. Many jump off and circle around South Maui resident Shep Gordon, the famed Hollywood manager and subject of the documentary “Supermensch.” Gordon is a partner with James Beard Awardwinning chef Roy Yamaguchi in Humble Market Kitchin at Wailea Beach Resort, where his actor pals Jason Sudeikis and Olivia Wilde recently savored dinner. A stellar group of talent once again rocked the house for New Year’s Eve at Wailea Beach Resort. Among the luminaries: guitar ace Steve Cropper of Booker T & the MGs and Blues Brothers fame. Cropper co-wrote the soul classics “(Sittin’ on) The Dock of the Bay” and “In the Midnight Hour.” Other New Year’s Eve repeats were Aerosmith frontman Steven Tyler; the “godfather of shock rock,” Alice Cooper; former Doobie Brothers bandmates Michael McDonald and Pat Simmons; parodist “Weird Al” Yankovic; “Wonder Woman” Lynda Carter; record producer Bob Rock (Bon Jovi and MÖtley CrÜe); Asleep at the Wheel’s Ray Benson and Disturbed’s David Draiman. The concert benefitted Maui Food Bank and Maui Arts & Cultural Center. Also at Wailea Beach Resort were Debbie Marriott Harrison and her family, solidifying its reputation as THE place to be. Former “Top Chef ” and “36 Hours” TV personality Kristen Kish returned to Grand Wailea to dazzle the crowd with a multicourse feast and promote her new “Kristen Kish Cookbook.” She was a big hit at the Celebrity Chef Tour at the resort last year. And former “Top Chef” Fan Favorite Sheldon Simeon is set to open his second restaurant, Lineage, in The Shops at Wailea in late spring. Jazz at The Shops launched at the tony shopping mall, and awardwinning musicians such as Rock Hendricks and multi-platinum selling pianist and composer Peter Kater have made stellar appearances.

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By Carla Tracy

Speaking of music, Four Seasons Resort Maui at Wailea presented the Maui Jazz & Blues Festival, a “saxy” affair on its oceanfront lawn, with gourmet food and Grammy Hall of Famers from New York, Chicago, Louisiana, Kansas and Canada. Acclaimed saxophonists Bobby Watson and Javon Jackson, guitar virtuoso Fareed Haque, Cajun accordionist Jo-El Sonnier and blues musician Jimmy D. Lane added to the star power. Of course, Wailea resorts are where funnymen like to hang. Howie Mandel was spotted. Yes, Howie was back on Maui. HBO’s “Real Time” host Bill Maher performed on Maui for the seventh year, this time joined by stand-up comedian Bob Saget and President Barack Obama-impersonator Reggie Brown. The trio stayed in Wailea. Wolfgang Puck’s Spago Maui bubbled with famous winemakers and proprietors from all over the globe. They included Even Bakke of Clos de Trias in France; Robert Sinskey of Robert Sinskey Vineyards in Napa Valley; Larry Turley of Turley Wine Cellars in Amador County and Paso Robles; John Gabelhausen of Alexana Vineyards in Oregon; and Rupert Billins of Dalla Terra wines. Turley raved about his dinner at Gannon’s Restaurant. Another Gannon’s visitor was Orel Hershiser, former Major League Baseball pitcher who threw fastballs for 18 seasons before becoming a broadcast analyst and professional poker player. Speaking of baseball, MVP Los Angeles Angels player Albert Pujols teed off at the Wailea Blue Course. Maui’s own Shane Victorino, two-time MLB All-Star, hosted the 10th Shane Victorino Foundation Celebrity Dinner and Golf Classic with celeb athletes competing at the Wailea Gold Course. The “Property Brothers” on HGTV took time off from transforming fixer-uppers into dream homes and dined at Longhi’s Wailea. Yes, the celebrity train keeps rolling into Wailea.


Faces OF WA I L E A

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The faces of Aloha come in many sizes, styles, seasons and presentations. But they all express one thing: Welcome. Photography by RACHEL OLSSON

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Ho‘okipa, the art of hospitality and welcome, is the Wailea signature, reflected throughout the resort.

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Maui On His Mind THE ARTIST REMEMBERS HIS ROOTS Story by GRADY TIMMONS Photography by DANA EDMUNDS

(Above) Peterson rides his favorite horse, Keoki, at his father's Makawao ranch. His family drove the old Ford Bronco all over Maui, even in Haleakalā crater.

WHOEVER COINED THE TERM “the gig economy” was probably inspired by the life of a working musician. After all, musicians don’t have jobs. They have gigs, and Maui-born guitarist Jeff Peterson is no exception. Peterson, 46, plays slack key, jazz and classical guitar, and he does it so well he has performed with the Hawaii Opera Theatre and the Hawai‘i Symphony Orchestra. Last December, around the time he released his first instructional DVD, he performed a slack key guitar concerto with the Hawai‘i Symphony Orchestra. Peterson has also shared the stage with rock icon Eric Clapton and has entertained a former U.S. president and his family at the Kaua‘i home of actor Pierce Brosnan, who has starred in several James Bond films. Recalling the latter, Peterson says, “Before the Clintons arrived, a helicopter did a sweep of the property. There were five or six Secret Service agents hiding in the bushes surrounding the house.

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They were all dressed in black and shining lights at each other for positioning. It was right out of a James Bond film.” With Peterson’s acoustic talents, the world is a small place. His performances have taken him to India, China, Brazil and across the United States, and Hollywood has also beckoned. His music is heard in “The Descendants,” a major Hollywood film, and he has contributed to two Grammy Award-winning CDs and amassed eight Hawaiian Nā Hōkū Hanohano music awards. But no matter how far Peterson travels or how high his star climbs, his music remains grounded in the experiences of his Maui childhood. That’s where his father, a Hawaiian paniolo, taught him the rich tradition of slack key guitar. “My music is deeply rooted in that culture,” he says. “I have very early memories of that music and the way my dad played. It’s a sound and a style that is very dear to my heart. It’s been my inspiration and guide my entire life.” Peterson grew up in upcountry Maui, in a Makawao ranch house surrounded by pastures, eucalyptus trees and wildlife. His family kept horses, a pony, homing pigeons and chickens, and he and his brother made bike paths through the woods and traveled to school in the back of a farmer’s cabbage truck. “My parents divorced when I was three, but both stayed in Makawao and remained part of my life,” he says. His father had served in Vietnam before return-

ing home to work as a paniolo—first on Hawai‘i Island and later as a manager at Haleakalā Ranch on Maui. The elder Peterson loved the outdoors and taught his sons to fish, surf, camp and ride horses. “He was an avid fisherman,” says Jeff, recalling the night his dad took the family Zodiac and sneaked over to Kaho‘olawe, returning home the next day with six ulua and an abandoned baby goat. Peterson remembers the sound of his father’s boots clomping across the ranch house floor as he left for work in the morning. In the evening, when he returned home, he liked to unwind with his guitar, playing slack key by himself or with fellow paniolo. “He played Hawaiian music. That’s what he loved,” Jeff says. “He played for his own pleasure, for the sheer joy of making music. That’s something that has stuck with me.” His father always left his guitar lying around the house, and as soon as Jeff could get his arms around it, he began teaching himself to play. He didn’t receive much guidance. His dad showed him what he knew, but the accomplished slack-key players kept the knowledge to themselves. “I had to figure it out on my own,” he says. “I tried to develop my ear at an early age so that whatever I heard, I could follow.” After he received his first guitar at age 12, his interest in music became an obsession. He would listen to slack-key masters like Gabby Pahinui, Sonny Chillingworth and Leonard Kwan and practice for hours. “I practiced so much,

(This page from left) Peterson's role model was his father, pictured here on his horse and teaching him how to fish. 28

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ARCHIVAL PHOTOS COURTESY OF JEFF PETERSON

No matter how far he travels or how high his star climbs, his music has remained grounded in the experiences of his Maui childhood.


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His father always left his guitar lying around the house, and as soon as Jeff could get his arms around it, he began teaching himself to play.

my mother would come down and say, ‘I see there’s a big south swell today. Maybe you should go hit the beach.’” One evening while walking home, he heard the rapturous sound of a violin and followed it through the woods to a neighbor’s home. The musician was Eugene Fodor—one of the world’s great solo violinists. He was playing Paganini and Bach, and Peterson was enthralled. In his teens, he found a mentor who taught him theory and how to read music. He also discovered rock ’n’ roll and legendary guitarists like Jimi Hendrix and Stevie Ray Vaughan. When a cousin introduced him to Eddie Van Halen, he was so awed he taught himself to play the rocker’s classic guitar solo, “Eruption.” After graduating from Maui’s Baldwin High School, Peterson, on scholarship, attended the guitar program at the University of Southern California. Going from upcountry Maui to South Central L.A. was both expansive and a radical change of scene. He studied jazz and classical guitar and sometimes practiced seven hours a day. But the long hours took a toll on his hands, and by the end of his first year he could hardly play. So he decided to take a break. Returning to the Islands, he enrolled in the business school at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. By the time he earned his degree, he was playing again—teaching, too, in the university’s guitar program. Peterson met his wife, Kahealani, at

the UH business school and has lived on O‘ahu since 1994. The Petersons live in windward O‘ahu’s Kailua, where his small recording studio turns out albums under the Peterson Productions label. He has released 12 albums to date. “I teach, I record, I perform as a solo artist, I play in different groups—and all of those things add up to a career,” he says. Perhaps the biggest thrill of that career was being on stage in 2005 while he and the other artists involved in “Slack Key Guitar, Volume 2” received the first-ever Grammy for a Hawaiian recording. Another was working with fellow slack-key artist Keola Beamer on the soundtrack of “The Descendants,” the 2011 Oscar-nominated film starring George Clooney. “I had already recorded a lot of the music used on that soundtrack,” he says. “I just edited the songs to fit the scenes. But then they asked me to compose a couple of songs right on the spot. Just watch the scenes, find the emotion and play what I felt.” Peterson’s father has passed on, so to keep his memory and the tradition of slack key alive, he plays and teaches wherever he can—in public libraries, shopping malls and at instructional summer camps. He has transcribed more than 200 songs (slack key is an oral tradition) and recently released the first in a series of instructional DVDs. What is it that distinguishes Peterson’s slack-key music? “It’s definitely the jazz and classical influences I bring to it,” he says. “I come from the traditional, but I reach out in ways that aren’t traditional.”

(This page from left) Peterson teaches himself to play and enjoying a moment with his father. (Opposite page) Peterson's passionate guitar practice.

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Eddie Would, So Others Could REMEMBERING A HAWAIIAN HERO By KATHY MUNENO

(From left) Wearing a pouch with his relatives’ hair, Eddie paddles out on the day of Hōkūle‘a’s departure; large surf in Waimea. 32

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“In 10 years, we only had a surfboard and fins to save lives.” —CLYDE AIKAU (Opposite page, clockwise from top left) Eddie and Linda on their wedding day; the young Eddie; on North Shore lifeguard duty; checking out the surf; and in a happy moment with his family.

(OPPOSITE PAGE) COURTESY AIKAU FAMILY (4); (LOWER RIGHT) COL. BENSON PHOTOGRAPHY

HE WORLD KNOWS HIM AS EDDIE, but those closest to him say you can tell how well people know him by whether they call him Ryon. Me? I never knew Eddie. But I know his greatness, that he was a Hawaiian, a legend, a hero, a lifeguard, a big wave surfer, a Hōkūle‘a crew member, and a man who, 40 years ago, gave his life trying to save others. He was so loved that an entire community fell to its knees when he was gone. Today, for the first time in the more than 10 years I’ve known Eddie’s sister, Myra, we sit down in her home at “the graveyard” (their O‘ahu homestead at the edge of a cemetery) and talk about their legendary family, her incredible brother, and a rarely spoken premonition. And we cry. Edward Ryon Makuahānai, “one who cares for others,” was born on Maui May 4, 1946, the third in a family of five boys and one girl. His father, known as Pops Aikau, worked for the Kahului Railroad Company. His mother, “Mom,” stayed home to raise the children. “Her children came first,” Myra tells me. “She took care of us, and she did a good job … just an angel sent from heaven.” They lived in Breakwater Camp in Kahului, right across the street from the ocean. Myra says they were poor, recalling how one can of soup fed their family of eight. Once Pops just ate the berries growing outside. But they were rich in love, with a bond stronger than many; even I can see that now. Without fail, for more than 20 years, they’d have “family comforts,” a meeting every fourth Sunday of the month. It was a time for them to talk to each other or resolve conflicts. “Everywhere we went,” Myra says, “there had to be all eight of us. And that’s how we got to be so close.” So close that Eddie’s youngest brother, Clyde, says Eddie was his best friend. Together they would indulge their love of the ocean and shine shoes. “As people would go by, we’d say, ‘Want a shine, want a shine, sir, two bits a shine, two bits a shine?’” Clyde recalls. Eddie was 13 years old in 1959, when Pops was offered work on O‘ahu. From Maui, the family moved in with Pops’ brother in Pauoa on the lower slopes of Punchbowl, two minutes from downtown Honolulu. Myra recalls that when Pops saw them maintaining the graveyard nearby, he told the landlord, “I have five boys and we can sickle all of this if you let us live here for free.” The Aikaus have been caretakers ever since, living at the graveyard.

(PREVIOUS PAGE, FROM LEFT) COURTESY OF BEN YOUNG, M.D.; ©CLARK LITTLE.

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It became a gathering place for friends and family and the center of Eddie’s universe, keeping him there and pulling him back whenever he left. He was a “homeboy,” notes Myra. All he wanted was to “come home to my mom and dad, my mom especially.” Eddie got a job at the pineapple factory working the graveyard shift. As soon as he got off at 5 a.m., he’d head out to the North Shore to surf. Clyde recalls November 19, 1967: “Eddie just fell in love with Waimea Bay.” Waves were pumping at 40 feet high, and Eddie felt at home catching “the biggest, deepest, most dangerous rides.” Eddie was picked to be the first City & County lifeguard at Waimea, one of only two ever hired without a high school diploma. Two years later, Clyde joined Eddie as a lifeguard at Waimea. “In 10 years, we only had a surfboard and fins to save lives,” he recalls. “And I’m really proud to say we never lost one person.” He says it’s not that Eddie was without fear, but that “it was controlled fear,” and that when they surfed Waimea’s 30- to 40-foot waves, “the entire lineup would feel safe with Eddie present.” “Not many can say they worked with the greats, and I did,” Evie Quartero, the secretary at lifeguard headquarters, tells me. And Eddie, she adds, “was the greatest one.” She describes how he took other Waimea lifeguards under his wing and taught them “how to get out of a situation, reassure the victim, take a deep breath, take the victim down (underwater), hold onto the reef, let the white wash pass, then come up.” Eddie knew the language of the ocean, “and that was never taught, it was a language you passed down,” Evie says. In 1970, Eddie met Linda Ipsen. She and a friend had come from Seattle for a vacation in Hawai‘i, and Eddie’s friend dragged him along to pick them up at the airport. Within a month, Linda had packed her bags and moved to Hawai‘i. By the next summer, she and Eddie were married. Evie says Eddie “was a one-track good guy. He didn’t have 20 girlfriends.” Adds Myra: “Yes, he loved his wife.” According to Linda, Eddie was humble, reserved, not a party person—and he always had his guitar or ukulele nearby as a way to feel comfortable. He and his family loved playing music. Linda spent many days on the beach watching Eddie. “He was always on the lookout for trouble,” she says. “His job was protection, no matter what, whether he was on the job or not.” For Eddie, she adds, the ocean was spiritual. “I mean, for him, surf was way up there on his list of what’s important; but his first priority was his mom and dad, then his family—his brothers, his sister. And his dream was ‘to be able to have a house’ for Mom and Pops.” On December 9th, 1973, tragedy struck. Eddie’s younger brother, Gerald, died, and Myra was the one to tell Mom and Pops. “She went berserk … The first thing my mom said was, ‘I brought all six of you up too close. I never should have brought you guys up


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“Hawai‘i’ s pride, she sails with the wind ... And proud are we to see her sail free ...” —EDDIE AIKAU

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Eddie Aikau displays his mastery of the North Shore’s monster waves. With his brother, Clyde, he saved hundreds of lives. No one died on his watch.

so close.’” Then the pain and sorrow wouldn’t cut so deep. Of the siblings, says Myra, Eddie took it hardest. “Ryon would hop over the fence” at the veterans’ cemetery at Punchbowl, she recalled, “and Mom and Pops would find him sleeping next to his [Gerald’s] grave.” Eddie and Linda moved to the graveyard to be close to Mom and Pops. They bought a plantation home and had it moved there. He was “trying to find his way back” from the overwhelming grief, Linda says. “And then Hōkūle‘a came along, and that’s what brought him back.” Hawai‘i was in the midst of a cultural renaissance. After decades of repression, the 1970s brought an upwelling of Hawaiian culture and pride—in Hawaiian music, language, land, self-determination. Hōkūle‘a emerged as a powerful symbol, a beacon of hope and identity. It was Hawai‘i’s first double-hulled, deep-sea voyaging canoe in more than 600 years, a 62-foot replica of the canoes that brought the Islands’ first settlers from the south. Hōkūle‘a’s 1976 maiden voyage to Tahiti, navigated strictly by the stars and nature’s other clues, was a resounding success. Eddie, recalls Clyde, “dedicated every ounce of the time and energy he had to positioning himself to be part of the crew.” They trained hard to make it on the crew for Hōkūle‘a’s 1978 voyage to Tahiti. Many didn’t know Eddie well before the voyage; they just knew that he was a champion surfer and lifeguard who had saved thousands of lives. Veteran ’76 crew member Nainoa Thompson recalls being in the elevator with his idol following a medical screening. He could barely speak to Eddie, so nervous was he around someone so great. It was Eddie who spoke. With an awkward, almost anxious kind of nervousness, he said, “I have to pull Tahiti out of the sea and bring back pride and dignity to our ancestors, to kūpuna, and give it to the children.” As they waited to hear who was chosen for the crew, candidate Marion Lyman-Mersereau recalls, “I’m biting my nails. Eddie is very cool. He gets up and says, ‘You know, we’ve gotten to know each other pretty well. We don’t know who’s going and who’s not going, but I wrote this song for you guys.’ I don’t think there was a dry eye in the room.” Hawai‘i’s pride, she sails with the wind And proud are we to see her sail free Feelings, deep and so strong For Hōkū, Hōkūle‘a And stars that glow to guide her straight back Across the sea down to Tahiti And back to Hawai‘i she sails For Hōkū, Hōkūle‘a For Hōkū, Hōkūle‘a

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“Every cell in his body is engineered to save those who find out how unforgiving the ocean is.” —NAINOA THOMPSON (Opposite page, clockwise from top left) Eddie on the mast; in a quiet moment; giving a speech after winning first place at the prestigious 1977 Duke Kahanamoku Surfing Championship; hauling the lauhala sail; the Eddie Aikau plaque and a forest of flowers and lei at a memorial in his honor, 2010 at Waimea Bay.

(BOTTOM LEFT) ©WATER RIGHTS/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO. (NEXT PAGE) ©ZAK NOYLE/A-FRAME

Sixteen crew members were “holding onto the bottom of the canoe, which was now the top of the canoe,” Marion says. Waves were knocking people off. “You’d be halfway up,” John Kruse remembers, “and the waves would drill you right in the eyes. You’re like a wet rat ….” At sunrise, Eddie spoke to the captain, David Lyman. “You can’t hear what he’s saying, but you know what he’s saying,” says Nainoa. “Every cell in his body is engineered to save those who find out how unforgiving the ocean is when you’re not prepared. And that was all of us. And you know he needs to go. You see Eddie sit back down; the captain doesn’t let him go.” A few crew members swam into the air pocket in the upsidedown hull and salvaged a cooler with a couple of oranges. Snake Ah Hee of Maui left on the surfboard for help, but a large military plane flew overhead. Thinking it was their rescue, Snake returned. The plane never did. They were drifting away from the Islands, and time was pushing them further away from any chance of rescue. One crew member was getting closer to hypothermia. “Mid-morning, you see Eddie in front of the captain again,” recalls Nainoa, “and you see someone tying a black knitted bag around his waist.” Into the bag went poi and oranges. A life jacket was placed on Eddie. They all held hands and said a prayer. “He starts to leave the canoe,” Nainoa continues. “I swim out. He’s so heroic; I can’t tell Eddie Aikau what to do, it just doesn’t feel right. I said, ‘Eddie, is this really the right thing you should do?’ And he pulled his arm away and paddled off.” Nainoa saw Eddie remove his life jacket. It’s harder to paddle with it on. Marion kept thinking, “Go Eddie go, go Eddie go, go Eddie go.” In the afternoon, she says, a military ship “came straight toward us. We thought, right on, he’s made it to shore.” It turned and never came back. With nightfall came a miracle. At about 9 p.m., what they knew was the last inter-island flight from Kona flew overhead. They shot flares they had salvaged, up over the plane, above the clouds. The plane descended below the clouds to see where the flare came from. “I think the flare went right up into the clouds, almost into the cockpit of the Hawaiian Airlines plane,” says John. When the descending plane saw Hōkūle‘a, it dipped its wings, indicating that help was coming. A rescue helicopter arrived within an hour. The rescuers hadn’t heard from Eddie. News of the capsizing started spreading. At the graveyard, Eddie’s younger brother, Solomon, saw it on TV. Myra’s first words were, “We lost Ryon, Solomon, we lost Ryon.” Myra drove to the harbor with Mom and Pops. One by one, crew members arrived into the embrace of loved ones. “We didn’t

(PREVIOUS PAGE) COURTESY OF AIKAU FAMILY. (OPPOSITE PAGE) COURTESY OF AIKAU FAMILY (4);

Eddie made crew, along with Marion, Nainoa and 13 others. Eddie’s friend tells me that as departure approached, Eddie told him he dreamed someone was going to die. He told Eddie not to go, but Eddie wanted to go. The day before departure, Eddie was at radio station KCCN to talk about the voyage with other crew members. When they finished, DJ Kimo Kahoano, who was in a different studio, recalls that Eddie knocked on the door. “I just want to thank Hawai‘i and play a song for them,” he said. He had his guitar with him. He sang “Hawai‘i’s Pride.” Eddie went to see Linda later that day. They were separated but spoke regularly, and he was looking forward to the voyage. Rather than being fearful or anxious, she says, he was excited, honored and grateful to have been accepted. His preparations included paperwork to ensure that if anything happened to him, his parents would get their house at the graveyard. “That was one of the things he told me: ‘If something happens to me, I just really want this house to be for Mom and Dad.’” That night there was a lū‘au at the graveyard. “Eddie was happy, everyone was happy,” Myra says. Then a family friend asked Mom and Pops to “come outside, and I was right there,” she continues. “He told both of them, ‘Please don’t let Eddie go on Hōkūle‘a.’ My dad said, ‘What?’ He again pleaded with my parents, saying ‘Something is going to happen.’ And my mom and dad looked at him and said there was no way in hell they’re gonna … tell Eddie not to go on Hōkūle‘a. They said, ‘We love you, but we’re not gonna do that, he’s gonna go, he’s gonna go.’” The friend’s premonition was that the crew members would return, but Eddie would not. Hōkūle‘a left at sunset on March 16, 1978. The winds were howling at an estimated 25 to 30 knots. In the dark of night, Hōkūle‘a entered the Ka‘iwi Channel between O‘ahu and Moloka‘i. Winds turned gale force and the seas, 12 feet. Recalls Nainoa: “Hōkūle‘a was just laboring. We opened up the hatch cover, and I’ll never forget that beam of light going into this crystal clear, turquoise-aqua saltwater up to the top of the deck. The hull was full of water.” Eddie started bailing, but for every bucket of water taken out, more poured in. Soon it was all hands on deck. Marion remembers, “We were told to quickly put on life jackets, and to sit on the port side hull to counterbalance it.” But Hōkūle‘a was sitting low in the water, heavy with food and water for 16 people for 30 days to Tahiti. A large swell hit the port side hull and picked up Hōkūle‘a. “She just went up and over,” Marion says. Hokule’a had capsized, and no one knew. All communications equipment was under water.


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“There were tears on the lifeguard’s log book.”

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Hundreds of surfers pay tribute to Eddie at his traditional surfers’ send-off.

find him,” they told Myra. “We didn’t find him.’” When told, their mother was inconsolable. “I’ll never forget the sound of a Hawaiian mother who cries and wails for her son, lost at sea,” says Nainoa 40 years later. Chants of lamentation, called uē, can haunt one forever. By morning, boats were scattered across the ocean. Helicopters whirred above, and people combed the shorelines of all the islands, searching for Eddie, hoping he had survived. A surfboard with a leash was spotted turning in the surf, but soon disappeared. There were tears on the lifeguard’s log book. In the midst of the search, a family friend went to the Aikau home with a letter Eddie had given him on the day of departure. According to Myra, Eddie wrote, “In case I don’t come back, and I feel I won’t, this is what I want. I don’t care what anyone says: Mom and Pops, you get the house.” He had so much love for everyone, Myra observes. “And he knew he wasn’t coming back.” “No one wanted to stop searching,” Nainoa says, “because stopping the search would bring the end of looking for him and the beginning of the deep sorrow.” After about two weeks, when a friend fell off a Kaua‘i cliff while searching for Eddie, Pops Aikau held a press conference and called off the search, saying, “Let him be with the sea.” On April 1, 1978, a helicopter landed at the graveyard to take the Aikaus to Waimea Bay, where thousands had gathered for a ceremony for a final farewell to Eddie. The whales, says Evie, “were dancing,” and the family’s tears joined the ocean Eddie loved. “No one could prevent Eddie from doing what he had to do,” notes Clyde. “Tie him up, and he would still find a way to go. Eddie would go.” Eddie Aikau’s dream—to “pull Tahiti out of the sea”—was fulfilled two years later and has been many times since, culminating in Mālama Honua, a four-year worldwide voyage. Crew members say Eddie was always in their hearts and minds. Today you’ll find bumper stickers declaring “Eddie Would Go.” There’s also “The Eddie,” an invitation-only big wave surf competition that only happens if the waves are consistently 30 feet or higher at Waimea Bay. In its decades-long history, it’s only been held nine times. The family still lives at the graveyard. Myra, Solomon, Clyde and Linda have their respective jobs but also keep Eddie’s name and inspiration alive through the Eddie Aikau Foundation. Every year it holds a statewide essay contest on values Eddie stood for and lived. Hundreds of middle and high school students enter, perpetuating the legend that is Eddie Aikau. “I like to say Eddie’s missing,” Clyde reflects. “We never found him. But maybe he’s on an island—20 kids, amnesia, happily ever after.”

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HOLY MOLY! THE VALLEY ISLAND IS A HOTBED OF PEPPER POWER Story by ILIMA LOOMIS Photography by RACHEL OLSSON

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Fairmont Kea Lani Chef Ricky De Boer's Hawaiian Red Pepper Sorbet

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When

I discovered a Hawaiian chili pepper plant growing in my backyard, I was delighted. Whether a previous tenant had planted it, or a long-ago discarded pepper had simply chosen to put down roots where it had been tossed, the sturdy little plant, with its cheerful string of bright red peppers the size and shape of Christmas tree lights, was a welcome addition to my garden. I love spicy food, so I picked a few of the tiny peppers to add to the chili simmering in my Crock-Pot. But when I tasted my chili a few hours later, it was so hot it made my eyes water. How could a handful of these little peppers have delivered enough heat to make my dish nearly inedible? These humble, diminutive peppers, it turns out, pack a powerful punch. After cooling my mouth with a glass of milk (chased by a bottle of beer to calm my nerves), I started to wonder about the spice bomb growing in my backyard. Chili peppers aren’t native to Hawai‘i. The plant can be traced to South America, but they’ve been here a long time, maybe since around the time of the first European contact. So says Ted Radovich, a horticulturalist at the University of Hawai‘i College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources and the author of a paper on Hawaiian chili peppers. They’re closely related and have a flavor similar to Tabasco peppers, as well as “bird” peppers, which are found throughout the Pacific islands. Easy to identify—the perky, bullet-shaped fruits point straight up—Hawaiian chili peppers aren’t easy to farm, as they can be affected by disease when grown close together. But they seem to happily thrive as solitary plants in backyard gardens, making them a favorite ingredient for traditional homemade sauces like Hawaiian chili pepper water. “They are considered to be extremely hot compared to other small-fruited peppers,” Radovich says. To be exact, Hawaiian chili peppers average around 200,000 Scoville heat units, the measurement of heat in spicy foods, making them about as spicy as a habanero. By comparison, jalapeno peppers average around 26,000 Scoville units, while Tabasco peppers rate closer to 50,000. “You get a lot of potency from a little pepper. It’s nice to work with,” says Ricky DeBoer, executive pastry chef at the Fairmont (Above) Fairmont Kea Lani's Executive Pastry Chef Ricky DeBoer. (Opposite page) Hawaiian chili peppers grow abundantly in local gardens and pack more heat than size. 44

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“It’s unique in that it’s essentially an infused beer. The longer we let it steep, the hotter it gets.” Kea Lani. When he was challenged to come up with a spicy dessert, DeBoer combined the peppers with yuzu and lemon to create a Hawaiian Red Pepper Sorbet. “It’s kind of got that hot-cold thing going on,” he says. “At first you get the yuzu a little bit, and then the peppers come on after. It’s very refreshing. I think it would make a great margarita, but that’s just my opinion.” The dish has been a hit with guests. “Out of a hundred people, I’ve had maybe one or two who thought it was too hot,” says DeBoer, who has also used Hawaiian peppers in brownies, hot cocoa and caramel. “You definitely want to be careful; it’s easy to put in too much of it.” DeBoer continues: “It has a flavor that’s sustaining, it’ll come on a little stronger, so you always want to start out with a small amount and adjust it afterward.” “You can go overboard really quickly,” agrees Garrett Marrero, owner of Maui Brewing Co. “You have to start out low. You can always add, but you can’t take away.” Marrero has used Hawaiian chili peppers in MBC’s “Hot Blonde” beer, a seasonal, spicy variation on its bestselling Bikini Blonde lager that has also been made with the infamous ghost pepper. That pepper clocks in at more than a million Scoville units. “We have rotated through whatever peppers are at hand,” Marrero says. “The current batch might even be peppers from my garden.”

HEALING HEAT The Hawaiian chili pepper may not be native to the Islands, but it has certainly put down roots. Today, the spicy peppers aren’t just a beloved ingredient in local cooking, they’re also used in lā‘au lapa‘au, or Hawaiian traditional medicine. Used to treat inflammation and promote circulation, as well as for its antiviral and antibacterial properties, chili peppers, or nīoi in Hawaiian, can be steeped in a liquid, like tea, water or vinegar, and combined with other medicinal plants, such as ginger or turmeric, to make a tonic. “You’re not going to eat it straight up, because it’s really potent,” says Ilima Ho-Lastimosa, a lā‘au lapa‘au practitioner on O‘ahu. “Traditionally it’s a strong medicine.” For a simple cough syrup, Ho-Lastimosa recommends taking a clean glass jar and layering Hawaiian chili peppers, garlic and turmeric between thin slices of citrus. When the jar is full, cover the fruit and peppers with honey, and let it sit in the refrigerator. “It’s delicious,” she says. “My mouth is watering just telling you about the recipe.”

To add the pepper’s heat and flavor to the beer, MBC adds them to a batch of Bikini Blonde and leaves them to soak. “It’s unique in that it’s essentially an infused beer,” Marrero says. “The longer we let it steep, the hotter it gets.” The brewery also offers “Hotter Blonde,” a supercharged version of the same brew. “Hotter Blonde is super hot,” Marrero says. “It’s almost too hot to drink, in my opinion, but some people love it.” What should you pair with a spicy beer? Marrero says there are more options than you might think. “Are you looking to enhance or contrast the flavor? Do you have something sweet, and you want to add spicy, or do you have something that already has heat, and you want to complement it?” he muses. “I happen to think a Hot Blonde and fish tacos are probably one of the best pairings of all time.” For true locals, the classic preparation for these little peppers is Hawaiian chili pepper water. A simple condiment of water boiled with Hawaiian peppers, garlic, vinegar and salt, a dash of chili pepper water can add a kick to anything from pork chops to scrambled eggs. Chili pepper water is a staple in Hawaiian restaurants, local diners and even the gourmet dining rooms of our vaunted Hawai‘i Regional Cuisine chefs. With the hankering for heat as an Island signature, chili pepper water seems to be an elevated version of Tabasco, a signature on many Island tables. “I love that flavor,” Marrero says. “It has the sharpness from the vinegar, and the heat from the pepper, and there’s a mild sweetness, which I also like.” Hawaiian chili pepper water is unlike other hot sauces, says Tim Parsons, co-founder of Adoboloco, a line of Maui hot sauces made with locally grown peppers. “It has more fluidity to it, so it flows into your food and works with your dish instead of on top of it and overpowering it with other flavors. It’s really about bringing the flavor of the chili pepper to the forefront and enhancing your food to another level.” Although my first culinary adventure with Hawaiian chili peppers may have ended in disaster, this potent pepper’s devotees have convinced me not to be intimidated by its sting. With a new crop of cherry-red peppers ripening in my backyard, I’m inspired to try them—sparingly—in sauces, curries and dips. But before I start slicing and dicing, Marrero offers some advice. “Remember not to rub your eyes,” he says. “I do it almost every time.”

(Opposite page) Peppery beer is a new twist at Maui Brewing Co. 46

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The Secret Life of Resort Wear WHY UNIFORMS ARE ANYTHING BUT UNIFORM By ILIMA LOOMIS Photography by RACHEL OLSSON

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(From left) At KĹ? restaurant at Fairmont Kea Lani, Mason Castle, Hannah Preziosi and Roland Ravida.

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From the valet stand

(Above) Manaola Yap's design for Four Seasons Maui. (Opposite page) Tori Richard’s palm design at Andaz Maui.

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to the front desk, from the banquet halls to housekeeping, it takes a small army to keep a resort running smoothly. And the uniforms of that army have a big job to do. Far from serving as camouflage, resort uniforms are designed to be eye-catching, flattering and complementary to resort décor. At the same time, they’re also expected to be cool enough to work poolside, sturdy and stretchy enough to help shoulder a heavy bag, and comfortable on a variety of body types. In a word, they’re expected to be Wonder Wear. And don’t get us started on the pockets. “We had to go through a couple of different variations on the pockets,” says Alex Howell, assistant director of housekeeping for the Four Seasons Resort Maui. When the resort updated its uniforms for guest services last year, pockets were a priority. Bellmen needed places to tuck guest arrival slips, baggage slips, notes, pens, treats and trinkets to hand out to kids, and spare parking slips in case they’re called in to help back up the valets. Early uniform designs didn’t look quite right. “Things would get too puffy, or the pockets would droop down if they had too many things in there,” Howell says. “We had to figure out how to give the guys the function without it looking like they have a million pockets everywhere.” At the same time, resorts work with some of the state’s top designers, artists and cultural advisors to come up with a design or print that makes a statement. For inspiration, Howell worked with the Four Seasons director of landscaping, who also advises on cultural issues. He shared a book of traditional lauhala weavings, and the patterns were incorporated into a blue stripe down the side of the white shirt. “We wanted to make sure there was a Hawaiian influence,” Howell says. Whether they’re for resorts, restaurants, seamen or pilots, uniforms always come with high expectations. While they come in a plethora of colors and prints, one thing they all have in common is a casual style, says Josh Feldman, president of local clothing company Tori Richard. The company designs resort wear around the world and uniforms for hotels throughout the state. “The old days on Maui, where you would see staff in suits and ties—those days are gone,” he says. While Hawai‘i resorts may have cultivated an air of old-world formality, he noted, they found that guests felt awkward lounging by the pool while nearby employees sweated in stuffy, uncomfortable clothes. “They wanted more informality,” Feldman says. “There’s an ease.” The Andaz Maui at Wailea Resort took that informality a step further by inviting front-of-house staff to forgo uniforms altogether and pick out their own clothes from Tori Richard’s retail store at The Shops at Wailea. “They wanted to give it more of a residential feel,” Feldman says, “so the guests feel like they’re being helped by friends and residents, rather than staff.” Uniform design also has to be culturally sensitive, Feldman says. With a workforce as multicultural and diverse as Hawai‘i itself, prints and imagery should be appropriate, and the cut and design of clothes should be modest enough that employees and guests of all backgrounds feel comfortable. “We need to be respectful and acknowledge our host culture,” Feldman says. For its uniforms, the Grand Wailea worked with several local and Native Hawaiian designers to develop prints inspired not only by native plants and animals, but also by traditional cultural practices. For hostess and cocktail server uniforms at the resort’s signature restaurant, Humuhumunukunukuapua‘a, Native Hawaiian designer Manaola Yap, of Manaola Hawaii, used the traditional practice of carving the design into a piece of bamboo. The carved bamboo was used as a stamp to press the pattern into a piece of paper. This was the pattern copied for the shirts, says Hawaiian Cultural Ambassador Kainoa Horcajo.


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“We need to be respectful and acknowledge our host culture.” —JOSH FELDMAN

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“It always comes down to form over function.”

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—TODD OLDHAM

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For the Volcano Grill & Bar, the Grand Wailea partnered with local tattoo artist Desmond Alexander of Mid Pacific Tattoo. Known for his modern Polynesian designs, Alexander suggested coming up with different motifs for male and female employees, with a bolder design for men and something softer for the women. “It was fun,” says Alexander, who met with Grand Wailea employees to brainstorm the ideas. “Both designs are on the chest, so I kind of treated it as if I were tattooing someone’s chest.” But, he added, because the body has more curves, the artist has to ensure that the designs will flow seamlessly. “With a shirt, it’s like drawing on a piece of paper,” he noted, “but in the end, you still need it to flow nicely when the person is wearing it.” The employees who put on a uniform have a primary concern: how it feels, and whether it will get the job done. When uniforms went through a reboot at the Fairmont Kea Lani, the resort started by asking employees what they were looking for. “We’ve actually changed out every uniform in the Kea Lani food and beverage division over the past two years,” says Todd Oldham, director of food and beverage. When employees give their input, “it always comes down to function over form. They want something that’s breathable and comfortable, and their jobs require a lot of freedom of movement.” For the service team, that often includes breezy, boxbottomed shirts that can be left untucked, while hosts, who don’t have to do much lifting or bending, may be comfortable in dresses or skirts for the ladies and slacks and a shirt for men. The Four Seasons guest services team had similar concerns, especially the valets. They wanted a uniform that would stay cool, even when they were running to retrieve a car in the hot Wailea sun. “One of the criteria we had when we were testing fabric was that if they couldn’t feel the wind when they ran, we would consider it too hot,” Howell says. But while workers focused first and foremost on function, the resort also wanted to consider the uniforms’ appearance. The Four Seasons wanted a uniform with clean lines and a smart, polished fit, especially for the team that holds down the front entrance. They came up with a streamlined white shirt with a blue stripe and blue highlight inside the collar. “The most important point is having that first impression with the guests,” Howell says. “Everything from the crisp white shoes to the way the uniform hangs on the employees gives that subtle signal to the guest that they’re in a luxury resort, and they’re going to be well taken care of.” At the same time, each position’s uniform has a subtly different design. This means that even though all the employees are working together as a team, guests can tell who is who. “If you have six gentlemen and ladies standing by ready to help a guest, the guest can distinguish the doorman, and see that the doorman is the person they would go to to retrieve their car.” Uniforms also have to complement their surroundings. At the Fairmont, designers had to take into account the decor of the spaces where employees would be working. In larger restaurants, where there might be as many as 30 servers on the floor at one time, uniforms almost become another element of the room’s interior design, Oldham says. So despite the name “uniforms,” they’re as versatile as they are uniform. That was the case at the Fairmont Kea Lani’s Kō restaurant, where servers were given new uniforms in the fall of 2017. “It can get warm in the restaurant, so we wanted something that was breathable, but we also had to be conscious of the restaurant’s color scheme,” Oldham says. The restaurant is decorated in warm, natural colors, with layers of greens and browns. At first, the resort looked at uniforms in complementary colors, like a burnt orange, or another shade of green. But it wasn’t quite right. “It was starting to become too much,” Oldham says. “We didn’t want another earth tone.” In the end, they selected a black shirt with an abstract print stripe down the front. “We decided to go with something that would almost disappear,” he says. No matter what job they’re made to do, designing a uniform that can keep up with resort employees throughout the day (or night), and keep them looking good on the go, isn’t easy. “It was an extensive process, especially in Guest Services,” Howell says. “It takes a lot of thought and time.”

(Opposite page) Fairmont Kea Lani likes Hawaiian motifs and ease of movement. (Above) Tori Richard's Hawaiian inspired print from Andaz.

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Fire and Water PELE’S PYROTECHNICS, UP CLOSE

Photography by TOM KUALI‘I and BRUCE OMORI

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Pāhoehoe, the smooth, ropey type of lava, flows like liquid glass.

The world touts the creativity of the human mind, but consider the volcano. Nowhere is nature’s flamboyance more brilliant than in a volcanic eruption, the ultimate spectacle of creation. In Pele’s triumphant volcanic dance, Kīlauea Volcano on Hawai‘i island has erupted PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAAM BOOK 5.5/9PT

continuously since 1983, destroying land and creating it anew. Here’s what Tom Kuali‘i and Bruce Omori have perilously captured. (Pages 54-56) Tom Kuali`i. (Pages 57-63) Bruce Omori.

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At night, volcanic fireworks are blinding.

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Maui’s Show of Stars IT'S NOT JUST GLITZ AND GLAMOUR

By RICK CHATENEVER

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Photography by RACHEL OLSSON


(CENTER) ©MATT WINKELMEYER/GETTY IMAGES

“I love this land,

and I’m deeply honored to be part of this landscape,” said iconic screen star Pierce Brosnan as he accepted the Maui Film Festival’s Pathfinder Award last June. “My wife Keely and I have a little homestead on the north shore of Kaua‘i. Fifteen years we’ve lived here and brought our children up here, and this is just the cherry on the cake to receive this fantastic award.” The dashing actor was being honored at the festival’s signature Celestial Cinema, an outdoor venue that may be the most spectacular screening room on the planet. It comes into being for five evenings—June 13-17—on what is otherwise Wailea’s renowned Gold & Emerald Golf Course. The setting put an exclamation point on Brosnan’s talk of landscape. The Celestial Cinema is surrounded by Maui’s majestic Haleakalā in one direction and a panorama of South Shore beaches in the other. A sense of place is integral to the festival’s identity. So is astronomy. “I made the decision very early on that I would infuse the event with the sense of where people were,” says festival director Barry Rivers, who launched the first one with his wife Stella in the year 2000. “That’s why all the food and wine events are outside. Our passes and venues have celestial-themed names. I want people to understand they live in a far bigger world than they might imagine. “When you’re watching a movie and detect the scent of someone with a lei walking by, you get that little hit. When you’re having some local food under a full moon, it’s hard to deny where you are.” The Toes in the Sand Cinema, with free movies on the beach, is another “uniquely Maui experience.” And Maui’s spell wasn’t lost on last summer’s glamorous honorees. “Everyone’s just been so kind here,” said Mumbai-born “Slumdog Millionaire” star Freida Pinto. “And welcoming. And so relaxed, actually, which is something you don’t usually see at a film festival. After that, everything you have here is just sort of paradise … I kind of want to move here.” Her sentiments were echoed by Scottish native Karen Gillan, fresh from filming “Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle” on O‘ahu a few months earlier. The witty actor-director was unfazed by a light rain falling during her awards tribute a few nights later. “I hear this is good luck, to have rain in Hawai‘i,” she laughed. “I’ve been having such a good time here; I’m thinking, what’s the catch? It’s so perfect.” Navigator Award recipient Connie Britton, best known for roles in “Friday Night Lights” and “Nashville,” had her own take: “Anything that happens on Maui has a certain mystique. It feels almost holy. So this feels different from other film festivals, because it really feels of this place, of the land, and I think the films here represent that.” There are also festival screenings across the island at the Maui Arts & Cultural Center. But the

“I am deeply honored to be a part of this landscape.” —PIERCE BROSNAN (Opposite page) Maui astronomer Harriet Witt captivates the audience under the stars and full moon. (This page, from top) Chocolate martinis at the Taste of Chocolate; from left, festival honorees Karen Gillan, Pierce Brosnan, Freida Pinto and Connie Britton; Four Seasons Maui chef Bruce Trouyet builds a chocolate sculpture at the Taste of Chocolate.

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—BARRY RIVERS (Opposite page) Alfresco Taste of Wailea tables overlook sunset and the Celestial Cinema on the Blue and Emerald golf courses. (This page, from top) The Celestial Cinema, the duo ManaBrasil, and a toothsome dessert.

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(TOP) ©RANDY JAY BRAUN

“We bring in films that shine a light on the better ways we can be on any given day.”

presence of gorgeous celebrities adds to the illusion that Wailea’s whirlwind of screenings, glitzy parties, filmmaker panels and more are themselves movies, co-starring everyone in attendance. “There are character actors and movie stars,” says Rivers. “I guess we lean more to the movie star end of that spectrum, but with character-actor chops. I’ve always sought out honorees who emit more light than heat.” Lately, those selections have balanced beloved veterans with young actors early in their careers. The festival honored Brie Larson and Viola Davis a few months before they held Oscars in their hands. “We try to get a mix of colors, genders … to keep it eclectic,” says Rivers. “In the middle of all that, we’ve gotten pretty lucky.” But stargazing is almost incidental to the festival’s grand design. “Now, more than ever, people need to share experiences, to distill what it means to be human,” says Rivers. “We bring in films that shine a light on the better ways we can be on any given day. It’s always been about way more than movies.” If Maui Film Festival thinks globally, or cosmically, it acts locally. It takes 250 volunteers, 75 paid staffers and 100 vendors to make it happen. Its shuttle network, transporting excited filmgoers and their beach chairs, is “basically a small village’s transportation system.” The local ties sometimes extend onto the screen. Last June’s biggest hit was “Kuleana,” a mystery/drama set on Maui in 1959 and 1971, written and directed by local boy Brian Kohne. Some 500 Mauians were involved in the production. Its audience topped 3,000. “Screening for so many under the stars on a warm summer night was incredible for cast, crew, and our friends and families,” recalls Kohne. “I hope in the coming years more Hawai‘i filmmakers find their way onto the Celestial Cinema screen, because it really is a once-in-a-lifetime experience.” That screening was followed by “Poisoning Paradise,” an environmental documentary directed and produced by Pierce Brosnan’s wife, Keely Shaye Brosnan, with Teresa Tico. “I have great respect for the wisdom of the indigenous culture,” says Rivers. Alluding to the opening-night hula and Hawaiian blessing, he says, “We want to dovetail the traditions of Polynesia and Hawai‘i and Western civilization storytelling. Prior to Hawai‘i becoming the Hawai‘i we know today, they told stories with their hands, their feet and their hearts. And they still do.” For 2018, he says, “We’re redoubling our efforts to bring more high-profile independent films.” And the festival will keep striving to bring people together. “More people have become comfortable seeing films on their big-screen TVs or their phones. I’m from an era that believes films are made to be seen in a community of people. They’re the campfire for the village that you live in. “There are people of all stripes on Maui, and they all attend the festival and find some commonality in that experience. It’s a movie. It needs to be seen big, it needs to be seen with other people.”


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[THE GUIDE]

PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAAM BOOK 5.5/9PT

©DANA EDMUNDS

Dine, shop and explore the sights of Wailea

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[ T H E G U I D E ] EXPLORE

Wellness, Recreation and a Way of Life

WA I L E A P R O P E RT I E S ANDAZ MAUI WAILEA RESORT andazmaui.com

FAIRMONT KEA LANI fairmont.com/kealani

FOUR SEASONS RESORT MAUI AT WAILEA fourseasons.com/maui

GRAND WAILEA grandwailea.com

HOTEL WAILEA hotelwailea.com

RESIDENCE INN MAUI AT WAILEA residenceinnmauiwailea.com

THE SHOPS AT WAILEA shopsatwailea.com

WAILEA BEACH RESORT waileamarriott.com

WAILEA GATEWAY CENTER wailea-gateway.com

WAILEA GOLF CLUB waileagolf.com

WAILEA RESORT ASSOCIATION wailearesortassociation.com

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WAILEA TENNIS CENTER waileatennis.com

WAILEA TOWN CENTER waileatowncenter.info

WAILEA VILLAGE CENTER

©DESIGN PICS/JENNA SZERLAG/MEDIA BAKERY

IT TAKES MORE THAN BEAUTY to define a lifestyle. Weather, wellness, recreation and location are also significant factors, and beaches enhance them all. Maui is renowned the world over for its location, amenities and events. Of the different districts that make up the Valley Isle, it’s the South Maui shore that defines the luxury lifestyle for visitors and residents. Three 18-hole championship golf courses—the Emerald, Gold and Blue—draw golfers from around the world. The Wailea Golf Academy trains the luminaries of the future, and pros like Brenda Rego, head professional at the Wailea Blue Golf Course, continue to bring honor to the resort and the sport. Recently inducted into the Hawai‘i Golf Hall of Fame, Rego was Hawai‘i’s first female Class A PGA professional when she became Wailea Blue’s head golf professional in 2008. For tennis enthusiasts, the Wailea Tennis Courts offer 11 courts throughout the resort. In and on the water, snorkeling, swimming,

kayaking and stand-up paddling are year-round pleasures. Lovers of the ocean need only take a few steps from their rooms to sink their toes in the silky sands of the five Wailea beaches, where wellness experiences abound. Throughout the resort, yoga classes, spas, massage, beauty salons and the full spectrum of activities and services enhance and promote an enhanced lifestyle. With worldrenowned chefs at the helm of Wailea’s restaurants, dining is an exalted experience. Weddings, honeymoons and bridal parties include multiple generations and demographics, and Hawaiian cultural programs share the core elements of aloha. But the sense of welcome goes deeper. In the villas, residences, hotels and multiple types of accommodations, the hand of aloha, of welcome, is palpable. Many will arrive at the resort to celebrate special occasions. But when they leave, if they leave, they will take more than memories and photographs. They will know the true meaning of renewal.


Longhi’s Ko’olina 7:30 am -10:00 pm 92-161 Waipahe Place Kapolei, HI 96707 808.671.8887


[ T H E G U I D E ] DINE

AMA BAR & GRILL Fairmont Kea Lani

808.875.4100 / Hawai‘i Modern BISTRO MOLOKINI Grand Wailea

808.875.1234 / Island Cuisine BOTERO LOUNGE Grand Wailea

808.875.1234 / Cocktails BUMBYE BEACH BAR Andaz Maui Wailea Resort

808.573.1234 / Cocktails CAFÉ KULA MARKETPLACE Grand Wailea

808.875.1234 / Gourmet Market CAFFÉ CIAO BAKERY & MARKET Fairmont Kea Lani

808.875.4100 / Gourmet Market CHEESEBURGER GRILLE & TAP ROOM The Shops at Wailea

808.874.8990 / American THE COFFEE BEAN & TEA LEAF The Shops at Wailea

808.891.2045 / Coffee Shop

MONKEYPOD KITCHEN Wailea Gateway Center

808.879.4655 / Seafood/Sushi

808.891.2322 / Handcrafted

HUMUHUMUNUKUNUKUAPUA‘A

MORIMOTO MAUI

Grand Wailea

Andaz Maui Wailea Resort

808.875.1234 / Hawai‘i Seasonal

808.243.4766 / Japanese

ISLAND GOURMET MARKETS

MULLIGANS ON THE BLUE

The Shops at Wailea

100 Kaukahi St.

808.874.5055 / Deli/Sushi/Market

808.874.1131 / Irish/American

KA‘ANA KITCHEN

NICK’S FISHMARKET MAUI

Andaz Maui Wailea Resort

Fairmont Kea Lani

808.573.1234 / Hawai‘i Regional

808.879.7224 / Modern/Seafood

KAPA BAR & GRILL

THE PINT & CORK

Wailea Beach Resort

The Shops at Wailea

808.879.1922 / American/Pacific Rim

808.727.2038 / Gastropub

PITA PARADISE

Fairmont Kea Lani

Wailea Gateway Center

808.875.2210 / Plantation Era

808.879.7177 / Mediterranean

LAPPERT’S HAWAII

THE RESTAURANT AT HOTEL WAILEA

The Shops at Wailea

808.879.1711 / Ice Cream LEHUA LOUNGE Andaz Maui Wailea Resort

808.573.1234 / Cocktails LINEAGE The Shops at Wailea Opening spring 2018

LOBBY LOUNGE Four Seasons Resort

808.874.8000 / Cocktails

DUO Four Seasons Resort

LONGHI'S

808.874.8000 / Steak/Seafood

The Shops at Wailea

FABIANI'S WAILEA

808.891.8883 / Mediterranean

Wailea Gateway Center

LUANA

808.874.1234 / Pizza/Pasta

Fairmont Kea Lani 808.875.4100 / Cocktails

FERRARO’S BAR E RISTORANTE Four Seasons Resort

MANOLI'S PIZZA COMPANY

808.874.8000 / Italian

100 Wailea Ike Drive

GANNON'S

808.874.7499 / Italian

Wailea Gold Course

THE MARKET MAUI

808.875.8080 / Hawai‘i Regional

Wailea Gateway Center

GRAND DINING ROOM MAUI

808.879.2433 / Gourmet Pantry

Grand Wailea

MATTEO’S OSTERIA

808.875.1234 / American

Wailea Town Center

HONOLULU COFFEE CO.

808.891.8466 / Italian

The Shops at Wailea

MOKAPU MARKET

808.875.6630 / Coffee Shop

Andaz Maui Wailea Resort

HONUA‘ULA LU‘AU Grand Wailea

808.875.7710 / Lu‘au Show 74

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808.573.1234 / 24-Hour Market

Hotel Wailea

808.879.2224 / Island Inspired RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE The Shops at Wailea

808.874.8880 / Steaks/Seafood SPAGO Four Seasons Resort

808.879.2999 / Pacific Rim STARBUCKS Wailea Beach Resort

808.874.7981 / Coffee Shop SUBWAY Wailea Gateway Center

808.875.7827 / Sandwich/Deli TE AU MOANA Wailea Beach Resort

877.827.2740 / Lu‘au Show TOMMY BAHAMA The Shops at Wailea

808.875.9983 / American/Caribbean VOLCANO GRILL & BAR Grand Wailea

808.875.1234 / American WAILEA KITCHEN & TAP Wailea Tennis Club

808.878.3663 / Comfort Food WHALERS GENERAL STORE The Shops at Wailea

808.891.2039 / Deli

Every November and May, Wailea restaurants present their finest offerings in prix-fixe menus for just $29, $39, $49 and $59 per person. Restaurant Week Wailea: May 20-26, 2018 November 4-10, 2018 www.restaurantweekwailea.com

©ANNA OM/SHUTTERSTOCK

Dining at Wailea

HUMBLE MARKET KITCHIN Wailea Beach Resort


SAVOUR The experience of a lifetime, every time.

Hawai‘i Seasonal Cuisine Chef de Cuisine Mike Lofaro

3850 Wailea Alanui, Wailea, HI 96753 808.875.1234 Ext. 51

WWW.GRANDWAILEA.COM


[ T H E G U I D E ] SHOP

OUR CENTERS FOR SHOPPING Haute couture. Art. Locally made gifts. Coffee and sunshine. These retail centers don't miss a beat.

Shopping at Wailea

THE SHOPS AT WAILEA 3750 Wailea Alanui Drive 808.891.6770 theshopsatwailea.com

Over 70 shops, galleries, restaurants, two coffeehouses and an ice cream shop are the tip of the iceberg at The Shops at Wailea. WAILEA GATEWAY CENTER At the intersection of Pi‘ilani Highway and Wailea Ike Drive.

The two-story Gateway is mauka from the coast, with unique peeks of the ocean and the West Maui Mountains. Chocolate, a day spa, coffee and pastries reign here, along with restaurants. WAILEA TOWN CENTER North on Ike Place off Ike Drive just above Wailea Alanui Drive.

The Wailea Town Center offers a range of services and hidden treasures, including a full-service bank, restaurant and a wine shop. WAILEA VILLAGE CENTER 100 Wailea Ike Drive

This center includes Urgent Care, Manoli’s Pizza Company, Water Lily Maui, the Wailea Blue Golf Course and other services.

(Clockwise from top) The Shops at Wailea, Wailea Town Center, Wailea Gateway Center 76

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(TOP) COURTESY THE SHOPS AT WAILEA; (BOTTOM RIGHT) COURTESY OF MAUI LUXURY REAL ESTATE LLC; (BOTTOM LEFT) ©RACHEL OLSSON

Open daily 9:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.


[ T H E G U I D E ] SHOP

SHO P S O N P R O P ERTY

Shops, Galleries and More

3550 Wailea Alanui Drive 808.573.1234 ‘ÄWILI SPA AND SALON

Along with custom-blended scrubs, lotions, oils and body butters, the spa boutique includes fashions by local designers. MOKAPU MARKET

Prepared takeaway foods include pastries, paninis, pizza, gelato and locally crafted beverages, all in a 24-hour convenience store with style. PACIFIC DREAM PHOTOGRAPHY

A photo studio on property captures the special moments of your visit.

Fairmont Kea Lani 4100 Wailea Alanui Drive 808.875.4100 CAFFE CIAO BAKERY & MARKET

This is a one-stop shop for tasty treats and foodie gifts, from gourmet made-on-Maui food products to a wide variety of unique souvenirs, including specialty kitchen items and signature Kea Lani jams, teas and condiments. From prepared foods to-go to deluxe pastries, chocolates and wines, it’s an epicurean oasis. LE SURF WAILEA

The boutique’s thoughtful selection of women’s, men’s and children’s products is designed to meet wide-ranging resort needs. Favorite and familiar designers share their exclusive offerings, and newly discovered brands make a splashy entrance. 78

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(CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT) ©SPL IMAGES/GETTY IMAGES; ©FELIX CHOO/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO; ©DMYTRO LASTOVYCH/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO; ©ART COOK STUDIO/SHUTTERSTOCK

Andaz Maui Wailea Resort


Your sunset awaits...

join us at GannonsRestaurant.com 808.875.8080


[ T H E G U I D E ] SHOP

PACIFIC DREAM PHOTOGRAPHY

PORTS

This is the on-the-spot memory maker on property, with a studio and professionals on hand.

Travel essentials—sundries, logowear, snacks and gift ideas—are covered in this thoughtful, colorful selection.

WILLOW STREAM SPA BOUTIQUE

THE SPA

This luxurious, state-of-the-art spa highlights the latest and finest in skin care, bath, body and beauty products, with treatments to match. Locally made jewelry, activewear, loungewear and much more are the epitome of comfort with fashion: Spiritual Gangster, Shu Uemura Art of Hair, Kerstin Florian International, NuFace and LightStim are just the tip of the iceberg.

A selection of activewear, body products, guest treatments and an extensive line of scrubs, sunscreens and skin care items make this a wellness nexus.

Four Seasons Resort Maui at Wailea 3900 Wailea Alanui Drive 808.874.8000

TOWN AND COUNTRY MAUI

Here’s where you’ll find fragrant, fresh and exotic blooms and arrangements, suitable for any occasion.

The Grand Wailea Shops and Galleries 3850 Wailea Alanui Drive 808.875.1234 AKAMAI BUSINESS CENTER

22 KNOTS

Fine jewelry, high-end fashion and beach-to-evening style make a strong sartorial statement here, with iconic labels—Missoni, Lanvin, Pucci included. CABANA

Chic, comfortable and exclusive printed tees, rash guards by James Perse and designer beachwear with flair are among the boutique’s finds. Shoes, accessories and apparel are included in this well-thought-out selection for men, women and kids.

A full-service center for copying, faxing, office equipment rentals, shipping and all your business needs. BEACH & POOL STORE

Water toys, hats, sun shirts, Maui Jim sunglasses, GoPro accessories and tanning lotions are just some of the water-friendly products you’ll find here. Located next to the activity pool registration desk. CHRISTOPHER EGAN GALLERY

With his photographic artistry, Christopher Egan creates extraordinary treasures to take home with you.

HILDGUND JEWELRY

CRUISE BOUTIQUE

Luxury gems, diamonds and unique designs are the signature of Hildgund’s, long considered one of Hawai‘i’s premier jewelers.

Many consider this the finest selection of swimwear in Hawai‘i. The sizes range from 0 to 18, and labels include Seafolly, Letarte, Maaji and Profile by Gottex.

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[ T H E G U I D E ] SHOP

ENTERPRISE

NAPUA GALLERY

This full-service rental car desk is located in the main lobby, next to the concierge desks.

Dale Chihuly is a Napua signature: unique art glass renowned the world over. Original paintings, sculptures, jewelry and fine-art items, including works by Maui's premier artists, have long been a Napua mainstay.

GRAND IMAGE BOUTIQUE

Top brands at this spa boutique include Eminence, ESPA, Moroccanoil, Tom Ford and Beyond Yoga, as well as Grand Wailea’s signature Honey Mango collection and Healing Waters of Maui Bath Salts. The boutique is located on the ground floor of the Chapel Wing at Spa Grande. GRAND JEWELS OF WAILEA

High-fashion finds include estate, vintage, rare and all manner of precious gems, including diamond, platinum and 18-karat jewelry and one-of-a-kind pieces by Norman Silverman Diamonds, Inc.

PACIFIC DREAM PHOTOGRAPHY Capture your Grand Wailea moments with a 45-minute beach portrait session. Advance reservations are required: gwr@pacificdreamphotography.com, or visit the lobby concierge for an appointment. Complimentary to Grand Wailea guests only.

CAFÉ • BREAKFAST • LUNCH • BARISTA • DELI • CHEESE • WINE • GELATO

PINEAPPLE PATCH

Imaginative toys, books, puzzles and beachwear are among the delights for children: hats, sun shirts, even a lifesize mermaid tail to swim in.

KI‘I GALLERY

Handmade jewelry, hand-blown art glass and luxurious pieces of luminous South Seas pearls are among the standouts in this long-standing, respected Maui gallery.

PINK LILIA, A LILLY PULITZER® SIGNATURE STORE

Lilly Pulitzer items include dresses, bags, women’s resortwear and accessories, all in the bright, cheerful Lilly Pulitzer palette.

MAKANA, GIFTS WITH ALOHA

Specializing in Maui and Hawai‘i-made gifts, Makana offers a wide selection of sundries, island-style treasures and souvenirs. NA HOKU

Na Hoku’s exotic, elegant jewelry is inspired by the beauty and traditions of the Islands. Many of the intricately crafted pieces are enhanced by Tahitian, Akoya or freshwater pearls.

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QUIKSILVER

Find the latest Roxy and Quiksilver swimwear here, along with board shorts, hats, sunglasses, backpacks and all you need to catch a wave or explore Maui. The selection of GoPro cameras and accessories promises an active life in the waves. SPA BOUTIQUE

This is a trove of beauty secrets: bath salts, facial products, apparel, shampoo, lotions, sandals and many other items for those who aspire to fitness and radiance.

808-879-2433 10 Wailea Gateway Pl., Wailea, Maui 96753


[ T H E G U I D E ] SHOP

WAILEA GIFT SHOP

Gift items from Hawai‘i can be found among the logowear, souvenirs, sundries and resort accessories, such as beach bags, polo shirts and bathrobes. WAILEA MEN’S AND WOMEN’S SHOP

With Tommy Bahama, Toes on The Nose, Johnnie-O and other spirited menswear lines, the spotlight is on men. From swimwear to graphic tees, hats, sunglasses and aloha shirts for the lū‘au, the man with style will feel right at home.

Wailea Beach Resort 3700 Wailea Alanui Drive 808.879.1922 HOLOHOLO MARKET

With snacks and sundries, beach and sports apparel, accessories, souvenirs and distinctive gifts, this is a shop for day-to-evening needs. And with ice cream, snacks and island-made goodies, it’s a good place to holoholo.

Nike, Adidas, Tail, TravisMathew, Puma and others. The Blue Course also offers a notable selection of Maui Jim and Nike sunglasses.

Wailea Golf Club 100 Wailea Golf Club Drive 808.875.7450 PRO SHOP, GOLD AND EMERALD CLUBHOUSE

Wailea’s award-winning pro shop, one of the largest in Hawai‘i, carries both golf and après-golf attire and accessories featuring the distinctive Seahorse logo. Included are Adidas, Bugatchi, Eric Javits, Helen Kaminski, JoFit, Nike, Peter Millar, Polo, Puma and TravisMathew, plus top-of-theline eyewear.

Wailea Tennis Club 131 Wailea Ike Place 808.879.1958 PRO SHOP

MANDARA SPA

Maui’s Island Essence mango-coconut body wash and Elemis lime-ginger scrub are among the finds at this fragrant spa shop. Treatment lines and beauty products uphold the East-West theme.

Wailea Blue Clubhouse PRO SHOP CLUBHOUSE

100 Wailea Ike Drive 808.879.2530 The Wailea Blue Course is home to the original Wailea Resort Sea & Sun logo. The official Wailea logo adorns the latest in resort and golf attire from 84

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In addition to logo apparel and accessories, the shop offers re-gripping and racket-stringing services.

MAUI’S BEST DINNER SHOW EVERY WEDNESDAY featuring songs, stories & comedy by Hawaii’s greatest entertainer

UNCLE WILLIE K

FOR RESERVATIONS CALL: 808.250.8288 FRIDAY – SOUL KITCHEN SATURDAY – MAKAI JAZZ SUNDAY – CELTIC TIGERS WAILEA’S ONLY SPORTS BAR 80” TV’s – Open Earlier for Football Season – All Sports Packages

MONDAY – JOYCE & GORD TUESDAY – MAGIC SHOW THURSDAY – PAT SIMMONS JR 2PM to 5PM and 10PM to 12AM BEST HAPPY HOURS IN WAILEA 10PM to 12AM KITCHEN OPEN TIL MIDNIGHT

OPEN DAILY FROM NOON-2AM – 808.874.1131 |

|

| MulligansOnTheBlue.com

5 MINUTES AWAY FROM ALL WAILEA HOTELS 100 KAUKAHI ST – ACROSS FROM THE FAIRMONT KEA LANI HOTEL


Luxury Contempory Design

Select Luxury Residences with Custom Design on Maui

Impeccable Design combined with Custom Materials create Ultimate Luxury in Paradise! MLS#376837 Representing the finest in Luxury Homes, Beach and Golf Course Condominiums, Oceanfront Estates, Exclusive Gated Communities, and New Developments.

Bradley S. MacArthur Principal Broker, Owner Direct: 808.357.5000

The Shops at Wailea ~ 3750 Wailes Alanui Dr., Ste B16 | Wailea, Maui, HI 96753 | Email: Brad@WaileaRealty.com


INSPIRED IT ALL

VISIT OUR SHOPS ON MAUI ELEPHANT WALK

The Shops at Wailea 808-891-8684 Front Street, Lahaina 808-667-0361

SOUL LEI

Whalers Village 808-661-6663 808.667.0361


ESCAPE The experience of a lifetime, every time.

3850 Wailea Alanui, Wailea, HI 96753

• 808.875.1234 Ext. 4949 •

WWW.GRANDWAILEA.COM

LOCATED AT GRAND WAILEA, A WALDORF ASTORIA RESORT


the SHOPS at WAILEA 3750 Wailea Alanui Drive EW23

Phone: 808•280•7979 Karl D. Gottling, Designer


PLAY MORE

TM

THERE’S PLENTY TO PLAY AT HAWAII’S ONLY 54-HOLE GOLF RESORT

Blue skies, great greens, ocean views on every hole – you’ll find more to enjoy on Wailea’s three award-winning courses than anywhere else in Hawaii. Plus: great seasonal rates, multi-round specials and family-friendly offers mean you can play even more. You’re just a tee time away. follow us!

www.waileagolf.com | TOLL-FREE 1.888.328.MAUI | 808.875.7450 WAILEA GOLD | WAILEA EMERALD | WAILEA BLUE


ALOHA MOMENT

©ALVIS UPITIS/GETTY IMAGES

Every sunset is a new song.

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Wailea Magazine Spring-Summer 2018  
Wailea Magazine Spring-Summer 2018